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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water fossil fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13- Particulate Emissions from Fossil Fuel Fired Steam or Hot Water Generating Units (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of this regulation is to limit emissions of particulate matter from fossil fuel fired and wood-fired steam or hot water generating units.

2

Crop production without fossil fuel.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??With diminishing fossil fuel reserves and concerns about global warming, the agricultural sector needs to reduce its use of fossil fuels. The objective of this… (more)

Ahlgren, Serina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Innovative Fresh Water Production Process for Fossil Fuel Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project concerns a diffusion driven desalination (DDD) process where warm water is evaporated into a low humidity air stream, and the vapor is condensed out to produce distilled water. Although the process has a low fresh water to feed water conversion efficiency, it has been demonstrated that this process can potentially produce low cost distilled water when driven by low grade waste heat. This report summarizes the progress made in the development and analysis of a Diffusion Driven Desalination (DDD) system. Detailed heat and mass transfer analyses required to size and analyze the diffusion tower using a heated water input are described. The analyses agree quite well with the current data and the information available in the literature. The direct contact condenser has also been thoroughly analyzed and the system performance at optimal operating conditions has been considered using a heated water/ambient air input to the diffusion tower. The diffusion tower has also been analyzed using a heated air input. The DDD laboratory facility has successfully been modified to include an air heating section. Experiments have been conducted over a range of parameters for two different cases: heated air/heated water and heated air/ambient water. A theoretical heat and mass transfer model has been examined for both of these cases and agreement between the experimental and theoretical data is good. A parametric study reveals that for every liquid mass flux there is an air mass flux value where the diffusion tower energy consumption is minimal and an air mass flux where the fresh water production flux is maximized. A study was also performed to compare the DDD process with different inlet operating conditions as well as different packing. It is shown that the heated air/heated water case is more capable of greater fresh water production with the same energy consumption than the ambient air/heated water process at high liquid mass flux. It is also shown that there can be significant advantage when using the heated air/heated water process with a less dense less specific surface area packed bed. Use of one configuration over the other depends upon the environment and the desired operating conditions.

James F. Klausner; Renwei Mei; Yi Li; Jessica Knight

2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

4

FOSSIL-FUEL COSTS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

FOSSIL-FUEL-BASED energy production, mostly from coal and oil, causes $120 billion worth of health and other non-climate-related damages in the U.S. each year that are not figured into the price of energy, says a National Research Council report ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2009-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

5

Fossil fuel furnace reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fossil fuel furnace reactor is provided for simulating a continuous processing plant with a batch reactor. An internal reaction vessel contains a batch of shale oil, with the vessel having a relatively thin wall thickness for a heat transfer rate effective to simulate a process temperature history in the selected continuous processing plant. A heater jacket is disposed about the reactor vessel and defines a number of independent controllable temperature zones axially spaced along the reaction vessel. Each temperature zone can be energized to simulate a time-temperature history of process material through the continuous plant. A pressure vessel contains both the heater jacket and the reaction vessel at an operating pressure functionally selected to simulate the continuous processing plant. The process yield from the oil shale may be used as feedback information to software simulating operation of the continuous plant to provide operating parameters, i.e., temperature profiles, ambient atmosphere, operating pressure, material feed rates, etc., for simulation in the batch reactor.

Parkinson, William J. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

fossil fuels | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fossil fuels fossil fuels Dataset Summary Description Energy intensity data and documentation published by the U.S. DOE's office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). Energy intensity is defined as: amount of energy used in producing a given level of output or activity; expressed as energy per unit of output. This is the energy intensity of the the electricity sector, which is an energy consuming sector that generates electricity. Data are organized to separate electricity-only generators from combined heat and power (CHP) generators. Data is available for the period 1949 - 2004. Source EERE Date Released May 31st, 2006 (8 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Electricity Energy Consumption energy intensity fossil fuels renewable energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon electricity_indicators.xls (xls, 2.1 MiB)

7

Liquid fossil fuel technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress reports are presented under the following headings: (1) extraction (technology assessment, oil research, gas research); (2) liquid processing (characterization, thermodynamics, processing technology); (3) utilization (energy conservation); and (4) project integration and technology transfer. BETC publications are also listed. Some of the highlights for this period are: the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center was converted into NIPER, the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research on October 1, 1983; modelling of enthalpies, heat capacities and volumes of aqueous surfactant solutions began using a mass action model; a series of experiments were run on upgrading by hydrogenation SRC-II coal liquid at different degrees of severity and the products have been analyzed; heavy crude oil extracts were separated into fraction with high performance liquid chromatography by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the mass spectra and electron spin resonance were determin ed; and particulates from exhaust gases of diesel engines using fire fuel types are being collected and will be analyzed by chemical methods and results will be compared with those obtained by biological assay. (ATT)

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) at Fossil-Fueled Electric Generating Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the Department of Energy-National Energy Technologies Laboratory (DOE-NETL) are evaluating and demonstrating integration of terrestrial carbon sequestration techniques at a coal-fired electric power plant through the use of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system gypsum as a soil amendment and mulch, and coal fly ash pond process water for periodic irrigation. From January to March 2002, the Project Team initiated the construction of a 40 ha Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) near TVA's Paradise Fossil Plant on marginally reclaimed surface coal mine lands in Kentucky. The CCWESTRS is growing commercial grade trees and cover crops and is expected to sequester 1.5-2.0 MT/ha carbon per year over a 20-year period. The concept could be used to meet a portion of the timber industry's needs while simultaneously sequestering carbon in lands which would otherwise remain non-productive. The CCWESTRS includes a constructed wetland to enhance the ability to sequester carbon and to remove any nutrients and metals present in the coal fly ash process water runoff. The CCWESTRS project is a cooperative effort between TVA, EPRI, and DOE-NETL, with a total budget of $1,574,000. The proposed demonstration project began in October 2000 and has continued through December 2005. Additional funding is being sought in order to extend the project. The primary goal of the project is to determine if integrating power plant processes with carbon sequestration techniques will enhance carbon sequestration cost-effectively. This goal is consistent with DOE objectives to provide economically competitive and environmentally safe options to offset projected growth in U.S. baseline emissions of greenhouse gases after 2010, achieve the long-term goal of $10/ton of avoided net costs for carbon sequestration, and provide half of the required reductions in global greenhouse gases by 2025. Other potential benefits of the demonstration include developing a passive technology for water treatment for trace metal and nutrient release reductions, using power plant by-products to improve coal mine land reclamation and carbon sequestration, developing wildlife habitat and green-space around production facilities, generating Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) credits for the use of process water, and producing wood products for use by the lumber and pulp and paper industry. Project activities conducted during the five year project period include: Assessing tree cultivation and other techniques used to sequester carbon; Project site assessment; Greenhouse studies to determine optimum plant species and by-product application; Designing, constructing, operating, monitoring, and evaluating the CCWESTRS system; and Reporting (ongoing). The ability of the system to sequester carbon will be the primary measure of effectiveness, measured by accessing survival and growth response of plants within the CCWESTRS. In addition, costs associated with design, construction, and monitoring will be evaluated and compared to projected benefits of other carbon sequestration technologies. The test plan involves the application of three levels each of two types of power plant by-products--three levels of FGD gypsum mulch, and three levels of ash pond irrigation water. This design produces nine treatment levels which are being tested with two species of hardwood trees (sweet gum and sycamore). The project is examining the effectiveness of applications of 0, 8-cm, and 15-cm thick gypsum mulch layers and 0, 13 cm, and 25 cm of coal fly ash water for irrigation. Each treatment combination is being replicated three times, resulting in a total of 54 treatment plots (3 FGD gypsum levels X 3 irrigation water levels x 2 tree species x 3 replicates). Survival and growth response of plant species in terms of sequestering carbon in plant material and soil will be the primary measure of effectiveness of each treatment. Additionally, the ability of the site soils and unsaturated zone subsurface m

P. Alan Mays; Bert R. Bock; Gregory A. Brodie; L. Suzanne Fisher; J. Devereux Joslin; Donald L. Kachelman; Jimmy J. Maddox; N. S. Nicholas; Larry E. Shelton; Nick Taylor; Mark H. Wolfe; Dennis H. Yankee; John Goodrich-Mahoney

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

9

Definition: Fossil fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Fossil fuels Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Fossil fuels Fuels formed in the Earth's crust over millions of years from decomposed organic matter. Common fossil fuels include petroleum, coal, and natural gas.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Fossil fuels are fuels formed by natural processes such as anaerobic decomposition of buried dead organisms. The age of the organisms and their resulting fossil fuels is typically millions of years, and sometimes exceeds 650 million years. Fossil fuels contain high percentages of carbon and include coal, petroleum, and natural gas. They range from volatile materials with low carbon:hydrogen ratios like methane, to liquid petroleum

10

HS_FossilFuels_Studyguide.indd  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fossil Fuels Fossil Fuels Fossil Energy Study Guide: Fossil Fuels C ontrary to what many people believe, fossil fuels are not the remains of dead dinosaurs. In fact, most of the fossil fuels found today were formed millions of years before the fi rst dinosaurs. Fossil fuels, however, were once alive. Th ey were formed from prehistoric plants and animals that lived hundreds of millions of years ago. Th ink about what the Earth must have looked like 300 million years or so ago. Th e land masses we live on today were just forming. Th ere were swamps and bogs everywhere. Th e climate was warmer. Trees and plants grew everywhere. Strange looking animals walked on the land, and just as weird looking fi sh swam in the rivers and seas. Tiny one-celled organisms called protoplankton fl

11

No Fossils in This Fuel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plan for Environmental Teaching Plan for Environmental Teaching GM Environmental Science Club No Fossils in This Fuel Your PlanET Sixth through Eighth Grades (Can be easily adapted to any elementary/middle school level) Ingredients: Yeast, sugar ... what are you making? Sweet rolls? Not in Science Class! You're blending these ingredients to make an innovative form of fuel! That's right ... when these two simple ingredients are mixed, the yeast  a simple, living organism  breaks the sugar down into ethyl alcohol, or ethanol, and carbon dioxide. While you won't be burning the fuel to prove its usefulness, you can share with your students how ethanol is being used right now to power some of today's vehicles! Students will be able to experiment with the activity, and they will see how the fermentation that occurs can blow up a

12

No Fossil Fuel - Kingston | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

No Fossil Fuel - Kingston No Fossil Fuel - Kingston Jump to: navigation, search Name No Fossil Fuel - Kingston Facility No Fossil Fuel - Kingston Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner No Fossil Fuel LLC Developer No Fossil Fuel LLC Energy Purchaser Net-metered Location Kingston MA Coordinates 41.97388106°, -70.72577477° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.97388106,"lon":-70.72577477,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

13

India Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

India India India Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends India's 2008 total fossil-fuel CO2 emissions rose 8.1% over the 2007 level to 475 million metric tons of carbon. From 1950 to 2008, India experienced dramatic growth in fossil-fuel CO2 emissions averaging 5.7% per year and becoming the world's third largest fossil-fuel CO2-emitting country. Indian total emissions from fossil-fuel consumption and cement production have more than doubled since 1994. Fossil-fuel emissions in India continue to result largely from coal burning with India being the world's third largest producer of coal. Coal contributed 87% of the emissions in 1950 and 71% in 2008; at the same time, the oil fraction increased from 11% to 20%. Indian emissions data reveal little impact from the oil price increases that

14

Combating global warming via non-fossil fuel energy options  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-fossil fuel energy options can help reduce or eliminate the emissions of greenhouse gases and are needed to combat climate change. Three distinct ways in which non-fossil fuel options can be used in society are examined here: the capture/production of non-fossil fuel energy sources, their conversion into appropriate energy carriers and increased efficiency throughout the life cycle. Non-fossil fuel energy sources are insufficient to avoid global warming in that they are not necessarily readily utilisable in their natural forms. Hydrogen energy systems are needed to facilitate the use of non-fossil fuels by converting them to two main classes of energy carriers: hydrogen (and hydrogen-derived fuels) and electricity. High efficiency is needed to allow the greatest benefits to be attained from energy options in terms of climate change and other factors. A case study is considered involving the production of hydrogen from non-fossil energy sources via thermochemical water decomposition. Thermochemical water decomposition provides a realistic future non-fossil fuel energy option, which can be driven by non-fossil energy sources (particularly nuclear or solar energy) and help combat global warming.

Marc A. Rosen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Fossil Fuels and Carbon Capture and Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reducing CO2...emissions, including those from the energy sector, ­presents a major challenge to the world at large. Fossil fuels provide two-thirds of the world’s electricity, with coal, in particular, the fuel ...

Keith Burnard; Sean McCoy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Projection of world fossil fuels by country  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Detailed projections of world fossil fuel production including unconventional sources were created by country and fuel type to estimate possible future fossil fuel production. Four critical countries (China, USA, Canada and Australia) were examined in detail with projections made on the state/province level. Ultimately Recoverable Resources (URR) for fossil fuels were estimated for three scenarios: Low = 48.4 ZJ, Best Guess (BG) = 75.7 ZJ, High = 121.5 ZJ. The scenarios were developed using Geologic Resources Supply-Demand Model (GeRS-DeMo). The Low and Best Guess (BG) scenarios suggest that world fossil fuel production may peak before 2025 and decline rapidly thereafter. The High scenario indicates that fossil fuels may have a strong growth till 2025 followed by a plateau lasting approximately 50 years before declining. All three scenarios suggest that world coal production may peak before 2025 due to peaking Chinese production and that only natural gas could have strong growth in the future. In addition, by converting the fossil fuel projections to greenhouse gas emissions, the projections were compared to IPCC scenarios which indicated that based on current estimates of URR there are insufficient fossil fuels to deliver the higher emission IPCC scenarios \\{A1Fl\\} and RCP8.5.

S.H. Mohr; J. Wang; G. Ellem; J. Ward; D. Giurco

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Global Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Data (ASCII, Fixed Format) Data graphic Data (ASCII, Fixed Format) Data graphic Data (ASCII, Comma-delimited) Trends Since 1751 approximately 337 billion metric tonnes of carbon have been released to the atmosphere from the consumption of fossil fuels and cement production. Half of these emissions have occurred since the mid 1970s. The 2007 global fossil-fuel carbon emission estimate, 8365 million metric tons of carbon, represents an all-time high and a 1.7% increase from 2006. Globally, liquid and solid fuels accounted for 76.3% of the emissions from fossil-fuel burning and cement production in 2007. Combustion of gas fuels (e.g., natural gas) accounted for 18.5% (1551 million metric tons of carbon) of the total emissions from fossil fuels in 2007 and reflects a gradually increasing global utilization of natural gas. Emissions from

18

Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal Buildings and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings OIRA Comparison Document Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy...

19

SECA Fuel Processing Fossil Energy Fuel Cell Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

June 3, 2003 SECA Fuel Processing National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Fossil Energy Strategic Center for Natural Gas REFORMING * Focus - Heavy hydrocarbons - Minimal use of water - Simplified system - Reduced cost - Sulfur tolerance with conversion to hydrogen sulfide * Challenges - Carbon deposition - Sulfur poisoning - Thermal gradients - Vaporization * Approaches - Metal oxide catalysts - Nobal metal cPox or ATR - Decorated nickel surface - Complete system interactions Tubular cPox Reformer Strategic Center for Natural Gas NETL Fuel Processing Budget Summary Proj. # PROJECT PERSONNEL KEY TASKS COST EST. 1 Diesel Reforming Kinetic Fundamentals *Shekhawat Gardner Berry 1.) Bring Reforming Lab Online 2.) Conduct Diesel Compound Interaction Study 3.) Level 1

20

Disclosure of Permitted Communication Concerning Fossil Fuel...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Fossil Fuel Energy Consumption Reduction for New Construction and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings -- Docket No. EERE-2010-BT-STD-0031; RIN 1904-AB96 Disclosure of Permitted...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water fossil fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu

22

Poland Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Europe Europe » Poland Poland Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends Carbon dioxide emissions from Poland's use of fossil-fuels and cement production climbed at a remarkably steady rate of 3.9% per year from 1800 until 1980, when they dropped abruptly (11.7%). Fossil-fuel CO2 emissions crept back up throughout the 1980s peaking in 1987 at 127 million metric tons of carbon. Since the 1987 high, CO2 emissions have plummeted 32% to early 1970s levels while per capita emissions have dropped to late 1960s levels. Poland is the world's ninth largest producer of coal and emissions are predominantly from coal burning: 97% in 1950 and 68% in 2008. The drop following 1980 is apparent in rates of liquid fuel burning but releases from consumption of petroleum products have returned and surpassed 1980s

23

A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Health and Safety Impacts of Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil- Fuel3 of HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF FOSSIL-FUEL NUCLEAR,HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Japan Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oceania » Japan Oceania » Japan Japan Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends The history of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions from Japan is remarkable for the abrupt change that occurred in 1973. With postwar growth at 9.8% per year from 1950 to 1973, total emissions were virtually constant from 1974-1987. From 1987-96, emissions grew 25.3% reaching 329 million metric tons of carbon. Growth during this period was characterized by a return to mid-1970s consumption levels for liquid petroleum products and increased contributions from coal and natural gas use. Since 1996, Japan's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions have vacilated and now total 329 million metric tons of carbon in 2008. Based on United Nations energy trade data for 2008, Japan is the world's largest importer of coal (184 million metric tons) and

25

Arizona: Solar Panels Replace Inefficient Fossil Fuel-Powered...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Arizona: Solar Panels Replace Inefficient Fossil Fuel-Powered Energy Systems Arizona: Solar Panels Replace Inefficient Fossil Fuel-Powered Energy Systems May 1, 2014 - 9:33am...

26

Carbon Capture by Fossil Fuel Power Plants: An Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Capture by Fossil Fuel Power Plants: An Economic Analysis ¨Ozge I¸slegen Graduate School excellent research assistance. #12;Carbon Capture by Fossil Fuel Power Plants: An Economic Analysis Abstract: For fossil fuel power plants to be built in the future, carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies offer

Silver, Whendee

27

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)-Fossil Fuel...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis Center (CDIAC)-Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions AgencyCompany Organization: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Sector: Energy, Climate Topics: GHG inventory, Background...

28

Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

fossil fuel sales continually flow into the DOI program offices, and those programs also conduct audit activities that may result, over time, in changes in the previously reported...

29

Three essays on biofuel's and fossil fuel's stochastic prices.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The dissertation consists of three essays on biofuel's and fossil fuel's stochastic prices focusing on the U.S. corn-based fuel-ethanol market. The research objectives include investigating… (more)

Zhang, Zibin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

People's Republic of China Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Asia Asia » People's Republic of China People's Republic of China Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends According to reported energy statistics, coal production and use in China has increased ten-fold since the 1960s. As a result, Chinese fossil-fuel CO2 emissions have more than doubled 2000 alone. At 1.92 billion metric tons of carbon in 2008, the People's Republic of China is the world's largest emitter of CO2 due to fossil-fuel use and cement production. Even with the reported decline in Chinese emissions from 1997 to 1999, China's industrial emissions of CO2 have grown phenomenally since 1950, when China stood tenth among nations based on annual fossil-fuel CO2 emissions. From 1970 to 1997, China's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions grew at an annual rate of

31

E-Print Network 3.0 - assess fossil fuel Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Geosciences 6 EARTH'S CLIMATE, THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT, AND ENERGY Summary: ,PgCyr Fossil Fuel Emissions Fossil Fuel - Marland...

32

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric fossil fuel Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Centre de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 10 EARTH'S CLIMATE, THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT, AND ENERGY Summary: ,PgCyr Fossil Fuel Emissions Fossil Fuel - Marland...

33

North Korea Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Far East » North Korea Far East » North Korea North Korea Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends The total fossil-fuel CO2 emissions for North Korea, or the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, averaged 11.2% growth from 1950-93, reaching 71 million metric tons of carbon. Since 1993 according to published UN energy statistics, fossil-fuel CO2 emissions have declined 70% to 21.4 million metric tons of carbon. As the world's 14th largest producer of coal, it is no surprise North Korea's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions record is dominated by emissions from coal burning. Coal consumption accounted for 93% of the 2008 CO2 emission total. With no natural gas usage, another 3.4% currently comes from liquid petroleum consumption, and the remainder is from cement

34

South Korea Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Far East » South Korea Far East » South Korea South Korea Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends South Korea, or the Republic of Korea, is the world's tenth largest emitter of CO2 based on 2008 fossil-fuel consumption and cement production with 139 million metric tons of carbon. From 1946-1997 South Korea experienced phenomenal growth in fossil-fuel CO2 emissions with a growth rate that averaged 11.5%. Initial growth in emissions was due to coal consumption, which still accounts for 46.9% of South Korea's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions. Since the late 1960s oil consumption has been a major source of emissions. South Korea is the world's fifth largest importer of crude oil. Natural gas became a significant source of CO2 for the first time in 1987, as South

35

Kyoto-Related Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emission Totals  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Kyoto-Related Emissions Kyoto-Related Emissions Kyoto-Related Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emission Totals DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/ffe.007_V2012 world map Kyoto-Related Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emission Totals Year Annex B Countries Non Annex B Countries Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions (million metric tonnes C) Bunkers (million metric tonnes C) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions (million metric tonnes C) Bunkers (million metric tonnes C) 1990 3894 90 2111 46 1991 3801 94 2299 38 1992 3750 109 2263 44 1993 3685 107 2339 48 1994 3656 107 2469 54 1995 3681 110 2570 59 1996 3704 111 2657 72 1997 3727 114 2737 74 1998 3746 118 2698 82 1999 3678 124 2718 90 2000 3725 130 2821 90 2001 3781 120 2936 92 2002 3764 128 3013 94 2003 3853 123 3347 98 2004 3888 135 3683 107 2005 3933 142 3926 106

36

NREL: Technology Deployment - Fossil Fuel Dependency Falls from...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel Dependency Falls from 100% to 56% on Alcatraz Island News Solar Cells Light Up Prison Cells on 'The Rock' Sponsors U.S. National Park Service American Recovery and...

37

Brazil-NETL Advanced Fossil Fuels Partnerships | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Advanced Fossil Fuels Partnerships Advanced Fossil Fuels Partnerships (Redirected from Brazil-NETL Cooperation) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Brazil-NETL Cooperation Name Brazil-NETL Cooperation Agency/Company /Organization National Energy Technology Laboratory Partner Brazil Sector Energy Topics Background analysis Website http://www.netl.doe.gov/techno Program Start 2007 Program End 2012 Country Brazil South America References NETL Technologies Programs[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Advanced Fossil Fuels Partnerships with Brazil ORD International Research Agreements Brazilian Coal Gasification and CCS MOUs References ↑ NETL Technologies Programs Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Brazil-NETL_Advanced_Fossil_Fuels_Partnerships&oldid=375248"

38

Hydrogen Separation Membranes for Vision 21 Fossil Fuel Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Eltron Research and team members CoorsTek, McDermott Technology, Sued Chemie, Argonne National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This objective is being pursued using dense membranes based in part on Eltron-patented ceramic materials with a demonstrated ability for proton and electron conduction. The technical goals are being addressed by modifying single-phase and composite membrane composition and microstructure to maximize proton and electron conductivity without loss of material stability. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. This project was motivated by the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. The proposed technology addresses the DOE Vision 21 initiative in two ways. First, this process offers a relatively inexpensive solution for pure hydrogen separation that can be easily incorporated into Vision 21 fossil fuel plants. Second, this process could reduce the cost of hydrogen, which is a clean burning fuel under increasing demand as supporting technologies are developed for hydrogen utilization and storage. Additional motivation for this project arises from the potential of this technology for other applications. By appropriately changing the catalysts coupled with the membrane, essentially the same system can be used to facilitate alkane dehydrogenation and coupling, aromatics processing, and hydrogen sulfide decomposition.

Roark, Shane E.; Mackay, Richard; Sammells, Anthony F.

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

39

ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Eltron Research Inc., and team members CoorsTek, McDermott Technology, inc., Sued Chemie, Argonne National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. This objective is being pursued using dense membranes based in part on Eltron-patented ceramic materials with a demonstrated ability for proton and electron conduction. The technical goals are being addressed by modifying single-phase and composite membrane composition and microstructure to maximize proton and electron conductivity without loss of material stability. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur.

Shane E. Roark; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard A. Mackay; Lyrik Y. Pitzman; Thomas A. Zirbel; Thomas F. Barton; Sara L. Rolfe; U. (Balu) Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; George Farthing; Dan Rowley; Tim R. Armstrong; R.D. Carneim; P.F. Becher; C-H. Hsueh; Aaron L. Wagner; Jon P. Wagner

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

40

The Fate of Fossil Fuel Hydrocarbons in Marine Animals [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article The Fate of Fossil Fuel Hydrocarbons in Marine Animals [and Discussion...mammals. The fate of fossil fuel hydrocarbons in marine animals. | Journal Article...Carcinogens 0 Epoxy Compounds 0 Fuel Oils 0 Hydrocarbons 0 Naphthalenes...

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water fossil fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Adaptable Sensor Packaging for High Temperature Fossil Fuel Energy System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Adaptable Sensor Packaging for High Adaptable Sensor Packaging for High Temperature Fossil Fuel Energy Systems Background The Advanced Research Sensors and Controls Program is leading the effort to develop sensing and control technologies and methods to achieve automated and optimized intelligent power systems. The program is led by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and is implemented through research and development agreements with other

42

US fossil fuel technologies for Thailand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy has been encouraging other countries to consider US coal and coal technologies in meeting their future energy needs. Thailand is one of three developing countries determined to be a potentially favorable market for such exports. This report briefly profiles Thailand with respect to population, employment, energy infrastructure and policies, as well as financial, economic, and trade issues. Thailand is shifting from a traditionally agrarian economy to one based more strongly on light manufacturing and will therefore require increased energy resources that are reliable and flexible in responding to anticipated growth. Thailand has extensive lignite deposits that could fuel a variety of coal-based technologies. Atmospheric fluidized-bed combustors could utilize this resource and still permit Thailand to meet emission standards for sulfur dioxide. This option also lends itself to small-scale applications suitable for private-sector power generation. Slagging combustors and coal-water mixtures also appear to have potential. Both new construction and refurbishment of existing plants are planned. 18 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

Buehring, W.A.; Dials, G.E.; Gillette, J.L.; Szpunar, C.B.; Traczyk, P.A.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Disclosure of Permitted Communication Concerning Fossil Fuel Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Disclosure of Permitted Communication Concerning Fossil Fuel Energy Disclosure of Permitted Communication Concerning Fossil Fuel Energy Consumption Reduction for New Construction and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings -- Docket No. EERE-2010-BT-STD-0031; RIN 1904-AB96 Disclosure of Permitted Communication Concerning Fossil Fuel Energy Consumption Reduction for New Construction and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings -- Docket No. EERE-2010-BT-STD-0031; RIN 1904-AB96 This memo provides an overview of communications made to DOE staff on the subject of the rulemaking referenced above. The communications occurred at a meeting held on February 13, 2013. DOE 433 ex parte memo.pdf More Documents & Publications Disclosure of Permitted Communication Concerning Regional Standards Enforcement Framework Document -- Docket No. EERE-2011-BT-CE-0077

44

Soot from the burning of fossil fuels and solid biofuels contributes far more to global  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soot from the burning of fossil fuels and solid biofuels contributes far more to global warming Researchers ScienceDaily (July 30, 2010) -- Soot from the burning of fossil fuels and solid biofuels analyzed the impacts of soot from fossil fuels -- diesel, coal, gasoline, jet fuel -- and from solid

45

Fossil Fuels Without CO2 Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...oxygen, or by steam reforming of the fuel to yield...coal beds contain methane adsorbed on...oxygen, or by steam reforming of the...coal beds contain methane adsorbed on...to coal-bed methane production, these...

E. A. Parson; D. W. Keith

1998-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

46

New Optical Sensor Suite for Ultrahigh Temperature Fossil Fuel Application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accomplishments of a program to develop and demonstrate photonic sensor technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants and solid oxide fuel cells are described. The goal of this project is the research and development of advanced, robust photonic sensors based on improved sapphire optical waveguides, and the identification and demonstration of applications of the new sensors in advanced fossil fuel power plants, where the new technology will contribute to improvements in process control and monitoring.

John Coggin; Tom Flynn; Jonas Ivasauskas; Daniel Kominsky; Carrie Kozikowski; Russell May; Michael Miller; Tony Peng; Gary Pickrell; Raymond Rumpf; Kelly Stinson-Bagby; Dan Thorsen; Rena Wilson

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

47

Changing Biomass, Fossil, and Nuclear Fuel Cycles for Sustainability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The energy and chemical industries face two great sustainability challenges: the need to avoid climate change and the need to replace crude oil as the basis of our transport and chemical industries. These challenges can be met by changing and synergistically combining the fossil, biomass, and nuclear fuel cycles.

Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Where do fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions from California go? An analysis based on radiocarbon observations and an atmospheric transport model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

do fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions from California go?do fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions from California go?1° distribution of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Causal relationship between fossil fuel consumption and economic growth in the world  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fossil fuels are major sources of energy, and have several advantages over other primary energy sources. Without extensive dependence on fossil fuels, it is questionable whether our economic prosperity can continue. This paper analyses cointegration and causality between fossil fuel consumption and economic growth in the world over the period 1971 to 2008. The estimation results indicate that fossil fuel consumption and GDP are cointegrated and there exists long-run unidirectional causality from fossil fuel consumption to GDP. This paper also investigates the nexus between non-fossil energy consumption and GDP, and shows that there is no causality between the variables. The conclusions are that reducing fossil fuel consumption may hamper economic growth, and that it is unlikely that non-fossil energy will substantially replace fossil fuels. This paper also examines causal linkages between the variables using a trivariate model, and obtains the same results as those from the bivariate model.

Hazuki Ishida

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

The breeder reactor: a fossil fuel viewpoint  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... elegant and simple: to generate electricity and, at the same time, to produce additional fuel from the uranium discarded by the existing thermal reactor system. Without the breeder reactor, ... seems likely that the role of nuclear energy will begin to be constrained by the price and availability of uranium at about the turn of the century. There is, however ...

David Merrick

1976-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

51

The Fate of Fossil Fuel Hydrocarbons in Marine Animals [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

20 May 1975 research-article The Fate of Fossil Fuel Hydrocarbons in Marine Animals [and Discussion] E...have been made of their fate in mammals. The fate of fossil fuel hydrocarbons in marine animals. | Journal Article...

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Fossil fuel combined cycle power generation method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for converting fuel energy to electricity includes the steps of converting a higher molecular weight gas into at least one mixed gas stream of lower average molecular weight including at least a first lower molecular weight gas and a second gas, the first and second gases being different gases, wherein the first lower molecular weight gas comprises H.sub.2 and the second gas comprises CO. The mixed gas is supplied to at least one turbine to produce electricity. The mixed gas stream is divided after the turbine into a first gas stream mainly comprising H.sub.2 and a second gas stream mainly comprising CO. The first and second gas streams are then electrochemically oxidized in separate fuel cells to produce electricity. A nuclear reactor can be used to supply at least a portion of the heat the required for the chemical conversion process.

Labinov, Solomon D [Knoxville, TN; Armstrong, Timothy R [Clinton, TN; Judkins, Roddie R [Knoxville, TN

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

53

Italy (including San Marino) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Western Europe » Italy Western Europe » Italy (including San Marino) Italy (including San Marino) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends As occurred in many industrialized nations, CO2 emissions from Italy rose steeply since the late 1940's until the growth was abruptly terminated in 1974. Since 1974, emissions from liquid fuels have vacillated, dropping from 76% to 46% of a static but varying total. Significant increases in natural gas consumption have compensated for the drop in oil consumption. In 2008, 35.8% of Italy's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions were due to natural gas consumption. Coal usage grew steadily until 1985 when CO2 emissions from coal consumption reached 16 million metric tons of carbon. Not until 2004 did coal usage exceed 1985 levels and now accounts for 13.9% of Italy's

54

ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Eltron Research Inc., and team members, are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. This objective is being pursued using dense membranes based in part on Eltron-patented ceramic materials with a demonstrated ability for proton and electron conduction. The technical goals are being addressed by modifying single-phase and composite membrane composition and microstructure to maximize proton and electron conductivity without loss of material stability. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. During this quarter, ceramic, cermet (ceramic/metal), and thin film membranes were prepared, characterized, and evaluated for H{sub 2} transport. For selected ceramic membrane compositions an optimum range for transition metal doping was identified, and it was determined that highest proton conductivity occurred for two-phase ceramic materials. Furthermore, a relationship between transition metal dopant atomic number and conductivity was observed. Ambipolar conductivities of {approx}6 x 10{sup -3} S/cm were achieved for these materials, and {approx} 1-mm thick membranes generated H{sub 2} transport rates as high as 0.3 mL/min/cm{sup 2}. Cermet membranes during this quarter were found to have a maximum conductivity of 3 x 10{sup -3} S/cm, which occurred at a metal phase contact of 36 vol.%. Homogeneous dense thin films were successfully prepared by tape casting and spin coating; however, there remains an unacceptably high difference in shrinkage rates between the film and support, which led to membrane instability. Further improvements in high pressure membrane seals also were achieved during this quarter, and a maximum pressure of 100 psig was attained. CoorsTek optimized many of the processing variables relevant to manufacturing scale production of ceramic H{sub 2} transport membranes, and SCI used their expertise to deposit a range of catalysts compositions onto ceramic membrane surfaces. Finally, MTI compiled relevant information regarding Vision 21 fossil fuel plant operation parameters, which will be used as a starting point for assessing the economics of incorporating a H{sub 2} separation unit.

Shane E. Roark; Tony F. Sammells; Richard A. Mackay; Adam E. Calihman; Lyrik Y. Pitzman; Tom F. Barton; Sara L. Rolfe; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Mike J. Holmes; Aaron L. Wagner

2001-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

55

Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Vision 21 Fossil Fuel Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Eltron Research Inc. and team members CoorsTek, Sued Chemie, Argonne National Laboratory, and NORAM are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative, which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. Currently, this project is focusing on four basic categories of dense membranes: (1) mixed conducting ceramic/ceramic composites, (2) mixed conducting ceramic/metal (cermet) composites, (3) cermets with hydrogen permeable metals, and (4) layered composites containing hydrogen permeable alloys. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. During this final quarter of the no cost extension several planar membranes of a cermet composition referred to as EC101 containing a high permeability metal and a ceramic phase were prepared and permeability testing was performed.

Carl R. Evenson; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

56

Fireside corrosion probes for fossil fuel combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrochemical corrosion rate probes have been constructed and tested along with mass loss coupons in environments consisting of N2/O2/CO2/SO2 plus water vapor. Temperatures ranged from 450° to 700°C. Results show that electrochemical corrosion rates for ash-covered mild steel are a function of time, temperature, and gaseous environment. Correlation between the electrochemical and mass loss corrosion rates was poor.

Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Holcomb, G.R.; Eden, D.A. (Intercorr International, Houston, TX)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Russia Federation Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Centrally Planned Europe Centrally Planned Europe » Russian Federation Russia Federation Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends Since 1992 total fossil-fuel CO2 emissions from the Russian Federation have dropped 23% to 466 million metric tons of carbon, still the fourth largest emitting country in the world and the largest emitter of the republics comprising the former USSR. Emissions from gas consumption still represent the largest fraction (49.1%) of Russia's emissions and only recently have returned to the 1992 level. Emissions from coal consumption have dropped 25.5% since 1992 and presently account for 26.6% of Russia's emissions. Russia has the largest population of any Eastern European country with a population of 141 million people. From a per capita standpoint, Russia's

58

Classification of fossil fuels according to structural-chemical characteristics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On the basis of a set of linear equations that relate the amount of major elements n{sub E} (E = C, H, O, N, S) in the organic matter of fossil fuels to structural characteristics, such as the number of cycles R, the number of atoms n{sub E}, the number of mutual chemical bonds, the degree of unsaturation of the structure {delta}, and the extent of its reduction B, a structural-chemical classification of fossil coals that is closely related to the parameters of the industrial-genetic classification (GOST 25543-88) is proposed. Structural-chemical classification diagrams are constructed for power-generating coals of Russia; coking coals; and coals designed for nonfuel purposes including the manufacture of adsorbents, synthetic liquid fuel, ion exchangers, thermal graphite, and carbon-graphite materials.

A.M. Gyul'maliev; G.S. Golovin; S.G. Gagarin [Institute for Fossil Fuels, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Fossil-Fu.e l and Geothermal Power Plants", Lawrencefrom fossil-fuel and geothermal power plants Control offrom fossil-fuel and geothermal power plants Radionuclide

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

SECA Core Technology Fossil Energy Fuel Cell Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

June 3, 2003 June 3, 2003 National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Fossil Energy SECA Core Technology IAPG, GPPD-DWC 4/30/03 SECA CORE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM W. Nernst "Electrical Glow-Light" U.S. Patent 623,811 April 25, 1899 C C IAPG, GPPD-DWC 4/30/03 SECA SECA Program Structure Program Management Research Topics Needs Industry Integration Teams Technology Transfer Small Business University National Lab Industry Power Electronics Modeling & Simulation Materials Controls & Diagnostics Fuel Processing Fuel Processing Manufacturing Modeling & Simulation Power Electronics Controls & Diagnostics Manufacturing Materials Core Technology Program Fuel Cell Core Technology Project Management Industry Input IAPG, GPPD-DWC 4/30/03 Core Technology Program Powering All Ships Siemens Westinghouse

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water fossil fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

An overview of alternative fossil fuel price and carbon regulation scenarios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Alternative Fossil Fuel Price and Carbon RegulationScenario, (2) a High Fuel Price Scenario, which includescap- and-trade and high fuel prices – are compared to other

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Large historical changes of fossil-fuel black carbon aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Anthropogenic emissions of fine black carbon (BC) particles, the principal light-absorbing atmospheric aerosol, have varied during the past century in response to changes of fossil-fuel utilization, technology developments, and emission controls. We estimate historical trends of fossil-fuel BC emissions in six regions that represent about two-thirds of present day emissions and extrapolate these to global emissions from 1875 onward. Qualitative features in these trends show rapid increase in the latter part of the 1800s, the leveling off in the first half of the 1900s, and the re-acceleration in the past 50 years as China and India developed. We find that historical changes of fuel utilization have caused large temporal change in aerosol absorption, and thus substantial change of aerosol single scatter albedo in some regions, which suggests that BC may have contributed to global temperature changes in the past century. This implies that the BC history needs to be represented realistically in climate change assessments.

Novakov, T.; Ramanathan, V.; Hansen, J.E.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Sato, M.; Sinton, J.E.; Sathaye, J.A.

2002-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

63

Projection of world fossil fuel production with supply and demand interactions.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Research Doctorate - Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) Historically, fossil fuels have been vital for our global energy needs. However climate change is prompting renewed interest… (more)

Mohr, Steve

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

July 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Fossil Fuels | OSTI, US Dept...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Fossil Fuels Science Subject Feed EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL DETERMINATION OF HEAVY OIL VISCOSITY UNDER RESERVOIR CONDITIONS Dr. Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet (2003) 82 >...

65

ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Eltron Research Inc., and team members, are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. This objective is being pursued using dense membranes based in part on Eltron-patented ceramic materials with a demonstrated ability for proton and electron conduction. The technical goals are being addressed by modifying single-phase and composite membrane composition and microstructure to maximize proton and electron conductivity without loss of material stability. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. During this quarter, it was demonstrated that increasing the transition metal loading in a model perovskite composition resulted in an increase in hydrogen flux. Improved flux corresponded to the emergence of additional phases in the ceramic membrane, and highest flux was achieved for a composite consisting of pseudo-cubic and rhombohedral perovskite phases. A 0.9-mm thick membrane of this material generated a hydrogen flux in excess of 0.1 mL/min/cm{sup 2}, which was approximately 35 times greater than analogs with lower transition metal levels. The dopant level and crystal structure also correlated with membrane density and coefficient of thermal expansion, but did not appear to affect grain size or shape. Additionally, preliminary ceramic-metal (cermet) composite membranes demonstrated a 10-fold increase in flux relative to analogous membranes composed of only the ceramic component. The hydrogen flux for these cermet samples corresponded to a conductivity of {approx} 10{sup -3} S/cm, which was consistent with the predicted proton conductivity of the ceramic phase. Increasing the sweep gas flow rate in test reactors was found to significantly increase hydrogen flux, as well as apparent material conductivity for all samples tested. Adding humidity to the feed gas stream produced a small increase in hydrogen flux. However, the catalyst on ceramic membrane surfaces did not affect flux, which suggested that the process was membrane-diffusion limited. Representative samples and fabrication processes were evaluated on the basis of manufacturing practicality. it was determined that optimum membrane densification occurs over a very narrow temperature range for the subject ceramics. Additionally, calcination temperatures currently employed result in powders that are difficult mill and screen. These issues must be addressed to improve large-scale fabricability.

Shane E. Roark; Tony F. Sammells; Adam E. Calihman; Lyrik Y. Pitzman; Pamela M. Van Calcar; Richard A. Mackay; Tom F. Barton; Sara L. Rolfe; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Tim R. Armstrong; Mike J. Holmes; Aaron L. Wagner

2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

66

ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Eltron Research Inc. and their team members are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. This objective is being pursued using dense membranes based in part on Eltron-patented ceramic materials with a demonstrated ability for proton and electron conduction. The technical goals are being addressed by modifying single-phase and composite membrane composition and microstructure to maximize proton and electron conductivity without loss of material stability. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. During this quarter, new cermet compositions were tested that demonstrated similar performance to previous materials. A 0.5-mm thick membrane achieved at H{sub 2} transport rate of 0.2 mL/min/cm{sup 2} at 950 C, which corresponded to an ambipolar conductivity of 3 x 10{sup -3} S/cm. Although these results were equivalent to those for other cermet compositions, this new composition might be useful if it demonstrates improved chemical or mechanical stability. Ceramic/ceramic composite membranes also were fabricated and tested; however, some reaction did occur between the proton- and electron-conducting phases, which likely compromised conductivity. This sample only achieved a H{sub 2} transport rate of {approx} 0.006 mL/min/cm{sup 2} and an ambipolar conductivity of {approx}4 x 10{sup -4} S/cm. Chemical stability tests were continued, and candidate ceramic membranes were found to react slightly with carbon monoxide under extreme testing conditions. A cermet compositions did not show any reaction with carbon monoxide, but a thick layer of carbon formed on the membrane surface. The most significant technical accomplishment this quarter was a new high-pressure seal composition. This material maintained a pressure differential across the membrane of {approx} 280 psi at 800 C, and is still in operation.

Shane E. Roark; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard A. Mackay; Lyrik Y. Pitzman; Thomas A. Zirbel; Thomas F. Barton; Sara L. Rolfe; U. (Balu) Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; George Farthing; Dan Rowley; Tim R. Armstrong; M.K. Ferber; Aaron L. Wagner; Jon P. Wagner

2002-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

67

ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Eltron Research Inc., and team members CoorsTek, McDermott Technology, Inc., Sued Chemie, Argonne National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. This objective is being pursued using dense membranes based in part on Eltron-patented ceramic materials with a demonstrated ability for proton and electron conduction. The technical goals are being addressed by modifying single-phase and composite membrane composition and microstructure to maximize proton and electron conductivity without loss of material stability. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. During this quarter, mixed proton/electron conductivity and hydrogen transport was measured as a function of metal phase content for a range of ceramic/metal (cermet) compositions. It was found that optimum performance occurred at 44 wt.% metal content for all compositions tested. Although each cermet appeared to have a continuous metal phase, it is believed that hydrogen transport increased with increasing metal content partially due to beneficial surface catalyst characteristics resulting from the metal phase. Beyond 44 wt.% there was a reduction in hydrogen transport most likely due to dilution of the proton conducting ceramic phase. Hydrogen separation rates for 1-mm thick cermet membranes were in excess of 0.1 mL/min/cm{sup 2}, which corresponded to ambipolar conductivities between 1 x 10{sup -3} and 8 x 10{sup -3} S/cm. Similar results were obtained for multiphase ceramic membranes comprised of a proton-conducting perovskite and electron conducting metal oxide. These multi-phase ceramic membranes showed only a slight improvement in hydrogen transport upon addition of a metal phase. The highest hydrogen separation rates observed this quarter were for a cermet membrane containing a hydrogen transport metal. A 1-mm thick membrane of this material achieved a hydrogen separation rate of 0.3 mL/min/cm{sup 2} at only 700 C, which increased to 0.6 mL/min/cm{sup 2} at 950 C.

Shane E. Roark; Tony F. Sammells; Richard A. Mackay; Lyrik Y. Pitzman; Alexandra Z. LaGuardia; Tom F. Barton; Sara L. Rolfe; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Mike J. Holmes; Aaron L. Wagner

2001-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

68

ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Eltron Research Inc., and team members CoorsTek, Sued Chemie, and Argonne National Laboratory are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. This objective is being pursued using dense membranes based in part on Eltron-patented ceramic materials with a demonstrated ability for proton and electron conduction. The technical goals are being addressed by modifying composite membrane composition and microstructure to maximize hydrogen permeation without loss of material stability. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. During this quarter, a composite metal membrane based on an inexpensive hydrogen permeable metal achieved permeation rates in excess of 25 mL/min/cm{sup 2}. Preliminary attempts to incorporate this metal into a cermet were successful, and a thick cermet membrane (0.83 mm) with 40 vol.% metal phase achieved a permeation rate of nearly 0.4 mL/min/cm{sup 2}. Increasing the metal phase content and decreasing membrane thickness should significantly increase permeation, while maintaining the benefits derived from cermets. Two-phase ceramic/ceramic composite membranes had low hydrogen permeability, likely due to interdiffusion of constituents between the phases. However, these materials did demonstrate high resistance to corrosion, and might be good candidates for other composite membranes. Temperature-programmed reduction measurements indicated that model cermet materials absorbed 2.5 times as much hydrogen than the pure ceramic analogs. This characteristic, in addition to higher electron conductivity, likely explains the relatively high permeation for these cermets. Incorporation of catalysts with ceramics and cermets increased hydrogen uptake by 800 to more than 900%. Finally, new high-pressure seals were developed for cermet membranes that maintained a pressure differential of 250 psi. This result indicated that the approach for high-pressure seal development could be adapted for a range of compositions. Other items discussed in this report include mechanical testing, new proton conducting ceramics, supported thin films, and alkane to olefin conversion.

Shane E. Roark; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard A. Mackay; Lyrik Y. Pitzman; Thomas A. Zirbel; Stewart R. Schesnack; Thomas F. Barton; Sara L. Rolfe; U. (Balu) Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; Aaron L. Wagner; Jon P. Wagner

2003-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

69

The European carbon balance. Part 1: fossil fuel emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyzed the magnitude, the trends and the uncertainties of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions in the European Union 25 member states (hereafter EU-25), based on emission inventories from energy-use statistics. The stability of emissions during the past decade at EU-25 scale masks decreasing trends in some regions, offset by increasing trends elsewhere. In the recent 4 years, the new Eastern EU-25 member states have experienced an increase in emissions, reversing after a decade-long decreasing trend. Mediterranean and Nordic countries have also experienced a strong acceleration in emissions. In Germany, France and United Kingdom, the stability of emissions is due to the decrease in the industry sector, offset by an increase in the transportation sector. When four different inventories models are compared, we show that the between-models uncertainty is as large as 19% of the mean for EU-25, and even bigger for individual countries. Accurate accounting for fossil CO2 emissions depends on a clear understanding of system boundaries, i.e. emitting activities included in the accounting. We found that the largest source of errors between inventories is the use of distinct systems boundaries (e.g. counting or not bunker fuels, cement manufacturing, nonenergy products). Once these inconsistencies are corrected, the between-models uncertainty can be reduced down to 7% at EU-25 scale. The uncertainty of emissions at smaller spatial scales than the country scale was analyzed by comparing two emission maps based upon distinct economic and demographic activities. A number of spatial and temporal biases have been found among the two maps, indicating a significant increase in uncertainties when increasing the resolution at scales finer than 200 km. At 100km resolution, for example, the uncertainty of regional emissions is estimated to be 60 gCm2 yr1, up to 50% of the mean. The uncertainty on regional fossil-fuel CO2 fluxes to the atmosphere could be reduced by making accurate 14C measurements in atmospheric CO2, and by combining them with transport models.

Ciais, Philippe [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Paris, J. D. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Peylin, Philippe [National Center for Scientific Research, Gif-sur-Yvette, France; Piao, S. L. [National Center for Scientific Research, Gif-sur-Yvette, France; River, L. [National Center for Scientific Research, Gif-sur-Yvette, France; Marland, Gregg [ORNL; Levin, I. [University of Heidelberg; Pregger, T. [Universitat Stuttgart; Scholz, Y. [Universitat Stuttgart; Friedrich, R. [Universitat Stuttgart; Schulze, E.-D. [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Liquid fossil fuel technology. Quarterly technical progress report, October-December 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Activities and progress are reported in: liquid fossil fuel cycle, extraction (enhanced recovery of oil and gas), processing (of petroleum and alternate fuels), utilization (transportation and energy conversion), and systems integration. BETC publications and finances are listed in appendices. (DLC)

Not Available

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Monthly, global emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel consumption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines available data, develops a strategy and presents a monthly, global time series of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions for the years 1950 2006. This monthly time series was constructed from detailed study of monthly data from the 21 countries that account for approximately 80% of global total emissions. These data were then used in a Monte Carlo approach to proxy for all remaining countries. The proportional-proxy methodology estimates by fuel group the fraction of annual emissions emitted in each country and month. Emissions from solid, liquid and gas fuels are explicitly modelled by the proportional-proxy method. The primary conclusion from this study is the global monthly time series is statistically significantly different from a uniform distribution throughout the year. Uncertainty analysis of the data presented show that the proportional-proxy method used faithfully reproduces monthly patterns in the data and the global monthly pattern of emissions is relatively insensitive to the exact proxy assignments used. The data and results presented here should lead to a better understanding of global and regional carbon cycles, especially when the mass data are combined with the stable carbon isotope data in atmospheric transport models.

Andres, Robert Joseph [ORNL; Gregg, JS [Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark; Losey, London M [ORNL; Marland, Gregg [ORNL; Boden, Thomas A [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Tracking the Origins of Fossil Fuels | Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tailoring the Properties of Magnetic Nanostructures Tailoring the Properties of Magnetic Nanostructures X-ray Holograms Expose Secret Magnetism How Dissolved Metal Ions Interact in Solution One Giant Leap for Radiation Biology? What's in the Cage Matters in Iron Antimonide Thermoelectric Materials Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Tracking the Origins of Fossil Fuels MAY 29, 2007 Bookmark and Share S-XANES absorbance and third derivative absorbance edge spectra of Duvernay (A) Type II kerogen and the results of curve fits using spectra from model compounds. Notice that sharp features appear in the thrid derivative spectrum that are easily associated with FeS2, aliphatic sulfur and

73

Reducing CO2 Emissions from Fossil Fuel Power Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 Emissions From Fossil Fuel Power Plants Scott M. Klara - National Energy Technology Laboratory EPGA's 3 rd Annual Power Generation Conference October 16-17, 2002 Hershey, Pennsylvania EPGA - SMK - 10/17/02 * One of DOE's 17 national labs * Government owned/operated * Sites in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Oklahoma, Alaska * More than 1,100 federal and support contractor employees * FY 02 budget of $750 million National Energy Technology Laboratory EPGA - SMK - 10/17/02 * Diverse research portfolio - 60 external projects - Onsite focus area * Strong industry support - 40% cost share * Portfolio funding $100M 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2003 2003 Budget (Million $) Fiscal Year Senate House Administration Request Carbon Sequestration: A Dynamic Program Separation & Capture From Power Plants Plays Key Role

74

Formulating Energy Policies Related to Fossil Fuel Use:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CONF-9 O O 255 --I CONF-9 O O 255 --I DE90 008741 Formulating Energy Policies Related to Fossil Fuel Use: i Critical Uncertainties in the Global Carbon Cycle. W. M. Post, V. H. Dale, D. L. DeAngelis, L. K. Mann, P. J. Mulholland, R. V. O'Neill, T. -H. Peng, M. P. Farrell Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Post Office Box 2008 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 The global carbon cycle is the dynamic interaction among the earth's carbon sources and sinks. Understanding the global carbon cycle requires knowledge of the carbon exchanges between major carbon reservoirs by various chemical, physical, geological, and biological processes (Bolin et al., 1979; Rosenberg, 1981; and Solomon et al., 1985). Four reservoirs can be identified, including the atmosphere, terrestrial biosphere (usually

75

Progress performance report of clean uses of fossil fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A one-year USDOE/EPSCOR Traineeship Grant, entitled Clean Uses of Fossil Fuels.'' was awarded to the Kentucky EPSCoR Committee in September 1991 and administered through the the DOE/EPSCoR Subcommittee. Ten Traineeships were awarded to doctoral students who are enrolled or accepted into Graduate Programs at either the University of Kentucky or the University of Louisville. The disciplines of these students include Biology, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Geological Sciences, and Physics. The methods used for a statewide proposal solicitation and to award the Traineeships are presented. The review panel and Kentucky DOE/EPSCoR Subcommittee involved in awarding the Traineeships are described. A summary of the proposed research to be performed within these awards is presented, along with a description of the qualifications of the faculty and students who proposed projects. Future efforts to increase participation in Traineeship proposals for the succeeding funding period are outlined.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Progress performance report of clean uses of fossil fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A one-year USDOE/EPSCOR Traineeship Grant, entitled ``Clean Uses of Fossil Fuels.`` was awarded to the Kentucky EPSCoR Committee in September 1991 and administered through the the DOE/EPSCoR Subcommittee. Ten Traineeships were awarded to doctoral students who are enrolled or accepted into Graduate Programs at either the University of Kentucky or the University of Louisville. The disciplines of these students include Biology, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Geological Sciences, and Physics. The methods used for a statewide proposal solicitation and to award the Traineeships are presented. The review panel and Kentucky DOE/EPSCoR Subcommittee involved in awarding the Traineeships are described. A summary of the proposed research to be performed within these awards is presented, along with a description of the qualifications of the faculty and students who proposed projects. Future efforts to increase participation in Traineeship proposals for the succeeding funding period are outlined.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Krakow Clean Fossil Fuels and Energy Efficiency Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Support for Eastern European Democracy (SEED) Act of 1989 directed the US Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake an equipment assessment project aimed at developing the capability within Poland to manufacture or modify industrial-scale combustion equipment to utilize fossil fuels cleanly. The project is being conducted in three phases. In Phase I, testing and analytical activities will establish the current level of emissions from existing equipment and operating practices, and will provide estimates of the costs and emission reductions of various options. Phase II consists of a series of public meetings in both Poland and the United States to present the results of Phase I activities. In Phase III, DOE will issue a solicitation for Polish/US joint ventures to perform commercial feasibility studies for the use of US technology in one or more of the areas under consideration. This report provides interim results from Phase 1.

Butcher, T.; Pierce, B.; Krishna, C.R.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Synergistic energy conversion processes using nuclear energy and fossil fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reviews the methods of producing energy carriers, such as electricity, hydrocarbons and hydrogen, by utilising both nuclear energy and fossil fuels synergistically. There are many possibilities for new, innovative, synergistic processes, which combine chemical and nuclear systems for efficient, clean and economical production of energy carriers. Besides the individual processes by each form of energy to produce the energy carriers, the synergistic processes which use two primary energies to produce the energy carriers will become important with the features of resource saving, CO2 emission reduction and economic production, due to the higher conversion efficiency and low cost of nuclear heat. The synergistic processes will be indispensable to the 21st century, when efficient best-mixed supplies of available primary energies are crucial.

Masao Hori

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Poly(3-Hydroxypropionate): a Promising Alternative to Fossil Fuel-Based Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...compete with fossil fuel-based materials...competitive with fossil fuel-based materials...scaffold for tissue engineering is conceivable...still-growing biodiesel production (61...issue: I. Tissue engineering. Int. J. Biol...glycerol resulting from biodiesel production. Environ...

Björn Andreeßen; Nicolas Taylor; Alexander Steinbüchel

2014-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

80

The Council of Industrial Boiler Owners special project on non-utility fossil fuel ash classification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information is outlined on the Council of Industrial Boiler Owners (CIBO) special project on non-utility fossil fuel ash classification. Data are presented on; current (1996) regulatory status of fossil-fuel combustion wastes; FBC technology identified for further study; CIBO special project methods; Bevill amendment study factors; data collection; and CIBO special project status.

Svendsen, R.L.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water fossil fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2011 Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2011 This paper was prepared in response to recent requests that the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) provide updated summary information regarding fossil fuel production on federal and Indian lands in the United States. It provides EIA's current best estimates of fossil fuels sales from production on federal and Indian lands for fiscal year 2003 through 2011. eia-federallandsales.pdf More Documents & Publications Testimony Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources Before the House Natural Resources Committee Before the Energy and Power Subcommittee - House Energy and Commerce

82

Where do fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions from California go? An analysis based on radiocarbon observations and an atmospheric transport model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ET AL. : FOSSIL FUEL CO 2 TRANSPORT IN CALIFORNIA health,fossil fuel combustion, with consequent impacts to human health [health. [ 45 ] Model predictions indicated that some areas within California had higher near-surface fossil fuel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

The Role of Nuclear Power in Reducing Risk of the Fossil Fuel Prices and Diversity of Electricity Generation in Tunisia: A Portfolio Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Given the global energy trend to substitute fossil fuel, the nuclear power has known an important ... degrees of uncertainties related to nuclear and fossil fuel. The higher uncertainty of fossil fuel prices make...

Mohamed Ben Abdelhamid; Chaker Aloui; Corinne Chaton…

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

FY 2010 Annual Report Office of Fossil Energy Fuel Cell Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FY 2010 Annual Report FY 2010 Annual Report Office of Fossil Energy Fuel Cell Program I. IntroductIon 2 Office of Fossil Energy Fuel Cell Program FY 2010 Annual Report 3 FY 2010 Annual Report Office of Fossil Energy Fuel Cell Program Competitive Innovation: Accelerating Technology Development The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy, through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and in collaboration with private industry, universities and national laboratories, has forged Government-industry partnerships under the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) to reduce the cost of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). This fuel cell technology shall form the basis for integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) systems utilizing coal for clean and efficient

85

Where do fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions from California go? An analysis based on radiocarbon observations and an atmospheric transport model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fossil fuel combustion, with consequent impacts to human health [health. Model predictions indicated that some areas within California had higher near-surface fossil fuel

Riley, W.J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

High Efficiency Direct Carbon and Hydrogen Fuel Cells for Fossil Fuel Power Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen he1 cells have been under development for a number of years and are now nearing commercial applications. Direct carbon fuel cells, heretofore, have not reached practical stages of development because of problems in fuel reactivity and cell configuration. The carbon/air fuel cell reaction (C + O{sub 2} = CO{sub 2}) has the advantage of having a nearly zero entropy change. This allows a theoretical efficiency of 100 % at 700-800 C. The activities of the C fuel and CO{sub 2} product do not change during consumption of the fuel. Consequently, the EMF is invariant; this raises the possibility of 100% fuel utilization in a single pass. (In contrast, the high-temperature hydrogen fuel cell has a theoretical efficiency of and changes in fuel activity limit practical utilizations to 75-85%.) A direct carbon fuel cell is currently being developed that utilizes reactive carbon particulates wetted by a molten carbonate electrolyte. Pure COZ is evolved at the anode and oxygen from air is consumed at the cathode. Electrochemical data is reported here for the carbon/air cell utilizing carbons derived from he1 oil pyrolysis, purified coal, purified bio-char and petroleum coke. At 800 O C, a voltage efficiency of 80% was measured at power densities of 0.5-1 kW/m2. Carbon and hydrogen fuels may be produced simultaneously at lugh efficiency from: (1) natural gas, by thermal decomposition, (2) petroleum, by coking or pyrolysis of distillates, (3) coal, by sequential hydrogasification to methane and thermal pyrolysis of the methane, with recycle of the hydrogen, and (4) biomass, similarly by sequential hydrogenation and thermal pyrolysis. Fuel production data may be combined with direct C and H2 fuel cell operating data for power cycle estimates. Thermal to electric efficiencies indicate 80% HHV [85% LHV] for petroleum, 75.5% HHV [83.4% LHV] for natural gas and 68.3% HHV [70.8% LHV] for lignite coal. Possible benefits of integrated carbon and hydrogen fuel cell power generation cycles are: (1) increased efficiency by a factor of up to 2 over many conventional fossil fuel steam plants, (2) reduced power generation cost, especially for increasing fossil fuel cost, (3) reduced CO2 emission per kWh, and (4) direct sequestration or reuse (e.g., in enhanced oil or NG recovery) of the CO{sub 2} product.

Steinberg, M; Cooper, J F; Cherepy, N

2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

87

INNOVATIVE FOSSIL FUEL FIRED VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY FOR SOIL REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Summary Report summarizes the progress of Phases 3, 3A and 4 of a waste technology Demonstration Project sponsored under a DOE Environmental Management Research and Development Program and administered by the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory-Morgantown (DOE-NETL) for an ''Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation''. The Summary Reports for Phases 1 and 2 of the Program were previously submitted to DOE. The total scope of Phase 3 was to have included the design, construction and demonstration of Vortec's integrated waste pretreatment and vitrification process for the treatment of low level waste (LLW), TSCA/LLW and mixed low-level waste (MLLW). Due to funding limitations and delays in the project resulting from a law suit filed by an environmental activist and the extended time for DOE to complete an Environmental Assessment for the project, the scope of the project was reduced to completing the design, construction and testing of the front end of the process which consists of the Material Handling and Waste Conditioning (MH/C) Subsystem of the vitrification plant. Activities completed under Phases 3A and 4 addressed completion of the engineering, design and documentation of the Material Handling and Conditioning System such that final procurement of the remaining process assemblies can be completed and construction of a Limited Demonstration Project be initiated in the event DOE elects to proceed with the construction and demonstration testing of the MH/C Subsystem.

J. Hnat; L.M. Bartone; M. Pineda

2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

88

Fossil Energy-Developed Fuel Cell Technology Being Adapted by Navy for  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy-Developed Fuel Cell Technology Being Adapted by Navy Energy-Developed Fuel Cell Technology Being Adapted by Navy for Advanced Unmanned Undersea Vehicles Fossil Energy-Developed Fuel Cell Technology Being Adapted by Navy for Advanced Unmanned Undersea Vehicles January 31, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis An unmanned undersea vehicle (UUV) being deployed during a U.S. Office of Naval Research demonstration near Panama City. Solid oxide fuel cell technology being developed by the Office of Fossil Energy for coal-fueled central power generation is being adapted to power UUVs. U.S. Navy photo by Mr. John F. Williams/Released. An unmanned undersea vehicle (UUV) being deployed during a U.S. Office of Naval Research demonstration near Panama City. Solid oxide fuel cell technology being developed by the Office of Fossil Energy for coal-fueled

89

Instructions for CEC-1250E-4 Biomass and Fossil Fuel Usage Report for Biomass Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Instructions for CEC-1250E-4 Biomass and Fossil Fuel Usage Report for Biomass Facilities Biomass energy input basis in the upcoming calendar year? - Please check "yes" or "no." 12. Types of Biomass Fuel Used - Please report the quantity and supplier of the following types of biomass fuel used

90

Letter to the editor The bio-fuel debate and fossil energy use in palm oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Letter to the editor The bio-fuel debate and fossil energy use in palm oil production: a critique-fuels based on palm oil to re- duce greenhouse gas emissions, due account should be taken of carbon emissions fuel use in palm oil pro- duction, making a number of assumptions that I believe to be incorrect

91

Environmental Law and Fossil Fuels: Barriers to Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article is concerned with renewable energy’s too-slow transition and with how existing legal regimes work to preserve fossil energy dominance. It develops from two related claims: that an implicit support structure for fossil energy is written...

Outka, Uma

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

>Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Cement Production, and Gas Flaring for 1995 on a One Degree Grid Cell Basis (NDP-058a) Prepared by Antoinette L. Brenkert Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6290 Date Published: February 1998 (Revised for the Web: 2003) CONTENTS Abstract Documentation file for Data Base NDP-058a (2-1998) Data Base NDP-058a (2-1998) Abstract Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Cement Production, and Gas Flaring for 1995 on a One Degree Grid Cell Basis. (March 1998) Antoinette L. Brenkert DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/ffe.ndp058.2003 This data package presents the gridded (one degree latitude by one degree longitude) summed emissions from fossil-fuel burning, hydraulic cement

93

Large historical changes of fossil-fuel black carbon aerosols T. Novakov,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Hansen,3 T. W. Kirchstetter,1 M. Sato,3 J. E. Sinton,1 and J. A. Sathaye1 Received 26 September 2002, M. Sato, J. E. Sinton, and J. A. Sathaye, Large historical changes of fossil-fuel black carbon

94

Liquid Fossil Fuel Technology. Quarterly technical progress report, July-September 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research activities at BETC are summarized under the headings liquid fossil fuel cycle, extraction (resource assessment, production, enhanced recovery), processing (of liquids such as coal liquids, and crudes, thermodynamics), utilization (energy conversion, combustion), and project integration and technology transfer. (DLC)

Linville, B. (ed.)

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Liquid fossil-fuel technology. Quarterly technical progress report, October-December 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress accomplished for the quarter ending December 1982 is reported for the following research areas: liquid fossil fuel cycle; extraction (technology assessment, gas research, oil research); liquid processing (characterization, thermodynamics, processing technology); utilization; and project integration and technology transfer. (ATT)

Linville, B. (ed.)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Impacts of Renewable Generation on Fossil Fuel Unit Cycling: Costs and Emissions (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prepared for the Clean Energy Regulatory Forum III, this presentation looks at the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study and reexamines the cost and emissions impacts of fossil fuel unit cycling.

Brinkman, G.; Lew, D.; Denholm, P.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

ith fossil-fuel combustion and land-use activities threatening to double  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

W ith fossil-fuel combustion and land- use activities threatening to double atmospheric carbon and now use this model to explore the response of the central Amazonian forest to an increase in biomass

Chambers, Jeff

98

EMGeo: Risk Minimizing Software for Finding Offshore Fossil Fuels by Fluid Identification  

Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

Berkeley Lab researchers Greg Newman and Michael Commer have developed advanced software for discovering and mapping offshore fossil fuel deposits. When combined with established seismic methods, this software makes possible direct imaging of reservoir fluids....

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

99

Fuel from Water: The Photochemical Generation of Hydrogen from Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fuel from Water: The Photochemical Generation of Hydrogen from Water ... Hydrogen can be generated from fossil fuels using well established industrial scale chem.; while this is clearly not green, it can provide the transitional capacity as infrastructure is developed and alternate ways of generating hydrogen using solar, nuclear, hydro, wind, or wave energy come to the fore. ... Our renewed interest in alternative energy has fuelled research in understanding this simplest, in terms of active site organization, of the known hydrogenases over the last two decades. ...

Zhiji Han; Richard Eisenberg

2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

100

INNOVATIVE FOSSIL FUEL FIRED VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY FOR SOIL REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Final Report summarizes the progress of Phases 3,3A and 4 of a waste technology Demonstration Project sponsored under a DOE Environmental Management Research and Development Program and administered by the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory-Morgantown (DOE-NETL) for an ''Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation''. The Summary Reports for Phases 1 and 2 of the Program were previously submitted to DOE. The total scope of Phase 3 was to have included the design, construction and demonstration of Vortec's integrated waste pretreatment and vitrification process for the treatment of low level waste (LLW), TSCA/LLW and mixed low-level waste (MLLW). Due to funding limitations and delays in the project resulting from a law suit filed by an environmental activist and the extended time for DOE to complete an Environmental Assessment for the project, the scope of the project was reduced to completing the design, construction and testing of the front end of the process which consists of the Material Handling and Waste Conditioning (MH/C) Subsystem of the vitrification plant. Activities completed under Phases 3A and 4 addressed completion of the engineering, design and documentation of the MH/C System such that final procurement of the remaining process assemblies can be completed and construction of a Limited Demonstration Project be initiated in the event DOE elects to proceed with the construction and demonstration testing of the MH/C Subsystem. Because of USEPA policies and regulations that do not require treatment of low level or low-level/PCB contaminated wastes, DOE terminated the project because there is no purported need for this technology.

J. Hnat; L.M. Bartone; M. Pineda

2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water fossil fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

METHODOLOGIES FOR REVIEW OF THE HEALTH AND SAFETY ASPECTS OF PROPOSED NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL SITES AND FACILITIES. VOLUME 9 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the health and safety impact of fossil fuel emissions.to public health and safety, of any fossil fuel plant areHEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Health and Safety Aspects of Pro- posed Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil-FuelHEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUELHealth and Safety Impacts of Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil- Fuel

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Evaluation of Innovative Fossil Fuel Power Plants with CO2 Removal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Innovative Fossil Fuel Power Innovative Fossil Fuel Power Plants with CO 2 Removal Technical Report EPRI Project Manager N. A. H. Holt EPRI * 3412 Hillview Avenue, Palo Alto, California 94304 * PO Box 10412, Palo Alto, California 94303 * USA 800.313.3774 * 650.855.2121 * askepri@epri.com * www.epri.com Evaluation of Innovative Fossil Fuel Power Plants with CO 2 Removal 1000316 Interim Report, December 2000 Cosponsors U. S. Department of Energy - Office of Fossil Energy 19901 Germantown Road Germantown, Maryland 20874 U.S. Department of Energy/NETL 626 Cochrans Mill Road PO Box 10940 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15236-0940 DISCLAIMER OF WARRANTIES AND LIMITATION OF LIABILITIES THIS DOCUMENT WAS PREPARED BY THE ORGANIZATION(S) NAMED BELOW AS AN ACCOUNT OF WORK SPONSORED OR COSPONSORED BY THE ELECTRIC POWER RESEARCH

104

METHODOLOGIES FOR REVIEW OF THE HEALTH AND SAFETY ASPECTS OF PROPOSED NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL SITES AND FACILITIES. VOLUME 9 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Fossil-Fuel and Geothermal Power Plants", Lawrenceof fossil-fuel and geothermal power plants. Choosing whatfor solid waste in geothermal power plants is the same as

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

2004 Office of Fossil Energy Fuel Cell Program Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Annual report of fuel cell projects sponsored by Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory.

NETL

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Liquid fossil fuel technology. Quarterly technical progress report, July-September 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The in-house results at Bartlesville Energy Technology Center on the liquid fossil fuel cycle are presented. The cycle covers extraction, processing, utilization, and environmental technology of the liquid fuels derived from petroleum, heavy oils, tar sands, oil shale, and coal.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Fossil fuel producing economies have greater potential for industrial interfuel substitution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study analyzes industrial interfuel substitution in an international context using a large unbalanced panel dataset of 63 countries. We find that compared to other countries fossil fuel producing economies have higher short-term interfuel substitution elasticities. This difference increases further in the long run as fossil fuel producing countries have a considerably longer adjustment of their fuel-using capital stock. These results imply lower economic cost for policies aimed at climate abatement and more efficient utilization of energy resources in energy-intensive economies.

Jevgenijs Steinbuks; Badri G. Narayanan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Integrated capture of fossil fuel gas pollutants including CO.sub.2 with energy recovery  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of reducing pollutants exhausted into the atmosphere from the combustion of fossil fuels. The disclosed process removes nitrogen from air for combustion, separates the solid combustion products from the gases and vapors and can capture the entire vapor/gas stream for sequestration leaving near-zero emissions. The invention produces up to three captured material streams. The first stream is contaminant-laden water containing SO.sub.x, residual NO.sub.x particulates and particulate-bound Hg and other trace contaminants. The second stream can be a low-volume flue gas stream containing N.sub.2 and O.sub.2 if CO2 purification is needed. The final product stream is a mixture comprising predominantly CO.sub.2 with smaller amounts of H.sub.2O, Ar, N.sub.2, O.sub.2, SO.sub.X, NO.sub.X, Hg, and other trace gases.

Ochs, Thomas L. (Albany, OR); Summers, Cathy A. (Albany, OR); Gerdemann, Steve (Albany, OR); Oryshchyn, Danylo B. (Philomath, OR); Turner, Paul (Independence, OR); Patrick, Brian R. (Chicago, IL)

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

109

Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Fuel Ethanol Produced from U.S. Midwest Corn  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Fuel Ethanol Produced from U essential to an informed choice about the corn-to-ethanol cycle are in need of updating, thanks to scientific and technological advances in both corn farming and ethanol production; and (2) generalized

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

110

Global partitioning of NOx sources using satellite observations: Relative roles of fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combustion, biomass burning and soil emissions Lyatt Jaegle´ ,a Linda Steinberger,a Randall V. Martinbc anthropogenic emissions, mostly resulting from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning, are superimposed-CHEM chemical transport model. Top-down NOx sources are partitioned among fuel combustion (fossil fuel

Lyatt Jaeglé

111

Power Gas and Combined Cycles: Clean Power from Fossil Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...gas has such a low heating value that it cannot...from residual fuel oil (the relatively...Oil Residual fuel oil with a low sulfur...stations in Maryland, Connecticut, and New York-has...low-sulfur residual fuel oil is growing and its price is rising. Residual...

William D. Metz

1973-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

112

Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal Buildings and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings OIRA Comparison Document  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Document details the Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal Buildings and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings in an OIRA Comparison Document.

113

Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal Buildings and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Document details Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal Buildings and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings in a Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking.

114

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)-Fossil Fuel CO2  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)-Fossil Fuel CO2 Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)-Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)-Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Agency/Company /Organization: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Sector: Energy, Climate Topics: GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type: Dataset Website: cdiac.ornl.gov/trends/emis/meth_reg.html Country: United States, Canada, Mexico, Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Venezuela, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Belgium, Luxembourg, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Kazakhstan, Lithuania, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Uzbekistan, Iran, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Algeria, Egypt, South Africa, Australia, Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, New Zealand, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand

115

Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2011 March 2012 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced on Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2011 i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or

116

Geographic Patterns of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Burning,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions » Gridded Estimates for Benchmark Years Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions » Gridded Estimates for Benchmark Years Geographic Patterns of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Cement Production, and Gas Flaring on a One Degree by One Degree Grid Cell Basis: 1950 to 1990 (NDP-058) data Data image ASCII Text Documentation PDF file PDF file Contributors R. J. Andres, G. Marland, I. Fung, and E. Matthews (contributors) DOI DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/ffe.ndp058 This data package presents data sets recording 1° latitude by 1° longitude CO2 emissions in units of thousand metric tons of carbon per year from anthropogenic sources for 1950, 1960, 1970, 1980, and 1990. Detailed geographic information on CO2 emissions can be critical in understanding the pattern of the atmospheric and biospheric response to these emissions.

117

renewable sources of power. Demand for fossil fuels surely will overrun supply s  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

renewable sources of power. Demand for fossil fuels surely will overrun supply sooner or later, renewable sources of power. Demand for fossil fuels surely will overrun supply sooner or later, as indeed it already has in the casc of United States domestic oil drilling. Recognition also is growing that our air and land can no longer absorb unlimited quantities of waste from fossil fuel extraction and combustion. As that day draws nearer, policymakers will have no realistic alternative but to turn to sources of power that today make up a viable but small part of America's energy picture. And they will be forced to embrace energy efficiencies - those that are within our reach today, and those that will be developed tomorrow. Precisely when they come lo grips with that reality - this year, 10 years from now, or 20 years from now - will determine bow smooth the transition will be for consumers and industry alike.

118

High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantification of fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions at fine space and time resolution is emerging as a critical need in carbon cycle and climate change research. As atmospheric CO{sub 2} measurements expand with the advent of a dedicated remote sensing platform and denser in situ measurements, the ability to close the carbon budget at spatial scales of {approx}100 km{sup 2} and daily time scales requires fossil fuel CO{sub 2} inventories at commensurate resolution. Additionally, the growing interest in U.S. climate change policy measures are best served by emissions that are tied to the driving processes in space and time. Here we introduce a high resolution data product (the 'Vulcan' inventory: www.purdue.edu/eas/carbon/vulcan/) that has quantified fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions for the contiguous U.S. at spatial scales less than 100 km{sup 2} and temporal scales as small as hours. This data product, completed for the year 2002, includes detail on combustion technology and 48 fuel types through all sectors of the U.S. economy. The Vulcan inventory is built from the decades of local/regional air pollution monitoring and complements these data with census, traffic, and digital road data sets. The Vulcan inventory shows excellent agreement with national-level Department of Energy inventories, despite the different approach taken by the DOE to quantify U.S. fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions. Comparison to the global 1{sup o} x 1{sup o} fossil fuel CO{sub 2} inventory, used widely by the carbon cycle and climate change community prior to the construction of the Vulcan inventory, highlights the space/time biases inherent in the population-based approach.

Gurney, Kevin R.; Mendoza, Daniel L.; Zhou, Yuyu; Fischer, Marc L.; Miller, Chris C.; Geethakumar, Sarath; de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

119

Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Global Stable Carbon Isotopic Signature  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 2 data Data image Documentation Contributors R.J. Andres, T.A. Boden, and G. Marland The 2012 revision of this database contains estimates of the annual, global mean value of δ 13C of CO2 emissions from fossil-fuel consumption and cement manufacture for 1751-2009. These estimates of the carbon isotopic signature account for the changing mix of coal, petroleum, and natural gas being consumed and for the changing mix of petroleum from various producing areas with characteristic isotopic signatures. This time series of global fossil-fuel del 13C signature provides an additional constraint for balancing the sources and sinks of the global carbon cycle and complements the atmospheric δ 13C measurements that are used to partition the uptake of fossil carbon emissions among the ocean, atmosphere, and terrestrial

120

Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Global Stable Carbon Isotopic Signature  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 data Data image Documentation Contributors R.J. Andres, T.A. Boden, and G. Marland The 2013 revision of this database contains estimates of the annual, global mean value of δ 13C of CO2 emissions from fossil-fuel consumption and cement manufacture for 1751-2010. These estimates of the carbon isotopic signature account for the changing mix of coal, petroleum, and natural gas being consumed and for the changing mix of petroleum from various producing areas with characteristic isotopic signatures. This time series of global fossil-fuel del 13C signature provides an additional constraint for balancing the sources and sinks of the global carbon cycle and complements the atmospheric δ 13C measurements that are used to partition the uptake of fossil carbon emissions among the ocean, atmosphere, and terrestrial

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water fossil fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Global Stable Carbon Isotopic Signature  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 data Data image Documentation Contributors R.J. Andres, T.A. Boden, and G. Marland The 2011 revision of this database contains estimates of the annual, global mean value of del 13C of CO2 emissions from fossil-fuel consumption and cement manufacture for 1751-2008. These estimates of the carbon isotopic signature account for the changing mix of coal, petroleum, and natural gas being consumed and for the changing mix of petroleum from various producing areas with characteristic isotopic signatures. This time series of global fossil-fuel del 13C signature provides an additional constraint for balancing the sources and sinks of the global carbon cycle and complements the atmospheric del 13C measurements that are used to partition the uptake of fossil carbon emissions among the ocean, atmosphere, and terrestrial

122

Small Scale SOFC Demonstration Using Bio-Based and Fossil Fuels - Technology Management, Inc.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Small Scale SOFC Demonstration Using Small Scale SOFC Demonstration Using Bio-based and Fossil Fuels-Technology Management, Inc. Background In this congressionally directed project, Technology Management, Inc. (TMI) will develop and demonstrate a residential scale prototype solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system at end-user sites. These small-scale systems would operate continuously on either conventional or renewable biofuels, producing cost effective, uninterruptible

123

Liquid fossil-fuel technology. Quarterly technical progress report, January-March 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights of research activities at Bartlesville Energy Technology Center for the quarter ending March 1982 are summarized. Major research areas are: liquid fossil fuel cycle; extraction (resource assessment and enhanced production); processing (characterization, thermodynamics, processing technology); utilization; and product integration and technology transfer. Special reports include: EOR data base - major new industry tool; properties of crude oils available via telephone hookup; alternative fuels data bank stresses transportation. (ATT)

Linville, B. (ed.)

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Global impact of fossil fuel combustion on atmospheric NOx Larry W. Horowitz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

potential than emissions in the United States to perturb the global oxidizing power of the atmosphere. #12% of NOx concentrations in the lower and middle troposphere throughout the extratropical northern of the ocean. Sources in the United States are found to contribute about half of the fossil fuel NOx over

Jacob, Daniel J.

125

Liquid fossil fuel technology. Quarterly technical progress report, January-March 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bartlesville Energy Technology Center's research activities are summarized under the following headings: liquid fossil fuel cycle; extraction which is subdivided into resource assessment and production; liquid processing which includes characterization of liquids from petroleum, coal, shale and other alternate sources, thermodynamics and process technology; utilization; and project integration and technology transfer. (ATT)

Not Available

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Liquid fossil fuel technology. Quarterly technical progress report, October-December 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights of research activities at BETC during the past quarter are summarized in this document. Major research areas include: liquid fossil fuel cycle, extraction (resource assessment and enhanced production); processing (characterization, thermodynamics, and process technology); utilization; and product integration and technology transfer.

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Liquid fossil-fuel technology. Quarterly technical progress report, April-June 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report primarily covers in-house oil, gas, and synfuel research and lists the contracted research. The report is broken into the following areas: liquid fossil fuel cycle, extraction, processing, utilization, and project integration and technology transfer. BETC publications are listed. (DLC)

Linville, B. (ed.)

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Impacts of Wind and Solar on Fossil-Fueled Generators: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High penetrations of wind and solar power will impact the operations of the remaining generators on the power system. Regional integration studies have shown that wind and solar may cause fossil-fueled generators to cycle on and off and ramp down to part load more frequently and potentially more rapidly. Increased cycling, deeper load following, and rapid ramping may result in wear-and-tear impacts on fossil-fueled generators that lead to increased capital and maintenance costs, increased equivalent forced outage rates, and degraded performance over time. Heat rates and emissions from fossil-fueled generators may be higher during cycling and ramping than during steady-state operation. Many wind and solar integration studies have not taken these increased cost and emissions impacts into account because data have not been available. This analysis considers the cost and emissions impacts of cycling and ramping of fossil-fueled generation to refine assessments of wind and solar impacts on the power system.

Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Agan, D.; Lefton, S.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2013  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimates that total sales of fossil fuels from production1 on federal and Indian lands decreased by 7% during fiscal year 2013. The decrease in production on federal lands alone was also 7%. Sales from production on Indian lands, which account for less than 7% of total federal and Indian lands production, increased by 9%.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Fossil fuel prices, exchange rate, and stock market: A dynamic causality analysis on the European market  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The article investigates causality between fossil fuel prices, exchange rates and the German Stock Index (DAX). The analysis is conducted dynamically with the use of rolling VAR methodology on the basis of weekly data from the period October 2001–June 2012. The results obtained show that the relationship between the variables changed over time depending on the level of volatility in financial markets.

S?awomir ?miech; Monika Papie?

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Fossil Energy Fuel Cell Wayne Surdoval, SECA Coordinator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flow Anode Interconnection Electrolyte Cathode Air flow #12;IAPG, GPPD-DWC 4/30/03 The Vision: Fuel supported · 800 C · Redesigned tubular · Seal-less stack Siemens Westinghouse · Tape calendering · 2­stage · Thermally matched materials · Seal-less stack Cummins- SOFCo ManufacturingDesignTeam #12;IAPG, GPPD-DWC 4

132

Spatial Relationships of Sector-Specific Fossil-fuel CO2 Emissions in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantification of the spatial distribution of sector-specific fossil fuel CO2 emissions provides strategic information to public and private decision-makers on climate change mitigation options and can provide critical constraints to carbon budget studies being performed at the national to urban scales. This study analyzes the spatial distribution and spatial drivers of total and sectoral fossil fuel CO2 emissions at the state and county levels in the United States. The spatial patterns of absolute versus per capita fossil fuel CO2 emissions differ substantially and these differences are sector-specific. Area-based sources such as those in the residential and commercial sectors are driven by a combination of population and surface temperature with per capita emissions largest in the northern latitudes and continental interior. Emission sources associated with large individual manufacturing or electricity producing facilities are heterogeneously distributed in both absolute and per capita metrics. The relationship between surface temperature and sectoral emissions suggests that the increased electricity consumption due to space cooling requirements under a warmer climate may outweigh the savings generated by lessened space heating. Spatial cluster analysis of fossil fuel CO2 emissions confirms that counties with high (low) CO2 emissions tend to be clustered close to other counties with high (low) CO2 emissions and some of the spatial clustering extends to multi-state spatial domains. This is particularly true for the residential and transportation sectors, suggesting that emissions mitigation policy might best be approached from the regional or multi-state perspective. Our findings underscore the potential for geographically focused, sector-specific emissions mitigation strategies and the importance of accurate spatial distribution of emitting sources when combined with atmospheric monitoring via aircraft, satellite and in situ measurements. Keywords: Fossil-fuel; Carbon dioxide emissions; Sectoral; Spatial cluster; Emissions mitigation policy

Zhou, Yuyu; Gurney, Kevin R.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Boiler and steam generator corrosion: Fossil fuel power plants. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning corrosion effects, mechanisms, detection, and inhibition in fossil fuel fired boilers. Fluidized bed combustors and coal gasification are included in the applications. The citations examine hot corrosion, thermal mechanical degradation, and intergranular oxidation corrosion studies performed on the water side and hot gas side of heat exchanger tubes and support structures. Coatings and treatment of material to inhibit corrosion are discussed. Corrosion affecting nuclear powered steam generators is examined in a separate bibliography. (Contains a minimum of 119 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into the fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

135

Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into a fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

136

Environmental impact of fossil fuel combustion in power generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

All the recent developments in the combustion systems employed for power generation have been based on environmental considerations. Combustion modifications have been developed and utilised in order to control NO{sub x} emissions and improvements continue to be made as the legislative requirements tighten. Chemical processes and fuel switching are used to control SO{sub x} emissions. After nitrogen, carbon dioxide is the major gas emitted from the combustion process and its potential potency as a greenhouse gas is well documented. Increased efficiency cycles, mainly based on natural gas as the prime fuel, can minimise the amount of CO{sub x} produced per unit of power generated. As the economics of natural gas utilisation become less favourable a return to clean coal technology based power generation processes may be required.

Allen, J.W.; Beal, P.R. [International Combustion Ltd., Derby (United Kingdom)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

137

Hydrogen milestone could help lower fossil fuel refining costs  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Hydrogen researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory have reached another milestone on the road to reducing carbon emissions and protecting the nation against the effects of peaking world oil production. Stephen Herring, laboratory fellow and technical director of the INL High Temperature Electrolysis team, today announced that the latest fuel cell modification has set a new mark in endurance. The group's Integrated Laboratory Scale experiment has now operated continuously for 2,583 hours at higher efficiencies than previously attained. Learn more about INL research at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

McGraw, Jennifer

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

138

Timing is everything : along the fossil fuel transition pathway.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

People save for retirement throughout their career because it is virtually impossible to save all you'll need in retirement the year before you retire. Similarly, without installing incremental amounts of clean fossil, renewable or transformative energy technologies throughout the coming decades, a radical and immediate change will be near impossible the year before a policy goal is set to be in place. Therefore, our research question is,To meet our desired technical and policy goals, what are the factors that affect the rate we must install technology to achieve these goals in the coming decades?' Existing models do not include full regulatory constraints due to their often complex, and inflexible approaches to solve foroptimal' engineering instead ofrobust' and multidisciplinary solutions. This project outlines the theory and then develops an applied software tool to model the laboratory-to-market transition using the traditional technology readiness level (TRL) framework, but develops subsequent and a novel regulatory readiness level (RRL) and market readiness level (MRL). This tool uses the ideally-suited system dynamics framework to incorporate feedbacks and time delays. Future energy-economic-environment models, regardless of their programming platform, may adapt this software model component framework ormodule' to further vet the likelihood of new or innovative technology moving through the laboratory, regulatory and market space. The prototype analytical framework and tool, called the Technology, Regulatory and Market Readiness Level simulation model (TRMsim) illustrates the interaction between technology research, application, policy and market dynamics as they relate to a new or innovative technology moving from the theoretical stage to full market deployment. The initial results that illustrate the model's capabilities indicate for a hypothetical technology, that increasing the key driver behind each of the TRL, RRL and MRL components individually decreases the time required for the technology to progress through each component by 63, 68 and 64%, respectively. Therefore, under the current working assumptions, to decrease the time it may take for a technology to move from the conceptual stage to full scale market adoption one might consider expending additional effort to secure regulatory approval and reducing the uncertainty of the technology's demand in the marketplace.

Kobos, Peter Holmes; Walker, La Tonya Nicole; Malczynski, Leonard A.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Assessment of a multi-stage underwater vehicle concept using a fossil-fuel Stirling engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Stirling Engine because of its inherent closed-cycle operation can be readily modified to work in an airless environment even if the primary source of energy is a fossil fuel. Thus, Stirling engines are well suited for use in the underwater environment and have been operated successfully in manned military submarines since the early 1980s. In recent years fossil fueled Stirling systems have been also proposed for use in small unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs). However, in this case the need to carry an onboard oxygen supply in a very confined space has presented a number of design difficulties. These are identified in the paper. However, if the oxidant supply to the engine is provided by the membrane extraction of dissolved oxygen from seawater and/or disposable fuel/oxidant pods are used then the UUV Stirling system becomes more attractive. If this latter concept is extended to include multi-stage vehicles then it can be shown that fossil fueled Stirlings could also be put to effective use in long range-long endurance underwater vehicular operations.

Reader, G.T.; Potter, I.J. [Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

140

A Multi-Pollutant Framework for Evaluating CO2 Control Options for Fossil Fuel Power Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Multi-Pollutant Framework for Evaluating CO Multi-Pollutant Framework for Evaluating CO 2 Control Options for Fossil Fuel Power Plants Edward S. Rubin (rubin@cmu.edu; 412-268-5897) Anand B. Rao (abr@andrew.cmu.edu; 412-268-5605) Michael B. Berkenpas (mikeb@cmu.edu; 412-268-1088) Carnegie Mellon University EPP Department, Baker Hall 128A Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Abstract As part of DOE/NETL's Carbon Sequestration Program, we are developing an integrated, multi-pollutant modeling framework to evaluate the costs and performance of alternative carbon capture and sequestration technologies for fossil-fueled power plants. The model calculates emissions, costs, and efficiency on a systematic basis at the level of an individual plant or facility. Both new and existing facilities can be modeled, including coal-based or natural gas-based combustion or gasification systems using air or oxygen.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water fossil fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 May 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced on Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2012 ii This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other federal agencies. May 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced on Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2012 1

142

Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 March 2012 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced on Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2011 i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. March 2012 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced on Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2011 1

143

Progress in Direct Experiments on the Ocean Disposal of Fossil Fuel CO2  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for the First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration, Washington D.C. May 14-17, 2001 for the First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration, Washington D.C. May 14-17, 2001 US DoE-NETL Progress in Direct Experiments on the Ocean Disposal of Fossil Fuel CO 2 Peter G. Brewer (brpe@mbari.org; 831-626-6618) Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute 7700 Sandholdt Road Moss Landing CA 95039 Introduction. My laboratory has now been engaged in carrying out small scale controlled field experiments on the ocean sequestration of fossil fuel CO 2 for about five years, and the field has changed enormously in that time. We have gone from theoretical assessments to experimental results, and from cartoon sketches of imagined outcomes to high-resolution video images of experiments on the ocean floor shared around the world. It seems appropriate therefore to give a brief review, albeit one very much from a

144

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Fossil Fuels --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Fossil Fuels Fossil Fuels Go to Research Groups Preprints Provided by Individual Scientists: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Abu-Khamsin, Sidqi (Sidqi Abu-Khamsin) - Department of Petroleum Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Al-Khattaf, Sulaiman (Sulaiman Al-Khattaf) - Department of Chemical Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Al-Majed, Abdulaziz Abdullah (Abdulaziz Abdullah Al-Majed) - Center for Petroleum and Minerals at the Research Institute & Department of Petroleum Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Ali, Mohammed (Mohammed Ali) - Petroleum Institute (Abu Dhabi) Go back to Individual Researchers Collections: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S

145

September 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Fossil Fuels | OSTI, US Dept of  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Fossil Fuels Fossil Fuels EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL DETERMINATION OF HEAVY OIL VISCOSITY UNDER RESERVOIR CONDITIONS Dr. Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet (2003) 42 Molecular catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and hydrotreating of coal liquids. Yang, Shiyong; Stock, L.M. (1996) 36 Fluid Dynamics in Sucker Rod Pumps Cutler, R.P.; Mansure, A.J. (1999) 35 Controlled low strength materials (CLSM), reported by ACI Committee 229 Rajendran, N. (1997) 35 Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics analysis, advanced simulation technology, and full-scale laboratory investigations Michael S. Bruno (2005) 35 Autothermal Reforming of Natural Gas to Synthesis Gas Steven F. Rice; David P. Mann (2007) 34 Evaluation of Wax Deposition and Its Control During Production of

146

Liquid-fossil-fuel technology. Quarterly technical progress report, July-September 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress reports for the quarter ending September 1982 are presented for the following major tasks: liquid fossil fuel cycle; extraction (resource assessment, enhanced recovery); liquid processing (characterization of petroleum, coal liquids, thermodynamics, process technology); utilization; project integration and technology transfer. Feature articles for this quarter are: new laboratory enhances BETC capability in mass spectrometry; and BETC tests on diesel particulate extracts indicate potential health risks. (ATT)

Linville, B. (ed.)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Liquid fossil fuel technology. Quarterly technical progress rport, April-June 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights of research activities for the quarter ending June 1983 are summarized under the following headings: liquid fossil fuel; extraction; processing; utilization; and project integration and technology transfer. BETC publications are listed. Titles of featured articles are: (1) chemical flooding field test produces 975,000 barrels of oil; (2) chemicals boost recovery in steam-drive tests; (3) North Dakota carbon dioxide minitest successful; (4) carbon dioxide EOR reports issued; and (5) BETC slated for new management and new name. (ATT)

Linville, B. (ed.)

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Carbon nanotube (CNT) gas sensors for emissions from fossil fuel burning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Fossil fuels endow wide applications in industrial, transportation, and power generation sectors. However, smoke released by burning fossil fuels contains toxic gases, which pollutes the environment and severely affects human health. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are potential material for gas sensors due to their high structural porosity and high specific surface area. Defects present on the CNT sidewalls and end caps facilitate adsorption of gas molecules. The chemical procedures adopted to purify and disperse carbon nanotubes create various chemical groups on their surface, which further enhance the adsorption of gas molecules and thus improve the sensitivity of CNTs. Present review focuses on CNT chemiresistive gas sensing mechanisms, which make them suitable for the development of next generation sensor technology. The resistance of carbon nanotubes decreases when oxidizing gas molecules adsorb on their surface, whereas, adsorption of reducing gas molecules results in increasing the resistance of CNTs. Sensing ability of carbon nanotubes for the gases namely, NO, NO2, CO, CO2 and SO2, released on burning of fossil fuels is reviewed. This review provides basic understanding of sensing mechanisms, creation of adsorption sites by chemical processes and charge transfer between adsorbed gas molecules and surface of CNTs. In addition, useful current update on research and development of CNT gas sensors is provided.

M. Mittal; A. Kumar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

A fast method for updating global fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We provide a fast and efficient method for calculating global annual mean carbon dioxide emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels by combining data from an established data set with BP annual statistics. Using this method it is possible to retrieve an updated estimate of global CO2 emissions six months after the actual emissions occurred. Using this data set we find that atmospheric carbon dioxide emissions have increased by over 40% from 1990 to 2008 with an annual average increase of 3.7% over the five-year period 2003?2007. In 2008 the growth rate in the fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions was smaller than in the preceding five years, but it was still over 2%. Global mean carbon dioxide emissions in 2008 were 8.8?GtC? yr?1. For the latter part of the last century emissions of carbon dioxide have been greater from oil than from coal. However during the last few years this situation has changed. The recent strong increase in fossil fuel CO2 emissions is mainly driven by an increase in emissions from coal, whereas emissions from oil and gas to a large degree follow the trend from the 1990s.

G Myhre; K Alterskj?r; D Lowe

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Bioenergy Plants in Indonesia: Sorghum for Producing Bioethanol as an Alternative Energy Substitute of Fossil Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Indonesia's energy demand is increasing every year. Bioenergy plants are expected to be one of the solutions to fill energy demand in Indonesia. Sorghum is a bioenergy plant that can be used in Indonesia for producing bioethanol. Sorghum bioethanol is produced from sorghum biomass waste processing results with fermentation process. Ethanol is derived from fermented sorghum which is about 40-55%. Sorghum bioethanol can be used as an alternative fuel that is renewable and can be used as a substitute for fossil fuels.

Rahayu Suryaningsih; Irhas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Carbon Capture and Storage From Fossil Fuels and Biomass – Costs and Potential Role in Stabilizing the Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The capture and storage of CO2 from combustion of fossil fuels is gaining attraction as a means to deal with climate change. CO2...emissions from biomass conversion processes can also be captured. If that is done...

Christian Azar; Kristian Lindgren; Eric Larson; Kenneth Möllersten

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

State-By-State Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil Fuel Use in the United States 1960–2000  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Time series of fossil fuel carbon emissions from 1960–2000 for each of the U.S. states and the District of Columbia are presented and discussed. Comparison of the nationally summarized results with other natio...

T. J. Blasing; Christine Broniak…

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Effects of aqueous effluents from in situ fossil fuel processing technologies on aquatic systems. Annual progress report, January 1-December 31, 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the third annual progress report for a continuing EPA-DOE jointly funded project to evaluate the effects of aqueous effluents from in situ fossil-fuel processing technologies on aquatic biota. The project is organized into four project tasks: (1) literature review; (2) process water screening; (3) methods development; and (4) recommendations. Our Bibliography of aquatic ecosystem effects, analytical methods and treatment technologies for organic compounds in advanced fossil-fuel processing effluents was submitted to the EPA for publication. The bibliography contains 1314 citations indexed by chemicals, keywords, taxa and authors. We estimate that the second bibliography volume will contain approximately 1500 citations and be completed in February. We compiled results from several laboratories of inorganic characterizations of 19 process waters: 55 simulated in situ oil-shale retort waters; and Hanna-3, Hanna-4B 01W and Lawrence Livermore Hoe Creek underground coal gasification condenser waters. These process waters were then compared to a published summary of the analyses from 18 simulated in situ oil-shale retort waters. We completed this year 96-h flow-through toxicity bioassays with fathead minnows and rainbow trout and 48-h flow-through bioassays with Daphnia pulicaria exposed to 5 oil-shale process waters, 1 tar-sand process water, 2 underground coal gasification condenser waters, 1 post-gasification backflood condenser water, as well as 2 bioassays with fossil-fuel process water constituents. The LC/sub 50/ toxicity values for these respective species when exposed to these waters are given in detail. (LTN)

Bergman, H.L.

1980-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

154

EA-1778: Proposed Rule, 10 CFR 433 and 435, Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of DOE's Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, “Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings” and 10 CFR Part 435, “Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings”.

155

Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Fuel Cells Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) emit approximately the same amount of water per...

156

Presence of estrogenic activity from emission of fossil fuel combustion as detected by a recombinant yeast bioassay  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Estrogenic activities of emission samples generated by fossil fuel combustion were investigated with human estrogen receptor (ER) recombinant yeast bioassay. The results showed that there were weak but clear estrogenic activities in combustion emissions of fossil fuels including coal, petroleum, and diesel. The estrogenic relative potency (RP) of fossil fuel combustion was the highest in petroleum-fired car, followed by coal-fired stove, diesel-fired agrimotor, coal-fired electric power station. On the other hand, the estrogenic relative inductive efficiency (RIE) was the highest in coal-fired stove and coal-fired electric power station, followed by petroleum-fired car and diesel-fired agrimotor. The estrogenic activities in the sub-fractions from chromatographic separation of emitted materials were also determined. The results indicated that different chemical fractions in these complex systems have different estrogenic potencies. The GC/MS analysis of the emission showed that there were many aromatic carbonyls, big molecular alcohol, \\{PAHs\\} and derivatives, and substituted phenolic compounds and derivatives which have been reported as environmental estrogens. The existence of estrogenic substances in fossil fuel combustion demands further investigation of their potential adverse effects on human and on the ecosystem. The magnitude of pollution due to global usage of fossil fuels makes it imperative to understand the issue of fossil fuel-derived endocrine activities and the associated health risks, particularly the aggregated risks stemmed from exposure to toxicants of multiple sources.

Jingxian Wang; Wenzhong Wu; Bernhard Henkelmann; Li You; Antonius Kettrup; Karl-Werner Schramm

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUELHealth and Safety Impacts of Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil- FuelHealth and Safety Aspects of Pro- posed Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil-Fuel

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUELHealth and Safety Impacts of Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil- FuelHealth and Safety Aspects of Pro- posed Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil-Fuel

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

A technical and environmental comparison between hydrogen and some fossil fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The exploitation of some fossil fuels such as oil, intended as gasoline or diesel fuel, natural gas and coal, currently satisfy the majority of the growing world energy demand, but they are destined to run out relatively quickly. Beyond this point, their combustion products are the main cause of some global problems such as the greenhouse effect, the hole in the ozone layer, acid rains and generalized environment pollution, so their impact is extremely harmful. Therefore, it is clear that a solution to the energy problem can be obtained only through the use of renewable sources and by means of the exploitation of new low-polluting fuels. In this scenario an important role might be played by hydrogen, which is able to define a new energy system that is more sustainable and cleaner than current systems. For the comparison of the different fuels investigated in this paper, a methodology, which defines appropriate technical and environmental quality indexes, has been developed. These indexes are connected to the pollution produced by combustion reactions and to their intrinsic characteristics of flammability and expansiveness linked to the use of the considered fuels. An appropriate combination of these indexes, in the specific sector of utilization, allows to evaluate a global environmental index for the investigated fuels, highlighting that hydrogen reaches the highest score. In the final part of the paper, a new hydrogen energy economy that would lead to solving the serious environmental problems that damages all the ecosystems of the planet earth, is presented.

Giovanni Nicoletti; Natale Arcuri; Gerardo Nicoletti; Roberto Bruno

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Historic patterns of CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil fuels: Implications for stabilization of emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the historical record of greenhouse gas emissions since 1950, reviews the prospects for emissions into the future, and projects what would be the short-term outcome if the stated targets of the FCCC were in fact achieved. The examination focuses on the most important of the greenhouse gases, CO{sub 2}. The extensive record of historic CO{sub 2} emissions is explored to ascertain if it is an adequate basis for useful extrapolation into the near future. Global carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel consumption have been documented. Emissions grew at 4.3% per year from 1950 until the time of the 1973 oil crisis. Another disruption in growth followed the oil price increases of 1979. Global total emissions have been increasing steadily since the 1982-1983 minimum and have grown by more than 20% since then. At present, emission Of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel burning is dominated by a few countries: the U.S., the former Soviet Union, China, the developed countries of Europe and Japan. Only 20 countries emit 84% of emissions from all countries. However, rates of growth in many of the developed countries are now very low. In contrast, energy use has grown rapidly over the last 20 years in some of the large, developing economies. Emissions from fossil fuel consumption are now nearly 4 times those from land use change and are the primary cause of measured increases in the atmospheric concentration of CO{sub 2}. The increasing concentration of atmospheric CO{sub 2} has led to rising concern about the possibility of impending changes in the global climate system. In an effort to limit or mitigate potential negative effects of global climate change, 154 countries signed the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC) in Rio de Janeiro in June, 1992. The FCCC asks all countries to conduct an inventory of their current greenhouse gas emissions setting non-binding targets.

Andres, R.J.; Marland, G.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water fossil fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Historic Patterns of CO{sub 2} Emissions from Fossil Fuels: Implications for Stabilization of Emissions  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

This paper examines the historical record of greenhouse gas emissions since 1950, reviews the prospects for emissions into the future, and projects what would be the short-term outcome if the stated targets of the FCCC were in fact achieved. The examination focuses on the most important of the greenhouse gases, CO{sub 2}. The extensive record of historic CO{sub 2} emissions is explored to ascertain if it is an adequate basis for useful extrapolation into the near future. Global carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel consumption have been documented. Emissions grew at 4.3% per year from 1950 until the time of the 1973 oil crisis. Another disruption in growth followed the oil price increases of 1979. Global total emissions have been increasing steadily since the 1982-1983 minimum and have grown by more than 20% since then. At present, emission Of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel burning is dominated by a few countries: the U.S., the former Soviet Union, China, the developed countries of Europe and Japan. Only 20 countries emit 84% of emissions from all countries. However, rates of growth in many of the developed countries are now very low. In contrast, energy use has grown rapidly over the last 20 years in some of the large, developing economies. Emissions from fossil fuel consumption are now nearly 4 times those from land use change and are the primary cause of measured increases in the atmospheric concentration of CO{sub 2}. The increasing concentration of atmospheric CO{sub 2} has led to rising concern about the possibility of impending changes in the global climate system. In an effort to limit or mitigate potential negative effects of global climate change, 154 countries signed the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC) in Rio de Janeiro in June, 1992. The FCCC asks all countries to conduct an inventory of their current greenhouse gas emissions setting non-binding targets.

Andres, R. J.; Marland, G.

1994-06-00T23:59:59.000Z

162

Assessing GHG Emissions, Ecological Footprint, and Water Linkage for Different Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Assessing GHG Emissions, Ecological Footprint, and Water Linkage for Different Fuels ... Currently, transport is highly dependent on fossil fuels and responsible for about 23% of world energy-related GHG (greenhouse gas) emissions. ... Ethanol from sugar cane and corn emerges as an alternative for gasoline in order to mitigate GHG emissions. ...

Mauro F. Chavez-Rodriguez; Silvia A. Nebra

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

163

Liquid fossil fuel technology. Quarterly technical progress report, July-September 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress accomplished during the quarter ending September 1981 is reported under the following headings: liquid fossil fuel cycle; extraction (reservoir characterization and evaluation, recovery projects, reservoir access, extraction technology, recovery processes and process implementation); liquid processing (characterization, thermodynamics, and process technology); utilization (energy conversion - adaptive engineering, combustion systems assessment, and heat engines/heat recovery); and project integration and technology transfer. Special reports include: air drilling research; fluid injection in reservoirs; target reservoirs in Permian Basin suitable for CO/sub 2/ flooding; heavy oil technology; and the fate of used motor oil/results of a survey.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Report Title: The Fossil Fuel Industry in New Mexico: A Comprehensive Impact Analysis Type of Report: Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuels 33 Summary Impacts 40 Works Cited 45 #12;3 List of Tables Table Title Page 1 Tax and Income Data0 Report Title: The Fossil Fuel Industry in New Mexico: A Comprehensive Impact Analysis Type AWARD Number: DE-NT0004397 Name and Address of Submitting Organization: Arrowhead Center New Mexico

Johnson, Eric E.

165

Liquid fossil fuel technology. Quarterly technical progress report, January-March 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights of the BETC January-March 1980 quarter were: Gasohol was tested in a cooperative effort with Southwestern Bell Telephone Co. Two fleets of 55 cars were tested using gasohol in one and gasoline in the other. No problems were encountered. The gasohol-fueled cars had less emissions, and the fuel efficiencies for both fleets were approximately the same. An in situ combustion has been successfully started in a heavy oil deposit in Kansas. After some difficulties in starting the burn, it is now operating satisfactorily and producing oil. Cooperation between DOE and the Venezuelan oil industry was explored in a meeting at BETC that emphasized efforts to produce heavy oil. Cooperation through the International Energy Agency is expected to result in sharing of technology on enhanced oil recovery. Petroleum product surveys are produced cooperatively by DOE and the American Petroleum Institute. They give the properties of the products currently being marketed in the US. During the quarter, surveys on Motor Gasolines, Summer 1979 and Diesel Fuel Oils, 1979 were published. They are used to trace changes in characteristics and also to set specifications. The size of colloids, micelles, and emulsions in petroleum and associated liquids can be a factor in the design of improved recovery processes. The use of small angle x-ray scattering has been facilitated by a new method of calculation. The development of the Liquid Fossil Fuel Cycle has been facilitated by a workshop and further discussions resulting in a new statement Planning Framework for Liquid Fossil Fuel Cycle, March 1, 1980. This has now been used to prepare a computer-processible form to use in a critical path study of the BETC program.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Turing Water into Hydrogen Fuel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Turning Water into Turning Water into Hydrogen Fuel Turning Water into Hydrogen Fuel New method creates highly reactive catalytic surface, packed with hydroxyl species May 15, 2012 | Tags: Franklin, Materials Science NERSC Contact: Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 PNNL Contacts: Loel Kathmann, Loel.Kathmann@pnnl.gov, +1 509 371 6068 Artwork from this catalysis research graced the cover of Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics. Image reproduced by permission of Dr Igor Lyubinetsky and the PCCP Owner Societies from Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2012. Build a surface of titanium and oxygen atoms arranged just so, coat with water, and add sunshine. What do you get? In theory, energy-rich hydrogen produced by photolysis-a process by which water molecules placed on a catalytic surface and exposed to sunlight (electromagnetic radiation) are

167

A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nuclear tors. for of of These studies can examine safety systems or safety research programsnuclear power plants, and at risk. to reduce population The Light-water Reactor Safety Research Program

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Policy Choice:Forest or Fuel? The demand for biofuels, driven by the desire to reduce fossil fuel use and CO2 emissions, has resulted in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Policy Choice:Forest or Fuel? The demand for biofuels, driven by the desire to reduce fossil fuel, combined with the expanded demand for biofuels, will result in higher food prices, since less land by using biofuels (vegetable oils). But the use of biofuels may not reduce CO2 emissions, even when

169

Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) emit approximately the same amount of water per mile as vehicles...

170

Development of high temperature air combustion technology in pulverized fossil fuel fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High temperature air combustion (HTAC) is a promising technology for energy saving, flame stability enhancement and NOx emission reduction. In a conventional HTAC system, the combustion air is highly preheated by using the recuperative or regenerative heat exchangers. However, such a preheating process is difficult to implement for pulverized fossil fuel fired boilers. In this paper, an alternative approach is proposed. In the proposed HTAC system, a special burner, named PRP burner is introduced to fulfill the preheating process. The PRP burner has a preheating chamber with one end connected with the primary air and the other end opened to the furnace. Inside the chamber, gas recirculation is effectively established such that hot flue gases in the furnace can be introduced. Combustible mixture instead of combustion air is highly preheated by the PRP burner. A series of experiments have been conducted in an industrial scale test facility, burning low volatile petroleum coke and an anthracite coal. Stable combustion was established for burning pure petroleum coke and anthracite coal, respectively. Inside the preheating chamber, the combustible mixture was rapidly heated up to a high temperature level close to that of the hot secondary air used in the conventional HTAC system. The rapid heating of the combustible mixture in the chamber facilitates pyrolysis, volatile matter release processes for the fuel particles, suppressing ignition delay and enhancing combustion stability. Moreover, compared with the results measured in the same facility but with a conventional low NOx burner, NOx concentration at the furnace exit was at the same level when petroleum coke was burnt and 50% less when anthracite was burnt. Practicability of the HTAC technology using the proposed approach was confirmed for efficiently and cleanly burning fossil fuels. 16 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Hai Zhang; Guangxi Yue; Junfu Lu; Zhen Jia; Jiangxiong Mao; Toshiro Fujimori; Toshiyuki Suko; Takashi Kiga [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China). Department of Thermal Engineering

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

In situ PEM fuel cell water measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efficient PEM fuel cell performance requires effective water management. The materials used, their durability, and the operating conditions under which fuel cells run, make efficient water management within a practical fuel cell system a primary challenge in developing commercially viable systems. We present experimental measurements of water content within operating fuel cells. in response to operational conditions, including transients and freezing conditions. To help understand the effect of components and operations, we examine water transport in operating fuel cells, measure the fuel cell water in situ and model the water transport within the fuel cell. High Frequency Resistance (HFR), AC Impedance and Neutron imaging (using NIST's facilities) were used to measure water content in operating fuel cells with various conditions, including current density, relative humidity, inlet flows, flow orientation and variable GDL properties. Ice formation in freezing cells was also monitored both during operation and shut-down conditions.

Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Davey, John R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spendalow, Jacob S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUELHEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUELHealth and Safety Impacts of Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil- Fuel

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

A REVIEW OF AIR QUALITY MODELING TECHNIQUES. VOLUME 8 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUELHEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUELHealth and Safety Impacts of Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil- Fuel

Rosen, L.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Modelling and forecasting fossil fuels, CO2 and electricity prices and their volatilities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the current uncertain context that affects both the world economy and the energy sector, with the rapid increase in the prices of oil and gas and the very unstable political situation that affects some of the largest raw materials’ producers, there is a need for developing efficient and powerful quantitative tools that allow to model and forecast fossil fuel prices, CO2 emission allowances prices as well as electricity prices. This will improve decision making for all the agents involved in energy issues. Although there are papers focused on modelling fossil fuel prices, CO2 prices and electricity prices, the literature is scarce on attempts to consider all of them together. This paper focuses on both building a multivariate model for the aforementioned prices and comparing its results with those of univariate ones, in terms of prediction accuracy (univariate and multivariate models are compared for a large span of days, all in the first 4 months in 2011) as well as extracting common features in the volatilities of the prices of all these relevant magnitudes. The common features in volatility are extracted by means of a conditionally heteroskedastic dynamic factor model which allows to solve the curse of dimensionality problem that commonly arises when estimating multivariate GARCH models. Additionally, the common volatility factors obtained are useful for improving the forecasting intervals and have a nice economical interpretation. Besides, the results obtained and methodology proposed can be useful as a starting point for risk management or portfolio optimization under uncertainty in the current context of energy markets.

Carolina García-Martos; Julio Rodríguez; María Jesús Sánchez

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Quantification of fossil fuel CO2 emissions at the building/street scale for a large US city  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to advance the scientific understanding of carbon exchange with the land surface, build an effective carbon monitoring system and contribute to quantitatively-based U.S. climate change policy interests, fine spatial and temporal quantification of fossil fuel CO2 emissions, the primary greenhouse gas, is essential. Called the ‘Hestia Project’, this research effort is the first to use bottom-up methods to quantify all fossil fuel CO2 emissions down to the scale of individual buildings, road segments, and industrial/electricity production facilities on an hourly basis for an entire urban landscape. a large city (Indianapolis, Indiana USA). Here, we describe the methods used to quantify the on-site fossil fuel CO2 emissions across the city of Indianapolis, Indiana. This effort combines a series of datasets and simulation tools such as a building energy simulation model, traffic data, power production reporting and local air pollution reporting. The system is general enough to be applied to any large U.S. city and holds tremendous potential as a key component of a carbon monitoring system in addition to enabling efficient greenhouse gas mitigation and planning. We compare our estimate of fossil fuel emissions from natural gas to consumption data provided by the local gas utility. At the zip code level, we achieve a bias adjusted pearson r correlation value of 0.92 (p<0.001).

Gurney, Kevin R.; Razlivanov, I.; Song, Yang; Zhou, Yuyu; Benes, Bedrich; Abdul- Massih, Michel

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Boiler and steam generator corrosion: Fossil-fuel power plants. March 1977-December 1989 (A Bibliography from the NTIS data base). Report for March 1977-December 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography contains citations concerning corrosion effects, mechanisms, detection, and inhibition in fossil fuel fired boilers. Fluidized bed combustors and coal gasification are included in the applications. Hot corrosion, thermal mechanical degradation, and intergranular oxidation corrosion studies performed on the water side and hot gas side of heat exchanger tubes and support structures are presented. Coatings and treatment of material to inhibit corrosion are discussed. Corrosion affecting nuclear powered steam generators is examined in a separate bibliography. (Contains 88 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

Not Available

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

A synthesis of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel combustion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

basis (e.g. , to remove bunker fuels, cement production,+ imports ?exports ? bunkers ? non ? fuel uses ? stockMarland and Rotty, 1984). Bunker fuels are fuels used in

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Separation of particulate from flue gas of fossil fuel combustion and gasification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The gas from combustion or gasification of fossil fuel contains flyash and other particulate. The flyash is separated from the gas in a plurality of standleg moving granular-bed filter modules. Each module includes a dipleg through which the bed media flows into the standleg. The bed media forms a first filter bed having an upper mass having a first frusto-conical surface in a frusto-conical member at the entrance to the standleg and a lower mass having a second frusto-conical surface of substantially greater area than the first surface after it passes through the standleg. A second filter media bed may be formed above the first filter media bed. The gas is fed tangentially into the module above the first surface. The flyash is captured on the first frusto-conical surface and within the bed mass. The processed gas flows out through the second frusto-conical surface and then through the second filter bed, if present. The bed media is cleaned of the captured flyash and recirculated to the moving granular bed filter. Alternatively, the bed media may be composed of the ash from the combustion which is pelletized to form agglomerates. The ash flows through the bed only once; it is not recycled.

Yang, Wen-Ching (Murrysville, PA); Newby, Richard A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Lippert, Thomas E. (Murrysville, PA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Separation of particulate from flue gas of fossil fuel combustion and gasification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The gas from combustion or gasification of fossil fuel contains fly ash and other particulates. The fly ash is separated from the gas in a plurality of standleg moving granular-bed filter modules. Each module includes a dipleg through which the bed media flows into the standleg. The bed media forms a first filter bed having an upper mass having a first frusto-conical surface in a frusto-conical member at the entrance to the standleg and a lower mass having a second frusto-conical surface of substantially greater area than the first surface after it passes through the standleg. A second filter media bed may be formed above the first filter media bed. The gas is fed tangentially into the module above the first surface. The fly ash is captured on the first frusto-conical surface and within the bed mass. The processed gas flows out through the second frusto-conical surface and then through the second filter bed, if present. The bed media is cleaned of the captured fly ash and recirculated to the moving granular bed filter. Alternatively, the bed media may be composed of the ash from the combustion which is pelletized to form agglomerates. The ash flows through the bed only once; it is not recycled. 11 figs.

Yang, W.C.; Newby, R.A.; Lippert, T.E.

1997-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

180

Liquid fossil fuel technology. Quarterly technical progress report, October-December 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress reports are presented for the following major areas of investigation: liquid fossil fuel cycle; extraction (resource assessment, enhanced recovery); liquid processing (characterization of petroleum and synthetic crude, thermodynamics; process technology); utilization; project integration and technology transfer. Highlights for this period in research studies are listed as those in extraction research and processing and thermodynamics research. Searches for microorganisms that will be useful in enhanced oil recovery have produced two promising leads. At Oklahoma State University, bacteria of the genus Clostridia have been found which can live in a brine solution as found in most petroleum reservoirs. These bacteria produce carbon dioxide, acetic acid, alcohols, and ketones as metabolic products. At the University of Georgia, a culture of bacteria has been found which will reduce the viscosity of a 10/sup 0/ API gravity oil by 95 percent. The analysis of heavy oils requires differentiation of sulfur, nitrogen, and oxygen-containing compounds from hydrocarbons. The most effective way to do this is with a high-resolution mass spectrometer that can distinguish between compounds having molecular weights only a fractional unit apart. These molecular weights are calculated from the computer acquired time-moments of the various ions in a mass spectrum. Thus, the accuracy of results reflects, in part, the numerical methods used in data processing. Consequently, the effect of the mathematical functions on the accuracy of mass measurement is being determined.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water fossil fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Central to any study of climate change is the development of an emission inventory that identifies and quantifies the State's primary anthropogenic sources and sinks of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion accounted for 80 percent of California GHG emissions (CARB, 2007a). Even though these CO2 emissions are well characterized in the existing state inventory, there still exist significant sources of uncertainties regarding their accuracy. This report evaluates the CO2 emissions accounting based on the California Energy Balance database (CALEB) developed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in terms of what improvements are needed and where uncertainties lie. The estimated uncertainty for total CO2 emissions ranges between -21 and +37 million metric tons (Mt), or -6percent and +11percent of total CO2 emissions. The report also identifies where improvements are needed for the upcoming updates of CALEB. However, it is worth noting that the California Air Resources Board (CARB) GHG inventory did not use CALEB data for all combustion estimates. Therefore the range in uncertainty estimated in this report does not apply to the CARB's GHG inventory. As much as possible, additional data sources used by CARB in the development of its GHG inventory are summarized in this report for consideration in future updates to CALEB.

de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Wenzel, Tom; Price, Lynn

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

182

Innovative fossil fuel fired vitrification technology for soil remediation. Phase 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vortec has successfully completed Phase 1 of the ``Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation`` program. The Combustion and Melting System (CMS) has processed 7000 pounds of material representative of contaminated soil that is found at DOE sites. The soil was spiked with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals surrogates, an organic contaminant, and a surrogate radionuclide. The samples taken during the tests confirmed that virtually all of the radionuclide was retained in the glass and that it did not leach to the environment-as confirmed by both ANS 16.1 and Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) testing. The organic contaminant, anthracene, was destroyed during the test with a Destruction and Removal Efficiency (DRE) of at least 99.99%. RCRA metal surrogates, that were in the vitrified product, were retained and did not leach to the environment as confirmed by the TCLP testing. Semi-volatile RCRA metal surrogates were captured by the Air Pollution Control (APC) system, and data on the amount of metal oxide particulate and the chemical composition of the particulate were established for use in the Phase 2 APC subsystem design.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Quantification of Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions on the Building/Street Scale for a Large U.S. City  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to advance the scientific understanding of carbon exchange with the land surface, build an effective carbon monitoring system, and contribute to quantitatively based U.S. climate change policy interests, fine spatial and temporal quantification of fossil fuel CO2 emissions, the primary greenhouse gas, is essential. ... Ammonia (NH3) is a key precursor species to atmospheric fine particulate matter with strong implications for regional air quality and global climate change. ...

Kevin R. Gurney; Igor Razlivanov; Yang Song; Yuyu Zhou; Bedrich Benes; Michel Abdul-Massih

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

184

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

various data sets, estimates of bunker fuel consumption forvarious data sets, estimates of bunker fuel consumption foras international marine bunker fuel. For the remaining 5% of

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as international marine bunker fuel. For the remaining 5% ofOf the distillate fuel consumed by all marine vessels, weresidual fuel oil from international marine travel. However,

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Indoor air pollution and the health of children in biomass- and fossil-fuel users of Bangladesh: situation in two different seasons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We conducted a cross-sectional study among biomass- (n = 42) and fossil-fuel (n...= 66) users having children Health-related information of one child from each...2),...

Md. Khalequzzaman; Michihiro Kamijima…

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

General Assembly Meeting: October 6th, 2013 Keywords: Labor/USLAC and Sun Services, divestment from fossil fuels, grading mode changes,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fossil fuels, grading mode changes, winter session ("JTerm"). Agenda: Opening of the Meeting: Meeting. Claire Marshall: there are health codes that prevent students from cleaning up toilets and other areas

Royer, Dana

188

On the environmental, economic and budgetary impacts of fossil fuel prices: A dynamic general equilibrium analysis of the Portuguese case  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper examines the influence of fossil fuel prices on carbon dioxide emissions, economic activity, and the public sector account in Portugal. It uses a dynamic general equilibrium model which highlights the mechanisms of endogenous growth and includes a detailed modeling of the public sector. Fuel price scenarios are based on forecasts by the US Department of Energy (DOE-US), the International Energy Agency (IEA-OECD) and IHS Global Insight Inc. The differences in relative fuel prices among the three scenarios lead to substantially different environmental impacts. Higher fuel prices in the DOE-US scenario lead to a 10.2% reduction in the policy effort required to meet the EU 2020 emission targets, while relative price changes in the IEA-OECD scenario result in a 19.2% increase in the required policy effort and decreasing fuel prices increase the emissions deficit by 95.9% under the IHS scenario. In terms of the long term economic impacts, our results suggest a 2.2% reduction in GDP in the DOE-US scenario and 1.9% in the IEA-OECD scenario and an increase of 1.4% in the IHS scenario. As to the budgetary impact, higher fuel prices lead to lower tax revenues, which, coupled with a reduction in public spending translates to lower public deficits. From a methodological perspective, our results highlight the importance of the mechanisms of endogenous growth. A scenario of higher fuel prices would, under exogenous economic growth assumptions, result in larger baseline emissions growth, substantially smaller economic effects, and rather different budgetary effects. From a policy perspective, our results highlight the importance of fossil fuel prices in defining the level of policy intervention required for compliance with international and domestic climate change legislation.

Alfredo M. Pereira; Rui M. Pereira

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Table 11.6 Installed Nameplate Capacity of Fossil-Fuel Steam-Electric Generators With Environmental Equipment, 1985-2010 (Megawatts)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Installed Nameplate Capacity of Fossil-Fuel Steam-Electric Generators With Environmental Equipment," Installed Nameplate Capacity of Fossil-Fuel Steam-Electric Generators With Environmental Equipment," " 1985-2010 (Megawatts)" "Year","Coal",,,,"Petroleum and Natural Gas",,,,"Total 1" ,,,"Flue Gas","Total 2",,,"Flue Gas","Total 2",,,"Flue Gas","Total 2" ,"Particulate","Cooling","Desulfurization",,"Particulate","Cooling","Desulfurization",,"Particulate","Cooling","Desulfurization" ,"Collectors","Towers","(Scrubbers)",,"Collectors","Towers","(Scrubbers)",,"Collectors","Towers","(Scrubbers)"

190

Partial replacement of fossil fuel in a cement plant: Risk assessment for the population living in the neighborhood  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In cement plants, the substitution of traditional fossil fuels not only allows a reduction of CO2, but it also means to check-out residual materials, such as sewage sludge or municipal solid wastes (MSW), which should otherwise be disposed somehow/somewhere. In recent months, a cement plant placed in Alcanar (Catalonia, Spain) has been conducting tests to replace fossil fuel by refuse-derived fuel (RDF) from MSW. In July 2009, an operational test was progressively initiated by reaching a maximum of partial substitution of 20% of the required energy. In order to study the influence of the new process, environmental monitoring surveys were performed before and after the RDF implementation. Metals and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) were analyzed in soil, herbage, and air samples collected around the facility. In soils, significant decreases of PCDD/F levels, as well as in some metal concentrations were found, while no significant increases in the concentrations of these pollutants were observed. In turn, PM10 levels remained constant, with a value of 16 ?g m? 3. In both surveys, the carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic risks derived from exposure to metals and PCDD/Fs for the population living in the vicinity of the facility were within the ranges considered as acceptable according to national and international standards. This means that RDF may be a successful choice in front of classical fossil fuels, being in accordance with the new EU environmental policies, which entail the reduction of CO2 emissions and the energetic valorization of MSW. However, further long-term environmental studies are necessary to corroborate the harmlessness of RDF, in terms of human health risks.

Joaquim Rovira; Montse Mari; Martí Nadal; Marta Schuhmacher; José L. Domingo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of residual fuel oil are identical in the inventory and inCARB SEDS inventory fuel use Residual fuel oil Distillatein their oil and gas extraction processes. In its inventory,

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Analysis of possible future atmospheric retention of fossil fuel CO/sub 2/  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report investigates the likely rates and the potential range of future CO/sub 2/ emissions, combined with knowledge of the global cycle of carbon, to estimate a possible range of future atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentrations through the year 2075. Historic fossil fuel usage to the present, growing at a rate of 4.5% per year until 1973 and at a slower rate of 1.9% after 1973, was combined with three scenarios of projected emissions growth ranging from approximately 0.2 to 2.8% per year to provide annual CO/sub 2/ emissions data for two different carbon cycle models. The emissions scenarios were constructed using an energy-economic model and by varying key parameters within the bounds of currently expected future values. The extreme values for CO/sub 2/ emissions in the year 2075 are 6.8 x 10/sup 15/ and 91 x 10/sup 15/ g C year/sup -1/. Carbon cycle model simulations used a range of year - 1800 preindustrial atmospheric concentrations of 245 to 292 ppM CO/sub 2/ and three scenarios of bioshere conversion as additional atmospheric CO/sub 2/ source terms. These simulations yield a range of possible atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentrations in year 2075 of approximately 500 to 1500 ppM, with a median of about 700 ppM. The time at which atmospheric CO/sub 2/ would potentially double from the preindustrial level ranges from year 2025 to >2075. The practical, programmatic value of this forecast exercise is that it forces quantitative definition of the assumptions, and the uncertainties therein, which form the basis of our understanding of the natural biogeochemical cycle of carbon and both historic and future human influences on the dynamics of the global cycle. Assumptions about the possible range of future atmospheric CO/sub 2/ levels provide a basis on which to evaluate the implications of these changes on climate and the biosphere. 44 references, 17 figures, 21 tables.

Edmonds, J.A.; Reilly, J.; Trabalka, J.R.; Reichle, D.E.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Summary of research on hydrogen production from fossil fuels conducted at NETL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this presentation we will summarize the work performed at NETL on the production of hydrogen via partial oxidation/dry reforming of methane and catalytic decomposition of hydrogen sulfide. We have determined that high pressure resulted in greater carbon formation on the reforming catalysts, lower methane and CO2 conversions, as well as a H2/CO ratio. The results also showed that Rh/alumina catalyst is the most resistant toward carbon deposition both at lower and at higher pressures. We studied the catalytic partial oxidation of methane over Ni-MgO solid solutions supported on metal foams and the results showed that the foam-supported catalysts reach near-equilibrium conversions of methane and H2/CO selectivities. The rates of carbon deposition differ greatly among the catalysts, varying from 0.24 mg C/g cat h for the dipped foams to 7.0 mg C/g cat h for the powder-coated foams, suggesting that the exposed Cr on all of the foam samples may interact with the Ni-MgO catalyst to kinetically limit carbon formation. Effects of sulfur poisoning on reforming catalysts were studies and pulse sulfidation of catalyst appeared to be reversible for some of the catalysts but not for all. Under pulse sulfidation conditions, the 0.5%Rh/alumina and NiMg2Ox-1100ºC (solid solution) catalysts were fully regenerated after reduction with hydrogen. Rh catalyst showed the best overall activity, less carbon deposition, both fresh and when it was exposed to pulses of H2S. Sulfidation under steady state conditions significantly reduced catalyst activity. Decomposition of hydrogen sulfide into hydrogen and sulfur was studied over several supported metal oxides and metal oxide catalysts at a temperature range of 650-850°C. H2S conversions and effective activation energies were estimated using Arrhenius plots. The results of these studies will further our understanding of catalytic reactions and may help in developing better and robust catalysts for the production of hydrogen from fossil fuels

Shamsi, Abolghasem

2008-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

194

Water injected fuel cell system compressor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel cell system including a dry compressor for pressurizing air supplied to the cathode side of the fuel cell. An injector sprays a controlled amount of water on to the compressor's rotor(s) to improve the energy efficiency of the compressor. The amount of water sprayed out the rotor(s) is controlled relative to the mass flow rate of air inputted to the compressor.

Siepierski, James S. (Williamsville, NY); Moore, Barbara S. (Victor, NY); Hoch, Martin Monroe (Webster, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Water Electrolysis Working Group  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water Electrolysis Water Electrolysis Working Group to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Water Electrolysis Working Group on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Water Electrolysis Working Group on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Water Electrolysis Working Group on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Water Electrolysis Working Group on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Water Electrolysis Working Group on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Water Electrolysis Working Group on AddThis.com... Key Activities Plans, Implementation, & Results Accomplishments Organization Chart & Contacts Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation

196

Microsoft Word - Emerging Issues for Fossil Energy and Water--062706 FINAL NO Tracked Changes.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

06 06 Emerging Issues for Fossil Energy and Water DOE/NETL-2006/1233 Investigation of Water Issues Related to Coal Mining, Coal to Liquids, Oil Shale, and Carbon Capture and Sequestration Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not

197

Estimates of Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emitted for Each State in the U.S.A.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

State-Level Emission Estimates State-Level Emission Estimates Estimates of Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emitted for Each State in the U.S.A. and the District of Columbia for Each Year from 1960 through 2001 graphics Graphics data Data (ASCII comma-delimited) Investigators T.J. Blasing and Gregg Marland Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6335, U.S.A. Christine Broniak Department of Agricultural & Resource Economics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331-3601 DOI 10.3334/CDIAC/00003 Period of Record 1960-2001 Methods Consumption data for coal, petroleum, and natural gas are multiplied by their respective thermal conversion factors, which are in units of heat energy per unit of fuel consumed (i.e., per cubic foot, barrel, or ton), to

198

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

residual fuel oil, petroleum coke, and waste and other oil)residual fuel oil, petroleum coke, and waste and other oil22 CHP plants. For petroleum coke, CALEB only reports final

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Turing Water into Hydrogen Fuel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

so, coat with water, and add sunshine. What do you get? In theory, energy-rich hydrogen produced by photolysis-a process by which water molecules placed on a catalytic surface...

200

Carbon capture technology: future fossil fuel use and mitigating climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sources for countries heavily reliant on imported fuels4 . Why CCS is not just a synonym for `clean coal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water fossil fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

1989 annual book of ASTM standards. Section 5: Petroleum products, lubricants, and fossil fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This standards volume covers test methods for rating motor, diesel, and aviation fuels. The standards include: Standard test method for knock characteristics of motor and aviation fuels by the motor method and Standard test method for knock characteristics of motor fuels by the research method.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Cost-effective policy instruments for greenhouse gas emission reduction and fossil fuel substitution through bioenergy production in Austria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Climate change mitigation and security of energy supply are important targets of Austrian energy policy. Bioenergy production based on resources from agriculture and forestry is an important option for attaining these targets. To increase the share of bioenergy in the energy supply, supporting policy instruments are necessary. The cost-effectiveness of these instruments in attaining policy targets depends on the availability of bioenergy technologies. Advanced technologies such as second-generation biofuels, biomass gasification for power production, and bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) will likely change the performance of policy instruments. This article assesses the cost-effectiveness of energy policy instruments, considering new bioenergy technologies for the year 2030, with respect to greenhouse gas emission (GHG) reduction and fossil fuel substitution. Instruments that directly subsidize bioenergy are compared with instruments that aim at reducing GHG emissions. A spatially explicit modeling approach is used to account for biomass supply and energy distribution costs in Austria. Results indicate that a carbon tax performs cost-effectively with respect to both policy targets if BECCS is not available. However, the availability of BECCS creates a trade-off between GHG emission reduction and fossil fuel substitution. Biofuel blending obligations are costly in terms of attaining the policy targets.

Johannes Schmidt; Sylvain Leduc; Erik Dotzauer; Erwin Schmid

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Generating Potable Water from Fuel Cell Technology Juan E. Tibaquir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with hydrogen economy scenario. 4. Research Approach and Results Survey of fuel cell water ASU lab fuel cell Capacity (kW) 5 ­ 150 5 ­ 250 5 50 ­ 1100 100 ­ 2000 100 ­ 250 PEM Fuel cell Oxygen (From air) Hydrogen Implications of Using water from Fuel Cells in a Hydrogen Economy · Hydrogen as an energy and water carrier

Keller, Arturo A.

204

Water management studies in PEM fuel cells, Part I: Fuel cell design and in situ water distributions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

schematically in Fig. 1, a fuel cell supplies two reactant streams, consisting of a fuel (hydrogen, H2Water management studies in PEM fuel cells, Part I: Fuel cell design and in situ water. Trabolda, * a General Motors Fuel Cell Laboratory, 10 Carriage Street, Honeoye Falls, New York, USA b

Kandlikar, Satish

205

1989 annual book of ASTM standards. Section 5: Petroleum products, lubricants and fossil fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume of standards pertains to petroleum products and lubricants and to catalysts. The standards presented include: Standard test method for estimation of net and gross heat of combustion of petroleum fuels; Standard guide for generation and dissipation of static electricity in petroleum fuel systems; and Standard test method for solidification point of petroleum wax.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Combustion and fuel characterization of coal-water fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Activities conducted under this contract include studies on the combustion and fireside behavior of numerous coal-water fuels (CWFs). The work has been broken down into the following areas: Task 1 -- Selection of Candidate Fuels; Task 2 -- Bench Scale Tests; Task 3 -- CWF Preparation and Supply; Task 4 -- Combustion Characterization; Task 5 -- Ash Deposition and Performance Testing; Task 6 -- Commercial Applications. This report covers Task 6, the study of commercial applications of CWFs as related to the technical and economic aspects of the conversion of existing boilers and heaters to CWF firing. This work involves the analysis of seven units of various sizes and configurations firing several selected CWFs. Three utility boilers, two industrial boilers, and two process heater designs are included. Each of the units was considered with four primary selected CWFs. A fifth fuel was considered for one of the utility units. A sixth fuel, a microfine grind CWF, was evaluated on two utility units and one industrial unit. The particular fuels were chosen with the objective of examining the effects of coal source, ash level, ash properties, and beneficiation on the CWF performance and economics of the seven units. 10 refs., 81 figs., 80 tabs.

Beal, H.R.; Gralton, G.W.; Gronauer, T.W.; Liljedahl, G.N.; Love, B.F.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Plasma Nanocrystalline Doped Ceramic Enabled Fiber Sensors for High Temperature In-Situ Monitoring of Fossil Fuel Gases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 7 Advanced Research contacts Robert R. Romanosky Technology Manager Advanced Research National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4721 robert.romanosky@netl.doe.gov susan M. Maley Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-1321 susan.maley@netl.doe.gov Hai Xiao University of Missouri-Rolla Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Rolla, MO 65409 573-341-6887 xiaoha@umr.edu Novel seNsors for high temperature iN-situ moNitoriNg of fossil fuel gases Description Novel types of sensors are needed to withstand the harsh environments characteristic of advanced power generation systems, particularly gasification-based systems.

208

A simulator for training fossil-fuel power plants operators with an HMI based on a multi-window system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The hardware-software architecture for a power plant simulator is presented. The simulator is hosted in a local area network of personal computers and has Windows XP as its operating system. The Human-Machine Interfaces (HMIs) for the operator and the instructor are based on a multi-window system; therefore, they have access to a lot of information inside their respective action field at any moment during the simulation session. In particular, the operator HMI has been designed for being suitable for training power plants operators with modern HMIs, where the operation is based on computer screens. The simulator has been installed in an operators training centre where a group of acceptance tests has been successfully carried out. Currently, the simulator is being used as part of the training courses for fossil-fuel power plant operators.

Jose Tavira Mondragon; Luis Jimenez Fraustro; Guillermo Romero Jimenez

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Cofiring: technological option in Romania for promoting cleaner fossil fuels usage.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Co-firing refers to the simultaneous or alternative utilisation of two or more fuels in a combustion unit for the purpose of heat/power generation and it… (more)

Marin, Bogdan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Ocean Sequestration of Crop Residue Carbon: Recycling Fossil Fuel Carbon Back to Deep Sediments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

burial of crop residues in the deep ocean (hereafter, CROPS: Crop Residue Oceanic Permanent Sequestration). ... As long as fuels exist with higher energy yield-to-carbon content (E/C) ratios than biomass, it will always be more energy efficient and less carbon polluting to sequester the biomass in the deep oceans, and use those fuels with higher E/C ratios for power generation, rather than to burn biomass for power generation. ...

Stuart E. Strand; Gregory Benford

2009-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

211

A multiresolution spatial parametrization for the estimation of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions via atmospheric inversions.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The estimation of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions (ffCO2) from limited ground-based and satellite measurements of CO2 concentrations will form a key component of the monitoring of treaties aimed at the abatement of greenhouse gas emissions. To that end, we construct a multiresolution spatial parametrization for fossil-fuel CO2 emissions (ffCO2), to be used in atmospheric inversions. Such a parametrization does not currently exist. The parametrization uses wavelets to accurately capture the multiscale, nonstationary nature of ffCO2 emissions and employs proxies of human habitation, e.g., images of lights at night and maps of built-up areas to reduce the dimensionality of the multiresolution parametrization. The parametrization is used in a synthetic data inversion to test its suitability for use in atmospheric inverse problem. This linear inverse problem is predicated on observations of ffCO2 concentrations collected at measurement towers. We adapt a convex optimization technique, commonly used in the reconstruction of compressively sensed images, to perform sparse reconstruction of the time-variant ffCO2 emission field. We also borrow concepts from compressive sensing to impose boundary conditions i.e., to limit ffCO2 emissions within an irregularly shaped region (the United States, in our case). We find that the optimization algorithm performs a data-driven sparsification of the spatial parametrization and retains only of those wavelets whose weights could be estimated from the observations. Further, our method for the imposition of boundary conditions leads to a 10computational saving over conventional means of doing so. We conclude with a discussion of the accuracy of the estimated emissions and the suitability of the spatial parametrization for use in inverse problems with a significant degree of regularization.

Ray, Jaideep; Lee, Jina; Lefantzi, Sophia; Yadav, Vineet [Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA; Michalak, Anna M. [Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; McKenna, Sean Andrew [IBM Research, Mulhuddart, Dublin 15, Ireland

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Control of SO{sub 2} and NOx emissions from fossil fuel-fired power plants: Research and practice of TPRI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The generation of electric power in China has been dominated by coal for many years. By the end of 1990, total installed generating capacity reached 135 GW, of which fossil fuel-fired plants accounted for 74 percent. The total electricity generated reached 615 TWh, with fossil fuels accounting for 80.5 percent. About 276 million tons of raw coal are consumed in these fossil fuel-burning units per year, accounting for about 25 percent of the total output of the country. According to the government, by the year 2000, the total installed capacity of Chinese power systems should be at least 240 GW, of which fossil fuels will account for about 77 percent. The coal required for power generation will increase to about 530 million tons per year, accounting for about 38 percent of the total coal output. So, it is obvious that coal consumed in coal-fired power plants occupies a very important place in the national fuel balance. The current environmental protection standards, which are based on ground-level concentrations of pollutants, do not effectively lead to the control of pollution emission concentrations or total SO{sub 2} emissions. Due to the practical limitations of the Chinese economy, there is a limited capability to introduce advanced sulfur emission control technologies. Thus, except for the two 360 MW units imported from Japan for the Luohuang Power Plant in Shichuan province, all the other fossil fuel-fired units have not yet adopted any kind of SO{sub 2} removal measures. The Luohuang units are equipped with Mitsubishi limestone flue gas desulfurization systems. Because of the lack of effective pollution control technologies, large areas of the country have been seriously polluted by SO{sub 2}, and some of them even by acid rain.

Ming-Chuan Zhang

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

213

Carbon emission and mitigation cost comparisons between fossil fuel, nuclear and renewable energy resources for electricity generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study was conducted to compare the electricity generation costs of a number of current commercial technologies with technologies expected to become commercially available within the coming decade or so. The amount of greenhouse gas emissions resulting per kWh of electricity generated were evaluated. A range of fossil fuel alternatives (with and without physical carbon sequestration), were compared with the baseline case of a pulverised coal, steam cycle power plant. Nuclear, hydro, wind, bioenergy and solar generating plants were also evaluated. The objectives were to assess the comparative costs of mitigation per tonne of carbon emissions avoided, and to estimate the total amount of carbon mitigation that could result from the global electricity sector by 2010 and 2020 as a result of fuel switching, carbon dioxide sequestration and the greater uptake of renewable energy. Most technologies showed potential to reduce both generating costs and carbon emission avoidance by 2020 with the exception of solar power and carbon dioxide sequestration. The global electricity industry has potential to reduce its carbon emissions by over 15% by 2020 together with cost saving benefits compared with existing generation.

Ralph E.H. Sims; Hans-Holger Rogner; Ken Gregory

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Problems of attracting nuclear energy resources in order to provide economical and rational consumption of fossil fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Depletion of fossil fuels resources and the gradual increase in cost of their extraction and transportation to the places of their consumption put forward into a line of the most urgent tasks the problem of rational and economical utilization of fuel and energy resources, as well as introduction of new energy sources into various sectors of the national economy. The nuclear energy sources which are widely spread in power engineering have not yet been used to a proper extent in the sectors of industrial technologies and residentidal space heating, which are the most energy consuming sectors in the national economy. The most effective way of solving this problem can be the development and commercialization of high temperature nuclear reactors, as the majority of power consuming industrial processes and those involved in chemico-thermal systems of distant heat transmission demand the temperature of a heat carrier generated by nuclear reactors and assimilated by the above processes to be in the range from 900° to 1000°C.

E.K. Nazarov; A.T. Nikitin; N.N. Ponomarev-Stepnoy; A.N. Protsenko; A.Ya. Stolyarevskii; N.A. Doroshenko

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Fossil Energy Fiscal Year 2012 Budget Request | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fiscal Year 2012 Budget Request Fiscal Year 2012 Budget Request Fossil Energy Fiscal Year 2012 Budget Request March 30, 2011 - 2:40pm Addthis Statement of Dr. Victor Der, Acting Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy before the House Committee on Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development. Mr. Chairman, Members of the Committee, it is my pleasure to appear before you today to present the Office of Fossil Energy's (FE) proposed Budget for Fiscal Year 2012. The Office of Fossil Energy's primary objective is to ensure that we can continue to utilize our traditional fuel sources for clean, affordable, reliable energy. Fossil fuels currently provide 83 percent of U.S. energy consumption and are expected to continue to play a critical role in meeting our Nation's energy needs for the foreseeable future. Making use of these

216

Fossil Energy FY 2014 Appropriations Hearing | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FY 2014 Appropriations Hearing FY 2014 Appropriations Hearing Fossil Energy FY 2014 Appropriations Hearing March 14, 2013 - 1:36pm Addthis Statement of Christopher Smith, Acting Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy before the House Committee on Appropriations, Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development. Mr. Chairman, Madam Ranking Member, and Members of the Committee, it is my pleasure to appear before you today to discuss the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy's (FE) programs. Our fossil fuel resources are essential to the Nation's security and economic prosperity. The Office of Fossil Energy's primary mission is to ensure that the U.S. can continue to utilize those traditional fuel sources for clean, affordable, reliable energy. Technology development is critical to this mission. FE's Research and Development (FER&D) program

217

Risk assessment of toxic pollutants from fossil fuel power plants: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the development and application of a methodology for assessing the control costs and chronic health risks of toxic pollutant emissions from coal-fired electric power plants. The approach emphasizes surface water discharges and pollution, but incorporates emissions to air, water, soil, and groundwater and transfers of pollutants between these media. The components of the general framework include (1) pollutant emission characterization, (2) environmental transport and fate analysis, (3) population exposure calculation, and (4) quantitative health risk assessment. The report provides a basic overview of the approach, discusses each component in detail, and describes its application to an hypothetical, simplified case study. 234 refs., 32 figs., 32 tabs.

Bolten, J.G.; Morrison, P.F.; Solomon, K.A.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Dual-water mixture fuel burner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A coal-water mixture (CWM) burner includes a conically shaped rotating cup into which fuel comprised of coal particles suspended in a slurry is introduced via a first, elongated inner tube coupled to a narrow first end portion of the cup. A second, elongated outer tube is coaxially positioned about the first tube and delivers steam to the narrow first end of the cup. The fuel delivery end of the inner first tube is provided with a helical slot on its lateral surface for directing the CWM onto the inner surface of the rotating cup in the form of a uniform, thin sheet which, under the influence of the cup's centrifugal force, flows toward a second, open, expanded end portion of the rotating cup positioned immediately adjacent to a combustion chamber. The steam delivered to the rotating cup wets its inner surface and inhibits the coal within the CWM from adhering to the rotating cup. A primary air source directs a high velocity air flow coaxially about the expanded discharge end of the rotating cup for applying a shear force to the CWM in atomizing the fuel mixture for improved combustion. A secondary air source directs secondary air into the combustion chamber adjacent to the outlet of the rotating cup at a desired pitch angle relative to the fuel mixture/steam flow to promote recirculation of hot combustion gases within the ignition zone for increased flame stability.

Brown, Thomas D. (Finleyville, PA); Reehl, Douglas P. (Pittsburgh, PA); Walbert, Gary F. (Library, PA)

1986-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

219

Beyond the Fossil Fuel Era: On the Feasibility of Sustainable Electricity Generation Using Biogas from Microalgae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The functional unit was the delivery of 1.0 TWh of electrical energy using biomethane firing. ... The main finding was that maize-based biomethane electricity provision outperforms a prospective microalgae system in terms of NER, estimated at 4.9 and 3.2, respectively, when utilizing cogenerated heat. ... The contributions of this paper are as follows: (1) maize-based biomethane production outperforms a prospective microalgae system, in terms of net energy ratio (i.e., ratio of energy produced to energy required for fuel production; abbreviated hereafter as NER); (2) a prospective microalgae system requires 35% less land area, compared to maize, and (3) the performance, in terms of NER, of microalgae-based biogas production is set by the provision and extraction of nutrients rather than areal productivity and/or microalgal lipid content. ...

Frank ter Veld

2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

220

Water Management in Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Management in Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cells Catherine Chan & Lauren Isbell objectives Important variables that lead to results Conclusion #12;Basic Operation of a PEM Fuel Cell fuel cell? A flow channel? The importance of water management Experimental setup and methods Project

Petta, Jason

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water fossil fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

www.fossil.energy.gov  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) programs are focused on The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) programs are focused on activities related to the reliable, efficient, affordable and en- vironmentally sound use of fossil fuels which are essential to our Nation's security and economic prosperity. FE manages DOE's Fossil Energy Research and Development Program, which includes the CCS Dem- onstration Programs; Carbon Capture and Storage and Power Systems Program; and

222

Fossil fuel depletion and socio-economic scenarios: An integrated approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The progressive reduction of high-quality-easy-to-extract energy is a widely recognized and already ongoing process. Although depletion studies for individual fuels are relatively abundant, few of them offer a global perspective of all energy sources and their potential future developments, and even fewer include the demand of the socio-economic system. This paper presents an Economy-Energy-Environment model based on System Dynamics which integrates all those aspects: the physical restrictions (with peak estimations for oil, gas, coal and uranium), the techno-sustainable potential of renewable energy estimated by a novel top-down methodology, the socio-economic energy demands, the development of alternative technologies and the net CO2 emissions. We confront our model with the basic assumptions of previous Global Environmental Assessment (GEA) studies. The results show that demand-driven evolution, as performed in the past, might be unfeasible: strong energy-supply scarcity is found in the next two decades, especially in the transportation sector before 2020. Electricity generation is unable to fulfill its demand in 2025–2040, and a large expansion of electric renewable energies move us close to their limits. In order to find achievable scenarios, we are obliged to set hypotheses which are hardly used in GEA scenarios, such as zero or negative economic growth.

Iñigo Capellán-Pérez; Margarita Mediavilla; Carlos de Castro; Óscar Carpintero; Luis Javier Miguel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Environmental Impact Evaluation of Conventional Fossil Fuel Production (Oil and Natural Gas) and Enhanced Resource Recovery with Potential CO2 Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The first set of results presented were the inventory of air emissions (CO, CO2, CH4, SOx, NOx, NH3, Pb, Hg, etc.), wastewater-containing acids and sulfides, and solid wastes released because of both fossil fuel production and energy usage from the power plant. ... Gases of SO2 and NOx are reported to pollute the air because of conventional oil production activities,16 but these contributions, as displayed by cases I and II, are less compared to the accumulated impacts coming from the CO2 sequestration chain. ... (1)?McKee, B. Solutions for the 21st Century:? Zero Emissions Technology for Fossil Fuels; Technology Status Report, International Energy Agency, Committee for Energy Research Technology, OECD/IEA:? France, 2002. ...

Hsien H. Khoo; Reginald B. H. Tan

2006-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

224

Liquid fossil fuel technology. Quarterly technical progress report, April-June 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights of progress made during the quarter ending June, 1981, are presented. Cation exchange capacity of oil and gas wells has been determined using a semi automated procedure. The equivalent alkane carbon number (EACN) has been determined for Delaware-Childers oil. It was shown that for this oil, the type of surfactant and alcohol used causes the EACN to vary on unusual amount. Arsenic compounds from samples of Green River oil shale kerogen have been identified (both inorganic and organometallic compounds). The concepts of adsorption isotherm, used for determining the thermodynamic properties of surfactant systems, has undergone some changes in order to better represent the physical model. A derivation of the new ideas and their application to immersion measurements are described. A method for analysis of alcohols in water, hydrocarbon mixtures, or exhaust gases has been developed. The method, which utilizes two gas chromatographs, analyzes methanol, ethanol, and other alcohols up through the C4 group. (DMC)

Not Available

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Fuel reforming for fuel cell application.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Fossil fuels, such as natural gas, petroleum, and coal are currently the primary source of energy that drives the world economy. However, fossil fuel is… (more)

Hung, Tak Cheong

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

An Integrated Hydrogen Production-CO2 Capture Process from Fossil Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The new technology concept integrates two significant complementary hydrogen production and CO{sub 2}-sequestration approaches that have been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Clark Atlanta University. The process can convert biomass into hydrogen and char. Hydrogen can be efficiently used for stationary power and mobile applications, or it can be synthesized into Ammonia which can be used for CO{sub 2}-sequestration, while char can be used for making time-release fertilizers (NH{sub 4}HCO{sub 3}) by absorption of CO{sub 2} and other acid gases from exhaust flows. Fertilizers are then used for the growth of biomass back to fields. This project includes bench scale experiments and pilot scale tests. The Combustion and Emission Lab at Clark Atlanta University has conducted the bench scale experiments. The facility used for pilot scale tests was built in Athens, GA. The overall yield from this process is 7 wt% hydrogen and 32 wt% charcoal/activated carbon of feedstock (peanut shell). The value of co-product activated carbon is about $1.1/GJ and this coproduct reduced the selling price of hydrogen. And the selling price of hydrogen is estimated to be $6.95/GJ. The green house experimental results show that the samples added carbon-fertilizers have effectively growth increase of three different types of plants and improvement ability of keeping fertilizer in soil to avoid the fertilizer leaching with water.

Zhicheng Wang

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

Marine engine with water cooled fuel line from remote tank  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a marine propulsion system. It comprises: a water cooled internal combustion engine, a remote fuel tank, a conduit connected between the fuel tank and the engine, the conduit having a first passage supplying fuel from the tank to the engine, the conduit having a second passage supplying cooling water from the engine towards the tank, the conduit having a third passage returning water from the second passage back to the engine.

Arms, J.F.

1990-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

228

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel power plants. However,power plants, which are reviewed and licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and relatively few areas of geothermal and

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Fossil | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fossil Fossil Fossil For the first time since 1995, U.S. oil production has surpassed imports. Explore the trend with our interactive chart. | Graphic by Daniel Wood, Energy Department. For the first time since 1995, U.S. oil production has surpassed imports. Explore the trend with our interactive chart. | Graphic by Daniel Wood, Energy Department. Fossil energy sources, including oil, coal and natural gas, are non-renewable resources that formed when prehistoric plants and animals died and were gradually buried by layers of rock. Over millions of years, different types of fossil fuels formed -- depending on what combination of organic matter was present, how long it was buried and what temperature and pressure conditions existed as time passed.

230

Tomographic Detection of Water in Fuel Cell Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present method and results for in situ characterization of water diffusion and other degradation mechanisms in fuel cell membranes using interferometric phase ...

Waller, Laura; Kim, Jungik; Shao-Horn, Yang; Barbastathis, George

231

Tomographic Detection of Water in Fuel Cell Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present method and results for in situ characterization of water diffusion and other degradation mechanisms in fuel cell membranes using interferometric phase tomography.

Waller, Laura; Kim, Jungik; Shao-Horn, Yang; Barbastathis, George

232

Surface Wettability Impact on Water Management in PEM Fuel Cell.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Excessive water formation inside the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell’s structures leads to the flooding of the cathode gas diffusion layer (GDL) and cathode… (more)

Al Shakhshir, Saher

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Biological Water Gas Shift DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cell, and Infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biological Water Gas Shift DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cell, and Infrastructure Technologies Program Review was produced from water in a linked cyanobacterial- hydrogenase hybrid system Isolated mutants and cloned 2

234

A liquid water management strategy for PEM fuel cell stacks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas and water management are key to achieving good performance from a PEM fuel cell stack. Previous experimentation had found, and this experimentation confirms, that one very effective method of achieving proper gas and water management is the use...

Van Nguyen, Trung; Knobbe, M. W.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

235

Energy, environmental, health and cost benefits of cogeneration from fossil fuels and nuclear energy using the electrical utility facilities of a province  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method is investigated for increasing the utilization efficiency of energy resources and reducing environmental emissions, focusing on utility-scale cogeneration and the contributions of nuclear energy. A case study is presented for Ontario using the nuclear and fossil facilities of the main provincial electrical utility. Implementation of utility-based cogeneration in Ontario or a region with a similar energy system and attributes is seen to be able to reduce significantly annual and cumulative uranium and fossil fuel use and related emissions, provide economic benefits for the province and its electrical utility, and substitute nuclear energy for fossil fuels. The reduced emissions of greenhouse gases are significant, and indicate that utility-based cogeneration can contribute notably to efforts to combat climate change. Ontario and other regions with similar energy systems and characteristics would benefit from working with the regional electrical utilities and other relevant parties to implementing cogeneration in a careful and optimal manner. Implementation decisions need to balance the interests of the stakeholders when determining which cogeneration options to adopt and barriers to regional utility-based cogeneration need to be overcome.

Marc A. Rosen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Taxes on fossil fuels.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Efterfrågan på biobränslen har ökat de 30 senaste åren och under samma tidsperiod har oljepriset stigit. I den här uppsatsen har vi undersökt i… (more)

Östman, Beata

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Fossil energy use in conventional and low-external-input cropping systems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The production of fossil fuels will crest within the next decade and with reliance of modern conventional agriculture on fossil fuel energy inputs, food production… (more)

Cruse, Michael James

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Hydrogen Production by Noncatalytic Autothermal Reformation of Aviation Fuel Using Supercritical Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen Production by Noncatalytic Autothermal Reformation of Aviation Fuel Using Supercritical Water ... Energy Fuels, 2009, 23 (12), ...

Jason W. Picou; Jonathan E. Wenzel; H. Brian Lanterman; Sunggyu Lee

2009-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

239

Rethinking the light water reactor fuel cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The once through nuclear fuel cycle adopted by the majority of countries with operating commercial power reactors imposes a number of concerns. The radioactive waste created in the once through nuclear fuel cycle has to ...

Shwageraus, Evgeni, 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

High Performance Fuel Desing for Next Generation Pressurized Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of internally and externally cooled annular fule rods for high power density Pressurized Water Reactors is assessed. The assessment included steady state and transient thermal conditions, neutronic and fuel management requirements, mechanical vibration issues, fuel performance issues, fuel fabrication methods and econmic assessment. The investigation was donducted by a team from MIT, Westinghouse, Gamma Engineering, Framatome ANP, and AECL. The analyses led to the conclusion that raising the power density by 50% may be possible with this advanced fuel. Even at the 150% power level, the fuel temperature would be a few hundred degrees lower than the current fuel temperatre. Significant economic and safety advantages can be obtained by using this fuel in new reactors. Switching to this type of fuel for existing reactors would yield safety advantages, but the economic return is dependent on the duration of plant shutdown to accommodate higher power production. The main feasiblity issue for the high power performance appears to be the potential for uneven splitting of heat flux between the inner and outer fuel surfaces due to premature closure of the outer fuel-cladding gap. This could be overcome by using a very narrow gap for the inner fuel surface and/or the spraying of a crushable zirconium oxide film at the fuel pellet outer surface. An alternative fuel manufacturing approach using vobropacking was also investigated but appears to yield lower than desirable fuel density.

Mujid S. Kazimi; Pavel Hejzlar

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water fossil fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Fossil Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Research and Development Fossil Energy Research and Development Table of Contents Page Appropriation Language .................................................................................................................... FE-3 Overview ............................................................................................................................................ FE-4 Coal .................................................................................................................................................. FE-13

242

Fossil fuel prices and the economic and budgetary challenges of a small energy-importing economy: the case of Portugal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper examines the economic and budgetary impacts of fuel prices using a dynamic general equilibrium model of ... detailed modeling of the public sector. The fuel price scenarios are based on forecasts by th...

Alfredo Marvão Pereira; Rui Marvão Pereira

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Synthetic Fuel  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Two global energy priorities today are finding environmentally friendly alternatives to fossil fuels, and reducing greenhouse gass Two global energy priorities today are finding environmentally friendly alternatives to fossil fuels, and reducing greenhous

Idaho National Laboratory - Steve Herring, Jim O'Brien, Carl Stoots

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

244

Innovative fossil fuel fired vitrification technology for soil remediation. Volume 1, Phase 1: Annual report, September 28, 1992--August 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vortex has successfully completed Phase 1 of the ``Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation`` program with the Department of Energy (DOE) Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). The Combustion and Melting System (CMS) has processed 7000 pounds of material representative of contaminated soil that is found at DOE sites. The soil was spiked with Resource Conversation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals surrogates, an organic contaminant, and a surrogate radionuclide. The samples taken during the tests confirmed that virtually all of the radionuclide was retained in the glass and that it did not leach to the environment. The organic contaminant, anthracene, was destroyed during the test with a Destruction and Removal Efficiency (DRE) of at least 99.99%. RCRA metal surrogates, that were in the vitrified product, were retained and will not leach to the environment--as confirmed by the TCLP testing. Semi-volatile RCRA metal surrogates were captured by the Air Pollution Control (APC) system, and data on the amount of metal oxide particulate and the chemical composition of the particulate were established for use in the Phase 2 APC system design. This topical report will present a summary of the activities conducted during Phase 1 of the ``Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation`` program. The report includes the detail technical data generated during the experimental program and the design and cost data for the preliminary Phase 2 plant.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Assessment of the impacts on health due to the emissions of Cuban power plants that use fossil fuel oils with high content of sulfur. Estimation of external costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fossil fuel electricity generation has been demonstrated to be a main source of atmospheric pollution. The necessity of finding out a balance between the costs of achieving a lower level of environmental and health injury and the benefits of providing electricity at a reasonable cost have lead to the process of estimating the external costs derived from these impacts and not included in the electricity prices as a quantitative measure of it that, even when there are large uncertainties involved, can be used by decision makers in the process of achieving a global sustainable development. The external costs of the electricity generation in three Cuban power plants that use fossil fuel oils with high sulfur content have been assessed. With that purpose a specific implementation of the Impact Pathways Methodology for atmospheric emissions was developed. Dispersion of atmospheric pollutants is modeled at local and regional scales in a detailed way. Health impacts include mortality and those morbidity effects that showed relation with the increment of selected pollutant concentration in national studies. The external cost assessed for the three plants was 40,588,309 USD yr?1 (min./max.: 10,194,833/169,013,252), representing 1.06 USD Cent kWh?1. Costs derived from sulfur species (SO2 and sulfate aerosol) stand for 93% of the total costs.

L. Turtós Carbonell; E. Meneses Ruiz; M. Sánchez Gácita; J. Rivero Oliva; N. Díaz Rivero

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Interferometric tomography of fuel cells for monitoring membrane water content  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have developed a system that uses two 1D interferometric phase projections for reconstruction of 2D water content changes over time in situ in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell system. By modifying the filtered ...

Waller, Laura

247

Fossil Energy Budget Request for Fiscal Year 2013 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Budget Request for Fiscal Year 2013 Budget Request for Fiscal Year 2013 Fossil Energy Budget Request for Fiscal Year 2013 March 27, 2012 - 1:12pm Addthis Statement of Mr. Chuck McConnell, Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy (nominated), before the House Committee on Appropriations, Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development on FE's FY2013 Budget Request. Mr. Chairman, Members of the Committee, it is my pleasure to appear before you today to present the Office of Fossil Energy's (FE) proposed Budget for Fiscal Year 2013. The Office of Fossil Energy's primary objective is to ensure that we can continue to utilize our traditional fuel sources for clean, affordable, reliable energy. Fossil fuels, which provide 83 percent of U.S. energy consumption, are expected to continue to play a critical role in meeting

248

Turning Sun and Water Into Hydrogen Fuel | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Turning Sun and Water Into Hydrogen Fuel Turning Sun and Water Into Hydrogen Fuel Turning Sun and Water Into Hydrogen Fuel May 5, 2011 - 1:27pm Addthis Tiny silicon pillars, used to absorb light. When dotted with a catalyst of molybdenum sulfide and exposed to sunlight, these pillars generate hydrogen gas from the hydrogen ions liberated by splitting water. Each pillar is approximately two micrometers in diameter. | Photo courtesy of Christian D. Damsgaard, Thomas Pedersen and Ole Hansen, Technical University of Denmark Tiny silicon pillars, used to absorb light. When dotted with a catalyst of molybdenum sulfide and exposed to sunlight, these pillars generate hydrogen gas from the hydrogen ions liberated by splitting water. Each pillar is approximately two micrometers in diameter. | Photo courtesy of Christian D.

249

Turning Sun and Water Into Hydrogen Fuel | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Turning Sun and Water Into Hydrogen Fuel Turning Sun and Water Into Hydrogen Fuel Turning Sun and Water Into Hydrogen Fuel May 5, 2011 - 1:27pm Addthis Tiny silicon pillars, used to absorb light. When dotted with a catalyst of molybdenum sulfide and exposed to sunlight, these pillars generate hydrogen gas from the hydrogen ions liberated by splitting water. Each pillar is approximately two micrometers in diameter. | Photo courtesy of Christian D. Damsgaard, Thomas Pedersen and Ole Hansen, Technical University of Denmark Tiny silicon pillars, used to absorb light. When dotted with a catalyst of molybdenum sulfide and exposed to sunlight, these pillars generate hydrogen gas from the hydrogen ions liberated by splitting water. Each pillar is approximately two micrometers in diameter. | Photo courtesy of Christian D.

250

Prospects for and problems of using light-water supercritical-pressure coolant in nuclear reactors in order to increase the efficiency of the nuclear fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Trends in the development of the power sector of the Russian and world power industries both at present time and in the near future are analyzed. Trends in the rise of prices for reserves of fossil and nuclear fuels used for electricity production are compared. An analysis of the competitiveness of electricity production at nuclear power plants as compared to the competitiveness of electricity produced at coal-fired and natural-gas-fired thermal power plants is performed. The efficiency of the open nuclear fuel cycle and various versions of the closed nuclear fuel cycle is discussed. The requirements on light-water reactors under the scenario of dynamic development of the nuclear power industry in Russia are determined. Results of analyzing the efficiency of fuel utilization for various versions of vessel-type light-water reactors with supercritical coolant are given. Advantages and problems of reactors with supercritical-pressure water are listed.

Alekseev, P. N.; Semchenkov, Yu. M.; Sedov, A. A., E-mail: sedov@dhtp.kial.ru; Subbotin, S. A.; Chibinyaev, A. V. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

Supersonic coal water slurry fuel atomizer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A supersonic coal water slurry atomizer utilizing supersonic gas velocities to atomize coal water slurry is provided wherein atomization occurs externally of the atomizer. The atomizer has a central tube defining a coal water slurry passageway surrounded by an annular sleeve defining an annular passageway for gas. A converging/diverging section is provided for accelerating gas in the annular passageway to supersonic velocities.

Becker, Frederick E. (Reading, MA); Smolensky, Leo A. (Concord, MA); Balsavich, John (Foxborough, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

"State","Fossil Fuels",,,,,,"Nuclear Electric Power",,"Renewable Energy",,,,,,"Total Energy Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

P2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 " P2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 " "State","Fossil Fuels",,,,,,"Nuclear Electric Power",,"Renewable Energy",,,,,,"Total Energy Production" ,"Coal a",,"Natural Gas b",,"Crude Oil c",,,,"Biofuels d",,"Other e",,"Total" ,"Trillion Btu" "Alabama",468.671,,226.821,,48.569,,411.822,,0,,245.307,,245.307,,1401.191 "Alaska",33.524,,404.72,,1188.008,,0,,0,,15.68,,15.68,,1641.933 "Arizona",174.841,,0.171,,0.215,,327.292,,7.784,,107.433,,115.217,,617.734 "Arkansas",2.985,,1090.87,,34.087,,148.531,,0,,113.532,,113.532,,1390.004 "California",0,,279.71,,1123.408,,383.644,,25.004,,812.786,,837.791,,2624.553

253

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Livestock Fuel for Water Pumping Motor Efficiency GW EnergyRequired for Water Pumps Using Electric Motors (AdaptedGasoline motors typically used for water pumps are

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Peak Oil Netherlands Foundation (PONL) was founded in May 2005 by a group of citizens who are concerned about the effects of a premature peak in oil and other fossil fuels production. The main aims of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Peak Oil Netherlands Foundation (PONL) was founded in May 2005 by a group of citizens who are concerned about the effects of a premature peak in oil and other fossil fuels production. The main aims of this report, the other people in the Peak Oil Netherlands Foundation for their work, peakoil.com & the oildrum

Keeling, Stephen L.

255

Visualization of Fuel Cell Water Transport and Characterization under Freezing Conditions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation, which focuses on fuel cell water transport, was given by Satish Kandlikar at a DOE fuel cell meeting in February 2007.

256

Ediacaran Fossils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...organisms are fossilized they are typically flattened. What is of interest is that the evident quilted structure of many of the Edia-caran fauna indicates that these orga-nisms were also of a generally flattened appearance in life. Hence, at least in part...

KENNETH E. CASTER

1984-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

257

Strategic backdrop analysis for fossil fuel planning. Task 2 report (New Task Series), The Base Case. Report 473-117-08/01  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a base case analysis performed using the strategic backdrop analytical framework developed by The Futures Group to facilitate fossil fuel planning within the Department of Energy. It builds upon the data base compiled in the default case previously submitted but uses a different set of energy technology assumptions. Objectives of the strategic backdrop analysis project are: (1) to delineate alternative socioeconomic futures or target worlds for the United States and to derive, for each world, the amount of energy needed to sustain its level of economic activity and lifestyle, assuming no technological changes; (2) to construct an analytical framework that accounts for the flow of energy from the disaggregated end-use target demand sectors back through the distribution and conversion processes to primary resource requirements; (3) to use this framework 1) to analyze how alternative government policies and associated new technologies can change the primary resource needs and fuel mix while still providing the same level of end-use energy service for the target world, and 2) to highlight resource constraints, program inconsistencies, and economic, environmental, and social implications; (4) to transfer to DOE personnel the methodology for generating energy targets and accounting for important characteristics of alternative energy policies and technologies.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

would in turn lower PHEV fuel costs and make them morestretches from fossil-fuel- powered conventional vehiclesbraking, as do Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions Making Plug-

Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Fossil Energy Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fossil Energy, the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory, the DOE Fossil Energy Clean Coal Technology Program, the DOE Fossil Energy Office of Strategic Petroleum Reserve, and...

260

Coupled Thermal and Water Management in Polymer-Electrolyte Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for porosity and tortuosity fuel-cell inlet conditionson the cathode side of the fuel cell. Water is evaporated indiagram corresponds to the fuel-cell inlet, the bottom to

Weber, Adam Z.; Newman, John

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water fossil fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Liquid-Water Uptake and Removal in PEM Fuel-Cell Components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uptake and Removal in PEM Fuel-Cell Components Prodip K. DasWater management in PEM fuel cells is critical for optimumof droplet dynamics in PEM fuel-cell gas flow channels has

Das, Prodip K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Fossil Energy RSS Feeds | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fossil Energy RSS Feeds Fossil Energy RSS Feeds Fossil Energy RSS Feeds RSS, sometimes known as Really Simple Syndication, is a popular means of sharing content (such as news headlines) without requiring readers to constantly visit a Web site to see what's new. RSS feeds contain headlines and hyperlinks to longer articles or Web pages. RSS feeds from the Office of Fossil Energy provide updates of specific interest to the fossil fuel community. Fossil Energy RSS feeds are free of charge. RSS content can be read using software called an RSS reader, feed reader, or an aggregator, which can be web-based or desktop-based. Click on RSS button below to subscribe to Fossil Energy latest news. All Fossil Energy News Clean Coal Technology News Carbon Capture and Storage News Oil & Natural Gas News

263

Novel Water-Neutral Diesel Fuel Processor and Sulfur Trap„Precision Combustion  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Novel Water-Neutral Diesel Fuel Novel Water-Neutral Diesel Fuel Processor and Sulfur Trap-Precision Combustion Background Solid-Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) technology for auxiliary power units (APUs) offers the potential for major contributions toward Department of Energy (DOE) objectives such as clean energy deployment and improved efficiency. Reforming of conventional liquid fuels to produce synthesis gas (syngas) fuel for SOFC stacks is a practical approach for operating fuel cell APUs

264

Fossil Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fossil Energy Fossil Energy Natural gas production from "shale" formations (fine-grained sedimentary rocks with relatively low permeability that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas) is one of the most rapidly-growing trends in U.S. domestic energy exploration and production. In some cases, this fast expansion has resulted in natural gas drilling and production activity in parts of the country that have seen little or no activity of this type in the recent past. "Natural Gas from Shale" explains the basics, including what shale gas is, where it's found, why it's important, how it's produced, and challenges associated with production. Also included are a list of frequently asked questions, a glossary of major terms, and a list of

265

A Parametric Study of the DUPIC Fuel Cycle to Reflect Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel Management Strategy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For both pressurized water reactor (PWR) and Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) tandem analysis, the Direct Use of spent PWR fuel In CANDU reactor (DUPIC) fuel cycle in a CANDU 6 reactor is studied using the DRAGON/DONJON chain of codes with the ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI libraries. The reference feed material is a 17 x 17 French standard 900-MW(electric) PWR fuel. The PWR spent-fuel composition is obtained from two-dimensional DRAGON assembly transport and depletion calculations. After a number of years of cooling, this defines the initial fuel nuclide field in the CANDU unit cell calculations in DRAGON, where it is further depleted with the same neutron group structure. The resulting macroscopic cross sections are condensed and tabulated to be used in a full-core model of a CANDU 6 reactor to find an optimized channel fueling rate distribution on a time-average basis. Assuming equilibrium refueling conditions and a particular refueling sequence, instantaneous full-core diffusion calculations are finally performed with the DONJON code, from which both the channel power peaking factors and local parameter effects are estimated. A generic study of the DUPIC fuel cycle is carried out using the linear reactivity model for initial enrichments ranging from 3.2 to 4.5 wt% in a PWR. Because of the uneven power histories of the spent PWR assemblies, the spent PWR fuel composition is expected to differ from one assembly to the next. Uneven mixing of the powder during DUPIC fuel fabrication may lead to uncertainties in the composition of the fuel bundle and larger peaking factors in CANDU. A mixing method for reducing composition uncertainties is discussed.

Rozon, Daniel; Shen Wei [Institut de Genie Nucleaire (Canada)

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

Annual book of ASTM Standards 2008. Section Five. Petroleum products, lubricants, and fossil fuels. Volume 05.06. Gaseous fuels; coal and coke  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first part covers standards for gaseous fuels. The second part covers standards on coal and coke including the classification of coals, determination of major elements in coal ash and trace elements in coal, metallurgical properties of coal and coke, methods of analysis of coal and coke, petrogrpahic analysis of coal and coke, physical characteristics of coal, quality assurance and sampling.

NONE

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

Annual book of ASTM Standards 2005. Section Five. Petroleum products, lubricants, and fossil fuels. Volume 05.06. Gaseous fuels; coal and coke  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first part covers standards for gaseous fuels. The standard part covers standards on coal and coke including the classification of coals, determination of major elements in coal ash and trace elements in coal, metallurgical properties of coal and coke, methods of analysis of coal and coke, petrographic analysis of coal and coke, physical characteristics of coal, quality assurance and sampling.

NONE

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

268

An empirical investigation of air pollution from fossil fuel combustion and its impact on health in India during 1973–1974 to 1996–1997  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many air pollution studies examine impacts on global climate warming in the future, but impacts on health of population are more actual and concrete. The aim of this paper is to evaluate air pollution (CO2, SO2, and NOx) from fossil fuel combustion in India. Input–Output Structural Decomposition Analysis approach is used to find out their sources of changes. We also estimate the emissions of CO2, SO2 and \\{NOx\\} for the year 2001–2002 and 2006–2007. A link between emission of pollutants and their impact on human health is finally analysed. The study categorizes the changes in the amount of CO2, SO2 and \\{NOx\\} emissions into four factors: the pollution intensity or eco-efficiency, technology or input-mix, composition of final demand, and the level of final demand. The main factors for these changes were the pollution intensity, technology, and the volume of final demand. Changes in the pollution intensity and technology were in most periods increasing air pollution. These results are quite different to those observed in some other studies. Pollution and health impacts have a close linear relationship and the main factors for the changes are the same as for the pollution.

Kakali Mukhopadhyay; Osmo Forssell

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Waste biomass from production process co-firing with coal in a steam boiler to reduce fossil fuel consumption: A case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Waste biomass is always generated during the production process in industries. The ordinary way to get rid of the waste biomass is to send them to landfill or burn it in the open field. The waste may potentially be used for co-firing with coal to save fossil fuel consumption and also reduce net carbon emissions. In this case study, the bio-waste from a Nicotiana Tabacum (NT) pre-treatment plant is used as the biomass to co-fire with coal. The samples of NT wastes were analysed. It was found that the wastes were of the relatively high energy content which were suitable for co-firing with coal. To investigate the potential and benefits for adding NT wastes to a Fluidised Bed Combustion (FBC) boiler in the plant, detailed modelling and simulation are carried out using the European Coal Liquefaction Process Simulation and Evaluation (ECLIPSE) process simulation package. The feedstock blending ratios of NT waste to coal studied in this work are varied from 0% to 30%. The results show that the addition of NT wastes may decrease the emissions of CO2 and \\{SOx\\} without reducing the boiler performance.

Hongyan Gu; Kai Zhang; Yaodong Wang; Ye Huang; Neil Hewitt; Anthony P Roskilly

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Sensitivity of global-scale climate change attribution results to inclusion of fossil fuel black carbon aerosol - article no. L14701  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is likely that greenhouse gas emissions caused most of the global mean warming observed during the 20th century, and that sulphate aerosols counteracted this warming to some extent, by reflecting solar radiation to space and thereby cooling the planet. However, the importance of another aerosol, namely black carbon, could be underestimated. Here we include fossil fuel black carbon aerosol in a detection and attribution analysis with greenhouse gas and sulphate aerosols. We find that most of the warming of the 20th Century is attributable to changes in greenhouse gases offset by net aerosol cooling. However the pattern of temperature change due to black carbon is currently indistinguishable from the sulphate aerosol pattern of temperature change. The attribution of temperature change due to greenhouse gases is not sensitive to the inclusion of black carbon. We can be confident about the overall attribution of total aerosols, but less so about the contributions of black carbon emissions to 20th century climate change. This work presents no evidence that black carbon aerosol forcing outweighed the cooling due to sulphate aerosol.

Jones, G.S.; Jones, A.; Roberts, D.L.; Stott, P.A.; Williams, K.D. [Hadley Center for Climate Predictions & Research, Exeter (United Kingdom)

2005-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

271

Extension of energy crops on surplus agricultural lands: A potentially viable option in developing countries while fossil fuel reserves are diminishing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The rapid depletion of fossil fuel reserves and environmental concerns with their combustion necessitate looking for alternative sources for long term sustainability of the world. These concerns also appear serious in developing countries who are striving for rapid economic growth. The net biomass growing potential on the global land surface is 10 times more than the global food, feed, fiber, and energy demands. This study investigates whether the developing countries have sufficient land resource to meet the projected energy demand towards 2035 by planting energy crops on surplus agricultural land after food and feed production. The annual yields of four commonly grown energy crops specifically jatropha, switchgrass, miscanthus, and willow have been used to make scenarios and estimate land requirements against each scenario. This paper first performs literature reviews on the availability of land resource, past and future trends in land use changes, demand of lands for food production, and potential expansion of croplands. The energy demands towards 2035 are compiled from energy scenarios derived by the International Energy Agency (IEA) and the British Petroleum (BP). This paper also reviewed bio-physiological characteristics of these energy crops to determine whether they are cultivable under tropical climatic conditions in developing regions. This paper found that projected energy demand through 2035 in developing regions could be provided by energy crops grown on a portion of surplus croplands or upgraded grasslands (27% and 22% respectively for miscanthus scenario). Sustainable land management practices, improved agricultural productivity, and adopting suitable energy crops cultivation can potentially supply increasing energy demands.

Md. Mizanur Rahman; Suraiya B. Mostafiz; Jukka V. Paatero; Risto Lahdelma

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Molecular fossil constraints on the water column structure of the CenomanianTuronian Western Interior Seaway, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

site the source of extractable organic matter is dominantly marine with minor terrestrial contribution Interior Seaway, USA Dirk-Jan H. Simons, Fabien Kenig* University of Illinois at Chicago, Department (molecular fossil) data were collected for four Cenomanian�Turonian sections in the Western Interior Basin

Kenig, Fabien

273

Fossil-fuel processing technical/professional services: comparison of Fischer-Tropsch reactor systems. Phase I, final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fischer-Tropsch reaction was commercialized in Germany and used to produce military fuels in fixed bed reactors. It was recognized from the start that this reactor system had severe operating and yield limitations and alternative reactor systems were sought. In 1955 the Sasol I complex, using an entrained bed (Synthol) reactor system, was started up in South Africa. Although this reactor was a definite improvement and is still operating, the literature is filled with proponents of other reactor systems, each claiming its own advantages. This report provides a summary of the results of a study to compare the development potential of three of these reactor systems with the commercially operating Synthol-entrained bed reactor system. The commercial Synthol reactor is used as a benchmark against which the development potential of the other three reactors can be compared. Most of the information on which this study is based was supplied by the M.W. Kellogg Co. No information beyond that in the literature on the operation of the Synthol reactor system was available for consideration in preparing this study, nor were any details of the changes made to the original Synthol system to overcome the operating problems reported in the literature. Because of conflicting claims and results found in the literature, it was decided to concentrate a large part of this study on a kinetic analysis of the reactor systems, in order to provide a theoretical analysis of intrinsic strengths and weaknesses of the reactors unclouded by different catalysts, operating conditions and feed compositions. The remainder of the study considers the physical attributes of the four reactor systems and compares their respective investment costs, yields, catalyst requirements and thermal efficiencies from simplified conceptual designs.

Thompson, G.J.; Riekena, M.L.; Vickers, A.G.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Carbon Sequestration to Mitigate Climate Change Human activities, especially the burning of fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and gas, have caused a substantial increase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Sequestration to Mitigate Climate Change Human activities, especially the burning of fossil-caused CO2 emissions and to remove CO2 from the atmosphere. 2.0 What is carbon sequestration? The term "carbon sequestration" is used to describe both natural and deliberate CARBON,INGIGATONSPERYEAR 1.5 Fossil

275

Advanced Fossil Energy Projects Loan Guarantee Solicitation  

Energy Savers [EERE]

of production and use, including resource development, energy generation, and end use. Fossil fuels currently account for more than 80 percent of U.S. energy production and are...

276

Sustainability Considerations in Spent Light-water Nuclear Fuel Retrievability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines long-term cost differences between two competing Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuels: Uranium Oxide (UOX) and Mixed Uranium Oxide-Plutonium Oxide (MOX). Since these costs are calculated on a life-cycle basis, expected savings from lower future MOX fuel prices can be used to value the option of substituting MOX for UOX, including the value of maintaining access to the used UOX fuel that could be reprocessed to make MOX. The two most influential cost drivers are the price of natural uranium and the cost of reprocessing. Significant and sustained reductions in reprocessing costs and/or sustained increases in uranium prices are required to give positive value to the retrievability of Spent Nuclear Fuel. While this option has positive economic value, it might not be exercised for 50 to 200 years. Therefore, there are many years for a program during which reprocessing technology can be researched, developed, demonstrated, and deployed. Further research is required to determine whether the cost of such a program would yield positive net present value and/or increases the sustainability of LWR energy systems.

Wood, Thomas W.; Rothwell, Geoffrey

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

277

Incorporation of Hydride Nuclear Fuels in Commercial Light Water Reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of hydride fueled BWRs. Nuclear Engineering and Design, 239:Fueled PWR Cores. Nuclear Engineering and Design, 239:1489–Hydride Fueled LWRs. Nuclear Engineering and Design, 239:

Terrani, Kurt Amir

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

A research needs assessment for the capture, utilization and disposal of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel-fired power plants. Volume 1, Executive summary: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study identifies and assesses system approaches in order to prioritize research needs for the capture and non-atmospheric sequestering of a significant portion of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emitted from fossil fuel-fired electric power plants (US power plants presently produce about 7% of the world`s CO{sub 2} emissions). The study considers capture technologies applicable either to existing plants or to those that optimistically might be demonstrated on a commercial scale over the next twenty years. Specific conclusions are as follows: (1) To implement CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration on a national scale will decrease power plant net efficiencies and significantly increase the cost of electricity. To make responsible societal decisions, accurate and consistent economic and environmental analysis of all alternatives for atmospheric CO{sub 2} mitigation are required. (2) Commercial CO{sub 2} capture technology, though expensive and energy intensive, exists today. (3) The most promising approach to more economical CO{sub 2} capture is to develop power plant systems that facilitate efficient CO{sub 2} capture. (4) While CO{sub 2} disposal in depleted oil and gas reservoirs is feasible today, the ability to dispose of large quantities Of CO{sub 2} is highly uncertain because of both technical and institutional issues. Disposal into the deep ocean or confined aquifers offers the potential for large quantity disposal, but there are technical, safety, liability, and environmental issues to resolve. Therefore, the highest priority research should focus on establishing the feasibility of large scale disposal options.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Sulfur accumulation in pinewood (Pinus sylvestris) induced by bacteria in a simulated seabed environment: Implications for marine archaeological wood and fossil fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fresh pinewood blocks were submerged in sulfate and iron(II) containing media, inoculated with bacterial consortia isolated from seawater, aiming to simulate the seabed conditions of the Vasa shipwreck (1628). The consortia contained erosion (EB) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and scanning X-ray spectromicroscopy images showed that organic sulfur, mainly thiols (R-SH), had accumulated in the lignin-rich middle lamella in EB-degraded parts of the wood. The sulfur content in the wood increased more than 10 times in 2 years. In another series with active inoculums from marine archaeological wood, the sulfur XANES spectra showed, after 4 years of anaerobic treatment, considerable amounts also of inorganic iron sulfides, Fe1?xS, which oxidized at atmospheric exposure. A sediment sample from the Vasa's seabed was also rich in iron sulfides, including pyrite, FeS2. X-ray fluorescence mappings of sulfur and phosphorous distributions indicate that scavenging SRB penetration, producing hydrogen sulfide in situ, is restricted to EB-degraded parts of the wood structure. The sulfur isotope depletion of 34S from ?34S = 21‰ in marine sulfate to ?34S = 6‰ and 1.8‰ for fractions of reduced sulfur and sulfate separated from a Vasa wood sample, respectively, suggests bacterial transformation. A fuller understanding of the routes of sulfur accumulation, as reactive iron sulfides and as organic sulfur, has important implications for improving conservation methods of marine archaeological wood. Moreover, the biogenic accumulation of organically bound sulfur, specifically in lignin-rich parts of waterlogged wood, has wider geochemical significance for fossil fuels of marine origin, as lignin-rich humic matter is important for the diagenetic formation of kerogens from anoxic marine sediments.

Yvonne Fors; Thomas Nilsson; Emiliana Damian Risberg; Magnus Sandström; Peter Torssander

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Dosimetry Modeling for Predicting Radiolytic Production at the Spent Fuel - Water Interface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modeling of the alpha, beta, and gamma dose from spent fuel as a function of particle size and fuel to water ratio was examined. These doses will be combined with modeling of G values and interactions to determine the concentration of various species formed at the fuel water interface and their affect on dissolution rates.

Miller, William H.; Kline, Amanda J.; Hanson, Brady D.

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water fossil fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Liquid Water Dynamics in a Model Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Flow Channel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Liquid Water Dynamics in a Model Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Flow Channel by Chris Miller in a Model Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Flow Channel by Chris Miller Bachelors of Engineering, University in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell is a critical issue in ensuring high cell performance. The water production

Victoria, University of

282

World Forests: The Area for Afforestation and their Potential for Fossil Carbon Sequestration and Substitution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A crucial factor in maintaining the carbon balance by forest plantations is to follow-up such programs by substituting fossil fuel by biomass. The amount of fossil fuel that 1 PJ of biomass energy can substitute ...

Wolfgang Schopfhauser

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Pressurized water reactor fuel assembly subchannel void fraction measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The void fraction measurement experiment of pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies has been conducted since 1987 under the sponsorship of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry as a Japanese national project. Two types of test sections are used in this experiment. One is a 5 x 5 array rod bundle geometry, and the other is a single-channel geometry simulating one of the subchannels in the rod bundle. Wide gamma-ray beam scanners and narrow gamma-ray beam computed tomography scanners are used to measure the subchannel void fractions under various steady-state and transient conditions. The experimental data are expected to be used to develop a void fraction prediction model relevant to PWR fuel assemblies and also to verify or improve the subchannel analysis method. The first series of experiments was conducted in 1992, and a preliminary evaluation of the data has been performed. The preliminary results of these experiments are described.

Akiyama, Yoshiei [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Yokohama (Japan). Nuclear Fuel and Core Engineering Dept.; Hori, Keiichi [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Hyougo (Japan); Miyazaki, Keiji [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Mishima, Kaichiro [Kyoto Univ., Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.; Sugiyama, Shigekazu [Nuclear Power Engineering Corp., Tokyo (Japan). Nuclear Fuel Dept.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Modeling Water Management in Polymer-Electrolyte Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel cells may become the energy-delivery devices of the 21st century with realization of a carbon-neutral energy economy. Although there are many types of fuel cells, polymerelectrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) are receiving the most attention for automotive and small stationary applications. In a PEFC, hydrogen and oxygen are combined electrochemically to produce water, electricity, and waste heat. During the operation of a PEFC, many interrelated and complex phenomena occur. These processes include mass and heat transfer, electrochemical reactions, and ionic and electronic transport. Most of these processes occur in the through-plane direction in what we term the PEFC sandwich as shown in Figure 1. This sandwich comprises multiple layers including diffusion media that can be composite structures containing a macroporous gas-diffusion layer (GDL) and microporous layer (MPL), catalyst layers (CLs), flow fields or bipolar plates, and a membrane. During operation fuel is fed into the anode flow field, moves through the diffusion medium, and reacts electrochemically at the anode CL to form hydrogen ions and electrons. The oxidant, usually oxygen in air, is fed into the cathode flow field, moves through the diffusion medium, and is electrochemically reduced at the cathode CL by combination with the generated protons and electrons. The water, either liquid or vapor, produced by the reduction of oxygen at the cathode exits the PEFC through either the cathode or anode flow field. The electrons generated at the anode pass through an external circuit and may be used to perform work before they are consumed at the cathode. The performance of a PEFC is most often reported in the form of a polarization curve, as shown in Figure 2. Roughly speaking, the polarization curve can be broken down into various regions. First, it should be noted that the equilibrium potential differs from the open-circuit voltage due mainly to hydrogen crossover through the membrane (i.e., a mixed potential on the cathode) and the resulting effects of the kinetic reactions. Next, at low currents, the behavior of a PEFC is dominated by kinetic losses. These losses mainly stem from the high overpotential of the oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR). As the current is increased, ohmic losses become a factor in lowering the overall cell potential. These ohmic losses are mainly from ionic losses in the electrodes and separator. At high currents, mass-transport limitations become increasingly important. These losses are due to reactants not being able to reach the electrocatalytic sites. Key among the issues facing PEFCs today is water management. Due to their low operating temperature (< 100 C), water exists in both liquid and vapor phases. Furthermore, state-of-the-art membranes require the use of water to provide high conductivity and fast proton transport. Thus, there is a tradeoff between having enough water for proton conduction (ohmic losses), but not too much or else the buildup of liquid water will cause a situation in which the reactant-gas-transport pathways are flooded (mass-transfer limitations). Figure 3 displays experimental evidence of the effects of water management on performance. In Figure 3(a), a neutron image of water content displays flooding near the outlet of the cell due to accumulation of liquid water and a decrease in the gas flowrates. The serpentine flow field is clearly visible with the water mainly underneath the ribs. Figure 3(b) shows polarization performance at 0.4 and 0.8 V and high-frequency resistance at 0.8 V as a function of cathode humidification temperature. At low current densities, as the inlet air becomes more humid, the membrane resistance decreases, and the performance increases. At higher current densities, the same effect occurs; however, the higher temperatures and more humid air also results in a lower inlet oxygen partial pressure.

Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley; Weber, Adam; Weber, Adam Z.; Balliet, Ryan; Gunterman, Haluna P.; Newman, John

2007-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

285

Office of Fossil Energy | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages

Fossil Energy Fossil Energy Search Search form Search Office of Fossil Energy Office of Fossil Energy Services Services Home Petroleum Reserves Petroleum Reserves Home Strategic Petroleum Reserve Heating Oil Reserve Naval Reserves International Cooperation Natural Gas Regulation Advisory Committees Science & Innovation Science & Innovation Home Clean Coal Clean Coal Home Turbines Gasification Fuel Cells Hydrogen from Coal Coal to Liquids Major Demonstrations Crosscutting Research Carbon Capture and Storage Carbon Capture and Storage Home Capture Storage Utilization MVA Regional Partnerships Oil & Gas Oil & Gas Home Methane Hydrate LNG Offshore Drilling Enhanced Oil Recovery Shale Gas Mission About Us About Us Home News & Blog News & Blog Home FE Today Press Releases & Techlines

286

Advanced Fuels Campaign Light Water Reactor Accident Tolerant Fuel Performance Metrics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The safe, reliable and economic operation of the nation’s nuclear power reactor fleet has always been a top priority for the United States’ nuclear industry. As a result, continual improvement of technology, including advanced materials and nuclear fuels, remains central to industry’s success. Decades of research combined with continual operation have produced steady advancements in technology and yielded an extensive base of data, experience, and knowledge on light water reactor (LWR) fuel performance under both normal and accident conditions. In 2011, following the Great East Japan Earthquake, resulting tsunami, and subsequent damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant complex, enhancing the accident tolerance of LWRs became a topic of serious discussion. As a result of direction from the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) initiated an Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) Development program. The complex multiphysics behavior of LWR nuclear fuel makes defining specific material or design improvements difficult; as such, establishing qualitative attributes is critical to guide the design and development of fuels and cladding with enhanced accident tolerance. This report summarizes a common set of technical evaluation metrics to aid in the optimization and down selection of candidate designs. As used herein, “metrics” describe a set of technical bases by which multiple concepts can be fairly evaluated against a common baseline and against one another. Furthermore, this report describes a proposed technical evaluation methodology that can be applied to assess the ability of each concept to meet performance and safety goals relative to the current UO2 – zirconium alloy system and relative to one another. The resultant ranked evaluation can then inform concept down-selection, such that the most promising accident tolerant fuel design option(s) can continue to be developed for lead test rod or lead test assembly insertion into a commercial reactor within the desired timeframe (by 2022).

Brad Merrill; Melissa Teague; Robert Youngblood; Larry Ott; Kevin Robb; Michael Todosow; Chris Stanek; Mitchell Farmer; Michael Billone; Robert Montgomery; Nicholas Brown; Shannon Bragg-Sitton

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Advanced Fuels Campaign Light Water Reactor Accident Tolerant Fuel Performance Metrics Executive Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research and development (R&D) activities on advanced, higher performance Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuels have been ongoing for the last few years. Following the unfortunate March 2011 events at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in Japan, the R&D shifted toward enhancing the accident tolerance of LWRs. Qualitative attributes for fuels with enhanced accident tolerance, such as improved reaction kinetics with steam resulting in slower hydrogen generation rate, provide guidance for the design and development of fuels and cladding with enhanced accident tolerance. A common set of technical metrics should be established to aid in the optimization and down selection of candidate designs on a more quantitative basis. “Metrics” describe a set of technical bases by which multiple concepts can be fairly evaluated against a common baseline and against one another. This report describes a proposed technical evaluation methodology that can be applied to evaluate the ability of each concept to meet performance and safety goals relative to the current UO2 – zirconium alloy system and relative to one another. The resultant ranked evaluation can then inform concept down-selection, such that the most promising accident tolerant fuel design option(s) can continue to be developed toward qualification.

Shannon Bragg-Sitton

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Light Water Reactor Fuel Cladding Research and Testing | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Light Water Reactor Fuel Cladding Research Light Water Reactor Fuel Cladding Research June 01, 2013 Severe Accident Test Station ORNL is the focus point for Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel cladding research and testing. The purpose of this research is to furnish U.S. industry (EPRI, Areva, Westinghouse), and regulators (NRC) with much-needed data supporting safe and economical nuclear power generation and used fuel management. LWR fuel cladding work is tightly integrated with ORNL accident tolerant fuel development and used fuel disposition programs thereby providing a powerful capability that couples basic materials science research with the nuclear applications research and development. The ORNL LWR fuel cladding program consists of five complementary areas of research: Accident tolerant fuel and cladding material testing under design

289

Benefits of Water-Fuel Emulsion on Automotive Diesel Exhaust Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water fuel emulsion is widely used to control pollutant emissions in large and medium diesel engines. The application of this fuel to small automotive engines has been limited by the emulsion stability and eco...

K. Lombaert; L. Le Moyne; P. Guibert…

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Conceptual design of an annular-fueled superheat boiling water reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The conceptual design of an annular-fueled superheat boiling water reactor (ASBWR) is outlined. The proposed design, ASBWR, combines the boiler and superheater regions into one fuel assembly. This ensures good neutron ...

Ko, Yu-Chih, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Impact of Shale Gas Development on Regional Water Quality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the Oil, Gas and Solution Mining Regulatory...S. J. , Water pollution risk associated...jPlayer( { solution: "flash, html...relatively clean fossil fuel that could potentially...engineering pollutants pollution production risk...

R. D. Vidic; S. L. Brantley; J. M. Vandenbossche; D. Yoxtheimer; J. D. Abad

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

292

Global tectonics and fossil fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... sediments, geosyn-clines and orogeny (Curray), geo-chemical formation of oil (Erdman), geothermal gradients, heat flow, and hydrocarbon recovery (Klemme), and the distribution and geological ... Petroleum Geologists.

R. C. Selley

1975-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

293

Fossil Fuel Reserves Versus Consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Table 2.1 of Chapter 2, data are presented which reveal that the U.S.’s known and recoverable reserves of petroleum are about 22.5 billion ... 2.2 percent of the known and recoverable reserves of the world. In...

Wendell H. Wiser

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Microbial fuel cell treatment of ethanol fermentation process water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a method for removing inhibitor compounds from a cellulosic biomass-to-ethanol process which includes a pretreatment step of raw cellulosic biomass material and the production of fermentation process water after production and removal of ethanol from a fermentation step, the method comprising contacting said fermentation process water with an anode of a microbial fuel cell, said anode containing microbes thereon which oxidatively degrade one or more of said inhibitor compounds while producing electrical energy or hydrogen from said oxidative degradation, and wherein said anode is in electrical communication with a cathode, and a porous material (such as a porous or cation-permeable membrane) separates said anode and cathode.

Borole, Abhijeet P. (Knoxville, TN)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

295

Colloidal Petcoke-in-Water Suspensions as Fuels for Power Generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Colloidal Petcoke-in-Water Suspensions as Fuels for Power Generation ... In this work, it is shown that, despite the low reactivity of petroleum coke (petcoke) and the presence of 40% water, a petcoke suspension having a large colloidal population burned with unprecedented high efficiencies (>99%) without a support fuel. ... Combustion tests of a typical heavy fuel oil (HFO) were carried out to produce baseline data for comparison to the colloidal petcoke in water suspension (CPW) performance. ...

Gustavo A. Núñez; María I. Briceño; Cebers Gómez; Takeshi Asa; Hamid Farzan; Shengteng Hu; Daniel D. Joseph

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

296

Characterization of coal-water slurry fuel sprays generated by an electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injector.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Experiments have been completed to characterize coal-water slurry sprays generated by an electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injection system for a diesel engine. The sprays were injected… (more)

Payne, Stephen Ellis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Characterization of coal-water slurry fuel sprays generated by an electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experiments have been completed to characterize coal-water slurry sprays generated by an electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injection system for a diesel engine. The sprays were injected into a pressurized chamber equipped with quartz...

Payne, Stephen Ellis

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

298

Fuel Performance Code Benchmark for Uncertainty Analysis in Light Water Reactor Modeling.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Fuel performance codes are used in the design and safety analysis of light water reactors. The differences in the physical models and the numerics of… (more)

Blyth, Taylor

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Modeling Water Management in Polymer-Electrolyte Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Newman, in Advances in Fuel Cells, Vol. 1, T. S. Zhao, K. -A. Uribe and B. S. Pivovar, Fuel Cells, 7, 153 (2007). R. C.and S. Srinivasan, Fuel Cells: Their Electrochemistry,

Weber, Adam; Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

* Corresponding author -kfingerman@berkeley.edu 1 Integrating Water Sustainability into the Low Carbon Fuel Standard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

it to Average Fuel Carbon Intensity (AFCI) (c) Charge a tax on water use for biofuel production (d) Establish Carbon Fuel Standard Kevin Fingerman1* , Daniel Kammen1,2 , and Michael O'Hare2 1 Energy & Resources (Chapagain and Hoekstra, 2004). As the State of California implements the Low Carbon Fuel Standard (LCFS

Kammen, Daniel M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water fossil fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

A non-isothermal PEM fuel cell model including two water transport mechanisms in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A non-isothermal PEM fuel cell model including two water transport mechanisms in the membrane K Freiburg Germany A dynamic two-phase flow model for proton exchange mem- brane (PEM) fuel cells and the species concentrations. In order to describe the charge transport in the fuel cell the Poisson equations

Münster, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität

302

Burning of Hydrocarbon Fuels Directly in a Water-Based Heat Carrier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A principal possibility of burning hydrocarbon fuels directly in a water-based heat carrier is demonstrated. The first experimental results are presented by an example of burning acetylene in water with initia...

V. S. Teslenko; V. I. Manzhalei; R. N. Medvedev…

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

FEASIBILITY OF RECYCLING PLUTONIUM AND MINOR ACTINIDES IN LIGHT WATER REACTORS USING HYDRIDE FUEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this DOE NERI program sponsored project was to assess the feasibility of improving the plutonium (Pu) and minor actinide (MA) recycling capabilities of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) by using hydride instead of oxide fuels. There are four general parts to this assessment: 1) Identifying promising hydride fuel assembly designs for recycling Pu and MAs in PWRs 2) Performing a comprehensive systems analysis that compares the fuel cycle characteristics of Pu and MA recycling in PWRs using the promising hydride fuel assembly designs identified in Part 1 versus using oxide fuel assembly designs 3) Conducting a safety analysis to assess the likelihood of licensing hydride fuel assembly designs 4) Assessing the compatibility of hydride fuel with cladding materials and water under typical PWR operating conditions Hydride fuel was found to offer promising transmutation characteristics and is recommended for further examination as a possible preferred option for recycling plutonium in PWRs.

Greenspan, Ehud; Todreas, Neil; Taiwo, Temitope

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

304

Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Fossil  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Fossil Fuels Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Fossil Fuels Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. nepdg_251_500.pdf. Demand for Fossil Fuels. Renewable sources of power. Demand for fossil fuels surely will overrun supply sooner or later, as indeed it already has in the casc of United States domestic oil drilling. Recognition also is growing that our air and land can no longer absorb unlimited quantities of waste from fossil fuel extraction and combustion. As that day draws nearer, policymakers will have no realistic alternative but to turn to sources of power that today make up a viable but small part of America's energy picture. And they will be

305

Fossil | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fossil Fossil Fossil December 12, 2013 Department of Energy Releases $8 Billion Solicitation for Advanced Fossil Energy Projects The Energy Department published a solicitation today, making up to $8 billion in loan guarantee authority available to support innovative advanced fossil energy projects that avoid, reduce, or sequester greenhouse gases December 12, 2013 The National Energy Technology Laboratory's chemical looping reactor. This promising approach to capturing carbon dioxide will be among the technologies explored as part of the the Loan Program Office's advanced fossil energy solicitation. | Photo courtesy of the National Energy Technology Laboratory.

306

Fossil | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

March 1, 2011 March 1, 2011 Alternative fuel vehicles and advanced vehicle technologies are helping to keep National treasures like Yellowstone National Park in Cody, Wyoming pristine. | Photo by Jeff Gunn National Parks Clean Up with Alternative Fuels Many National Parks are adopting clean alternative fuel vehicles, advanced vehicles technologies and other fuel saving measures to maintain their air quality and keep the parks pristine. February 16, 2011 At left, highly turbulent behavior as water flows into (clear) oil. At right, all turbulence is suppressed by using cornstarch. | Department of Energy Photo | Courtesy of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | Public Domain Forceful Fluid: Scientists Discover a Starchy Substance with Oily Applications Researchers at the Energy Department's Lawrence Livermore National

307

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The hydrogen economy emerged as a potential response to two major problems that mankind faces today, namely, its dependence on fossil fuels and the high level of pollution associated with the fossil fuel combusti...

?brahim Dinçer; Calin Zamfirescu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Corrosion optimized Zircaloy for boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel elements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A corrosion optimized Zircaloy has to be based primarily on in-boiling water reactor (in-BWR) results. Therefore, the material parameters affecting corrosion were deduced from results of experimental fuel rod irradiation with systematic variations and from a large variety of material coupons exposed in water rods up to four cycles. The major material effects is the size and distribution of precipitates. For optimizing both early and late corrosion, the size has to stay in a small range. In the case of material quenched in the final stage, the quenching rate appears to be an important parameter. As far as materials chemistry is concerned, the in-BWR results indicate that corrosion in BWRs is influenced by the alloying elements tin, chromium, and the impurity silicon. In addition to corrosion optimization, hydriding is also considered. A large variation from lot to lot under identically coolant condition has been found. The available data indicate that the chromium content is the most important material parameter for hydrogen pickup.

Garzarolli, F.; Schumann, R.; Steinberg, E. [Siemens AG, Erlangen (Germany). Power Generation Group

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

309

Economic Analysis on Direct Use of Spent Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel in CANDU Reactors - I: DUPIC Fuel Fabrication Cost  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A preliminary conceptual design of a Direct Use of spent Pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel In Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactors (DUPIC) fuel fabrication plant was studied, which annually converts spent PWR fuel of 400 tonnes heavy element (HE) into CANDU fuel. The capital and operating costs were estimated from the viewpoint of conceptual design. Assuming that the annual discount rate is 5% during the construction (5 yr) and operation period (40 yr) and contingency is 25% of the capital cost, the levelized unit cost (LUC) of DUPIC fuel fabrication was estimated to be 616 $/kg HE, which is mostly governed by annual operation and maintenance costs that correspond to 63% of LUC. Among the operation and maintenance cost components being considered, the waste disposal cost has the dominant effect on LUC ({approx}49%). From sensitivity analyses of production capacity, discount rate, and contingency, it was found that the production capacity of the plant is the major parameter that affects the LUC.

Choi, Hangbok; Ko, Won Il; Yang, Myung Seung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

Reconstruction of Early Paleogene North Pacific Deep-Water Circulation using the Neodymium Isotopic Composition of Fossil Fish Debris  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the timing of the cessation of major, deep convection in the North Pacific occurred much earlier, ~52 Ma than the timing obtained from shallower Shatsky Rise sites, ~45 Ma. Convection in the North Pacific likely produced a dense water mass that influenced...

Hague, Ashley Melissa

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

311

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential BuildingsŽ  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR Part 435 "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1778) 2 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential

312

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential BuildingsŽ  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR Part 435 "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1778) 2 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential

313

WORKING PAPER N 2010 -11 Carbon price and optimal extraction of a polluting fossil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WORKING PAPER N° 2010 - 11 Carbon price and optimal extraction of a polluting fossil fuel atmospheric CO2. For instance, Chakravorty et al. (2006b) examine the optimal fossil fuel price path, when AGRONOMIQUE halshs-00564852,version1-10Feb2011 #12;Carbon Price and Optimal Extraction of a Polluting Fossil

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

314

Metabolic Engineering and Synthetic Biology in Strain Development Every year, we consume about 27 billion barrels of fossil oil.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

billion barrels of fossil oil. This enormous amount of oil is used for fueling our cars and airplanes

315

Behavior of Spent Nuclear Fuel in Water Pool Storage  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Behavior of Spent Nuclear Behavior of Spent Nuclear Fuel in Water Pool Storage A. 0; Johnson, jr. , I ..: . Prepared Cor the Energy Research and Development Administration under Contract EY-76-C-06-1830 ---- Pat t i ~ < N ~ ~ r ~ t b w t ~ - ! I , ~ I ~ ~ ~ I . I I ~ ) ~ I I ~ ~ N O T I C E T€& - was prepad pnpn4. m w n t of w k spon-d by the Unitd S t . & ) C a u n m ~ (*WU ij*. M t e d $tam w the Wqy R e s e w & a d Ohrsropmcnt ~dmhirmlion, nor m y d thair ewhew,,nq Pny @fw a n t r ~ ~ t 0 ~ 1 , s ~ k m r i t r i l t t q r , ~ , m r tWf ernpfQw, r(tLltm any wartany, s x p r e s or kWld,= w w aAql -9 . o r r w p a m l ~ ~ t y for e~ o r uodruincvr of any infomutim, 9 F p d + d - , or repratants that -would nat 1 d - e privately owned rfghas. ,i PAQFIC NORTHWEST UBORATORY operated b ;"' SArnLLE ' fw the E M R m RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRAT1QN Wk.Cwfraa rv-76c-ts-is38

316

Prospects for increased low-grade bio-fuels use in home and commercial heating applications .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Though we must eventually find viable alternatives for fossil fuels in large segments of the energy market, there are economically attractive fossil fuel alternatives today… (more)

Pendray, John Robert

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

An Estimate of the Cost of Electricity from Light Water Reactors and Fossil Plants with Carbon Capture and Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As envisioned in this report, LIFE technology lends itself to large, centralized, baseload (or 'always on') electrical generation. Should LIFE plants be built, they will have to compete in the electricity market with other generation technologies. We consider the economics of technologies with similar operating characteristics: significant economies of scale, limited capacity for turndown, zero dependence on intermittent resources and ability to meet environmental constraints. The five generation technologies examined here are: (1) Light Water Reactors (LWR); (2) Coal; (3) Coal with Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS); (4) Natural Gas; and (5) Natural Gas with Carbon Capture and Sequestration. We use MIT's cost estimation methodology (Du and Parsons, 2009) to determine the cost of electricity at which each of these technologies is viable.

Simon, A J

2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

318

High temperature chemistry of advanced heavy water reactor fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Department of Atomic Energy envisages the use of thoria based fuel in the third phase of nuclear power generation. The fuel will consist of solid solution of thorium-uranium and thorium-plutonium in the form of their oxides. The former will contain 2.5 mole % UO2 while the latter about 4 mole % PuO2. Since no other country in the world has used such fuel, no data is available on its behavior under long-term irradiation. The high temperature chemistry of fuel can however provide some insight into the behavior of such fuel during irradiation and could be of considerable help in the assessment of its long-term integrity. The high temperature chemistry of the fuel essentially involves the measurement of thermodynamic properties of the compounds formed in the multi-component systems comprising the fuel matrix, the fission products and the clad. The physical integrity of the fuel under long-term irradiation can be predicted with the help of basic thermodynamic data such as the Gibbs energy of formation of various compounds and their thermophysical properties such as thermal conductivity and coefficient of thermal expansion derived from experimental measurements. The paper highlights the measurements made on some typical systems relevant to the prediction of thoria based fuel behaviour during long-term irradiation. The experimental problems faced in such measurements are also discussed.

S.R. Dharwadkar

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Radio-toxicity of spent fuel of the advanced heavy water reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Radio-toxicity of spent fuel of the advanced heavy water reactor S. Anand * K. D. S...Mumbai 400085, India The Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is a new power...PHWR. INTRODUCTION The Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR)(1, 2), currently......

S. Anand; K. D. S. Singh; V. K. Sharma

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Categorization of failed and damaged spent LWR (light-water reactor) fuel currently in storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of a study that was jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the Electric Power Research Institute are described in this report. The purpose of the study was to (1) estimate the number of failed fuel assemblies and damaged fuel assemblies (i.e., ones that have sustained mechanical or chemical damage but with fuel rod cladding that is not breached) in storage, (2) categorize those fuel assemblies, and (3) prepare this report as an authoritative, illustrated source of information on such fuel. Among the more than 45,975 spent light-water reactor fuel assemblies currently in storage in the United States, it appears that there are nearly 5000 failed or damaged fuel assemblies. 78 refs., 23 figs., 19 tabs.

Bailey, W.J.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water fossil fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Fossil Energy Research Efforts in Carbon Capture and Storage | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fossil Energy Research Efforts in Carbon Capture and Storage Fossil Energy Research Efforts in Carbon Capture and Storage Fossil Energy Research Efforts in Carbon Capture and Storage May 14, 2009 - 1:54pm Addthis Statement of Dr. Victor K. Der, Acting Assistant Secretary, Office of Fossil Energy before the Energy and Natural Resources Committee, United States Senate. Thank you, Mr. Chairman and members of the Committee. I appreciate this opportunity to provide testimony on the United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) research efforts in carbon capture and storage. The Department of Energy has not had an opportunity to fully analyze S. 1013, and therefore, cannot take a position on the bill at this time. Introduction Fossil fuel resources represent a tremendous national asset. An abundance of fossil fuels in North America has contributed to our Nation's economic

322

Fuels from Water, CO2, and Solar Energy Prof. Aldo Steinfeld  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuels from Water, CO2, and Solar Energy Prof. Aldo Steinfeld Department of Mechanical and Process fuels make use of concentrated solar radiation as the energy source of high-temperature process heat Engineering, ETH Zurich, Switzerland and Solar Technology Laboratory, Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland

Ponce, V. Miguel

323

Under Pressure and in Hot Water: Algae Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

March 3rd Under Pressure and in Hot Water: Algae Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals Dr. Phil:50 April 10th (Joint Seminar with EES) Fecal Sludge-Fed Biodiesel Plants: The Next-Generation Urban

Minsker, Barbara S.

324

New Polymeric Proton Conductors for Water-free and High-temperature Fuel Cells  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation on New Polymeric Proton Conductors for Water-free and High-temperature Fuel Cells to the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting held in Arlington, Virginia, May 26,2005.

325

Improving the technology of creating water-coal fuel from lignites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the preparation of coal-water fuel slurries from lignite. The heat of combustion as related to the preparation of the lignite was investigated. The hydrobarothermal processing of suspensions of lignites was studied in autoclaves.

Gorlov, E.G.; Golovin, G.S.; Zotova, O.V. [Rossiiskaya Akadeiya, Nauk (Russian Federation)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

326

Antiwear properties of water-fuel emulsions for marine diesel engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water-fuel emulsions (WFEs) were prepared by hydrodynamic mixing of fuel, water and additive. The physicochemical characteristics of the WFE with 20% water were analyzed and the tests were performed in an MI-1 friction tester and in a 1 Ch 10.5/13 test-stand diesel; rubbing parts made of ShKh15 steel were in the tester. Engine test results show that introduction of water into fuel gives an increase in the rate of wear. With the introduction of 0.03% synthetic fatty acid still residues, the fuel consumption in the 2 Ch 8.5/11 engine is reduced by approximately 2% over a certain period of time.

Danilov, A.M.; Selyagina, A.A.; Karyakin, K.B.; Gorbachev, Yu.A.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Fossil energy program. Progress report, July 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report - the seventy-second of a series - is a compendium of monthly progress reports for the ORNL research and development programs that are in support of the increased utilization of coal and other fossil fuel alternatives to oil and gas as sources of clean energy. The projects reported this month include those for coal conversion development, chemical research and development, materials technology, component development and process evaluation, technical support to major liquefaction projects, process and program analysis, fossil energy environmental analysis, coal preparation and waste utilization, coal preparation plant automation, atmospheric fluidized bed coal combustor for cogeneration, technical support to the TVA fluidized bed combustion demonstration plant program, fossil energy applications assessments, performance assurance system support for fossil energy projects, international assessment of atmospheric fluidized bed combustion technology, and PFBC systems analysis.

McNeese, L. E.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Evaluation of hybrid solar/fossil Rankine-cooling concept  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hybrid solar/fossil Rankine cycle is analyzed thermodynamically to determine fuel use and efficiency. The hybrid system is briefly compared with solar organic Rankine systems with a fossil fuel auxiliary mode, and with geothermal resources. The economic evaluation compares the present value of the superheater fuel cost over the system lifetime with the first cost reduction obtained by substituting a hybrid solar/fossil Rankine engine for an organic Rankine engine. The economics analysis indicates that even if the hybrid solar/fossil Rankine cooling system were developed to the point of being a commercial product with an economic advantage over an otherwise equivalent solar organic Rankine cooling system, it would gradually lose that advantage with rising fuel costs and decreasing collector costs. From the standpoint of national fossil fuel conservation, the hybrid concept would be preferable only in applications where the operating duration in the solar/fossil mode would be substantially greater than in the fossil fuel-only auxiliary mode. (LEW)

Curran, H M

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

HISTORY | Fuel Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Together with the electric motor, dynamo, gas turbine, internal combustion engine, and the fused salt electrolysis of aluminum, the industrial revolution of the nineteenth century brought about the fuel cell – the silent or cold combustion of fossil fuels by the electrochemical oxidation with atmospheric oxygen to water and carbon dioxide. Wilhelm Ostwald, in 1894, emphasized the high efficiency and the nonpolluting properties of the direct conversion of chemical energy into electricity – in contrast to the then combination of steam engine and dynamo, which reached only about 10% efficiency. Direct coal fuel cells designed for the propulsion of ships, however, have not become a reality so far. Instead of fuel cells and batteries, internal combustion engines determined the nineteenth- and twentieth- century technological landscape. Against the background of the oil crisis and the long-term scarcity of natural gas, crude oil, and coal, new hopes have focused on fuel cell technology, which saw first early splendid applications during the space programs of the 1960s, in submarines since the 1980s, and in experimental zero-emission vehicles (ZEVs) since the 1990s. This article outlines (1) early insights about energy conversion: Grove's cell, direct conversion of coal and indirect fuel cells; (2) historical roots of alkaline fuel cells: the discovery of gas diffusion electrodes; low-pressure alkaline fuel cell conquer spacecrafts and submarines; (3) polymer electrolyte fuel cells: solid polymer technology, electric vehicles, direct methanol fuel-cell, stationary power systems and portable polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell systems; (4) phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC): acid fuel cells, PAFC plants in Japan, gasoline fuel cells; and (5) high-temperature fuel cells: molten carbonate fuel cell and solid oxide fuel cell.

P. Kurzweil

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Fossil Energy Fiscal Year 2011 Budget Request | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Fiscal Year 2011 Budget Request Energy Fiscal Year 2011 Budget Request Fossil Energy Fiscal Year 2011 Budget Request March 17, 2010 - 1:12pm Addthis Mr. Chairman, Members of the Committee, it is my pleasure to appear before you today to present the Office of Fossil Energy's (FE) proposed Budget for Fiscal Year 2011 (FY 2011). The Office of Fossil Energy's primary objective is to ensure that we can continue to utilize our traditional fuel sources for clean, affordable, reliable energy. Fossil fuels are anticipated to play a critical role in meeting our Nation's future energy needs. Making use of the Nation's fossil fuel assets in an environmentally responsible manner will help the United States to meet its energy requirements, minimize detrimental environmental impacts, positively contribute to energy security and compete

331

Fossil-energy program. Progress report for June 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report - the eighty-third of series - is a compendium of monthly progress reports for the ORNL research and development programs that are in support of the increased utilization of coal and other fossil fuel alternatives as sources of clean energy. The projects reported this month include those for coal conversion development, chemical research and development, materials technology, component development and process evaluation, technical support to major liquefaction projects, process analysis and engineering evaluations, fossil energy environmental analysis, flue gas desulfurization, coal preparation waste utilization, atmospheric fluidized bed coal combustor for cogeneration, TVA FBC demonstration plant program technical support, PFBC systems analysis, fossil fuel applications assessments, performance assurance system support for fossil energy projects, international energy technology assessment, generalized equilibrium models for liquid and gaseous fuel supplies, analyses of coal production goals, and fossil energy information center.

Not Available

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Department of Energy - Fossil  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

61 en Department of Energy Releases $8 61 en Department of Energy Releases $8 Billion Solicitation for Advanced Fossil Energy Projects http://energy.gov/articles/department-energy-releases-8-billion-solicitation-advanced-fossil-energy-projects fossil-energy-projects" class="title-link">Department of Energy Releases $8 Billion Solicitation for Advanced Fossil Energy Projects

333

End-of-life destructive examination of light water breeder reactor fuel rods (LWBR Development Program)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Destructive examination of 12 representative Light Water Breeder Reactor fuel rods was performed following successful operation in the Shippingport Atomic Power Station for 29,047 effective full power hours, about five years. Light Water Breeder Reactor fuel rods were unique in that the thorium oxide and uranium-233 oxide fuel was contained within Zircaloy-4 cladding. Destructive examinations included analysis of released fission gas; chemical analysis of the fuel to determine depletion, iodine, and cesium levels; chemical analysis of the cladding to determine hydrogen, iodine, and cesium levels; metallographic examination of the cladding, fuel, and other rod components to determine microstructural features and cladding corrosion features; and tensile testing of the irradiated cladding to determine mechanical strength. The examinations confirmed that Light Water Breeder Reactor fuel rod performance was excellent. No evidence of fuel rod failure was observed, and the fuel operating temperature was low (below 2580/sup 0/F at which an increased percentage of fission gas is released). 21 refs., 80 figs., 20 tabs.

Richardson, K.D.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Nuclear tanker producing liquid fuels from air and water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emerging technologies in CO? air capture, high temperature electrolysis, microchannel catalytic conversion, and Generation IV reactor plant systems have the potential to create a shipboard liquid fuel production system ...

Galle-Bishop, John Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

In-Situ Safeguards Verification of Low Burn-up Pressurized Water Reactor Spent Fuel Assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel in-situ gross defect verification method for light water reactor spent fuel assemblies was developed and investigated by a Monte Carlo study. This particular method is particularly effective for old pressurized water reactor spent fuel assemblies that have natural uranium in their upper fuel zones. Currently there is no method or instrument that does verification of this type of spent fuel assemblies without moving the spent fuel assemblies from their storage positions. The proposed method uses a tiny neutron detector and a detector guiding system to collect neutron signals inside PWR spent fuel assemblies through guide tubes present in PWR assemblies. The data obtained in such a manner are used for gross defect verification of spent fuel assemblies. The method uses 'calibration curves' which show the expected neutron counts inside one of the guide tubes of spent fuel assemblies as a function of fuel burn-up. By examining the measured data in the 'calibration curves', the consistency of the operator's declaration is verified.

Ham, Y S; Sitaraman, S; Park, I; Kim, J; Ahn, G

2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

336

The burnup dependence of light water reactor spent fuel oxidation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the temperature range of interest for dry storage or for placement of spent fuel in a permanent repository under the conditions now being considered, UO{sub 2} is thermodynamically unstable with respect to oxidation to higher oxides. The multiple valence states of uranium allow for the accommodation of interstitial oxygen atoms in the fuel matrix. A variety of stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric phases is therefore possible as the fuel oxidizers from UO{sub 2} to higher oxides. The oxidation of UO{sub 2} has been studied extensively for over 40 years. It has been shown that spent fuel and unirradiated UO{sub 2} oxidize via different mechanisms and at different rates. The oxidation of LWR spent fuel from UO{sub 2} to UO{sub 2.4} was studied previously and is reasonably well understood. The study presented here was initiated to determine the mechanism and rate of oxidation from UO{sub 2.4} to higher oxides. During the early stages of this work, a large variability in the oxidation behavior of samples oxidized under nearly identical conditions was found. Based on previous work on the effect of dopants on UO{sub 2} oxidation and this initial variability, it was hypothesized that the substitution of fission product and actinide impurities for uranium atoms in the spent fuel matrix was the cause of the variable oxidation behavior. Since the impurity concentration is roughly proportional to the burnup of a specimen, the oxidation behavior of spent fuel was expected to be a function of both temperature and burnup. This report (1) summarizes the previous oxidation work for both unirradiated UO{sub 2} and spent fuel (Section 2.2) and presents the theoretical basis for the burnup (i.e., impurity concentration) dependence of the rate of oxidation (Sections 2.3, 2.4, and 2.5), (2) describes the experimental approach (Section 3) and results (Section 4) for the current oxidation tests on spent fuel, and (3) establishes a simple model to determine the activation energies associated with spent fuel oxidation (Section 5).

Hanson, B.D.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Non-Proliferative, Thorium-Based, Core and Fuel Cycle for Pressurized Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two of the major barriers to the expansion of worldwide adoption of nuclear power are related to proliferation potential of the nuclear fuel cycle and issues associated with the final disposal of spent fuel. The Radkowsky Thorium Fuel (RTF) concept proposed by Professor A. Radkowsky offers a partial solution to these problems. The main idea of the concept is the utilization of the seed-blanket unit (SBU) fuel assembly geometry which is a direct replacement for a 'conventional' assembly in either a Russian pressurized water reactor (VVER-1000) or a Western pressurized water reactor (PWR). The seed-blanket fuel assembly consists of a fissile (U) zone, known as seed, and a fertile (Th) zone known as blanket. The separation of fissile and fertile allows separate fuel management schemes for the thorium part of the fuel (a subcritical 'blanket') and the 'driving' part of the core (a supercritical 'seed'). The design objective for the blanket is an efficient generation and in-situ fissioning of the U233 isotope, while the design objective for the seed is to supply neutrons to the blanket in a most economic way, i.e. with minimal investment of natural uranium. The introduction of thorium as a fertile component in the nuclear fuel cycle significantly reduces the quantity of plutonium production and modifies its isotopic composition, reducing the overall proliferation potential of the fuel cycle. Thorium based spent fuel also contains fewer higher actinides, hence reducing the long-term radioactivity of the spent fuel. The analyses show that the RTF core can satisfy the requirements of fuel cycle length, and the safety margins of conventional pressurized water reactors. The coefficients of reactivity are comparable to currently operating VVER's/PWR's. The major feature of the RTF cycle is related to the total amount of spent fuel discharged for each cycle from the reactor core. The fuel management scheme adopted for RTF core designs allows a significant decrease in the amount of discharged spent fuel, for a given energy production, compared with standard VVER/PWR. The total Pu production rate of RTF cycles is only 30 % of standard reactor. In addition, the isotopic compositions of the RTF's and standard reactor grade Pu are markedly different due to the very high burnup accumulated by the RTF spent fuel.

Todosow M.; Todosow M.; Raitses, G. (BNL) Galperin, A. (Ben Gurion University)

2009-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

338

Fossil Algae in India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... TWENTY-FIVE years ago, I reported in Nature J. the discovery of abundant fossil algae in the Cretaceous rocks of South India, especially in one of the limestones belonging ... associated flints and cherts which are their silicified representatives yielded a rich harvest of fossil algae of various kinds; these were studied and described by me in collaboration with Dr. ...

L. RAMA RAO

1958-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

339

Economic Analysis on Direct Use of Spent Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel in CANDU Reactors - III: Spent DUPIC Fuel Disposal Cost  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The disposal costs of spent pressurized water reactor (PWR), Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, and DUPIC fuels have been estimated based on available literature data and the engineering design of a spent CANDU fuel disposal facility by the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. The cost estimation was carried out by the normalization concept of total electricity generation. Therefore, the future electricity generation scale was analyzed to evaluate the appropriate capacity of the high-level waste disposal facility in Korea, which is a key parameter of the disposal cost estimation. Based on the total electricity generation scale, it is concluded that the disposal unit costs for spent CANDU natural uranium, CANDU-DUPIC, and PWR fuels are 192.3, 388.5, and 696.5 $/kg heavy element, respectively.

Ko, Won Il; Choi, Hangbok; Roh, Gyuhong; Yang, Myung Seung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

8/10/12 Bureaucracy fuels China's safe water problems | Eco-Business.com 1/2www.eco-business.com/news/bureaucracy-fuels-chinas-safe-water-problems/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2012 - SHANGHAI Australian PV Solar Energy Conference & Exh8/10/12 Bureaucracy fuels China's safe water problems | Eco-Business.com 1/2www.eco-business.com/news/bureaucracy-fuels-chinas-safe-water-problems/ Policy & Finance Energy Green Buildings Transport Manufacturing Waste Eco-Cities Food & Agriculture Water

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water fossil fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Microbial Fuel Cells for Recycle of Process Water from Cellulosic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to improve ethanol process economics in biorefineries Decreased water consumption Enables wastewater recycling Electricity or hydrogen generation Inexpensive Versatile Applications...

342

Use of electromagnetic clutch water pumps in vehicle engine cooling systems to reduce fuel consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In general, when the internal combustion engine of a vehicle is started, its operationally connected cooling system provides excessive cooling, resulting in unnecessary energy consumption and excessive emission of exhaust gas. If the rotational speed of the engine is high, the excessive cooling causes the combustion efficiency to decrease. Therefore, better control of the operating temperature range of the engine through use of an active cooling system can achieve better fuel economy and reduction of exhaust gas emission. Effective control of the cooling system in accordance with the operating conditions of the engine can be realized by changing the mass flow rate of the coolant. In this study, we designed electromagnetic clutch water pumps that can control the coolant flow. We made two types of water pump: (1) a planetary gear (PG)-type water pump which can reduce the rotation speed of the water pump by 65%, compared with a pulley; and (2) an on/off-type water pump which can completely stop the rotation of the impeller. The performance evaluation of these pumps consisted of a warm-up test and the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC). Warm-up test results showed that the time required to achieve a temperature of approximately 80 °C with the PG water pump and the on/off water pump was improved by 7.3% and 24.7% respectively, compared with that of a conventional water pump. Based on the NEDC results, we determined that the fuel economy of the engine using the PG water pump and the on/off water pump was improved by 1.7% and 4.0% compared with the fuel economy when using the conventional water pump. The application of clutch water pumps is expected to contribute to the improvement of engine cooling system performance, because their effect in reducing the fuel consumption rate is similar to that of an electric water pump.

Yoon Hyuk Shin; Sung Chul Kim; Min Soo Kim

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

WaterTransport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing and Design Optimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water management in Proton Exchange Membrane, PEM, Fuel Cells is challenging because of the inherent conflicts between the requirements for efficient low and high power operation. Particularly at low powers, adequate water must be supplied to sufficiently humidify the membrane or protons will not move through it adequately and resistance losses will decrease the cell efficiency. At high power density operation, more water is produced at the cathode than is necessary for membrane hydration. This excess water must be removed effectively or it will accumulate in the Gas Diffusion Layers, GDLs, between the gas channels and catalysts, blocking diffusion paths for reactants to reach the catalysts and potentially flooding the electrode. As power density of the cells is increased, the challenges arising from water management are expected to become more difficult to overcome simply due to the increased rate of liquid water generation relative to fuel cell volume. Thus, effectively addressing water management based issues is a key challenge in successful application of PEMFC systems. In this project, CFDRC and our partners used a combination of experimental characterization, controlled experimental studies of important processes governing how water moves through the fuel cell materials, and detailed models and simulations to improve understanding of water management in operating hydrogen PEM fuel cells. The characterization studies provided key data that is used as inputs to all state-of-the-art models for commercially important GDL materials. Experimental studies and microscopic scale models of how water moves through the GDLs showed that the water follows preferential paths, not branching like a river, as it moves toward the surface of the material. Experimental studies and detailed models of water and airflow in fuel cells channels demonstrated that such models can be used as an effective design tool to reduce operating pressure drop in the channels and the associated costs and weight of blowers and pumps to force air and hydrogen gas through the fuel cell. Promising improvements to materials structure and surface treatments that can potentially aid in managing the distribution and removal of liquid water were developed; and improved steady-state and freeze-thaw performance was demonstrated for a fuel cell stack under the self-humidified operating conditions that are promising for stationary power generation with reduced operating costs.

J. Vernon Cole; Abhra Roy; Ashok Damle; Hari Dahr; Sanjiv Kumar; Kunal Jain; Ned Djilai

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

344

3D Simulation of Missing Pellet Surface Defects in Light Water Reactor Fuel Rods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cladding on light water reactor (LWR) fuel rods provides a stable enclosure for fuel pellets and serves as a first barrier against fission product release. Consequently, it is important to design fuel to prevent cladding failure due to mechanical interactions with fuel pellets. Cladding stresses can be effectively limited by controlling power increase rates. However, it has been shown that local geometric irregularities caused by manufacturing defects known as missing pellet surfaces (MPS) in fuel pellets can lead to elevated cladding stresses that are sufficiently high to cause cladding failure. Accurate modeling of these defects can help prevent these types of failures. Nuclear fuel performance codes commonly use a 1.5D (axisymmetric, axially-stacked, one-dimensional radial) or 2D axisymmetric representation of the fuel rod. To study the effects of MPS defects, results from 1.5D or 2D fuel performance analyses are typically mapped to thermo-mechanical models that consist of a 2D plane-strain slice or a full 3D representation of the geometry of the pellet and clad in the region of the defect. The BISON fuel performance code developed at Idaho National Laboratory employs either a 2D axisymmetric or 3D representation of the full fuel rod. This allows for a computational model of the full fuel rod to include local defects. A 3D thermo-mechanical model is used to simulate the global fuel rod behavior, and includes effects on the thermal and mechanical behavior of the fuel due to accumulation of fission products, fission gas production and release, and the effects of fission gas accumulation on thermal conductivity across the fuel-clad gap. Local defects can be modeled simply by including them in the 3D fuel rod model, without the need for mapping between two separate models. This allows for the complete set of physics used in a fuel performance analysis to be included naturally in the computational representation of the local defect, and for the effects of the local defect to be coupled with the global fuel rod model. This approach for modeling fuel with MPS defects is demonstrated and compared with alternative techniques. The effects of varying parameters of the MPS defect are studied using this technique and presented here.

B.W. Spencer; J.D. Hales; S.R. Novascone; R.L. Williamson

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Water Chemistry Control System for Recovery of Damaged and Degraded Spent Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the government of Serbia have led the project cosponsored by the U.S, Russia, European Commission, and others to repackage and repatriate approximately 8000 spent fuel elements from the RA reactor fuel storage basins at the VIN?A Institute of Nuclear Sciences to Russia for reprocessing. The repackaging and transportation activities were implemented by a Russian consortium which includes the Sosny Company, Tekhsnabeksport (TENEX) and Mayak Production Association. High activity of the water of the fuel storage basin posed serious risk and challenges to the fuel removal from storage containers and repackaging for transportation. The risk centered on personnel exposure, even above the basin water, due to the high water activity levels caused by Cs-137 leached from fuel elements with failed cladding. A team of engineers from the U.S. DOE-NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative, the Vinca Institute, and the IAEA performed the design, development, and deployment of a compact underwater water chemistry control system (WCCS) to remove the Cs-137 from the basin water and enable personnel safety above the basin water for repackaging operations. Key elements of the WCCS system included filters, multiple columns containing an inorganic sorbent, submersible pumps and flow meters. All system components were designed to be remotely serviceable and replaceable. The system was assembled and successfully deployed at the Vinca basin to support the fuel removal and repackaging activities. Following the successful operations, the Cs-137 is now safely contained and consolidated on the zeolite sorbent used in the columns of the WCCS, and the fuel has been removed from the basins. This paper reviews the functional requirements, design, and deployment of the WCCS.

Sindelar, R.; Fisher, D.; Thomas, J.

2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

346

High resolution neutron imaging of water in the polymer electrolyte fuel cell membrane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water transport in the ionomeric membrane, typically Nafion{reg_sign}, has profound influence on the performance of the polymer electrolyte fuel cell, in terms of internal resistance and overall water balance. In this work, high resolution neutron imaging of the Nafion{reg_sign} membrane is presented in order to measure water content and through-plane gradients in situ under disparate temperature and humidification conditions.

Mukherjee, Partha P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Makundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spendelow, Jacob S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hussey, D S [NIST; Jacobson, D L [NIST; Arif, M [NIST

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL STORAGE BASIN WATER CHEMISTRY: ELECTROCHEMICAL EVALUATION OF ALUMINUM CORROSION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The factors affecting the optimal water chemistry of the Savannah River Site spent fuel storage basin must be determines in order to optimize facility efficiency, minimize fuel corrosion, and reduce overall environmental impact from long term spent nuclear fuel storage at the Savannah River Site. The Savannah River National Laboratory is using statistically designed experiments to study the effects of NO{sub 3}{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, and Cl{sup -} concentrations on alloys commonly used not only as fuel cladding, but also as rack construction materials The results of cyclic polarization pitting and corrosion experiments on samples of Al 6061 and 1100 alloys will be used to construct a predictive model of the basin corrosion and its dependence on the species in the basin. The basin chemistry model and corrosion will be discussed in terms of optimized water chemistry envelope and minimization of cladding corrosion.

Hathcock, D

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

348

Three-dimensional effects of liquid water flooding in the cathode of a PEM fuel cell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Researchers all over the world are focusing on optimizing this system to be cost competitive with energy conversion devices currently available. It is a well known fact that the cathode of the PEM fuel cell is the performance limiting component due...THREE DIMENSIONAL EFFECTS OF LIQUID WATER FLOODING IN THE CATHODE OF A PEM FUEL CELL by Dilip Natarajan and Trung Van Nguyen* Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering University of Kansas Lawrence, KS 66045, USA Submitted...

Natarajan, Dilip; Van Nguyen, Trung

2003-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

349

Addressing the Critical Link between Fossil Energy and Water „ the Department of Energys Water-Related Research and Developme  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Technology Laboratory's Water-Energy Interface Research Program: December 2010 Update December 1, 2010 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States

350

Historically Black Colleges and Universities Receive Funds for Fossil  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Historically Black Colleges and Universities Receive Funds for Historically Black Colleges and Universities Receive Funds for Fossil Energy Research Historically Black Colleges and Universities Receive Funds for Fossil Energy Research August 15, 2013 - 1:18pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - Five fossil energy-related projects that will help maintain the nation's energy portfolio while also providing educational and research training opportunities for tomorrow's scientists and engineers have been selected for funding by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The funding opportunity to enhance scientific and technical understanding of conversion and utilization of fossil fuels is through the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The DOE program involved is the Support of Advanced Fossil Resource Utilization

351

Measurement of Petroleum Fuel Contamination in Water by Solid-Phase Microextraction with Direct Raman Spectroscopic Detection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method is described for determining petroleum fuel contamination in water based on solid-phase microextraction and Raman spectroscopy (SPME/Raman). In this method, contaminants are...

Jager, Michael J; McClintic, Daniel P; Tilotta, David C

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing, and Design Optimization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in PEM Fuel Cells: in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing, and Design Optimization J. Vernon Cole and Ashok Gidwani CFDRC Prepared for: DOE Hydrogen Fuel Cell Kickoff Meeting February 13, 2007 This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information. Background Water Management Issues Arise From: ƒ Generation of water by cathodic reaction ƒ Membrane humidification requirements ƒ Capillary pressure driven transport through porous MEA and GDL materials ƒ Scaling bipolar plate channel dimensions J.H. Nam and M. Kaviany, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 46, pp. 4595-4611 (2003) Relevant Barriers and Targets ƒ Improved Gas Diffusion Layer, Flow Fields, Membrane Electrode Assemblies Needed to Improve Water Management: * Flooding blocks reactant transport

353

Static and dynamic contact angle measurement on rough surfaces using sessile drop profile analysis with application to water management in low temperature fuel cells.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Fuel Cells are a promising alternative energy technology. One of the biggest problems that exists in fuel cell is that of water management. A… (more)

Konduru, Vinaykumar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Assessment of the use of extended burnup fuel in light water power reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study has been conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to review the environmental and economic impacts associated with the use of extended burnup nuclear fuel in light water power reactors. It has been proposed that current batch average burnup levels of 33 GWd/t uranium be increased to above 50 GWd/t. The environmental effects of extending fuel burnup during normal operations and during accident events and the economic effects of cost changes on the fuel cycle are discussed in this report. The physical effects of extended burnup on the fuel and the fuel assembly are also presented as a basis for the environmental and economic assessments. Environmentally, this burnup increase would have no significant impact over that of normal burnup. Economically, the increased burnup would have favorable effects, consisting primarily of a reduction: (1) total fuel requirements; (2) reactor downtime for fuel replacement; (3) the number of fuel shipments to and from reactor sites; and (4) repository storage requirements. 61 refs., 4 figs., 27 tabs.

Baker, D.A.; Bailey, W.J.; Beyer, C.E.; Bold, F.C.; Tawil, J.J.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Electrolytic Reduction of Spent Light Water Reactor Fuel Bench-Scale Experiment Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of experiments were performed to demonstrate the electrolytic reduction of spent light water reactor fuel at bench-scale in a hot cell at the Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex. The process involves the conversion of oxide fuel to metal by electrolytic means, which would then enable subsequent separation and recovery of actinides via existing electrometallurgical technologies, i.e., electrorefining. Four electrolytic reduction runs were performed at bench scale using ~500 ml of molten LiCl – 1 wt% Li2O electrolyte at 650 ºC. In each run, ~50 g of crushed spent oxide fuel was loaded into a permeable stainless steel basket and immersed into the electrolyte as the cathode. A spiral wound platinum wire was immersed into the electrolyte as the anode. When a controlled electric current was conducted through the anode and cathode, the oxide fuel was reduced to metal in the basket and oxygen gas was evolved at the anode. Salt samples were extracted before and after each electrolytic reduction run and analyzed for fuel and fission product constituents. The fuel baskets following each run were sectioned and the fuel was sampled, revealing an extent of uranium oxide reduction in excess of 98%.

Steven D. Herrmann

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Program’s understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear power’s cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-iradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

D. E. Shropshire

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Acceptance Criteria for Light Water Reactor Spent Fuel Storage System [OCRWM PER REV2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the decommissioning of the 324 Building Radiochemical Engineering Cells there is a need to remove commercial Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) presently stored in these hot cells. To enable fuel removal from the hot cells, the commercial LWR SNF will be packaged and shipped to the 200 Area Interim Storage Area (ISA) in a manner that satisfies site requirements for SNF interim storage. This document identifies the criteria that the 324 Building Radiochemical Engineering Cell Clean-out Project must satisfy for acceptance of the LWR SNF by the SNF Project at the 200 Area ISA. In addition to the acceptance criteria identified herein, acceptance is contingent on adherence to applicable Project Hanford Management Contract requirements and procedures in place at the time of work execution.

JOHNSON, D.M.

2000-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

358

Water management studies in PEM fuel cells, part IV: Effects of channel surface wettability, geometry and orientation on the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water management studies in PEM fuel cells, part IV: Effects of channel surface wettability in the commercialization of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) due to its association with the performance, cost-phase flow in parallel gas channels of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are investigated. Ex situ

Kandlikar, Satish

359

Water management studies in PEM fuel cells, Part II: Ex situ investigation of flow maldistribution, pressure drop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by externally humidified air and hydrogen gas streams, must be present within the fuel cell to maintain 4 5 6 #12;a fuel cell blocks gas transport pathways in the catalyst layers, gas diffusion layersWater management studies in PEM fuel cells, Part II: Ex situ investigation of flow maldistribution

Kandlikar, Satish

360

Water Dynamics in Nafion Fuel Cell Membranes: The Effects of Confinement and Structural Changes on the Hydrogen Bond Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emissions energy source is hydrogen. Hydrogen powered vehicles using polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells and hydrophilic aggregates.1-4 Hydrogen fuel cells operate through the oxidation of hydrogen gas at the anodeWater Dynamics in Nafion Fuel Cell Membranes: The Effects of Confinement and Structural Changes

Fayer, Michael D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water fossil fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Oxygen Electrocatalysts for Water Electrolyzers and Reversible Fuel Cells: Status and Perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen production by electrochemical water electrolysis has received great attention as an alternative technology for energy conversion and storage. The oxygen electrode has a substantial effect on the performance and durability in water electrolyzers and reversible fuel cells because of its intrinsically slow kinetics for oxygen evolution/reduction and poor durability under harsh operating environments. To improve oxygen kinetics and durability of the electrode, extensive studies for highly active and stable oxygen electrocatalyst have been performed. However, due to the thermodynamic instability of transition metals in acidic media, noble metal compounds have been primarily utilized as electrocatalysts in water electrolyzers and reversible fuel cells. For water electrolyzer applications, single noble metal oxides such as ruthenium oxide and iridium oxide have been studied, and binary or ternary metal oxides have been developed to take synergestic effects of each component. On the other hand, a variety of bifunctional electrocatalysts with a combination of monofunctional electrocatalysts such as platinum for oxygen reduction and iridium oxide for oxygen evolution for reversible fuel cell applications have been mainly proposed. Practically, supported iridium oxide-on-platinum, its reverse type, and non-precious metal-supported platinum and iridium bifunctional electrocatalysts have been developed. Recent theoretical calculations and experimental studies in terms of water electrolysis and fuel cell technology suggest effective ways to cope with current major challenges of cost and durability of oxygen electrocatalysts for technical applications.

Park, Seh Kyu; Shao, Yuyan; Liu, Jun; Wang, Yong

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Modification of the feeding behavior of marine copepods by sub-lethal concentrations of water-accommodated fuel oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The feeding behaviors of Acartia clausi and A. tonsa were measured in samples of water containing low levels of a water-accommodated fraction of No. 2 fuel oil. The copepods fed normally at a hydrocarbon concentr...

M. S. Berman; D. R. Heinle

363

Fossil Energy FY 2009 Budget  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Fossil Energy's FY 2009 budget, including request, House and Senate marks, and Omnibus appropriation.

364

Lattice cell and full core physics of internally cooled annular fuel in heavy water moderated reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A program is underway at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) to develop a new fuel bundle concept to enable greater burnups for PT-HWR (pressure tube heavy water reactor) cores. One option that AECL is investigating is an internally cooled annular fuel (ICAF) element concept. ICAF contains annular cylindrical pellets with cladding on the inner and outer diameters. Coolant flows along the outside of the element and through the centre. With such a concept, the maximum fuel temperature as a function of linear element rating is significantly reduced compared to conventional, solid-rod type fuel. The preliminary ICAF bundle concept considered in this study contains 24 half-metre long internally cooled annular fuel elements and one non-fuelled centre pin. The introduction of the non-fuelled centre pin reduces the coolant void reactivity (CVR), which is the increase in reactivity that occurs on voiding the coolant in accident scenarios. Lattice cell and full core physics calculations of the preliminary ICAF fuel bundle concept have been performed for medium burnups of approximately 18 GWd/tU using WIMS-AECL and reactor fuel simulation program (RFSP). The results will be used to assist in concept configuration optimization. The effects of radial and axial core power distributions, linear element power ratings, refuelling rates and operational power ramps have been analyzed. The results suggest that burnups of greater than 18 GWd/tU can be achieved in current reactor designs. At approximately 18 GWd/tU, expected maximum linear element ratings in a PT-HWR with online-refuelling are approximately 90 kW/m. These conditions would be prohibitive for solid-rod fuel, but may be possible in ICAF fuel given the reduced maximum fuel temperature as a function of linear element rating. (authors)

Armstrong, J.; Hamilton, H.; Hyland, B. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Pyroprocessing of Light Water Reactor Spent Fuels Based on an Electrochemical Reduction Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A concept of pyroprocessing light water reactor (LWR) spent fuels based on an electrochemical reduction technology is proposed, and the material balance of the processing of mixed oxide (MOX) or high-burnup uranium oxide (UO{sub 2}) spent fuel is evaluated. Furthermore, a burnup analysis for metal fuel fast breeder reactors (FBRs) is conducted on low-decontamination materials recovered by pyroprocessing. In the case of processing MOX spent fuel (40 GWd/t), UO{sub 2} is separately collected for {approx}60 wt% of the spent fuel in advance of the electrochemical reduction step, and the product recovered through the rare earth (RE) removal step, which has the composition uranium:plutonium:minor actinides:fission products (FPs) = 76.4:18.4:1.7:3.5, can be applied as an ingredient of FBR metal fuel without a further decontamination process. On the other hand, the electroreduced alloy of high-burnup UO{sub 2} spent fuel (48 GWd/t) requires further decontamination of residual FPs by an additional process such as electrorefining even if RE FPs are removed from the alloy because the recovered plutonium (Pu) is accompanied by almost the same amount of FPs in addition to RE. However, the amount of treated materials in the electrorefining step is reduced to {approx}10 wt% of the total spent fuel owing to the prior UO{sub 2} recovery step. These results reveal that the application of electrochemical reduction technology to LWR spent oxide fuel is a promising concept for providing FBR metal fuel by a rationalized process.

Ohta, Hirokazu; Inoue, Tadashi; Sakamura, Yoshiharu; Kinoshita, Kensuke

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

Water Footprint of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

If energy use is split into two categories, stationary and transportation, it is clear from the breakdown in ref 14 that water already plays a major role in stationary energy production: thermoelectric power generation is responsible for approximately 49% of total freshwater withdrawals in the United States (see the Supporting Information (SI) Figure S1 for complete breakdown). ... These more GHG-intensive water supplies serve a variety of users: in California, 18% of total desalination capacity provides freshwater for power plants with closed-loop cooling systems, 23% serves industrial facilities, 1% goes to crop irrigation, 57% goes to municipal customers, and 1% goes to other users. ... Fthenakis, V.; Kim, H. C.Life-Cycle Uses of Water in U.S. Electricity Generation Renewable Sustainable Energy Rev. 2010, 14 ( 7) 2039– 2048 ...

Corinne D. Scown; Arpad Horvath; Thomas E. McKone

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

Energy-Water Overview  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Emerging Issues and Challenges Emerging Issues and Challenges DOE/EIA 2010 Energy Conference Mike Hightower Sandia National Laboratories mmhight@sandia.gov, 505-844-5499 Energy and Water are ... Interdependent Water for Energy and Energy for Water Energy and power production require water: * Thermoelectric cooling * Hydropower * Energy minerals extraction/mining * Fuel Production (fossil fuels, H 2 , biofuels) * Emission control Water production, processing, distribution, and end-use require energy: * Pumping * Conveyance and Transport * Treatment * Use conditioning * Surface and Ground water Water Consumption by Sector U.S. Freshwater Consumption, 100 Bgal/day Livestock 3.3% Thermoelectric 3.3% Commercial 1.2% Domestic 7.1% Industrial 3.3% Mining 1.2% Irrigation 80.6% Energy uses 27 percent of all non-agricultural fresh water

368

The combined system for fuel supply of fuel cells on the basis of the aluminum-water hydrogen generator and the metal hybride hydrogen storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The system for fuel supply of a hydrogen-air fuel cell on the basis of the aluminum-water hydrogen generator and hydride-forming alloy as an intermediate gas storage has been developed. For a series of...4.5 ? x ...

I. V. Yanilkin; Ye. I. Shkol’nikov; S. N. Klyamkin; M. S. Vlaskin…

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Abstract: Air, Thermal and Water Management for PEM Fuel Cell Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PEM fuel cells are excellent candidates for transportation applications due to their high efficiencies. PEM fuel cell Balance of Plant (BOP) components, such as air, thermal, and water management sub-systems, can have a significant effect on the overall system performance, but have traditionally not been addressed in research and development efforts. Recognizing this, the U.S. Department of Energy and Honeywell International Inc. are funding an effort that emphasizes the integration and optimization of air, thermal and water management sub-systems. This effort is one of the major elements to assist the fuel cell system developers and original equipment manufacturers to achieve the goal of an affordable and efficient power system for transportation applications. Past work consisted of: (1) Analysis, design, and fabrication of a motor driven turbocompressor. (2) A systematic trade study to select the most promising water and thermal management systems from five different concepts (absorbent wheel humidifier, gas to gas membrane humidifier, porous metal foam humidifier, cathode recycle compressor, and water injection pump.) This presentation will discuss progress made in the research and development of air, water and thermal management sub-systems for PEM fuel cell systems in transportation applications. More specifically, the presentation will discuss: (1) Progress of the motor driven turbocompressor design and testing; (2) Progress of the humidification component selection and testing; and (3) Progress of the thermal management component preliminary design. The programs consist of: (1) The analysis, design, fabrication and testing of a compact motor driven turbocompressor operating on foil air bearings to provide contamination free compressed air to the fuel cell stack while recovering energy from the exhaust streams to improve system efficiency. (2) The analysis, design, fabrication and testing of selected water and thermal management systems and components to improve system efficiency and reduce packaging size.

Mark K. Gee

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Advanced dry head-end reprocessing of light water reactor spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from a light water reactor includes the step of reacting spent nuclear fuel in a voloxidation vessel with an oxidizing gas having nitrogen dioxide and oxygen for a period sufficient to generate a solid oxidation product of the spent nuclear fuel. The reacting step includes the step of reacting, in a first zone of the voloxidation vessel, spent nuclear fuel with the oxidizing gas at a temperature ranging from 200-450.degree. C. to form an oxidized reaction product, and regenerating nitrogen dioxide, in a second zone of the voloxidation vessel, by reacting oxidizing gas comprising nitrogen monoxide and oxygen at a temperature ranging from 0-80.degree. C. The first zone and the second zone can be separate. A voloxidation system is also disclosed.

Collins, Emory D.; Delcul, Guillermo D.; Hunt, Rodney D.; Johnson, Jared A.; Spencer, Barry B.

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

371

Advanced dry head-end reprocessing of light water reactor spent nuclear fuel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from a light water reactor includes the step of reacting spent nuclear fuel in a voloxidation vessel with an oxidizing gas having nitrogen dioxide and oxygen for a period sufficient to generate a solid oxidation product of the spent nuclear fuel. The reacting step includes the step of reacting, in a first zone of the voloxidation vessel, spent nuclear fuel with the oxidizing gas at a temperature ranging from 200-450.degree. C. to form an oxidized reaction product, and regenerating nitrogen dioxide, in a second zone of the voloxidation vessel, by reacting oxidizing gas comprising nitrogen monoxide and oxygen at a temperature ranging from 0-80.degree. C. The first zone and the second zone can be separate. A voloxidation system is also disclosed.

Collins, Emory D; Delcul, Guillermo D; Hunt, Rodney D; Johnson, Jared A; Spencer, Barry B

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

372

Survey of Worldwide Light Water Reactor Experience with Mixed Uranium-Plutonium Oxide Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US and the Former Soviet Union (FSU) have recently declared quantities of weapons materials, including weapons-grade (WG) plutonium, excess to strategic requirements. One of the leading candidates for the disposition of excess WG plutonium is irradiation in light water reactors (LWRs) as mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel. A description of the MOX fuel fabrication techniques in worldwide use is presented. A comprehensive examination of the domestic MOX experience in US reactors obtained during the 1960s, 1970s, and early 1980s is also presented. This experience is described by manufacturer and is also categorized by the reactor facility that irradiated the MOX fuel. A limited summary of the international experience with MOX fuels is also presented. A review of MOX fuel and its performance is conducted in view of the special considerations associated with the disposition of WG plutonium. Based on the available information, it appears that adoption of foreign commercial MOX technology from one of the successful MOX fuel vendors will minimize the technical risks to the overall mission. The conclusion is made that the existing MOX fuel experience base suggests that disposition of excess weapons plutonium through irradiation in LWRs is a technically attractive option.

Cowell, B.S.; Fisher, S.E.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

A model for waterside oxidation of zircaloy fuel cladding in pressurized water reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model is developed to simulate the oxidation of zircaloy fuel rod cladding exposed to pressurized water reactor operating conditions. The model is used to predict the oxidation rate for both ex- and in-reactor conditions in terms of the weight gain and oxide thickness. Comparisons of the model predictions with experimental data show very good agreement.

Amarshad, A.I.A. [Institute of Atomic Energy Research, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Klein, A.C. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

374

Extension and improvement of Central Station District heating budget period 1 and 2, Krakow Clean Fossil Fuels and Energy Efficiency Program. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Project aim was to reduce pollution levels in the City of Krakow through the retirement of coal-fired (hand and mechanically-stoked) boiler houses. This was achieved by identifying attractive candidates and connecting them to the Krakow district heating system, thus permitting them to eliminate boiler operations. Because coal is less costly than district hot water, the district heating company Miejskie Przedsiebiorstwo Energetyki Cieplnej S.A., henceforth identified as MPEC, needed to provide potential customers with incentives for purchasing district heat. These incentives consisted of offerings which MPEC made to the prospective client. The offerings presented the economic and environmental benefits to district heating tie-in and also could include conservation studies of the facilities, so that consumption of energy could be reduced and the cost impact on operations mitigated. Because some of the targeted boiler houses were large, the capacity of the district heating network required enhancement at strategic locations. Consequently, project construction work included both enhancement to the district piping network as well as facility tie-ins. The process of securing new customers necessitated the strengthening of MPEC`s competitive position in Krakow`s energy marketplace, which in turn required improvements in marketing, customer service, strategic planning, and project management. Learning how US utilities address these challenges became an integral segment of the project`s scope.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

NETL: News Release - Four Minority Universities Selected for Fossil Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9, 2006 9, 2006 Four Minority Universities Selected for Fossil Energy Research Grants Projects Advance Concepts in Fossil Fuel Conversion and Utilization WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded grants to four institutions for energy research through the Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Other Minority Institutions (HBCU/OMI) program. "It is indeed gratifying to see the creativity and technical expertise of our HBCU/OMI college students applied to the resolution of critical energy issues," said Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy Jeffrey Jarrett. "The bright minds and enthusiasm that the students bring to the program are essential to fossil energy research in the 21st century." The HBCU/OMI program is carried out under DOE's Office of Fossil Energy. The program gives minority students valuable hands-on experience in developing technologies to promote the efficient and environmentally safe use of coal, oil, and natural gas. The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) will manage the projects.

376

Status of fossil energy resources: A global perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article deals with recently status of global fossil energy sources. Fossil energy sources have been split into three categories: oil,coal, and natural gas. Fossil fuels are highly efficient and cheap. Currently oil is the fastest primary energy source in the world (39% of world energy consumption). Coal will be a major source of energy for the world for the foreseeable future (24% of world energy consumption). In 2030, coal covers 45% of world energy needs. Natural gas is expected to be the fastest growing component of world energy consumption (23% of world energy consumption). Fossil fuel extraction and conversion to usable energy has several environmental impacts. They could be a major contributor to global warming and greenhouse gases and a cause of acid rain; therefore, expensive air pollution controls are required.

Balat, M. [SILA Science, Trabzon (Turkey)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Pulse neutron subcritical K/sub EFF/ measurements on water flooded arrays of fuel rods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pulsed neutron source technique has been utilized at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory for some twenty years for measurement of subcritical reactivities of a variety of fuel systems. One area of application has included measurements of subcritical reactivities of water flooded arrays of fuel rods. This report summarizes these measurements. The theory behind the measurement process is reviewed and the instrumentation of the measurement system discussed. Also, four experiment programs are described in detail, illustrating system use and flexibility. Some changes are suggested for system improvements to speed up data collection and data reduction, and some possible areas of future application of the method are described.

Durst, B.M.; Bierman, S.R.; Clayton, E.D.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Preparation and gasification of a Thailand coal-water fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to an inquiry by the Department of Mineral Resources (DMR) in Thailand, the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) prepared a four-task program to assess the responsiveness of Wiang Haeng coal to the temperature and pressure conditions of hot-water drying (HWD). The results indicate that HWD made several improvements in the coal, notably increases in heating value and carbon content and reductions in equilibrium moisture and oxygen content. The equilibrium moisture content decreased from 37.4 wt% for the raw coal to about 20 wt% for the HWD coals. The energy density, determined at 500 cP, indicates an increase from 4450 to 6650 Btu/lb by hydrothermal treatment. Raw and HWD coal were then gasified at various mild gasification conditions of 700 C and 30 psig. The tests indicated that the coal is probably similar to other low-rank coals and will produce high levels of hydrogen and be fairly reactive.

Ness, R.O. Jr.; Anderson, C.M.; Musich, M.A.; Richter, J.J.; Dewall, R.A.; Young, B.C. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center; Nakanart, A. [Ministry of Industry, Bangkok (Thailand)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

379

President Requests $842.1 Million for Fossil Energy Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

President Obama’s FY 2016 budget seeks $842.1 million for the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) to advance technologies related to the reliable, efficient, affordable and environmentally sound use of fossil fuels, implement ongoing federal responsibilities at the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves, and manage the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Northeast Gasoline Supply Reserve and Northeast Home Heating oil Reserve to provide strategic and economic security against disruptions in U.S. petroleum supplies.

380

Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development Materials Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objective of this materials program is to conduct R and D on materials for fossil energy applications with focus on longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The projects are organized according to materials research areas: (1) ceramics, (2) new alloys: iron aluminides, advanced austenitics and chromium niobium alloys, and (3) technology development and transfer. Separate abstracts have been prepared.

Cole, N.C.; Judkins, R.R. (comps.)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water fossil fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

RTP Green Fuel: A Proven Path to Renewable Heat and Power  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuels * Pourable, storable and transportable liquid fuel * Contains approximately 50-55% energy content of fossil fuel * Meets applicable ASTM Standard for industrial use (ASTM...

382

Development of Test Methodology for Evaluation of Fuel Economy in Motorcycle Engines.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Rising fuel costs and concerns over fossil fuel emissions have resulted in more stringent fuel economy and emissions standards globally. As a result, motor vehicle… (more)

Michlberger, Alexander

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

The Potential for Increased Atmospheric CO2 Emissions and Accelerated Consumption of Deep Geologic CO2 Storage Resources Resulting from the Large-Scale Deployment of a CCS-Enabled Unconventional Fossil Fuels Industry in the U.S.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Desires to enhance the energy security of the United States have spurred significant interest in the development of abundant domestic heavy hydrocarbon resources including oil shale and coal to produce unconventional liquid fuels to supplement conventional oil supplies. However, the production processes for these unconventional fossil fuels create large quantities of carbon dioxide (CO2) and this remains one of the key arguments against such development. Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies could reduce these emissions and preliminary analysis of regional CO2 storage capacity in locations where such facilities might be sited within the U.S. indicates that there appears to be sufficient storage capacity, primarily in deep saline formations, to accommodate the CO2 from these industries. Nevertheless, even assuming wide-scale availability of cost-effective CO2 capture and geologic storage resources, the emergence of a domestic U.S. oil shale or coal-to-liquids (CTL) industry would be responsible for significant increases in CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. The authors present modeling results of two future hypothetical climate policy scenarios that indicate that the oil shale production facilities required to produce 3MMB/d from the Eocene Green River Formation of the western U.S. using an in situ retorting process would result in net emissions to the atmosphere of between 3000-7000 MtCO2, in addition to storing potentially 900-5000 MtCO2 in regional deep geologic formations via CCS in the period up to 2050. A similarly sized, but geographically more dispersed domestic CTL industry could result in 4000-5000 MtCO2 emitted to the atmosphere in addition to potentially 21,000-22,000 MtCO2 stored in regional deep geologic formations over the same period. While this analysis shows that there is likely adequate CO2 storage capacity in the regions where these technologies are likely to deploy, the reliance by these industries on large-scale CCS could result in an accelerated rate of utilization of the nation’s CO2 storage resource, leaving less high-quality storage capacity for other carbon-producing industries including electric power generation.

Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.; Davidson, Casie L.

2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

384

President Requests $711.0 Million for Fossil Energy Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

President Obama’s FY 2015 budget seeks $711.0 million for the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) to advance technologies related to the reliable, efficient, affordable and environmentally sound use of fossil fuels as well as manage the Strategic Petroleum Reserve and Northeast Home Heating oil Reserve to provide strategic and economic security against disruptions in U.S. oil supplies. The request includes $475.5 million for Fossil Energy Research and Development, $205.0 million for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, $1.6 million for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve and $19.95 million for the Naval Petroleum Reserves.

385

Fossil Energy Advanced Technologies (2008 - 2009) | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fossil Energy Advanced Technologies (2008 - 2009) Fossil Energy Advanced Technologies (2008 - 2009) Fossil Energy Advanced Technologies (2008 - 2009) Amendment: Energy and...

386

Thermodynamic and transport properties of thoria–urania fuel of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High temperature thermochemistry of thoria–urania fuel for Advanced Heavy Water Reactor was investigated. Oxygen potential development within the matrix and distribution behaviors of the fission products (fps) in different phases were worked out with the help of thermodynamic and transport properties of the fps as well as fission generated oxygen and the detailed balance of the elements. Some of the necessary data for different properties were generated in this laboratory while others were taken from literatures. Noting the behavior of poor transports of gases and volatile species in the thoria rich fuel (thoria–3 mol% urania), the evaluation shows that the fuel will generally bear higher oxygen potential right from early stage of burnup, and Mo will play vital role to buffer the potential through the formation of its oxygen rich chemical states. The problems related to the poor transport and larger retention of fission gases (Xe) and volatiles (I, Te, Cs) are discussed.

M. Basu (Ali); R. Mishra; S.R. Bharadwaj; D. Das

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Chemical aspects of pellet-cladding interaction in light water reactor fuel elements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In contrast to the extensive literature on the mechanical aspects of pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) in light water reactor fuel elements, the chemical features of this phenomenon are so poorly understood that there is still disagreement concerning the chemical agent responsible. Since the earliest work by Rosenbaum, Davies and Pon, laboratory and in-reactor experiments designed to elucidate the mechanism of PCI fuel rod failures have concentrated almost exclusively on iodine. The assumption that this is the reponsible chemical agent is contained in models of PCI which have been constructed for incorporation into fuel performance codes. The evidence implicating iodine is circumstantial, being based primarily upon the volatility and significant fission yield of this element and on the microstructural similarity of the failed Zircaloy specimens exposed to iodine in laboratory stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests to cladding failures by PCI.

Olander, D.R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Fuels  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Goals > Fuels Goals > Fuels XMAT for nuclear fuels XMAT is ideally suited to explore all of the radiation processes experienced by nuclear fuels.The high energy, heavy ion accleration capability (e.g., 250 MeV U) can produce bulk damage deep in the sample, achieving neutron type depths (~10 microns), beyond the range of surface sputtering effects. The APS X-rays are well matched to the ion beams, and are able to probe individual grains at similar penetrations depths. Damage rates to 25 displacements per atom per hour (DPA/hr), and doses >2500 DPA can be achieved. MORE» Fuels in LWRs are subjected to ~1 DPA per day High burn-up fuel can experience >2000 DPA. Traditional reactor tests by neutron irradiation require 3 years in a reactor and 1 year cool down. Conventional accelerators (>1 MeV/ion) are limited to <200-400 DPAs, and

389

Liquid-Water Uptake and Removal in PEM Fuel-Cell Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Management of liquid water is critical for optimal fuel-cell operation, especially at low temperatures. It is therefore important to understand the wetting properties and water holdup of the various fuel-cell layers. While the gas-diffusion layer is relatively hydrophobic and exhibits a strong intermediate wettability, the catalyst layer is predominantly hydrophilic. In addition, the water content of the ionomer in the catalyst layer is lower than that of the bulk membrane, and is affected by platinum surfaces. Liquid-water removal occurs through droplets on the surface of the gas-diffusion layer. In order to predict droplet instability and detachment, a force balance is used. While the pressure or drag force on the droplet can be derived, the adhesion or surface-tension force requires measurement using a sliding-angle approach. It is shown that droplets produced by forcing water through the gas-diffusion layer rather than placing them on top of it show much stronger adhesion forces owing to the contact to the subsurface water.

Das, Prodip K.; Gunterman, Haluna P.; Kwong, Anthony; Weber, Adam Z.

2011-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

390

Fossil-Based Hydrogen Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Fossil-Based Hydrogen Production Praxair Praxair SNL TIAX · Integrated Ceramic Membrane System for H2

391

Life-Cycle Water and Greenhouse Gas Implications of Alternative Fuel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Life-Cycle Water and Greenhouse Gas Implications of Alternative Fuel Life-Cycle Water and Greenhouse Gas Implications of Alternative Fuel Production Speaker(s): Corinne Scown Date: January 31, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Michael Sohn If the goal of science is to understand the structure and behavior of the physical and natural world, and the goal of engineering is to design, build, and manage systems that serve society's needs, then the study of civil infrastructure systems acts as a link between the two. Understanding the reliance of engineered systems on constrained natural resources, as well as their impact on human well-being and the environment, is key to building and maintaining infrastructure that is sustainable in the broader sense. This talk will explore the important role of life-cycle assessment and optimization in assessing such questions as: a.)

392

Fossil | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

August 15, 2012 August 15, 2012 Alex-andra "Ale" Hakala is an award-winning geoscientist at DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory. | Photo from the National Energy Technology Laboratory. Energy Department Lab Researcher Wins HENAAC Award for Outstanding Achievement One of the Energy Department's own talented scientists is recognized with a Great Minds in STEM award. July 26, 2012 Ohio State University (OSU) Professor Liang-Shih Fan shows Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy Charles McConnell OSU's coal direct chemical looping reactor. | Photo by Niranjani Deshpande Making Carbon Capture and Storage Efficient and Cost Competitive Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy Charles McConnell visited Ohio State University to highlight new Energy Department investments in carbon capture

393

Office of Fossil Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Office of Fossil Energy Office of Fossil Energy Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate Semi-annual Progress Report Reporting Period: November, 2008-April, 2009 Submitted by: Rice University and University of Houston George J. Hirasaki and Walter Chapman, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Gerald R. Dickens, Colin A. Zelt, and Brandon E. Dugan, Earth Science Kishore K. Mohanty, University of Houston May, 2009 DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-06NT42960 Rice University - MS 362 6100 Main St. Houston, TX 77251-1892 Phone: 713-348-5416; FAX: 713-348-5478; Email: gjh@rice.edu University of Houston Department of Chemical Engineering 4800 Calhoun Street Houston, TX 77204-4004 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Oil & Natural Gas Technology

394

Fossil | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

July 28, 2010 July 28, 2010 DOE Collaboration with National Geographic's JASON Project Yields Three CODiE Awards The JASON Project's multimedia energy curriculum has earned three CODiE Awards from the Software & Information Industry Association. July 23, 2010 Weekly Wrap-Up: Testing Wind Blades, Converting Carbon Emissions, and Eco-Driving Two Energy Department-funded projects are helping save energy and save money. Find out more here. July 23, 2010 Cool Roofs Lead to Cooler Cities Want to know more about one of the quickest and lowest cost ways we can reduce our carbon footprint and slow climate change? Read this. February 1, 2010 President Requests $760.4 Million for Fossil Energy Programs President Obama's FY 2011 budget seeks $760.4 million for the Office of Fossil Energy to support improved energy security and rapid development of

395

Fundamental aspects of coal-water fuel droplet combustion and secondary atomization of coal-water mixtures. Volume I, final report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This Final Report is issued in two volumes, covering research into the combustion of coal-water fuels (CWF). Two separate but related tasks are discussed; the present report, Volume I, contains results obtained under Task ...

Sarofim, Adel F.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Scaling the Water Percolation in PEM Fuel Cell Porous Transport Layers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A typical polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) consist of a series of non?wetting porous layers comprised between the bipolar plates: the porous transport anode and cathode layers with their catalyst layer and the proton exchange membrane. The cathode porous transport layer (PTL) also known as gas diffusion layer has the dual role of facilitating the access of the reactants to the catalyst layer while removing the generated water. Water percolation through the PTL will evolve on one of the drainage flow patterns (either capillary fingering or stable displacement) depending on the injection flow rate.

E. F. Medici; J. S. Allen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

External Costs of Fossil Fuel Cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of energy causes damage to a wide range of receptors, including human health, natural ecosystems, and the built environment. Such damages are referred to as external costs, as they are not reflected in...

W. Krewitt; P. Mayerhofer; R. Friedrich; A. Trukenmüller…

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Fossil Fuels Without CO2 Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...develop a zero-emission electric plant that exploits...moderate marginal cost. In electric plants, even present...decentralized sources as vehicles, home furnaces, or...participate. Unlike the electric sector, the required...sequestration—a tax rebate or creation...

E. A. Parson; D. W. Keith

1998-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

399

Microsoft Word - Fossil Fuel EA Final EA  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Agency EUI Energy use intensity, kBtuft2-yr FR Federal Register ft 2 square feet GHG greenhouse gas HVAC heating, ventilation, and air conditioning IPCC Intergovernmental...

400

The future of oil: unconventional fossil fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...revolutionizing the energy outlook in...revolutionizing the energy outlook in...estimate what the price of oil will...terminals in the USA to meet projected...and its history is instructive...domestic oil prices that followed...and for the USA as a whole...are used. -Energy return on...geological history, which could...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water fossil fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Fossil Fuels Without CO2 Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...from the atmosphere (1). Recent work in carbon...capacity ?200 to 500 GtC), deep coal beds...molar ratio of ?2:1, allowing...sequestration—a tax rebate or creation...global capacity ~200 to 500 GtC), deep coal...molar ratio of ~2:1, allowing...

E. A. Parson; D. W. Keith

1998-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

402

The future of oil: unconventional fossil fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...groundwater contamination. Nevertheless, innovative solutions have been found to many of...long project lead times, environmental remediation and the future oil price. Canadian...operations, being cheaper than mining; -innovative technology; -co-generation to reduce...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

UNDERSTANDING THE EFFECTS OF COMPRESSION AND CONSTRAINTS ON WATER UPTAKE OF FUEL-CELL MEMBRANES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate characterization of polymer-electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) requires understanding the impact of mechanical and electrochemical loads on cell components. An essential aspect of this relationship is the effect of compression on the polymer membrane?s water-uptake behavior and transport properties. However, there is limited information on the impact of physical constraints on membrane properties. In this paper, we investigate both theoretically and experimentally how the water uptake of Nafion membrane changes under external compression loads. The swelling of a compressed membrane is modeled by modifying the swelling pressure in the polymer backbone which relies on the changes in the microscopic volume of the polymer. The model successfully predicts the water content of the compressed membrane measured through in-situ swelling-compression tests and neutron imaging. The results show that external mechanical loads could reduce the water content and conductivity of the membrane, especially at lower temperatures, higher humidities, and in liquid water. The modeling framework and experimental data provide valuable insight for the swelling and conductivity of constrained and compressed membranes, which are of interest in electrochemical devices such as batteries and fuel cells.

Kusoglu, Ahmet; Kienitz, Briian; Weber, Adam

2011-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

404

Coal-water slurry fuel internal combustion engine and method for operating same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An internal combustion engine fueled with a coal-water slurry is described. About 90 percent of the coal-water slurry charge utilized in the power cycle of the engine is directly injected into the main combustion chamber where it is ignited by a hot stream of combustion gases discharged from a pilot combustion chamber of a size less than about 10 percent of the total clearance volume of main combustion chamber with the piston at top dead center. The stream of hot combustion gases is provided by injecting less than about 10 percent of the total coal-water slurry charge into the pilot combustion chamber and using a portion of the air from the main combustion chamber that has been heated by the walls defining the pilot combustion chamber as the ignition source for the coal-water slurry injected into the pilot combustion chamber.

McMillian, Michael H. (Fairmont, WV)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Mesoscopic modeling of liquid water transport in polymer electrolyte fuel cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A key performance limitation in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC), manifested in terms of mass transport loss, originates from liquid water transport and resulting flooding phenomena in the constituent components. Liquid water leads to the coverage of the electrochemically active sites in the catalyst layer (CL) rendering reduced catalytic activity and blockage of the available pore space in the porous CL and fibrous gas diffusion layer (GDL) resulting in hindered oxygen transport to the active reaction sites. The cathode CL and the GDL therefore playa major role in the mass transport loss and hence in the water management of a PEFC. In this article, we present the development of a mesoscopic modeling formalism coupled with realistic microstructural delineation to study the profound influence of the pore structure and surface wettability on liquid water transport and interfacial dynamics in the PEFC catalyst layer and gas diffusion layer.

Mukherjee, Partha P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Chao Yang [PENNSTATE UNIV.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Oil Shale and Other Unconventional Fuels Activities | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Naval Reserves Oil Shale and Other Unconventional Fuels Activities Oil Shale and Other Unconventional Fuels Activities The Fossil Energy program in oil shale focuses on...

407

Evaluation of Lake Erie Algae as Bio-fuel Feedstock.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Currently, transportation fuels are produced from continuously depleting fossil fuel sources. This calls for additional renewable sources that could be used for the production… (more)

Gottumukala, Vasudev

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Land and Water Use, CO2 Emissions, and Worker Radiological Exposure Factors for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Fuel Cycle Technologies program is preparing to evaluate several proposed nuclear fuel cycle options to help guide and prioritize Fuel Cycle Technology research and development. Metrics are being developed to assess performance against nine evaluation criteria that will be used to assess relevant impacts resulting from all phases of the fuel cycle. This report focuses on four specific environmental metrics. • land use • water use • CO2 emissions • radiological Dose to workers Impacts associated with the processes in the front-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, mining through enrichment and deconversion of DUF6 are summarized from FCRD-FCO-2012-000124, Revision 1. Impact estimates are developed within this report for the remaining phases of the nuclear fuel cycle. These phases include fuel fabrication, reactor construction and operations, fuel reprocessing, and storage, transport, and disposal of associated used fuel and radioactive wastes. Impact estimates for each of the phases of the nuclear fuel cycle are given as impact factors normalized per unit process throughput or output. These impact factors can then be re-scaled against the appropriate mass flows to provide estimates for a wide range of potential fuel cycles. A companion report, FCRD-FCO-2013-000213, applies the impact factors to estimate and provide a comparative evaluation of 40 fuel cycles under consideration relative to these four environmental metrics.

Brett W Carlsen; Brent W Dixon; Urairisa Pathanapirom; Eric Schneider; Bethany L. Smith; Timothy M. AUlt; Allen G. Croff; Steven L. Krahn

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Performance of a solid oxide fuel cell CHP system coupled with a hot water storage tank for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performance of a solid oxide fuel cell CHP system coupled with a hot water storage tank for single storage tank is studied. Thermal stratification in the tank increases the heat recovery performance of the residence. Two fuels are considered, namely syngas and natural gas. The tank model considers the temperature

Berning, Torsten

410

EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF USING EMULSIFIED DIESEL FUEL ON THE PERFORMANCE AND POLLUTANTS EMITTED FROM FOUR STROKE WATER COOLED DIESEL ENGINE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A water?cooled four stroke four cylinder direct injection diesel engine was used to study the effect of emulsified diesel fuel on the engine performance and on the main pollutant emissions. Emulsified diesel fuels of 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% and 30% water by volume were used. The experiments were conducted in the speed range from 1000 to 3000 rpm. It was found that in general using emulsified fuel improves the engine performance and reduces emissions. While the BSFC has a minimum value at 5% water and 2000 rpm the torque the BMEP and efficiency are found to have maximum values under these conditions. CO 2 was found to increase with engine speed and to decrease with water content. NO x produced from emulsified fuel is significantly less than that produced from pure diesel under the same conditions.

A. Sakhrieh; R. H. Fouad; J. A. Yamin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Enhanced biodegradation of diesel fuel through the addition of particulate organic carbon and inorganic nutrients in coastal marine waters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diesel fuel pollution in coastal waters, resulting from recreational ... operations, is common and can adversely affect marine biota. The purpose of this study was...Spartina alterniflora...), inorganic nutrients...

Michael F. Piehler; Hans W. Paerl

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

An advanced fuel cell simulator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Fuel Cells ...................... 4 D. Fuel Cell Power Plant ..................... 4 E. Challenges in Fuel Cell Development ............ 5 F. Previous Work ......................... 6 G. Solar Array Simulators .................... 8 H. Battery... ............................. 54 28 Under-voltage Fault ........................... 55 1 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION The depleting fossil fuel resources and increasing pollution are leading to the research and development of alternate energy generation techniques like fuel cells...

Acharya, Prabha Ramchandra

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Mathematics: Food, Soil, Water, Air, Free Speech  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, you should take note that it has an "Achilles heel;" it runs on fossil fuel. Fossil fuel supplies anything to do with health or disease, there is a definite pattern that has come to dominate the "food

Russo, Bernard

414

An integrated approach for the verification of fresh mixed oxide fuel (MOX) assemblies at light water reactor MOX recycle reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents an integrated approach for the verification of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies prior to their being loaded into the reactor. There is a coupling of the verification approach that starts at the fuel fabrication plant and stops with the transfer of the assemblies into the thermal reactor. The key measurement points are at the output of the fuel fabrication plant, the receipt at the reactor site, and the storage in the water pool as fresh fuel. The IAEA currently has the capability to measure the MOX fuel assemblies at the output of the fuel fabrication plants using a passive neutron coincidence counting systems of the passive neutron collar (PNCL) type. Also. at the MOX reactor pool, the underwater coincidence counter (UWCC) has been developed to measure the MOX assemblies in the water. The UWCC measurement requires that the fuel assembly be lifted about two meters up in the storage rack to avoid interference from the fuel that is stored in the rack. This paper presents a new method to verify the MOX fuel assemblies that are in the storage rack without the necessity of moving the fuel. The detector system is called the Underwater MOX Verification System (UMVS). The integration and relationship of the three measurements systems is described.

Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lee, Sang - Yoon [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Prediction of heat transfer for a supercritical water test with a four pin fuel bundle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a next step to validate prediction methods for core design of a Supercritical Water Cooled Reactor, a small, electrically heated fuel bundle with 4 pins is planned to be tested. This paper summarizes first heat transfer predictions for such a test, which were performed based on supercritical and subcritical sub-channel analyses. For heat transfer under supercritical pressure conditions, the sub-channel code STAFAS has been applied, which had been tested successfully already for a supercritical water reactor design. Design studies with different assembly box sizes at a given pin diameter and pitch have been performed to optimize the coolant temperature distribution. With a fuel pin outer diameter of 10 mm and a pitch to diameter ratio of 1.15, an optimum inner width of the assembly box was determined to be 24 mm. Coolant and cladding surface temperatures to be expected at subcritical pressure conditions have been predicted with the sub-channel code MATRA. As, different from typical PWR or BWR conditions, a dryout has been foreseen for the tests, this code had to be extended to include suitable dryout criteria as well as post dryout heat transfer correlations at higher enthalpies and pressures. Different from PWR or BWR design, the cladding surface temperature of fuel pins in supercritical water reactors can vary significantly around the circumference of each pin, causing bending towards its hotter side which, in turn, can cause additional sub-channel heat-up and thus additional thermal bending of the pin. To avoid a thermal instability by this effect, a sensitivity study with respect to thermal bending of fuel pins has been performed, which determines the minimum number of grid spacers needed for this test. (authors)

Behnke, L. [RWE Power AG, Essen (Germany); Himmel, S.; Waata, C.; Schulenberg, T. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies, PO Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Laurien, E. [University of Stuttgart (Germany)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Preparation and combustion of coal-water fuel from the Sin Pun coal deposit, southern Thailand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to an inquiry by the Department of Mineral Resources in Thailand, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) prepared a program to assess the responsiveness of Sin Pun lignite to the temperature and pressure conditions of hot-water drying. The results indicate that drying made several improvements in the coal, notably increases in heating value and carbon content and reductions in equilibrium moisture and oxygen content. The equilibrium moisture content decreased from 27 wt% for the raw coal to about 15 wt% for the hot-water-dried (HWD) coals. The energy density for a pumpable coal-water fuel (CWF) indicates an increase from 4500 to 6100 Btu/lb by hot-water drying. Approximately 650 lb of HWD Sin Pun CWF were fired in the EERC`s combustion test facility. The fuel burned extremely well, with no feed problems noted during the course of the test. Fouling and slagging deposits each indicated a very low rate of ash deposition, with only a dusty layer formed on the cooled metal surfaces. The combustor was operated at between 20% and 25% excess air, resulting in a flue gas SO{sub 2} concentration averaging approximately 6500 parts per million.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Task 27 -- Alaskan low-rank coal-water fuel demonstration project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development of coal-water-fuel (CWF) technology has to-date been predicated on the use of high-rank bituminous coal only, and until now the high inherent moisture content of low-rank coal has precluded its use for CWF production. The unique feature of the Alaskan project is the integration of hot-water-drying (HWD) into CWF technology as a beneficiation process. Hot-water-drying is an EERC developed technology unavailable to the competition that allows the range of CWF feedstock to be extended to low-rank coals. The primary objective of the Alaskan Project, is to promote interest in the CWF marketplace by demonstrating the commercial viability of low-rank coal-water-fuel (LRCWF). While commercialization plans cannot be finalized until the implementation and results of the Alaskan LRCWF Project are known and evaluated, this report has been prepared to specifically address issues concerning business objectives for the project, and outline a market development plan for meeting those objectives.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Energy and Air Emission Effects of Water Supply  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Breakdown of energy comsumption of a water utility: (a) life-cycle phase, (b) water supply phase, (c) life-cycle activity, and (d) material production category. ... The Water?Energy Sustainability Tool (WEST) can evaluate the construction, operation, and maintenance of water systems and compare the direct and indirect (supply chain) energy and environmental effects of alternative water sources in terms of material production (e.g., concrete, pipe, and chemicals), material delivery, construction and maintenance equipment use, energy production (electricity and fuel), and sludge disposal. ... The difference is due to fossil fuels, especially coal, which make up a larger portion of the U.S. electricity mix. ...

Jennifer R. Stokes; Arpad Horvath

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

419

Investigation of Water Droplet Interaction with the Sidewalls of the Gas Channel in a PEM Fuel Cell in the Presence of Gas Flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

forms of hydrogen powered technologies exist and have been well-researched, fuel cells is considered efficiently in the fuel cells (4). Inefficient water removal results in flooding of the catalyst layerInvestigation of Water Droplet Interaction with the Sidewalls of the Gas Channel in a PEM Fuel Cell

Kandlikar, Satish

420

NETL: News Release - Four Minority Universities Selected for Fossil Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

May 20, 2010 May 20, 2010 Four Minority Universities Selected for Fossil Energy Research Grants College Students to Focus on Computational Modeling, High-Temperature Materials and Components Washington, DC - Innovative fossil energy research projects will be investigated by students and faculty from four winning institutions in the Department of Energy's annual competition for fossil energy research ideas from the nation's Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Other Minority Institutions (HBCU/OMI). Students and faculty from the chosen universities - the University of Texas, El Paso; Southern University and A&M College; Tennessee State University; and the University of Texas, San Antonio - will investigate projects dealing with computational energy sciences, material sciences, and sensors and controls for use in fossil fuel power systems.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water fossil fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Projects Selected to Advance Innovative Materials for Fossil Energy Power  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Selected to Advance Innovative Materials for Fossil Energy Selected to Advance Innovative Materials for Fossil Energy Power Systems Projects Selected to Advance Innovative Materials for Fossil Energy Power Systems September 14, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Four projects that will develop capabilities for designing sophisticated materials that can withstand the harsh environments of advanced fossil energy power systems have been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy. The projects will develop computational capabilities for designing materials with unique thermal, chemical and mechanical properties necessary for withstanding the high temperatures and extreme environments of advanced energy systems. These innovative systems are both fuel efficient and produce lower amounts of emissions, including carbon dioxide for permanent

422

Projects Selected to Advance Innovative Materials for Fossil Energy Power  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Projects Selected to Advance Innovative Materials for Fossil Energy Projects Selected to Advance Innovative Materials for Fossil Energy Power Systems Projects Selected to Advance Innovative Materials for Fossil Energy Power Systems September 14, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Four projects that will develop capabilities for designing sophisticated materials that can withstand the harsh environments of advanced fossil energy power systems have been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy. The projects will develop computational capabilities for designing materials with unique thermal, chemical and mechanical properties necessary for withstanding the high temperatures and extreme environments of advanced energy systems. These innovative systems are both fuel efficient and produce lower amounts of emissions, including carbon dioxide for permanent

423

Proceedings of the fourth annual conference on fossil energy materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fourth Annual Conference on Fossil Energy Materials was held in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on may 15--17, 1990. The meeting was sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy through the Advanced Research and Technology Development (AR TD) Materials Program, and ASM International. The objective of the AR TD Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for longer-term fossil energy applications as well as for generic needs of various fossil fuel technologies. The work is divided into the following categories: (1) Ceramics, (2) New Alloys, (3) Corrosion and Erosion, and (4) Technology Assessment and Technology Transfer. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

Judkins, R.R.; Braski, D.N. (comps.)

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Advanced U–Np–Pu fuel to achieve long-life core in heavy water reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to look at the possibility of approaching the long-life core comparable with reactor life-time. The main issues are centered on U–Np–Pu fuel in a tight lattice design with heavy water as a coolant. It is found that in a hard neutron spectrum thus obtained, a large fraction of 238Pu produced by neutron capture in 237Np not only protects plutonium against uncontrolled proliferation, but substantially contributes in keeping criticality due to improved fissile properties (its capture-to-fission ratio drops below unit). Equilibrium fuel composition demonstrates excellent conversion properties that yield the burn-up value as high as 200 GWd/t at extremely small reactivity swings.

K. Nikitin; M. Saito; V. Artisyuk; A. Chmelev; V. Apse

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

The Fossil Record of the Peronosporomycetes (Oomycota)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

identified as a parasite. Key words: antheridium, Carboniferous, chert, coal ball, Devonian, fossil water mold, oogonium INTRODUCTION The Peronosporomycetes (also called Peronosporo- mycota, Oomycota or Oomycetes; David 2002) are heterotrophic eukaryotes... that thrive in both aquatic and terrestrial environments where they are effective as saprotrophs and disease-causative agents in plants and animals including humans (Margulis and Schwartz 1998). Within the group are economically important phytopathogens...

Krings, Michael; Taylor, Thomas N.; Dotzler, Nora

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Ferritic Alloys as Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Material for Light Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the GE project is to demonstrate that advanced steels such as iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys could be used as accident tolerant fuel cladding material in commercial light water reactors. The GE project does not include fuel development. Current findings support the concept that a FeCrAl alloy could be used for the cladding of commercial nuclear fuel. The use of this alloy will benefit the public since it is going to make the power generating light water reactors safer. In the Phase 1A of this cost shared project, GE (GRC + GNF) teamed with the University of Michigan, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study the environmental and mechanical behavior of more than eight candidate cladding material both under normal operation conditions of commercial nuclear reactors and under accident conditions in superheated steam (loss of coolant condition). The main findings are as follows: (1) Under normal operation conditions the candidate alloys (e.g. APMT, Alloy 33) showed excellent resistance to general corrosion, shadow corrosion and to environmentally assisted cracking. APMT also showed resistance to proton irradiation up to 5 dpa. (2) Under accident conditions the selected candidate materials showed several orders of magnitude improvement in the reaction with superheated steam as compared with the current zirconium based alloys. (3) Tube fabrication feasibility studies of FeCrAl alloys are underway. The aim is to obtain a wall thickness that is below 400 µm. (4) A strategy is outlined for the regulatory path approval and for the insertion of a lead fuel assembly in a commercial reactor by 2022. (5) The GE team worked closely with INL to have four rodlets tested in the ATR. GE provided the raw stock for the alloys, the fuel for the rodlets and the cost for fabrication/welding of the rodlets. INL fabricated the rodlets and the caps and welded them to provide hermetic seal. The replacement of a zirconium alloy using a ferritic material containing chromium and aluminum appears to be the most near term implementation for accident tolerant nuclear fuels.

Rebak, Raul B. [General Electric] (ORCID:0000000280704475)

2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

427

Effects of draw solutions and membrane conditions on electricity generation and water flux in osmotic microbial fuel cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

membrane processes such as microfil- tration, ultrafiltration, nanofiltration, and reverse osmosis con. Such a water movement does not require external energy input like that in reverse osmosis; thus, FO is a low Keywords: Forward osmosis Osmotic microbial fuel cell Wastewater treatment Water flux Draw solution a b

428

Department of Energy/Office of Fossil Energys Innovations for Existing Plants Energy-Water R&D Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Technology Laboratory's Power Energy Technology Laboratory's Power Plant-Water R&D Program Thomas J. Feeley, III 1 , Sara Pletcher 1 , Barbara Carney 1 , and Andrea T. McNemar 2 1 U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, 626 Cochrans Mill Road, P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 2 Science Applications International Corporation, 626 Cochrans Mill Road, P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 ABSTRACT Thermoelectric power plants utilize significant quantities of water for generating electrical energy. For example, a 500 MW power plant that employs once-through cooling uses over 12 million gallons per hour of water for cooling and other process requirements. The United States Geological Survey (USGS) estimates that thermoelectric generation accounts for approximately

429

Hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation process for in situ destruction of chlorinated hydrocarbon and fuel hydrocarbon contaminants in water and soil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In situ hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation process is useful for in situ degradation of hydrocarbon water and soil contaminants. Fuel hydrocarbons, chlorinated hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, petroleum distillates and other organic contaminants present in the soil and water are degraded by the process involving hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation into non-toxic products of the degradation. The process uses heat which is distributed through soils and water, optionally combined with oxygen and/or hydrocarbon degradation catalysts, and is particularly useful for remediation of solvent, fuel or other industrially contaminated sites.

Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA); Copenhaver, Sally C. (Livermore, CA); Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Combined cooling and purification system for nuclear reactor spent fuel pit, refueling cavity, and refueling water storage tank  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The spent fuel pit of a pressured water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant has sufficient coolant capacity that a safety rated cooling system is not required. A non-safety rated combined cooling and purification system with redundant branches selectively provides simultaneously cooling and purification for the spent fuel pit, the refueling cavity, and the refueling water storage tank, and transfers coolant from the refueling water storage tank to the refueling cavity without it passing through the reactor core. Skimmers on the suction piping of the combined cooling and purification system eliminate the need for separate skimmer circuits with dedicated pumps.

Corletti, Michael M. (New Kensington, PA); Lau, Louis K. (Monroeville, PA); Schulz, Terry L. (Murrysville Boro, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

The Challenge Human activities, such as the burning of fossil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil is a multinational independent exploration and production company with interests in the North Sea oil, gas fields or saline aquifers. Emissions from fossil fuel power stations could then be reduced, is the process of the capture and long-term storage of atmospheric CO2 and will play a vital role in future

Crowther, Paul

432

NETL - Fuel Reforming Facilities  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Research using NETL's Fuel Reforming Facilities explores catalytic issues inherent in fossil-energy related applications, including catalyst synthesis and characterization, reaction kinetics, catalyst activity and selectivity, catalyst deactivation, and stability.

None

2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

433

EA-1778: Proposed Rule, 10 CFR 433 and 435, Energy Conservation and Fossil  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

78: Proposed Rule, 10 CFR 433 and 435, Energy Conservation and 78: Proposed Rule, 10 CFR 433 and 435, Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy EA-1778: Proposed Rule, 10 CFR 433 and 435, Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of DOE's Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR Part 435, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings". Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time.

434

Health and safety implications of alternative energy technologies. III. Fossil energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reviews both innovative fossil energy sources (tar sands, oil shale, ... being considered as suppliers of gaseous and liquid fuels (that is, coal gasification and liquefaction). Potential health and sa...

P. J. Walsh; E. L. Etnier; A. P. Watson

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Funds Awarded to Historically Black Colleges and Universities for Fossil Energy Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy has selected four research projects that will provide educational and research training opportunities for minority students while advancing key technical areas in fossil fuel utilization.

436

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced fossil energy Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cheap oil and fossil fuels is coming to an end, humanity will face an energy crisis. Many alternative... energy sources have already been identified. However, there is no optimal...

437

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: Hydrogen Production  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen Manufacturing Fuel Cells Applications/Technology Validation Safety Codes and Standards Education Basic Research Systems Analysis Systems Integration U.S. Department of Energy Search help Home > Hydrogen Production Printable Version Hydrogen Production Hydrogen can be produced from diverse domestic feedstocks using a variety of process technologies. Hydrogen-containing compounds such as fossil fuels, biomass or even water can be a source of hydrogen. Thermochemical processes can be used to produce hydrogen from biomass and from fossil fuels such as coal, natural gas and petroleum. Power generated from sunlight, wind and nuclear sources can be used to produce hydrogen electrolytically. Sunlight alone can also drive photolytic production of

438

Proceedings: 7th International Conference on Cycle Chemistry in Fossil Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purity of boiler water, feedwater, and steam is central to ensuring component availability and reliability in fossil-fired plants. These proceedings of EPRI's Seventh International Conference on Cycle Chemistry in Fossil Plants address the state of the art in fossil plant and combined cycle/heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) cycle chemistry as well as international practices for corrosion control and water preparation and purification.

None

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Advances in Fuel Cell Vehicle Design.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Factors such as global warming, dwindling fossil fuel reserves, and energy security concerns combine to indicate that a replacement for the internal combustion engine (ICE)… (more)

Bauman, Jennifer

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Adaptation of gas tagging for failed fuel identification in light water reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses experience with noble gas tagging and its adaptation to commercial reactors. It reviews the recent incidence of fuel failures in light water reactors, and methods used to identify failures, and concludes that the on-line technique of gas tagging could significantly augment present flux tilting, sipping and ultrasonic testing of assemblies. The paper describes calculations on tag gas stability in-reactor, and tag injection tests that were carried out collaboratively with Commonwealth Edison Company in the Byron-2 pressurized water reactor (P%a) and with Duke Power Company and Babcock and Wilcox Fuel Company in the Oconee-2 PWM. The tests gave information on: (a) noble gas concentration dynamics as the tag gases were dissolved in and eventually removed from subsystems of the RCS; and (b) the suitability of candidate Ar, Ne, Kr and Xe isotopes for tagging PWR fuel. It was found that the activity of Xe{sup 125} (the activation product of the tag isotope Xe{sup 124}) acted as a ``tag of a tag`` and tracked gas through the reactor; measured activities are being used to model gas movement in the RCS. Several interference molecules (trace contaminants normally present at sub-ppM concentrations in RCS samples) and entrained air in the RCS were found to affect mass spectrometer sensitivity for tag isotopes. In all instances the contaminants could be differentiated from the tag isotopes by operating the mass spectrometer at high resolution (2500). Similarly, it was possible to distinguish all the candidate tag gases against a high background of air. The test results suggested, however, that for routine analysis a high resolution static mass spectrometer will be preferable to the dynamic instrument used for the present analyses.

Lambert, J.D.B.; Gross, K.C.; Depiante, E.V. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Callis, E.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Egebrecht, P.M. [Commonwealth Edison Company, Downers Grove, IL (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water fossil fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

A correlation of water solubility in jet fuels with API gravity: aniline point percent aromatics, and temperature.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A CORRELATION OF WATER SOLUBILITY IN JET FUELS WITH API GRAVITY, ANILINE POINT PERCENT AROMATICS, AND TEMPERATURE A Thesis By ALONZO B YINGTON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January, 1964 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering A CORRELATION OF MATER SOLUBILITT IH JET FUELS WITS API GEAVITT, ANILINE POINT, PERCENT ARONATICS, AND TENPERATURE A Thesis By ALOHZO BYIHGTOH Approved...

Byington, Alonzo

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

442

Heat and water transport in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell electrode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the present scenario of a global initiative toward a sustainable energy future, the polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) has emerged as one of the most promising alternative energy conversion devices for various applications. Despite tremendous progress in recent years, a pivotal performance limitation in the PEFC comes from liquid water transport and the resulting flooding phenomena. Liquid water blocks the open pore space in the electrode and the fibrous diffusion layer leading to hindered oxygen transport. The electrode is also the only component in the entire PEFC sandwich which produces waste heat from the electrochemical reaction. The cathode electrode, being the host to several competing transport mechanisms, plays a crucial role in the overall PEFC performance limitation. In this work, an electrode model is presented in order to elucidate the coupled heat and water transport mechanisms. Two scenarios are specifically considered: (1) conventional, Nafion{reg_sign} impregnated, three-phase electrode with the hydrated polymeric membrane phase as the conveyer of protons where local electro-neutrality prevails; and (2) ultra-thin, two-phase, nano-structured electrode without the presence of ionomeric phase where charge accumulation due to electro-statics in the vicinity of the membrane-CL interface becomes important. The electrode model includes a physical description of heat and water balance along with electrochemical performance analysis in order to study the influence of electro-statics/electro-migration and phase change on the PEFC electrode performance.

Mukherjee, Partha P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borup, Rod L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ranjan, Devesh [TEXAS A& M UNIV

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Use Average Energy Use Average Supply-Chain Corn Stover tothe corn ethanol debate focused on its fossil energy andMiscanthus Energy Use U.S. Average Supply-Chain Corn Grain

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

ALARA Analysis for Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 Fuel Storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The addition of Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Core 2 Blanket Fuel Assembly storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB) will increase the total cumulative CSB personnel exposure from receipt and handling activities. The loaded Shippingport Spent Fuel Canisters (SSFCs) used for the Shippingport fuel have a higher external dose rate. Assuming an MCO handling rate of 170 per year (K East and K West concurrent operation), 24-hr CSB operation, and nominal SSFC loading, all work crew personnel will have a cumulative annual exposure of less than the 1,000 mrem limit.

Lewis, M E

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

An Investigation of the Use of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel for Transuranic Waste Recycling in Pressurized Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An investigation of the utilization of TRistructural- ISOtropic (TRISO)-coated fuel particles for the burning of plutonium/neptunium (Pu/Np) isotopes in typical Westinghouse four-loop pressurized water reactors is presented. Though numerous studies have evaluated the burning of transuranic isotopes in light water reactors (LWRs), this work differentiates itself by employing Pu/Np-loaded TRISO particles embedded within a silicon carbide (SiC) matrix and formed into pellets, constituting the fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) fuel concept that can be loaded into standard LWR fuel element cladding. This approach provides the capability of Pu/Np burning and, by virtue of the multibarrier TRISO particle design and SiC matrix properties, will allow for greater burnup of Pu/Np material, plus improved fuel reliability and thermal performance. In this study, a variety of heterogeneous assembly layouts, which utilize a mix of FCM rods and typical UO2 rods, and core loading patterns were analyzed to demonstrate the neutronic feasibility of Pu/Np-loaded TRISO fuel. The assembly and core designs herein reported are not fully optimized and require fine-tuning to flatten power peaks; however, the progress achieved thus far strongly supports the conclusion that with further rod/assembly/core loading and placement optimization, Pu/Np-loaded TRISO fuel and core designs that are capable of balancing Pu/Np production and destruction can be designed within the standard constraints for thermal and reactivity performance in pressurized water reactors.

Gentry, Cole A [ORNL] [ORNL; Godfrey, Andrew T [ORNL] [ORNL; Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL] [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL] [ORNL; Powers, Jeffrey J [ORNL] [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Controlling Accumulation of Fermentation Inhibitors in Biorefinery Recycle Water Using Microbial Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background Microbial fuel cells (MFC) and microbial electrolysis cells are electrical devices that treat water using microorganisms and convert soluble organic matter into electricity and hydrogen, respectively. Emerging cellulosic biorefineries are expected to use large amounts of water during production of ethanol. Pretreatment of cellulosic biomass results in production of fermentation inhibitors which accumulate in process water and make the water recycle process difficult. Use of MFCs to remove the inhibitory sugar and lignin degradation products from recycle water is investigated in this study. Results Use of an MFC to reduce the levels of furfural, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, vanillic acid, 4- hydroxybenzaldehyde and 4-hydroxyacetophenone while simultaneously producing electricity is demonstrated here. An integrated MFC design approach was used which resulted in high power densities for the MFC, reaching up to 3700mW/m2 (356W/m3 net anode volume) and a coulombic efficiency of 69%. The exoelectrogenic microbial consortium enriched in the anode was characterized using a 16S rRNA clone library method. A unique exoelectrogenic microbial consortium dominated by -Proteobacteria (50%), along with -Proteobacteria (28%), -Proteobacteria (14%), -Proteobacteria (6%) and others was identified. The consortium demonstrated broad substrate specificity, ability to handle high inhibitor concentrations (5 to 20mM) with near complete removal, while maintaining long-term stability with respect to power production. Conclusions Use of MFCs for removing fermentation inhibitors has implications for: 1) enabling higher ethanol yields at high biomass loading in cellulosic ethanol biorefineries, 2) improved water recycle and 3) electricity production up to 25% of total biorefinery power needs.

Borole, Abhijeet P [ORNL; Mielenz, Jonathan R [ORNL; Leak, David [Imperial College, London; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A [ORNL; Hamilton, Choo Yieng [ORNL; Andras, Calin [Imperial College, London

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels Using Solar Thermochemical Splitting of Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to identify economically feasible concepts for the production of hydrogen from water using solar energy. The ultimate project objective was to select one or more competitive concepts for pilot-scale demonstration using concentrated solar energy. Results of pilot scale plant performance would be used as foundation for seeking public and private resources for full-scale plant development and testing. Economical success in this venture would afford the public with a renewable and limitless source of energy carrier for use in electric power load-leveling and as a carbon-free transportation fuel. The Solar Hydrogen Generation Research (SHGR) project embraces technologies relevant to hydrogen research under the Office of Hydrogen Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technology (HFCIT) as well as concentrated solar power under the Office of Solar Energy Technologies (SET). Although the photoelectrochemical work is aligned with HFCIT, some of the technologies in this effort are also consistent with the skills and technologies found in concentrated solar power and photovoltaic technology under the Office of Solar Energy Technologies (SET). Hydrogen production by thermo-chemical water-splitting is a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or a combination of heat and electrolysis instead of pure electrolysis and meets the goals for hydrogen production using only water and renewable solar energy as feed-stocks. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production also meets these goals by implementing photo-electrolysis at the surface of a semiconductor in contact with an electrolyte with bias provided by a photovoltaic source. Here, water splitting is a photo-electrolytic process in which hydrogen is produced using only solar photons and water as feed-stocks. The thermochemical hydrogen task engendered formal collaborations among two universities, three national laboratories and two private sector entities. The photoelectrochemical hydrogen task included formal collaborations with three universities and one national laboratory. The formal participants in these two tasks are listed above. Informal collaborations in both projects included one additional university (the University of Nevada, Reno) and two additional national laboratories (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory).

Heske, Clemens; Moujaes, Samir; Weimer, Alan; Wong, Bunsen; Siegal, Nathan; McFarland, Eric; Miller, Eric; Lewis, Michele; Bingham, Carl; Roth, Kurth; Sabacky, Bruce; Steinfeld, Aldo

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

448

PIA - Fossil Energy Web System (FEWEB) | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Fossil Energy Web System (FEWEB) PIA - Fossil Energy Web System (FEWEB) PIA - Fossil Energy Web System (FEWEB) PIA - Fossil Energy Web System (FEWEB) More Documents & Publications...

449

Recovery of solid fuel from municipal solid waste by hydrothermal treatment using subcritical water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrothermal treatment using subcritical water was studied to recover solid fuel from MSW. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer More than 75% of carbon in MSW was recovered as char. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heating value of char was comparable to that of brown coal and lignite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polyvinyl chloride was decomposed at 295 Degree-Sign C and 8 MPa and was removed by washing. - Abstract: Hydrothermal treatments using subcritical water (HTSW) such as that at 234 Degree-Sign C and 3 MPa (LT condition) and 295 Degree-Sign C and 8 MPa (HT condition) were investigated to recover solid fuel from municipal solid waste (MSW). Printing paper, dog food (DF), wooden chopsticks, and mixed plastic film and sheets of polyethylene, polypropylene, and polystyrene were prepared as model MSW components, in which polyvinylchloride (PVC) powder and sodium chloride were used to simulate Cl sources. While more than 75% of carbon in paper, DF, and wood was recovered as char under both LT and HT conditions, plastics did not degrade under either LT or HT conditions. The heating value (HV) of obtained char was 13,886-27,544 kJ/kg and was comparable to that of brown coal and lignite. Higher formation of fixed carbon and greater oxygen dissociation during HTSW were thought to improve the HV of char. Cl atoms added as PVC powder and sodium chloride to raw material remained in char after HTSW. However, most Cl originating from PVC was found to converse into soluble Cl compounds during HTSW under the HT condition and could be removed by washing. From these results, the merit of HTSW as a method of recovering solid fuel from MSW is considered to produce char with minimal carbon loss without a drying process prior to HTSW. In addition, Cl originating from PVC decomposes into soluble Cl compound under the HT condition. The combination of HTSW under the HT condition and char washing might improve the quality of char as alternative fuel.

Hwang, In-Hee, E-mail: hwang@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Solid Waste Disposal Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060 8628 (Japan); Aoyama, Hiroya; Matsuto, Toshihiko; Nakagishi, Tatsuhiro; Matsuo, Takayuki [Laboratory of Solid Waste Disposal Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060 8628 (Japan)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

450

FOSSIL2 energy policy model documentation: FOSSIL2 documentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the structure, derivations, assumptions, and mathematical formulation of the FOSSIL2 model. Each major facet of the model - supply/demand interactions, industry financing, and production - has been designed to parallel closely the actual cause/effect relationships determining the behavior of the United States energy system. The data base for the FOSSIL2 program is large, as is appropriate for a system dynamics simulation model. When possible, all data were obtained from sources well known to experts in the energy field. Cost and resource estimates are based on DOE data whenever possible. This report presents the FOSSIL2 model at several levels. Volumes II and III of this report list the equations that comprise the FOSSIL2 model, along with variable definitions and a cross-reference list of the model variables. Volume III lists the model equations and a one line definition for equations, in a short, readable format.

None

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Fossil descriptions: Private collections of fossils are a plus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Paul Barrett and Martin Munt contend that private collections of fossil specimens hold back science because they are not readily accessible (Nature ... , but this need not be the case. The solution lies in closer collaboration between private collectors and palaeontologists. ...

Oliver W. M. Rauhut; Adriana López-Arbarello; Gert Wörheide

2014-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

452

Effect of Fuel Wobbe Number on Pollutant Emissions from Advanced Technology Residential Water Heaters: Results of Controlled Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research summarized in this report is part of a larger effort to evaluate the potential air quality impacts of using liquefied natural gas in California. A difference of potential importance between many liquefied natural gas blends and the natural gas blends that have been distributed in California in recent years is the higher Wobbe number of liquefied natural gas. Wobbe number is a measure of the energy delivery rate for appliances that use orifice- or pressure-based fuel metering. The effect of Wobbe number on pollutant emissions from residential water heaters was evaluated in controlled experiments. Experiments were conducted on eight storage water heaters, including five with “ultra low-NO{sub X}” burners, and four on-demand (tankless) water heaters, all of which featured ultra low-NO{sub X} burners. Pollutant emissions were quantified as air-free concentrations in the appliance flue and fuel-based emission factors in units of nanogram of pollutant emitter per joule of fuel energy consumed. Emissions were measured for carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub X}), nitrogen oxide (NO), formaldehyde and acetaldehyde as the water heaters were operated through defined operating cycles using fuels with varying Wobbe number. The reference fuel was Northern California line gas with Wobbe number ranging from 1344 to 1365. Test fuels had Wobbe numbers of 1360, 1390 and 1420. The most prominent finding was an increase in NO{sub X} emissions with increasing Wobbe number: all five of the ultra low-NO{sub X} storage water heaters and two of the four ultra low-NO{sub X} on-demand water heaters had statistically discernible (p<0.10) increases in NO{sub X} with fuel Wobbe number. The largest percentage increases occurred for the ultra low-NO{sub X} water heaters. There was a discernible change in CO emissions with Wobbe number for all four of the on-demand devices tested. The on-demand water heater with the highest CO emissions also had the largest CO increase with increasing fuel Wobbe number.

Rapp, VH; Singer, BC

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Solar water heaters | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

water heaters water heaters (Redirected from - Solar Hot Water) Jump to: navigation, search (The following text is derived from the United States Department of Energy's description of Solar Water Heating technology.)[1] Solar Water Heater One of the most cost-effective ways to include renewable technologies into a building is by incorporating solar hot water. A typical residential solar water-heating system reduces the need for conventional water heating by about two-thirds. It minimizes the expense of electricity or fossil fuel to heat the water and reduces the associated environmental impacts. Solar Water Heating for Buildings Most solar water-heating systems for buildings have two main parts: (1) a solar collector and (2) a storage tank. The most common collector used in solar hot water systems is the

454

Fossil Energy FY 2015 Budget in Brief  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Fossil Energy FY 2015 Budget in Brief document gives highlights to the budget request for the FY 2015 budget request for the Office of Fossil Energy.

455

An overview of utilizing water-in-diesel emulsion fuel in diesel engine and its potential research study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The need for more efficient energy usage and a less polluted environment are the prominent research areas that are currently being investigated by many researchers worldwide. Water-in-diesel emulsion fuel (W/D) is a promising alternative fuel that could fulfills such requests in that it can improve the combustion efficiency of a diesel engine and reduce harmful exhaust emission, especially nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM). To date, there have been many W/D emulsion fuel studies, especially regarding performance, emissions and micro-explosion phenomena. This review paper gathers and discusses the recent advances in emulsion fuel studies in respect of the impact of W/D emulsion fuel on the performance and emission of diesel engines, micro-explosion phenomena especially the factors that affecting the onset and strength of micro-explosion process, and proposed potential research area in W/D emulsion fuel study. There is an inconsistency in the results reported from previous studies especially for the thermal efficiency, brake power, torque and specific fuel consumption. However, it is agreed by most of the studies that W/D does result in an improvement in these measurements when the total amount of diesel fuel in the emulsion is compared with that of the neat diesel fuel. \\{NOx\\} and PM exhaust gas emissions are greatly reduced by using the W/D emulsion fuel. Unburnt hydrocarbon (UHC) and carbon monoxide (CO) exhaust emissions are found to be increased by using the W/D emulsion fuel. The inconsistency of the experimental result can be related to the effects of the onset and the strength of the micro-explosion process. The factors that affect these measurements consist of the size of the dispersed water particle, droplet size of the emulsion, water-content in the emulsion, ambient temperature, ambient pressure, type and percentage of surfactant, type of diesel engine and engine operating conditions. Durability testing and developing the fuel production device that requires no/less surfactant are the potential research area that can be explored in future.

Ahmad Muhsin Ithnin; Hirofumi Noge; Hasannuddin Abdul Kadir; Wira Jazair

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

President Requests $638.0 Million for Fossil Energy Programs | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

President Requests $638.0 Million for Fossil Energy Programs President Requests $638.0 Million for Fossil Energy Programs President Requests $638.0 Million for Fossil Energy Programs April 10, 2013 - 4:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - President Obama's FY 2014 budget seeks $638.0 million for the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) to advance technologies related to the reliable, efficient, affordable and environmentally sound use of fossil fuels as well as manage the Strategic Petroleum Reserve and Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to provide strategic and economic security against disruptions in U.S. oil supplies. The request includes $420.6 million for Fossil Energy Research and Development, $189.4 million for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, $8.0 million for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve and $20.0 million for the Naval Petroleum Reserves.

457

Fossil Energy Program annual progress report for April 1993 through March 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers progress made during the period April 1, 1993, through March 31, 1994, for research and development projects that contribute to the advancement of various fossil energy technologies. Projects on the Fossil Energy Program are supported by the DOE Office of Fossil Energy, the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, the DOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, the DOE Fossil Energy Clean Coal Technology Program, the DOE Bartlesville Project Office, the DOE Fossil Energy Office of Petroleum Reserves, and the US Agency for International Development. The five areas of research covered in this report are: Materials research and development; Environmental analysis and support; Bioprocessing; Coal combustion; and Fossil fuels supplies modeling and research. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Judkins, R.R.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Fossil Energy [Corrosion and Mechanics of Materials] - Nuclear Engineering  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fossil Energy Fossil Energy Capabilities Materials Testing Environmentally Assisted Cracking (EAC) of Reactor Materials Corrosion Performance/Metal Dusting Overview Light Water Reactors Fossil Energy Fusion Energy Metal Dusting Publications List Irradiated Materials Steam Generator Tube Integrity Other Facilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Corrosion and Mechanics of Materials Fossil Energy Bookmark and Share Conceptual designs of advanced coal-fired combustion systems require furnaces and heat transfer surfaces that operate at much higher temperatures than those in current coal-fired power plants. The combination of elevated temperatures and hostile combustion environments necessitates the development and application of ceramic materials in these designs.

459

Review of experiments to evaluate the ability of electrical heater rods to simulate nuclear fuel rod behavior during postulated loss-of-coolant accidents in light water reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Issues related to using electrical fuel rod simulators to simulate nuclear fuel rod behavior during postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions in light water reactors are summarized. Experimental programs which will provide a data base for comparing electrical heater rod and nuclear fuel rod LOCA responses are reviewed.

McPherson, G D; Tolman, E L

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

A Two Dimensional Model of a Direct Propane Fuel Cell with an Interdigitated Flow Field .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Increasing environmental concerns as well as diminishing fossil fuel reserves call for a new generation of energy conversion technologies. Fuel cells, which convert the chemical… (more)

Khakdaman, Hamidreza

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water fossil fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Evaporation Characteristics of a Liquid Bio-Fuel from Chicken Litter .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Alternative fuels are becoming more important as fossil fuels become more expensive. This thesis describes the production and properties of a bio-oil produced from waste… (more)

Tolonen, Erik

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Economic Analysis of Various Reforming Techniques and Fuel Sources for Hydrogen Production.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Hydrogen is emerging as a future replacement fuel for the traditional fossil fuels that will be capable of satisfying our energy needs. Hydrogen may enable… (more)

MCGLOCKLIN, KRISTIN

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Assessment of bio-fuel options for solid oxide fuel cell applications.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Rising concerns of inadequate petroleum supply, volatile crude oil price, and adverse environmental impacts from using fossil fuels have spurred the United States to promote… (more)

Lin, Jiefeng

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Critical Experiments Supporting Close Proximity Water Storage of Power Reactor Fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Argonne National Laboratory Specialists’ Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Nuclear Waste Management / Fuel

Gary S. Hoovler; M. Neil Baldwin; Ray L. Eng; Fred G. Welfare

465

A new future for carbohydrate fuel cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The development of renewable energy sources to reduce our dependence on limiting fossil fuel reserves continues to be a critical research initiative. Utilizing the abundant high energy content of carbohydrates contained in biomass (cellulose and hemicellulose) must be considered to be an important contribution to our overall energy budget. Carbohydrate-derived furan-based liquid fuels and especially ethanol are becoming important added components forming gasoline blends to lower overall fossil fuel use. Alternate renewable energy processes that more efficiently use the carbohydrate energy content are desirable and would lower the overall carbohydrate input requirement for energy production. Recently, new catalysts have shown the feasibility of efficiently transporting the 24 electrons in glucose to fuel cell electrodes making possible the direct conversion of the stored energy in carbohydrates into electricity with the benign formation of carbonate and water as products. The conversion of glycerol, a byproduct of biodiesel production, into three-carbon carbohydrates provides another opportunity to produce electricity from an abundant carbohydrate source. New developments in catalyst systems promise to make carbohydrate fuel cells an important part of future energy strategies.

G.D. Watt

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Carbonation of Fly Ash in Oxy-fuel CFB Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oxy-fuel combustion of fossil fuel is one of the most promising methods to produce a stream of concentrated CO2 ready for sequestration. Oxy-fuel FBC (fluidized bed combustion) can use limestone as a sorbent for

Chunbo Wang; Lufei Jia; Yewen Tan…

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

NETL: Releases & Briefs - Producing hydrogen from water, without  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Producing Hydrogen from Water, without Electrolysis Producing Hydrogen from Water, without Electrolysis Electrochemical potential difference drives the reaction Electrochemical potential difference drives the reaction Researchers at DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory have patented a "Method of Generating Hydrogen by Catalytic Decomposition of Water." The invention potentially leapfrogs current capital and energy intensive processes that produce hydrogen from fossil fuels or through the electrolysis of water. According to co-inventor Arun Bose, "Hydrogen can be produced by electrolysis, but the high voltage requirements are a commercial barrier. The invention provides a new route for producing hydrogen from water by using mixed proton-electron conducting membranes." Water is

468

Effect of direct liquid water injection and interdigitated flow field on the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

70-108B One Cyclotron Road Berkeley, California 94720 December 2, 1997 Key Words: Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cells, humidification, gas distribution, direct liquid water injection, interdigitated flow fields. * Corresponding... of the catalyst layers were made of waterproof, carbon fiber cloths. Liquid water was injected by two metering pumps into two heated stainless steel coils, where it was preheated to the cell operating temperatures, and then directly into the gas streams...

Wood, D. L.; Yi, Y. S.; Nguyen, Trung Van

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z