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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water effective date" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Type Policy Title Here Effective Date: [Insert Date  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Type Policy Title Here Effective Date: [Insert Date] Policy Statement [Type Statement Text Here] Reason(s) for the Policy [Type Reason Text Here] Primary Guidance to Which This Policy Responds [Type Primary Policy Here ­ If there is NOT a Primary Policy indicate that] Responsible University Office

Salzman, Daniel

2

UPS 300.019 Effective Date: 3-25-08  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPS 300.019 Effective Date: 3-25-08 UPS 300.019 ACADEMIC RESPONSIBILITY FOR MISSED INSTRUCTION DUE of the absence. Given prior notice, instructors are encouraged to allow students to make up class work, complete-25-08 EFFECTIVE DATE: March 25, 2008 Supersedes: UPS 300.019 dated 6-19-02 and ASD 07-177 University Policy

de Lijser, Peter

3

UPS 420.105 Effective Date: 4-14-14  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPS 420.105 Effective Date: 4-14-14 UPS 420.105 RIGHT OF NON-COMPLIANCE, RISK ACTIVITIES Certain EFFECTIVE DATE: April 14, 2014 Supersedes: UPS 420.105 dated 10-3-75 and ASD 14-35 University Policy

de Lijser, Peter

4

UPS 420.105 Effective Date: 10-3-75  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPS 420.105 Effective Date: 10-3-75 UPS 420.105 RIGHT OF NON-COMPLIANCE, RISK ACTIVITIES Certain, or both. EFFECTIVE DATE: October 3, 1975 Supersedes: UPS 420.105 dated 12-15-74 and FCD 74-175 University

de Lijser, Peter

5

Date  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Revised: 6122014 Template Reviewed: 6122014 Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation P.O. Box 5800 MS-1461 Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1461 Date...

6

UPS 210.100 Effective Date: 3-28-84  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPS 210.100 Effective Date: 3-28-84 University Policy Statement California State University, Fullerton UPS 210.100 AFFIRMATIVE ACTION POLICY I. PREAMBLE California State University, Fullerton. #12;UPS 210.100 Page 2 of 2 UPS 210.100 Effective Date: 3-28-84 III. DEPARTMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY All

de Lijser, Peter

7

UPS 450.400 Effective Date: 6-14-04  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPS 450.400 Effective Date: 6-14-04 UPS 450.400 OPEN UNIVERSITY ENROLLMENT POLICY I. OBJECTIVES A University. University Policy Statement California State University, Fullerton #12;UPS 450.400 Page 2 of 3 UPS 450.400 Effective Date: 6-14-04 B. Each semester, all students enrolling through Open University

de Lijser, Peter

8

DATE:  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartmentSmart GridThird QuarterintoCurrent June 20105-01 DATE:22 DATE:

9

DATE  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

These activities will require Infrastructure upgrades (office space, potable water, wastewater treatment, communications, etc.) to accommodate the increasing number of personnel...

10

DATE  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

These activities will require infrastructure upgrades (office space, potable water, wastewater treatment, communications, etc.) to accommodate the increasing number of personnel...

11

DATE:  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartmentSmart GridThird QuarterintoCurrent June 20105-01 DATE: October

12

DATE:  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartmentSmart GridThird QuarterintoCurrent June 20105-01 DATE:

13

DATE:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site |Documents D.O.E. RACE TOForm3-12 DATE:

14

DATE:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site |Documents D.O.E. RACE TOForm3-12 DATE:3

15

DATE:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site |Documents D.O.E. RACE TOForm3-12 DATE:34

16

DATE:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site |Documents D.O.E. RACE09 DATE: October 22,

17

DATE:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY 2012JDA 1/31/13 Jan 31, 2013 DATE: 01/31/2013 x

18

DATE:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY 2012JDA 1/31/13 Jan 31, 2013 DATE: 01/31/2013

19

DATE:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY 2012JDA 1/31/13 Jan 31, 2013 DATE:

20

DATE:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY 2012JDA 1/31/13 Jan 31, 2013 DATE:8:05 am, Mar

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water effective date" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

DATE:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY 2012JDA 1/31/13 Jan 31, 2013 DATE:8:05 am, Mar0

22

UPS 300.003 Effective Date: 1-28-13  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPS 300.003 Effective Date: 1-28-13 UPS 300.003 University-wide Student Learning Outcomes Preamble New UPS Source: Executive Committee ASD 12-146 With Campus-wide collaboration Academic Senate approved

de Lijser, Peter

23

DATE OF INITIAL ADOPTION AND EFFECTIVE DATE 5/21/2008 APPLICABILITY/ACCOUNTABILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of access control and security protection, whether in storage or in transit. Further defined in UCF policy 4, and process information that is essential to the academic, research, and administrative functions, mainframes, data storage systems, and similar SUBJECT: Effective Date: Policy Number: 5/13/2014 4-002.1 Use

Glebov, Leon

24

UPS 102.001 Effective Date: 5-11-12  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPS 102.001 Effective Date: 5-11-12 UPS 102.001 THE FACULTY DEVELOPMENT CENTER (FDC) IN SUPPORT Board membership shall be as specified in UPS 100.001 Academic Senate Bylaws [BL 11-8]. (b) Functions Statement #12;UPS 102.001 Effective Date: 5-11-12 UPS 102.001 Page 2 of 2 Review, assess and evaluate

de Lijser, Peter

25

UPS 292.000 Effective Date: 5-6-12  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPS 292.000 Effective Date: 5-6-12 UPS 292.000 FACULTY LEADERSHIP IN COLLEGIAL GOVERNANCE AWARD contributions to the principle and practice of shared governance. Up to five letters of support may be made part Statement #12;UPS 292.000 Page 2 of 2 UPS 292.000 Effective Date: 5-6-12 c. The nominee's record of service

de Lijser, Peter

26

UPS 240.200 Effective Date: 9-19-94  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPS 240.200 Effective Date: 9-19-94 University Policy Statement California State University, Fullerton UPS 240.200 POLICY ON AMOROUS OR SEXUAL RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN FACULTY, STAFF AND STUDENTS Amorous relationship will be deemed to have violated this policy. #12;UPS 240.200 Page 2 of 2 UPS 240.200 Effective

de Lijser, Peter

27

FAILURE MODES AND EFFECTS ANALYSIS Dated: May 27, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 NSTX FAILURE MODES AND EFFECTS ANALYSIS (FMEA) Revision 7 Dated: May 27, 2010 Prepared By: Name.07.13 09:11:02 -04'00' #12;NSTX Failure Modes & Effects Analysis / NSTX-FMEA-71-7 / p. 2 of 120 2 Table

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

28

UPS 210.050 Effective Date: 6-16-04  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPS 210.050 Effective Date: 6-16-04 University Policy Statement California State University, Fullerton UPS 210.050 PERSONNEL POLICY FOR FULL-TIME TEMPORARY FACULTY 1. DEFINITIONS A. In this document UPS documents, temporary faculty have the same rights and responsibilities as do tenure track faculty

de Lijser, Peter

29

UPS 300.018 Effective Date: 5-11-12  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPS 300.018 Effective Date: 5-11-12 UPS 300.018 WITHDRAWAL UNAUTHORIZED ISSUANCE OF WU GRADE When, UPS 300.016 summarizes the campus policy on authorized withdrawals; the administrative grade of W in a class. Such reasons must be documented by the student, in accordance with UPS 300.016. In the first

de Lijser, Peter

30

UPS 210.500 Effective Date: 1-30-13  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPS 210.500 Effective Date: 1-30-13 UPS 210.500 PROCEDURES: SEARCH COMMITTEES FOR ADMINISTRATIVE by UPS 210.007. A. The work of a search committee is confidential. It is similar in its functions temporary positions. C. Search committees created pursuant to UPS 210.007 shall follow these procedures. 1

de Lijser, Peter

31

UPS 100.601 1 Effective Date: 7-7-06  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPS 100.601 1 Effective Date: 7-7-06 UPS 100.601 PROCEDURES FOR DEPARTMENT/PROGRAM NAME CHANGES I California State University, Fullerton #12;UPS 100.601 UPS 100.601 2 Effective Date: 7-7-06 E. If opposition. Source: University Curriculum Committee EFFECTIVE DATE: July 7, 2006 Supersedes UPS 100.601 dated 10

de Lijser, Peter

32

UPS 240.200 1 Effective Date: 9-19-94  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPS 240.200 1 Effective Date: 9-19-94 UPS 240.200 POLICY ON AMOROUS OR SEXUAL RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN Policy Statement California State University, Fullerton #12;UPS 240.200 UPS 240.200 2 Effective Date: 9 of this policy. EFFECTIVE DATE: September 19, 1994 [New UPS] Supersedes ASD 94-115 #12;

de Lijser, Peter

33

UPS 210.060 1 Effective Date: 1-10-00  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPS 210.060 1 Effective Date: 1-10-00 UPS 210.060 PERSONNEL POLICY FOR PART-TIME LECTURERS 1;UPS 210.060 UPS 210.060 2 Effective Date: 1-10-00 appropriate Vice President shall decide whether) Supersedes: UPS 210.060 dated September 20, 1999 and ASD 99-125 #12;

de Lijser, Peter

34

UPS 300.022 1 Effective Date: 3-3-14  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPS 300.022 1 Effective Date: 3-3-14 UPS 300.022 Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes DATE: March 3, 2014 Supersedes UPS 300.022 dated 8-16-2000 and ASD 13-171 University Policy Statement

de Lijser, Peter

35

Nuclear quantum effects in water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, a path integral Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulation of liquid water is performed. It is found that the inclusion of nuclear quantum effects systematically improves the agreement of first principles simulations of liquid water with experiment. In addition, the proton momentum distribution is computed utilizing a recently developed open path integral molecular dynamics methodology. It is shown that these results are in good agreement with neutron Compton scattering data for liquid water and ice.

Joseph A. Morrone; Roberto Car

2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

36

UPS 100.001 COVER PAGE Effective Date: 5-15-14  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPS 100.001 COVER PAGE Effective Date: 5-15-14 UPS 100.001 ACADEMIC SENATE BYLAWS #12;UPS 100.001 TOC i Effective Date: 5-15-14 UPS 100.001 ACADEMIC SENATE BYLAWS TABLE OF CONTENTS Pages I. ACADEMIC................................................................................................4 2. University Policy Statement (UPS

de Lijser, Peter

37

UPS 330.231 1 Effective Date: 8-17-09  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPS 330.231 1 Effective Date: 8-17-09 UPS 330.231 POLICY REGARDING THE USE OF DRUGS BY STUDENTS illegal use of alcohol is covered in UPS 330.232 University Policy Statement California State University, Fullerton #12;UPS 330.231 UPS 330.231 2 Effective Date: 8-17-09 and others. Students are encouraged to seek

de Lijser, Peter

38

UPS 270.102 1 Effective Date: 10-16-02  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPS 270.102 1 Effective Date: 10-16-02 UPS 270.102 GRADUATE COMMITTEES AND ADVISERS I. Policies administration of the program. University Policy Statement California State University, Fullerton #12;UPS 270.102 UPS 270.102 2 Effective Date: 10-16-02 2. If a degree is entirely contained within a particular

de Lijser, Peter

39

UPS 410.103 1 Effective Date: 6-17-08  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPS 410.103 1 Effective Date: 6-17-08 UPS 410.103 CURRICULUM GUIDELINES AND PROCEDURES: NEW for certificates and certificate programs are subject to UPS 410.115. II. TYPES OF PROGRAMS A. Majors 1. A major University, Fullerton #12;UPS 410.103 UPS 410.103 2 Effective Date: 6-17-08 4. These minimum course

de Lijser, Peter

40

UPS 620.000 (formerly UPS 420.103) 1 Effective Date: 4-26-13  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPS 620.000 (formerly UPS 420.103) 1 Effective Date: 4-26-13 UPS 620.000 PROTECTION OF HUMAN Philanthropic Foundation (CSFPF), and the Associated Students, Inc. (ASI). University Policy Statement #12;UPS 620.000 Page 2 of 10 UPS 620.000 (formerly UPS 420.103) 2 Effective Date: 4-26-13 "Minimal risk" means

de Lijser, Peter

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water effective date" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

UPS 410.115 1 Effective Date: 6-24-05  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPS 410.115 1 Effective Date: 6-24-05 UPS 410.115 ACADEMIC CREDIT CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS California State University, Fullerton #12;UPS 410.115 UPS 410.115 2 Effective Date: 6-24-05 D. Specific-off sheet similar in form and function to a graduate degree study plan. F. A mock-up of the certificate

de Lijser, Peter

42

UPS 410.113 1 Effective Date: 2-18-05  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPS 410.113 1 Effective Date: 2-18-05 UPS 410.113 GUIDELINES FOR THE STRUCTURE AND ADMINISTRATION either as belonging to academic departments/divisions or to joint degree programs (cf. UPS 410.103, UPS University, Fullerton #12;UPS 410.113 UPS 410.113 2 Effective Date: 2-18-05 III. ADMINISTRATION

de Lijser, Peter

43

UPS 210.200 1 Effective Date: 12-1-81  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPS 210.200 1 Effective Date: 12-1-81 UPS 210.200 PERFORMANCE REVIEW OF ADMINISTRATIVE PERSONNEL A not subject to UPS 210.000. These shall include the president, vice presidents, associate vice presidents #12;UPS 210.200 UPS 210.200 2 Effective Date: 12-1-81 3. Develop, in consultation with the incumbent

de Lijser, Peter

44

UPS 450.000 1 Effective Date: 12-3-04  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPS 450.000 1 Effective Date: 12-3-04 UPS 450.000 GOALS, SCOPE, AND POLICY REGULATION FOR EXTENDED, Fullerton #12;UPS 450.000 UPS 450.000 2 Effective Date: 12-3-04 4. The workload for faculty teaching credit up to a maximum of 24 semester units may be used for degree purposes at the baccalaureate level

de Lijser, Peter

45

UPS 210.050 1 Effective Date: 6-16-04  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPS 210.050 1 Effective Date: 6-16-04 UPS 210.050 PERSONNEL POLICY FOR FULL-TIME TEMPORARY FACULTY Agreement (CBA) and in provisions of other relevant UPS documents, temporary faculty have the same rights Statement California State University, Fullerton #12;UPS 210.050 UPS 210.050 2 Effective Date: 6-16-04 F

de Lijser, Peter

46

UPS 610.000 1 Effective Date: 3-12-96  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPS 610.000 1 Effective Date: 3-12-96 UPS 610.000 CONFLICT OF INTEREST POLICY for EXTERNALLY FUNDED Policy Statement California State University, Fullerton #12;UPS 610.000 UPS 610.000 2 Effective Date: 3-12-96 UPS 610.000 CONFLICT OF INTEREST POLICY FOR EXTERNALLY FUNDED PROPOSALS I. Introduction and Purpose A

de Lijser, Peter

47

UPS 450.200 1 Effective Date: 6-18-03  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPS 450.200 1 Effective Date: 6-18-03 UPS 450.200 POLICY ON SPECIAL SESSIONS Executive Order No Code Section 89708). University Policy Statement California State University, Fullerton #12;UPS 450.200 UPS 450.200 2 Effective Date: 6-18-03 B. Financing Special sessions are self-supporting with fees set

de Lijser, Peter

48

UPS 300.004 1 Effective Date: 7-28-09  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPS 300.004 1 Effective Date: 7-28-09 UPS 300.004 POLICY ON COURSE OUTLINES Course outlines which to include examinations dates, "make up" policy (if any), required materials and equipment, penalties://www.fullerton.edu/senate/PDF/300/UPS300-021.pdf ); 8. Actions students should take in an emergency (http

de Lijser, Peter

49

UPS 411.600 1 Effective Date: 6-17-08  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPS 411.600 1 Effective Date: 6-17-08 UPS 411.600 POLICY ON SERVICE LEARNING POLICY To provide high UPS 320.002), which seek to integrate academic work from an entire major with practical experience;UPS 411.600 UPS 411.600 2 Effective Date: 6-17-08 (h) involve no more than forty hours of community

de Lijser, Peter

50

UPS 211.100 1 Effective Date: 3-25-08  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPS 211.100 1 Effective Date: 3-25-08 UPS 211.100 APPOINTMENT OF DEPARTMENT CHAIRS AND VICE University, Fullerton #12;UPS 211.100 UPS 211.100 2 Effective Date: 3-25-08 3. A member of the department who to place this responsibility in the hands of an ad hoc committee, made up of persons who are not candidates

de Lijser, Peter

51

Physics of Aquatic Systems II, 8. Dating young waters Universitt HeidelbergInstitut fr Umweltphysik Physics of Aquatic Systems II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HeidelbergInstitut für Umweltphysik 4 Principles of transient trace gas dating methods 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 1970 · Small natural production in volcanoes (?) · Long-lived, strong ozone destroyers in stratosphere by 1995) · Stable in oxic water, at least F-11 degrades under anoxic conditions · Analysis: GC-ECD (Gas

Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner

52

SUBJECT: Effective Date: Policy Number: ADMINISTRATION OF CAMPUS SURVEYS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

online at http://www.fau.edu/academic/iea/inst/auth.htm The IEA Associate Provost will review requests to administration by the Office of Institutional Effectiveness and Analysis (IEA). Excluded from this policy (presentation or publication) may require Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval. DEFINITIONS: Institutional

Fernandez, Eduardo

53

Title: Campus Violence and Threat Management Effective Date: September 1, 2012 Page: Page 1 of 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Campus Violence and Threat Management Effective Date: September 1, 2012 Page: Page 1 of 4 or intentional damage to property and has the effect of intimidating, frightening, coercing, or provoking others; brandishing or using a weapon in a manner not required by the individual's position (see also the university

Swaddle, John

54

Effects of oil charge on illite dates and stopping quartz cement: calibration of basin models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract Effects of oil charge on illite dates and stopping quartz cement: calibration of basin Oil can fill pores in reservoir sandstones at any burial depth by long or short distance migration. There has been a debate since 1920 concerning the effect of oil charge. We have made detailed local

Haszeldine, Stuart

55

UPS 450.501 1 Effective Date: 6-24-05  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPS 450.501 1 Effective Date: 6-24-05 UPS 450.501 NON-ACADEMIC CREDIT/CEU CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS Non. University Policy Statement California State University, Fullerton #12;UPS 450.501 UPS 450.501 2 Effective in UPS 450.100. 3. Program Design and Coordination: Each certificate program shall have an advisory board

de Lijser, Peter

56

Effects of Brush Management on Water Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TR-338 2008 Effects of Brush Management on Water Resources By: C. Allan Jones and Lucas Gregory, Texas Water Resources Institute, Texas A&M AgriLife Texas Water Resources Institute Technical Report... November 2008 Effects of Brush Management on Water Resources By Allan Jones and Lucas Gregory Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M AgriLife November 2008 TR-338 2008 1 Summary ? For several decades, land managers have cleared brush...

Jones, C. Allan; Gregory, Lucas

57

Title: Weapons on Campus Effective Date: October 1, 2011 Responsible Office: William & Mary Police  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Weapons on Campus Effective Date: October 1, 2011 Responsible Office: William & Mary Police the prohibition on weapons, firearms, combustibles, and explosives. II. PURPOSE The purpose of this policy by restricting weapons possession on university property. III.DEFINITIONS "law enforcement officials" means

Shaw, Leah B.

58

PROCEDURES FOR ACCESS TO AND CORRECTION OF INFORMATION Procedural Authority: University Secretary Effective Date: January, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROCEDURES FOR ACCESS TO AND CORRECTION OF INFORMATION Procedural Authority: University Secretary Effective Date: January, 2010 Procedural Officer: University Archivist Supersedes: New Last Editorial Change of these procedures is to set out how the university will manage: · freedom of information requests; · requests

Victoria, University of

59

LASER SAFETY POLICY Effective Date: August 30, 2011 Originating Office: Office of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LASER SAFETY POLICY Effective Date: August 30, 2011 Originating Office: Office of the Vice-President, Services Supersedes /Amends: VRS-51/n/a Policy Number: VPS-51 All users of lasers shall be expected to control hazards associated with lasers. Laboratories with high powered (Class 3b and Class 4; see section

Doedel, Eusebius

60

SUBJECT: Effective Date: Policy Number: Radio Frequency Spectrum 12-15-10 4-011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUBJECT: Effective Date: Policy Number: Radio Frequency Spectrum 12-15-10 4-011 Supersedes: Page. POLICY STATEMENT: Radio frequency spectrum is a critical resource that must be managed to eliminate be approved by UCF Computer Services & Telecommunications to provide spectrum coordination and avoid radio

Glebov, Leon

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water effective date" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

UPS 450.100 1 Effective Date: 12-3-04  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPS 450.100 1 Effective Date: 12-3-04 UPS 450.100 POLICY ON EXTENSION PROGRAM University Extended on a contractual basis. Policies associated with Special Session Courses are dealt with in UPS 450.200. A. DEGREE and special courses, (UPS 411.100), and travel courses, (UPS 450.700) and certificate programs (UPS 410

de Lijser, Peter

62

UPS 220.000 1 Effective Date: 10-8-07  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPS 220.000 1 Effective Date: 10-8-07 UPS 220.000 POLICIES, PROCEDURES, AND GUIDELINES and Federal laws; and University Policy Statement (UPS) 210.000, UPS 210.020, UPS 210.050, and UPS 210.060. B forms are the same, regardless of whether forms are administered on paper or online (see UPS 210.000). F

de Lijser, Peter

63

UPS 450.500 1 Effective Date: 6-18-03  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPS 450.500 1 Effective Date: 6-18-03 UPS 450.500 POLICY FOR IMPLEMENTATION AND AWARDING approval. CEU's may be awarded for up to a maximum of 10 hours of instruction per day, assuming that students have no work commitment during the day, and for up to a maximum of 5 hours per day, after working

de Lijser, Peter

64

UPS 210.001 1 Effective Date: 8-18-14  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPS 210.001 1 Effective Date: 8-18-14 UPS 210.001 RECRUITMENT AND APPOINTMENT OF TENURE-track faculty. Appointment of temporary faculty is covered in UPS 210.050 while invitation of visiting scholars is covered in UPS 108.000. The appointment of tenure-track faculty must comply with the Collective Bargaining

de Lijser, Peter

65

UPS 300.023 Page 1 of 2 Effective Date: 12-23-13  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPS 300.023 Page 1 of 2 Effective Date: 12-23-13 4 UPS 300.023 GRADE CHANGES The university (described in UPS 300.017 and UPS 300.018, respectively). 1. In general, all course grades are final when to circumstances beyond the control of the student (see UPS 300.020). 3. A request for a change of grade initiated

de Lijser, Peter

66

Effects on the Physical Environment (Hydrodynamics, and Water...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Effects on the Physical Environment (Hydrodynamics, and Water Quality Food Web) Effects on the Physical Environment (Hydrodynamics, and Water Quality Food Web) Effects on the...

67

Water Budgets: Foundations for Effective Water-Resources and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for consumption, for producing food, and for manufacturing; we also are attracted to water for its esthetic value pets and livestock--all depend on water. Competition for water among humans and between humans

68

Radiation Effects on Metastable States of Superheated Water.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Radiation Effects on Metastable States of Superheated Water covers theory, application, and experimentation into the behavior of water at temperatures above the boiling point. The (more)

Alvord, Charles William

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

67425Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 219 / Thursday, November 13, 2014 / Notices effective on the date of publication of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

67425Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 219 / Thursday, November 13, 2014 / Notices effective on the date of publication of the ITC's notice of final determination in the Federal Register, and to require contact the Department's Central Records Unit, Room 7046 of the main Commerce Building, for copies

70

POLICY FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Effective Date: February 15, 2010 Originating Office: Office of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POLICY FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Effective Date: February 15, 2010 Originating. The following policies also relate to the management of hazardous materials and should be used as references. Radiation Safety Policy (VPS-46) outlines the management of radioactive materials as required

Doedel, Eusebius

71

The effect of the number of potential dating partners on standards for an ideal partner.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This experiment was designed to fill the gap in research concerning the relationship between decision making and mate choice. It aimed to discover how the number of online dating profiles one is presented with changed ...

Stewart, Amanda

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Radiocarbon Dating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiocarbon dating can be used to determine the age of objects that contain components that were once alive. In the case of human remains, a radiocarbon date can distinguish between a crime scene and an archeological site. Documents, museum artifacts and art objects can be dated to determine if their age is correct for the historical context. A radiocarbon date does not confirm authenticity, but it can help identify a forgery.

Buchholz, B A

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

73

The Effect of Salt Water on Rice.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mq A QTF *'. ' . - - . 1 bC1 r*. .. r * - .=.-ksl-, G v $. THE EFFECT OF SALT WATER ON RICE AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS T. 0. WALTON, President \\ STATION ,,,bfINISTRATION: *B. YOUNGBLOOD, M. S., Ph. D.,, Director A B CONNER... Station, near R. k. HALL, b. S., ~u~eriniendent College Station. Brazos County: No. 2 Troup Smith County: R. M. SHERWOOD, M. S., Animal Husbanri- W.'S. EIOT&HKISS. Superintendent man In Charge of Farm No. 3, Angleton, Brazoria County: L. J. MCCALL...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1927-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Preliminary evaluation of VTA effectiveness to protect runoff water quality on small pork production facilities in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/or Robertson County sites on the following dates: January 9, 2013 February 10, 2013 March 10, 2013 April 3, 2013 May 9, 2013 May 16, 2013 May 21, 2013 June 3, 2013 June 10, 2013 July 15, 2013 Results from the analysis... Research Service Texas Water Resources Institute TR-452 November 2013 Preliminary evaluation of VTA effectiveness to protect runoff water quality on small pork production facilities in Texas STATE NONPOINT SOURCE GRANT PROGRAM TSSWCB PROJECT...

Wagner, K.; Harmel, D.; Higgs, K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Arnold Schwarzenegger TIME-OF-USE WATER METER EFFECTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor TIME-OF-USE WATER METER EFFECTS ON CUSTOMER WATER USE; Master Meter Ed Amelung; Southern California Edison Company ­ Matt Garcia, Curtis DeWoody, and James · Transportation TimeofUse Water Meter Impacts on Customer Water Use is the final report for the project 500 07022

76

End of Enrollment Form This form should be completed by the student at least one week before the effective date of termination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the effective date of termination of enrollment and submitted to the Office of Academic Affairs of the Graduate for Termination (Select one of the items below): All degree requirements have been completed. Date of Final Public Oral Examination (where applicable): Enrollment Terminated, Degree Candidacy Continues (ET/DCC). I have

Petta, Jason

77

Boiler System Efficiency Improves with Effective Water Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water treatment is an important aspect of boiler operation which can affect efficiency or result in damage if neglected. Without effective water treatment, scale can form on boiler tubes, reducing heat transfer, and causing a loss of boiler...

Bloom, D.

78

Effect of Harvest Dates on Biomass Accumulation and Composition in Bioenergy Sorghum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for use as a feedstock for ethanol production. Other factors such as water use efficiency, drought tolerance, yield potential, composition, and established production systems also make sorghum a logical choice as a feedstock for bioenergy production...

Borden, Dustin Ross

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

79

Phase effects for electrons in liquid water and water vapor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of these studies is to compare transport, energy loss, and other phenomena for electrons in water in the liquid and vapor phases. Understanding the differences and similarities is an interesting physics problem in its own right. It is also important for applying the relatively large body of experimental data available for the vapor to the liquid, which is of greater relevance in radiobiology. This paper presents a summary of results from a series of collaborative studies carried out by the authors at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung (GSF). 14 figs.

Turner, J.E.; Paretzke, H.G.; Wright, H.A.; Hamm, R.N.; Ritchie, R.H.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Alaska - 3 AAC 48.280 Notice and Effective Date | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWaterBrasil JumpAerowattOpen2008District No 3 Jump

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water effective date" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

DATE: TO:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site |Documents D.O.E. RACE09 DATE:28 - DATE:

82

DATE: TO:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site |Documents D.O.E. RACE09 DATE:28 - DATE:41

83

EFFECTS OF WATER INJECTION INTO FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DIVISION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY STANFORD-DOE CONTRACT DE-AT03-80SF11459 #12;EFFECTS OF WATER INJECTION improvement and degradation of total energy recovery. placement of reservoir f l u i d can mean support of waste water disposal and %proved re- source recovery. I n order t o correctly apportion importance

Stanford University

84

"Modeling for effective and sustainable water resources management."  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Modeling for effective and sustainable water resources management." Teresa Culver Associate Professor tculver@virginia.edu ce.virginia.edu/faculty/culvert.html Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering University of Virginia Charlottesville, VA 434.982.6375 Environmental & Water Resources Group We

Acton, Scott

85

ARSENIC IN DRINKINGARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER: HEALTH EFFECTS ANDWATER: HEALTH EFFECTS AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARSENIC IN DRINKINGARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER: HEALTH EFFECTS ANDWATER: HEALTH EFFECTS AND CURRENT;EPA. National Primary Drinking Water Regulations; Arsenic and Clarification to Compliance and New National Occurrence and Exposure to Arsenic in Public Drinking Water Supplies (Revised Draft). Washington

86

Effects of Original Vegatation on Reservoir Water Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this study was to undertake an initial step that would lead to a better understanding of the effects of nutrients released from vegetation inundated by water at newly constructed reservoirs. Specifically, a series of leaching studies...

Ball, J.; Weldon, C.; Crocker, B.

87

DATE: PAGE:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site |Documents D.O.E. RACE09 DATE:

88

Review of Wildfire Effects on Chemical Water Quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cerro Grande Fire of May 2000 burned almost 43,000 acres of forested land within the Pajarito Plateau watershed in northern New Mexico. Runoff events after the fire were monitored and sampled by Los Alamos National Laboratory. Changes in the composition of runoff water were noted when compared to runoff water composition of the previous 20 years. In order to understand the chemical water quality changes noted in runoff water after the Cerro Grande Fire, a summary of the reported effects of fire on runoff water chemistry and on soils that contribute to runoff water chemistry was compiled. The focus of this report is chemical water quality, so it does not address changes in sediment transport or water quantity associated with fires. Within the general inorganic parameters, increases of dissolved calcium, magnesium, nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium and pH in runoff water have been observed as a result of fire. However, the dissolved sodium, carbon, and sulfate have been observed to increase and decrease as a result of fire. Metals have been much less studied, but manganese, copper, zinc, and cesium-137 have been observed to increase as a result of fire.

Kelly Bitner; Bruce Gallaher; Ken Mullen

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Orders General Terms and Conditions for Purchasing of TU Graz 1. Orders (Order forms) of TU Graz shall take effect from the date confirmed in writing by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

shall take effect from the date confirmed in writing by TU Graz and duly signed by the responsible or for delivery of the Contractor as well as retentions on invoices or delivery documents etc. which"). Furthermore TU Graz shall have the right to demand compensation for all costs and expenses from the Contractor

90

Natural streamflow cycles and effects on water supply reliability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT Natural Streamf low Cycles and Effects on Water Supply Reliability. (August 2002) Fabrice Felden, Diploma de I'Ecole Speciale des Travaux Publics Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Ralph A. Wurbs The Texas Natural Resource Conservation... and cycles in streamflows that could be directly correlated to climate changes. The presence of trends and/or cycles in streamflows is primarily studied to assess the significance of not directly considering climate change in the Texas Water Availability...

Felden, Fabrice

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Measurement of the Cotton Mouton effect of water vapour  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we report on a measurement of the Cotton Mouton effect of water vapour. Measurement performed at room temperature ($T=301$ K) with a wavelength of 1064 nm gave the value $\\Delta n_u = (6.67 \\pm 0.45) \\cdot 10^{-15}$ for the unit magnetic birefringence (1 T magnetic field and atmospheric pressure).

Della Valle, F; Gastaldi, U; Messineo, G; Milotti, E; Pengo, R; Piemontese, L; Ruoso, G; Zavattini, G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Alkaline industrial waters and wetlands: prospects for effective treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Alkaline industrial waters and wetlands: prospects for effective treatment Will Mayes1 & Jon · Circum-neutral pH, high Fe concentrations Treatment wetlands and post-industrial pollution Taff Merthyr The basis for treatment wetlands · `Volunteer' wetlands · pH 12 lime spoil leachate · pH 12 steel slag

Heal, Kate

93

Interfacial Water-Transport Effects in Proton-Exchange Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is well known that the proton-exchange membrane is perhaps the most critical component of a polymer-electrolyte fuel cell. Typical membranes, such as Nafion(R), require hydration to conduct efficiently and are instrumental in cell water management. Recently, evidence has been shown that these membranes might have different interfacial morphology and transport properties than in the bulk. In this paper, experimental data combined with theoretical simulations will be presented that explore the existence and impact of interfacial resistance on water transport for Nafion(R) 21x membranes. A mass-transfer coefficient for the interfacial resistance is calculated from experimental data using different permeation cells. This coefficient is shown to depend exponentially on relative humidity or water activity. The interfacial resistance does not seem to exist for liquid/membrane or membrane/membrane interfaces. The effect of the interfacial resistance is to flatten the water-content profiles within the membrane during operation. Under typical operating conditions, the resistance is on par with the water-transport resistance of the bulk membrane. Thus, the interfacial resistance can be dominant especially in thin, dry membranes and can affect overall fuel-cell performance.

Kienitz, Brian; Yamada, Haruhiko; Nonoyama, Nobuaki; Weber, Adam

2009-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

94

Effects of soil water repellency on infiltration rate and flow instability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. They are difficult to manage and pose negative effects on agricultural productivity and environmental sustain the contaminant transport to ground water. The purpose of this paper is to quantify the effects of soil waterEffects of soil water repellency on infiltration rate and flow instability Z. Wanga,*, Q.J. Wua,1

Wang, Zhi "Luke"

95

Effects on the Physical Environment (Hydrodynamics, and Water Quality Food  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPC ENABLE: ECM Summary ECMWear |CharacteristicsEffectsWaterWeb) |

96

Enhancing the Effectiveness of Heuristic Rule Curves for Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

leader in water management practices Develop a water centre of expertise with international reach University- Current Activities Development of parsimonious tools for water resources planning and management water management Flood risks assessment and management Advanced training in various aspects of water

Painter, Kevin

97

Developing Criteria and Metrics for Assessing Recycled Water Program Effectiveness.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Many U.S. states are currently experiencing or expect to experience water shortages in the next ten years. Recycling water is one strategy states are (more)

Arias, Michelle

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

THE EFFECT OF LOCATION OF THE PREDICTED PERFORMANCE OF A HEAT PUMP WATER HEATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;THE EFFECT OF LOCATION OF THE PREDICTED PERFORMANCE OF A HEAT PUMP WATER HEATER Laboratory testing and field testing have shown that a heat pump water heater (HPWH) uses about half the electrical energy input that an electric resistance water heater does. However, since the heat pump water heater

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

99

THE EFFECT OF LAKE ERIE WATER LEVEL VARIATIONS ON SEDIMENT RESUSPENSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECT OF LAKE ERIE WATER LEVEL VARIATIONS ON SEDIMENT RESUSPENSION A Thesis Presented. Shore Approved by Adviser Civil Engineering Graduate Program #12;#12;ABSTRACT A recent decline in water used to estimate the wave climate over the entire lake. Shallow water effects were approxi- mated

Foster, Diane

100

A Report on the Effectiveness of Texas Water Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A readership survey conducted in May 1977 found that readers of Texas Water Resources find it useful, attractive and informative. The bulletin is published by the Texas Water Resources Institute to generate public awareness and understanding...

Ruesink, L. E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water effective date" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Effects of Storage Container Color and Shading on Water Temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RWH systems has become a concern. Water temperature is a parameter of water quality and storage container color and shading affect this temperature. Four different colors and three different shadings were applied to twelve rainwater storage barrels...

Clayton, James Brent

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

102

Fluctuations in Water and their Relation to the Hydrophobic Effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cavities of radius R in SPC/E water. After Ref. [49].hydrophobic polymer, in explicit SPC/E water. The collectiveA 60 60 60 ? A 3 slab of SPC/E water is set up in a 60

Varilly, Patrick Stephen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Exploring the Effect of Continuing Increases in Water Demands on the Sustainability of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the Rio Grande Compact was approved by Congress, dividing the annual water flow among the three states3 Exploring the Effect of Continuing Increases in Water Demands on the Sustainability of Limited Water Resources byDr.JamesF.Booker NRLCVisitingFellow The Rio Grande originates in the southern Colorado

104

Feasibility Study of the Effects of Water Quality on Soil Properties in the Red River Valley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on permeability of soil to water. The effects of specific ions such as Na or lack of salts in the water can reduce permeability to the extent that crops are not adequately supplied with water and yields are reduced. As pointed out by Rhoades and Ingvalson...

Gerard, C. J.; Hipp, B. W.; Runkles, J. R.; Bordovsky, D. J.; McCully, W. G.

105

EFFECTS OF WATER SPRAYS AND SCRUBBER EXHAUST ON FACE METHANE CONCENTRATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

methane levels. KEYWORDS Ventilation, water sprays, methane, coal mining, dust scrubber INTRODUCTIONChapter 65 EFFECTS OF WATER SPRAYS AND SCRUBBER EXHAUST ON FACE METHANE CONCENTRATIONS Ch.D. Taylor-mounted scrubber and water sprays can reduced methane levels at the face. The current research was conducted

Saylor, John R.

106

Heavy water hydration of mannose: the anomeric effect in solvation, laid Nitzan Mayorkas,ab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heavy water hydration of mannose: the anomeric effect in solvation, laid bare Nitzan Mayorkas,3 in a series of `proof of principle' experiments, revealed that these heavy water molecules engage the key, which has the advantage of isotopically isolating the carbohydrate (OH) bands from the water (OD) bands

Davis, Ben G.

107

Effect of Coadsorbed Water on the Photodecomposition of Acetone...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

exceeded 1 ML, acetone was preferentially displaced from the first layer to physisorbed states by water and the extent of acetone photodecomposition attenuated. The displacement...

108

Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by Soft...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of temperature and isotope substitution (replacing the hydrogen with deuterium to make "heavy" water). Their findings shed new light on the unique microscopic and macroscopic...

109

Water effects of the use of western coal for electrical production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water may be a constraint on the expanded development of coal resources in the semi-arid western United States. Water allocation in the West has been determined by the appropriative rights doctrine which allows perpetual use of water sources by those who first claim it for beneficial purposes. This has had the effect of placing a dominative interest in water allocation in one economic sector: agriculture. New water sources are available to coal producers but political and economic problems must be overcome. Water is required by every phase of coal development. Mines use water for dust control and land reclamation. Coal slurry pipelines would use water as a transport medium. Steam electric power plants use water for cooling, cleaning, and in the boiler. Coal gasification plants would use water for cooling, cleaning, and as a material input. In addition to these direct uses of water by coal development, the people who build and operate the development demand water for domestic and recreational purposes. The quantity of water required for a given element of a coal development is site specific and dependent on many factors. The available literature cites a range of estimates of the amount of water required for each type of development. The width of this range seems related to the stage of development of the particular technology. Estimates of water requirements for various schemes to provide an average electrical load of 9 GWe to a load center 1000 miles from western mines are shown in Table 5.

Rogers, E.A.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Nanoparticle Doped Water -NeowaterTM The effects of the rf-treatments of water and aqueous solutions can be amplified and stabilized by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoparticle Doped Water - NeowaterTM The effects of the rf-treatments of water and aqueous by the rf-treatment and cavitation is generated due to the injection of hot particles into water below solutions can be amplified and stabilized by doping the water with low density of insoluble nanoparticles [1

Jacob, Eshel Ben

111

Impervious Areas: Examining the Undermining Effects on Surface Water Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the classification. The overall accuracy was 85%, and the kappa coefficient was 0.80. Additionally, field sampling and chemical analysis techniques were used to examine the relationship between impervious surfaces and water quality in a rainfall simulation parking...

Young, De'Etra Jenra

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

112

Criteria for an effective water resource planning process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In examining the present status of water resource planning in the Pacific Northwest, numerous critical inadequacies become readily apparent. One method of minimizing some of these inadequacies is through administrative ...

Bowers, James Myron

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Modeling water content effects in polymer electrolyte fuel cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water content and transport is the key factor in the one-dimensional, steady-state model of a complete polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) described here. Water diffusion coefficients, electroosmotic drag coefficients, water sorption isotherms, and membrane conductivities, all measured in our laboratory as functions of membrane water content, were used in the model. The model predicts a net-water-per-proton flux ratio of 0.2 H{sub 2}O/H{sup +} under typical operating conditions, which is much less than the measured electroosmotic drag coefficient for a fully hydrated membrane. It also predicts an increase in membrane resistance with increased current density and demonstrates the great advantage of thinner membranes in alleviating this resistance problem. Both of these predictions were verified experimentally under certain conditions. We also describe the sensitivity of the water concentration profile and associated observables to variations in the values of some of the transport parameters in anticipation of applying the model to fuel cells employing other membranes. 16 refs., 9 figs.

Springer, T.E.; Zawodzinski, T.A.; Gottesfeld, S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Method of manipulating the chemical properties of water to improve the effectiveness of a desired process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The method of the present invention is adapted to manipulate the chemical properties of water in order to improve the effectiveness of a desired process. The method involves heating the water in the vessel to subcritical temperatures between 100.degree. to 374.degree. C. while maintaining sufficient pressure to the water to maintain the water in the liquid state. Various physiochemical properties of the water can be manipulated including polarity, solute solubility, surface tension, viscosity, and the disassociation constant. The method of the present invention has various uses including extracting organics from solids and semisolids such as soil, selectively extracting desired organics from liquids, selectively separating organics using sorbent phases, enhancing reactions by controlling the disassociation constant of water, cleaning waste water, removing organics from water using activated carbon or other suitable sorbents, and degrading various compounds.

Hawthorne, Steven B. (Grand Forks, ND); Miller, David J. (Grand Forks, ND); Lagadec, Arnaud Jean-Marie (Grand Forks, ND); Hammond, Peter James (York, GB); Clifford, Anthony Alan (Leeds, GB)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Effect of calcium nitrate on the vapor-liquid equilibria of ethanol + water and 2-propanol + water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of calcium nitrate on the vapor-liquid equilibria of ethanol + water and 2-propanol + water was studied using a Swietoslawski ebulliometer. The measurements were performed for two constant salt molalities (1 and 2 mol[center dot]kg[sup [minus]1]) under isobaric conditions at 50.66 kPa. Strong salting-out of the alcohol was observed in all cases, leading to a complete elimination of the azeotropic point at relatively low salt concentrations. The results were correlated using an extension of the NRTL equation for mixed solvent electrolyte systems proposed by Mock, Evans, and Chen.

Polka, H.M.; Gmehling, J. (Univ. of Oldenburg (Germany). Chair of Industrial Chemistry)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Advanced Membrane Filtration Technology for Cost Effective Recovery of Fresh Water from Oil & Gas Produced Brine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Produced water is a major waste generated at the oil and natural gas wells in the state of Texas. This water could be a possible source of new fresh water to meet the growing demands of the state after treatment and purification. Treatment of brine generated in oil fields or produced water with an ultrafiltration membranes were the subject of this thesis. The characterization of ultrafiltration membranes for oil and suspended solids removal of produced water, coupled with the reverse osmosis (RO) desalination of brine were studied on lab size membrane testing equipment and a field size testing unit to test whether a viable membrane system could be used to treat produced water. Oil and suspended solids were evaluated using turbidity and oil in water measurements taken periodically. The research considered the effect of pressure and flow rate on membrane performance of produced water treatment of three commercially available membranes for oily water. The study also analyzed the flux through the membrane and any effect it had on membrane performance. The research showed that an ultrafiltration membrane provided turbidity removal of over 99% and oil removal of 78% for the produced water samples. The results indicated that the ultrafiltration membranes would be asset as one of the first steps in purifying the water. Further results on selected RO membranes showed that salt rejection of greater than 97% could be achieved with satisfactory flux and at reasonable operating cost.

David B. Burnett

2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

117

Effects of hydration water on protein methyl group dynamics insolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Elastic and quasielastic neutron scattering experiments have been used to investigate the dynamics of methyl groups in a protein-model hydrophobic peptide in solution. The results suggest that, when the hydrophobic side chains are hydrated by a single hydration water layer, the only allowed motions are confined and attributed to librational and rotational movement associated with the methyl groups. They provide unique experimental evidence that the structural and dynamical properties of the interfacial water strongly influence the side-chain dynamics and the activation of diffusive motion.

Russo D; Hura GL; Copley JRD

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

REPLACEMENT/STALE DATED CHEQUE REQUEST FORM Date: ____________________________ Student Number: _________________________  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REPLACEMENT/STALE DATED CHEQUE REQUEST FORM Date: ____________________________ Student: _________________________ Cheque Date: _____________________ CHEQUE AMOUNT: ________________________ REASON FOR REPLACEMENT Building at the address below. Please indicate how you would like to receive your replacement cheque

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

119

Dating the Vinland Map  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Scientists from Brookhaven National Laboratory, the University of Arizona, and the Smithsonian Institution used carbon-dating technology to determine the age of a controversial parchment that might be the first-ever map of North America.

None

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

120

Effect of hydrogen bond cooperativity on the behavior of water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Four scenarios have been proposed for the low--temperature phase behavior of liquid water, each predicting different thermodynamics. The physical mechanism which leads to each is debated. Moreover, it is still unclear which of the scenarios best describes water, as there is no definitive experimental test. Here we address both open issues within the framework of a microscopic cell model by performing a study combining mean field calculations and Monte Carlo simulations. We show that a common physical mechanism underlies each of the four scenarios, and that two key physical quantities determine which of the four scenarios describes water: (i) the strength of the directional component of the hydrogen bond and (ii) the strength of the cooperative component of the hydrogen bond. The four scenarios may be mapped in the space of these two quantities. We argue that our conclusions are model-independent. Using estimates from experimental data for H bond properties the model predicts that the low-temperature phase diagram of water exhibits a liquid--liquid critical point at positive pressure.

Kevin Stokely; Marco G. Mazza; H. Eugene Stanley; Giancarlo Franzese

2009-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water effective date" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The effects of mixing energy on water column oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/water system was mixed in a reactor and sampled after 48 h. Three experimental runs were performed for eight increasing mixing energies: 0 s?, 2.6 s?, 7.4 s?, 10.8 s?, 13.4 s?, 14.6 s?, 15.6 s? and 20.4 s?. GC-MS was used to analyze the samples...

Rogers, Ellen Tiffany

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

122

Effect of Pressure Gradient and InitialWater Saturation on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

saturation upon depth. In the Prudhoe Bay reservoirs, residual oil saturation to waterflood decreases-Wet Fractured Porous Media Guo-Qing Tang,*SPE. and Abbas Firoozabadi,SPE, Reservoir Engineering Research Inst matrix of the North Sea fractured chalk reservoirs.) Water- injection tests were conducted at different

Firoozabadi, Abbas

123

Diesel Emission Control -- Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program; Phase I Interim Date Report No. 3: Diesel Fuel Sulfur Effects on Particulate Matter Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Diesel Emission Control-Sulfur Effects (DECSE) is a joint government/industry program to determine the impact of diesel fuel sulfur levels on emission control systems whose use could lower emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and particulate matter (PM) from on-highway trucks in the 2002--2004 model years. Phase 1 of the program was developed with the following objectives in mind: (1) evaluate the effects of varying the level of sulfur content in the fuel on the emission reduction performance of four emission control technologies; and (2) measure and compare the effects of up to 250 hours of aging on selected devices for multiple levels of fuel sulfur content. This interim report covers the effects of diesel fuel sulfur level on particulate matter emissions for four technologies.

DOE; ORNL; NREL; EMA; MECA

1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

124

The effects of the implementation of grey water reuse systems on construction cost and project schedule  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the United States due to their effects on construction cost and project schedules. Even though a project could get one or multiple points upon successful implementation of a grey water reuse system and conserving potable water, the following factors may have...

Kaduvinal Varghese, Jeslin

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Heat transfer through a water spray curtain under the effect of a strong radiative source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat transfer through a water spray curtain under the effect of a strong radiative source P. Boulet - mail Pascal.Boulet@lemta.uhp-nancy.fr Keywords : heat transfer, radiative transfer, vaporization, convection, water spray Abstract Heat transfer inside a participating medium, made of droplets flowing in gas

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

126

Subcritical Creep Compaction of Quartz Sand at Diagenetic Conditions: Effects of Water and Grain Size  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Subcritical Creep Compaction of Quartz Sand at Diagenetic Conditions: Effects of Water and Grain growth. Creep rates are explained by subcritical crack growth, as governed by water-silicate reactions through subcritical cracking and grain rearrangement of medium- grained, porous, wet quartz sands can

Chester, Frederick M.

127

Cooling rate, heating rate, and aging effects in glassy water Nicolas Giovambattista,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be glassified by cooling using hyper- quenching techniques (i.e., with rates of the order of 105 K/s [8Cooling rate, heating rate, and aging effects in glassy water Nicolas Giovambattista,1 H. Eugene of water molecules during the process of generating a glass by cooling, and during the process

Sciortino, Francesco

128

Effect of Water on Deposition, Aggregate Size, and Viscosity of Asphaltenes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Water on Deposition, Aggregate Size, and Viscosity of Asphaltenes Seyma Aslan and Abbas. In this study, we investigate the aggregation and deposition of water and asphaltenes, the most polar fraction and provide the evidence for clear changes in asphaltene deposition. Differential interference contrast (DIC

Firoozabadi, Abbas

129

Effects of Irrigating with Treated Oil and Gas Product Water on Crop Biomass and Soil Permeability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demonstrating effective treatment technologies and beneficial uses for oil and gas produced water is essential for producers who must meet environmental standards and deal with high costs associated with produced water management. Proven, effective produced-water treatment technologies coupled with comprehensive data regarding blending ratios for productive long-term irrigation will improve the state-of-knowledge surrounding produced-water management. Effective produced-water management scenarios such as cost-effective treatment and irrigation will discourage discharge practices that result in legal battles between stakeholder entities. The goal of this work is to determine the optimal blending ratio required for irrigating crops with CBNG and conventional oil and gas produced water treated by ion exchange (IX), reverse osmosis (RO), or electro-dialysis reversal (EDR) in order to maintain the long term physical integrity of soils and to achieve normal crop production. The soils treated with CBNG produced water were characterized with significantly lower SAR values compared to those impacted with conventional oil and gas produced water. The CBNG produced water treated with RO at the 100% treatment level was significantly different from the untreated produced water, while the 25%, 50% and 75% water treatment levels were not significantly different from the untreated water. Conventional oil and gas produced water treated with EDR and RO showed comparable SAR results for the water treatment technologies. There was no significant difference between the 100% treated produced water and the control (river water). The EDR water treatment resulted with differences at each level of treatment, which were similar to RO treated conventional oil and gas water. The 100% treated water had SAR values significantly lower than the 75% and 50% treatments, which were similar (not significantly different). The results of the greenhouse irrigation study found the differences in biomass production between each soil were significant for Western Wheatgrass and Alfafla. The Sheridan sandy loam soil resulted in the highest production for western wheatgrass and alfalfa while the X-ranch sandy loam had the lowest production rate for both plants. Plant production levels resulting from untreated CBNG produced water were significantly higher compared to untreated conventional oil and gas produced water. However, few differences were found between water treatments. The biomass produced from the greenhouse study was analyzed for elemental composition and for forage value. Elemental composition indentified several interesting findings. Some of the biomass was characterized with seemly high boron and sodium levels. High levels of boron found in some of the biomass was unexpected and may indicate that alfalfa and western wheatgrass plants may have been impacted by either soil or irrigation water containing high boron levels. Plants irrigated with water treated using EDR technology appeared to contain higher levels of boron with increased levels of treatment. Forage evaluations were conducted using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy. The data collected show small differences, generally less than 10%, between produced water treatments including the no treatment and 100% treatment conditions for each plant species studied. The forage value of alfalfa and western wheatgrass did not show significant tendencies dependent on soil, the amount of produced water treatment, or treatment technology.

Terry Brown; Jeffrey Morris; Patrick Richards; Joel Mason

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

130

Water Overcomes Methyl Group Directing Effects in Epoxide-Opening Cascades  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water is an effective promoter of the endo-selective opening of trisubstituted epoxides, enabling related cascades leading to a variety of substituted ladder polyether structures. When used in conjunction with a ...

Morten, Christopher J.

131

Model studies to investigate the effects of fixed streamlines on water flooding performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODEL STUDIES TO INVESTIGATE THE EFFECTS OF FIXED STREAMLINES ON WATER FLOODING PERFORMANCE A Thesis by Axel Venton Green Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ASrM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

Green, Axel Venton

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Water chlorination: environmental impact and health effects. Volume 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The papers dealt with the major facets of chlorination and its associated effects. Each has been abstracted and indexed individually for ERA/EDB. (JGB)

Jolley, R.L.; Brungs, W.A.; Cumming, R.B. (eds.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Effects of water deficits upon protein metabolism in leaves of southern pea and sorghum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF WATER DEFICITS UPON PROTEIN METABOLISM IN LEAVES OF SOUTHERN PEA AND SORGHUM A Thesis by GALEN DUANE PEISER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in Partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... ttee) (Head of Department) (Member) ( r August 1971 Effects of Water Deficits upon Protein Metabolism in Leaves of Southern Pea and Sorghum. (August 1971) Galen Duane Pei. ser, B. S. , Texas A6? University Directed by: Dr. V. R. Jordan Moderate...

Peiser, Galen Duane

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Simulating the Effect of Water on the Fracture System of Shale Gas Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SIMULATING THE EFFECT OF WATER ON THE FRACTURE SYSTEM OF SHALE GAS WELLS A Thesis by HASSAN HASAN H. HAMAM Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2010 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering SIMULATING THE EFFECT OF WATER ON THE FRACTURE SYSTEM OF SHALE GAS WELLS A Thesis by HASSAN HASAN H. HAMAM Submitted to the Office of Graduate...

Hamam, Hassan Hasan H.

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

135

The effects of water and heat stress on protein synthesis in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECTS OF WATER AND HEAT STRESS ON PROTEIN SYNTHESIS IN LOBLOLLY PINE (PINUS TAEDA L. ) A Thesis CHRYS HULBERT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1987 Major Subjett: Plant Physiology THE EFFECTS OF WATER AND HEAT STRESS ON PROTEIN SYNTHESIS IN LOBLOLLY PINE (PINUS TAEDA L. ) A Thesis CHRYS HULBERT Approved as to style and content by: Ronald . Newton I (Co...

Hulbert, Chrys

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Effects of fluid properties and initial gas saturation on oil recovery by water flooding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF FLUID PROPERTIES AND INITIAL GAS SATURATION ON OIL RECOVERY BY WATER FLOODING A Thesis By MARION D. ARNOLD Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1959 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering EFFECTS OF FLUID PROPERTIES AND INITIAL GAS SATURATION ON OIL RECOVERY BY WATER FLOODING A Thesis By MARION D, ARNOLD Approved as to style and content by...

Arnold, Marion Denson

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

137

Current and Long-Term Effects of Delta Water Quality on Drinking Water Treatment Costs from Disinfection Byproduct Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for protecting public drinking water (CALFED 2000), are alsobest management options for drinking water sourced from theDelta Authority. 2004. Drinking water quality program multi-

Chen, Wei-Hsiang; Haunschild, Kristine; Lund, Jay R.; Fleenor, William E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Water-lithium bromide double-effect absorption cooling analysis. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This investigation involved the development of a numerical model for the transient simulation of the double-effect, water-lithium bromide absorption cooling machine, and the use of the model to determine the effect of the various design and input variables on the absorption unit performance. The performance parameters considered were coefficient of performance and cooling capacity. The sensitivity analysis was performed by selecting a nominal condition and determining performance sensitivity for each variable with others held constant. The variables considered in the study include source hot water, cooling water, and chilled water temperatures; source hot water, cooling water, and chilled water flow rates; solution circulation rate; heat exchanger areas; pressure drop between evaporator and absorber; solution pump characteristics; and refrigerant flow control methods. The performance sensitivity study indicated in particular that the distribution of heat exchanger area among the various (seven) heat exchange components is a very important design consideration. Moreover, it indicated that the method of flow control of the first effect refrigerant vapor through the second effect is a critical design feature when absorption units operate over a significant range of cooling capacity. The model was used to predict the performance of the Trane absorption unit with fairly good accuracy. The dynamic model should be valuable as a design tool for developing new absorption machines or modifying current machines to make them optimal based on current and future energy costs.

Vliet, G.C.; Lawson, M.B.; Lithgow, R.A.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

DATE: TO: FROM: SUBJECT:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site |Documents D.O.E. RACE09 DATE:284~ DATE:

140

WATER-LITHIUM BROMIDE DOUBLE-EFFECT ABSORPTION COOLING ANALYSIS  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

1980 Final Report f o r Contract: DE AC03-79SF10540 (Mu1 tiple-Effect Absorption Cycle Solar Cooling) with the U.S. Department of Energy DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water effective date" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Quantum fluctuations and isotope effects in ab initio descriptions of water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isotope substitution is extensively used to investigate the microscopic behavior of hydrogen bonded systems such as liquid water. The changes in structure and stability of these systems upon isotope substitution arise entirely from the quantum mechanical nature of the nuclei. Here, we provide a fully ab initio determination of the isotope exchange free energy and fractionation ratio of hydrogen and deuterium in water treating exactly nuclear quantum effects and explicitly modeling the quantum nature of the electrons. This allows us to assess how quantum effects in water manifest as isotope effects, and unravel how the interplay between electronic exchange and correlation and nuclear quantum fluctuations determine the structure of the hydrogen bond in water.

Wang, Lu; Markland, Thomas E., E-mail: tmarkland@stanford.edu [Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, 333 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Ceriotti, Michele, E-mail: michele.ceriotti@epfl.ch [Laboratory of Computational Science and Modeling, cole Polytechnique Fdrale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

142

Toxicity bioassays: Water pollution effects on aquatic animals and plants. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning toxicity bioassay studies of water pollution effects on reproduction, growth, and mortality of aquatic fauna and flora. Industrial and agricultural water pollutants such as heavy metals, chemicals, pesticides, and herbicides are evaluated and tested. Standard fish and algal assays are used to determine effects of potential toxicants. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

MSW Informational Session Dates . . .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MSW Informational Session Dates . . . Please RSVP . . . Space is limited so we ask that you call: Enderis Hall 115 Friday, December 7, 2012 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Location: Enderis Hall 115 The MSW invites you to attend one of three MSW informational sessions. While the admissions packet contains most

Saldin, Dilano

144

Procedure No: Approval Date  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Redding City Council Resolution: 10/15/2013 Date: 10/15/2013 #12;RPS-001 RPS ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM 1 2 TABLE: ................................................................ 5 D. Portfolio Balance Requirement Reduction: ................................................. 6 3 in California to acquire 33 percent of their annual unmet energy needs from renewable resources by 2020

145

Create Date: Create Time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

provisions. AB 0074 Ch. 666 Assembly Member Ma Public event action plans and cooperative agreements. AB 0080 Ch. 138 Assembly Member Fong Presidential primary: election date. AB 0082 Ch. 92 * Assembly Assembly Member Fong Elections: new citizens. AB 0089 Ch. 390 * Assembly Member Hill County employees

146

The effect of water on tritium release behavior from solid breeder candidates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have made a tritium release model to represent the release behavior of bred tritium from solid breeder materials using a series of studies. It has been observed that a large amount of adsorbed water and water produced by water formation reaction are released to the purge gas even though dry purge gas with hydrogen is introduced to solid breeder materials. According to our tritium release model, the presence of water in the purge gas and surface water on the material has a large effect on the tritium release behavior. In this study, the authors quantified the amount of adsorbed water and the capacity of the water formation reaction for various solid breeder materials (Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}, Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}, Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, LiAlO{sub 2}). The effect of surface water on the chemical form of tritium released from the LiAlO{sub 2} blanket is also discussed in this study. (authors)

Suematsu, K.; Nishikawa, M.; Fukada, S.; Kinjyo, T.; Koyama, T.; Yamashita, N. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka, 812-8581 (Japan)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

Amazon River water in the northeastern Caribbean Sea and its effect on larval reef fish assemblages during April 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Amazon River water in the northeastern Caribbean Sea and its effect on larval reef fish assemblages.S.A. ABSTRACT During April to June 2009, a large bolus of Amazon River water impacted the northeastern Caribbean Ocean waters to the north, with Caribbean surface waters showing intermediate values. Plankton net tows

148

Effect of atmospheric water vapor on modification of stable isotopes in near-surface snow on ice sheets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

temperature and the abundance of heavy isotopes of water found in water vapor and precipitation as functionsEffect of atmospheric water vapor on modification of stable isotopes in near-surface snow on ice fractionation model is developed to investigate postdepositional modification of stable isotopes of water

Walden, Von P.

149

Effects of soil moisture and water depth on ERS SAR backscatter measurements from an Alaskan wetland complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2009 Accepted 17 April 2009 Keywords: Wetlands Boreal region Synthetic aperture radar Water level SoilEffects of soil moisture and water depth on ERS SAR backscatter measurements from an Alaskan was negatively correlated to water depth in all open (non-forested) wetlands when water table levels were more

Turetsky, Merritt

150

Summary Effects of water stress on fruit fresh and dry weights were investigated in peach trees, Prunus persica (L.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summary Effects of water stress on fruit fresh and dry weights were investigated in peach trees of water stress increased with increasing crop load. Water stress induced fruit fresh weight reductions at all crop loads. Fruit dry weight was not reduced by water stress in trees having light to moderate

DeJong, Theodore

151

Paleomagnetic Secular Variation (PSV), 137Cs, and Hg dating techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Portland State University Department of Geology #12;Hg-Mercury contamination dating http fission of Uranium-235 · Due to nuclear weapons testing · Highly water soluble (spreads quickly) · Half

Fountain, Andrew G.

152

Effect of non-ageing and ageing ceria nanoparticles suspensions on fresh water micro-algae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of non-ageing and ageing ceria nanoparticles suspensions on fresh water micro-algae Manier nanoparticle (nCeO2) suspensions, towards freshwater micro-algae assessing the effect nCeO2 suspensions microscopy (TEM). In addition, the interaction between NPs and algae were investigated using flow

Boyer, Edmond

153

EFFECTS OF WATER AND TEMPERATURE John R. Jones, Merrill R. Kaufmann, and E. Arlo Richardson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF WATER AND TEMPERATURE John R. Jones, Merrill R. Kaufmann, and E. Arlo Richardson not tolerate sustained high temperatures, or semiarid or even dry, subhumid conditions. Much can be inferred streams in relatively hot deserts. This indicates intolerance of high temper- ature effects-either direct

154

ORIGINAL PAPER Effects of elevated CO2 and soil water content on phytohormone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and agricultural productivity (Goldblum 2009), whereas elevated CO2 has the opposite effect (Ainsworth and LongORIGINAL PAPER Effects of elevated CO2 and soil water content on phytohormone transcript induction increased atmospheric CO2 and drought in the future, possibly altering plant insect dynamics

DeLucia, Evan H.

155

Supercooling and freezing processes in nanoconfined water by time-resolved optical Kerr effect spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using heterodyne-detected optical Kerr effect (HD-OKE) measurements, we investigate the vibrational dynamics and the structural relaxation of water nanoconfined in Vycor porous silica samples (pore size $\\simeq~4~nm$ ) at different levels of hydration and temperatures. At low level of hydration, corresponding to two complete superficial water layers, no freezing occurs and water remains mobile at all the investigated temperatures with dynamic features similar, but not equal, to the bulk water. The fully hydrated sample shows formation of ice at about 248 K, this process does not involve all the contained water; a part of it remains in a supercooled phase. The structural relaxation times measured from the decay of the time-dependent HD-OKE signal shows temperature dependence largely affected by the hydration level; the low frequency ($\

A. Taschin; P. Bartolini; A. Marcelli; R. Righini; R. Torre

2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

156

Ground-water effects of the UCG experiments at the Hoe Creek site in northeastern Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ground-water changes and subsidence effects associated with three underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments have been monitored at the Hoe Creek site in northeastern Wyoming. Ground-water quality measurements have extended over a period of four years and have been supplemented by laboratory studies of contaminant sorption by coal. It was found that a broad range of residual gasification products are introduced into the ground-water system. These contaminants may be of environmental significance if they find their way, in sufficient concentrations, into surface waters, or into aquifers from which water is extracted for drinking or agricultural purposes. Fortunately, the concentrations of these contaminants are substantially reduced by sorption on the surrounding coal. However, recent field measurements indicate that there may be significant limitations on this natural cleansing process. The contaminants of potential concern, and the mechanisms that affect their deposition and persistence have been identified.

Mead, S.W.; Wang, F.T.; Stuermer, D.H.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Nuclear quantum effects in liquid water from path-integral simulations using an ab initio force matching approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have applied path integral simulations, in combination with new ab initio based water potentials, to investigate nuclear quantum effects in liquid water. Because direct ab initio path integral simulations are computationally expensive, a flexible water model is parameterized by force-matching to density functional theory-based molecular dynamics simulations. The resulting effective potentials provide an inexpensive replacement for direct ab inito molecular dynamics simulations and allow efficient simulation of nuclear quantum effects. Static and dynamic properties of liquid water at ambient conditions are presented and the role of nuclear quantum effects, exchange-correlation functionals and dispersion corrections are discussed in regards to reproducing the experimental properties of liquid water.

Thomas Spura; Christopher John; Scott Habershon; Thomas D. Khne

2014-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

158

Quantum fluctuations and isotope effects in ab initio descriptions of water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear quantum effects, such as zero-point energy and tunneling, cause significant changes to the structure and dynamics of hydrogen bonded systems such as liquid water. However, due to the current inability to simulate liquid water using an exact description of its electronic structure, the interplay between nuclear and electronic quantum effects remains unclear. Here we use simulations that incorporate the quantum mechanical nature of both the nuclei and electrons to provide a fully ab initio determination of the particle quantum kinetic energies, free energy change upon exchanging hydrogen for deuterium and the isotope fractionation ratio in water. These properties, which selectively probe the quantum nature of the nuclear degrees of freedom, allow us to make direct comparison to recent experiments and elucidate how electronic exchange and correlation and nuclear quantum fluctuations determine the structure of the hydrogen bond in water.

Lu Wang; Michele Ceriotti; Thomas E. Markland

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

159

Temperature effects on oil-water relative permeabilities for unconsolidated sands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study presents an experimental investigation of temperature effects on relative permeabilities of oil-water systems in unconsolidated sands. The fluids used in this study were refined mineral oil and distilled water. A rate sensitivity study was done on residual oil saturation (S/sub or/) and oil and water relative permeabilities. The temperature sensitivity study of relative permeabilities was conducted in two parts. The first was to investigate changes in S/sub or/ with temperature where the cores were 100% saturated with oil at the start of the waterflood. Runs were terminated when the water-cut exceeded 99.8%. For these experiments, S/sub or/ decreased from 0.31 at 70/sup 0/F to 0.09 at 250/sup 0/F. The second part continued the floods for a longer time until the water-cut was virtually 100%. Under these conditions, little change in S/sub or/ was observed with temperature; (0.11 at 70/sup 0/F and 0.085 at 186/sup 0/F). Temperature effects on irreducible water saturations were studied. A small increase in irreducibile water saturation was observed upon increasing the temperature. However, the same magnitude of change was observed by changing the flowrate. Upon increasing the oil flowrate, immediate water production was observed from the core indicating a change in the capillary end effect. By comparing the change in irreducible water saturation with rate and temperature, it was determined that the change was caused mainly by a change in the viscous force across the core. A study on viscous instabilities was also performed. This verified the existence of viscous fingers during waterflooding. It was also observed that tubing volume after the core could cause fingering, resulting in lower apparent breakthrough oil recoveries.

Sufi, A.H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Some Economic Effects of Adjusting to a Changing Water Supply, Texas High Plains.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. the following categories. Shifting from butane (L. P. gas) to natural gas Areas not particularly affected by water-lev4 for pump engine fuel is another significant eco- decline include about 194,000 acres, or 5.4 percr:!:: nomic adjustment... the decline in water level and decI:rs- from butane to natural gas for pumping fuel. induced adjustments have seriously depietd ::x Elimination or of transmission losses water supply, sharply increased the investms:: :r pcrrticulcrrly has had a effect...

Hughes, William F.; Magee, A. C.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water effective date" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The effect on oil recovery of water flooding at pressures above and below the bubble point  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

if the reservoir is water flooded in the presence of a {9) {10) free gas phase. Guerrero and Kennedy conducted a study using Woodbine sand and East Texas crude oil on the effect of surface-active agents on oil recovery by water flooding, They made several f.... Once the gas saturation increases to a value such that its mo- bility is as great as the mobility ef the otl it no longer can act as a blocking agent. , but probably the water is still forced to flush some of the more tortuous channels which normally...

Bass, Daniel Materson

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Effect of water in salt repositories. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Additional results confirm that during most of the consolidation of polycrystalline salt in brine, the previously proposed rate expression applies. The final consolidation, however, proceeds at a lower rate than predicted. The presence of clay hastens the consolidation process but does not greatly affect the previously observed relationship between permeability and void fraction. Studies of the migration of brine within polycrystalline salt specimens under stress indicate that the principal effect is the exclusion of brine as a result of consolidation, a process that evidently can proceed to completion. No clear effect of a temperature gradient could be identified. A previously reported linear increase with time of the reciprocal permeability of salt-crystal interfaces to brine was confirmed, though the rate of increase appears more nearly proportional to the product of sigma ..delta..P rather than sigma ..delta..P/sup 2/ (sigma is the uniaxial stress normal to the interface and ..delta..P is the hydraulic pressure drop). The new results suggest that a limiting permeability may be reached. A model for the permeability of salt-crystal interfaces to brine is developed that is reasonably consistent with the present results and may be used to predict the permeability of bedded salt. More measurements are needed, however, to choose between two limiting forms of the model.

Baes, C.F. Jr.; Gilpatrick, L.O.; Kitts, F.G.; Bronstein, H.R.; Shor, A.J.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Ground-water hydrologic effects resulting from underground coal gasification experiments at the Hoe Creek Site near Gillette, Wyoming. Interim report, October 1979-March 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical note summarizes our activities, to date, on the research project: Ground-Water Hydrologic Effects Resulting from Underground Coal Gasification Experiments (EPA-IAG-79-D-X0795). The gasified coal seam (Felix No. 2 coal) and two overlying aquifers (Felix No. 1 coal and overlying sand) appear to have become interconnected as a result of roof collapse and subsidence at both Hoe Creek Sites II and III near Gillette, Wyoming. To evaluate changes in the ground-water flow regime at the two sites, completion of supplementary wells was necessary to define the distance versus head drawdown relationships in each of the three aquifers. Hydraulic head potentials have been measured at Site III since gasification ended on October 10, 1979. These data are presented in graphic format. Although hydraulic head measurements at Site II seemed to be approaching a steady-state condition 1.5 years after gasification, the subsequent gasification at Site III temporarily altered the ground-water flow patterns. These changes will have a definite effect on contaminant dispersal and will need to be taken into consideration.

Raber, E.; Stone, R.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

The effects of an intermittent piped water network and storage practices on household water quality in Tamale, Ghana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The United Nations Millennium Development Goals include a target to halve the number of people without access to "improved" water sources, which include piped water supply. However, an "improved" source of water does not ...

Vacs Renwick, Deborah Alexandra

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Current and Long-Term Effects of Delta Water Quality on Drinking Water Treatment Costs from Disinfection Byproduct Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

existing treatment plant. American Water Woks Association Water Quality Technology.plant, representing an existing treatment configuration, to add alternative disinfection and other technologies.

Chen, Wei-Hsiang; Haunschild, Kristine; Lund, Jay R.; Fleenor, William E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

The investigation of the effects of wettability on residual oil after water flooding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE INVESTIGATION OF THE EFFECTS OF WETTABILITY ON RESIDUAL OIL AFTER WATER FLOODING A Thesis BY E. 0, BUR JA Approved as to style and content by: (Cha rman of C mmittee (Head of Department) (Mo th (Year) THE INVESTIGATION OF THE EFFECTS... OF WETTABILITY ON RESIDUAL OIL AFTER WATER FLOODING By E. O. Burja A Thesis Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Major Subject...

Burja, Edward Oscar

1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

The effect of water application rate on the formation of a soil crust  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECT OF WATER APPLICATION RATE ON THE FOR11ATION OF A SOIL CRUST A Thesis by FAUSTO DANIEL BOGRAN CARCA1'10 Subni tted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillnent of the requlrenents for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1985 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering THE EFFECT OF WATER APPLICATION RATE ON THE FORMATION OF A SOIl. CRUST A Thesi s by FAUSTO DANIEL BOGRAN CARCAMO Approved as to style and content by: ars a . McFar an (Chairman...

Bogran Carcamo, Fausto Daniel

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Effects of Climate Variability and Change on Mountain Water Resources in the Western U.S.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The western U.S. derives its water resources predominantly from cold season precipitation and storage in snowpack along the narrow Cascades and Sierra ranges, and the Rocky Mountains. Hydroclimate is modulated by the diverse orographic features across the region. Precipitation, runoff, and water demand generally peaks during winter, spring, and summer respectively. Such phase differences between water supply and demand create a necessity for water management, which is reflected by major development in irrigation, hydropower production, and flood control during the past 50 years. Because water resources have been essential to the economic development and environmental well being of the western states, it is worrisome that recent studies suggest that global warming may exert significant impacts on snowpack and streamflow, which may seriously affect water resources in the western U.S. in the 21st century (e.g., Leung and Wigmosta 1999; Leung and Ghan 1999; Mile et al. 2000; Leung et al. 2002a; Miller et al. 2002). To understand how climate change may affect mountain water resources, we have taken the approach of ?end-to-end? assessment where simulations of current and future climate produced by global climate models (GCMs) are downscaled using regional climate models (RCMs), which then provide atmospheric conditions for assessing water impacts using hydrologic models (e.g., Leung and Wigmosta 1999; Miller et al. 2000; Wood et al. 2002) and water management models (e.g., Hamlet and Lettenmaier 1999; Payne et al. 2002). This suite of models guides us through a comprehensive and global view of the effects of greenhouse warming on the atmosphere-ocean-land system to regional climate change, hydrologic response in river basins and watersheds, and reservoir management. The latter converts hydrologic response to impacts on water management objectives and enables the evaluation of adaptation strategies through modifications to existing reservoir operating rules.

Leung, Lai R.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Effects of long-term water stress on net photosynthesis, growth and water-use efficiency of conifers in the field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of long-term water stress on net photosynthesis, growth and water-use efficiency the highest net photosynthesis PICEA and thus also 'the fastest growth. Douglas fir was superior to spruce into consideration. Thus, the reduction in net photosynthesis was always greater on long and sunny summer days

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

170

Some effects of date of planting, depth of planting, and fertilization on the performance of five important native grasses of Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was given a numerical value, The factors considered wex ex number of plants per square foot; distribution~ or the evenness wi. th which the plants wexe spaoed; vigor as indicated by siss, colox, spread, etc. for the pax'ticular stage of plant growth... to four different dates of planting A one foot border on the ends and a three foot border on each side of the outside plots were maintain- ed free of vegetation. he arrangement and. dimensions of the plots are illustrated in . igures 1 and 2, ~rr er t...

Anderson, James Edward

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Temperature effects on oil-water relative permeabilities for unconsolidated sands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study presents an experimental investigation of temperature effects on relative permeabilities of oil- water systems in unconsolidated sands. The fluids used in this study were refined mineral oil and distilled water. A rate sensitivity study was done on residual oil saturation and oil and water relative permeabilities. The temperature sensitivity study of relative permeabilities was conducted in 2 parts. The first was to investigate changes in residual oil saturation with temperature where the cores were 100% saturated with oil at the start of the waterflood. The second part continued the floods for a longer time until the water-cut was virtually 100%. Under these conditions, little change in residual oil saturation was observed with temperature. A study on viscous instabilities also was performed. This verified the existence of viscous fingers during waterflooding. It also was observed that tubing volume after the core could cause fingering, resulting in lower apparent breakthrough oil recoveries.

Sufi, A.H.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

DATE: TO: FROM:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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173

DATE: TO: FROM:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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174

DATE: TO: FROM:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site |Documents D.O.E. RACE09 DATE:28 -21

175

DATE: TO: FROM:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site |Documents D.O.E. RACE09 DATE:28 -21175

176

DATE: TO: FROM:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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177

DATE: TO: POLICY FLASH  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site |Documents D.O.E. RACE09 DATE:284~POLICY

178

DATE: TO: FROM:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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179

Date | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power Basics (The following text09-0018-CXBasin Jump to:Date" Showing 48

180

Alien species in fresh waters: ecological effects, interactions with other stressors, and prospects for the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Alien species in fresh waters: ecological effects, interactions with other stressors, and prospects dozens of alien species. 2. Invasions are highly nonrandom with respect to the taxonomic identity, which probably have been underestimated as an ecological force. 4. The number of alien species

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water effective date" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Trout in hot water Understanding the effects of climate change on ecosystems is a complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trout in hot water Understanding the effects of climate change on ecosystems is a complex business as we set out for the Hengill geothermal valley. You might think of Iceland as a cold, dark country up the breakdown of organic matter and nutrients are recycled more quickly, leading to more resources

Brierley, Andrew

182

Water Research 36 (2002) 37393746 Effect of ethanol on BTEX biodegradation kinetics: aerobic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Research 36 (2002) 3739­3746 Effect of ethanol on BTEX biodegradation kinetics: aerobic November 2001; received in revised form 1 February 2002 Abstract The use of ethanol as an automotive fuel oxygenate represents potential economic and air-quality benefits. However, little is known about how ethanol

Alvarez, Pedro J.

183

The Effects of Rotation and Ice Shelf Topography on Frazil-Laden Ice Shelf Water Plumes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Antarctica. In addition, it is found that the model only produces reasonable marine ice formation rates whenThe Effects of Rotation and Ice Shelf Topography on Frazil-Laden Ice Shelf Water Plumes PAUL R of the dynamics and thermodynamics of a plume of meltwater at the base of an ice shelf is presented. Such ice

Feltham, Daniel

184

The effect of surface and interfacial tensions upon the recovery of oil by water flooding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECT OF SURFACE AND INTERFACIAL TENSIONS UPON THE RECOVERY OF OIL BY WATER FLOODING A Dissertation By ERASMO T . GUERRERO Approved as to style and content by: J t Q J w & U 7 T Chsfirman of Cfommittee f Head of Department TABLE....................................................................................................... .......... 25 Surface and Interfacial Tensions..........................................................26 Adsorption............................... .................. . ........................................ .......... 31 Flow Tests...

Guerrero, Erasmo Trevino

1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

ORIGINAL PAPER Effects of elevated CO2 and soil water content on phytohormone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of droughts this century (Meehl et al. 2007). Typically, drought reduces yield and agricultural productivityORIGINAL PAPER Effects of elevated CO2 and soil water content on phytohormone transcript induction Science+Business Media B.V. 2012 Abstract Plants will experience increased atmospheric CO2 and drought

DeLucia, Evan H.

186

Toward evaluating the effect of climate change on investments in the water resources sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Toward evaluating the effect of climate change on investments in the water resources sector: insights from the forecast and analysis of hydrological indicators in developing countries* Kenneth of the risks of climate change and the challenges of limiting human influence on the environment

187

Effects of petroleum resins on asphaltene aggregation and water-in-oil emulsion formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of petroleum resins on asphaltene aggregation and water-in-oil emulsion formation P; accepted 30 December 2002 Abstract Asphaltenes from four crude oils were fractionated by precipitation) indicated the onset of asphaltene precipitation occurred at lower toluene volume fractions (0.1Á/0.2) than

Kilpatrick, Peter K.

188

Effect of Channel Materials on the Behavior of Water Droplet Emerging From GDL into PEMFC Gas Channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hand, lack of water in the cell leads to membrane dehydration and reduction of proton exchange throughEffect of Channel Materials on the Behavior of Water Droplet Emerging From GDL into PEMFC Gas, Rochester, New York 14623, USA Water accumulation in the gas channels of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

Kandlikar, Satish

189

Understanding B Cell Kinetics in Humans via Heavy Water Labeling Using Nonlinear Mixed Effects Models and Stochastic Approximation EM algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding B Cell Kinetics in Humans via Heavy Water Labeling Using Nonlinear Mixed Effects, 2010 #12;Abstract Heavy water labeling is an endogenous labeling technique for measuring kinetics synthesized during cell division. Therefore, heavy water labeling is suitable for human studies and has been

Goldman, Steven A.

190

A Report of the Regional Monitoring Program for Water Quality in the San Francisco Estuary pollutant effects on aquatic life  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Program for Water Quality in the San Francisco Estuary 2011 pollutant effects on aquatic life pulse goals of Bay water quality managers is to ensure that pollutants do not interfere with the abilityA Report of the Regional Monitoring Program for Water Quality in the San Francisco Estuary

191

Optical Kerr effect of liquid and supercooled water: the experimental and data analysis perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The time-resolved optical Kerr effect spectroscopy (OKE) is a powerful experimental tool enabling accurate investigations of the dynamic phenomena in molecular liquids. We introduced innovative experimental and fitting procedures, that permit a safe deconvolution of sample response function from the instrumental function. This is a critical issue in order to measure the dynamics of sample presenting weak signal, e.g. liquid water. We report OKE data on water measuring intermolecular vibrations and the structural relaxation processes in an extended temperature range, inclusive of the supercooled states. The unpreceded data quality makes possible a solid comparison with few theoretical models; the multi-mode Brownian oscillator model, the Kubo's discrete random jump model and the schematic mode-coupling model. All these models produce reasonable good fits of the OKE data of stable liquid water, i.e. over the freezing point. The features of water dynamics in the OKE data becomes unambiguous only at lower temperatures, i.e. for water in the metastable supercooled phase. Hence this data enable a valid comparison between the model fits. We found that the schematic mode-coupling model provides the more rigorous and complete model for water dynamics, even if is intrinsic hydrodynamic approach hide the molecular information.

A. Taschin; P. Bartolini; R. Eramo; R. Righini; R. Torre

2014-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

192

Effect of makeup water properties on the condenser fouling in power planr cooling system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermoelectric power industry in the U.S. uses a large amount of fresh water. As available freshwater for use in thermoelectric power production becomes increasingly limited, use of nontraditional water sources is of growing interest. Utilization of nontraditional water, in cooling systems increases the potential for mineral precipitation on heat exchanger surfaces. In that regard, predicting the accelerated rate of scaling and fouling in condenser is crucial to evaluate the condenser performance. To achieve this goal, water chemistry should be incorporated in cooling system modeling and simulation. This paper addresses the effects of various makeup water properties on the cooling system, namely pH and aqueous speciation, both of which are important factors affecting the fouling rate in the main condenser. Detailed modeling of the volatile species desorption (i.e. CO{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}), the formation of scale in the recirculating system, and the relationship between water quality and the corresponding fouling rates is presented.

Safari, I.; Walker, M.; Abbasian, J.; Arastoopour, H.; Hsieh, M-K.; Dzombak, D.; Miller, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Modeling threat assessments of water supply systems using markov latent effects methodology.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act emphasize efforts toward safeguarding our nation's water supplies against attack and contamination. Specifically, the Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 established requirements for each community water system serving more than 3300 people to conduct an assessment of the vulnerability of its system to a terrorist attack or other intentional acts. Integral to evaluating system vulnerability is the threat assessment, which is the process by which the credibility of a threat is quantified. Unfortunately, full probabilistic assessment is generally not feasible, as there is insufficient experience and/or data to quantify the associated probabilities. For this reason, an alternative approach is proposed based on Markov Latent Effects (MLE) modeling, which provides a framework for quantifying imprecise subjective metrics through possibilistic or fuzzy mathematics. Here, an MLE model for water systems is developed and demonstrated to determine threat assessments for different scenarios identified by the assailant, asset, and means. Scenario assailants include terrorists, insiders, and vandals. Assets include a water treatment plant, water storage tank, node, pipeline, well, and a pump station. Means used in attacks include contamination (onsite chemicals, biological and chemical), explosives and vandalism. Results demonstrated highest threats are vandalism events and least likely events are those performed by a terrorist.

Silva, Consuelo Juanita

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Potential climate change effects on Great Lakes hydrodynamics and water quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The problem of climate change has become increasingly recognized as a major environmental concern. Its impact can affect many socio-economic and ecosystem components. This book provides a state-of-the-art review of the climate change effects on lake hydrodynamics and water quality. Most of the engineering cases covered deal with the ability of existing infrastructure to cope with extreme weather conditions. The aim is to provide sufficient case studies to illustrate the advancement in modeling research on lake hydrodynamics, thermal stratification, pollutant transport and water quality by highlighting the climate change aspects in the application of these techniques.

Lam, D.C.L.; Schertzer, W.M. [eds.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Effects of Water in Synthetic Lubricant Systems and Clathrate Formation: A Literature Search and Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An extensive literature search and a confidential survey were critically analyzed to determine the effects of water on the stability of hydrofluorocarbon/synthetic lubricant systems and to identify key areas requiring further investigation. Following are highlights from the analysis: Clathrate hydrates are solid solutions formed when water molecules are linked through hydrogen bonding creating cavities that can enclose various guest molecules from hydrate formers, such as hydrofluorocarbons R-32, R-125, R-134a, R-407C and R-410A. The four methods for preventing clathrate formation were drying the gas, heating it, reducing its pressure, or using inhibitors. The hydrolysis of polyolester lubricants was mostly acid-catalyzed and its reaction rate constant typically followed the Arrhenius equation of an activated process. Hydrolytic stability improved with hindered molecular structures, and with the presence of acid catcher additives and desiccants. Water vapor can effect the adsorption of long-chain fatty acids and the chemistry of formation of protective oxide film. However, these effects on lubrication can be either positive or negative. Fifty to sixty percent of the moisture injected into an air-conditioning system remained in the refrigerant and the rest mixed with the compressor oil. In an automotive air-conditioning system using R-134a, ice would form at 0 C evaporating temperature when the water content in the vapor refrigerant on the low-pressure side was more than 350 ppm. Moisture would cause the embrittlement of polyethylene terephthalate and the hydrolysis of polyesters, but would reduce the effect of amine additives on fluoroelastomer rubbers. The reactions of water with refrigerants and lubricants would cause formicary and large-pit corrosion in copper tubes, as well as copper plating and sludge formation. Moreover, blockage of capillary tubes increased rapidly in the presence of water. Twenty-four companies responded to the survey. From the responses, the water concentrations specified and expected for different refrigerant/lubricant systems varied depending on the products, their capacities and applications, and also on the companies. Among the problems associated with high moisture level, lubricant breakdown was of greatest concern, followed by acid formation, compressor failure and expansion valve sticking. The following research topics are suggested: 1. The air-conditioning and refrigeration industry needs to measure and record the water content and total acid number of the lubricant of newly installed systems as well as operating systems that are shutdown for service or repair. The reason for the shutdown needs to be documented. A database can then be established to correlate water content with type and cause of breakdown. 2. Detailed studies on the distribution of water in refrigeration and air-conditioning systems should be conducted to pinpoint problem areas associated with free water. 3. Research is needed to validate the current theories and mechanisms of formicary corrosion. Corrosion inhibitors need to be developed. 4. The conditions for clathrate formation and decomposition of other alternative refrigerants, such as R-23, R-41, R-116, R-125, R-143a, R-404A and R-507C, and water should be determined to avoid possible problems associated with tube plugging. The mechanism by which water facilitates or hinders lubrication needs to be studied.

Rohatgi, Ngoc Dung T.

2001-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

196

Effect of fulvic acid on the kinetics of aluminum fluoride complexation in acidic waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Both fluoride ion and fulvic acid are important aluminum binding ligands present in soil and surface waters. As such they play a role in the speciation and toxicity of natural waters that have increased aluminum concentration due to acid precipitation. We report here a kinetic study of aluminum complexation in the presence of both of these naturally occurring ligands. An overall mechanism has been identified and rate constants have been obtained for several of the reactions involved. We find that an a priori model of the two ligands in competition for aluminum is incorrect. In fact, the rate of fluoride ion consumption is increased by the presence of fulvic acid. Evidence is presented that this effect is due to several equilibria, some of which involve mixed-ligand species. The important equilibria in this three-component system are identified and discussed, as are aluminum speciation and toxicity in acidic waters.

Plankey, B.J.; Patterson, H.H.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Water quality effects of tire chip fills placed above the groundwater table  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two field trials were constructed to investigate the effect on water quality of tire chip fills placed above the groundwater table. Control wells were used to distinguish the substances naturally present in groundwater from those that leached from tire chips. There was no evidence that tire chips increased the level of substances that have a primary drinking water standard. In addition, there was no evidence that tire chips increased the levels of aluminum, zinc, chloride or sulfate which have secondary (aesthetic) drinking water standards. Under some conditions iron levels may exceed their secondary standard. It is likely that manganese levels will exceed their secondary standard, however, manganese is naturally present in groundwater in many areas. Two sets of samples were tested for organics. Results were below the method detection limit for all compounds.

Humphrey, D.N.; Katz, L.E. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Blumenthal, M. [Scrap Tire Management Council, Washington, DC (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

198

Nuclear quantum effects in water exchange around lithium and fluoride ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We employ classical and ring polymer molecular dynamics simulations to study the effect of nuclear quantum fluctuations on the structure and the water exchange dynamics of aqueous solutions of lithium and fluoride ions. While we obtain reasonably good agreement with experimental data for solutions of lithium by augmenting the Coulombic interactions between the ion and the water molecules with a standard Lennard-Jones ion-oxygen potential, the same is not true for solutions of fluoride, for which we find that a potential with a softer repulsive wall gives much better agreement. A small degree of destabilization of the first hydration shell is found in quantum simulations of both ions when compared with classical simulations, with the shell becoming less sharply defined and the mean residence time of the water molecules in the shell decreasing. In line with these modest differences, we find that the mechanisms of the exchange processes are unaffected by quantization, so a classical description of these reaction...

Wilkins, David M; Dang, Liem X

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Cost Effective Recovery of Low-TDS Frac Flowback Water for Re-use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project goal was to develop a cost-effective water recovery process to reduce the costs and envi-ronmental impact of shale gas production. This effort sought to develop both a flowback water pre-treatment process and a membrane-based partial demineralization process for the treatment of the low-Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) portion of the flowback water produced during hydrofracturing operations. The TDS cutoff for consideration in this project is < 35,000 {approx} 45,000 ppm, which is the typical limit for economic water recovery employing reverse osmosis (RO) type membrane desalination processes. The ultimate objective is the production of clean, reclaimed water suitable for re-use in hydrofracturing operations. The team successfully compiled data on flowback composition and other attributes across multiple shale plays, identified the likely applicability of membrane treatment processes in those shales, and expanded the proposed product portfolio to include four options suitable for various reuse or discharge applications. Pretreatment technologies were evaluated at the lab scale and down-selected based upon their efficacy in removing key contaminants. The chosen technologies were further validated by performing membrane fouling studies with treated flowback water to demonstrate the technical feasibility of flowback treatment with RO membranes. Process flow schemes were constructed for each of the four product options based on experimental performance data from actual flowback water treatment studies. For the products requiring membrane treatment, membrane system model-ing software was used to create designs for enhanced water recovery beyond the typical seawater desalination benchmark. System costs based upon vendor and internal cost information for all process flow schemes were generated and are below target and in line with customer expectations. Finally, to account for temporal and geographic variability in flowback characteristics as well as local disposal costs and regulations, a parametric value assessment tool was created to assess the economic attractiveness of a given flowback recovery process relative to conventional disposal for any combination of anticipated flowback TDS and local disposal cost. It is concluded that membrane systems in combination with appropriate pretreatment technologies can provide cost-effective recovery of low-TDS flow-back water for either beneficial reuse or safe surface discharge.

Claire Henderson; Harish Acharya; Hope Matis; Hareesh Kommepalli; Brian Moore; Hua Wang

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

200

UNDERSTANDING THE EFFECTS OF COMPRESSION AND CONSTRAINTS ON WATER UPTAKE OF FUEL-CELL MEMBRANES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate characterization of polymer-electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) requires understanding the impact of mechanical and electrochemical loads on cell components. An essential aspect of this relationship is the effect of compression on the polymer membrane?s water-uptake behavior and transport properties. However, there is limited information on the impact of physical constraints on membrane properties. In this paper, we investigate both theoretically and experimentally how the water uptake of Nafion membrane changes under external compression loads. The swelling of a compressed membrane is modeled by modifying the swelling pressure in the polymer backbone which relies on the changes in the microscopic volume of the polymer. The model successfully predicts the water content of the compressed membrane measured through in-situ swelling-compression tests and neutron imaging. The results show that external mechanical loads could reduce the water content and conductivity of the membrane, especially at lower temperatures, higher humidities, and in liquid water. The modeling framework and experimental data provide valuable insight for the swelling and conductivity of constrained and compressed membranes, which are of interest in electrochemical devices such as batteries and fuel cells.

Kusoglu, Ahmet; Kienitz, Briian; Weber, Adam

2011-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water effective date" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Environmental controls for underground coal gasification: ground-water effects and control technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Underground coal gasfication (UCG) promises to provide economic access to an enormous deep-coal resource. It is, therefore, of considerable importance to develop appropriate environmental controls for use in conjunction with the UCG process. The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory has conducted three UCG experiments at its Hoe Creek site in northeastern Wyoming. Environmental studies are being conducted in conjunction with these UCG experiments, including an investigation of changes in local ground-water quality and subsidence effects. Ground-water monitoring and geotechnical measurements have helped to clarify the environmental significance of reaction-product contaminants that remain underground following gasification, and the implications of cavity roof collapse and aquifer interconnection. These investigations have led to the development of preliminary plans for a specific method of ground water quality restoration utilizing activated carbon adsorption. Unconventional technologies are also being investigated that may be appropriate for restoring ground water that has been contaminated as a result of UCG operations. These water treatment technologies are being explored as possible supplements to natural controls and process restrictions.

Mead, W.; Raber, E.

1980-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

202

Effects of translational and rotational degrees of freedom on the properties of model water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molecular dynamics simulations with separate thermostats for rotational and translational motions were used to study the effects of these degrees of freedom on the structure of water at a fixed density. To describe water molecules, we used the SPC/E model. The results indicate that an increase of the rotational temperature, $T_\\textrm{R}$, causes a significant breaking of the hydrogen bonds. This is not the case, at least not to such an extent, when the translational temperature, $T_\\textrm{T}$, is raised. The probability of finding an empty spherical cavity (no water molecule present) of a given size, strongly decreases with an increase of $T_\\textrm{R}$, but this only marginally affects the free energy of the hydrophobe insertion. The excess internal energy increases proportionally with an increase of $T_\\textrm{R}$, while an increase of $T_\\textrm{T}$ yields a much smaller effect at high temperatures. The diffusion coefficient of water exhibits a non-monotonous behaviour with an increase of the rotational temperature.

T. Mohori?; B. Hribar-Lee; V. Vlachy

2015-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

203

Effects of translational and rotational degrees of freedom on the properties of model water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molecular dynamics simulations with separate thermostats for rotational and translational motions were used to study the effects of these degrees of freedom on the structure of water at a fixed density. To describe water molecules, we used the SPC/E model. The results indicate that an increase of the rotational temperature, $T_\\textrm{R}$, causes a significant breaking of the hydrogen bonds. This is not the case, at least not to such an extent, when the translational temperature, $T_\\textrm{T}$, is raised. The probability of finding an empty spherical cavity (no water molecule present) of a given size, strongly decreases with an increase of $T_\\textrm{R}$, but this only marginally affects the free energy of the hydrophobe insertion. The excess internal energy increases proportionally with an increase of $T_\\textrm{R}$, while an increase of $T_\\textrm{T}$ yields a much smaller effect at high temperatures. The diffusion coefficient of water exhibits a non-monotonous behaviour with an increase of the rotational ...

Mohori?, T; Vlachy, V

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Earth Day Save the Date  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Save the Date April 22, 2014 Forrestal & Germantown Working together to reduce our environmental footprint... * USPS, USDA, EPA, and GSA will join DOE this year * DOE Program...

205

Direct Measurement of Competing Quantum Effects on the Kinetic Energy of Heavy Water upon Melting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Even at room temperature, quantum mechanics plays a major role in determining the quantitative behaviour of light nuclei, changing significantly the values of physical properties such as the heat capacity. However, other observables appear to be only weakly affected by nuclear quantum effects (NQEs): for instance, the melting temperatures of light and heavy water differ by less than 4 K. Recent theoretical work has attributed this to a competition between intra and inter molecular NQEs, which can be separated by computing the anisotropy of the quantum kinetic energy tensor. The principal values of this tensor change in opposite directions when ice melts, leading to a very small net quantum mechanical effect on the melting point. This paper presents the first direct experimental observation of this phenomenon, achieved by measuring the deuterium momentum distributions n(p) in heavy water and ice using Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering (DINS), and resolving their anisotropy. Results from the experiments, supple...

Romanelli, Giovanni; Manolopoulos, David E; Pantalei, Claudia; Senesi, Roberto; Andreani, Carla

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Date Created: March 2008 Date Amended: March 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Date Created: March 2008 Date Amended: March 2009 DYSLEXIA POLICY.doc- 1 - DYSLEXIA POLICY 1 (both written and spoken) reading, memory and organisation associated with the terms dyslexia, dyspraxia this document the term `dyslexia' will be used in a comprehensive way to refer to all of the above. The College

Subramanian, Sriram

207

Absolute Time Radiometric Dating: the source of the dates on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Absolute Time Radiometric Dating: the source of the dates on the Geologic Time Scale Radiometric.g. uranium to lead. · The parent element is radioactive, the daughter element is stable. · The decay rate nucleosynthesis. Common Radioactive Elements, Parents and Daughters · Carbon-14, C14 Nitrogen-14, N14 · Uranium

Kammer, Thomas

208

Method of manipulating the chemical properties of water to improve the effectiveness of a desired chemical process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The method of the present invention is adapted to manipulate the chemical properties of water in order to improve the effectiveness of a desired chemical process. The method involves heating the water in the vessel to subcritical temperatures between 100.degree. to 374.degree. C. while maintaining sufficient pressure to the water to maintain the water in the liquid state. Various physiochemical properties of the water can be manipulated including polarity, solute solubility, surface tension, viscosity, and the disassociation constant. The method of the present invention has various uses including extracting organics from solids and semisolids such as soil, selectively extracting desired organics from nonaqueous liquids, selectively separating organics using sorbent phases, enhancing reactions by controlling the disassociation constant of water, cleaning waste water, and removing organics from water using activated carbon or other suitable sorbents.

Hawthorne, Steven B. (Grand Forks, ND); Miller, David J. (Grand Forks, ND); Yang, Yu (Greenville, NC); Lagadec, Arnaud Jean-Marie (Grand Forks, ND)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

The effect of soil water content on the phytotoxicity of diuron, fluridone, metribuzin and trifluralin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'HIE ~ OF SOIL WATER CONTENT ON 'IBE ~XICITY OF DIURON, FLURIDONE, NETMBUZIN AND TRIFLURALIN by Sutmitted to the Graduate College of Tom A&M University in partial fulfillnant of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1979... Major Subject: Agroncxny THE ~ OF SOIL KQER ~ ON 'IBE PHY'IVIOIIICITY OF DIUIrON, FLUPIDONE, NETRUKZIN AND TRII'LUHALIN A Thesis Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Cormittee) (Head of Departrrent) (Member) August. 1979 'Ihe Effect...

Baumann, Paul A

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Three-dimensional effects of liquid water flooding in the cathode of a PEM fuel cell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Researchers all over the world are focusing on optimizing this system to be cost competitive with energy conversion devices currently available. It is a well known fact that the cathode of the PEM fuel cell is the performance limiting component due...THREE DIMENSIONAL EFFECTS OF LIQUID WATER FLOODING IN THE CATHODE OF A PEM FUEL CELL by Dilip Natarajan and Trung Van Nguyen* Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering University of Kansas Lawrence, KS 66045, USA Submitted...

Natarajan, Dilip; Van Nguyen, Trung

2003-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

211

The effects of mepiquat chloride on the water relations of cotton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Member) C. R. Benedict (Nember) Norris G. Nerkle (Member) (Department Head) E. C. A. Runge Nay 1983 ABSTRACT The Effects of Mepiquat Chloride on the Water Relations of Cotton (May 1983) Bryan Lee Stuart, B. S. , Texas A&M University Co...-Chairmen of Advisory Committee: Dr. C. W. Wendt Dr. J. R. Abernathy Field tests were conducted in 1979 and 1980 near Lubbock, Texas to determine the effects of the growth regulator mepiquat chloride (1, 1 dimethyl piperidinium chloride) on t (~G' h L. ) t *1 t...

Stuart, Bryan Lee

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Characterizing Pleiotropic Effects of Glucocorticoids in Mice Using Heavy Water Labeling and Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

turnover rates by heavy water labeling of nonessential aminocell proliferation by heavy water labeling. Nature protocolscell proliferation by heavy water labeling. American journal

Roohk, Donald Jason

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Potential Effects of Organic Carbon Production on Ecosystems and Drinking Water Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Primary Drinking Water Regulations, disinfectantsand implications for drinking water quality and the Deltaand control in drinking water. American Chemical Society,

Brown, Larry R.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Water Research Consortium U.S. Department of Energy Grant Award Number DE-FG02-05ER64132 Final Technical Report For Period Beginning: 15 September 2005 And Ending: 31 December 2009 Report Date: 16 March 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the activities of the INRA Water Research Consortium (IWRC) for the period beginning September 15, 2005 and ending December 16, 2010. This report compares accomplishments to project objectives, documents the activities associated with this project, and lists products developed during the course of the project. The Water Resources Research Needs Assessment team received funding from the Inland Northwest Research Alliance Water Resources Steering Committee to facilitate a structured needs assessment process that could provide a basis for future targeted research efforts to improve regional water resources management in the Inland Northwest region. The original INRA proposal specifically mentions the need to conduct a detailed assessment of the information and research needs of policy makers and water user groups during a period of increasing competition for scarce water supplies. A particular focus of this assessment would be to understand what types of research might facilitate water resource management during periods of drought. The specific goals of the Needs Assessment project were to: (1) Quickly ascertain the perceptions of diverse stakeholders in this region; (2) Condense this complex information into a format that can be shared with the INRA scientific panel, and (3) Develop of a realistic set of research needs & priorities that can shape future INRA-funded research activities.

Steven R. Billingsley

2010-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

215

Effect of contamination on the water separability of steam turbine oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect on water separability of three commercial steam turbine oils when contaminated with engine oil and/or a commercially available enhancement additive (designated as Additive X in this paper) for automotive lubricants was investigated. Additive X is an after-market lubricating oil supplement containing conventional crankcase type additives. All three oils showed degradation of water separability when contaminated with as little as 500 ppm (the ppm unit used through out this paper is ppm m/m.) of Additive X alone, as little as 500 ppm of engine oil alone, or 300 ppm of Additive X and 300 ppm of engine oil. It is speculated that the contamination affects water separability because of its calcium-based detergent component. The contamination at these levels in the steam turbine oil is not easily detected by trace metal analysis commonly used in rapid oil analysis programs. This is of concern because Additive X and engine oil are often used in industry to coat bearings during turbine generator maintenance. This study indicates that such practices could result in unsatisfactory water separation characteristics of the turbine oil. 3 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

Li, Tsong-Dsu; Mansfield, J.M. [Texaco Port Arthur Research Lab., TX (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Effects of Water Levels on Productivity of Canada Geese in the Northern Flathead Valley, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council calls for wildlife mitigation at hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River System. Beginning April, 1984, the Bonneville Power Administration funded a study of the effects of the operation of Hungry Horse and Kerr Dams on the western Canada goose (Branta canadensis moffittii) inhabitating the Flathead Valley of northwest Montana. The study was conducted by personnel of the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks (MDFWP), to: (1) identify the size and productivity of this population, (2) identify current habitat conditions and losses of nesting and brood-rearing areas, (3) describe the effects of water level fluctuations on nesting and brood-rearing, and (4) identify mitigation alternatives to offset these effects. Annual pair and nest surveys were used to document the location and fate of goose nests. The number of known nesting attempts varied from 44 in 1984 to 108 in 1985, to 136 in 1986 and 134 in 1987. Fifty-four percent of the annual meeting nesting effort took place on elevated sites which were secure from the flooding and dewatering effects of fluctuating water levels. An average of 15 nests were found on stumps in the remnant Flathead River delta, however, an area strongly influenced by the operation of Kerr Dam. Annual nest losses to flooding and predation attributable to fluctuations caused by the dam were recorded. 53 refs., 24 figs., 35 tabs.

Casey, Daniel

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Well-Head Management and Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can release large amounts of bacteria, nitrates and other contam- inants that could pollute well water. The Texas Water Well Drillers Act (1985), the Water Well Pump Installer Act (1991) and vari- ous other legislative actions have guided devel- opment... of regulations, primarily contained in Chapter 287 of the Texas Administrative Code, to provide for licensing of well drillers and pump installers and establish standards for drilling, capping and plugging water wells. For wells drilled before the effective date...

Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

218

The concepts of total stress, effective stress, and fluid pressure are important to understanding where water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to understanding where water comes from when producing water from a confined aquifer system. However, the overall is not drained, but rather water is produced as a function of the water and aquifer compressibilities. I present describing the extraction of water from confined aquifers is not difficult, understanding how water

Singha, Kamini

219

CHRONIC ZINC SCREENING WATER EFFECT RATIO FOR THE H-12 OUTFALL, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to proposed Zn limits for the NPDES outfall H-12, a Zn screening Water Effects Ratio (WER) study was conducted to determine if a full site-specific WER is warranted. Using standard assumptions for relating the lab results to the stream, the screening WER data were consistent with the proposed Zn limit and suggest that a full WER would result in a similar limit. Addition of a humate amendment to the outfall water reduced Zn toxicity, but the toxicity reduction was relatively small and unlikely to impact proposed Zn limits. The screening WER data indicated that the time and expense required to perform a full WER for Zn is not warranted.

Coughlin, D; Brian02 Looney, B; Margaret Millings, M

2009-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

220

The Effects of Water Vapor and Hydrogen on the High-Temperature Oxidation of Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Essentially all alloys and coatings that are resistant to corrosion at high temperature require the formation of a protective (slowly-growing and adherent) oxide layer by a process known as selective oxidation. The fundamental understanding of this process has been developed over the years for exposure in pure oxygen or air. However, the atmospheres in most applications contain significant amounts of water vapor which can greatly modify the behavior of protective oxides. The development of oxy-fuel combustion systems in which fossil fuels are burned in a mixture of recirculated flue gas and oxygen, rather than in air, has caused renewed interest in the effects of water vapor and steam on alloy oxidation. The focus of this paper is on the ways the presence of water vapor can directly alter the selective oxidation process. The paper begins with a brief review of the fundamentals of selective oxidation followed by a description of recent experimental results regarding the effect of water vapor on the oxidation of a variety of chromia-forming alloys (Fe- and Ni-base) in the temperature range 600 to 700 C. The atmospheres include air, air-H{sub 2}O, Ar-H{sub 2}O and Ar-H{sub 2}O-O{sub 2}. Then the behavior of alumina-forming alloys in H{sub 2}O-containing atmospheres is briefly described. As hydrogen is produced during oxidation of alloys in H{sub 2}O, it can be released back into the gas phase or injected into the metal (where it can diffuse through to the other side). Experiments in which hydrogen concentrations have been measured on both sides of thin specimens during oxidation by H{sub 2}O on only one side are described. Finally, it is attempted to catalogue the various experimental observations under a few general principles.

Mu, N.; Jung, K.; Yanar, N. M.; Pettit, F. S; Holcomb, G. R.; Howard, B. H.; Meier, G. H.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water effective date" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Corrosion, Passivation, and the Effect of Water Addition on an n-GaAs(100)/Methanol Photoelectrochemical Cell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corrosion, Passivation, and the Effect of Water Addition on an n-GaAs(100)/Methanol of corrosion of the cell on the PL-V profile is examined in detail. It is found that the inclusion of the redox couple gives some protection from corrosion, but the addition of a small amount of water

Richmond, Geraldine L.

222

Simplified 1-D Hydrodynamic and Salinity Transport Modeling of the SacramentoSan Joaquin Delta: Sea Level Rise and Water Diversion Effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrodynamic and Salinity Transport Modeling of the SacramentoSan Joaquin Delta: Sea Level Rise and Water Diversion Effects

Fleenor, William E.; Bombardelli, Fabian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

PROTESTING RETALIATION Date: ___________________________  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the landlord. Since I have recently engage in protected activity, I believe that your action(s) of of the law. Thank you for your attention to this matter. Sincerely, Tenant. (Effective 10/1/01). Please take time to read this and keep it in your records for future reference

Bogaerts, Steven

224

Charge transfer effects of ions at the liquid water/vapor interface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Charge transfer (CT), the movement of small amounts of electron density between non-bonded pairs, has been suggested as a driving force for a variety of physical processes. Herein, we examine the effect of CT on ion adsorption to the water liquid-vapor interface. Using a CT force field for molecular dynamics, we construct a potential of mean force (PMF) for Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Cl{sup ?}, and I{sup ?}. The PMFs were produced with respect to an average interface and an instantaneous interface. An analysis of the PMF relative to the instantaneous surface reveals that the area in which the anions experience a free energy minimum is quite narrow, and the cations feel a steeply repulsive free energy near the interface. CT is seen to have only minor effects on the overall free energy profiles. However, the long-ranged effects of ions are highlighted by the CT model. Due to CT, the water molecules at the surface become charged, even when the ion is over 15 away from the surface.

Soniat, Marielle; Rick, Steven W., E-mail: srick@uno.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, Louisiana 70148 (United States)

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

225

Evaluating the Effects of Underground Nuclear Testing Below the Water Table on Groundwater and Radionuclide Migration in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluating the Effects of Underground Nuclear Testing Below the Water Table on Groundwater, using FEHM, evaluate perturbed groundwater behavior associated with underground nuclear tests to an instantaneous pressurization event caused by a nuclear test when different permeability and porosity

226

Requirements for the Effective Use of the Water Resources Scientific Information Center (WRSIC) -- Determined by Field Evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A field evaluation study of user requirements for effective use of the Water Resources Scientific Information Center (WRSIC) is described. The study included several components including an analysis of potential users classified...

Herbich, J. B.; Smith, E. B.; Benson, J. D.

1969-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

Tidal Residual Eddies and their Effect on Water Exchange in Puget Sound  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tidal residual eddies are one of the important hydrodynamic features in tidally dominant estuaries and coastal bays, and they could have significant effects on water exchange in a tidal system. This paper presents a modeling study of tides and tidal residual eddies in Puget Sound, a tidally dominant fjord-like estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast, using a three-dimensional finite-volume coastal ocean model. Mechanisms of vorticity generation and asymmetric distribution patterns around an island/headland were analyzed using the dynamic vorticity transfer approach and numerical experiments. Model results of Puget Sound show that a number of large twin tidal residual eddies exist in the Admiralty Inlet because of the presence of major headlands in the inlet. Simulated residual vorticities near the major headlands indicate that the clockwise tidal residual eddy (negative vorticity) is generally stronger than the anticlockwise eddy (positive vorticity) because of the effect of Coriolis force. The effect of tidal residual eddies on water exchange in Puget Sound and its sub-basins were evaluated by simulations of dye transport. It was found that the strong transverse variability of residual currents in the Admiralty Inlet results in a dominant seaward transport along the eastern shore and a dominant landward transport along the western shore of the Inlet. A similar transport pattern in Hood Canal is caused by the presence of tidal residual eddies near the entrance of the canal. Model results show that tidal residual currents in Whidbey Basin are small in comparison to other sub-basins. A large clockwise residual circulation is formed around Vashon Island near entrance of South Sound, which can potentially constrain the water exchange between the Central Basin and South Sound.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

228

An investigation of the effects of wettability on oil recovery after water flooding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i Theeie Lpyr as te stg1o ask eoateat hgs 7, L1BRARY A A B COLLEGE OF TEXAS AB IB|tESTIGATION OF TBE EFFECTS QF WETTABILITY OK OIL RECO|tERT AFTER WATER FMOIDIBG Robert, S, BojFldn Suhaittsl to the GracTnate School cd. ' the Agrioultaral a...CRncwlelgaenteo b'av eee ~ a ~ 0 ~ ~ ~ 0 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ e ~ aee ~ ee ~ e ~ e ReferenCeet ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ e ~ ~ ~ a ~ 0 ~ ~ eao ~ ~ tee ~ ~ e44 ~ 4 ~ 4 ~ ~ 0 ~ 04 ~ 1. Schsaatio Diagram of Theoretical Oil Retention?~ ?, . ??4, 2. Schematic Diagram of Theoretical Oil...

Boykin, Robert Stith

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Liquid-liquid equilibrium of cyclohexane-n-hexane-methanol mixtures; Effect of water content  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental liquid-liquid equilibrium data for the ternary system cyclohexane-n-hexane-methanol and for the binary systems n-hexane-methanol and cyclohexane-methanol are presented over a temperature range from 284 to 298{Kappa} at pressure of 0.1 MPa. Attention is given to the effect of the purity of methanol as far as the water content is concerned. The data are correlated by means of excess Gibbs energy models (NRTL and UNIQUAC), and the binary interaction parameters are reported.

Alessi, P.; Fermeglia, M.; Kikic, I. (Istituto di Chimica Applicata e Industriale, University of Trieste, via Valerio 2, I-34127 Trieste (IT))

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Sewage sludge application effects on runoff water quality in a semiarid grassland  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the concerns of land application of sewage sludge (also referred to as biosolids) to rangeland is its effect on the amount and quality of runoff water. In this study, we applied three treatments consisting of 0, 22, and 41 Mg ha{sup -1} of municipal sewage sludge to Larim gravelly sandy loam (Ustollic Argiustoll) and Altvan sandy loam (Aridic Argiustoll) soils in paired plots on two slope gradients (8 and 15%). We used a one-time application of simulated rainfall for 30 min at a rate of 100 mm h{sup -1} and collected and analyzed the runoff. Results are described. 22 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

Harris-Pierce, R.L.; Redente, E.F.; Barbarick, K.A. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Supraoptimal root-zone temperature effects on water use of three Cercis spp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Horticulture SUPRAOPTIMAL ROOT-ZONE TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON WATER USE OF THREE CERCIS SPP. A Thesis BETH JEZ LAWRENCE Approved as to style and content by: yneM. Z i e (C irof Co tt ) Malcolm Drew (Member) J s L..., flowering, and fruiting. When a plant is subjected to supraoptimal root- zone temperature conditions, these responses are typically deleterious (Gur et al. , 1976b; Gur et al, 1976c; Martin et al. , 1989; Nightingale and Blake, 1935; Wong et al. , 1971...

Lawrence, Beth Jez

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Dates Fact Sheet.cdr  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

minimizing interference to the critical functions of the control systems To find out more about DATES, contact: SRI International Alfonso Valdes 650.859.4976 alfonso.valdes@sri.com...

233

Modelled effects of precipitation on ecosystem carbon and water dynamics in different climatic zones  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ongoing changes in the global climate expose the world s ecosystems not only to increasing CO2 concentrations and temperatures but also to altered precipitation (P) regimes. Using four well-established process-based ecosystem models (LPJ, DayCent, ORCHIDEE, TECO), we explored effects of potential P changes on water limitation and net primary production (NPP) in seven terrestrial ecosystems with distinctive vegetation types in different hydroclimatic zones. We found that NPP responses to P changes differed not only among sites but also within a year at a given site. The magnitudes of NPP change were basically determined by the degree of ecosystem water limitation, which was quantified here using the ratio between atmospheric transpirational demand and soil water supply. Humid sites and/or periods were least responsive to any change in P as compared with moderately humid or dry sites/periods. We also found that NPP responded more strongly to doubling or halving of P amount and a seasonal shift in P occurrence than that to altered P frequency and intensity at constant annual amounts. The findings were highly robust across the four models especially in terms of the direction of changes and largely consistent with earlier P manipulation experiments and modelling results. Overall, this study underscores the widespread importance of P as a driver of change in ecosystems, although the ultimate response of a particular site will depend on the detailed nature and seasonal timing of P change.

Gerten, Dieter [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Luo, Yiqi [University of Oklahoma; Le Maire, Guerric [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Parton, William [University of Colorado, Fort Collins; Keough, Cindy [University of Colorado, Fort Collins; Weng, Ensheng [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Beier, Claus [Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark; Ciais, Philippe [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Cramer, Wolfgang [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Dukes, Jeff [University of Massachusetts, Boston; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Knapp, Alan [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Linder, Sune [Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Upsalla, Sweden; Nepstad, Daniel [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Woods Hole, MA; Rustad, Lindsey [USDA Forest Service; Sowerby, ALWYN [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Bangor, Gwynedd, United Kingdom

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Effects of Water Injection into Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs: A Summary of Experience Worldwide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reinjection of water into fractured geothermal reservoirs holds potential both for improvement and degradation of total energy recovery. The replacement of reservoir fluid can mean support of placement of reservoir pressures and also more efficient thermal energy recovery, but at the same time the premature invasion of reinjected water back into production wells through high permeability fractures can reduce discharge enthalpy and hence deliverability and useful energy output. Increases in reservoir pressure and maintenance of field output have been observed in operating fields, but unfortunately so too have premature thermal breakthroughs. The design of reinjection schemes, therefore, requires careful investigation into the likely effects, using field experimentation. This paper summarizes field experience with reinjection around the world, with the intention of elucidating characteristics of possible problems. The results summarized in this paper fall into three categories of interest: permeability changes dye to injection (both increases and decreases); the path followed by injected water (as indicated by tracer tests); and the thermal and hydraulic influences of injection on the reinjection well itself and on surrounding producers. [DJE-2005

Horne, Roland N.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Effect of differing mineral contents in process water on the quantity and nitrogen concentration of protein isolates from defatted soy and cottonseed flours  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

isolates with deionized water treatments; but deionized Bryan city water decreased the amount of total solids and nitrogen in the residue, and some decreasing effect was obtained with deionized Lubbock and Nuscatine city water- on the amount of total... solids and nitrogen in the whey fractions. Positive effects of using deionized process waters in the cotton- seed protein isolation process were shown only with non-storage protein (NSP) curds, the minor isolates. Deionized process waters increased...

Kim, Heikyung

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

236

Effects of water chemistry on itergranular cracking of irradiated austenitic stainless steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To determine the effects of water chemistry on the susceptibility to irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in austenitic stainless steels. constant-extension-rate tests were conducted in simulated BWR environments on several heats of high- and commercial-purity (HP and CP) Type 304 SS specimens from BWR components irradiated to fluences up to 2.4 {times} 10{sup 21} n cm{sup {minus}2} (E > I MeV). Effects of dissolved oxygen (DO) and electrochemical potential (ECP) in 289{degrees}C water were investigated. Dependence of Susceptibility to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) on DO was somewhat different for the two materials. Susceptibility of the HP heats. less influenced by DO and ECP, was higher than that of CP material for all DO and fluence levels. Percent IGSCC in the CP material was negligible for DO <0.01 ppm or ECP <{minus}140 mV SHE. Results of analysis by Auger electron spectroscopy indicated that the HP neutron absorber tubes were characterized by relatively lower concentrations of C, Ni, and Li and relatively higher concentrations of F and N on grain boundaries than those of the CP materials. It is suggested that a synergism between irradiation-induced grain-boundary Cr depletion and fabrication-related fluorine contamination plays an important role in the stress corrosion cracking behavior of the HP neutron absorber tubes.

Chung, H.M.; Ruther, W.E.; Sanecki, J.E.; Hins, A.; Kassner, T.F.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

237

Effects of water chemistry on NF/RO membrane structure and performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1.1. Drinking water. . 1.1.2.concern (CECs) in drinking water 2.1.1. Classes ofOther Nitrosamines - Drinking Water Issues, in, 2011. [4

Mo, Yibing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Water Management Act (Massachusetts)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act regulates and registers water withdrawals in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to enable effective planning and management of water use and conservation. The Act establishes a Water...

239

Water stress, temperature, and light effects on isoprene emission and photosynthesis of Kudzu leaves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kudzu (Pueraia lobata (Willd) Ohwi.) emits isoprene, a hydrocarbon which can significantly affect atmospheric chemistry. Isoprene emission under standard conditions of 1000 [mu]mol photons[center dot]M[sup [minus]2][center dot]S[sup [minus]1] and 30[degrees]C developed only after the leaf bad reached full expansion and was not maximal until up to two weeks past the point of full expansion of the leaf. Isoprene emission from kudzu was stimulated by increases in temperature and photon flux density (up to 3000 [mu]mol photons[center dot]m[sup [minus]2][center dot]s[sup [minus]1]). For unstressed plants, 20 % of the carbon fixed in photosynthesis was reemitted as isoprene at 1000 [mu]mol photons[center dot]m[sup [minus]2][center dot]S[sup [minus]1]. Following the relief of water stress, photosynthesis recovered to the prestress rate but isoprene emission increased up to five times the prestress rate. At 1000 [mu]mol photons[center dot]M[sup [minus]2][center dot]S[sup [minus]1] and 35[degrees]C, 67% of the carbon fixed in photosynthesis was reemitted as isoprene eight days after water stress. For some leaves the rate of isoprene emission exceeded 500 nmol[center dot]M[sup [minus]2][center dot]S[sup [minus]1], substantially higher than ever reported before. Leaves of plants grown at less than 20[degrees]C did not make isoprene until an inductive treatment was given. Withholding water from plants or keeping leaves at 30[degrees]C induced isoprene emission. The observation of rapid and dramatic changes in the rate of isoprene emission from leaves in response to water stress and temperature may indicate that isoprene emission improves the ability of plants to cope with these conditions. With the new information on temperature and water stress effects on isoprene emission we speculate on possible reasons for isoprene emission from plants.

Sharkey, T.D.; Loreto, F. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

A review and assessment of variable density ground water flow effects on plume formation at UMTRA project sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A standard assumption when evaluating the migration of plumes in ground water is that the impacted ground water has the same density as the native ground water. Thus density is assumed to be constant, and does not influence plume migration. This assumption is valid only for water with relatively low total dissolved solids (TDS) or a low difference in TDS between water introduced from milling processes and native ground water. Analyses in the literature suggest that relatively minor density differences can significantly affect plume migration. Density differences as small as 0.3 percent are known to cause noticeable effects on the plume migration path. The primary effect of density on plume migration is deeper migration than would be expected in the arid environments typically present at Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites, where little or no natural recharge is available to drive the plume into the aquifer. It is also possible that at some UMTRA Project sites, a synergistic affect occurred during milling operations, where the mounding created by tailings drainage (which created a downward vertical gradient) and the density contrast between the process water and native ground water acted together, driving constituents deeper into the aquifer than either process would alone. Numerical experiments were performed with the U.S. Geological Survey saturated unsaturated transport (SUTRA) model. This is a finite-element model capable of simulating the effects of variable fluid density on ground water flow and solute transport. The simulated aquifer parameters generally are representative of the Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Project site where some of the highest TDS water from processing has been observed.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water effective date" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Simulation and performance analysis of a quadruple-effect lithium bromide-water absorption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to investigate the possibility of improving utilization of high temperature heat sources, such as natural gas, for absorption chillers, performance simulation has been conducted for a quadruple-effect lithium bromide-water cycle, capable of substantial performance improvement over state-of-the-art double-effect cycles. The system investigated includes four condensers and four desorbers coupled together, forming an extension of the conventional double-effect cycle; based on prior experience, a parallel flow system was perferred over series flow, and double-condenser coupling (DCC) was employed, extending from triple-effect cycles, to further improve performance. A modular computer code for simulation of absorption systems (ABSIM) was used to investigate the performances of the cycle. The simulation was carried out over a range of operating conditions, including investigation of the influence of some major design parameters. A coefficient of performance in the neighborhood of 2.0 (cooling) was calculated at the design point, with a heat supply temperature of 600{degrees}F at the solution outlet from the high temperature desorber. With some optimization of the weak (pumped) solution flowrate and of the solution split among the four desorbers, this COP may be raised above 2.2, without any increase in the heat transfer surface of the system`s components.

Grossman, G. [Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa (Israel). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering; Zaltash, A.; DeVault, R.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Addressing trend-related changes within cumulative effects studies in water resources planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summarized herein are 28 case studies wherein trend-related causative physical, social, or institutional changes were connected to consequential changes in runoff, water quality, and riparian and aquatic ecological features. The reviewed cases were systematically evaluated relative to their identified environmental effects; usage of analytical frameworks, and appropriate models, methods, and technologies; and the attention given to mitigation and/or management of the resultant causative and consequential changes. These changes also represent important considerations in project design and operation, and in cumulative effects studies associated therewith. The cases were grouped into five categories: institutional changes associated with legislation and policies (seven cases); physical changes from land use changes in urbanizing watersheds (eight cases); physical changes from land use changes and development projects in watersheds (four cases); physical, institutional, and social changes from land use and related policy changes in river basins (three cases); and multiple changes within a comprehensive study of land use and policy changes in the Willamette River Basin in Oregon (six cases). A tabulation of 110 models, methods and technologies used in the studies is also presented. General observations from this review were that the features were unique for each case; the consequential changes were logically based on the causative changes; the analytical frameworks provided relevant structures for the studies, and the identified methods and technologies were pertinent for addressing both the causative and consequential changes. One key lesson was that the cases provide useful, real-world illustrations of the importance of addressing trend-related changes in cumulative effects studies within water resources planning. Accordingly, they could be used as an initial tool kit for addressing trend-related changes.

Canter, L.W., E-mail: envimptr@aol.com [University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma and President, Canter Associates, Inc., Horseshoe Bay, TX (United States); Chawla, M.K. [ERDC-CERL, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Champaign, IL (United States)] [ERDC-CERL, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Champaign, IL (United States); Swor, C.T. [Canter Associates, Inc., Frankewing, TN (United States)] [Canter Associates, Inc., Frankewing, TN (United States)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

Modeling the effects of maintenance on the degradation of a water-feeding turbo-pump of nuclear power plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the components, which derives from the particular `life' (failures, shocks, preventive maintenance actionsModeling the effects of maintenance on the degradation of a water-feeding turbo-pump of nuclear Abstract: This work addresses the modeling of the effects of maintenance on the degradation of an electric

Boyer, Edmond

244

Effects of Regulated Water Flows on Regen-eration of Fremont Cottonwood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-long dam and reservoir system designed to provide water and hydroelectric power to the greater Phoenix

245

Interaction of Water Management and Riparian Ecosystems: Attitudes, Practices, and Effects1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydroelectric power, provide irrigation water, improve wa ter quality, conserve and develop fish, wildlife

246

Effect of Water Education on Reducing Residential Consumption in San Antonio, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cities in the southwest found that nearly 60% percent of water was used outdoors.(Mayer 1999). Municipal water conservation programs focus on reducing residential, commercial and industrial consumption. Residential water conservation relies on five... of week limitations; (4) rebate programs encouraging a change of landscape material to drought tolerant native landscapes and (5) water pricing. San Antonio has employed all five conservation strategies. Currently, the San Antonio Water System (SAWS...

Rice, Jeremy Joseph

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

247

Simulation and performance analysis of a 4-effect lithium bromide-water absorption chiller  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performance simulation has been conducted for a 4-effect lithium bromide-water chiller, capable of substantial performance improvement over state-of-the-art double-effect cycles. The system investigated includes four condensers and four desorbers coupled together, forming an extension of the conventional double-effect cycle; based on prior analytical studies, a parallel flow system was preferred over series flow, and double-condenser coupling was employed, to further improve performance. A modular computer code for simulation of absorption systems (ABSIM) was used to investigate the performances of the cycle. The simulation was carried out to investigate the influence of some major design parameters. A coefficient of performance around 2.0 (cooling) was calculated at the design point, with a heat supply temperature of 600{degrees}F (315{degrees}C) at the solution outlet from the high temperature desorber. With some optimization of the weak (pumped) solution flowrate and of the solution split among the four desorbers, this COP may be raised above 2.2.

Grossman, G. [Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel); Zaltash, A.; DeVault, R.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

An analytical investigation of the effects of water injection on combustion products and detonation in spark ignition engines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN ANALYTICAL INVESTIGATION OF THE EFFECTS OF WATER INJECTION ON COMBUSTION PRODUCTS AND DETONATION IN SPARK IGNITION ENGINES A Thesis by WILIIAM CHARLES BROWN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ANNI University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1979 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering AN ANALYTICAL INVESTIGATION Ol' THE El'FECTS OF WATER INJECTION ON COMBUSTION PRODUCTS AND DETONATION IN SPARK IGNITION ENGINES A Thesis by WILLIAM...

Brown, William Charles

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

The effect of water temperature on the adsorption equilibrium of dissolved organic matter and atrazine on granular activated carbon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of water temperature on the adsorption of natural dissolved organic matter (DOM) on activated carbon has not been investigated intensively yet. In this study, batch experiments with granular activated carbon (GAC) F300, from bituminous coal, have been carried out at three temperatures (5, 20, 35{sup o} C) using a humic acid model water and different types of surface water (lake, river, canal). Furthermore, the adsorption of an anthropogenic contaminant, atrazine, was quantified in the absence and presence of DOM. The results indicate a significant influence of water temperature on the adsorption equilibrium of DOM and atrazine. Contrary to expectations, DOM and atrazine adsorption in surface water tends to be increased with increasing water temperature, whereas the extent of this effect is dependent on the type and concentration of DOM. Furthermore, the temperature effect on atrazine adsorption is controlled by competition of DOM and atrazine on adsorption sites. Some assumptions are proposed and discussed for explaining the temperature effects observed in the batch studies. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Bernd Schreiber; Viktor Schmalz; Thomas Brinkmann; Eckhard Worch [Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany). Institute of Water Chemistry

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

250

FOR OFFICE USE ONLY Effective Date  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

office changes, please indicate below under the Blue Cross HMOSM (CaliforniaCare) IPA Primary Care or Independent Practice Association (IPA) within their enrollment area. IF YOU SELECT AN IPA,YOU MUST INDICATE A PRIMARY CARE PHYSICIAN FROM WITHIN THAT IPA ON THIS FORM. If you need assistance, contact Blue Cross

Gleeson, Joseph G.

251

Equipment Policy for Federal Sponsored Effective Date  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Property Manager I. Background Division of Research Florida Atlantic University is required to comply. Equipment shall be defined as an article of nonexpendable tangible personal property. Florida Atlantic and a useful life of more than one year. III. General Statement Research Accounting and Property Management

Fernandez, Eduardo

252

DATE  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

replacement of conductors of the same nominal voltage, poles, circuit breakers, transformers, capacitors, crossarms, insulators, and downed transmission lines N. Routine...

253

DATE:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

(w 39 fusrap6 I FROM: Ed Mitchellzm SUBJECT: Elimination Recommendation for American Machine and Foundry in New York City The purpose of this note is to provide the following...

254

DATE:  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Corporations Section 743 Any Payment for the Election for a Federal Office or to a Political Committee Section 3003 Reporting on Conference Spending 2 The FAL addresses the...

255

DATE:  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Corporations * Section 735 Any Payment for the Election for a Federal Office or to a Political Committee * Section 742 Reporting on Conference Spending The FAL addresses the...

256

DATE:  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Letter (AL) 2013-08 and Financial Assistance Letter (FAL) 2013-05 provide Contracting Officers with notice of the recently passed, Whistleblower Protection Enhancement...

257

Date  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laboratory during July 30 th to August 2 nd , 2012. As the NDE technical lead for the piping fatigue task, I hosted a full day workshop on August 2 nd , 2012. A summary of...

258

DATE  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Anticipated work, however, will not adversely impact the original structure of the building. Generating and Managing Waste: Wooden material wastes would be generated from...

259

DATE  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the subcontractor will be required to follow all applicable requirements (training, abatement requirements, control methods, sampling, etc.). Immediately west of MFC-TR-1 there...

260

DATE  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 SECTION A. Project Title: INL - Off-Road ATV Use In Support of Engineering Surveys SECTION B. Project Description The proposed action will allow for off-road ATV use near T-24...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water effective date" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

DATE  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

unit will be specified to meet ASHRAE 90.1, "Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings" or "DOE Energy Star" as appropriate. SECTION D. Determine the...

262

DATE  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and seepage testing. This EC also evaluates impacts for the transfer of wastewater in the current lagoons to the Central Facilities Area (CFA) Sewage Treatment Ponds...

263

DATE  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

necessary on-site and sent off-site for disposal. The on-site treatment will be macroencapsulation, which will be performed with the use of either commercially available HDPE...

264

DATE:  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

has been revised. The subject form has been posted on the DOE Financial Assistance web page on the Recipients Page under the Financial Assistance Forms and Information for...

265

Date:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofofOxford SiteToledo SiteTonawanda North SiteD&Dir^0 0 039 1

266

DATE  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

in nuclear reactors). SECTION C. Environmental Aspects Potential Sources of Impact 1. Air Pollutants - Fugitive dust may be generated during maintenance activities. All fugitive...

267

DATE  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

fan controls to limited air flow capable of maintaining Radiological Control-required air flows necessary for contamination control. 5. Drain and isolate steam, condensate, and...

268

DATE  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

200K SECTION C. Environmental Aspects Potential Sources of Impact 1. Air Pollutants - Fugitive emissions will be generated from breaking up the concrete pads around the...

269

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: Crude OilPublic SafetyTraining » CybersecurityD D D1

270

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: Crude OilPublic SafetyTraining » CybersecurityD D D112

271

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: Crude OilPublic SafetyTraining » CybersecurityD D D11242

272

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: Crude OilPublic SafetyTraining » CybersecurityD D

273

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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274

DATE  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: Crude OilPublic SafetyTraining » CybersecurityD D809

275

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: Crude OilPublic SafetyTraining » CybersecurityD D8090

276

DATE  

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277

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: Crude OilPublic SafetyTraining » CybersecurityD D809012

278

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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279

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: Crude OilPublic SafetyTraining » CybersecurityD D80901234

280

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water effective date" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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281

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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282

DATE  

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283

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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284

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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285

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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286

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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287

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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288

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: Crude OilPublic SafetyTraining »ICP-12-003 SECTION A.

289

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: Crude OilPublic SafetyTraining »ICP-12-003 SECTION A. CX

290

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: Crude OilPublic SafetyTraining »ICP-12-003 SECTION A.

291

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: Crude OilPublic SafetyTraining »ICP-12-003 SECTION

292

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: Crude OilPublic SafetyTraining »ICP-12-003 SECTION1

293

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: Crude OilPublic SafetyTraining »ICP-12-003 SECTION12

294

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: Crude OilPublic SafetyTraining »ICP-12-003 SECTION122 CX

295

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: Crude OilPublic SafetyTraining »ICP-12-003 SECTION122 CX4

296

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: Crude OilPublic SafetyTraining »ICP-12-003 SECTION122

297

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: Crude OilPublic SafetyTraining »ICP-12-003 SECTION1226

298

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: Crude OilPublic SafetyTraining »ICP-12-003 SECTION12267

299

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: Crude OilPublic SafetyTraining »ICP-12-003 SECTION12267CX

300

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: Crude OilPublic SafetyTraining »ICP-12-003

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water effective date" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: Crude OilPublic SafetyTraining »ICP-12-0030 SECTION A.

302

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: Crude OilPublic SafetyTraining »ICP-12-0030 SECTION A.EC

303

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: Crude OilPublic SafetyTraining »ICP-12-0030 SECTION A.EC2

304

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: Crude OilPublic SafetyTraining »ICP-12-0030 SECTION

305

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: Crude OilPublic SafetyTraining »ICP-12-0030 SECTION4

306

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: Crude OilPublic SafetyTraining »ICP-12-0030 SECTION45

307

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: Crude OilPublic SafetyTraining »ICP-12-0030 SECTION4516

308

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: Crude OilPublic SafetyTraining »ICP-12-0030 SECTION45162

309

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: Crude OilPublic SafetyTraining »ICP-12-0030 SECTION45162

310

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: Crude OilPublic SafetyTraining »ICP-12-0030

311

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: Crude OilPublic SafetyTraining »ICP-12-0030Environmental

312

Date  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOffice ofINL is aID Service First DOIDataDTNTemplate

313

DATE  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2Consolidated Edison5 by ISA -ofDATA REPORT ON SPOUSE/COHABITANT DATACX

314

DATE  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2Consolidated Edison5 by ISA -ofDATA REPORT ON SPOUSE/COHABITANT

315

DATE:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site |Documents D.O.E. RACE TOForm gathers

316

DATE:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site |Documents D.O.E. RACE TOForm gathers53

317

DATE:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site |Documents D.O.E. RACE TOForm gathers53 61

318

DATE:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site |Documents D.O.E. RACE TOForm gathers53

319

DATE:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site |Documents D.O.E. RACE TOForm gathers535

320

DATE:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site |Documents D.O.E. RACE TOForm gathers5357

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water effective date" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

DATE:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site |Documents D.O.E. RACE TOForm

322

DATE:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site |Documents D.O.E. RACE TOForm3-12

323

DATE:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site |Documents D.O.E. RACE TOForm3-1222

324

DATE:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site |Documents D.O.E. RACE TOForm3-12222- 38

325

DATE:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site |Documents D.O.E. RACE TOForm3-12222- 3819

326

DATE:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site |Documents D.O.E. RACE TOForm3-12222-

327

DATE:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site |Documents D.O.E. RACE TOForm3-12222-4

328

DATE:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site |Documents D.O.E. RACE TOForm3-12222-48

329

DATE:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site |Documents D.O.E. RACE TOForm3-12222-489

330

DATE:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site |Documents D.O.E. RACE

331

DATE:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site -MiamiYVE r.x-L* ..-*.. 6<*.

332

DATE:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site -MiamiYVE r.x-L* ..-*..

333

DATE:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site -MiamiYVE r.x-L* ..-*..OOE F 1325.3

334

DATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY 2012 FYCustomer-CommentsloadvancesMarchCAES-061

335

DATE:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545 OCTTO:March_BayoRECORD OF^_.Ther-tin

336

Use of uranium^thorium dating to determine C reservoir eects in lakes: examples from Antarctica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Use of uranium^thorium dating to determine past 14 C reservoir e¡ects in lakes: examples from of dissolved `dead' carbon or to slow air^water exchange. Here we use the TIMS uranium^thorium disequilibrium

Henderson, Gideon

337

Trading pollution for water quality : assessing the effects of market-based instruments in three basins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since its passage in 1972, the majority of pollution reduction under the federal Clean Water Act has resulted from technology-based limits imposed on point source dischargers. However, most U.S. water bodies are unmonitored ...

Wallace, Katherine Hay

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Monitoring effective use of household water treatment and safe storage technologies in Ethiopia and Ghana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Household water treatment and storage (HWTS) technologies dissemination is beginning to scale-up to reach the almost 900 million people without access to an improved water supply (WHO/UNICEF/JMP, 2008). Without well-informed ...

Stevenson, Matthew M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Determining the removal effectiveness of flame retardants from drinking water treatment processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low concentrations of xenobiotic chemicals have recently become a concern in the surface water environment. The concern expands to drinking water treatment processes, and whether or not they remove these chemicals while ...

Lin, Joseph C. (Joseph Chris), 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

A study of the effect of surfactants on the flow of water and oil in small capillaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

f. f S ftAR + ldM pp(t E~& Pf IEX~g A STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF SURFACTANTS ON THE FLOW OF WATER AND OIL IN SMALL CAPILLARIES ay ) WILLIAM Rx~ LANCASTER Subxnitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas bx... partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE hhjxjgxxjg 1$5g jjjBbj t:pt*1 ~Ejjeerla A STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF SURFACTANTS ON THE FLOW OF WATER AND OIL IN SMALL CAPILLARIES A Thesis WILLIAM R. LANCASTER Approved...

Lancaster, William Richard

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water effective date" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Effect of pH, phosphorus, and water-extractable zinc of soil on plant growth and zinc absorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECT OF pH~ PHOSPHORilS, AND WATER-EXTRACTABLE ZINC OF SOIL ON PLANT GROWTH AND ZINC ABSORPT1ON A Thesis Najafali Karimian Submitted to the Graduate College cf Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1970 Major Sub ject: Soil Chemistry EFFECT OF pH, PHOSPHORUS, AND WATER-EXTRACTABLE ZINC OF SOIL ON PLANT GROWTH AND ZINC ABSORPTION A Thesis by NajafaIi Karimian Approved as to sty1e and content by: Chairman Committee...

Karimian, Najafali

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Effect of transpiration rate on internal plant resistance to water flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

models for liquid water flow in plants. because it enables one to estimate leaf water potential from known or estimated transpiration rates. The predicted leaf water potential can be used for scheduling irrigation ~ The leaf diffusion resistance... OF LITERATURE Soil Resistance Internal Plant Resistance Ohm's Law Analogy Mathematical Models of Water Transport in the Soil-Plant- Atmosphere System . ~ Poiseuille's Law . ~ ~ ~ ~ Leaf Diffusion and Aerodynamic Resistances ~ Conclusions of Literature...

Hailey, James Lester

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Effect of the Protein Denaturants Urea and Guanidinium on Water Structure: A Structural and Thermodynamic Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the hydrogen bond network of water in the first hydration shell of urea and guanidinium were analyzed in terms of the random network model using Monte Carlo simulations. Bulk water consists of two populations of hydrogen and more bent hydrogen bonds. In the first shell of urea, hydrogen bonds between waters solvating the amino

Sharp, Kim

344

Derived Willingness-To-Pay For Water: Effects Of Probabilistic Rationing And Price  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consumers might be willing to accept a greater frequency of shortages in exchange for reduced water bills, cities have started to argue that the costs of water shortages to the urban/residential sector should, more stringent regulatory requirements and increasing marginal costs of new projects water, shortage

Lund, Jay R.

345

Effects of water deficit on leaf growth and initiation in fast-growing tree species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be particularly sensi- tive to water shortage (Pereira et al., 1986). These researchers have shown that biomass. In the longer term, a decline in biomass production under water shortage will result from reduced assimilation attributed the decreased foliage area observed with water shortage to de- creased leaf number. Our

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

346

Effects of Woody Vegetation Removal on Soil Water Dynamics in a South Texas Shrubland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

removal on various soil textures we studied changes in soil water, rooting depth, and the role of water redistribution by woody vegetation. Woody vegetation was removed using common methods of cut-stump and roller chop across three soil types. Soil water...

Mattox, April Marie

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

347

Effect of surface tension on the acoustic radiation pressure-induced motion of the water-air interface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of surface tension on the acoustic radiation pressure-induced motion of the water to be a function of the surface tension. The time of mound formation measurementsin cleanwaterat low.Our objectiveisto investigatetheeffectsof surface tension on mound formation. We usea boundaryintegralmethodto

Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T. "Pierre"

348

Water management studies in PEM fuel cells, part IV: Effects of channel surface wettability, geometry and orientation on the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water management studies in PEM fuel cells, part IV: Effects of channel surface wettability in the commercialization of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) due to its association with the performance, cost-phase flow in parallel gas channels of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are investigated. Ex situ

Kandlikar, Satish

349

Effect of water concentration in the anode catalyst layer on the performance of direct methanol fuel cells operating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

significantly increase the methanol-crossover rate, producing an unfavorable * Corresponding author. DepartmentEffect of water concentration in the anode catalyst layer on the performance of direct methanol fuel cells operating with neat methanol Q.X. Wu a , S.Y. Shen a , Y.L. He b , T.S. Zhao a

Zhao, Tianshou

350

Most informed people realize that cumulative impacts have had significant adverse effects on water quality and aquatic resources.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are highly inter-related. One large variable in the puzzle are the choices people make. Choices Affect us AllMost informed people realize that cumulative impacts have had significant adverse effects on water to look at shorelines as an ecosystem. The ecosystem concept is important because our coastal lands, air

351

THE EFFECT OF WATER MANAGEMENT AND LAND USE PRACTICES ON THE RESTORATION OF LEE VINING AND RUSH CREEKS1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The implications of existing and potential management practices for the restoration of the stream habitat the condition of stream habitat and should be considered in any restoration plan. The in-stream studies can thusTHE EFFECT OF WATER MANAGEMENT AND LAND USE PRACTICES ON THE RESTORATION OF LEE VINING AND RUSH

Standiford, Richard B.

352

Water Dynamics in Nafion Fuel Cell Membranes: The Effects of Confinement and Structural Changes on the Hydrogen Bond Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emissions energy source is hydrogen. Hydrogen powered vehicles using polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells and hydrophilic aggregates.1-4 Hydrogen fuel cells operate through the oxidation of hydrogen gas at the anodeWater Dynamics in Nafion Fuel Cell Membranes: The Effects of Confinement and Structural Changes

Fayer, Michael D.

353

The Effects of Climate Change on Water Resources in the West: Introduction and Overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the summer of 2000, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded a project to perform an experimental end-to-end assessment of the effects of climate change on the western United States. The project was intended both to demonstrate and test a methodology for performing quantitative assessments of climate-driven environmental impacts. A second objective was to provide useful information to regional, state, and local decision-makers, whose job it will be to deal with the conflicting demands that climate change, population increases, and economic growth will place on the water resources of the West. The third objective was to demonstrate the potential value of an Accelerated Climate Prediction Initiative (ACPI). The ACPI was a DOE initiative to accelerate the development, improvement, and application of U.S. climate models and to provide the advanced computational facilities that would be needed to carry out this work. Although the ACPI was not funded, some of its spirit lives on in various DOE and other federal agency projects and programs designed to advance ultra-scale computing and the science of climate simulation. In this volume, we hope to demonstrate what can be achieved if a highly qualified group of scientists are brought together, under relatively light management reins, to take an in-depth look at how future climate change might affect issues of real importance to the citizens of the United States.

Barnett, Tim P.; Malone, Robert; Pennell, William T.; Stammer, Detlet; Semtner, Bret; Washington, Warren M.

2004-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

354

Summary To determine the effects of lifting time and stor-age on water-stress resistance of nursery-grown white spruce  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

results in reduced water- stress resistance because of a lack of reserves for osmotic adjustment and newSummary To determine the effects of lifting time and stor- age on water-stress resistance in January 1992. The seedlings were placed in nutrient solution and subjected to 1.1 or 2.7 MPa water

Macdonald, Ellen

355

Effect of the water activities of the heating and the recovery media on1 the apparent heat resistance of Bacillus cereus spores.2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of the water activities of the heating and the recovery media on1 the apparent heat the water activity of the recovery medium was kept near 1. Reciprocally, the water activity of the14 heating with the same depressors. Lastly, in a third set of experiments, the heating medium and the recovery16 medium

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

356

Trading pollution for water quality : assessing the effects of market-based instruments in three basins .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Since its passage in 1972, the majority of pollution reduction under the federal Clean Water Act has resulted from technology-based limits imposed on point source (more)

Wallace, Katherine Hay

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

The effect of petroleum operations on the phytoplankton ecology of the Louisiana coastal waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

comparison of phytoplankton standing crop and pro- duction from productive neritic areas of the Gulf of Mexico. 59 INTRODUCTION The waters of the northwest Gulf of Mexico represent the major oil-producing site in the U. S. with an estimated 30-40, 000... spills (Smith, 1968; Oguri and Kanter, 1971). Smith (1968) collected phytoplankton samples from several stations in waters uncontaminated by oil, in waters with a thin oil film, and in waters near to detergent sprayed oil after the ~Torre ~Can...

Fucik, K

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

The effect of water content, cooling rate, and growth temperature on the freezing temperature of 4 Tillandsia species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the exotherm initiation temperatures (EIT) of leaf sections. The effect of 2 growth temperatures (5 and 25oC) on the absolute water content and EIT of T. recurvata and T. usneoides was also determined. All p * * pt T. mb'1 ', f o t ld temperatures at 80... used to detect ice formation in plant tissues by exotherm detection. An electronic device is used to measure the heat released (exotherm) when water freezes. From this information, the freezing and supercooling temperatures of plant tissues can...

Hagar, Christopher Flint

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Water Resources Competitive Grants Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Resources Competitive Grants Program Fiscal Year 2012 Request for Proposals Pursuant to Section 104 of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984, as Amended Closing Date 4:00 PM, Eastern Time, August 15, 2012 (Institutes) Institute for Water Resources National Institutes for U.S. Army Corps

Virginia Tech

360

Water Resources Competitive Grants Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Resources Competitive Grants Program Fiscal Year 2014 Request for Proposals Pursuant to Section 104 of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984, as Amended Closing Date 4:00 PM, Eastern Time, August 15, 2014 (Institutes) Institute for Water Resources National Institutes for U.S. Army Corps

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water effective date" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

DATE: TO: FROM: POLICY FLASH  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site |Documents D.O.E. RACE09 DATE:28

362

DATE: TO: FROM: POLICY FLASH  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site |Documents D.O.E. RACE09 DATE:284

363

DATE: TO: FROM: POLICY FLASH  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2Consolidated Edison5 by ISA -ofDATA REPORT ON7 DATE: May54 7

364

Cotton production and water quality: Economic and environmental effects of pollution prevention. Agricultural economic report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cotton production, compared with other crops, is less likely to cause erosion-induced water-quality problems because cotton acreage is not the major source of erosion in most regions. For cotton production, the most widespread potential damages to water quality are nitrates from fertilizer polluting ground water and pesticides contaminating surface water. This damage could be reduced by restricting chemical and fertilizer use on all cotton production, but doing so could reduce cotton yields and raise cotton prices. The same level of water-quality improvement could be achieved at less cost by targeting the chemical use or erosion restrictions only to cotton farms with the most vulnerable soils. Data come from a 1989 USDA survey of cotton producers.

Crutchfield, S.R.; Ribaudo, M.O.; Hansen, L.T.; Quiroga, R.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Advanced Membrane Filtration Technology for Cost Effective Recovery of Fresh Water from Oil & Gas Produced Brine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study is developing a comprehensive study of what is involved in the desalination of oil field produced brine and the technical developments and regulatory changes needed to make the concept a commercial reality. It was originally based on ''conventional'' produced water treatment and reviewed (1) the basics of produced water management, (2) the potential for desalination of produced brine in order to make the resource more useful and available in areas of limited fresh water availability, and (3) the potential beneficial uses of produced water for other than oil production operations. Since we have begun however, a new area of interest has appeared that of brine water treatment at the well site. Details are discussed in this technical progress report. One way to reduce the impact of O&G operations is to treat produced brine by desalination. The main body of the report contains information showing where oil field brine is produced, its composition, and the volume available for treatment and desalination. This collection of information all relates to what the oil and gas industry refers to as ''produced water management''. It is a critical issue for the industry as produced water accounts for more than 80% of all the byproducts produced in oil and gas exploration and production. The expense of handling unwanted waste fluids draws scarce capital away for the development of new petroleum resources, decreases the economic lifetimes of existing oil and gas reservoirs, and makes environmental compliance more expensive to achieve. More than 200 million barrels of produced water are generated worldwide each day; this adds up to more than 75 billion barrels per year. For the United States, the American Petroleum Institute estimated about 18 billion barrels per year were generated from onshore wells in 1995, and similar volumes are generated today. Offshore wells in the United States generate several hundred million barrels of produced water per year. Internationally, three barrels of water are produced for each barrel of oil. Production in the United States is more mature; the US average is about 7 barrels of water per barrel of oil. Closer to home, in Texas the Permian Basin produces more than 9 barrels of water per barrel of oil and represents more than 400 million gallons of water per day processed and re-injected.

David B. Burnett

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

366

Moisture effects in low-slope roofs: Drying rates after water addition with various vapor retarders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tests have been conducted in the Large Scale Climate Simulator (LSCS) of the US. Building Envelope Research Center at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to investigate downward drying rates of various unvented, low-slope roof systems. A secondary objective was to study heat flow patterns so as to understand how to control latent heat effects on impermeable heat flux transducers. Nine test sections were tested simultaneously. The sections had a p deck above fibrous-glass insulation and were examples of cold-deck systems. These five sections had various vapor retarder systems on a gypsum board ceiling below the insulation. The other four sections had a lightweight insulating concrete deck below expanded polystyrene insulation and the same vapor retarder systems, and were examples of warm-deck systems. The cold-deck systems had materials that were relatively permeable to water vapor, while the materials in the warm-deck systems were less permeable. All test sections were topped by an impermeable roofing membrane. The test sections were instrumented with thermocouples between all layers and with small heat flux transducers at the bottom and top of the fibrous-glass insulation and in the middle of the expanded polystyrene insulation. Two different kinds of moisture probes were used to qualitatively monitor the movement of the moisture. The heat flux measurements showed that heat conduction dominates the system using impermeable insulation materials, with only a slight increase due to increased thermal conductivity of wet expanded polystyrene. There was significant transfer of latent heat in the test sections with permeable insulation, causing the peak heat fluxes to increase by as much as a factor of two. With temperatures imposed that are typical of summer days, latent heat transfer associated with condensation and evaporation of moisture in the test sections was measured to be as important as the heat transfer by conduction.

Pedersen, C.R. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark); Petrie, T.W. [Marquette Univ., Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Courville, G.E.; Desjarlais, A.O.; Childs, P.W.; Wilkes, K.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Effects of Surface Treatments on Mechanical Properties and Water Resistance of Kenaf Fiber-Reinforced Unsaturated Polyester Composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Effects of surface treatments on the strength and water resistance of kenaf fiber-reinforced unsaturated polyester (UPE) composites were investigated. A new coupling agent that consists of 1,6-diisocyanato-hexane (DIH) and 2-hydroxylethyl acrylate (HEA) was investigated for surface treatments of kenaf fibers. The surface treatments were found to significantly enhance the tensile strength, modulus of rupture, modulus of elasticity, and water resistance of the resulting kenaf UPE composites. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) confirmed that DIH-HEA was covalently bonded onto kenaf fibers. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the composites revealed that chemical treatment of kenaf fibers with a combination of DIH and HEA improved the interfacial adhesion between kenaf fibers and UPE resin in the DIHHEA-treated kenafUPE composites. The mechanisms by which the chemical treatment of kenaf fiber surfaces improved strength and water resistance of the resulting kenaf UPE composites were discussed.

Ren, Xiaofeng; Qui, Renhui; Fifield, Leonard S.; Simmons, Kevin L.; li, Kaichang

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

368

The EPRI state-of-the-art cooling water treatment research project: A tailored collaboration program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EPRI Tailored Collaboration State-of-the-Art Cooling Water Treatment Research Program has been initiated with several electric utility participants. Started in January 1995, the program provides O&M cost reduction through improved cooling water system reliability and operation,. This effort is discussed along with the objectives and goals, the participants and project timetable. The program will provide three (3) main results to the participating utilities: cost effective optimization of cooling water treatment, production of a new Cooling Water Treatment Manual and updating of two (2) EPRI software products - SEQUIL and COOLADD. A review of the specific objectives, project timetable and results to date will be presented. 1 tab.

Zammitt, K. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Selby, K.A. [Puckorius & Associates, Inc., Evergreen, CO (United States); Brice, T. [Entergy Operations - River Bend Station, St. Francisville, LA (United States)] [and others

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Vehicle arrived for disposal Date Disposal of Asset form approved (copy required) Date  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colour Engine (ltrs) Fuel (ulp/diesel) Transmission (auto/manual) Compliance date Kilometres Additions

Botea, Adi

370

The effect of monomolecular films on oxygen transfer across an air-water interface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rate 8. Effect of Aquasave Monolayer on Oxygen Uptake Rate 9. Effect of Isopropyl Alcohol on Oxygen Uptake Rate 10. Effect of Isopropyl Alcohol on Oxygen Uptake Rate 11. Effect of Isopropyl Alcohol on Oxygen Uptake Rate 12. Effect of Kerosene... on Oxygen Uptake Rate 13. Effect of Kerosene on Oxygen Uptake Rate 14. Effect of n-Pentanol on Oxygen Uptake Rate 15. Effect of n-Pentanol on Oxygen Uptake Rate 16. Effect of Hexane on Oxygen Uptake Rate 17. Effect of Hexane on Oxygen Uptake Rate 18...

Mahmoud, Tariq Ahmad

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Simulated effects of climate change on the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, is evaluating the geologic and hydrologic characteristics of the Death Valley regional flow system as part of the Yucca Mountain Project. As part of the hydrologic investigation, regional, three-dimensional conceptual and numerical ground-water-flow models have been developed to assess the potential effects of past and future climates on the regional flow system. A simulation that is based on climatic conditions 21,000 years ago was evaluated by comparing the simulated results to observation of paleodischarge sites. Following acceptable simulation of a past climate, a possible future ground-water-flow system, with climatic conditions that represent a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide, was simulated. The steady-state simulations were based on the present-day, steady-state, regional ground-water-flow model. The finite-difference model consisted of 163 rows, 153 columns, and 3 layers and was simulated using MODFLOWP. Climate changes were implemented in the regional ground-water-flow model by changing the distribution of ground-water recharge. Global-scale, average-annual, simulated precipitation for both past- and future-climate conditions developed elsewhere were resampled to the model-grid resolution. A polynomial function that represents the Maxey-Eakin method for estimating recharge from precipitation was used to develop recharge distributions for simulation.

D`Agnese, F.A.; O`Brien, G.M.; Faunt, C.C.; San Juan, C.A.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Evaluation of Resource Use and Economic Effects Due to Irrigation Water Availiability in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

subject to conjecture. Future agricultural price and production control programs are unknown and can only be hypothesized. These factors and others are important to water requirements of agriculture and must be dealt with by measurement or estimation...

Trock, W. L.; Schmer, F. A.

373

Temperature and water vapor pressure effects on the friction coefficient of hydrogenated diamondlike carbon films.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microtribological measurements of a hydrogenated diamondlike carbon film in controlled gaseous environments show that water vapor plays a significant role in the friction coefficient. These experiments reveal an initial high friction transient behavior that does not reoccur even after extended periods of exposure to low partial pressures of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2}. Experiments varying both water vapor pressure and sample temperature show trends of a decreasing friction coefficient as a function of both the decreasing water vapor pressure and the increasing substrate temperature. Theses trends are examined with regard to first order gas-surface interactions. Model fits give activation energies on the order of 40 kJ/mol, which is consistent with water vapor desorption.

Dickrell, P. L.; Sawyer, W. G.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Erdemir, A.; Energy Technology; Univ. of Florida

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Implications and potential applications of bactericidal fullerene water suspensions: effect of nC60 concentration,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the reduction of waste production, remediation of contaminant spills, water treatment, and improved energy conditions. Antibacterial activity was observed in the presence or absence of light or oxygen, and increased

Alvarez, Pedro J.

375

Countervailing effects of atrazine on water recreation: How do recreators evaluate them?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Carpenter [1997], the value of freshwater ecosystem services, such as those provided by Clinton Lake to Lawrence residents, can be quite large. Estimates of such values can help to clarify the stakes in environmental debates, including the evaluation... the two dimensions. [7] By examining recreators responses to these potential trade-offs involving water quality, our analysis sheds new light on the societal valuation of water resources. This improved understanding facilitates well-informed ecological...

Earnhart, Dietrich H.; Smith, Val H.

2003-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

376

Effect of connate water on miscible displacement of reservoir oil by flue gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gas and water injection, have allowed the industry to greatly increase primary oil recovery. But the common weakness of gas and water as pressure maintenance and secondary recovery agents is im- miscibility with the reservoir fluid to be displaced... to using a hydrocarbon slug, Saxon, et al was one of the earliest investigators of carbon dioxide as a possible flooding 14 agent. Gatlin and Slobod reported on laboratory investigations of another possible miscible flooding agent, methyl alcohol. Each...

Maxwell, H. D.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Liquid-liquid equilibria of fuel oxygenate + water + hydrocarbon mixtures. 3: Effect of temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have measured the ternary liquid-liquid equilibria of water + ethanol mixtures with, separately, 2,2,4-trimethylpentane and toluene at 5 and 40 C, water + tert-amyl alcohol (TAOH) mixtures with, separately, toluene and hexane at 5 and 40 C, and of water + TAOH + pentane mixtures at 5 C. The ethanol-containing systems exhibit type 1 liquid-liquid phase behavior, and the TAOH-containing systems exhibit type 2 behavior. These data, together with the data they have previously reported at 25 C, provide information on how the liquid-liquid equilibria of these systems change as a function of temperature. While the addition of ethanol is found to increase the solubility of hydrocarbons in the aqueous phase, the concentration of the hydrocarbon in the water-rich phase decreases with increasing temperature. With the exception of hydrocarbon in the water-rich phase, the experimental data could be correlated quite well with either the UNIQUAC or NRTL models. For most of the systems considered here the predictions of the phase behavior with the liquid-liquid UNIFAC group-contribution model are only qualitatively correct. However, the liquid-liquid UNIFAC model erroneously predicts type 2 phase behavior to occur for water + ethanol + 2,2,4-trimethylpentane system at 5 C.

Wagner, G. [Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany). Institut fuer Thermische Verfahrenstechnik; Sandler, S.I. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States). Center for Molecular and Engineering Thermodynamics

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Date: June 12, 2007 To: Pacific Northwest Demand Response Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Date: June 12, 2007 To: Pacific Northwest Demand Response Project From: Rich Sedano/RAP and Chuck, 2007 meeting of the Pacific Northwest Demand Response Project, we agreed to form three Working Groups for the evaluation of cost-effectiveness of Demand Response resources. One potential outcome would be for state

379

Drinking Water Problems: Copper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High levels of copper in drinking water can cause health problems. This publication explains the effects of copper in water and methods of removing it. 4 pp....

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

380

The Individual and Collective Effects of Exact Exchange and Dispersion Interactions on the Ab Initio Structure of Liquid Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, we report the results of a series of density functional theory (DFT) based ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations of ambient liquid water using a hierarchy of exchange-correlation (XC) functionals to investigate the individual and collective effects of exact exchange (Exx), via the PBE0 hybrid functional, non-local vdW/dispersion interactions, via a fully self-consistent density-dependent dispersion correction, and approximate nuclear quantum effects (aNQE), via a 30 K increase in the simulation temperature, on the microscopic structure of liquid water. Based on these AIMD simulations, we found that the collective inclusion of Exx, vdW, and aNQE as resulting from a large-scale AIMD simulation of (H$_2$O)$_{128}$ at the PBE0+vdW level of theory, significantly softens the structure of ambient liquid water and yields an oxygen-oxygen structure factor, $S_{\\rm OO}(Q)$, and corresponding oxygen-oxygen radial distribution function, $g_{\\rm OO}(r)$, that are now in quantitative agreement with the best available experimental data. This level of agreement between simulation and experiment as demonstrated herein originates from an increase in the relative population of water molecules in the interstitial region between the first and second coordination shells, a collective reorganization in the liquid phase which is facilitated by a weakening of the hydrogen bond strength by the use of the PBE0 hybrid XC functional, coupled with a relative stabilization of the resultant disordered liquid water configurations by the inclusion of non-local vdW/dispersion interactions.

Robert A. DiStasio Jr.; Biswajit Santra; Zhaofeng Li; Xifan Wu; Roberto Car

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water effective date" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Decentralization of Water Service Delivery in Mexico: The Effects of Party Politics, Intergovernmental Dynamics, and Municipal Capacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of resources. While states and water commissions couldwater agency directors state water agency directors B.provided by local and state water agencies Review of public

Hastings, Cameron Jones

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Decentralization of Water Service Delivery in Mexico: The Effects of Party Politics, Intergovernmental Dynamics, and Municipal Capacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

impacted by the lack of clean water. The percentage of thestatistics regarding lack of access to water and the impactspopulation lacks access to high quality water services. The

Hastings, Cameron Jones

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Effect of Fuel Wobbe Number on Pollutant Emissions from Advanced Technology Residential Water Heaters: Results of Controlled Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emissions from Residential Water Heaters Table of Contents46 Table 10. Storage water heaters evaluated experimentally50 Table 11. Published information for water heater

Rapp, VH

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Effect of Fuel Wobbe Number on Pollutant Emissions from Advanced Technology Residential Water Heaters: Results of Controlled Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

46 Table 10. Storage water heaters evaluated experimentallyfor interchangeability experiments for storage water heaterfor experiments with storage water heater AW01. 53

Rapp, VH

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Electronic structure effects in liquid water studied by photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present valence photoelectron emission spectra of liquid water in comparison with gas-phase water, ice close to the melting point, low temperature amorphous and crystalline ice. All aggregation states have major electronic structure changes relative to the free molecule, with rehybridization and development of bonding and anti-bonding states accompanying the hydrogen bond formation. Sensitivity to the local structural order, most prominent in the shape and splitting of the occupied 3a{sub 1} orbital, is understood from the electronic structure averaging over various geometrical structures, and reflects the local nature of the orbital interaction.

Nordlund, Dennis; Odelius, Michael; Bluhm, Hendrik; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Pettersson, Lars G.M.; Nilsson, Anders

2008-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

386

Effect of Fuel Wobbe Number on Pollutant Emissions from Advanced Technology Residential Water Heaters: Results of Controlled Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research summarized in this report is part of a larger effort to evaluate the potential air quality impacts of using liquefied natural gas in California. A difference of potential importance between many liquefied natural gas blends and the natural gas blends that have been distributed in California in recent years is the higher Wobbe number of liquefied natural gas. Wobbe number is a measure of the energy delivery rate for appliances that use orifice- or pressure-based fuel metering. The effect of Wobbe number on pollutant emissions from residential water heaters was evaluated in controlled experiments. Experiments were conducted on eight storage water heaters, including five with ultra low-NO{sub X} burners, and four on-demand (tankless) water heaters, all of which featured ultra low-NO{sub X} burners. Pollutant emissions were quantified as air-free concentrations in the appliance flue and fuel-based emission factors in units of nanogram of pollutant emitter per joule of fuel energy consumed. Emissions were measured for carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub X}), nitrogen oxide (NO), formaldehyde and acetaldehyde as the water heaters were operated through defined operating cycles using fuels with varying Wobbe number. The reference fuel was Northern California line gas with Wobbe number ranging from 1344 to 1365. Test fuels had Wobbe numbers of 1360, 1390 and 1420. The most prominent finding was an increase in NO{sub X} emissions with increasing Wobbe number: all five of the ultra low-NO{sub X} storage water heaters and two of the four ultra low-NO{sub X} on-demand water heaters had statistically discernible (p<0.10) increases in NO{sub X} with fuel Wobbe number. The largest percentage increases occurred for the ultra low-NO{sub X} water heaters. There was a discernible change in CO emissions with Wobbe number for all four of the on-demand devices tested. The on-demand water heater with the highest CO emissions also had the largest CO increase with increasing fuel Wobbe number.

Rapp, VH; Singer, BC

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

PII S0016-7037(99)00422-6 U-Th dating of deep-sea corals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EDWARDS,1 and EDWARD A. BOYLE 3 1 Minnesota Isotope Laboratory, Department of Geology and Geophysics of the water column. Copyright © 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd 1. INTRODUCTION Uranium series dates from surface and uranium series dates from surface corals constrain the history of atmospheric 14 C beyond the tree ring

Adkins, Jess F.

388

Effect of voltage polarity on oxidation-reduction potential by plasma in water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Use of plasma in water for water treatment and medical treatment is growing and raises expectations of finding advanced functions such as an increase of biological compatibility. In the present study with a focus on the variation of oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), relationships between the electrode polarities of plasma in water and the change of water quality such as conductivity, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration, dissolved hydrogen concentration, pH and ORP were revealed. Similar line spectra of radiation at the electrode tip were observed for each case of positive and negative electrode polarity. The emission intensities of OH (309 nm), H? (656 nm), and OI (777 nm) for the positive discharge were significantly higher than those for the negative one, though the energy consumption during the discharge period of both cases was nearly the same. Positive electrode polarity was found to be more suitable than negative electrode polarity for increasing dissolved hydrogen gas and hydrogen peroxide. The ORP for the positive polarity decreased from 460 to 45 mV and that for the negative polarity decreased from 460 to 183 mV, although the pH and conductivity were not significantly changed.

Miyahara, Takashi [Faculty of Engineering, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan)] [Faculty of Engineering, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Oizumi, Masanobu [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577, Japan (Currently, Nippon Steel and Sumikin Engineering Co. Ltd.) (Japan)] [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577, Japan (Currently, Nippon Steel and Sumikin Engineering Co. Ltd.) (Japan); Nakatani, Tatsuyuki [Toyo Advanced Technologies Co., Ltd., 5-3-38 Ujinahigashi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8501 (Japan)] [Toyo Advanced Technologies Co., Ltd., 5-3-38 Ujinahigashi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8501 (Japan); Sato, Takehiko, E-mail: sato@ifs.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)] [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Effect of composition on adsorption of water on perfect olivine surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Chemistry, University College London, UK 3 Department of Material Science and Engineering, USA be a viable source of water in the terrestrial planets. Gases coexist with dust in the accretion disk for long cycle C.H. STIRLING Department of Chemistry, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand (cstirling

Deymier, Pierre

390

The effect of chilled drinking water on heat-stressed lactating Holstein cows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

20 consumption of non-lactating dairy cows. J. Daizy Scr. 47:382. 20 Dillon, R. D. and R. E. Nichols. 1955. Changes in temperature of reticulo-ruminal content following the drinking of water. Am. J. Vet. Res. 16:69. 21 DuBois, P. R. and D. J...

Baker, Christopher Charles

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Freshwater mussels and water quality: A review of the effects of hydrologic and instream habitat alterations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43212 ABSTRACT: Hydraulic impacts represent a suite of habitat. These hydraulic impacts thus overlap each other to one degree or another. I have attempted to break them down to divert water to mills and turbines, where its seemingly limitless power ground grain, cut lumber

Watters, G. Thomas

392

Effects of cattle manure on erosion rates and runoff water pollution by faecal coliforms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of organic matter and nutrients. Recycling these wastes via land application could lead to improvements and nutrients for agriculture. However, the benefits of waste recycling may be partially offset by the risk-site specific. However, the benefits of waste recycling may be partially offset by the risk of water pollution

Quinton, John

393

Effect of surfactants on the interfacial tension and emulsion formation between water and carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The lowering of the interfacial tension ({gamma}) between water and carbon dioxide by various classes of surfactants is reported and used to interpret complementary measurements of the capacity, stability, and average drop size of water-in-CO{sub 2} emulsions. {gamma} is lowered from {approximately}20 to {approximately}2 mN/m for the best poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide) (PPO-b-PEO-b-PPO) and PeO-b-PPO-b-PEO Pluronic triblock copolymers, 1.4 mN/m for a poly(butylene oxide)-b-PEO copolymer, 0.8 mN/m for a perfluoropolyether (PEPE) ammonium carboxylate and 0.2 mN/m for PDMS{sub 24}-g-EO{sub 22}. The hydrophilic-CO{sub 2}-philic balance (HCB) of the triblock Pluronic and PDMS-g-PEO-PPO surfactants is characterized by the CO{sub 2}-to-water distribution coefficient and V-shaped plots of log {gamma} vs wt % EO. A minimum in {gamma} is observed for the optimum HCB. As the CO{sub 2}-philicity of the surfactant tail is increased, the molecular weight of the hydrophilic segment increases for an optimum HCB. The stronger interactions on both sides of the interface lead to a lower {gamma}. Consequently, more water was emulsified for the PDMS-based copolymers than either the PPO- or PBO-based copolymers.

Rocha, S.R.P. da; Harrison, K.L.; Johnston, K.P. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1999-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

394

Aquatic Botany 64 (1999) 6375 Methanogenesis and methane emissions: effects of water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, substrate type and presence of Phragmites australis Simon Grünfeld, Hans Brix Department of Plant Ecology Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud. were studied in outdoor experimental mesocosms. Water table sediments (1 versus 55 mmol m-2 per day). The presence of P. australis in inundated sediments attenuated

Brix, Hans

395

On 1 January 2006, a new U.S. drinking water standard of 10 g arsenic/L will come into effect [U.S. Environmental Protection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On 1 January 2006, a new U.S. drinking water standard of 10 µg arsenic/L will come into effect [U limit of As in drinking water from 50 µg/L to 10 µg/L because it promises to reduce the risk of an array states, where drinking water sources are most likely to exceed the 10 µg/L limit, public agencies

van Geen, Alexander

396

Essays on the Effectiveness of Environmental Conservation and Water Management Policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An awareness of the effect of agricultural production on the environment has led to the development of policies to mitigate its adverse effects. This dissertation provides analyses of agri-environmental policies designed to protect environmental...

Mezzatesta, Mariano

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

397

Effects of a modular two-step ozone-water and annealing process on silicon carbide graphene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By combining ozone and water, the effect of exposing epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide to an aggressive wet-chemical process has been evaluated after high temperature annealing in ultra high vacuum. The decomposition of ozone in water produces a number of oxidizing species, however, despite long exposure times to the aqueous-ozone environment, no graphene oxide was observed after the two-step process. The systems were comprehensively characterized before and after processing using Raman spectroscopy, core level photoemission spectroscopy, and angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy together with low energy electron diffraction, low energy electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. In spite of the chemical potential of the aqueous-ozone reaction environment, the graphene domains were largely unaffected raising the prospect of employing such simple chemical and annealing protocols to clean or prepare epitaxial graphene surfaces.

Webb, Matthew J., E-mail: matthew.webb@cantab.net; Lundstedt, Anna; Grennberg, Helena [Department of ChemistryBMC, Uppsala University, Box 576, SE-751 23 Uppsala (Sweden); Polley, Craig; Niu, Yuran; Zakharov, Alexei A.; Balasubramanian, Thiagarajan [MAX IV Laboratory, Lund University, 22100 Lund (Sweden); Dirscherl, Kai [DFMDanish Fundamental Metrology, Matematiktorvet 307, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Burwell, Gregory; Guy, Owen J. [College of Engineering, Faraday Tower, Singleton Park, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Palmgren, Pl [VG Scienta Scientific AB, Box 15120, Vallongatan 1, SE-750 15 Uppsala (Sweden); Yakimova, Rositsa [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology, Linkping University, SE-581 83 Linkping (Sweden)

2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

398

Water Quality Co-effects of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in US Agriculture Subhrendu K. Pattanayak, Bruce A. McCarl, Allan J. Sommer, Brian C. Murray, Timothy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

greenhouse gas (GHG) emission offset strategies in U.S. agriculture by linking a national level agriculturalWater Quality Co-effects of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in US Agriculture Subhrendu K. Pattanayak sector model (ASMGHG) to a national level water quality model (NWPCAM). The simulated policy scenario

McCarl, Bruce A.

399

The Analysis of Interference Effects in the Sum Frequency Spectra of Water Interfaces Mac G. Brown, Elizabeth A. Raymond, Heather C. Allen, Lawrence F. Scatena, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Analysis of Interference Effects in the Sum Frequency Spectra of Water Interfaces Mac G. Brown, Elizabeth A. Raymond, Heather C. Allen, Lawrence F. Scatena, and Geraldine L. Richmond* Department involve the surface of liquid water. Unfortunately, obtaining spectral fits to vibrational spectra

Richmond, Geraldine L.

400

Water Basins Civil Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Basins Civil Engineering Objective · Connect the study of water, water cycle, and ecosystems with engineering · Discuss how human impacts can effect our water basins, and how engineers lessen these impacts: · The basic concepts of water basins are why they are important · To use a topographic map · To delineate

Provancher, William

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water effective date" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Insights into Cold Water Injection Stimulation Effects through Analytical Solutions to Flow and Heat Transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wells in traditional hydrothermal reservoirs are used to extract heat and to dispose of cooled water. In the first case, high productivity (the ratio of production flow rate to the pressure differential required to produce that rate) to is preferred in order to maximize power generation, while minimizing the parasitic energy loss of pumping. In the second case, high injectivity (the ratio of injection flow rate to the pressure differential required to produce that rate) is preferred, in order to reduce pumping costs. In order to improve productivity or injectivity, cold water is sometimes injected into the reservoir in an attempt to cool and contract the surrounding rock matrix and thereby induce dilation and/or extension of existing fractures or to generate new fractures. Though the increases in permeability associated with these changes are likely localized, by improving connectivity to more extensive high-permeability fractures they can at least temporarily provide substantially improved productivity or injectivity.

M.A. Plummer

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

PURCHASE REQUEST FORM (Rev. 8/6/14) Vendor: Date: Date Required  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PURCHASE REQUEST FORM (Rev. 8/6/14) Shortcode Vendor: Date: Date Required: Vendor # (if known attachments/quotes from the Vendor to CEE-Purchasing@umich.edu. For Non-M-Marketsite orders only. Once

Eustice, Ryan

403

Surface Water Chemistry in White Oak Creek, North-East Texas: Effect of Land Use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

watersheds soils, leaches readily to surface waters. Manure can contribute a significant amount of phosphorus loading into adjacent streams from livestock agriculture (James et al. 2007). Contributions from dairy cattle in a watershed in southeastern... New York showed that in-stream fecal deposits from pastured cattle represented 10% of watershed phosphorus loadings (James et al. 2007). Additionally, it was found that livestock grazing along streams and riparian zones can also have adverse...

Watson, Eliza

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

404

Investigating the pore-water chemistry effects on the volume change behaviour of Boom clay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as that for the site water: 5.037 g/L for core Ess83 and 5.578 g/L for core Ess96. Mechanical loading was then carried not induce significant volume change. For Ess83, hydro-mechanical behaviour was found to be slightly-mechanical behaviour of Ess96. This can be attributed to the higher smectite content in Ess83 than in Ess96. Keywords

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

405

Zero Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PG Report Date Issued: June 2012 DOE Award : DE-FE0001466 Submitting Organization: West Virginia Water Research Institute West Virginia University PO Box 6064 Morgantown, WV...

406

Condensing Heating and Water Heating Equipment Workshop Location...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Condensing Heating and Water Heating Equipment Workshop Location: Washington Gas Light Appliance Training Facility 6801 Industrial Road Springfield, VA Date: October 9, 2014 Time:...

407

Summer Academy Scholarship Application Name: Date  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summer Academy Scholarship Application Name: Date: Address: City: State: Zip Code: Please for this scholarship? In the spirit of St. Vincent DePaul, Summer Academy scholarships are distributed based on both Date Apply online to the Summer Academy before submitting your scholarship application. You must first

Schaefer, Marcus

408

Range Creek Calibrated Dates Beta-202190  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Range Creek Calibrated Dates 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 Beta-202190 Beta-175753 Beta-175755 Beta-235067 Beta-202189 Beta-214831 Beta-202188 Beta-202191 Beta-203630 Beta-214832 Beta-175754 Beta a Carbon-14 calibrated date (95% CI) between 1000 and 1200 C.E. (Figure 5: Beta-235067). The calibrated

Provancher, William

409

Absolute Time Radiometric Dating: the source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Absolute Time Radiometric Dating: the source of the dates on the Geologic Time Scale #12 as an element changes to another element, e.g. uranium to lead. · The parent element is radioactive · Carbon-14, C14 Nitrogen-14, N14 · Uranium-235, U235 Lead-207, Pb207 · Potassium-40, K40 Argon-40, Ar40

Kammer, Thomas

410

Exact Location : Date of Accident : AM PM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SSN Cell Phone Home Phone Work Phone Exact Location : Date of Accident : AM PM Date accident treatment provided? Yes No Where Was time lost from work? Yes No If yes, how long? Could this accident have the following information as soon as it relates to your work related accident/injury/illness within 72 hours

Swaddle, John

411

Effects of Hyporheic Exchange Flows on Egg Pocket Water Temperature in Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of the Snake River hydroelectric system has affected fall chinook salmon smolts by shifting their migration timing to a period when downstream reservoir conditions are unfavorable for survival. Subsequent to the Snake River chinook salmon fall-run Evolutionary Significant Unit being listed as Threatened under the Endangered Species Act, recovery planning has included changes in hydrosystem operations to improve water temperature and flow conditions during the juvenile chinook salmon summer migration period. In light of the limited water supplies from the Dworshak reservoir for summer flow augmentation, and the associated uncertainties regarding benefits to migrating fall chinook salmon smolts, additional approaches for improved smolt survival need to be evaluated. This report describes research conducted by PNNL that evaluated relationships among river discharge, hyporheic zone characteristics, and egg pocket water temperature in Snake River fall chinook salmon spawning areas. The potential for improved survival would be gained by increasing the rate at which early life history events proceed (i.e., incubation and emergence), thereby allowing smolts to migrate through downstream reservoirs during early- to mid-summer when river conditions are more favorable for survival. PNNL implemented this research project throughout 160 km of the Hells Canyon Reach (HCR) of the Snake River. The hydrologic regime during the 2002?2003 sampling period exhibited one of the lowest, most stable daily discharge patterns of any of the previous 12 water years. The vertical hydraulic gradients (VHG) between the river and the riverbed suggested the potential for predominantly small magnitude vertical exchange. The VHG also showed little relationship to changes in river discharge at most sites. Despite the relatively small vertical hydraulic gradients at most sites, the results from the numerical modeling of riverbed pore water velocity and hyporheic zone temperatures suggested that there was significant vertical hydrologic exchange during all time periods. The combined results of temperature monitoring and numerical modeling indicate that only two sites were significantly affected by short-term (hourly to daily) large magnitude changes in discharge. Although the two sites exhibited acute flux reversals between river water and hyporheic water resulting from short-term large magnitude changes in discharge, these flux reversals had minimal effect on emergence timing estimates. Indeed, the emergence timing estimates at all sites was largely unaffected by the changes in river stage resulting from hydropower operations at Hells Canyon Dam. Our results indicate that the range of emergence timing estimates due to differences among the eggs from different females can be as large as or larger than the emergence timing estimates due to site differences (i.e., bed temperatures within and among sites). We conclude that during the 2002-2003 fall chinook salmon incubation period, hydropower operations of Hells Canyon Dam had an insignificant effect on fry emergence timing at the study sites. It appears that short-term (i.e., hourly to daily) manipulations of discharge from the Hells Canyon Complex during the incubation period would not substantially alter egg pocket incubation temperatures, and thus would not affect fry emergence timing at the study sites. However, the use of hydropower operational manipulations at the Hells Canyon Complex to accelerate egg incubation and fry emergence should not be ruled out on the basis of only one water year's worth of study. Further investigation of the incubation environment of Snake River fall chinook salmon is warranted based on the complexity of hyporheic zone characteristics and the variability of surface/subsurface interactions among dry, normal, and wet water years.

Hanrahan, Timothy P.; Geist, David R.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Abernethy, Cary S.

2004-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

412

Precipitation over South America during the Last Glacial Maximum: An analysis of the "amount effect" with a water isotope-enabled general circulation model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF THE AMOUNT EFFECT Hoffmann, G. , M. Werner, and M.A. , A. N. LeGrande, and G. Hoffmann (2007), Water isotopeare prescribed as 0.5 [Hoffmann et al. , 1998] and 1.7% [

Lee, Jung-Eun; Johnson, Kathleen; Fung, Inez

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Growth and Histological Effects to Protothaca staminea (Littleneck Clam) of Long-Term Exposure to Chlorinated Sea Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There has been considerable concern about the potential for long-term effects to marine organisms from chlorinated sea water. As part of a larger study to investigate the effects of materials resulting from seawater chlorination on marine organisms, groups of littleneck clams, Protothaca staminea, were exposed to sea water that had been chlorinated. Two experiments were conducted. In one test, groups of littleneck clams were exposed to dilutions of chlorinated sea water that had average chlorine produced oxidant (CPO) concentrations of 16 {micro}g/l or less. In the second test, groups of clams were exposed to chlorinated seawater-unchlorinated seawater mixtures that had target CPO concentrations of 0, 6, 12, 25, 50 and 100 {micro}g/l. In the first experiment, length measurements were made on all clams at approximately one-month intervals for three months. In the second test, length, weight, depth, width and edge etching were used to measure growth, and subsamples were harvested and measured at one-month intervals. In addition, clams were preserved for histological examination. The clams in the first experiment all had negative growth. In the second test, growth was inhibited under all conditions through the first four months of exposure. During the last four months, there was positive signs of growth at the 0, 6 and 12 {micro}g/l CPO test conditions. Histological examination indicates that P. staminea does not adapt well to being held in aquaria. Most clams, tram all test and control conditions, showed evidence of necrosis at one month. This condition seemed to improve with longer exposure at lower CPO concentrations but persisted at CPO concentrations of 25 {micro}g/l and higher. Other histological effects were apparent at the higher exposure concentrations as the length of exposure increased.

Gibson, C. I.; Hillman, A. E.; Wilkinson, P.; Woodruff, D. L.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

WATER QUALITY EFFECTS OF LEACHATES FROM AN IN SITU OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

34 Other Solid Waste Disposalto contain the liquid and solid wastes. Colony, for example,discuss each type of solid waste and quantify effects to the

Fox, J. P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

The effect on recovery of the injection of alternating slugs of gas and water at pressures above the bubble point  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. CONCLUSIONS, 24 6. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT. 7. APPE NDIX. 8. REFERENCES. 25 32 337530 LIST OF FIGURES AND TABLES FIGURES 1. Core Saturating and Flooding Apparatus Page 2. Physical Characteristics of Refined Oil and East Texas Crude Oil at 77'F. 3. Refined... Oil Recovery vs Pore Volumes of Injected Fluid for an Initial Gas Slug. 13 4, Refined Oil Recovery vs Pore Volumes of Injected Fluid for an Initial Water Slug. 14 5. The Effect of Slug Length on Recovery of Refined Oil. 15 6. Recovery of East...

Givens, James Wilson

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

The effect of freezing on the sulfate-chloride and density-chloride ratios of sea-water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the sulphate-chloride ratio would be expected to have a corresponi- ingly larger effect, on density than would one of the less abundant iona. CHAPTER II LITERATURE REVIEW Evidence for Sulphate Enricl ment in Ice The sulphate-chloride ratio was studied... as early as 1907 vhen Ringer performed laboratory freezing experiments vith sea-vater in which he cooled sea-water until solid salts began to freeze out. of solution. l Portions of the ice and the brine below the ice vere collected and analyzed...

Burkhalter, Albert Charles

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

The sublethal effects of the non volatile water soluble fraction of Southern Louisiana crude oil on the growth of Skeletonema costatum (Greve.) Cleve  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE SUBLETHAL EFFECTS OF THE NON VOLATILE WATER SOLUBLE FRACTION OF SOUTHERN LOUISIANA CRUDE OIL ON THE GROWTH OF Skeletonema costatum (GREVE. ) CLEVE A Thesis by SUE MYHRE SCHAUFFLER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ~I University... in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979 Major Subject: Oceanography THE SUBLETHAL EFFECTS OF THE NON VOLATILE WATER SOLUBLE FRACTION OF SOUTHERN LOUISIANA CRUDE OIL ON THE GROWTH OF Skeletonema...

Schauffler, Sue Myhre

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

A computer program to estimate the combined effect of refraction and diffraction of water waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. I %/AVE REFRACTIGN DEFINITION SKETCH yH Lb H2L 2 8 8 (5) From this can be obtained the ratio H o b H b 0 which is called the refraction coefficient, C . 17 r (6) As the wave moves into shallow water, it is also subjected to a second... 0 0 . I . 2 . 3 . 4 . 5 . 6 . 7 . 8 . 9 I. O 1. 1 1. 2 EXPERIMENTAL WAVE HEIGHT COEFFICENT FIG. 9 COMPARISON OF EXPERIMENTAL DATA WITH REDSEA PREDICTION 36 coefficiert of the incident wave. Also the predicted values in Table 2 were determined...

Worthington, Henry Wilson

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

419

Information Effects in Valuation of Electricity and Water Service Attributes Using Contingent Valuation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and duration of power outages had a highly signi?cant negative impact on WTP. Willingness to pay for water attributes has mostly been analysed in devel- oping countries, mainly in Latin America and Asia. Casey et. al. (2005) use a CVM survey in the Amazon Basin... . In addition, the electricity industry will face the challenge of signi?cantly increasing the share of renewable energy in electricity gener- ation in order to meet the EU and government?s target of generating 20 per cent of energy from renewables by 2020...

Akcura, Elcin

420

A system to test the effects of materials on the electron drift lifetime in liquid argon and observations on the effect of water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A materials test system (MTS) has been developed at FNAL to assess the suitability of materials for use in a large liquid argon time projection chamber. During development of the MTS, it was noted that controlling the cryostat pressure with a 'raining' condenser reduced the electron drift lifetime in the liquid argon. The effect of condensing has been investigated using a series of passive materials to filter the condensate. We report the results of these studies and of tests on different candidate materials for detector construction. The inferred reduction of electron drift lifetime by water concentrations in the parts per trillion is of particular interest.

Andrews, R.; Jaskierny, W.; Jostlein, H.; Kendziora, C.; Pordes, S.; Tope, T.; /Fermilab; ,

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water effective date" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The effects of water on the passive behavior of 1018 carbon steel in organic solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The passivation and breakdown behavior of 1018 carbon steel in propylene carbonate (PC) or dimethoxyethane (DME) mixtures with water and containing 0.5M LiAsF[sub 6] were studied. The behavior of the steel in the organic solvent/water mixtures was highly dependent on the organic solvent. The anodic polarization of carbon steel displayed active-passive behavior in 10--90 mole percent (m/o) PC/H[sub 2]O mixtures and a tenuous degree of stability within the passive range. The anodic polarization of carbon steel displayed no active-passive behavior in 50--90 m/o DME/H[sub 2]O mixtures and displayed active-passive behavior in 10--30 m/o DME/H[sub 2]O mixtures. The steel was stable within the passive range of these DME/H[sub 2]O solutions. The breakdown potential of the steel in DME/H[sub 2]O mixtures is more electropositive than the oxidation potential of the DME solvent at all molar ratios.

Shifler, D.A.; Kruger, J. (John Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Moran, P.J. (Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Irrigation Water Source: Effect on Soil Nutrient Dynamics and Microbial Community Composition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.7 (11.6) 205.9 (24.8) 194.9 (35.2) 189.4 (30.9) K+ 1.0 (0.8) 3.0 (2.6) 6.3 (5.0) 4.3 (1.0) Mg2+ 0.4 (0.1) 0.4 (0.1) 0.5 (0.3) 0.4 (0.1) Ca2+ 6.0 (1.7) 3.0 (0.6) 2.3 (1.1) 1.9 (0.6) NH4-N 0.07 (0.09) 0.03 (0.02) 5.6 (10... will face different water supply and demand issues (Hilaire et al., 2008). In the United States, the yearly average residential water use ranged from a low of 208.4 L?d?1 per person in the temperate mesic state of Wisconsin to a high of 784.5 L?d?1 per...

Holgate, Leon Carl

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

423

The effect of cross flow in a stratified reservoir during a water flood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF SCIENCE August 1970 Major Subject: PETROLEUM ENGINEERING THE EFFECT OF CROSS FLOW IN A STRATIFIED RESERVOIR DURING A WATERFLOOD A Thesis by GORDON EDMUND SOMMERS Approved as to style and content by: (C a'rman of Committee) (Hea of Depart nt...) (Member ) (Member) (Member) (Member) (Member) August 1970 111 ABSTRACT The Effect of Crossflow in a Stratified Reservoir During a Waterflood. (August 1970) Gordon Edmund Sommers, B. S. , Texas A@M University Directed by: Dr. Joseph S. Osoba...

Sommers, Gordon Edmund

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

The effect of cathodic protection on duplex stainless steels in sea water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report reviews the available data on the embrittlement of duplex stainless steels under cathodic protection in sea water. Much of this data has previously been unpublished. The results show that while hydrogen enters duplex alloys at typical protection potentials ({minus}1V SCE) the risk of failure is very low. The austenite phase tends to block cracks in the ferrite, and very high stresses are needed to produce fracture of the austenite or austenite-ferrite phase boundaries to enable crack propagation to occur. The smaller the grain size the more resistant duplex stainless steel is to embrittlement. The report also shows that currently used design stresses for duplex alloys are well below the stresses needed to produce failure. The service experiences with cathodically protected duplex are reviewed and the few failures explained. The report concludes that at normal protection potentials the risk of failure of duplex stainless steel due to hydrogen embrittlement is extremely low.

Francis, R.; Byrne, G.; Warburton, G.R. [Weir Materials Ltd., Manchester (United Kingdom)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

The Effect of Water Vapor on Cr Depletion in Advanced Recuperator Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Durable alloy foils are needed for gas turbine recuperators operating at 650--700 C. It has been established that water vapor in the exhaust gas causes more rapid consumption of Cr in austenitic stainless steels leading to a reduction in operating lifetime of these thin-walled components. Laboratory testing at 650--800 C of commercial and model alloys is being used to develop a better understanding of the long-term rate of Cr consumption in these environments. Results are presented for commercial alloys 709, 120 and 625. After 10,000h exposures at 650 C and 700 C in humid air, grain boundary Cr depletion was observed near the surface of all these materials. In the Fe-base alloys, 709 and 120, this depletion led to localized Fe-rich nodule formation. This information then can be used to develop low-cost alternatives to currently available candidate materials.

Pint, Bruce A [ORNL

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Orientation and alignment effects in ion-induced fragmentation of water: A triple coincidence study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technique of recoil ion momentum spectroscopy is employed to determine the complete momentum vectors for three fragment dissociation channels, [D{sub 2}O]{sup (q+2)} ? (D{sup +} + D{sup +} + O{sup q+}) with q = 1, 2, or 3 formed in collisions of isolated water molecules with 450 keV Xe{sup 9+} ions. The kinetic energy released in each of these dissociation channels is measured and angular correlations between the fragment momenta are determined. From the angular correlations of the three fragment ions with the direction of the incoming beam, a strong anisotropy in the emission of recoil fragments is reported. It is inferred that the molecular plane prefers to lie orthogonal to the incoming beam direction with certain orientations being more preferred than others and a clear signature of non-coplanar dissociation is also observed.

Rajput, Jyoti, E-mail: jyotirajput2803@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Safvan, C. P. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India)

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

427

Factors affecting water quality in Cherokee Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose was to: (1) define reservoir problems related to water quality conditions; (2) identify the probable causes of these problems; and (3) recommend procedures for achieving needed reservoir water quality improvements. This report presents the project findings to date and suggests steps for upgrading the quality of Cherokee Reservoir. Section II presents background information on the characteristics of the basin, the reservoir, and the beneficial uses of the reservoir. Section III identifies the impacts of existing reservoir water quality on uses of the reservoir for water supply, fishery resources, recreation, and waste assimilation. Section IV presents an assessment of cause-effect relationships. The factors affecting water quality addressed in Section IV are: (1) reservoir thermal stratification and hydrodynamics; (2) dissolved oxygen depletion; (3) eutrophication; (4) toxic substances; and (5) reservoir fisheries. Section V presents a preliminary evaluation of alternatives for improving the quality of Cherokee Reservoir. Section VI presents preliminary conclusions and recommendations for developing and implementing a reservoir water quality management plan. 7 references, 22 figures, 21 tables.

Iwanski, M.L.; Higgins, J.M.; Kim, B.R.; Young, R.C.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Modeled Interactive Effects of Precipitation, temperature, and [CO2] on Ecosystem Carbon and Water Dynamics in Different Climatic Zones  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interactive effects of multiple global change factors on ecosystem processes are complex. It is relatively expensive to explore those interactions in manipulative experiments. We conducted a modeling analysis to identify potentially important interactions and to stimulate hypothesis formulation for experimental research. Four models were used to quantify interactive effects of climate warming (T), altered precipitation amounts [doubled (DP) and halved (HP)] and seasonality (SP, moving precipitation in July and August to January and February to create summer drought), and elevated [CO2] (C) on net primary production (NPP), heterotrophic respiration (Rh), net ecosystem production (NEP), transpiration, and runoff.We examined those responses in seven ecosystems, including forests, grasslands, and heathlands in different climate zones. The modeling analysis showed that none of the threeway interactions among T, C, and altered precipitation was substantial for either carbon or water processes, nor consistent among the seven ecosystems. However, two-way interactive effects on NPP, Rh, and NEP were generally positive (i.e. amplification of one factor s effect by the other factor) between T and C or between T and DP. A negative interaction (i.e. depression of one factor s effect by the other factor) occurred for simulated NPP between T and HP. The interactive effects on runoff were positive between T and HP. Four pairs of two-way interactive effects on plant transpiration were positive and two pairs negative. In addition, wet sites generally had smaller relative changes in NPP, Rh, runoff, and transpiration but larger absolute changes in NEP than dry sites in response to the treatments. The modeling results suggest new hypotheses to be tested in multifactor global change experiments. Likewise, more experimental evidence is needed for the further improvement of ecosystem models in order to adequately simulate complex interactive processes.

Luo, Yiqi [University of Oklahoma; Gerten, Dieter [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Le Maire, Guerric [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Parton, William [University of Colorado, Fort Collins; Weng, Ensheng [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Zhou, Xuhuui [University of Oklahoma; Keough, Cindy [University of Colorado, Fort Collins; Beier, Claus [Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark; Ciais, Philippe [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Cramer, Wolfgang [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Dukes, Jeff [University of Massachusetts, Boston; Emmett, Bridget [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Bangor, Gwynedd, United Kingdom; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Knapp, Alan [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Linder, Sune [Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Upsalla, Sweden; Nepstad, Daniel [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Woods Hole, MA; Rustad, Lindsey [USDA Forest Service

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

SAVE THE DATE!!! The Silicon Valley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SAVE THE DATE!!! The Silicon Valley 3rd Annual Social Innovation Leadership Forum 2014 (SILF 2014 towards a better tomorrow... Register for the event today! The Social Innovation Leadership Forum (SILF

Su, Xiao

430

Oklahoma 4-H Enrollment Form Today's Date: ___________________  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- wind, electric, hydro, solar, gas, oil, coal, etc. EOklahoma 4-H Enrollment Form Today's Date: ___________________ Personal Information First Name student/child to receive direct electric/USP communications from 4-H / OCES staff for educational

Ghajar, Afshin J.

431

Version Date: July 2012 COPYRIGHT & TRADEMARKS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WEB Clock Version Date: July 2012 #12;COPYRIGHT & TRADEMARKS Copyright © 1998, 2011, Oracle and Guide WEB Clock Page iii Table of Contents WEB Clock ........................................................................................................................ 1 WEB Clock Procedure

432

MRSEC TRAVEL APPROVAL REQUEST FORM Name: __________________________________________________ Date: ____________________  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ VERY IMPORTANT: Please attach the abstract(s) for your presentation. Abstract(s) must cite that your work was supported by the NSF-MRSEC at the University of Maryland, DMR # 0520471. Departure Date

Rubloff, Gary W.

433

RESIDENTIAL BURGLARY DATE: November 25, 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESIDENTIAL BURGLARY DATE: November 25, 2014 INCIDENT / LOCATION: Residential Burglary in Vista Del 22, 2014, at approximately 11:07 pm, the UCI Police Department received a report of a residential

Rose, Michael R.

434

Water Resources Water Quality and Water Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Resources TD 603 Lecture 1: Water Quality and Water Treatment CTARA Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay 2nd November, 2011 #12;OVERVIEW Water Quality WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TRE OVERVIEW OF THE LECTURE 1. Water Distribution Schemes Hand Pump

Sohoni, Milind

435

NO. REV. NO. Systems Division DATE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-~ NO. REV. NO. EATM-15 PAGE OF ~ Systems Division DATE EASEP /PSEP Solar Panel Development Design+"'--.:L'_;;;J....;::::::..··-=·~::!!:!!!e::...._ K. Hsi #12;NO. REV. NO. EATM-15 EASEP/PSEP Solar Panel Development ~ Systems Division Design of the EASE-PSEP Solar Panel Array~PA::G:,:E:..::=l=~o:F~=2=7= DATE 20 Nov. 1968 1. 0 SUMMARY Electrical power

Rathbun, Julie A.

436

DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF COST EFFECTIVE SURFACE MOUNTED WATER TURBINES FOR RURAL ELECTRICITY PRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

model and design of hydro dynamically balanced rotor. Small-scale hydro power is the key source of serving the ever increasing demand of power requirements in the shortest time are driving forces for small/low head hydro power generation. This project intends to design and develop cost effective design

Sóbester, András

437

Zinc Treatment Effects on Corrosion Behavior of 304 Stainless Steel in High Temperature, Hydrogenated Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Trace levels of soluble zinc(II) ions (30 ppb) maintained in mildly alkaline, hydrogenated water at 260 C were found to lower the corrosion rate of austenitic stainless steel (UNS S30400) by about a factor of five, relative to a non-zinc baseline test after 10,000 hr. Characterizations of the corrosion oxide layer via grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in combination with argon ion milling and target factor analysis, confirmed the presence of two spinel oxide phases and minor amounts of recrystallized nickel. Based on the distribution of the three oxidized alloying constituents (Fe, Cr, Ni) with respect to depth and oxidation state, it was concluded that: (a) corrosion occurs in a non-selective manner, but approximately 30% of the oxidized iron is released to the water, and (b) the two spinel oxides exist as a ferrite-based outer layer (Ni{sub 0.1}Zn{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 0.3})(Fe{sub 0.95}Cr{sub 0.05}){sub 2}O{sub 4} on top of a chromite-based inner layer (Ni{sub 0.1}Zn{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.7})(Fe{sub 0.4}Cr{sub 0.6}){sub 2}O{sub 4}. These results suggest that immiscibility in the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} binary may play a role in controlling the zinc content of the outer layer. On the other hand, the lower corrosion rate caused by zinc additions is believed to be a consequence of corrosion oxide film stabilization due to the substitution reaction equilibrium: z Zn{sup 2+}(aq) + FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}(s) {approx} z Fe{sup 2+}(aq) + (Zn{sub z}Fe{sub 1-z})Cr{sub 2}O{sub 4}(s). The liquid-solid distribution coefficient for the reaction, defined by the ratio of total zinc to iron ion concentrations in solution divided by the Zn(II)/Fe(II) ratio in the solid, z/(1-z), was found to be 0.184. This interpretation is consistent with the benefits of zinc treatment being concentration dependent.

S.E. Ziemniak; M. Hanson

2001-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

438

Effect of Fuel Wobbe Number on Pollutant Emissions from Advanced Technology Residential Water Heaters: Results of Controlled Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Heaters 7.0 Glossary of Abbreviations AGA American Gas Association ANSI American National Standards

Rapp, VH

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Point-of-use water treatment and diarrhoea reduction in the emergency context: an effectiveness trial in Liberia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water storage have been shown to reduce diarrhoea in populations with poor hygiene and sanitation the provision of adequate water and sanitation can be fraught with challenges. Diarrhoea is widely considered of adequate sanitation and water supply, including both water quantity and quality, and hygiene education

Scharfstein, Daniel

440

Effects of Water Levels on Productivity of Canada Geese in the Northern Flathead Valley, 1985 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the South Fork Flathead River causes sporadic water level fluctuations along the main stem Flathead River. Changes in chronology of seasonal water level fluctuations and substantial habitat losses have occurred as a result of construction and operation of Kerr Dam, which regulates Flathead Lake. These fluctuations may impact goose populations through flooding and erosion of nesting and brood-rearing habitats, and increased susceptibility of nests and young to predation. The number, location, and success of goose nests were determined through pair surveys and nest searches. Our 1985 pair count data indicated that 95 to 143 nests may have been present. Hatching success for 1985 nests (55%) was low compared to long-term averages for the region. Predation was the predominant cause of ground nest failure (25 nests); we documented 2 nest failures due to flooding. The maximum gosling count in the study area for 1985 was 197. Six key brood-rearing areas were identified. Most (80%) sites were located in the herbaceous or pasture cover type and the riparian bench landform. Analysis of aerial photographs taken prior to construction of Kerr Dam documented the loss of 1859 acres of habitat along the north shore of Flathead Lake. Losses were attributed to inundation and to continuing erosion due to operation of Kerr Dam. Lake and river water level regimes were compared with the chronology of important periods in the nesting cycle. Low lake levels in May and early June coincide with the breed-rearing period. Mudflats are heavily used by broods, but their effect on survival must still be documented. Preliminary recommendations to protect and enhance Canada goose habitat and production are being developed.

Casey, Daniel

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water effective date" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Protonation effect on the electronic properties of 2-pyridone monomer, dimer and its water clusters: A theoretical study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CC2 (second order approximate coupled cluster method) has been applied to investigate protonation effect on electronic transition energies of 2-pyridone (2PY), 2-pyridone dimer, and micro-solvated 2-pyridone (0-2 water molecules). The PE profiles of protonated 2-pyridone (2PYH{sup +}) as well as monohydrated 2PYH{sup +} at the different electronic states have been investigated. The {sup 1}??* state in protonated species (2PYH{sup +}) is a barrier free and dissociative state along the O-H stretching coordinate. In this reaction coordinate, the lowest lying {sup 1}??* predissociates the bound S{sub 1}({sup 1}??*) state, connecting the latter to a conical intersection with the S{sub 0} state. These conical intersections lead the {sup 1}??* state to proceed as predissociative state and finally direct the excited system to the ground state. Furthermore, in presence of water molecule, the {sup 1}??* state still remains dissociative but the conical intersection between {sup 1}??* and ground state disappears. In addition, according to the CC2 calculation results, it has been predicted that protonation significantly blue shifts the S{sub 1}-S{sub 0} electronic transition of monomer, dimer, and microhydrated 2-pyridone.

Saed, Behnaz [Department of Chemistry, University of Isfahan, 81746-73441 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Isfahan, 81746-73441 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Omidyan, Reza, E-mail: r.omidyan@sci.ui.ac.ir, E-mail: reza.omidyan@u-psud.fr [Department of Chemistry, University of Isfahan, 81746-73441 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of) [Department of Chemistry, University of Isfahan, 81746-73441 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Centre Laser de lUniversit Paris Sud (LUMAT, FR, 2764), Bt. 106, Univ. Paris-Sud 11, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

442

2014 NEJC Save the Date (Spanish) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2014 NEJC Save the Date (Spanish) 2014 NEJC Save the Date (Spanish) 2014 National Environmental Justice Conference and Training Program Save the Date, March 26 to 28, 2014 Save the...

443

2014 NEJC Save the Date (English) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4 NEJC Save the Date (English) 2014 NEJC Save the Date (English) 2014 National Environmental Justice Conference and Training Program Save the Date, March 26 to 28, 2014 Save the...

444

Chronological information and uncertainty Radiocarbon dating & calibration -Paula Reimer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

naked body'. Robert Boyle 1663 Includes ­ Thermoluminescence (TL), Optically stimulated luminescenceSUPRA-net: Chronological information and uncertainty Radiocarbon dating & calibration - Paula Tephrochronology ­ David Lowe U series dating ­ David Richards* Combining multiple dating techniques ­ Andrew

Sengun, Mehmet Haluk

445

Effects of Ce, Y and Mo Addition on the Stress Accelerated Oxidation of Austenitic Stainless Steel in Oxygenated High Temperature Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based upon the recent progress in mechanistic understanding of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of austenitic stainless steels in high temperature water in light water reactor (LWR), the effects of Ce, Y, and Mo addition on oxidation kinetics under a tensile stress condition was investigated. Minor impurity of P was also studied. A kind of circumferentially notched tensile specimen was prepared to simulate the crack tip stress field. The notched specimens of different materials studied were applied with an almost constant load in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) water. The oxidation was examined by the specimen cross section. It was shown that these elements have quite clear effects on the metal oxidation and alloying element distribution in the oxide layer. (authors)

Shengchun Wang; Nobuaki Kawaguchi; Tetsuo Shoji [Fracture Research Institute, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Aramaki Aoba 01, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

wastewater_sink_disposal_guidance.docx Revision Date: 10/26/2012 Page 1 of 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wastewater_sink_disposal_guidance.docx Revision Date: 10/26/2012 Page 1 of 3 LABORATORY & BUILDING limitations and prohibitions established by the local wastewater treatment authority, the Massachusetts Water for wastewater disposal purposes is strictly prohibited. Hazardous Wastes: Hazardous wastes are prohibited from

Heller, Eric

447

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, effectiveness of best management practices and trends in water quality. SCOPE This report is for continued water Bridge site is a full storm-water sampling station with auto- sampler and data sonde. The Portland site. Garret Bridge site. 2 #12;Figure 2 Portland site. METHODS The Garrett Bridge site is a full storm-water

Soerens, Thomas

448

Effects of land disposal of municipal sewage sludge on soil, streambed sediment, and ground- and surface-water quality at a site near Denver, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report describes the effects of burial and land application of municipal sewage sludge on soil and streambed sediment and water quality in the underlying aquifers and surface water within and around the Lowry sewage-sludge-disposal area. The existing ground-water observation-well network at the disposal area was expanded for the study. Surface-water-sampling sites were selected so that runoff could be sampled from intense rainstorms or snowmelt. The sampling frequency for ground-water and surface-water runoff was changed from yearly to quarterly, and soil samples were collected. Four years of data were collected from 1984 to 1987 during the expanded monitoring program at the Lowry sewage-sludge-disposal area. These data, in addition to the data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey from 1981 to 1983, were used to determine effects of sewage-sludge-disposal on soil and streambed sediment and surface- and ground-water quality at the disposal area.

Gaggiani, N.G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Montana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the potential to release significant levels of acidity, heavy metals, and toxic oxyanions (As) to groundwater Information Category Data Title Influence of Organic Mine Reclamation Amendments on Metal Mobility and Water Pollution Potential Project Number C-01 Start Date 09/01/1998 End Date 09/30/2000 Research Category Water

450

Kentucky Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Number C-04 Start Date 07/01/1997 End Date 06/30/1999 Research Category Water Quality Focus Category #1 Methods Focus Category #2 Water Quality Focus Category #3 Toxic Substances Lead Institution University column), and the blood plasma surrogate (growth media) maintained on the basolateral side (facing blood

451

Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a New Technology for Extraction of Insoluble Impurities from Nuclear Power Plant Steam Generators with Purge Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental technology for the removal of insoluble impurities from a horizontal steam generator with purge water during planned shutdowns of the power generating unit is improved through a more representative determination of the concentration of impurities in the purge water ahead of the water cleanup facility and a more precise effective time for the duration of the purge process. Tests with the improved technique at power generating unit No. 1 of the Rostov Nuclear Power Plant show that the efficiency with which insoluble impurities are removed from the steam generator volume was more than two orders of magnitude greater than under the standard regulations.

Bud'ko, I. O. [JSC NIITsE 'Tsentrenergo' (Russian Federation)] [JSC NIITsE 'Tsentrenergo' (Russian Federation); Zhukov, A. G. [Rostov Nuclear Power Plant (Russian Federation)] [Rostov Nuclear Power Plant (Russian Federation)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

452

Radionuclide Sensors for Water Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radionuclide contamination in the soil and groundwater at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites is a severe problem that requires monitoring and remediation. Radionuclide measurement techniques are needed to monitor surface waters, groundwater, and process waters. Typically, water samples are collected and transported to an analytical laboratory, where costly radiochemical analyses are performed. To date, there has been very little development of selective radionuclide sensors for alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides such as 90Sr, 99Tc, and various actinides of interest. The objective of this project is to investigate novel sensor concepts and materials for sensitive and selective determination of beta- and alpha-emitting radionuclide contaminants in water. To meet the requirements for low-level, isotope-specific detection, the proposed sensors are based on radiometric detection. As a means to address the fundamental challenge of the short ranges of beta and alpha particles in water, our overall approach is based on localization of preconcentration/separation chemistries directly on or within the active area of a radioactivity detector. Automated microfluidics is used for sample manipulation and sensor regeneration or renewal. The outcome of these investigations will be the knowledge necessary to choose appropriate chemistries for selective preconcentration of radionuclides from environmental samples, new materials that combine chemical selectivity with scintillating properties, new materials that add chemical selectivity to solid-state diode detectors, new preconcentrating column sensors, and improved instrumentation and signal processing for selective radionuclide sensors. New knowledge will provide the basis for designing effective probes and instrumentation for field and in situ measurements.

Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.; DeVol, Timothy A.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Radionuclide Sensors for Water Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radionuclide contamination in the soil and groundwater at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites is a severe problem that requires monitoring and remediation. Radionuclide measurement techniques are needed to monitor surface waters, groundwater, and process waters. Typically, water samples are collected and transported to an analytical laboratory, where costly radiochemical analyses are performed. To date, there has been very little development of selective radionuclide sensors for alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides such as 90Sr, 99Tc, and various actinides of interest. The objective of this project is to investigate novel sensor concepts and materials for sensitive and selective determination of beta- and alpha-emitting radionuclide contaminants in water. To meet the requirements for low-level, isotope-specific detection, the proposed sensors are based on radiometric detection. As a means to address the fundamental challenge of the short ranges of beta and alpha particle s in water, our overall approach is based on localization of preconcentration/separation chemistries directly on or within the active area of a radioactivity detector. Automated microfluidics is used for sample manipulation and sensor regeneration or renewal. The outcome of these investigations will be the knowledge necessary to choose appropriate chemistries for selective preconcentration of radionuclides from environmental samples, new materials that combine chemical selectivity with scintillating properties, new materials that add chemical selectivity to solid-state diode detectors, new preconcentrating column sensors, and improved instrumentation and signal processing for selective radionuclide sensors. New knowledge will provide the basis for designing effective probes and instrumentation for field and in situ measurements.

Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.; DeVol, Timothy A.

2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

454

NEMA Lighting, CCE Overview and Update presentation, dated 05...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Equipment-- AHRI Annual Meeting CCE Overview and Update Presenation, dated April 13, 2011 NEMA Distribution Transformers, CCE Overview and Update presentation, dated 05242011...

455

SAVE THE DATE - 2015 National Environmental Justice Conference...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EJ Save the Date More Documents & Publications 2014 NEJC Save the Date (English) ITP Aluminum: Technical Working Group on Inert Anode Technologies Leadership Transition Program...

456

Scientists ignite aluminum water mix  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

an atom of one of the reactants (water) is substituted with its isotope (deuterium, or "heavy water") and the two reactions are compared for differences. This effect is...

457

UNDERSTANDING THE EFFECT OF DYNAMIC FEED CONDITIONS ON WATER RECOVERY FROM IC ENGINE EXHAUST BY CAPILLARY CONDENSATION WITH INORGANIC MEMBRANES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An inorganic membrane water recovery concept is evaluated as a method to recovering water from the exhaust of an internal combustion engine. Integrating the system on-board a vehicle would create a self-sustaining water supply that would make engine water injection technologies consumer transparent . In laboratory experiments, water recovery from humidified air was measured to evaluate how different operating parameters affect the membrane system s efficiency. The observed impact of transmembrane pressure and gas flow rate suggest that gas residence time is more important than water flux through the membrane. Heat transfer modeling suggests that increasing membrane length can be used to improve efficiency and allow greater flow per membrane, an important parameter for practical applications where space is limited. The membrane water recovery concept was also experimentally validated by extracting water from diesel exhaust coming from a stationary generator. The insight afforded by these studies provides a basis for developing improved membrane designs that balance both efficiency and cost.

DeBusk, Melanie Moses [ORNL] [ORNL; Bischoff, Brian L [ORNL] [ORNL; Hunter, James A [ORNL] [ORNL; Klett, James William [ORNL] [ORNL; Nafziger, Eric J [ORNL] [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Extended-burnup LWR (light-water reactor) fuel: The amount, characteristics, and potential effects on interim storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of a study on extended-burnup, light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel are described in this report. The study was performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of the study was to collect and evaluate information on the status of in-reactor performance and integrity of extended-burnup LWR fuel and initiate the investigation of the effects of extending fuel burnup on the subsequent handling, interim storage, and other operations (e.g., rod consolidation and shipping) associated with the back end of the fuel cycle. The results of this study will aid DOE and the nuclear industry in assessing the effects on waste management of extending the useful in-reactor life of nuclear fuel. The experience base with extended-burnup fuel is now substantial and projections for future use of extended-burnup fuel in domestic LWRs are positive. The basic performance and integrity of the fuel in the reactor has not been compromised by extending the burnup, and the potential limitations for further extending the burnup are not severe. 104 refs., 15 tabs.

Bailey, W.J.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Computational Age Dating of Special Nuclear Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This slide-show presented an overview of the Constrained Progressive Reversal (CPR) method for computing decays, age dating, and spoof detecting. The CPR method is: Capable of temporal profiling a SNM sample; Precise (compared with known decay code, such a ORIGEN); Easy (for computer implementation and analysis). ? We have illustrated with real SNM data using CPR for age dating and spoof detection. If SNM is pure, may use CPR to derive its age. If SNM is mixed, CPR will indicate that it is mixed or spoofed.

None

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

460

The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com Analysis of the effect of aluminum in drinking water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of aluminum in drinking water and transferrin C2 allele on Alzheimer's disease. a Virginie Rondeau, b Albert.Rondeau@isped.u-bordeaux2.fr Key words: aluminum, drinking water, transferrin, apolipoprotein E, Alzheimer's disease Word of a link between aluminum in drinking water and Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been supported by several

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water effective date" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Drinking Water Problems: Perchlorate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Perchlorate is a potential contaminate of well water that can have harmful effects on human health. Methods of removing perchlorate from water are described and illustrated. There is information to help well owners select and maintain treatment...

Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Porter, Dana; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2005-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

462

An Innovative System for the Efficient and Effective Treatment of Non-Traditional Waters for Reuse in Thermoelectric Power Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study assessed opportunities for improving water quality associated with coal-fired power generation including the use of non-traditional waters for cooling, innovative technology for recovering and reusing water within power plants, novel approaches for the removal of trace inorganic compounds from ash pond effluents, and novel approaches for removing biocides from cooling tower blowdown. This research evaluated specifically designed pilot-scale constructed wetland systems for treatment of targeted constituents in non-traditional waters for reuse in thermoelectric power generation and other purposes. The overall objective of this project was to decrease targeted constituents in non-traditional waters to achieve reuse criteria or discharge limitations established by the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and Clean Water Act (CWA). The six original project objectives were completed, and results are presented in this final technical report. These objectives included identification of targeted constituents for treatment in four non-traditional water sources, determination of reuse or discharge criteria for treatment, design of constructed wetland treatment systems for these non-traditional waters, and measurement of treatment of targeted constituents in non-traditional waters, as well as determination of the suitability of the treated non-traditional waters for reuse or discharge to receiving aquatic systems. The four non-traditional waters used to accomplish these objectives were ash basin water, cooling water, flue gas desulfurization (FGD) water, and produced water. The contaminants of concern identified in ash basin waters were arsenic, chromium, copper, mercury, selenium, and zinc. Contaminants of concern in cooling waters included free oxidants (chlorine, bromine, and peroxides), copper, lead, zinc, pH, and total dissolved solids. FGD waters contained contaminants of concern including arsenic, boron, chlorides, selenium, mercury, chemical oxygen demand (COD), and zinc. Similar to FGD waters, produced waters contained contaminants of concern that are predominantly inorganic (arsenic, cadmium, chlorides, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, sulfide, zinc, total dissolved solids), but also contained some organics (benzene, PAHs, toluene, total organic carbon, total suspended solids, and oil and grease). Constituents of concern that may cause chemical scaling, biofouling and corrosion, such as pH, hardness and ionic strength, and nutrients (P, K, and N) may also be found in all four non-traditional waters. NPDES permits were obtained for these non-traditional waters and these permit limits are summarized in tabular format within this report. These limits were used to establish treatment goals for this research along with toxicity values for Ceriodaphnia dubia, water quality criteria established by the US EPA, irrigation standards established by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), and reuse standards focused on minimization of damage to the power plant by treated waters. Constructed wetland treatment systems were designed for each non-traditional water source based on published literature reviews regarding remediation of the constituents of concern, biogeochemistry of the specific contaminants, and previous research. During this study, 4 non-traditional waters, which included ash basin water, cooling water, FGD water and produced water (PW) were obtained or simulated to measure constructed wetland treatment system performance. Based on data collected from FGD experiments, pilot-scale constructed wetland treatment systems can decrease aqueous concentrations of elements of concern (As, B, Hg, N, and Se). Percent removal was specific for each element, including ranges of 40.1% to 77.7% for As, 77.6% to 97.8% for Hg, 43.9% to 88.8% for N, and no measureable removal to 84.6% for Se. Other constituents of interest in final outflow samples should have aqueous characteristics sufficient for discharge, with the exception of chlorides (<2000 mg/L). Based on total dissolved solids, co-

John Rodgers; James Castle

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

463

Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program on irradiation effects in light-water reactor pressure vessel materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The safety of commercial light-water nuclear plants is highly dependent on the structural integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). In the absence of radiation damage to the RPV, fracture of the vessel is difficult to postulate. Exposure to high energy neutrons can result in embrittlement of radiation-sensitive RPV materials. The Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), is assessing the effects of neutron irradiation on RPV material behavior, especially fracture toughness. The results of these and other studies are used by the USNRC in the evaluation of RPV integrity and regulation of overall nuclear plant safety. In assessing the effects of irradiation, prototypic RPV materials are characterized in the unirradiated condition and exposed to radiation under varying conditions. Mechanical property tests are conducted to provide data which can be used in the development of guidelines for structural integrity evaluations, while metallurgical examinations and mechanistic modeling are performed to improve understanding of the mechanisms responsible for embrittlement. The results of these investigations, in conjunction with results from commercial reactor surveillance programs, are used to develop a methodology for the prediction of radiation effects on RPV materials. This irradiation-induced degradation of the materials can be mitigated by thermal annealing, i.e., heating the RPV to a temperature above that of normal operation. Thus, thermal annealing and evaluation of reirradiation behavior are major tasks of the HSSI Program. This paper describes the HSSI Program activities by summarizing some past and recent results, as well as current and planned studies. 30 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

Nanstad, R.K.; Corwin, W.R.; Alexander, D.J.; Haggag, F.M.; Iskander, S.K.; McCabe, D.E.; Sokolov, M.A.; Stoller, R.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Water-heating dehumidifier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A water-heating dehumidifier includes a refrigerant loop including a compressor, at least one condenser, an expansion device and an evaporator including an evaporator fan. The condenser includes a water inlet and a water outlet for flowing water therethrough or proximate thereto, or is affixed to the tank or immersed into the tank to effect water heating without flowing water. The immersed condenser design includes a self-insulated capillary tube expansion device for simplicity and high efficiency. In a water heating mode air is drawn by the evaporator fan across the evaporator to produce cooled and dehumidified air and heat taken from the air is absorbed by the refrigerant at the evaporator and is pumped to the condenser, where water is heated. When the tank of water heater is full of hot water or a humidistat set point is reached, the water-heating dehumidifier can switch to run as a dehumidifier.

Tomlinson, John J. (Knoxville, TN)

2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

465

Date of Birth Declaration Office of the Registrar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that shows your birth date. (Examples: Driver's License, Birth Certificate, Passport, court or other legalDate of Birth Declaration Office of the Registrar http://registrar.wisc.edu OFFICE USE ONLY Date Date of Birth Month: Day: Year: By my signature, I hereby claim that my correct day of birth

Yavuz, Deniz

466

Radiocarbon dating of ancient rock paintings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents progress made on a technique for {sup 14}C dating pictographs. A low-temperature oxygen plasma is used coupled with high-vacuum technologies to selectively remove C-containing material in the paints without contamination from inorganic carbon from rock substrates or accretions.

Ilger, W.A.; Hyman, M.; Rowe, M.W. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Southon, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1995-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

467

Date: April 1, 2013 Citizenship: Israel, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Haifa, Israel Marital status: Married, four daughters, four grandchildren Web site: http://iew3.technion.Sc. Industrial Engineering and Management Faculty of Industrial Engineering and Management Technion, IIT, Haifa Laboratory, Technion, IIT, Haifa, Israel. 2009 - date Visiting Professor, Engineering Systems Division

Levit, Anna

468

CURRICULUM VITAE DATE PREPARED: September 5, 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CURRICULUM VITAE DATE PREPARED: September 5, 2007 PART I: General Information Education 2000- Organization for Human Brain Mapping (OHBM), Member HMS Curriculum Vitae Page 1 of 14 #12;2005- Society for Neuroscience (SFN), Member HMS Curriculum Vitae Page 2 of 14 #12;Part II: Research, Teaching

Boas, David

469

Proposed Start Date: Title of Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposed Start Date: Title of Project: 1 Department:Principal Investigator(s): 1. College: Phone/ Email: 5 6 7 8 Does project involve: Human subjects? No Yes VertebrateAnimals? No Yes Radioactive understand and agree to comply with the URI policies and procedures for misconduct, conflict of interest

Rhode Island, University of

470

SAVE THE DATE! Saskatchewan Epidemiology Association  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SAVE THE DATE! Saskatchewan Epidemiology Association Annual Fall Symposium & Workshop November 9 look forward to presentations by: Saskatchewan's Chief Medical Health Officer, Dr. Moira Mc of Regina ­ expert in climate change on the prairies Saskatchewan-based veterinarian ­ name to be announced

Saskatchewan, University of

471

DATE: AUGUST 10, 2011 UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DATE: AUGUST 10, 2011 UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA FACULTY CURRICULUM VITAE NAME BRUNT JOHN HOWARD TO APPOINTMENT AT UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA 2004-2007 Vice-President (Academic and Provost), University of Northern British Columbia 1999-2004 Associate Vice-President Research, University of Victoria 1997-2004 Professor

Herwig, Falk

472

Date: --20 1. Name (BLOCK LETTERS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Date: - - 20 1. Name (BLOCK LETTERS) : 2. E-Mail ID : 3. Contact Number : +91_____________________ 4. Unit: Eco. & PLANNING STAT-MATH SQC & OR 5. Category you belong : Faculty Visiting Scientist Research Scholar (JRF/SRF/SDP) Student M. Stat MSQE Technical Staff (JTA/STA) Project Staff 6. Duration

Bandyopadhyay, Antar

473

Queen's University Environmental Health & Safety Date Issued  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Queen's University Environmental Health & Safety Date Issued: November 27, 2013 Page No.: 1: The Department of Environmental Health & Safety 1.0 Introduction Queen's University acknowledges that the use of the Aboriginal culture and heritage. This standard operating procedure outlines the University's guidelines

Graham, Nick

474

AMS Internship Program Student Application Date: ______________________  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AMS Internship Program ­ Student Application Date: ______________________ Full Name: Student Number the following questions in as much detail as possible. Applications [form +resume] for summer internships are due March 4th 1) Why are you interested in the Internship Program? What do you expect to gain from

Pulfrey, David L.

475

SPRU Wednesday Seminar Date 3 July 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's electricity sector has to date been inextricably bound up with its dependence on abundant coal resources. This is taking place alongside a reconfiguration of stakeholders traditional to the country's coal, the country's second largest coal producer and the largest black owned company on the Johannesburg Stock

Sussex, University of

476

2011 TRAINING DATES January 10-12  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2011 TRAINING DATES January 10-12 March 1-3 April 11-13 June 7-9 July 26-28 September 6-8 November: Tools and Functionality Professional Development Training Course OVERVIEW ArcGIS Desktop II: Tools come- first serve basis. · The workshop registration cost is $650. Payment is due prior to the training

477

Cooperating for Cleaner Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to date. TCEQ contracted with James Miertschin & Associates to develop the Leon River TMDL. The company is using a water quality model to mimic the hydrologic conditions on the impaired segment of the river. The Leon River Bacteria TMDL Advisory Group... water quality data during run-off events. Niemann said the TMDL report should be finalized by August 2006. After the TMDL is reviewed internal- ly and a public meeting held, then the TCEQ com- missioners and EPA will examine it for approval. Once...

Wythe, Kathy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Effective Date: September 1, 2013 AGENDA ITEM NO.: 5.I. MEETING DATE: 08/19/2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of its RPS Procurement Plan. 3. FREQUENCY OF REVIEW Annually, the AMP General Manager shall cause AMP Procurement Plan shall include annual progress reviews and compliance period reviews, plus the timely filing of RPS compliance reports to the CEC pursuant to SB X1 2 and the RPS Regulations. A. Annual Reviews

479

The effects of sulfate fertilization and high levels of sulfate and salt drinking water on the growth and mineral status of ruminants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Three experiments were conducted to determine the effects of sulfate (SO??) in forage and drinking water on the performance and mineral status of cattle and sheep. In Experiment 1, forty-eight late gestation crossbred cows were grazed on twelve 10...

Xie, Kehe

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute, New Mexico State University http://wrri.nmsu.edu Predicting Land Use Change and its Effect on Nonpoint  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute, New Mexico State University http://wrri.nmsu.edu Predicting Land Use Change and its Effect on Nonpoint Source Pollution Jennifer Thacher, and Janie Chermak, Department of Economics, University of New Mexico Project descriptors: Risk aversion, non-point source

Johnson, Eric E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water effective date" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Interaction of wide-band-gap single crystals with 248-nm excimer laser radiation. XI. The effect of water vapor and temperature on laser desorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Significantly, introducing water vapor lowers the particle velocities and thus the effective surface temperature systems, simultaneous electronic excitation and exposure to aggressive chemicals can acceler- ate etching-induced neutral particle desorption and surface erosion on single- crystal sodium chloride in the presence of low

Dickinson, J. Thomas

482

Hydrologic and Vegetation Effects on Water Column Phosphorus in Wetland Mesocosms J. R. White,* K. R. Reddy, and J. Majer-Newman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrologic and Vegetation Effects on Water Column Phosphorus in Wetland Mesocosms J. R. White,* K. The restoration plan for the Everglades includes construction of large stormwater treatment areas (STAs) decreased by 49% for the SAV treatments compared with 41% for the EAV treatments, irrespective of hydrology

Florida, University of

483

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual effective dose Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dose Calculations For The Annual Environmental Surveillance Report Effective Date: 7112008 Next... ;Procedure No : SOP-5203 Revision: 0 Effective Date: 7112008...

484

Experimental Investigation of the Root Cause Mechanism and Effectiveness of Mitigating Actions for Axial Offset Anomaly in Pressurized Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Axial offset anomaly (AOA) in pressurized water reactors refers to the presence of a significantly larger measured negative axial offset deviation than predicted by core design calculations. The neutron flux depression in the upper half of high-power rods experiencing significant subcooled boiling is believed to be caused by the concentration of boron species within the crud layer formed on the cladding surface. Recent investigations of the root-cause mechanism for AOA [1,2] suggest that boron build-up on the fuel is caused by precipitation of lithium metaborate (LiBO2) within the crud in regions of subcooled boiling. Indirect evidence in support of this hypothesis was inferred from operating experience at Callaway, where lithium return and hide-out were, respectively, observed following power reductions and power increases when AOA was present. However, direct evidence of lithium metaborate precipitation within the crud has, heretofore, not been shown because of its retrograde solubility. To this end, this investigation has been undertaken in order to directly verify or refute the proposed root-cause mechanism of AOA, and examine the effectiveness of possible mitigating actions to limit its impact in high power PWR cores.

Said Abdel-Khalik

2005-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

485

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING . . . July 1973 The final report of the National Water Commission entitled Water Policies for the Future has been issued. Because its con- cluslons -a-rid -re-commend-atlOnsmay have far-reaching effects on water

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

486

Final Report - Effects of High Spinel and Chromium Oxide Crystal Contents on Simulated HLW Vitrification in DM100 Melter Tests, VSL-09R1520-1, Rev. 0, dated 6/22/09  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objective of the work was to evaluate the effects of spinel and chromium oxide particles on WTP HLW melter operations and potential impacts on melter life. This was accomplished through a combination of crucible-scale tests, settling and rheological tests, and tests on the DM100 melter system. Crucible testing was designed to develop and identify HLW glass compositions with high waste loadings that exhibit formation of crystalline spinel and/or chromium oxide phases up to relatively high crystal contents (i.e., > 1 vol%). Characterization of crystal settling and the effects on melt rheology was performed on the HLW glass formulations. Appropriate candidate HLW glass formulations were selected, based on characterization results, to support subsequent melter tests. In the present work, crucible melts were formulated that exhibit up to about 4.4 vol% crystallization.

Kruger, Albert A.; Matlack, K. S.; Kot, W.; Pegg, I. L.; Chaudhuri, M.; Lutze, W.

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

487

Isolating Effects of Water Table Dynamics, Terrain, and Soil Moisture Heterogeneity on the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Using Coupled Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

depth (PBLD), (b) vertical wind speed (w), (c) latent heatdepth (PBLD), (b) vertical wind speed (w), (c) latent heatdepth (PBLD) and (b) vertical wind speed (w) versus water

Rihani, Jehan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Coagulation chemistries for silica removal from cooling tower water.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The formation of silica scale is a problem for thermoelectric power generating facilities, and this study investigated the potential for removal of silica by means of chemical coagulation from source water before it is subjected to mineral concentration in cooling towers. In Phase I, a screening of many typical as well as novel coagulants was carried out using concentrated cooling tower water, with and without flocculation aids, at concentrations typical for water purification with limited results. In Phase II, it was decided that treatment of source or make up water was more appropriate, and that higher dosing with coagulants delivered promising results. In fact, the less exotic coagulants proved to be more efficacious for reasons not yet fully determined. Some analysis was made of the molecular nature of the precipitated floc, which may aid in process improvements. In Phase III, more detailed study of process conditions for aluminum chloride coagulation was undertaken. Lime-soda water softening and the precipitation of magnesium hydroxide were shown to be too limited in terms of effectiveness, speed, and energy consumption to be considered further for the present application. In Phase IV, sodium aluminate emerged as an effective coagulant for silica, and the most attractive of those tested to date because of its availability, ease of use, and low requirement for additional chemicals. Some process optimization was performed for coagulant concentration and operational pH. It is concluded that silica coagulation with simple aluminum-based agents is effective, simple, and compatible with other industrial processes.

Nyman, May Devan; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Stewart, Tom

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

A Probabilistic Water Resources Assessment of the Paradise Creek Watershed Presented in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Probabilistic Water Resources Assessment of the Paradise Creek Watershed A Thesis Presented Probabilistic Water Resources Assessment of the Paradise Creek Watershed," has been reviewed in final form ____________________________________Date____________ Margrit von Braun #12;iii iii A Probabilistic Water Resources Assessment

Fiedler, Fritz R.

490

The effects of proposed water development by AWDI on Great Sand Dunes National Monument and the San Luis Valley in southern Colorado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Management Zoning Map . Figure 2. Map of thc San Luis Valley . 11 Figurc 3. Depth to Water in thc San Luis Valley Figurc 4. Anridunc Washout and Bore Formation . 16 21 Figure 5. Confined and Unconfined Aquifers in the San Luis VaUey . . Figure 6...THE EFFECTS OF PROPOSED WATER DEVELOPMENT BY AWDI ON GREAT SAND DUNES NATIONAL MONUMENT AND THE SAN LUIS VALLEY IN SOUTHERN COLORADO A PROFESSIONAL PAPER by RICHARD THOMAS RAINES Submitted to thc College of Agriculture of Texas Agr...

Raines, Richard Thomas

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Effects of Electron Trapping and Protonation on the Efficiency of Water-Splitting Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy in fuels is a key challenge for solar energy research. Water-splitting dye- sensitized light illumination. In these cells, a mesoporous anatase TiO2 anode is sensitized with a dye and a water- sensitized solar cells. In nanocrystalline TiO2 films, trap states are thought to be the related

492

Effects of storage temperature and duration on release of antimony and bisphenol A from polyethylene terephthalate drinking water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

polyethylene terephthalate drinking water bottles of China Ying-Ying Fan a , Jian-Lun Zheng a , Jing-Hua Ren Accepted 9 May 2014 Available online xxx Keywords: Polyethylene terephthalate Antimony Bisphenol A Release of antimony (Sb) and bisphenol A (BPA) from 16 brands of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) drinking water

Ma, Lena

493

Effects of draw solutions and membrane conditions on electricity generation and water flux in osmotic microbial fuel cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

membrane processes such as microfil- tration, ultrafiltration, nanofiltration, and reverse osmosis con. Such a water movement does not require external energy input like that in reverse osmosis; thus, FO is a low Keywords: Forward osmosis Osmotic microbial fuel cell Wastewater treatment Water flux Draw solution a b

494

Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Investigation of Water in Supercritical CO2 and the Effect of CaCl2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy was applied to investigate the dissolution and chemical interaction of water dissolved into supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and the influence of CaCl2 in the co-existing aqueous phase at fo empe e : 40 50 75 nd 100 C at 90 atm. Consistent with the trend of the vapor pressure of water, the solubility of pure water in scCO2 inc e ed f om 40 ?C (0.32 mole%) o 100 ?C (1.61 mole%). The presence of CaCl2 negatively affects the solubility of water in scCO2: at a given temperature and pressure the solubility of water decreased as the concentration of CaCl2 in the aqueous phase increased, following the trend of the activity of water. A 40 ?C, the water concentration in scCO2 in contact with saturated CaCl2 aqueous solution was only 0.16 mole%, a drop of more than 50% as compared to pure water while that a 100 ?C was 1.12 mole%, a drop of over 30% as compared to pure water, under otherwise the same conditions. Analysis of the spectral profiles suggested that water dissolved into scCO2 exists in the monomeric form under the evaluated temperature and pressure conditions, for both neat water and CaCl2 solutions. However, its rotational degrees of freedom decrease at lower temperatures due to higher fluid densities, leading to formation of weak H2O:CO2 Lewis acid-base complexes. Similarly, the nearly invariant spectral profiles of dissolved water in the presence and absence of saturated CaCl2 under the same experimental conditions was taken as evidence that CaCl2 dissolution in scCO2 was limited as the dissolved Ca2+/CaCl2 would likely be highly hydrated and would alter the overall spectra of waters in the scCO2 phase.

Wang, Zheming; Felmy, Andrew R.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Loring, John S.; Joly, Alan G.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Dixon, David A.

2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

495

Water Quality  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface...

496

An Analysis of the Effects of Sociodemographic Factors on Daily Per Capita Residential Water Use in Texas Cities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consideration of numerous factors including hydrologic and physiographic factors, engineering feasibility and economic feasibility. At the same time, it is increasingly evident that water needs are closely tied to population growth and to the social, economic...

Murdock, Steve H.; Albrecht, Don E.; Hamm, Rita R.; Bachman, Kenneth; Parpia, Banoo

497

Effect of Forest Site Preparation and Livestock Grazing on Stormflow and Water Quality in the South East  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Texas. However, little is known about the influence of intensive forest practices or livestock grazing on water quality, yield or site productivity in Texas. This is the only instrumented watershed study in Texas or Louisiana that is currently evaluating...

Hunter, T. K.; Blackburn, W. H.; Weichert, A. T.; Dobrowolski, J. P.

498

Effects of liquid pore water on acoustic wave propagation in snow as a Biot-type porous material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A method to estimate phase velocity and attenuation of acoustic waves in the presence of liquid water in a snowpack is presented. The method is based on Biot's theory of wave propagation in porous materials. Empirical relations and a priori information is used to characterize snow as a porous material as a function of porosity. Plane wave theory and an equivalent pore fluid are used to solve Biot's differential equations and to asses the impact of the air and water in the pore space. The liquid water in the pore space of a snow pack reduces the velocity of the first compressional wave by roughly 300 m/s for every 0.1 increase in liquid water saturation. Also the attenuation of the compressional waves is increased with increasing liquid water content. Two end member models for compaction are evaluated to asses the importance of an independent density measurement for an estimate of liquid pore water saturation in snow with acoustic waves. The two end members correspond to no compaction at all and to a melting s...

Sidler, Rolf

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Immobilization of U(VI) from Oxic Groundwater by Hanford 300 Area Sediments and Effects of Columbia River Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regions within the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford 300 Area (300 A) site experience periodic hydrologic influences from the nearby Columbia River as a result of changing river stage, which causes changes in groundwater elevation, flow direction and water chemistry. An important question is the extent to which the mixing of Columbia River water and groundwater impacts the speciation and mobility of uranium (U). In this study, we designed experiments to mimic interactions among U, oxic groundwater or Columbia River water, and 300 A sediments in the subsurface environment of Hanford 300 A. The goals were to investigate mechanisms of: 1) U immobilization in 300 A sediments under bulk oxic conditions and 2) U remobilization from U-immobilized 300 A sediments exposed to oxic Columbia River water. Initially, 300 A sediments in column reactors were fed with U(VI)-containing oxic 1) synthetic groundwater (SGW), 2) organic-amended SGW (OA-SGW), and 3) de-ionized (DI) water to investigate U immobilization processes. After that, the sediments were exposed to oxic Columbia River water for U remobilization studies. The results reveal that U was immobilized by 300 A sediments predominantly through reduction (80-85%) when the column reactor was fed with oxic OA-SGW. However, U was immobilized by 300 A sediments through adsorption (100%) when the column reactors were fed with oxic SGW or DI water. The reduced U in the 300 A sediments fed with OA-SGW was relatively resistant to remobilization by oxic Columbia River water. Oxic Columbia River water resulted in U remobilization (?7%) through desorption, and most of the U that remained in the 300 A sediments fed with OA-SGW (?93%) was in the form of uraninite nanoparticles. These results reveal that: 1) the reductive immobilization of U through OA-SGW stimulation of indigenous 300 A sediment microorganisms may be viable in the relatively oxic Hanford 300 A subsurface environments and 2) with the intrusion of Columbia River water, desorption may be the primary process resulting in U remobilization from OA-SGW-stimulated 300 A sediments at the subsurface of the Hanford 300 A site.

Ahmed, B.; Cao, Bin; Mishra, Bhoopesh; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

2012-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

500

Nuclear Speed-Dating | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohnSecurityControls |NavyNuclear Speed-Dating Nuclear