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1

Heavy Water Components Test Reactor Decommissioning - Major Component Removal  

SciTech Connect

The Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility (Figure 1) was built in 1961, operated from 1962 to 1964, and is located in the northwest quadrant of the Savannah River Site (SRS) approximately three miles from the site boundary. The HWCTR facility is on high, well-drained ground, about 30 meters above the water table. The HWCTR was a pressurized heavy water test reactor used to develop candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. It was not a defense-related facility like the materials production reactors at SRS. The reactor was moderated with heavy water and was rated at 50 megawatts thermal power. In December of 1964, operations were terminated and the facility was placed in a standby condition as a result of the decision by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to redirect research and development work on heavy water power reactors to reactors cooled with organic materials. For about one year, site personnel maintained the facility in a standby status, and then retired the reactor in place. In 1965, fuel assemblies were removed, systems that contained heavy water were drained, fluid piping systems were drained, deenergized and disconnected and the spent fuel basin was drained and dried. The doors of the reactor facility were shut and it wasn't until 10 years later that decommissioning plans were considered and ultimately postponed due to budget constraints. In the early 1990s, DOE began planning to decommission HWCTR again. Yet, in the face of new budget constraints, DOE deferred dismantlement and placed HWCTR in an extended surveillance and maintenance mode. The doors of the reactor facility were welded shut to protect workers and discourage intruders. The $1.6 billion allocation from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to SRS for site clean up at SRS has opened the doors to the HWCTR again - this time for final decommissioning. During the lifetime of HWCTR, 36 different fuel assemblies were tested in the facility. Ten of these experienced cladding failures as operational capabilities of the different designs were being established. In addition, numerous spills of heavy water occurred within the facility. Currently, radiation and radioactive contamination levels are low within HWCTR with most of the radioactivity contained within the reactor vessel. There are no known insults to the environment, however with the increasing deterioration of the facility, the possibility exists that contamination could spread outside the facility if it is not decommissioned. An interior panoramic view of the ground floor elevation taken in August 2009 is shown in Figure 2. The foreground shows the transfer coffin followed by the reactor vessel and control rod drive platform in the center. Behind the reactor vessel is the fuel pool. Above the ground level are the polar crane and the emergency deluge tank at the top of the dome. Note the considerable rust and degradation of the components and the interior of the containment building. Alternative studies have concluded that the most environmentally safe, cost effective option for final decommissioning is to remove the reactor vessel, steam generators, and all equipment above grade including the dome. Characterization studies along with transport models have concluded that the remaining below grade equipment that is left in place including the transfer coffin will not contribute any significant contamination to the environment in the future. The below grade space will be grouted in place. A concrete cover will be placed over the remaining footprint and the groundwater will be monitored for an indefinite period to ensure compliance with environmental regulations. The schedule for completion of decommissioning is late FY2011. This paper describes the concepts planned in order to remove the major components including the dome, the reactor vessel (RV), the two steam generators (SG), and relocating the transfer coffin (TC).

Austin, W.; Brinkley, D.

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

2

Heavy Water Components Test Reactor Decommissioning - Major Component Removal  

SciTech Connect

The Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility (Figure 1) was built in 1961, operated from 1962 to 1964, and is located in the northwest quadrant of the Savannah River Site (SRS) approximately three miles from the site boundary. The HWCTR facility is on high, well-drained ground, about 30 meters above the water table. The HWCTR was a pressurized heavy water test reactor used to develop candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. It was not a defense-related facility like the materials production reactors at SRS. The reactor was moderated with heavy water and was rated at 50 megawatts thermal power. In December of 1964, operations were terminated and the facility was placed in a standby condition as a result of the decision by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to redirect research and development work on heavy water power reactors to reactors cooled with organic materials. For about one year, site personnel maintained the facility in a standby status, and then retired the reactor in place. In 1965, fuel assemblies were removed, systems that contained heavy water were drained, fluid piping systems were drained, deenergized and disconnected and the spent fuel basin was drained and dried. The doors of the reactor facility were shut and it wasn't until 10 years later that decommissioning plans were considered and ultimately postponed due to budget constraints. In the early 1990s, DOE began planning to decommission HWCTR again. Yet, in the face of new budget constraints, DOE deferred dismantlement and placed HWCTR in an extended surveillance and maintenance mode. The doors of the reactor facility were welded shut to protect workers and discourage intruders. The $1.6 billion allocation from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to SRS for site clean up at SRS has opened the doors to the HWCTR again - this time for final decommissioning. During the lifetime of HWCTR, 36 different fuel assemblies were tested in the facility. Ten of these experienced cladding failures as operational capabilities of the different designs were being established. In addition, numerous spills of heavy water occurred within the facility. Currently, radiation and radioactive contamination levels are low within HWCTR with most of the radioactivity contained within the reactor vessel. There are no known insults to the environment, however with the increasing deterioration of the facility, the possibility exists that contamination could spread outside the facility if it is not decommissioned. An interior panoramic view of the ground floor elevation taken in August 2009 is shown in Figure 2. The foreground shows the transfer coffin followed by the reactor vessel and control rod drive platform in the center. Behind the reactor vessel is the fuel pool. Above the ground level are the polar crane and the emergency deluge tank at the top of the dome. Note the considerable rust and degradation of the components and the interior of the containment building. Alternative studies have concluded that the most environmentally safe, cost effective option for final decommissioning is to remove the reactor vessel, steam generators, and all equipment above grade including the dome. Characterization studies along with transport models have concluded that the remaining below grade equipment that is left in place including the transfer coffin will not contribute any significant contamination to the environment in the future. The below grade space will be grouted in place. A concrete cover will be placed over the remaining footprint and the groundwater will be monitored for an indefinite period to ensure compliance with environmental regulations. The schedule for completion of decommissioning is late FY2011. This paper describes the concepts planned in order to remove the major components including the dome, the reactor vessel (RV), the two steam generators (SG), and relocating the transfer coffin (TC).

Austin, W.; Brinkley, D.

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

3

HEAVY WATER COMPONENTS TEST REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) Decommissioning Project was initiated in 2009 as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Removal Action with funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). This paper summarizes the history prior to 2009, the major D&D activities, and final end state of the facility at completion of decommissioning in June 2011. The HWCTR facility was built in 1961, operated from 1962 to 1964, and is located in the northwest quadrant of the Savannah River Site (SRS) approximately three miles from the site boundary. The HWCTR was a pressurized heavy water test reactor used to develop candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. In December of 1964, operations were terminated and the facility was placed in a standby condition as a result of the decision by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to redirect research and development work on heavy water power reactors to reactors cooled with organic materials. For about one year, site personnel maintained the facility in a standby status, and then retired the reactor in place. In the early 1990s, DOE began planning to decommission HWCTR. Yet, in the face of new budget constraints, DOE deferred dismantlement and placed HWCTR in an extended surveillance and maintenance mode. The doors of the reactor facility were welded shut to protect workers and discourage intruders. In 2009 the $1.6 billion allocation from the ARRA to SRS for site footprint reduction at SRS reopened the doors to HWCTR - this time for final decommissioning. Alternative studies concluded that the most environmentally safe, cost effective option for final decommissioning was to remove the reactor vessel, both steam generators, and all equipment above grade including the dome. The transfer coffin, originally above grade, was to be placed in the cavity vacated by the reactor vessel and the remaining below grade spaces would be grouted. Once all above equipment including the dome was removed, a concrete cover was to be placed over the remaining footprint and the groundwater monitored for an indefinite period to ensure compliance with environmental regulations.

Austin, W.; Brinkley, D.

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

4

NREL: Water Power Research - Device and Component Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing NREL houses the nation's premier laboratory facilities for testing offshore wind and water power devices and maintains a staff of offshore-trained test engineers and...

5

CHARACTERIZATION OF RADIOACTIVITY IN THE REACTOR VESSEL OF THE HEAVY WATER COMPONENT TEST REACTOR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Heavy Water Component Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility is a pressurized heavy water reactor that was used to test candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. The reactor operated at nominal power of 50 MW{sub th}. The reactor coolant loop operated at 1200 psig and 250 C. Two isolated test loop were designed into the reactor to provide special test conditions. Fig. 1 shows a cut-away view of the reactor. The two loops are contained in four inch diameter stainless steel piping. The HWCTR was operated for only a short duration, from March 1962 to December 1964 in order to test the viability of test fuel elements and other reactor components for use in a heavy water power reactor. The reactor achieved 13,882 MWd of total power while testing 36 different fuel assemblies. In the course of operation, HWCTR experienced the cladding failures of 10 separate test fuel assemblies. In each case, the cladding was breached with some release of fuel core material into the isolated test loop, causing fission product and actinide contamination in the main coolant loop and the liquid and boiling test loops. Despite the contribution of the contamination from the failed fuel, the primary source of radioactivity in the HWCTR vessel and internals is the activation products in the thermal shields, and to a lesser degree, activation products in the reactor vessel walls and liner. A detailed facility characterization report of the HWCTR facility was completed in 1996. Many of the inputs and assumptions in the 1996 characterization report were derived from the HWCTR decommissioning plan published in 1975. The current paper provides an updated assessment of the radioisotopic characteristics of the HWCTR vessel and internals to support decommissioning activities on the facility.

Vinson, Dennis

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Component reliability testing  

SciTech Connect

Component and system reliability of active solare energy systems continues to be a major concern of designers, manufacturers, installers, and consumers. Six test loops were constructed at the Solar Energy Research Institute in Golden, Colorado, to thermally cycle active solar energy system components. Drain valves, check valves, air vents, vacuum breakers, tempering valves, and polybutylene pipe were included in the testing. Test results show poor reliabiity of some of the components and limited performance from others. The results lead to a better understanding of certain failures in the field and present designers with realistic expectations for these components.

Farrington, R.B.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Software Component Integration Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a combination of off-the-shelf components, with new components integrated to satisfy ... oriented, that is, it consists of objects with state and behavior. ...

2011-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

8

Analytical Study of High Concentration PCB Paint at the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This report provides results of an analytical study of high concentration PCB paint in a shutdown nuclear test reactor located at the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). The study was designed to obtain data relevant for an evaluation of potential hazards associated with the use of and exposure to such paints.

Lowry, N.J.

1998-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

9

Analysis of removal alternatives for the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor at the Savannah River Site. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This engineering study evaluates different alternatives for decontamination and decommissioning of the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR). Cooled and moderated with pressurized heavy water, this uranium-fueled nuclear reactor was designed to test fuel assemblies for heavy water power reactors. It was operated for this purpose from march of 1962 until December of 1964. Four alternatives studied in detail include: (1) dismantlement, in which all radioactive and hazardous contaminants would be removed, the containment dome dismantled and the property restored to a condition similar to its original preconstruction state; (2) partial dismantlement and interim safe storage, where radioactive equipment except for the reactor vessel and steam generators would be removed, along with hazardous materials, and the building sealed with remote monitoring equipment in place to permit limited inspections at five-year intervals; (3) conversion for beneficial reuse, in which most radioactive equipment and hazardous materials would be removed and the containment building converted to another use such as a storage facility for radioactive materials, and (4) entombment, which involves removing hazardous materials, filling the below-ground structure with concrete, removing the containment dome and pouring a concrete cap on the tomb. Also considered was safe storage, but this approach, which has, in effect, been followed for the past 30 years, did not warrant detailed evaluation. The four other alternatives were evaluate, taking into account factors such as potential effects on the environment, risks, effectiveness, ease of implementation and cost. The preferred alternative was determined to be dismantlement. This approach is recommended because it ranks highest in the comparative analysis, would serve as the best prototype for the site reactor decommissioning program and would be most compatible with site property reuse plans for the future.

Owen, M.B.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Geothermal component test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A description is given of the East Mesa geothermal facility and the services provided. The facility provides for testing various types of geothermal energy-conversion equipment and materials under field conditions using geothermal fluids from three existing wells. (LBS)

Not Available

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Decontamination of large components-test case  

SciTech Connect

The rising per-cubic-foot burial costs, together with the trend toward standardized above-ground burial sites, provides the basis for seeking an alternative to direct burial of large components. Large contaminated components such as steam generators can be safely dismantled and decontaminated for free release, metals recycle, and volume reduction. This grand-scale disposal technology will prove to be an economical and ecological alternative to direct burial or interim storage. Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC) in Bolton, operators and decommissioners of the Yankee Nuclear Power Station in Rowe, Massachusetts, has teamed with Frank W Hake Associates in Memphis, TN, to decontaminate a large component as a test case. The large component is YAEC`s reactor pressure vessel head (RPVH). The 79 100 lb RPVH is surface contaminated with 0.7 Ci (1500 mR/h contact) resulting from 32 yr of operating in a 2000 psi, 530{degrees}F pressurized water reactor environment.

Mancini, A. [Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States); Bosco, B. [Frank W. Hake Associates, Memphis, TN (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

12

A New Approach to Component Testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carefully tested electric/electronic components are a requirement for effective hardware-in-the-loop tests and vehicle tests in automotive industry. A new method for definition and execution of component tests is described. The most important advantage of this method is independance from the test stand. It therefore offers the oppportunity to build up knowledge over a long period of time and the ability to share this knowledge with different partners.

Brinkmeyer, Horst

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Failure testing of active solar energy components  

SciTech Connect

Component and system reliability of active solar energy systems continue to be a major concern of designers, manufacturers, installers, and consumers. Six test loops were constructed and the Solar Energy Research Institute, in Golden, Colorado, to thermally cycle active solar energy system components. Drain valves, check valves, air vents, vacuum breakers, tempering valves, and polybutylene pipe were included in the testing. The test methods and results are discussed in this report. Test results show poor reliability of some of the components and limited performance from others. The results lead to a better understanding of certain failures in the field and present designers with realistic expectations for these components. Recommendations are given to improve component reliability and for further testing.

Farrington, R.B.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

TECHNICAL DESCRIPTION OF A SODIUM-COMPONENT TEST INSTALLATION  

SciTech Connect

The instellation is designed primarily for operational testing of Na- heated steam generators and intermediate heat exchangers suitable as prototype components for large, Na-cooled power plants. Other types of Na components can also be tested in the facility. The instellation consists of a 35-Mwt gas-fired Na heat source, a main primary-Na system, a main secondary-Na system, a water- steam system, and a set-up for heat rejection to air. (J.R.D.)

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices (Project) was to test critical components of hydrokinetic devices in waters with high levels of suspended sediment – information that is widely applicable to the hydrokinetic industry. Tidal and river sites in Alaska typically have high suspended sediment concentrations. High suspended sediment also occurs in major rivers and estuaries throughout the world and throughout high latitude locations where glacial inputs introduce silt into water bodies. In assessing the vulnerability of technology components to sediment induced abrasion, one of the greatest concerns is the impact that the sediment may have on device components such as bearings and seals, failures of which could lead to both efficiency loss and catastrophic system failures.

Worthington, Monty [ORPC Alaska] [ORPC Alaska; Ali, Muhammad [Ohio University] [Ohio University; Ravens, Tom [University of Alaska Anchorage] [University of Alaska Anchorage

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

16

TEST PLAN CHARACTERIZATION OF JET FORCES UPON WASTE TANK COMPONENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Westinghouse Hanford Company plans to install mixer pumps in double-shell waste tanks to mobilize and suspend settled sludge to allow eventual retrieval for treatment and permanent storage. The mixer pumps produce high momentum, horizontally directed jets that impact and mobilize the sludge and mix it into slurry for removal. There is concern that the force of the jet may damage tank internal components in its path. This test plan describes scaled experiments designed to characterize the velocity profiles of a near floor jet and to quantify the impact farces and drag coefficients of three tank components: radiation dry well, airlift circulator, and steam coil. The experiments will be conducted in water, at approximately 1/6-scale, using one stationary nozzle to simulate the jet. To measure and confirm the velocity profile of the free, submerged jet, the horizontal and vertical velocity profiles will be measured at several distances from the nozzle. The profile will also be measured after the jet impinges upon the tank floor to determine the·extent of the change in the profile caused by impingement. The jet forces upon the test articles will be measured at a maximum of four velocities and a variety of test article orientations. Each orientation will represent a unique position of the test article relative to the jet and the tank floor. In addition, the steam coil will be tested in three rotational orientations because it is not symmetric. The highest jet velocity will be selected so that the Reynolds number of the test article in the model will match that of the prototype when operating at design conditions. The forces measured upon the model components will be used to calculate the force on the prototype components using geometric scaling factors. In addition, the model force measurements will be used to calculate the component's drag coefficient as a function of the component Reynolds number.

Bamberger, J. A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

CRBR pump water test experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hydraulic design features and water testing of the hydraulic scale model and prototype pump of the sodium pumps used in the primary and intermediate sodium loops of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) are described. The Hydraulic Scale Model tests are performed and the results of these tests are discussed. The Prototype Pump tests are performed and the results of these tests are discussed.

Cook, M.E.; Huber, K.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Conformance Testing of Object-Oriented Components ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Defn 7.2. An abstract test suite for M, denoted by ATS(M) is the set defined by Page 12. -10- AbsTestId = AbsTestId ClassId ...

2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

19

NREL: TroughNet - Parabolic Trough System and Component Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

System and Component Testing System and Component Testing Here you'll find information about parabolic trough system and components testing, as well facilities and laboratories used for testing. Tests include those for: Concentrator thermal efficiency Receiver thermal performance Mirror contour and collector alignment Mirror reflectivity and durability Some of the following documents are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Download Adobe Reader. Concentrator Thermal Efficiency Testing Researchers and industry use the following facilities for testing parabolic trough collectors. AZTRAK Rotating Platform At Sandia National Laboratories' National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF), the AZTRAK rotating platform has been used to test several parabolic trough modules and receivers. Initially, researchers tested a

20

Heavy-ion Accelerators for Testing Microelectronic Components...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Accelerators for Testing Microelectronic Components at LBNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water components test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Ultra Accelerated Testing of PV Module Components  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using concentrated natural sunlight at the NREL High Flux Solar Furnace, we have exposed several materials to acceleration factors of up to 400 times the normal outdoor UV exposure dose. This accelerated rate allows the exposure of materials such that a year of outdoor exposure can be simulated in about 5 hours. We have studied the solarization of cerium containing glass, the degradation of ethylene vinyl acetate laminated between borosilicate glass, and the yellowing of standard polystyrene test coupons. The first two candidates are of interest to the photovoltaics (PV) program, and the last candidate material is a widely used dosimeter for ultra violet (UV) exposure in accelerated weathering chambers

Pitts, J. R.; King, D. E.; Bingham, C.; Czanderna, A. W.

1998-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

22

Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

USCAR FUEL CELL TECH TEAM USCAR FUEL CELL TECH TEAM CELL COMPONENT ACCELERATED STRESS TEST PROTOCOLS FOR PEM FUEL CELLS (Electrocatalysts, Supports, Membranes, and Membrane Electrode Assemblies) Revised May 26, 2010 Fuel cells, especially for automotive propulsion, must operate over a wide range of operating and cyclic conditions. The desired operating range encompasses temperatures from below the freezing point to well above the boiling point of water, humidity from ambient to saturated, and half-cell potentials from 0 to >1.5 volts. Furthermore, the anode side of the cell may be exposed to hydrogen and air during different parts of the driving and startup/shutdown cycles. The severity in operating conditions is greatly exacerbated by the transient and cyclic nature of

23

An Assessment Of Atmospheric Water Budget Components Over Tropical Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Balancing global moisture budgets is a difficult task that is even more challenging at regional scales. Atmospheric water budgets components are investigated within five tropical (15°S, 15°N) ocean regions, including the Indian Ocean, three ...

Paula J. Brown; Christian D. Kummerow

24

NGNP Component Test Capability Design Code of Record  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project is conducting a trade study to select a preferred approach for establishing a capability whereby NGNP technology development testing—through large-scale, integrated tests—can be performed for critical HTGR structures, systems, and components (SSCs). The mission of this capability includes enabling the validation of interfaces, interactions, and performance for critical systems and components prior to installation in the NGNP prototype.

S.L. Austad; D.S. Ferguson; L.E. Guillen; C.W. McKnight; P.J. Petersen

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Structural dynamics test simulation and optimization for aerospace components  

SciTech Connect

This paper initially describes an innovative approach to product realization called Knowledge Based Testing (KBT). This research program integrates test simulation and optimization software, rapid fabrication techniques and computational model validation to support a new experimentally-based design concept. This design concept implements well defined tests earlier in the design cycle enabling the realization of highly reliable aerospace components. A test simulation and optimization software environment provides engineers with an essential tool needed to support this KBT approach. This software environment, called the Virtual Environment for Test Optimization (VETO), integrates analysis and test based models to support optimal structural dynamic test design. A goal in developing this software tool is to provide test and analysis engineers with a capability of mathematically simulating the complete structural dynamics test environment within a computer. A developed computational model of an aerospace component can be combined with analytical and/or experimentally derived models of typical structural dynamic test instrumentation within the VETO to determine an optimal test design. The VETO provides the user with a unique analysis and visualization environment to evaluate new and existing test methods in addition to simulating specific experiments designed to maximize test based information needed to validate computational models. The results of both a modal and a vibration test design are presented for a reentry vehicle and a space truss structure.

Klenke, S.E.; Baca, T.J.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Heavy-ion Accelerators for Testing Microelectronic Components at LBNL |  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Heavy-ion Accelerators for Testing Heavy-ion Accelerators for Testing Microelectronic Components at LBNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives Heavy-ion Accelerators for Testing Microelectronic Components at LBNL Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: Use of heavy-ion accelerators for testing microelectronic components for

27

A Small-Scale Safety Test for Initiation Components  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a small-scale safety test for initiation train components. A low-cost test was needed to assess the response of initiation components to an abnormal shock environment and to detect changes in the sensitivity of initiation components as they age. The test uses a disk of Detasheet to transmit a shock through a PMMA barrier into a the test article. A schematic drawing of the fixture is shown. The 10-cm-diameter disk of 3-mm-thick Detasheet, initiated at its center by a RISI, RP detonator, produces a shock wave that is attenuated by a variable-thickness PMMA spacer (gap). Layers of metal and plastic above the test article and the material surrounding the test article may be chosen to mock up the environment of the test article at its location in a warhead. A metal plate at the bottom serves as a witness plate to record whether or not the test article detonated. For articles containing a small amount of explosive, it can be difficult to determine whether or not a detonation has occurred. In such cases, one can use a pressure transducer or laser velocimeter to detect the shock wave from the detonation of the article. The assembly is contained in a 10-cm-ID section of PVC pipe and fired in a containment vessel rated at 100 g. Test results are given for a hemispherical, exploding-bridgewire (EBW) detonator.

Cutting, J; Chow, C; Chau, H; Hodgin, R; Lee, R

2002-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

28

Testing to Support Improvements to PV Components and Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Photovoltaic (PV) Program is sponsored by the US Department of Energy and includes a PV Manufacturing Research and Development (R and D) project conducted with industry. This project includes advancements in PV components to improve reliability, reduce costs, and develop integrated PV systems. Participants submit prototypes, pre-production hardware products, and examples of the resulting final products for a range of tests conducted at several national laboratories, independent testing laboratories, and recognized listing agencies. The purpose of this testing is to use the results to assist industry in determining a product's performance and reliability, and to identify areas for potential improvement. This paper briefly describes the PV Manufacturing R and D project, participants in the area of PV systems, balance of systems, and components, and several examples of the different types of product and performance testing used to support and confirm product performance.

THOMAS,H.; KROPOSKI,B.; WITT,C.; BOWER,WARD I.; BONN,RUSSELL H.; GINN,JERRY W.; GONZALEZ,SIGIFREDO

2000-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

29

Testing to Support Improvements to PV Components and Systems  

SciTech Connect

The National Photovoltaic (PV) Program is sponsored by the US Department of Energy and includes a PV Manufacturing Research and Development (R and D) project conducted with industry. This project includes advancements in PV components to improve reliability, reduce costs, and develop integrated PV systems. Participants submit prototypes, pre-production hardware products, and examples of the resulting final products for a range of tests conducted at several national laboratories, independent testing laboratories, and recognized listing agencies. The purpose of this testing is to use the results to assist industry in determining a product's performance and reliability, and to identify areas for potential improvement. This paper briefly describes the PV Manufacturing R and D project, participants in the area of PV systems, balance of systems, and components, and several examples of the different types of product and performance testing used to support and confirm product performance.

THOMAS,H.; KROPOSKI,B.; WITT,C.; BOWER,WARD I.; BONN,RUSSELL H.; GINN,JERRY W.; GONZALEZ,SIGIFREDO

2000-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

30

Evaluation of Integrated High Temperature Component Testing Needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the requirements for a large-scale component test capability to support the development of advanced nuclear reactor technology and their adaptation to commercial applications that advance U.S. energy economy, reliability, and security and reduce carbon emissions.

Rafael Soto; David Duncan; Vincent Tonc

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Core-support performance test in the component-flow test loop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CFTL is a closed-circuit, out-of-pile loop circulating helium at temperatures and pressures anticipated in gas-cooled reactors at flows sufficiently large to perform engineering-scale tests. It has the present capability for fast data acquisition and the control and measurement of gaseous impurities, and it has the potential to perform controlled rapid transients in pressure, flow, and power. The initial HTGR component to be tested in the CFTL is the core support structure for the prismatic bed HTGR. This structure has vertical posts mating with post seats, each with spherical curvatures of different radii. At the point of contact, Hertzian stress concentrations are produced. Under the load of the weight of the core plus the pressure gradient, the graphite will deform until the stress is below its yield limit. The Core Support Performance Test (CSPT) will subject this interface, using actual materials and geometry, to impure helium at HTGR operating temperatures, pressures, and flows under a simulated structural load. The concentration of water, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide will be controlled so that six months of test operation will simulate 40 years of reactor operation. The specification of this concentration is based on existing studies involving small graphite samples exposed to a variety of conditions at a few atmospheres. The extrapolation to concentrations that will duplicate both the amount and the nature of the corrosion is based on the oxidation kinetics of the Gadsby equation as parameterized by Velasquez. Ports are provided in the test vessel for in situ inspection of the graphite during the test period. Post-test examination of the structure will be used to correlate its performance with available computational methods.

Sanders, J.P.; Grindell, A.G.; Eatherly, W.P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

CEBAF UPGRADE CRYOMODULE COMPONENT TESTING IN THE HORIZONTAL TEST BED (HTB)*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CEBAF UPGRADE CRYOMODULE COMPONENT TESTING IN THE HORIZONTAL TEST BED (HTB)* I. E. Campisi , B The planned upgrade of the CEBAF electron accelerator includes the development of an improved cryomodule. Several components differ substantially from the original CEBAF cryomodule; these include: the new 7-cell

33

Feasibility of Using Measurements of Internal Components of Tankless Water Heaters for Field Monitoring of Energy and Water Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Products: Test Procedures for Water Heaters; Final Rule,"Testing of Tankless Gas Water Heater Performance," DavisInc. , "T-K2 Instantaneous Water Heater Installation Manual

Lutz, Jim

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Irradiation qualification testing of SNAP-10A components  

SciTech Connect

Selected SNAP 10A components were irradiated to about 10{sup14} nvt and 5{times} 10{sup 7} r at an average temperature of 136{degrees}F in a nominal vacuum of 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} torr. The components were operated periodically and the electrical characteristics recorded. Pre-irradiationand post-irradiation tests were conducted. Catastropic degradation occurred only in the low-level neutron detection system and about 1.5 {times} 10{sup 13} nvt and in the high-level neutron power supply at about 6{times} 10{sup 12} nvt. Marginal degradation occurred in the fusistors and in the silicone rubber insert material in connectors. The relays, low-voltage trip devices, expansion compensator position demodulator, resistance thermometer sensor and bridge, and the gamma detection system opearted within their respective specifications during and after irradiation. The insulation resistance of all components was adeqauate during and after irradiation.

Chesavage, A.J.

1964-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

35

Service Water Heat Exchanger Testing Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report will assist the Service Water Heat Exchanger (SWHX) test engineer in designing specific test methods which define and constrain the analysis, operational and measurement strategies for each specific SWHX application. The resulting test methods will provide the necessary assurance that the results of tests are sufficiently representative of the true capability of the SWHX.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Heat Pump Water Heaters—Laboratory Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI conducted laboratory tests of several heat pump water heaters to assess their performance and energy efficiency. Among U.S. heat pump water heaters tested were new products from A. O. Smith, General Electric (GE), and Rheem. These units are designed to be integral, drop-in replacements for standard electric water heaters. Additionally, EPRI tested the Japanese-based Eco-cute heat pump water heater from Daikin, which is a split unit with an outdoor heat pump using CO2 as the refrigerant and an indoor...

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

37

Field Testing of Nano-PCM Enhanced Building Envelope Components  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE) Building Technologies Program s goal of developing high-performance, energy efficient buildings will require more cost-effective, durable, energy efficient building envelopes. Forty-eight percent of the residential end-use energy consumption is spent on space heating and air conditioning. Reducing envelope-generated heating and cooling loads through application of phase change material (PCM)-enhanced envelope components can facilitate maximizing the energy efficiency of buildings. Field-testing of prototype envelope components is an important step in estimating their energy benefits. An innovative phase change material (nano-PCM) was developed with PCM encapsulated with expanded graphite (interconnected) nanosheets, which is highly conducive for enhanced thermal storage and energy distribution, and is shape-stable for convenient incorporation into lightweight building components. During 2012, two test walls with cellulose cavity insulation and prototype PCM-enhanced interior wallboards were installed in a natural exposure test (NET) facility at Charleston, SC. The first test wall was divided into four sections, which were separated by wood studs and thin layers of foam insulation. Two sections contained nano-PCM-enhanced wallboards: one was a three-layer structure, in which nano-PCM was sandwiched between two gypsum boards, and the other one had PCM dispersed homogeneously throughout graphite nanosheets-enhanced gypsum board. The second test wall also contained two sections with interior PCM wallboards; one contained nano-PCM dispersed homogeneously in gypsum and the other was gypsum board containing a commercial microencapsulated PCM (MEPCM) for comparison. Each test wall contained a section covered with gypsum board on the interior side, which served as control or a baseline for evaluation of the PCM wallboards. The walls were instrumented with arrays of thermocouples and heat flux transducers. Further, numerical modeling of the walls containing the nano-PCM wallboards were performed to determine their actual impact on wall-generated heating and cooling loads. The models were first validated using field data, and then used to perform annual simulations using Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) weather data. This article presents the measured performance and numerical analysis to evaluate the energy-saving potential of the nano-PCM-enhanced building components.

Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Childs, Phillip W [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Options for Shielding Tokamak Cooling Water Electrical Components against High Magnetic Fields  

SciTech Connect

The Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS) Instrumentation and Control (I&C) components of ITER will be located in areas of relatively high magnetic fields. Previous tests on electrical and I&C components have indicated that shielding will be required to protect these components from such magnetic fields. To accomplish this, studies were performed by AREVA Federal Services (AFS) in support of the TCWS Design project with the intent of identifying an optimal solution for shielding I&C components. This report presents a summary of these studies and presents design options for providing magnetic shielding to ITER TCWS I&C components and electrical equipment that are susceptible to the magnetic fields present.

Korsah, Kofi [ORNL; Michael, Smith [AREVA Federal Services LLC; Kim, Seokho H [ORNL; Charles, Neumeyer [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Single Component Sorption-Desorption Test Experimental Design Approach Discussions  

SciTech Connect

A task was identified within the fission-product-transport work package to develop a path forward for doing testing to determine behavior of volatile fission products behavior and to engage members of the NGNP community to advise and dissent on the approach. The following document is a summary of the discussions and the specific approaches suggested for components of the testing. Included in the summary isare the minutes of the conference call that was held with INL and external interested parties to elicit comments on the approaches brought forward by the INL participants. The conclusion was that an initial non-radioactive, single component test will be useful to establish the limits of currently available chemical detection methods, and to evaluated source-dispersion uniformity. In parallel, development of a real-time low-concentration monitoring method is believed to be useful in detecting rapid dispersion as well as desorption phenomena. Ultimately, the test cycle is expected to progress to the use of radio-traced species, simply because this method will allow the lowest possible detection limits. The consensus of the conference call was that there is no need for an in-core test because the duct and heat exchanger surfaces that will be the sorption target will be outside the main neutron flux and will not be affected by irradiation. Participants in the discussion and contributors to the INL approach were Jeffrey Berg, Pattrick Calderoni, Gary Groenewold, Paul Humrickhouse, Brad Merrill, and Phil Winston. Participants from outside the INL included David Hanson of General Atomics, Todd Allen, Tyler Gerczak, and Izabela Szlufarska of the University of Wisconsin, Gary Was, of the University of Michigan, Sudarshan Loyalka and Tushar Ghosh of the University of Missouri, and Robert Morris of Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Phil WInston

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

ERDA Geothermal Component Test Facility (GCTF), East Mesa, Imperial Valley, California. Test operations management plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discussion of the operation of the Geothermal Component Test Facility (GCTF), established for testing heat extraction and energy conversion equipment and materials, is presented under the following section headings: purposes of the facility; operating policies: service, conflicts, safety and environmental, investigator activities, shops and equipment, and test certification; organization: chart; Lawrence Berkely Laboratory: organization, responsibilities, individual responsibilities, and funding; Bureau of Reclamation: organization, responsibilities, and funding; operations contractor: contract, qualifications, and personnel; Test Operations Advisory Board; experiment processing: test acceptance, scheduling and priorities, cost reimbursement, and activities flow chart.

Not Available

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water components test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Trip Report-Produced-Water Field Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) conducted field testing of a produced-water pretreatment apparatus with assistance from faculty at the Texas A&M University (TAMU) protein separation sciences laboratory located on the TAMU main campus. The following report details all of the logistics surrounding the testing. The purpose of the test was to use a new, commercially-available filter media housing containing modified zeolite (surfactant-modified zeolite or SMZ) porous medium for use in pretreatment of oil and gas produced water (PW) and frac-flowback waters. The SMZ was tested previously in October, 2010 in a lab-constructed configuration ('old multicolumn system'), and performed well for removal of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from PW. However, a less-expensive, modular configuration is needed for field use. A modular system will allow the field operator to add or subtract SMZ filters as needed to accommodate site specific conditions, and to swap out used filters easily in a multi-unit system. This test demonstrated the use of a commercial filter housing with a simple flow modification and packed with SMZ for removing BTEX from a PW source in College Station, Texas. The system will be tested in June 2012 at a field site in Pennsylvania for treating frac-flowback waters. The goals of this test are: (1) to determine sorption efficiency of BTEX in the new configuration; and (2) to observe the range of flow rates, backpressures, and total volume treated at a given flow rate.

Sullivan, Enid J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

42

NREL: Water Power Research - Testing and Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing and Standards Testing and Standards NREL's marine and hydrokinetics (MHK) testing activities provide industry partners with essential operational data on a wide variety of systems and components. This data helps researchers establish baseline cost and performance metrics and advance the technology readiness of those systems that demonstrate the greatest potential for successful commercial deployment. The development of standards leads to accelerated development, reduced risks, and increased access to capital. Examples of testing and standards activities include: Verdant Rotor Blade Development Test Center Support IEC Standards Verdant Rotor Blade Development NREL applied its more than three decades of experience in designing and testing horizontal-axis wind turbine rotors to the development and testing

43

Retrofitting Combined Space and Water Heating Systems: Laboratory Tests  

SciTech Connect

Better insulated and tighter homes can often use a single heating plant for both space and domestic water heating. These systems, called dual integrated appliances (DIA) or combination systems, can operate at high efficiency and eliminate combustion safety issues associated by using a condensing, sealed combustion heating plant. Funds were received to install 400 DIAs in Minnesota low-income homes. The NorthernSTAR DIA laboratory was created to identify proper system components, designs, operating parameters, and installation procedures to assure high efficiency of field installed systems. Tests verified that heating loads up to 57,000 Btu/hr can be achieved with acceptable return water temperatures and supply air temperatures.

Schoenbauer, B.; Bohac, D.; Huelman, P.; Olson, R.; Hewitt, M.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

HVAC Water Heater Field Tests Research Project | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HVAC Water Heater Field Tests Research Project HVAC Water Heater Field Tests Research Project The U.S. Department of Energy is currently conducting research into heating,...

45

Isotropic and Nonisotropic Components of Earthquakes and Nuclear Explosions on the Lop Nor Test Site, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Isotropic and Nonisotropic Components of Earthquakes and Nuclear Explosions on the Lop Nor Test and 1996 following events (seven nuclear explosions, three earthquakes) that occurred on the Lop Nor test Abstract Ð We test the hypothesis that the existence of an observable non-zero isotropic component

Ritzwolle, Mike

46

High level radioactive waste vitrification process equipment component testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Remote operability and maintainability of vitrification equipment were assessed under shielded-cell conditions. The equipment tested will be applied to immobilize high-level and transuranic liquid waste slurries that resulted from plutonium production for defense weapons. Equipment tested included: a turntable for handling waste canisters under the melter; a removable discharge cone in the melter overflow section; a thermocouple jumper that extends into a shielded cell; remote instrument and electrical connectors; remote, mechanical, and heat transfer aspects of the melter glass overflow section; a reamer to clean out plugged nozzles in the melter top; a closed circuit camera to view the melter interior; and a device to retrieve samples of the glass product. A test was also conducted to evaluate liquid metals for use in a liquid metal sealing system.

Siemens, D.H.; Heath, W.O.; Larson, D.E.; Craig, S.N.; Berger, D.N.; Goles, R.W.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

225-kW Dynamometer for Testing Small Wind Turbine Components  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Poster for WindPower 2006 held June 4-7, 2006, in Pittsburgh, PA, describing the 225-kW dynamometer for testing small wind turbine components.

Green, J.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Measuring testing as a distributed component of the software life cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study software testing as a distributed component of the software life cycle, developing a technique for estimating testing validity. The goal of this paper is to build measures for testing result estimation, to find how tested properties influence ... Keywords: Software quality, diagnostics, estimation, software life cycle, testing, validation

M. Burgin; N. Debnath; H. K. Lee

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Engineering development of selective agglomeration: Task 6, Operation of the Component Development Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to summarize the component development and laboratory binder test work at Wilsonville during Task 6. This Task included the construction and startup of the Component Development Test Facility (CDTF), coal procurement, evaluation of unit operation and dewatering performance, laboratory binder tests for diesel and heptane, production characterization, and vendor tests. Data evaluation, interpretation, and analysis are not included in this report, but will be discussed in the Task 7 report.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Experience with non-fuel-bearing components in LWR (light-water reactor) fuel systems  

SciTech Connect

Many non-fuel-bearing components are so closely associated with the spent fuel assemblies that their integrity and behavior must be taken into consideration with the fuel assemblies, when handling spent fuel of planning waste management activities. Presented herein is some of the experience that has been gained over the past two decades from non-fuel-bearing components in light-water reactors (LWRs), both pressurized-water reactors (PWRs) and boiling-water reactors (BWRs). Among the most important of these components are the control rod systems, the absorber and burnable poison rods, and the fuel assembly channels. 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Bailey, W.J.; Berting, F.M.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Results of scoping tests for open-cycle OTEC (ocean thermal energy conversion) components operating with seawater  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents comprehensive documentation of the experimental research conducted on open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) components operating with seawater as a working fluid. The results of this research are presented in the context of previous analysis and fresh-water testing; they provide a basis for understanding and predicting with confidence the performance of all components of an OC-OTEC system except the turbine. Seawater tests have confirmed the results that were obtained in fresh-water tests and predicted by the analytical models of the components. A sound technical basis has been established for the design of larger systems in which net power will be produced for the first time from OC-OTEC technology. Design and operation of a complete OC-OTEC system that produces power will provide sufficient confidence to warrant complete transfer of OC-OTEC technology to the private sector. Each components performance is described in a separate chapter written by the principal investigator responsible for technical aspects of the specific tests. Chapters have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Zangrando, F; Bharathan, D; Green, H J; Link, H F; Parsons, B K; Parsons, J M; Pesaran, A A [Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA); Panchal, C B [Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

THE COMPONENT TEST FACILITY – A NATIONAL USER FACILITY FOR TESTING OF HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR (HTGR) COMPONENTS AND SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) and other High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) Projects require research, development, design, construction, and operation of a nuclear plant intended for both high-efficiency electricity production and high-temperature industrial applications, including hydrogen production. During the life cycle stages of an HTGR, plant systems, structures and components (SSCs) will be developed to support this reactor technology. To mitigate technical, schedule, and project risk associated with development of these SSCs, a large-scale test facility is required to support design verification and qualification prior to operational implementation. As a full-scale helium test facility, the Component Test facility (CTF) will provide prototype testing and qualification of heat transfer system components (e.g., Intermediate Heat Exchanger, valves, hot gas ducts), reactor internals, and hydrogen generation processing. It will perform confirmation tests for large-scale effects, validate component performance requirements, perform transient effects tests, and provide production demonstration of hydrogen and other high-temperature applications. Sponsored wholly or in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, the CTF will support NGNP and will also act as a National User Facility to support worldwide development of High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor technologies.

David S. Duncan; Vondell J. Balls; Stephanie L. Austad

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Building Technologies Office: HVAC and Water Heater Field Tests Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HVAC and Water Heater HVAC and Water Heater Field Tests Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: HVAC and Water Heater Field Tests Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: HVAC and Water Heater Field Tests Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: HVAC and Water Heater Field Tests Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: HVAC and Water Heater Field Tests Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: HVAC and Water Heater Field Tests Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: HVAC and Water Heater Field Tests Research Project on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research

54

EA-1035: Relocation of the Weapons Component Testing Facility Los Alamos  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

35: Relocation of the Weapons Component Testing Facility Los 35: Relocation of the Weapons Component Testing Facility Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico EA-1035: Relocation of the Weapons Component Testing Facility Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to relocate the Weapons Component Testing Facility from Building 450 to Building 207, both within Technical Area 16, at the U.S. Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD February 10, 1995 EA-1035: Finding of No Significant Impact Relocation of the Weapons Component Testing Facility Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico February 10, 1995 EA-1035: Final Environmental Assessment

55

Warm Water Oxidation Verification - Scoping and Stirred Reactor Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scoping tests to evaluate the effects of agitation and pH adjustment on simulant sludge agglomeration and uranium metal oxidation at {approx}95 C were performed under Test Instructions(a,b) and as per sections 5.1 and 5.2 of this Test Plan prepared by AREVA. (c) The thermal testing occurred during the week of October 4-9, 2010. The results are reported here. For this testing, two uranium-containing simulant sludge types were evaluated: (1) a full uranium-containing K West (KW) container sludge simulant consisting of nine predominant sludge components; (2) a 50:50 uranium-mole basis mixture of uraninite [U(IV)] and metaschoepite [U(VI)]. This scoping study was conducted in support of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) Phase 2 technology evaluation for the treatment and packaging of K-Basin sludge. The STP is managed by CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) for the U.S. Department of Energy. Warm water ({approx}95 C) oxidation of sludge, followed by immobilization, has been proposed by AREVA and is one of the alternative flowsheets being considered to convert uranium metal to UO{sub 2} and eliminate H{sub 2} generation during final sludge disposition. Preliminary assessments of warm water oxidation have been conducted, and several issues have been identified that can best be evaluated through laboratory testing. The scoping evaluation documented here was specifically focused on the issue of the potential formation of high strength sludge agglomerates at the proposed 95 C process operating temperature. Prior hydrothermal tests conducted at 185 C produced significant physiochemical changes to genuine sludge, including the formation of monolithic concretions/agglomerates that exhibited shear strengths in excess of 100 kPa (Delegard et al. 2007).

Braley, Jenifer C.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

56

Interannual Variability of Summer Water Balance Components in Three Major River Basins of Northern Eurasia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigated water balance components in the three major river basins of Siberia (the Lena, Yenisey, and Ob) based on the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)–Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Model Intercomparison ...

Yoshiki Fukutomi; Hiromichi Igarashi; Kooiti Masuda; Tetsuzo Yasunari

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Estimating the Vertical Component of Water Velocity from Measurements Collected with a Free-fall Vehicle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimated of the vertical component of water velocity are made with measurements of the pressure-change rate and rotation rate recorded by the free-fall vehicle “Cartesian diver” (CD). Using buoyancy control, this device moves alternately up and ...

David C. Jacobs; Charles S. Cox

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

NARR’s Atmospheric Water Cycle Components. Part I: 20-Year Mean and Annual Interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) atmospheric water cycle is examined from 1980 to 1999 using a budget approach, with a particular emphasis on annual component interactions and the role of hourly precipitation assimilation. NARR’s ...

Alex C. Ruane

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

225-kW Dynamometer for Testing Small Wind Turbine Components: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes NREL's new 225-kW dynamometer facility that is suitable for testing a variety of components and subsystems for small wind turbines and discusses opportunities for industry partnerships with NREL for use of the facility.

Green, J.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Design and testing of components for a low cost laser cutter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main goal of this thesis is to document the design and testing of various components for use in a low cost laser cutting mechanism for hobbyists and recreational designers. Different electronics were used to assess the ...

Ramos, Joshua D

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water components test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The Trials and Tribulations of Testing Water Heaters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Trials and Tribulations of Testing Water Heaters The Trials and Tribulations of Testing Water Heaters Speaker(s): James Lutz Date: August 14, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Julie Osborn During our work on efficiency standards for electric water heaters, we discovered significant discrepancies between the rated and tested efficiencies of the highest rated electric resistance water heaters. For high efficiency electric resistance water heaters with an Energy Factor above .92, the heat losses are so small that minor flaws in the tank or obscure problems in the test procedure become more apparent. This seminar reports on our investigation into the causes of inconsistent results obtained during testing of high efficiency electric resistance water heaters at different test labs. We discovered some reasons for the

62

Test Procedures for Faucets, Showerheads, Water Closets, Urinals...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Test Procedures for Showerheads, Faucets, Water Closets, Urinals, and Commercial Prerinse Spray Valves AGENCY: Office of Energy...

63

Conservative numerical simulation of multi-component transport in two-dimensional unsteady shallow water flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An explicit finite volume model to simulate two-dimensional shallow water flow with multi-component transport is presented. The governing system of coupled conservation laws demands numerical techniques to avoid unrealistic values of the transported ... Keywords: ?-? model, 35L65, 65M06, 65M12, 76M12, 76M20, Coupled system, Multi-component transport, Reactive source terms, Shallow flow, Solute constraints, Turbulence, Variable domain, Well-balanced approach

J. Murillo; P. García-Navarro; J. Burguete

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Design and component integration of a T63-A-700 gas turbine engine test facility ; .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A gas turbine engine test cell was developed integrating an Allison T63-A-700 helicopter engine with a superflow water brake dynamometer power absorber. Design specifications were… (more)

Eckerle, Brian P.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

The development and testing of ceramic components in piston engines. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Within the past 10--15 years, ceramic hardware has been fabricated and tested in a number of piston engine applications including valves, piston pins, roller followers, tappet shims, and other wear components. It has been shown that, with proper design and installation, ceramics improve performance, fuel economy, and wear and corrosion resistance. These results have been obtained using rig and road tests on both stock and race engines. Selected summaries of these tests are presented in this review paper.

McEntire, B.J. [Norton Co., Northboro, MA (United States). Advanced Ceramics Div.; Willis, R.W.; Southam, R.E. [TRW, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Fluence thresholds for laser-induced damage of optical components in the injector laser of the SSRL gun test facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluence thresholds for laser-induced damage of optical components in the injector laser of the SSRL gun test facility

Bolton, P

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Tritium experiments on components for fusion fuel processing at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly  

SciTech Connect

Under a collaborative agreement between US and Japan, two tritium processing components, a palladium diffuser and a ceramic electrolysis cell have been tested with tritium for application to a Fuel Cleanup System (FCU) for plasma exhaust processing at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The fundamental characteristics, compatibility with tritium, impurities effects with tritium, and long-term behavior of the components, were studied over a three year period. Based on these studies, an integrated process loop, JAERI Fuel Cleanup System'' equipped with above components was installed at the TSTA for full scale demonstration of the plasma exhaust reprocessing.

Konishi, S.; Yoshida, H.; Naruse, Y. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)); Carlson, R.V.; Binning, K.E.; Bartlit, J.R.; Anderson, J.L. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

An Analysis of Testing Requirements for Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor Components  

SciTech Connect

This report provides guidance on the component testing necessary during the next phase of fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactor (FHR) development. In particular, the report identifies and describes the reactor component performance and reliability requirements, provides an overview of what information is necessary to provide assurance that components will adequately achieve the requirements, and then provides guidance on how the required performance information can efficiently be obtained. The report includes a system description of a representative test scale FHR reactor. The reactor parameters presented in this report should only be considered as placeholder values until an FHR test scale reactor design is completed. The report focus is bounded at the interface between and the reactor primary coolant salt and the fuel and the gas supply and return to the Brayton cycle power conversion system. The analysis is limited to component level testing and does not address system level testing issues. Further, the report is oriented as a bottom-up testing requirements analysis as opposed to a having a top-down facility description focus.

Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Peretz, Fred J [ORNL; Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

A new two-component system modelling shallow-water waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For propagation of surface shallow-water waves on irrotational flows, we derive a new two-component system. The system is obtained by a variational approach in the Lagrangian formalism. The system has a non-canonical Hamiltonian formulation. We also find its exact solitary-wave solutions.

Delia Ionescu-Kruse

2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

70

Final report : testing and evaluation for solar hot water reliability.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar hot water (SHW) systems are being installed by the thousands. Tax credits and utility rebate programs are spurring this burgeoning market. However, the reliability of these systems is virtually unknown. Recent work by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has shown that few data exist to quantify the mean time to failure of these systems. However, there is keen interest in developing new techniques to measure SHW reliability, particularly among utilities that use ratepayer money to pay the rebates. This document reports on an effort to develop and test new, simplified techniques to directly measure the state of health of fielded SHW systems. One approach was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and is based on the idea that the performance of the solar storage tank can reliably indicate the operational status of the SHW systems. Another approach, developed by the University of New Mexico (UNM), uses adaptive resonance theory, a type of neural network, to detect and predict failures. This method uses the same sensors that are normally used to control the SHW system. The NREL method uses two additional temperature sensors on the solar tank. The theories, development, application, and testing of both methods are described in the report. Testing was performed on the SHW Reliability Testbed at UNM, a highly instrumented SHW system developed jointly by SNL and UNM. The two methods were tested against a number of simulated failures. The results show that both methods show promise for inclusion in conventional SHW controllers, giving them advanced capability in detecting and predicting component failures.

Caudell, Thomas P. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); He, Hongbo (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Menicucci, David F. (Building Specialists, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Mammoli, Andrea A. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Burch, Jay (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

B3.11 SWCX for Outdoor Tests, Experiments on Materials and Equipment Components-  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 SWCX for Outdoor Tests, Experiments on Materials and Equipment Components- 1 SWCX for Outdoor Tests, Experiments on Materials and Equipment Components- Revision 0 Sitewide Categorical Exclusion for Outdoor Tests, Experiments on Materials and Equipment Components Introduction .A .. s defined in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Richland Operations Office Integrated Management System Procedure, NEPA Analysis at Hanford, a sitewide categorical exclusion is: An application of DOE categorical exclusions described in 10 CFR 1021, Appendices A and B, which may apply to Hanford Site proposed actions (activities) that are "sitewide" in nature and extent, which the cognizant DOE Hanford NCO has determined fit within the scope (i.e., same n

72

In-situ parameter estimation for solar domestic hot water heating systems components. Final report, June 1995--May 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three different solar domestic hot water systems are being tested at the Colorado State University Solar Energy Applications Laboratory; an unpressurized drain-back system with a load side heat exchanger, an integral collector storage system, and an ultra low flow natural convection heat exchanger system. The systems are fully instrumented to yield data appropriate for in-depth analyses of performance. The level of detail allows the observation of the performance of the total system and the performance of the individual components. This report evaluates the systems based on in-situ experimental data and compares the performances with simulated performances. The verification of the simulations aids in the rating procedure. The whole system performance measurements are also used to analyze the performance of individual components of a solar hot water system and to develop improved component models. The data are analyzed extensively and the parameters needed to characterize the systems fully are developed. Also resulting from this indepth analysis are suggested design improvements wither to the systems or the system components.

Smith, T.R.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Energy test method development for electric heat pump water heaters  

SciTech Connect

Modifications are proposed for the current US Department of Energy test procedures for water heaters in order to make them applicable to electric heat pump water heaters. The modifications are in the areas of definitions and technical procedures. The latter include the test conditions, test procedures and measurements, and calculations. Reasons for making these modifications and laboratory test data are provided to support the modifications in the technical procedures. The main modifications include: (1) lowering the water supply temperature from 70/sup 0/F to 55/sup 0/F, (2) lowering the tank thermostat setting from 160/sup 0/F to 145/sup 0/F to maintain the same 90/sup 0/F temperature rise, (3) measuring the power input instead of using the nameplate rating as in the case for an electric water heater, and (4) measuring the recovery efficiency instead of calculating it by using the standby losses in the case for an electric water heater.

Wan, C.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Overview of Component Testing Requirements for a Small Fluoride Salt-Cooled High Tempreature Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article summarizes the information necessary to provide reasonable assurance that components for a small fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactor will meet their functional requirements. In support of the analysis of testing requirements, a simplified, conceptual description of the systems, structures, and components specific to this reactor class was developed. These reactor system elements were divided into major categories based on their functions: (1) reactor core systems, (2) heat transport system, (3) reactor auxiliary cooling system, and (4) instrumentation and controls system. An assessment of technical maturity for each element was made, and a gap analysis was performed to identify specific areas that require further testing. A prioritized list of the testing requirements was then developed. The prioritization was based on both the relative importance of the system to reactor viability, and performance and time requirements to perform the testing.

Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Peretz, Fred J [ORNL; Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

225-kW Dynamometer for Testing Small Wind Turbine Components: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes NREL's new 225-kW dynamometer facility that is suitable for testing a variety of components and subsystems for small wind turbines and discusses opportunities for industry partnerships with NREL for use of the facility.

Green, J.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

LARGO hot water system thermal performance test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal performance tests and results on the LARGO Solar Hot Water System under natural environmental conditions are presented. Some objectives of these evaluations are to determine the amount of energy collected, the amount of energy delivered to the household as contributed by solar power supplied to operate the system and auxiliary power to maintain tank temperature at proper level, overall system efficiency and to determine temperature distribution within the tank. The tests and evaluation were performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center solar test facility. The Solar Hot Water system is termed a ''Dump-type'' because of the draining system for freeze protection. The solar collector is a single glazed flat plate. An 82-gallon domestic water heater is provided as the energy storage vessel. Water is circulated through the collector and water heater by a 5.3 GPM capacity pump, and control of the pump motor is achieved by a differential temperature controller.

Not Available

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Effect of Water Content on SOFC Single Cell Testing: Materials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cell was tested at 800C using pure H2 with different water content (~3% and ~30%). Impedance, IV curve, and power density were recorded. SEM and OM ...

78

Icing Wind Tunnel Tests on the CSIRO Liquid Water Probe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wet wind tunnel tests have been Performed on several versions of the CSIRO probe designed for the airborne measurement of liquid water content. Four different controller units and 17 different Probe sensors (including half-size and shielded ...

W. D. King; J. E. Dye; D. Baumgardner; J. W. Strapp; D. Huffman

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

SITEWIDE CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION FOR OUTDOOR TESTS ON MATERIALS AND COMPONENTS, PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SITEWIDE CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION FOR OUTDOOR TESTS ON SITEWIDE CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION FOR OUTDOOR TESTS ON MATERIALS AND COMPONENTS, PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL LABORATORY, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON Proposed AetioD: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) proposes to conduct outdoor tests and experiments on materials and equipment components under controlled conditions. No source, special nuclear, or byproduct materials would be involved, but encapsulated radioactive sources manufactured to applicable standards or other radiological materials could be used in activities under this categorical exclusion (eX). LoeatioD of Action: The locations would include DOE property at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site and other offsite outdoor locations. Description of the Proposed Action:

80

Dynamics of the fast component of nano-confined water under electric field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the diffusion of water molecules confined in the pores of folded silica materials (FSM-12 with average pore diameter of $\\sim$ 16 \\AA), measured by means of quasielastic neutron scattering using the cold neutron chopper spectrometer (CNCS). The goal is to investigate the effect of electric field on the previously observed fast component of nano-confined water. The measurements were taken at temperatures between 220 K and 245 K, and at two electric field values, 0 kV/mm and 2 kV/mm. Similar to the recently observed electric field induced enhancement of the slow translational motion of confined water, there is a an equally important impact of the field on the faster diffusion.

Omar Diallo, Souleymane [ORNL; Mamontov, Eugene [ORNL; Podlesnyak, Andrey A [ORNL; Ehlers, Georg [ORNL; Wada, Nobuo [Nagoya University, Japan; Inagaki, S [Toyota Central Research and Development Labs. Inc.; Fukushima, Y [Toyota Central Research and Development Labs. Inc.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water components test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Dynamics of the fast component of nano-confined water under electric field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the diffusion of water molecules confined in the pores of folded silica materials (FSM-12 with average pore diameter of $\\sim$ 16 \\AA), measured by means of quasielastic neutron scattering using the cold neutron chopper spectrometer (CNCS). The goal is to investigate the effect of electric field on the previously observed fast component of nano-confined water. The measurements were taken at temperatures between 220 K and 245 K, and at two electric field values, 0 kV/mm and 2 kV/mm. Similar to the recently observed electric field induced enhancement of the slow translational motion of confined water, there is a an equally important impact of the field on the faster diffusion.

S. O. Diallo; E. Mamontov; A. Podlesnyak; G. Ehlers; N. Wada; S. Inagaki; Y. Fukushima

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

82

Water content test for EOR crude simulates desalter  

SciTech Connect

Crude oil produced from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects employing micellar/polymer flooding can require an alternative test method for water content to the ASTM centrifuge test, or grindout procedure. The reason is that centrifuging cannot break the surfactant-stabilized emulsion. As an alternative, Marathon Oil Co. has developed a simulated desalter test (SDT) and necessary apparatus for the accurate evaluation of the quality of crude oil from such projects. Oil quality parameters such as basic sediment and water values are used almost universally for determining the acceptability of crude oil into pipeline or refinery systems.

Duke, R.B. (Marathon Oil Co., Littleton, CO (US))

1991-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

83

Applications Tests of Commercial Heat Pump Water Heaters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Field application tests have been conducted on three 4 to 6-ton commercial heat pump water heater systems in a restaurant, a coin-operated laundry, and an office building cafeteria in Atlanta. The units provide space cooling while rejecting heat to a water heating load. The tests, conducted for Georgia Power Company, examined both quantitative and qualitative aspects of the heat pumps and the overall water heating systems. The results provide valuable insight into the actual operating characteristics of heat pump water heaters and useful guidelines for system design and operation. The capacity and efficiency of the units agreed with manufacturers' specifications. COP values ranged from 2 .6 to 3.0 for water heating only, and from 4.1 to 5.0 when space cooling benefit was included. It was concluded that heat pump water heaters can provide economical water heating and space conditioning. However, application sites must be selected within certain constraints and a minimum level of operating control and maintenance must be observed.

Oshinski, J. N..; Abrams, D. W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Side by Side Testing of Water Heating Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida Florida A Research Institute of the University of Central Florida Side by Side Testing of Water Heating Systems Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Austin , Texas March 1st, 2012 Carlos J. Colon carlos@fsec.ucf.edu FLORIDA SOLAR ENERGY CENTER - A Research Institute of the University of Central Florida Hot Water Systems (HWS) Laboratory FSEC Cocoa, Florida 3 2009 -Present (Currently in third testing rotation) FLORIDA SOLAR ENERGY CENTER - A Research Institute of the University of Central Florida Underground Circulation Loop * Solar circulation Loop 140+ feet of ½" copper tubing * Encased in PVC tubing with R-2.4 insulation * ICS to 50 gallon storage tank path need to

85

Transpiring wall supercritical water oxidation test reactor design report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories is working with GenCorp, Aerojet and Foster Wheeler Development Corporation to develop a transpiring wall supercritical water oxidation reactor. The transpiring wall reactor promises to mitigate problems of salt deposition and corrosion by forming a protective boundary layer of pure supercritical water. A laboratory scale test reactor has been assembled to demonstrate the concept. A 1/4 scale transpiring wall reactor was designed and fabricated by Aerojet using their platelet technology. Sandia`s Engineering Evaluation Reactor serves as a test bed to supply, pressurize and heat the waste; collect, measure and analyze the effluent; and control operation of the system. This report describes the design, test capabilities, and operation of this versatile and unique test system with the transpiring wall reactor.

Haroldsen, B.L.; Ariizumi, D.Y.; Mills, B.E.; Brown, B.G. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Engineering for Transportation and Environment Dept.; Rousar, D.C. [GenCorp Aerojet, Sacramento, CA (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Design requirements for the supercritical water oxidation test bed  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the design requirements for the supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) test bed that will be located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The test bed will process a maximum of 50 gph of waste plus the required volume of cooling water. The test bed will evaluate the performance of a number of SCWO reactor designs. The goal of the project is to select a reactor that can be scaled up for use in a full-size waste treatment facility to process US Department of Energy mixed wastes. EG&G Idaho, Inc. will design and construct the SCWO test bed at the Water Reactor Research Test Facility (WRRTF), located in the northern region of the INEL. Private industry partners will develop and provide SCWO reactors to interface with the test bed. A number of reactor designs will be tested, including a transpiring wall, tube, and vessel-type reactor. The initial SCWO reactor evaluated will be a transpiring wall design. This design requirements report identifies parameters needed to proceed with preliminary and final design work for the SCWO test bed. A flow sheet and Process and Instrumentation Diagrams define the overall process and conditions of service and delineate equipment, piping, and instrumentation sizes and configuration Codes and standards that govern the safe engineering and design of systems and guidance that locates and interfaces test bed hardware are provided. Detailed technical requirements are addressed for design of piping, valves, instrumentation and control, vessels, tanks, pumps, electrical systems, and structural steel. The approach for conducting the preliminary and final designs and environmental and quality issues influencing the design are provided.

Svoboda, J.M.; Valentich, D.J.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Construction and testing of ceramic fabric heat pipe with water working fluid  

SciTech Connect

A prototype ceramic fabric/titanium water heat pipe has been constructed and tested; it transported 25 to 80 W of power at 423 K. Component development and testing is continuing with the aim of providing an improved prototype, with a 38-{mu}m stainless steel linear covered by a biaxially-braided Nextel (trademark of the 3M Co., St. Paul Minnesota) sleeve that is approximately 300-{mu}m thick. This fabric has been tested to 800 K, and its emittance is about 0.5 at that temperature. Advanced versions of the water heat pipe will probably require a coating over the ceramic fabric in order to increase this emittance to the 0.8 to 0.9 range. 2 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Antoniak, Z.I.; Webb, B.J.; Bates, J.M.; Cooper, M.F.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Reliability testing of active SDHW components. Part III. Development of a fault detection system  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a fault detection system developed for solar domestic hot water systems that will assist the homeowner and repairman in detecting major operational faults with the system. A study by the Florida Solar Energy Center showed that most homeowners were unaware of how well their systems were operating. With this need in mind, we developed a system that will detect and display circulation failures, nighttime circulation, freeze protection failure, and overheating protection failure. Cost of the unit using retail prices for components is less than $55.00 (1985 $), excluding the sensors. Fault detection systems are necessary, since it is difficult for homeowners to know the status of their system. Our device is sufficiently developed for industry to use, although further development of some of the sensors and some cost reduction is necessary.

Farrington, R.B.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) before Upgrade to Component Test Facility (CTF)  

SciTech Connect

The compact (R0~1.2-1.3m) Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) is aimed at providing a fully integrated, continuously driven fusion nuclear environment of copious fusion neutrons. This facility would be used to test, discover, understand, and innovate scientific and technical solutions for the challenges facing DEMO, by addressing the multi-scale synergistic interactions involving fusion plasma material interactions, tritium fuel cycle, power extraction, and the nuclear effects on materials. Such a facility properly designed would provide, initially at the JET-level plasma pressure (~30%T2) and conditions (e.g., Hot-Ion H-Mode), an outboard fusion neutron flux of 0.25 MW/m2 while requiring a fusion power of 19 MW. If and when this research operation is successful, its performance can be extended to 1 MW/m2 and 76 MW by reaching for twice the JET plasma pressure and Q. High-safety factor q and moderate- plasmas would minimize plasma-induced disruptions, helping to deliver reliably a neutron fluence of 1 MW-yr/m2 and a duty factor of 10% presently anticipated for the FNS research. Success of this research will depend on achieving time-efficient installation and replacement of all components using extensive remote handling (RH). This in turn requires modular designs for all internal components, including the single-turn toroidal field coil center-post with RH-compatible bi-directional sliding joints. Such device goals would further dictate placement of support structures and vacuum seal welds behind the internal and shielding components. If these further goals could be achieved, the FNSF would provide a ready upgrade path to the Component Test Facility (CTF), which would aim to test, at higher neutron fluence and duty cycle, the demanding fusion nuclear engineering and technologies for DEMO. This FNSF-CTF strategy would be complementary to the ITER and the Broader Approach programs, and thereby help mitigate the risks of an aggressive world fusion DEMO R&D Program. The key physics and technology research needed in the next decade to manage the potential risks of this FNSF are identified.

Peng, Yueng Kay Martin [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Investigation of clean water test sites for prototype turbomachinery. [Two-phase impulse expander  

SciTech Connect

Expanded development of total-flow expander technology in order to obtain efficient energy extraction from the liquid flow component of the geothermal well flow, in addition to steam enthalpy conversion, has been undertaken by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL). The flow conditions necessary for this type of complete system performance characterization are beyond the capabilities of the test facility utilized in the preliminary tests at the LLL hot-water test facility. As an alternative to increasing the existing facility to meet the expanded test requirements, test facilities in the industrial California community are being surveyed to assess their capability in supporting future tests of the LLL expander. Biphase Engines, Inc. of Santa Monica, California was contracted by LLL to perform this survey. The goal of the Biphase Engines survey is to identify organizations with, first, an interest in supporting the LLL turbine test program and, second, to review their test capabilities with respect to the turbine test requirements. The results of the survey are described in the following sections which includes a listing of all organizations contacted. The responses to all inquiries are given. The affirmative responses to the test-support requirement are detailed with a description of the test facility, range of operating conditions, facility modifications and auxiliary equipment required and costs thereof, and testing schedule costs. (JGB)

Cerini, D.J.

1978-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

91

Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: • Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements • Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout • Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required • Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems • Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs • Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs.

S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Design, fabrication and testing of a marketable waterwall component. Final technical report, 1 September 1978-31 August 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One Design, Inc., has designed and developed modular waterwall components that make up a system for passive solar space heating using a south-facing thermal storage wall. The modules can also be used as thermal mass storage for roof apertures and for greenhouse applications. The modules are constructed of fiberglass reinforced polyester and each is 95 inches long, 16.5 inches wide and 24.5 inches tall. Each module contains 94 gallons or 784 pounds of water. When stacked behind south glazing, they provide 52 Btu//sup 0/F per square foot of net glazed area. A stack of four modules has a height of 93.5 inches, suitable for an 8-foot interior ceiling; a stack of five modules is 116.5 inches high, suitable for a 10-foot interior ceiling. The modules are designed to stack on one another without requiring additional hardware and nest inside each other to reduce shipping costs. Prototype modules were fabricated and subjected to structural tests. They were found to be capable of supporting at least 4.8 times the load imposed by a five tank stack, well above the recommended safety factor of 2. Long term purity of the water in the containers was tested and evaluated and found to be within acceptable limits. Prototype modules were installed in One Design's Star Tannery House near Winchester, Virginia, and performance was extensively monitored from January to April, 1979. Based on the performance during the period, it has been estimated that the passive solar heating contribution would be 79.5% of the house's total heating requirement.

Maloney, T.J.; Habib, V.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Analysis of water reinjection at the Niland Geothermal Test Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The problems associated with reinjecting spent geothermal brines are currently under investigation. This effort has included field tests of injection water to evaluate treating equipment effectiveness at the Niland Geothermal Test Loop. Membrane filter tests were conducted on fluids from the settling tanks, from the test loop, from the clarifier and at the injection well head (Magmamax No. 3). From this and other information concerning the injection interval, pressure, temperature and well history, an attempt to predict a well half life was made. The results of these calculations were not in agreement with observed well performance. An attempt with some apparent success has been made to understand the possible source of these discrepancies. The cyclic nature of the injection history dictated by need for descaling the test loop, followed by apparent partial recovery of injection acceptance, has led to a theory that is under investigation concerning effect of reheating the injection fluid containing amorphous particulate silica by the reservoir rock and fluid during well shut-in. Preliminary tests indicate some of this finely divided silica may be redisolving with consequent reduction in reservoir damage, and that two widely spaced injection wells in an alternating mode may provide low-cost, long-life injection capacity at Niland and similar geothermal projects.

Jorda, R.M.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Low cycle thermal fatigue testing of beryllium grades for ITER plasma facing components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel technique has been used to test the relative low cycle thermal fatigue resistance of different grades of US and Russian beryllium, which is proposed as plasma facing armor for fusion reactor first wall, limiter, and divertor components. The 30 kW electron beam test system at Sandia National Laboratories was used to sweep the beam spot along one direction at 1 Hz. This produces a localized temperature ``spike`` of 750{degree}C for each pass of the beam. Large thermal stresses in excess of the yield strength are generated due to very high spot heat flux, 250 MW/m{sup 2}. Cyclic plastic strains on the order of 0.6% produced visible cracking on the heated surface in less than 3000 cycles. An in-vacuo fiber optic borescope was used to visually inspect the beryllium surfaces for crack initiation. Grades of US beryllium tested included: S-65C, S- 65H, S-200F, S-200F-H, SR-200, I-400, extruded high purity, HIP`d spherical powder, porous beryllium (94% and 98% dense), Be/30% BeO, Be/60% BeO, and TiBe{sub 12}. Russian grades included: TGP-56, TShGT, DShG-200, and TShG-56. Both the number of cycles to crack initiation, and the depth of crack propagation, were measured. The most fatigue resistant grades were S-65C, DShG-200, TShGT, and TShG-56. Rolled sheet Be (SR-200) showed excellent crack propagation resistance in the plane of rolling, despite early formation of delamination cracks. Only one sample showed no evidence of surface melting, Extruded (T). Metallographic and chemical analyses are provided. Good agreement was found between the measured depth of cracks and a 2-D elastic-plastic finite element stress analysis.

Watson, R.D.; Youchison, D.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Dombrowski, D.E. [Brush Wellman, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Guiniatouline, R.N. [Efremov Institute, (Russia); Kupriynov, I.B. [Russian Institute of Inorganic Materials (Russia)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

A Significance Test for Principal Components Applied to a Cyclone Climatology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique is presented for selection of principal components for which the geophysical signal is greater than the level of noise. The level of noise is simulated by repeated sampling of principal components computed from a spatially and ...

James E. Overland; R. W. Preisendorfer

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Built-in data-flow integration testing in large-scale component-based systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern large-scale component-based applications and service ecosystems are built following a number of different component models and architectural styles, such as the data-flow architectural style. In this style, each building block receives data from ...

Éric Piel; Alberto Gonzalez-Sanchez; Hans-Gerhard Gross

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Field Validation of Toxicity Tests to Evaluate the Potential for Beneficial Use of Produced Water  

SciTech Connect

This study investigated potential biological effects of produced water contamination derived from occasional surface overflow and possible subsurface intrusion at an oil production site along the shore of Skiatook Lake, Oklahoma. We monitored basic chemistry and acute toxicity to a suite of standard aquatic test species (fathead minnow-Pimephales promelas, Daphnia pulex, Daphnia magna, and Ceriodaphnia dubia) in produced water and in samples taken from shallow groundwater wells on the site. Toxicity identification evaluations and ion toxicity modeling were used to identify toxic constituents in the samples. Lake sediment at the oil production site and at a reference site were also analyzed for brine intrusion chemically and by testing sediment toxicity using the benthic invertebrates, Chironomus dilutus, and Hyallela azteca. Sediment quality was also assessed with in situ survival and growth studies with H. azteca and the Asian clam, Corbicula fluminea, and by benthic macroinvertebrate community sampling. The produced water was acutely toxic to the aquatic test organisms at concentrations ranging from 1% to 10% of the whole produced water sample. Toxicity identification evaluation and ion toxicity modeling indicated major ion salts and hydrocarbons were the primary mixture toxicants. The standardized test species used in the laboratory bioassays exhibited differences in sensitivity to these two general classes of contaminants, which underscores the importance of using multiple species when evaluating produced water toxicity. Toxicity of groundwater was greater in samples from wells near a produced water injection well and an evaporation pond. Principle component analyses (PCA) of chemical data derived from the groundwater wells indicated dilution by lake water and possible biogeochemical reactions as factors that ameliorated groundwater toxicity. Elevated concentrations of major ions were found in pore water from lake sediments, but toxicity from these ions was limited to sediment depths of 10 cm or greater, which is outside of the primary zone of biological activity. Further, exposure to site sediments did not have any effects on test organisms, and macroinvertebrate communities did not indicate impairment at the oil production site as compared to a reference site. In situ experiments with H. azteca and C. fluminea, indicated a sublethal site effect (on growth of both species), but these could not be definitively linked with produced water infiltration. Severe weather conditions (drought followed by flooding) negatively influenced the intensity of lake sampling aimed at delineating produced water infiltration. Due to the lack of clear evidence of produced water infiltration into the sub-littoral zone of the lake, it was not possible to assess whether the laboratory bioassays of produced water effectively indicate risk in the receiving system. However, the acutely toxic nature of the produced water and general lack of biological effects in the lake at the oil production site suggest minimal to no produced water infiltration into surficial lake sediments and the near-shore water column. This study was able to demonstrate the utility of ion toxicity modeling to support data from toxicity identification evaluations aimed at identifying key toxic constituents in produced water. This information could be used to prioritize options for treating produced water in order to reduce toxic constituents and enhance options for reuse. The study also demonstrated how geographic information systems, toxicity modeling, and toxicity assessment could be used to facilitate future site assessments.

Joseph Bidwell; Jonathan Fisher; Naomi Cooper

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

Results of the DF-4 BWR (boiling water reactor) control blade-channel box test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The DF-4 in-pile fuel damage experiment investigated the behavior of boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel canisters and control blades in the high temperature environment of an unrecovered reactor accident. This experiment, which was carried out in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories, was performed under the USNRC's internationally sponsored severe fuel damage (SFD) program. The DF-4 test is described herein and results from the experiment are presented. Important findings from the DF-4 test include the low temperature melting of the stainless steel control blade caused by reaction with the B{sub 4}C, and the subsequent low temperature attack of the Zr-4 channel box by the relocating molten blade components. Hydrogen generation was found to continue throughout the experiment, diminishing slightly following the relocation of molten oxidizing zircaloy to the lower extreme of the test bundle. A large blockage which was formed from this material continued to oxidize while steam was being fed into the the test bundle. The results of this test have provided information on the initial stages of core melt progression in BWR geometry involving the heatup and cladding oxidation stages of a severe accident and terminating at the point of melting and relocation of the metallic core components. The information is useful in modeling melt progression in BWR core geometry, and provides engineering insight into the key phenomena controlling these processes. 12 refs., 12 figs.

Gauntt, R.O.; Gasser, R.D.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Cooling Towers: Understanding Key Components of Cooling Towers and How to Improve Water Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paul Johnston-Knight Introduction Federal laws and regulations require Federal agencies to reduce water use and improve water efficiency. Namely, Executive Order 13514 Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance, requires an annual two percent reduction of water use intensity (water use per square foot of building space) for agency potable water consumption as well as a two percent reduction of water use for industrial, landscaping, and agricultural applica- tions. Cooling towers can be a significant

100

Review of International Methods of Test to Rate the Efficiency of Water Heaters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

test procedures for solar water heaters characterizes systemWasted water Solar Heat pump water heater Australia/Newwater_heaters/Annex_IV_8July08 International Organization for Standardization, "Draft International Standard ISO/DIS 9459-4 Solar

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water components test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Investigation of water accumulation in an offgas test facility HEPA housing  

SciTech Connect

The Consolidated Incineration Facility, at the Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site, is designed to treat solid and liquid RCRA hazardous and mixed wastes generated by site operations and clean-up activities. During CIF`s pretrial burn campaigns in 1995, an appreciable amount of water was recovered from the HEPA housings. Questions were immediately raised as to the source of the water, and the degree of wetness of the filters during operation. There are two primary issues involved: Water could reduce the life expectancy and performance of the HEPA filters, housing, and associated ducting, and wet HEPAs also present radiological concerns for personnel during filter change-out. A similar phenomenon was noted at the Offgas Components Test Facility (OCTF), a 1/10 scale pilot of CIF`s air pollution control system. Tests at OCTF indicated the water`s most likely origin to be vapor condensing out from the flue gas stream due to excessive air in-leakage at housing door seals, ducting flanges, and actual holes in the ducting. The rate of accumulation bears no statistical correlation to such process parameters as steam flow, reheater outlet temperature and offgas velocity in the duct. Test results also indicated that the HEPA filter media is moistened by the initial process flow while the facility is being brought on line. However, even when the HEPA filters were manually drenched prior to startup, they became completely dry within four hours of the time steam was introduced to the reheater. Finally, no demonstrable relationship was found between the degree of filter media wetness and filter dP.

Speed, D.L.; Burns, D.B.; Van Pelt, W.B.; Burns, H.H.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Modeling and Test-and-Rate Methods for Innovative Thermosiphon Solar Water Heaters: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Conference paper regarding research in modeling and test-and-rate methods for thermosiphon solar domestic water heaters.

Burch, J.; Shoukas, G.; Brandemuhl, M.; Krarti, M.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Remote Handling and Plasma Conditions to Enable Fusion Nuclear Science R&D Using a US Component Testing Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of a fusion component testing facility to study and establish, during the ITER era, the remaining scientific and technical knowledge needed by fusion Demo is considered and described in this paper. This use aims to lest components in an integrated fusion nuclear environment, for the first time, to discover and understand the underpinning physical properties, and to develop improved components for further testing, in a time-efficient manner. It requires a design with extensive modularization and remote handling of activated components, and flexible hot-cell laboratories. It further requires reliable plasma conditions to avoid disruptions and minimize their impact, and designs to reduce the divertor heat flux to the level of ITER design. As the plasma duration is extended through the planned ITER level (similar to 10(3) s) and beyond, physical properties with increasing time constants, progressively for similar to 10(4) s, similar to 10(5) s, and similar to 10(6) s, would become accessible for testing and R&D. The longest time constants of these are likely to be of the order of a week ( 106 S). Progressive stages of research operation are envisioned in deuterium, deuterium-tritium for the ITER duration, and deuterium-tritium with increasingly longer plasma durations. The fusion neutron fluence and operational duty factor anticipated for this "scientific exploration" phase of a component test facility are estimated to be up to 1 MW-yr/m(2) and up to 10%, respectively.

Peng, Yueng Kay Martin [ORNL; Burgess, Thomas W [ORNL; Carroll, Adam J [ORNL; Neumeyer, C. L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Canik, John [ORNL; Cole, Michael J [ORNL; Dorland, W. D. [University of Maryland; Fogarty, P. J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Grisham, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Hillis, Donald Lee [ORNL; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Korsah, Kofi [ORNL; Kotschenreuther, M. [University of Texas, Austin; LaHaye, R. [General Atomics, San Diego; Mahajan, S. [University of Texas, Austin; Majeski, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Nelson, Brad E [ORNL; Patton, Bradley D [ORNL; Rasmussen, David A [ORNL; Sabbagh, S. A. [Columbia University; Sontag, Aaron C [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Tsai, C. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Vanlanju, P. [University of Texas, Austin; Wagner, Jill C [ORNL; Yoder, III, Graydon L [ORNL

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Materials Reliability Program, Environmental Fatigue Testing of Type 304L Stainless Steel U-Bends in Simulated PWR Primary Water (MR P-188)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory data generated in the past decade indicate a significant reduction in component fatigue life when reactor water environmental effects are experimentally simulated. However, these laboratory data have not been supported by nuclear power plant component operating experience. In an earlier comprehensive review of laboratory component and structural test data performed through the EPRI Materials Reliability Program (MRP), flow rate was identified as a critical variable that was generally not consi...

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

105

Materials Reliability Program: Environmental Fatigue Testing of Type 304L Stainless Steel U-Bends in Simulated PWR Primary Water (MRP-137)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory data generated in the past decade indicate a significant reduction in component fatigue life when reactor water environmental effects are experimentally simulated. However, these laboratory data have not been supported by nuclear power plant component operating experience. In a recent comprehensive review of laboratory, component, and structural test data performed through the EPRI Materials Reliability Program, flow rate was identified as a critical variable that was generally not considered ...

2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

106

Design, Construction, and Field Testing of a Prototype Mobile Vault Water Treatment System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsurface vaults and manholes provide access to underground electric distribution equipment in many areas. These structures can accumulate water through storm water runoff or ground water seepage. The water must be removed before maintenance work can proceed. This report presents results of a project to design, construct, and test a mobile treatment system to manage vault waters.

2001-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

107

Brief summary of reactor core component welding for the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF)  

SciTech Connect

Included are descriptions of welding methods and joint design, welding equipment, and qualification tests. (DG)

Brown, W.F.

1974-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

IGT Stack No. 6 (SDG{ampersand}E-1) Test Plan and Component Specification Document: Topical report, March 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of Stack-6 (SDG{ampersand}E-1) is to scale up and demonstrate the long term performance and endurance characteristics of the IMHEX stack design and the Generation No. 2 cell components (improved pore matching electrodes) in a 20 cell subscale stack test.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

109

System Engineering Program Applicability for the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Component Test Capability (CTC)  

SciTech Connect

This white paper identifies where the technical management and systems engineering processes and activities to be used in establishing the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) Component Test Capability (CTC) should be addressed and presents specific considerations for these activities under each CTC alternative

Jeffrey Bryan

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Concentrating Solar Power Ã?¢Ã?Â?Ã?Â? Central Receiver Panel Component Fabrication and Testing FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to complete a design of an advanced concentrated solar panel and demonstrate the manufacturability of key components. Then confirm the operation of the key components under prototypic solar flux conditions. This work is an important step in reducing the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) from a central receiver solar power plant. The key technical risk to building larger power towers is building the larger receiver systems. Therefore, this proposed technology project includes the design of an advanced molten salt prototypic sub-scale receiver panel that can be utilized into a large receiver system. Then complete the fabrication and testing of key components of the receive design that will be used to validate the design. This project shall have a significant impact on solar thermal power plant design. Receiver panels of suitable size for utility scale plants are a key element to a solar power tower plant. Many subtle and complex manufacturing processes are involved in producing a reliable, robust receiver panel. Given the substantial size difference between receiver panels manufactured in the past and those needed for large plant designs, the manufacture and demonstration on prototype receiver panel components with representative features of a full-sized panel will be important to improving the build process for commercial success. Given the thermal flux limitations of the test facility, the panel components cannot be rendered full size. Significance changes occurred in the projects technical strategies from project initiation to the accomplishments described herein. The initial strategy was to define cost improvements for the receiver, design and build a scale prototype receiver and test, on sun, with a molten salt heat transport system. DOE had committed to constructing a molten salt heat transport loop to support receiver testing at the top of the NSTTF tower. Because of funding constraints this did not happen. A subsequent plan to test scale prototype receiver, off sun but at temperature, at a molten salt loop at ground level adjacent to the tower also had to be abandoned. Thus, no test facility existed for a molten salt receiver test. As a result, PWR completed the prototype receiver design and then fabricated key components for testing instead of fabricating the complete prototype receiver. A number of innovative design ideas have been developed. Key features of the receiver panel have been identified. This evaluation includes input from Solar 2, personal experience of people working on these programs and meetings with Sandia. Key components of the receiver design and key processes used to fabricate a receiver have been selected for further evaluation. The Test Plan, Concentrated Solar Power Receiver In Cooperation with the Department of Energy and Sandia National Laboratory was written to define the scope of the testing to be completed as well as to provide details related to the hardware, instrumentation, and data acquisition. The document contains a list of test objectives, a test matrix, and an associated test box showing the operating points to be tested. Test Objectives: 1. Demonstrate low-cost manufacturability 2. Demonstrate robustness of two different tube base materials 3. Collect temperature data during on sun operation 4. Demonstrate long term repeated daily operation of heat shields 5. Complete pinhole tube weld repairs 6. Anchor thermal models This report discusses the tests performed, the results, and implications for design improvements and LCOE reduction.

McDowell, Michael W [Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne; Miner, Kris [Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne

2013-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

111

Reliability Testing Beyond Qualification as a Key Component in Photovoltaic's Progress Toward Grid Parity: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses why it is necessary for new lower cost PV modules to be tested using a reliability test sequence that goes beyond the Qualification test sequence now utilized for modules. Today most PV modules are warranted for 25 years, but the Qualification Test Sequence does not test for 25-year life. There is no accepted test protocol to validate a 25-year lifetime. This paper recommends the use of long term accelerated testing to compare now designs directly with older designs that have achieved long lifetimes in outdoor exposure. If the new designs do as well or better than the older ones, then it is likely that they will survive an equivalent length of time in the field.

Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Kurtz, S.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Model tests of OTEC-1: test of HMB with and without cold water pipes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In early 1977, ERDA began an extensive study of various factors which could effect the early design and deployment of OTEC-1, a test platform for evaluation of one megawatt (1 MW) OTEC heat exchangers. The platform was to consist of the Hughes Mining Barge (HMB) and a 3000 foot deep cold water pipe (CWP). One of the factors to be considered was the motions of the HMB and the motions, loads and stresses of the CWP. Several theoretical methods, including one developed at HYDRONAUTICS, Incorporated were to be used to predict motions and CWP loads and stresses. There existed, however, no model tests or other validation of these theoretical methods. The lack of any validation of the theoretical methods was of some concern as early studies indicated that high CWP bending stresses, in particular, could represent a significant design problem. In early May 1977, HYDRONAUTICS proposed to carry out model tests of a one-fiftieth scale model of the HMB with several CWP models representing relatively rigid (steel) and flexible (glass reinforced plastic GRP) CWP's. This proposal was accepted by ERDA, and the model tests were carried out during June 1977. Preliminary results were provided to ERDA during June and July 1977. This report describes the work carried out and presents and discusses the results, including a comparison of measured and predicted results.

Sheldon, L. R.; Barr, R. A.; O'Dea, J. F.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Life extension of structural components via an improved nondestructive testing methodology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study was performed to determine the flaw detection sensitivity of advanced nondestructive testing (NDT) techniques with respect to structural applications. The techniques analyzed exemplify the incorporation ...

Hohmann, Brian P. (Brian Patrick)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Estimation of land surface water and energy balance flux components and closure relation using conditional sampling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Models of terrestrial water and energy balance include numerical treatment of heat and moisture diffusion in the soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum. These two diffusion and exchange processes are linked only at a few ...

Farhadi, Leila

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Liquid-Water Uptake and Removal in PEM Fuel-Cell Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Management of liquid water is critical for optimal fuel-cell operation, especially at low temperatures. It is therefore important to understand the wetting properties and water holdup of the various fuel-cell layers. While the gas-diffusion layer is relatively hydrophobic and exhibits a strong intermediate wettability, the catalyst layer is predominantly hydrophilic. In addition, the water content of the ionomer in the catalyst layer is lower than that of the bulk membrane, and is affected by platinum surfaces. Liquid-water removal occurs through droplets on the surface of the gas-diffusion layer. In order to predict droplet instability and detachment, a force balance is used. While the pressure or drag force on the droplet can be derived, the adhesion or surface-tension force requires measurement using a sliding-angle approach. It is shown that droplets produced by forcing water through the gas-diffusion layer rather than placing them on top of it show much stronger adhesion forces owing to the contact to the subsurface water.

Das, Prodip K.; Gunterman, Haluna P.; Kwong, Anthony; Weber, Adam Z.

2011-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

116

Making automated testing of cloud applications an integral component of PaaS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditional testing is inadequate for the complexity of modern cloud application software stacks. While the platform-as-a-service (PaaS) model has streamlined application development and deployment, its multiple abstraction layers and dependencies have ...

Stefan Bucur, Johannes Kinder, George Candea

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Field testing of component-level model-based fault detection methods for mixing boxes and VAV fan systems  

SciTech Connect

An automated fault detection and diagnosis tool for HVAC systems is being developed, based on an integrated, life-cycle, approach to commissioning and performance monitoring. The tool uses component-level HVAC equipment models implemented in the SPARK equation-based simulation environment. The models are configured using design information and component manufacturers' data and then fine-tuned to match the actual performance of the equipment by using data measured during functional tests of the sort using in commissioning. This paper presents the results of field tests of mixing box and VAV fan system models in an experimental facility and a commercial office building. The models were found to be capable of representing the performance of correctly operating mixing box and VAV fan systems and detecting several types of incorrect operation.

Xu, Peng; Haves, Philip

2002-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

118

Nondestructive Evaluation: Ultrasonic Equivalency Testing of Weld Inlaid and Weld Onlaid Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) investigations in which ultrasonic data were acquired using American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI, Appendix VIII qualified procedures on Performance Demonstration Initiative (PDI) 600 Series nozzle mockups containing crack-like flaws. These mockups were representative of dissimilar metal weld (DMW) safe-end-to-nozzle configurations found in the U.S. pressurized water reactor (PWR) fleet. T...

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

119

Towards the visualization of water supply system components with GPR images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a methodological tool for examining the layout and revealing the concealed characteristics of urban water supply systems (WSS). For this purpose, we use underground images obtained with ground penetrating radar (GPR) as a method that does ... Keywords: Ground penetrating radar, Images processing and analysis, Pipe location, Signal processing

David Ayala-Cabrera; Manuel Herrera; Idel Montalvo; Rafael PéRez-GarcíA

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

High Temperature Steam Electrolysis Materials Degradation: Preliminary Results of Corrosion Tests on Ceramatec Electrolysis Cell Components  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Corrosion tests were performed on stainless steel and nickel alloy coupons in H2O/H2 mixtures and dry air to simulate conditions experienced in high temperature steam electrolysis systems. The stainless steel coupons were tested bare and with one of three different proprietary coatings applied. Specimens were corroded at 850°C for 500 h with weight gain data recorded at periodic intervals. Post-test characterization of the samples included surface and cross-section scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and area-specific resistance measurements. The uncoated nickel alloy outperformed the ferritic stainless steel under all test conditions based on weight gain data. Parabolic rate constants for corrosion of these two uncoated alloys were consistent with values presented in the literature under similar conditions. The steel coatings reduced corrosion rates in H2O/H2 mixtures by as much as 50% compared to the untreated steel, but in most cases showed negligible corrosion improvement in air. The use of a rare-earth-based coating on stainless steel did not result in a significantly different area specific resistance values after corrosion compared to the untreated alloy. Characterization of the samples is still in progress and the findings will be revised when the complete data set is available.

Paul Demkowicz; Prateek Sachdev; Kevin DeWall; Pavel Medvedev

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water components test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Nondestructive testing of ceramic engine components. Final progress report for completed CRADAs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a method for the nondestructive testing of ZrO{sub 2} plasma-sprayed layers with intentional disbonds. A theoretical analysis was conducted to determine the surface-temperature difference for each disbond using a given input heat pulse.

Ellingson, W.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Happoldt, G.P. [Caterpillar, Inc., Peoria, IL (United States)

1993-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

Development of a propulsion system and component test facility for advanced radioisotope powered Mars Hopper platforms  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Verification and validation of design and modeling activities for radioisotope powered Mars Hopper platforms undertaken at the Center for Space Nuclear Research is essential for proof of concept. Previous research at the center has driven the selection of advanced material combinations; some of which require specialized handling capabilities. The development of a closed and contained test facility to forward this research is discussed within this paper.

Robert C. O'Brien; Nathan D. Jerred; Steven D. Howe

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Crack growth rates and metallographic examinations of Alloy 600 and Alloy 82/182 from field components and laboratory materials tested in PWR environments.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In light water reactors, components made of nickel-base alloys are susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking. This report summarizes the crack growth rate results and related metallography for field and laboratory-procured Alloy 600 and its weld alloys tested in pressurized water reactor (PWR) environments. The report also presents crack growth rate (CGR) results for a shielded-metal-arc weld of Alloy 182 in a simulated PWR environment as a function of temperature between 290 C and 350 C. These data were used to determine the activation energy for crack growth in Alloy 182 welds. The tests were performed by measuring the changes in the stress corrosion CGR as the temperatures were varied during the test. The difference in electrochemical potential between the specimen and the Ni/NiO line was maintained constant at each temperature by adjusting the hydrogen overpressure on the water supply tank. The CGR data as a function of temperature yielded activation energies of 252 kJ/mol for a double-J weld and 189 kJ/mol for a deep-groove weld. These values are in good agreement with the data reported in the literature. The data reported here and those in the literature suggest that the average activation energy for Alloy 182 welds is on the order of 220-230 kJ/mol, higher than the 130 kJ/mol commonly used for Alloy 600. The consequences of using a larger value of activation energy for SCC CGR data analysis are discussed.

Alexandreanu, B.; Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.

2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

124

Mixed waste chemical compatibility: A testing program for plastic packaging components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of hazardous and radioactive materials packaging is to enable these materials to be transported without posing a threat to the health or property of the general public. To achieve this aim, regulations in the United States have been written establishing general design requirements for such packagings. While no regulations have been written specifically for mixed waste packaging, regulations for the constituents of mixed wastes, i.e., hazardous and radioactive substances, have been codified by the US Department of Transportation (DOT, 49 CFR 173) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC, 10 CFR 71). The design requirements for both hazardous [49 CFR 173.24 (e)(1)] and radioactive [49 CFR 173.412 (g)] materials packaging specify packaging compatibility, i.e., that the materials of the packaging @d any contents be chemically compatible with each other. Furthermore, Type A [49 CFR 173.412 (g)] and Type B (10 CFR 71.43) packaging design requirements stipulate that there be no significant chemical, galvanic, or other reaction between the materials and contents of the package. Based on these requirements, a Chemical Compatibility Testing Program was developed in the Transportation Systems Department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The program attempts to assure any regulatory body that the issue of packaging material compatibility towards hazardous and radioactive materials has been addressed. This program has been described in considerable detail in an internal SNL document, the Chemical Compatibility Test Plan & Procedure Report (Nigrey 1993).

Nigrey, P.J.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

LARGO hot water system long range thermal performance test report. Addendum  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The test procedure used and the test results obtained during the long range thermal performance tests of the LARGO Solar Hot Water System under natural environmental conditions are presented. Objectives of these tests were to determine the amount of energy collected, the amount of power required for system operation, system efficiency temperature distribution and system performance degradation.

Not Available

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Wave-Energy Company Looks to Test Prototypes in Maine Waters | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wave-Energy Company Looks to Test Prototypes in Maine Waters Wave-Energy Company Looks to Test Prototypes in Maine Waters Wave-Energy Company Looks to Test Prototypes in Maine Waters April 9, 2010 - 4:19pm Addthis Lindsay Gsell Resolute Marine Energy - a Boston-based, wave-energy technology company - hopes to test ocean wave energy conversion prototypes in Maine sometime in the summer of 2011. The company has already completed two of the three testing stages, the first using computer simulation and the second with reduced-scale prototypes in a controlled environment. Now, the company is ready to take the technology offshore to begin ocean testing. Its eyes are set on the waters of its Northern neighbor, Maine. Maine is an ideal location for Resolute Marine Energy to conduct testing for a few reasons, said CEO and President Bill Staby. Working in Maine

127

Cesium reservoir and interconnective components. Final test report: TFE Verification Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The program objective is to demonstrate the technology readiness of a TFE (thermionic fuel element) suitable for use as the basic element in a thermionic reactor with electric power output in the 0.5 to 5.0 MW range. A thermionic converter must be supplied with cesium vapor for two reasons. Cesium atoms adsorbed on the surface of the emitter cause a reduction of the emitter work function to permit high current densities without excessive heating of the emitter. The second purpose of the cesium vapor is to provide space-charge neutralization in the emitter-collector gap so that the high current densities may flow across the gap unattenuated. The function of the cesium reservoir is to provide a source of cesium atoms, and to provide a reserve in the event that cesium is lost from the plasma by any mechanism. This can be done with a liquid cesium metal reservoir in which case it is heated to the desired temperature with auxiliary heaters. In a TFE, however, it is desirable to have the reservoir passively heated by the nuclear fuel. In this case, the reservoir must operate at a temperature intermediate between the emitter and the collector, ruling out the use of liquid reservoirs. Integral reservoirs contained within the TFE will produce cesium vapor pressures in the desired range at typical electrode temperatures. The reservoir material that appears to be the best able to meet requirements is graphite. Cesium intercalates easily into graphite, and the cesium pressure is insensitive to loading for a given intercalation stage. The goals of the cesium reservoir test program were to verify the performance of Cs-graphite reservoirs in the temperature-pressure range of interest to TFE operation, and to test the operation of these reservoirs after exposure to a fast neutron fluence corresponding to seven year mission lifetime. In addition, other materials were evaluated for possible use in the integral reservoir.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Private Water Well Testing in Areas Impacted by Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Private Water Well Testing in Areas Impacted by Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling (Updated November 15th in the absence of shale-gas drilling, well owners are strongly encouraged to evaluate their water on a regular testing in order to more specifically document potential impacts of Marcellus Shale gas development

Manning, Sturt

129

Review of International Methods of Test to Rate the Efficiency of Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Review of International Methods of Test to Rate the Efficiency of Water Review of International Methods of Test to Rate the Efficiency of Water Heaters Title Review of International Methods of Test to Rate the Efficiency of Water Heaters Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5187E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Lutz, James D. Subsidiary Authors Energy Analysis Department Document Number LBNL-5187E Pagination 21 Date Published January Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley ISBN Number LBNL-5187E Abstract The American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standards Project Committee (SPC) 118.2, Method of Testing for Rating Residential Water Heaters, is seeking to improve the test procedure used for measuring the energy efficiency of residential gas and electric water heaters. ASHRAE is seeking to develop an improved test procedure in part to support the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) desire to update and amend the water heater test procedure underlying the minimum energy efficiency standards for water heaters. DOE's test procedures are often based on or reference ASHRAE standards.DOE's most recent minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) for residential water heaters were promulgated in 2010.[1] The associated test procedures are stipulated in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR).[2] Although DOE currently is conducting a rulemaking to review and possibly amend the test procedures for residential water heaters, that rulemaking pertains to accounting for energy consumed during standby and off modes. In its notice of proposed rulemaking published in the Federal Register on August 30, 2010, DOE tentatively concluded that the test procedure for water heaters already fully accounts for and incorporates the energy consumed during standby and off modes [3].

130

HOWSE (HOt Water SAver) test program. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility of recovering heat from a domestic dishwasher was demonstrated in a working, full scale model. That project showed it could be done. This test program showed the HOWSE to be effective and safe over a period of eighteen months. The data from the test program is essential to show safety for requesting approval for use of this appliance by building code authorities.

Olson, W.R.

1983-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

131

PV Standards Work: Photovoltaic System and Component Certification, Test Facility Accreditation, and Solar Photovoltaic Energy Systems International Standards  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses efforts led by two companies (PowerMark Corporation and Sunset Technologies Inc.) to support both U.S. domestic and international photovoltaic (PV) system and component certification and test facility accreditation programs and the operation of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Committee 82 (TC-82) Photovoltaic Energy Systems. International and national PV certification/accreditation programs are successfully facilitating entry of only the highest quality PV products into the marketplace. Standards also continue to be a cornerstone for assuring global PV product conformity assessment, reducing non-tariff trade barriers, and ultimately improving PV products while lowering cost.

Basso, T. S.; Chalmers, S.; Barikmo, H. O.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Further Performance Tests on the CSIRO Liquid Water Probe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A further 400 h of flying experience with the CSIRO hot-wire probe has shown that it can accurately measure liquid water content in clouds. Computations and experiments suggest that when an epoxy coating is used for protection, it should be less ...

W. D. King; C. T. Maher; G. A. Hepburn

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Evaluation of AMIP II Global Climate Model Simulations of the Land Surface Water Budget and Its Components over the GEWEX-CEOP Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The land surface water balance components simulated by 20 atmospheric global circulation models (AGCMs) participating in phase II of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP II) are analyzed globally and over seven Global Energy and ...

P. Irannejad; A. Henderson-Sellers

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

STARTUP AND INITIAL TESTING OF SM-1 CORE II WITH SPECIAL COMPONENTS  

SciTech Connect

The loading operation for SM-1 Core II is described. Results of startup physics measurements (Test A-300 (Series) and fission product iodine monitoring in the primary coolant are given. The SM-1 Core II initial loading progressed satisfactorily, fulfilling the predictions of the zero power experiment performed at the Alco Criticality Facility. The initial cold clean five rod bank position was 6.53 in.; the initial hot, no xenon, five rod bank position was 9.62 in.; the initial hot, equilibrium xenon, five rod bank position was 11.41 in.; and the initial hot, peak xenon, five rod bank position was 12.14 in. Rods A and B were 19.00 in. in all four measurements. Stuck rod measurements indicated that an adequate shutdown margin was available with 20% of the rods fully withdrawn. All rod calibrations indicated a distinct shift and broadening of the peaks when compared with similar Core I calibrations. The temperature coefficient for Core II was 3.5 cents/ deg F at 440 deg F. Equilibrium xenon was worth approximately - 00 while peak xenon was worth - 43, both relative to the hot, no xenon core condition. During the period June 2, 1961 through September 30, 1961, the reactor operated at a total of 935.68 deg Fdays which is equivalent to 1.34 MWYR of energy release and represents an average load factor of 44% typical of training periods. The estimated reactivity in the core at startup is .00. A core life of 12.2 MWYR is predicted for the original configuration of Core II. The results of gross fission product iodine monitoring showed that those levels were about one-third to one-half of those found at the end of Core I Operation. (auth)

Moote, F.G.; Schrader, E.W.

1962-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

135

Materials Reliability Program: Laboratory Testing to Determine Resistance of Alloys 690/52/152 to Stress Corrosion Crack Growth in S imulated Primary Water - An Update (MRP-253)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) has led to increased costs for repair and replacement of thick-walled, pressurized water reactor (PWR) components made of Alloy 600 and its weld metals. Thick-section Alloy 690 welded material is now being widely used, particularly for nozzle penetrations during the replacement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) heads and during repairs to other components in the primary system. Much testing has been carried out on thick-wall Alloy 690 and it...

2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

136

Feasibility of underwater welding of highly irradiated in-vessel components of boiling-water reactors: A literature review  

SciTech Connect

In February 1997, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES), initiated a literature review to assess the state of underwater welding technology. In particular, the objective of this literature review was to evaluate the viability of underwater welding in-vessel components of boiling water reactor (BWR) in-vessel components, especially those components fabricated from stainless steels that are subjected to high neutron fluences. This assessment was requested because of the recent increased level of activity in the commercial nuclear industry to address generic issues concerning the reactor vessel and internals, especially those issues related to repair options. This literature review revealed a preponderance of general information about underwater welding technology, as a result of the active research in this field sponsored by the U.S. Navy and offshore oil and gas industry concerns. However, the literature search yielded only a limited amount of information about underwater welding of components in low-fluence areas of BWR in-vessel environments, and no information at all concerning underwater welding experiences in high-fluence environments. Research reported by the staff of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site and researchers from the DOE fusion reactor program proved more fruitful. This research documented relevant experience concerning welding of stainless steel materials in air environments exposed to high neutron fluences. It also addressed problems with welding highly irradiated materials, and primarily attributed those problems to helium-induced cracking in the material. (Helium is produced from the neutron irradiation of boron, an impurity, and nickel.) The researchers found that the amount of helium-induced cracking could be controlled, or even eliminated, by reducing the heat input into the weld and applying a compressive stress perpendicular to the weld path.

Lund, A.L.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Material Reliability Program Technical Basis Document Concerning Irradiation-Induced Stress Relaxation and Void Swelling in Pressuri zed Water Reactor Vessel Internals Components (MRP-50)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Irradiation-induced swelling and irradiation-enhanced stress relaxation are two potential degradation mechanisms that could affect reactor vessel (RV) core internals components in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). This report describes current knowledge of these two potential degradation mechanisms, available relevant data and known functional relationships, and a qualitative assessment of these two mechanisms' combined and separate effects on PWR internals components.

2001-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

138

A NORMETEX MODEL 15 M3/HR WATER VAPOR PUMPING TEST  

SciTech Connect

Tests were performed using a Model 15 m{sup 3}/hr Normetex vacuum pump to determine if pump performance degraded after pumping a humid gas stream. An air feed stream containing 30% water vapor was introduced into the pump for 365 hours with the outlet pressure of the pump near the condensation conditions of the water. Performance of the pump was tested before and after the water vapor pumping test and indicated no loss in performance of the pump. The pump also appeared to tolerate small amounts of condensed water of short duration without increased noise, vibration, or other adverse indications. The Normetex pump was backed by a dual-head diaphragm pump which was affected by the condensation of water and produced some drift in operating conditions during the test.

Klein, J.; Fowley, M.; Steeper, T.

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

139

Argonne Liquid-Metal Advanced Burner Reactor : components and in-vessel system thermal-hydraulic research and testing experience - pathway forward.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This white paper provides an overview and status report of the thermal-hydraulic nuclear research and development, both experimental and computational, conducted predominantly at Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne from the early 1970s through the early 1990s was the Department of Energy's (DOE's) lead lab for thermal-hydraulic development of Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs). During the 1970s and into the mid-1980s, Argonne conducted thermal-hydraulic studies and experiments on individual reactor components supporting the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR). From the mid-1980s and into the early 1990s, Argonne conducted studies on phenomena related to forced- and natural-convection thermal buoyancy in complete in-vessel models of the General Electric (GE) Prototype Reactor Inherently Safe Module (PRISM) and Rockwell International (RI) Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor (SAFR). These two reactor initiatives involved Argonne working closely with U.S. industry and DOE. This paper describes the very important impact of thermal hydraulics dominated by thermal buoyancy forces on reactor global operation and on the behavior/performance of individual components during postulated off-normal accident events with low flow. Utilizing Argonne's LMR expertise and design knowledge is vital to the further development of safe, reliable, and high-performance LMRs. Argonne believes there remains an important need for continued research and development on thermal-hydraulic design in support of DOE's and the international community's renewed thrust for developing and demonstrating the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) reactor(s) and the associated Argonne Liquid Metal-Advanced Burner Reactor (LM-ABR). This white paper highlights that further understanding is needed regarding reactor design under coolant low-flow events. These safety-related events are associated with the transition from normal high-flow operation to natural circulation. Low-flow coolant events are the most difficult to design for because they involve the most complex thermal-hydraulic behavior induced by the dominance of thermal-buoyancy forces acting on the coolants. Such behavior can cause multiple-component flow interaction phenomena, which are not adequately understood or appreciated by reactor designers as to their impact on reactor performance and safety. Since the early 1990s, when DOE canceled the U.S. Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) program, little has been done experimentally to further understand the importance of the complex thermal-buoyancy phenomena and their impact on reactor design or to improve the ability of three-dimensional (3-D) transient computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and structures codes to model the phenomena. An improved experimental data base and the associated improved validated codes would provide needed design tools to the reactor community. The improved codes would also facilitate scale-up from small-scale testing to prototype size and would facilitate comparing performance of one reactor/component design with another. The codes would also have relevance to the design and safety of water-cooled reactors. To accomplish the preceding, it is proposed to establish a national GNEP-LMR research and development center at Argonne having as its foundation state-of-art science-based infrastructure consisting of: (a) thermal-hydraulic experimental capabilities for conducting both water and sodium testing of individual reactor components and complete reactor in-vessel models and (b) a computational modeling development and validation capability that is strongly interfaced with the experimental facilities. The proposed center would greatly advance capabilities for reactor development by establishing the validity of high-fidelity (i.e., close to first principles) models and tools. Such tools could be used directly for reactor design or for qualifying/tuning of lower-fidelity models, which now require costly experimental qualification for each different type of design

Kasza, K.; Grandy, C.; Chang, Y.; Khalil, H.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

140

Post-test analysis of components from selenide isotope generator modules M-7, M-15, and M-18  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several critical components removed from SIG (Selenide Isotope Generator) thermoelectric modules M-7, M-15C, M-15D, and M-18 were examined. These modules failed to show the predicted stability and conversion efficiency. Understanding the degradation and identifying means for preventing it necessitated detailed post-test examinations of key parts in the modules. Steel springs, which provided pressure for contacts at the hot and cold ends of P- or N-legs, relaxed more than expected. Beryllium oxide insulators had dark deposits that caused electrical shorts. The GdSe/sub 1/ /sub 49/ N-leg exhibited cracking. The (Cu,Ag)/sub 2/Se P-leg lost weight or sublimed excessively in module M-7 and more than expected in the other modules.

Wei, G.C.; Keiser, J.R.; Crouse, R.S.; Allen, M.D.; Schaffhauser, A.C.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water components test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Comment submitted by the Alliance for Water Efficiency (AWE) regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Date: May 9, 2011 To: ESTARVerificationTesting@ee.doe.gov From: Mary Ann Dickinson, President and CEO Re: Comments on DOE Verification Testing in Support of Energy Star (www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/appliance_standards/pdfs/estar_verification_process.pdf) The Alliance for Water Efficiency is pleased to provide DOE with comments on the above document. We are a North American non-profit organization, composed of diverse stakeholders with significant experience in water efficiency programs and conservation policies. Our mission is to promote the efficient and sustainable use of water, to promote cost-effective water efficiency measures that will reduce wasteful consumption, reduce the need for additional drinking water and waste water capacity, and provide multiple

142

Fast Spherical Harmonic Transform Routine FLTSS Applied to the Shallow Water Test Set  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fast spherical harmonic transform algorithm proposed by Suda and Takami is evaluated in the solutions of the shallow water equation test set defined by Williamson et al. through replacing the Legendre transforms of the NCAR spectral transform ...

Reiji Suda

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Feasibility Test of Multifrequency Radiometric Data Assimilation to Estimate Snow Water Equivalent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A season-long, point-scale radiometric data assimilation experiment is performed in order to test the feasibility of snow water equivalent (SWE) estimation. Synthetic passive microwave observations at Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) and ...

Michael Durand; Steven A. Margulis

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Stack Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stack Components Stack Components Nancy L. Garland Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Fuel Cell Team FORS 5G-086 (202) 586-5673 nancy.garland@ee.doe.gov Stack Components F u e l P r o c e s s o r Bipolar Plate Cathode + Anode - Electrolyte H+ H+ HYDROGEN OXYGEN Example shown is for acidic electrolytes Bipolar Plate e - e - O 2 O 2 O 2 e - H+ Bipolar Plate Bipolar Plate Cathode + Anode - Electrolyte H+ H+ H+ H+ HYDROGEN OXYGEN Example shown is for acidic electrolytes Bipolar Plate Bipolar Plate e - e - e - e - O 2 O 2 O 2 O 2 O 2 O 2 e - e - H+ H+ Power Stack Component Barriers $10 Other Bipolar Plates Membranes Electrodes $25 $5 $5 Fuel Cell Power Systems $45/kW BARRIERS * Stack material cost/manufacturing * Durability * Electrode performance * Thermal and water management Stack Component Targets

145

Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-6 test data report : thermal hydraulic results, Rev. 0.  

SciTech Connect

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure? (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx} {phi} 30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength is being addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus measures the fracture strength of the crust while it is either at room temperature or above, the latter state being achieved with a heating element placed below the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the sixth water ingression test, designated SSWICS-6. This test investigated the quenching behavior of a fully oxidized PWR corium melt containing 15 wt% siliceous concrete at a system pressure of 1 bar absolute. The report includes a description of the test apparatus, the instrumentation used, plots of the recorded data, and some rudimentary data reduction to obtain an estimate of the heat flux from the corium to the overlying water pool.

Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D.; Aeschlimann, B. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

146

Effects of Barometric Fluctuations on Well Water-Level Measurements and Aquifer Test Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, as part of the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project, examines the potential for offsite migration of contamination within underlying aquifer systems. Well water-level elevation measurements from selected wells within these aquifer systems commonly form the basis for delineating groundwater-flow patterns (i.e., flow direction and hydraulic gradient). In addition, the analysis of water-level responses obtained in wells during hydrologic tests provides estimates of hydraulic properties that are important for evaluating groundwater-flow velocity and transport characteristics. Barometric pressure fluctuations, however, can have a discernible impact on well water-level measurements. These barometric effects may lead to erroneous indications of hydraulic head within the aquifer. Total hydraulic head (i.e., sum of the water-table elevation and the atmospheric pressure at the water-table surface) within the aquifer, not well water-level elevation, is the hydrologic parameter for determining groundwater-flow direction and hydraulic gradient conditions. Temporal variations in barometric pressure may also adversely affect well water-level responses obtained during hydrologic tests. If significant, adjustments or removal of these barometric effects from the test-response record may be required for quantitative hydraulic property determination. This report examines the effects of barometric fluctuations on well water-level measurements and evaluates adjustment and removal methods for determining areal aquifer head conditions and aquifer test analysis. Two examples of Hanford Site unconfined aquifer tests are examined that demonstrate barometric response analysis and illustrate the predictive/removal capabilities of various methods for well water-level and aquifer total head values. Good predictive/removal characteristics were demonstrated with best corrective results provided by multiple-regression deconvolution methods.

FA Spane, Jr.

1999-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

147

Stability of CIGS Solar Cells and Component Materials Evaluated by a Step-Stress Accelerated Degradation Test Method: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A step-stress accelerated degradation testing (SSADT) method was employed for the first time to evaluate the stability of CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cells and device component materials in four Al-framed test structures encapsulated with an edge sealant and three kinds of backsheet or moisture barrier film for moisture ingress control. The SSADT exposure used a 15oC and then a 15% relative humidity (RH) increment step, beginning from 40oC/40%RH (T/RH = 40/40) to 85oC/70%RH (85/70) as of the moment. The voluminous data acquired and processed as of total DH = 3956 h with 85/70 = 704 h produced the following results. The best CIGS solar cells in sample Set-1 with a moisture-permeable TPT backsheet showed essentially identical I-V degradation trend regardless of the Al-doped ZnO (AZO) layer thickness ranging from standard 0.12 ?m to 0.50 ?m on the cells. No clear 'stepwise' feature in the I-V parameter degradation curves corresponding to the SSADT T/RH/time profile was observed. Irregularity in I-V performance degradation pattern was observed with some cells showing early degradation at low T/RH < 55/55 and some showing large Voc, FF, and efficiency degradation due to increased series Rs (ohm-cm2) at T/RH ? 70/70. Results of (electrochemical) impedance spectroscopy (ECIS) analysis indicate degradation of the CIGS solar cells corresponded to increased series resistance Rs (ohm) and degraded parallel (minority carrier diffusion/recombination) resistance Rp, capacitance C, overall time constant Rp*C, and 'capacitor quality' factor (CPE-P), which were related to the cells? p-n junction properties. Heating at 85/70 appeared to benefit the CIGS solar cells as indicated by the largely recovered CPE-P factor. Device component materials, Mo on soda lime glass (Mo/SLG), bilayer ZnO (BZO), AlNi grid contact, and CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG in test structures with TPT showed notable to significant degradation at T/RH ? 70/70. At T/RH = 85/70, substantial blistering of BZO layers on CIGS cell pieces was observed that was not seen on BZO/glass, and a CdS/CIGS sample displayed a small darkening and then flaking feature. Additionally, standard AlNi grid contact was less stable than thin Ni grid contact at T/RH ? 70/70. The edge sealant and moisture-blocking films were effective to block moisture ingress, as evidenced by the good stability of most CIGS solar cells and device components at T/RH = 85/70 for 704 h, and by preservation of the initial blue color on the RH indicator strips. The SSADT experiment is ongoing to be completed at T/RH = 85/85.

Pern, F. J.; Noufi, R.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Field testing of component-level model-based fault detection methods for mixing boxes and VAV fan systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

based methods of fault detection and diagnosis (FDD).Component-level FDD, which is the subject of the work

Xu, Peng; Haves, Philip

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Design and testing of a deep sea formation water and temeperature sampling probe for the Ocean Drilling Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Ocean Drilling Program is an international research consortium dedicated to exploring the structure and history of earth beneath the oceans. The program receives funds from the National Science Foundation and 18 member countries. Texas A&M University serves as the science operator, drill ship operator, and Gulf Coast Core Repository. The objective of the program is to learn about the geological makeup of the ocean floor and develop a better understanding of how it was formed. Fluid and temperature samples are one means of determining the chemistry of the formation. In order to obtain quality samples a tool must probe into the formation approximately 18 inches and capture a small volume of fluid and record temperatures. The Ocean Drilling Program has developed two such probes, the IPOD in situ Pore Water Sampling Probe (PWS) and the Water Sample and Temperature Probe (WSTP). These probes return samples at near in situ conditions; however, fluid samples typically encounter a pressure drop as they enter the tool. Samples collected using these probes are suspected of giving questionable results due to possible gas/fluid separation as the sample experiences a pressure drop upon entering the probe. Fluid returned at formation pressure is hoped to give scientist a more accurate picture of the formation conditions and allow comparison between samples returned at formation pressure and those returned under partial pressure. The objective of this project was to design, test, and manufacture a probe that would consistently-return fluid and temperature samples at in situ conditions, The project was broken down into two stages, namely the design stage and the testing and manufacturing stage. The design stage was governed by a regimented design methodology. Steps included in the methodology were 1) Need Analysis, 2) Conceptual Design, 3) Conceptual Design Evaluation, and 4) Embodiment Design. The manufacturing and testing stage of the project consisted of full sample system testing and supervision of the manufacturing process. the result of the design process was a sampling system that combined a back pressure piston and metering valve. Full testing of this sampling system showed the sampling system allowed sampling of formation fluid with minimal pressure drop between the formation and the probe. Favorable results of the sampling system allowed for the development of a new probe tip configuration, as well as, a new modularized electronics section. Machine drawings were generated for all components of the tool. Components were then fabricated by a local machine shop. All components under went quality inspection and were then assembled. Full scale testing at the Ocean Drilling Programs Annex is the next step. If successful, the probe is to undergo sea trials in October of 1995.

Fisseler, Patrick James

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Core-concrete interactions with overlying water pools. The WETCOR-1 test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The WETCOR-1 test of simultaneous interactions of a high-temperature melt with water and a limestone/common-sand concrete is described. The test used a 34.1-kg melt of 76.8 w/o Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 16.9 w/o CaO, and 4.0 w/o SiO{sub 2} heated by induction using tungsten susceptors. Once quasi-steady attack on concrete by the melt was established, an attempt was made to quench the melt at 1850 K with 295 K water flowing at 57 liters per minute. Net power into the melt at the time of water addition was 0.61 {plus_minus} 0.19 W/cm{sup 3}. The test configuration used in the WETCOR-1 test was designed to delay melt freezing to the walls of the test fixture. This was done to test hypotheses concerning the inherent stability of crust formation when high-temperature melts are exposed to water. No instability in crust formation was observed. The flux of heat through the crust to the water pool maintained over the melt in the test was found to be 0.52 {plus_minus} 0.13 MW/m{sup 2}. Solidified crusts were found to attenuate aerosol emissions during the melt concrete interactions by factors of 1.3 to 3.5. The combination of a solidified crust and a 30-cm deep subcooled water pool was found to attenuate aerosol emissions by factors of 3 to 15.

Blose, R.E. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Powers, D.A.; Copus, E.R.; Brockmann, J.E.; Simpson, R.B.; Lucero, D.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Side-by-Side Testing of Water Heating Systems: Results from the 2010 - 2011 Evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) continues the testing and evaluation of seven water heating systems operating side-by-side at the HWS laboratory in Cocoa, Florida, and documents results in this report. All systems are submitted to alternating hot water draw schedules (ASHRAE 90.1 and NREL/BA). The most significant system change under the latest testing rotation comes from the evaluation of a new state-of-the-art electric heat pump water heater (HPWH) system. The HPWH water heater has demonstrated that under favorable ambient conditions it can perform very well against the best system evaluated in Phase I (2009-2010) ? the differentially controlled solar flat plate solar system.

Colon, C.; Parker, D.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Evaluating the Effects of Underground Nuclear Testing Below the Water Table on Groundwater and Radionuclide Migration in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluating the Effects of Underground Nuclear Testing Below the Water Table on Groundwater, using FEHM, evaluate perturbed groundwater behavior associated with underground nuclear tests to an instantaneous pressurization event caused by a nuclear test when different permeability and porosity

153

Eddy Current Testing of Service Water Heat Exchangers for Engineers Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Service water (SW) heat exchangers experience tube failures due primarily to Inside Diameter (ID) pitting and flow-induced fretting wear at tube-to-tube support plate intersections. Eddy current is a fast volumetric tube wall examination technique performed from inside a tube to test and maintain structural integrity of the installed tubing. Because the service water heat exchanger tubing examination is not mandated under the ASME Code or the Regulatory Guide requirements, eddy current examination practi...

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

154

Light Water Reactor Fuel Cladding Research and Testing | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Water Reactor Fuel Cladding Research Light Water Reactor Fuel Cladding Research June 01, 2013 Severe Accident Test Station ORNL is the focus point for Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel cladding research and testing. The purpose of this research is to furnish U.S. industry (EPRI, Areva, Westinghouse), and regulators (NRC) with much-needed data supporting safe and economical nuclear power generation and used fuel management. LWR fuel cladding work is tightly integrated with ORNL accident tolerant fuel development and used fuel disposition programs thereby providing a powerful capability that couples basic materials science research with the nuclear applications research and development. The ORNL LWR fuel cladding program consists of five complementary areas of research: Accident tolerant fuel and cladding material testing under design

155

Drinking water quality standards and standard tests: Worldwide. (Latest citations from Food Science & Technology Abstracts (FSTA)). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the laws, regulations, standards, and testing methods for drinking water from domestic and international sources. Citations discuss quality standardization and control. Topics include safety codes for drinking water systems and installations, contaminated water and toxicity analyses, biological and chemical standards, diseases derived from drinking water, plastic materials for water packaging, and natural mineral drinking water. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

NETL: Gasification- Water-Gas Shift (WGS) Tests to Reduce Steam Use  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Syngas Processing Systems Syngas Processing Systems Water-Gas Shift (WGS) Tests to Reduce Steam Use National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility Southern Company Services, Inc. Project Number: NT0000749 Project Description The National Carbon Capture Center is testing commercial water-gas shift (WGS) catalysts from multiple vendors in support of developing WGS reactor systems which will reduce the cost of carbon dioxide (CO2) capture from the production of syngas using coal. These tests have revealed that steam-to-carbon monoxide (CO) ratios can be reduced, resulting in a substantial increase in the net power output and significantly reducing the cost of electricity from an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant with CO2 capture. Several commercially available WGS catalysts have been tested, and the results are being provided to the manufacturers to aid them in specifying future WGS systems for IGCC plants incorporating CO2 capture.

157

Technical specification: Mixed-oxide pellets for the light-water reactor irradiation demonstration test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical specification is a Level 2 Document as defined in the Fissile Materials Disposition Program Light-Water Reactor Mixed-oxide Fuel Irradiation Test Project Plan. It is patterned after the pellet specification that was prepared by Atomic Energy of Canada, Limited, for use by Los Alamos National Laboratory in fabrication of the test fuel for the Parallex Project, adjusted as necessary to reflect the differences between the Canadian uranium-deuterium reactor and light-water reactor fuels. This specification and the associated engineering drawing are to be utilized only for preparation of test fuel as outlined in the accompanying Request for Quotation and for additional testing as directed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory or the Department of Energy.

Cowell, B.S.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Thorium-230 dating of natural waters at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Radiocarbon determinations have been used in the past to estimate the ages of groundwater from the Paleozoic aquifer underlying the Nevada Test Site and adjacent areas. We measured the concentrations of {sup 230}Th, {sup 232}Th, {sup 234}U and {sup 238}U in several water samples taken from the wells and spring at the Nevada Test Site and calculated the {sup 230}Th ages. 2 refs.

Bakhtiar, S.N.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Pore Water Extraction Test Near 241-SX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site, Washington, USA - 14168  

SciTech Connect

A proof-of-principle test is underway near the Hanford Site 241-SX Tank Farm. The test will evaluate a potential remediation technology that will use tank farm-deployable equipment to remove contaminated pore water from vadose zone soils. The test system was designed and built to address the constraints of working within a tank farm. Due to radioactive soil contamination and limitations in drilling near tanks, small-diameter direct push drilling techniques applicable to tank farms are being utilized for well placement. To address space and weight limitations in working around tanks and obstacles within tank farms, the aboveground portions of the test system have been constructed to allow deployment flexibility. The test system utilizes low vacuum over a sealed well screen to establish flow into an extraction well. Extracted pore water is collected in a well sump,and then pumped to the surface using a small-diameter bladder pump.If pore water extraction using this system can be successfully demonstrated, it may be possible to target local contamination in the vadose zone around underground storage tanks. It is anticipated that the results of this proof-of-principle test will support future decision making regarding interim and final actions for soil contamination within the tank farms.

Eberlein, Susan J.; Parker, Danny L.; Tabor, Cynthia L.; Holm, Melissa J.

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

160

Preliminary Modeling, Testing and Analysis of a Gas Tankless Water Heater  

SciTech Connect

Tankless water heaters offer significant energy savings over conventional storage-tank water heaters, because thermal losses to the environment are much less. Although standard test results are available to compare tankless heaters with storage tank heaters, actual savings depend on the draw details because energy to heat up the internal mass depends on the time since the last draw. To allow accurate efficiency estimates under any assumed draw pattern, a one-node model with heat exchanger mass is posed here. Key model parameters were determined from test data. Burner efficiency showed inconsistency between the two data sets analyzed. Model calculations show that efficiency with a realistic draw pattern is {approx}8% lower than that resulting from using only large {approx}40 liter draws, as specified in standard water-heater tests. The model is also used to indicate that adding a small tank controlled by the tankless heater ameliorates unacceptable oscillations that tankless with feedback control can experience with pre-heated water too hot for the minimum burner setting. The added tank also eliminates problematic low-flow cut-out and hot-water-delay, but it will slightly decrease efficiency. Future work includes model refinements and developing optimal protocols for parameter extraction.

Burch, J.; Thornton, J.; Hoeschele, M.; Springer, D.; Rudd, A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water components test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Variability in energy factor test results for residential electric water heaters  

SciTech Connect

Recent modifications to the minimum energy efficiency requirements for residential water heaters have spurred an investigation into the variability in testing high-efficiency electric water heaters. While initial inter-laboratory comparisons showed excellent agreement between test results from different labs, subsequent inter-laboratory comparisons show differences between measured energy factors of up to 0.040. To determine the source of these differences, analyses of various parts of the test procedure are performed. For one case studied, the uncertainty in test results can be as high as +-0.028 if instrument accuracies reach the minimum level allowed in the test procedure. Other areas of the test procedure where variability is introduced are the optional use of pre-draws, the location of the lower tank temperature-measuring device, the use of insulation on tank fittings, and the use of a warm-up period before the simulated-use test commences. The implications of these issues on test results are provided.

Healy, William; Lutz, James D.; Lekov, Alex

2003-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

162

Cone Penetration of Lubricating Grease Operating Fluorescent Light Apparatus for UV Exposure of Nonmetallic Materials California Test 413 ? Testing Cold Applied Two-Component Polysulfide Polymer Type Joint Sealing Compound  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This test method describes the procedure for testing two-component joint sealants used for filling joints in concrete structures where movement occurs. These sealants must meet the table of properties in Section 51-2.02B Type A and AL Joint Seals in the Caltrans Standard Specifications.

Type A Sealants; Astm D; C. Apparatus

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

NREL Tests Integrated Heat Pump Water Heater Performance in Different Climates (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This technical highlight describes NREL tests to capture information about heat pump performance across a wide range of ambient conditions for five heat pump water heaters (HPWH). These water heaters have the potential to significantly reduce water heater energy use relative to traditional electric resistance water heaters. These tests have provided detailed performance data for these appliances, which have been used to evaluate the cost of saved energy as a function of climate. The performance of HPWHs is dependent on ambient air temperature and humidity and the logic controlling the heat pump and the backup resistance heaters. The laboratory tests were designed to measure each unit's performance across a range of air conditions and determine the specific logic controlling the two heat sources, which has a large effect on the comfort of the users and the energy efficiency of the system. Unlike other types of water heaters, HPWHs are both influenced by and have an effect on their surroundings. Since these effects are complex and different for virtually every house and climate region, creating an accurate HPWH model from the data gathered during the laboratory tests was a main goal of the project. Using the results from NREL's laboratory tests, such as the Coefficient of Performance (COP) curves for different air conditions as shown in Figure 1, an existing HPWH model is being modified to produce more accurate whole-house simulations. This will allow the interactions between the HPWH and the home's heating and cooling system to be evaluated in detail, for any climate region. Once these modeling capabilities are in place, a realistic cost-benefit analysis can be performed for a HPWH installation anywhere in the country. An accurate HPWH model will help to quantify the savings associated with installing a HPWH in the place of a standard electric water heater. In most locations, HPWHs are not yet a cost-effective alternative to natural gas water heaters. The detailed system performance maps that were developed by this testing program will be used to: (1) Target regions of the country that would benefit most from this technology; (2) Identify improvements in current systems to maximize homeowner cost savings; and (3) Explore opportunities for development of advanced hot water heating systems.

Not Available

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Data-oriented research for bioresource utilization: A case study to investigate water uptake in cellulose using Principal Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bioresource utilization represents an important interdisciplinary research that integrates academic and industrial expertise across diverse scientific domains, including physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering. The present paper describes a cyber-infrastructure ... Keywords: Principal component analysis,Laboratories,Loading,Correlation,Data visualization,Materials,Databases,bioethanol,Principal Component Analysis,Scientific workflow,lignocellulose

Roberto M. Cesar, Liu Yi Ling, Carlos Driemeier

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Materials Reliability Program: Primary Water Stress Corrosion Testing of Alloys 690 and Weld Metals -- An Update (MRP-309)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) continues to cause increased costs for operation, maintenance, assessment, and repair of thick-walled, pressurized water reactor (PWR) components made of Alloy 600 and its weld metals Alloys 182 and 82. Thick-section Alloy 690 and its weld metals (Alloys 52, or 52M, and 152) are now being widely used, particularly for nozzle penetrations during replacement of RPV heads and for repairs to other components in the primary system. Three reports have already bee...

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

166

Commissioning of the Korean High Heat Flux Test Facility by Using Electron Beam System for Plasma Facing Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Divertor and High-Heat-Flux Components / Proceedings of the Twentieth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE-2012) (Part 1), Nashville, Tennessee, August 27-31, 2012

Suk-Kwon Kim; Eo Hwak Lee; Jae-Sung Yoon; Dong Won Lee; Duck-Hoi Kim; Seungyon Cho

167

SRAT/SME components: Wear evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Material water of internal components in the Slurry Receipt Adjustment Tank/Slurry Mix Evaporator (SRAT/SME) has been documented. This study consisted of a special wear test of approximately 1,950 hours of simulated run time. Basic dimensions were obtained for components before the test, and they were compared with measurements taken after the exposure. Wear of tank components, the estimated life of design materials of construction, and guidance for design configuration were obtained. The test program is continuing with no basic changes in design.

Jenkins, C.F.

1987-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

168

Design and Testing of Vacuum Breaker Check Valve for Simplified Boiling Water Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new design of the vacuum breaker check valve was developed to replace the mechanical valve in a simplified boiling water reactor. Scaling and design calculations were performed to obtain the geometry of new passive hydraulic vacuum breaker check valve. In order to check the valve performance, a RELAP5 model of the simplified boiling water reactor system with the new valve was developed. The valve was implemented in an integral facility, PUMA and was tested for large break loss of coolant accident. (authors)

Ishii, M.; Xu, Y.; Revankar, S.T. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

HYDROSTATIC JOURNAL BEARING WATER TESTS CONDUCTED IN MODIFIED PK-A PUMP  

SciTech Connect

A hydrostatic journal bearing mounted near the impeller of an overhung vertical shaft centrifugal pump was subjected to water testing as a part of the molten salt lubrication investigation at ORNL. Three tests were performed with bearings having radial clearances of 0.003 in., 0.0075 in., and 0.005 in. The first journal and bearing (0.003 in. radial clearance) were found to be heavily scored after testing. Only faint localized scratches were found on tho second journal (0.0075 in. radial clearance) and these may have been caused by the many test starts and stops. Localized scratches, somewhat deeper than those on the second journal, were observed on the third journal, but no measurable wear had occurred from testing. An apparent inconsistency was noted in that at the same pump operating condition the bearing load as computed from pocket pressure data increased by a factor of 1.2 to 1.7 as bearing radial clearance was increased from 0.005 in. to 0.0075 in. The configuration of the submerged hydrostatic bearing used in these tests appears to be satisfactory for use as a lower journal bearing in this size and type of centrifugal pump, at least insofar as operation in water is concerned. (auth)

Gilkey, H.E.; Smith, P.G.

1959-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Extensive remote handling and conservative plasma conditions to enable fusion nuclear science R&D using a component testing facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FT/P3-14 Page 1 Extensive remote handling and conservative plasma conditions to enable fusion modularization and remote handling, and allow conservative plasma assumptions including an extended divertor component modularization and capability for remote handling, and estimate the replacement times of various

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

171

At-sea test system point design for a one-third scale cold water pipe  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One step in the development of the technology for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Cold Water Pipes (CWP) is the at-sea testing of a fiberglass reinforced plastic nominal 10-foot diameter pipe. A design procedure and criteria for developing test hardware by scaling down a 30-foot diameter OTEC 10/40 MW Pilot Plant CWP design are presented. An example point design for the pipe, instrumentation to be used during the at-sea tests, and methods for selecting the support platform and mooring are described. The design considered starts with a scale model of a larger prototype, and then is modified to address the problems of fabrication and of survivability and handling during the 1/3rd scale model tests.

Sutherland, W.H. (ed.)

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing, and Design Optimization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in PEM Fuel Cells: in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing, and Design Optimization J. Vernon Cole and Ashok Gidwani CFDRC Prepared for: DOE Hydrogen Fuel Cell Kickoff Meeting February 13, 2007 This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information. Background Water Management Issues Arise From: ƒ Generation of water by cathodic reaction ƒ Membrane humidification requirements ƒ Capillary pressure driven transport through porous MEA and GDL materials ƒ Scaling bipolar plate channel dimensions J.H. Nam and M. Kaviany, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 46, pp. 4595-4611 (2003) Relevant Barriers and Targets ƒ Improved Gas Diffusion Layer, Flow Fields, Membrane Electrode Assemblies Needed to Improve Water Management: * Flooding blocks reactant transport

173

LWRS Fuels Pathway: Engineering Design and Fuels Pathway Initial Testing of the Hot Water Corrosion System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development R&D pathway performs strategic research focused on cladding designs leading to improved reactor core economics and safety margins. The research performed is to demonstrate the nuclear fuel technology advancements while satisfying safety and regulatory limits. These goals are met through rigorous testing and analysis. The nuclear fuel technology developed will assist in moving existing nuclear fuel technology to an improved level that would not be practical by industry acting independently. Strategic mission goals are to improve the scientific knowledge basis for understanding and predicting fundamental nuclear fuel and cladding performance in nuclear power plants, and to apply this information in the development of high-performance, high burn-up fuels. These will result in improved safety, cladding, integrity, and nuclear fuel cycle economics. To achieve these goals various methods for non-irradiated characterization testing of advanced cladding systems are needed. One such new test system is the Hot Water Corrosion System (HWCS) designed to develop new data for cladding performance assessment and material behavior under simulated off-normal reactor conditions. The HWCS is capable of exposing prototype rodlets to heated, high velocity water at elevated pressure for long periods of time (days, weeks, months). Water chemistry (dissolved oxygen, conductivity and pH) is continuously monitored. In addition, internal rodlet heaters inserted into cladding tubes are used to evaluate repeated thermal stressing and heat transfer characteristics of the prototype rodlets. In summary, the HWCS provides rapid ex-reactor evaluation of cladding designs in normal (flowing hot water) and off-normal (induced cladding stress), enabling engineering and manufacturing improvements to cladding designs before initiation of the more expensive and time consuming in-reactor irradiation testing.

Dr. John Garnier; Dr. Kevin McHugh

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Results of molten salt panel and component experiments for solar central receivers: Cold fill, freeze/thaw, thermal cycling and shock, and instrumentation tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments have been conducted with a molten salt loop at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM to resolve issues associated with the operation of the 10MW{sub e} Solar Two Central Receiver Power Plant located near Barstow, CA. The salt loop contained two receiver panels, components such as flanges and a check valve, vortex shedding and ultrasonic flow meters, and an impedance pressure transducer. Tests were conducted on procedures for filling and thawing a panel, and assessing components and instrumentation in a molten salt environment. Four categories of experiments were conducted: (1) cold filling procedures, (2) freeze/thaw procedures, (3) component tests, and (4) instrumentation tests. Cold-panel and -piping fill experiments are described, in which the panels and piping were preheated to temperatures below the salt freezing point prior to initiating flow, to determine the feasibility of cold filling the receiver and piping. The transient thermal response was measured, and heat transfer coefficients and transient stresses were calculated from the data. Freeze/thaw experiments were conducted with the panels, in which the salt was intentionally allowed to freeze in the receiver tubes, then thawed with heliostat beams. Slow thermal cycling tests were conducted to measure both how well various designs of flanges (e.g., tapered flanges or clamp type flanges) hold a seal under thermal conditions typical of nightly shut down, and the practicality of using these flanges on high maintenance components. In addition, the flanges were thermally shocked to simulate cold starting the system. Instrumentation such as vortex shedding and ultrasonic flow meters were tested alongside each other, and compared with flow measurements from calibration tanks in the flow loop.

Pacheco, J.E.; Ralph, M.E.; Chavez, J.M.; Dunkin, S.R.; Rush, E.E.; Ghanbari, C.M.; Matthews, M.W.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Performance of Charcoal Cookstoves for Haiti Part 1: Results from the Water Boiling Test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In April 2010, a team of scientists and engineers from Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) and UC Berkeley, with support from the Darfur Stoves Project (DSP), undertook a fact-finding mission to Haiti in order to assess needs and opportunities for cookstove intervention. Based on data collected from informal interviews with Haitians and NGOs, the team, Scott Sadlon, Robert Cheng, and Kayje Booker, identified and recommended stove testing and comparison as a high priority need that could be filled by LBNL. In response to that recommendation, five charcoal stoves were tested at the LBNL stove testing facility using a modified form of version 3 of the Shell Foundation Household Energy Project Water Boiling Test (WBT). The original protocol is available online. Stoves were tested for time to boil, thermal efficiency, specific fuel consumption, and emissions of CO, CO{sub 2}, and the ratio of CO/CO{sub 2}. In addition, Haitian user feedback and field observations over a subset of the stoves were combined with the experiences of the laboratory testing technicians to evaluate the usability of the stoves and their appropriateness for Haitian cooking. The laboratory results from emissions and efficiency testing and conclusions regarding usability of the stoves are presented in this report.

Booker, Kayje; Han, Tae Won; Granderson, Jessica; Jones, Jennifer; Lsk, Kathleen; Yang, Nina; Gadgil, Ashok

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Field testing of component-level model-based fault detection methods for mixing boxes and VAV fan systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

precluded testing the fan based on design data. Since thisStatic Pressure (inWg) fan CFM SF-SP SF-SP-Design-Sim time (supply fan pressure rise) SF- DP SF-DP-Design-simulated D.

Xu, Peng; Haves, Philip

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Field testing of component-level model-based fault detection methods for mixing boxes and VAV fan systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

measurement of airflow rate. Supply fan speed (0-1) SA S.A.Supply Fan test S.B.Fan pressure rise calibration SF-DP-Simulated Pressure

Xu, Peng; Haves, Philip

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

HWMA/RCRA CLOSURE PLAN FOR THE MATERIALS TEST REACTOR WING (TRA-604) LABORATORY COMPONENTS VOLUNTARY CONSENT ORDER ACTION PLAN VCO-5.8 D REVISION2  

SciTech Connect

This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan was developed for the laboratory components of the Test Reactor Area Catch Tank System (TRA-630) that are located in the Materials Test Reactor Wing (TRA-604) at the Reactor Technology Complex, Idaho National Laboratory Site, to meet a further milestone established under Voluntary Consent Order Action Plan VCO-5.8.d. The TRA-604 laboratory components addressed in this closure plan were deferred from the TRA-630 Catch Tank System closure plan due to ongoing laboratory operations in the areas requiring closure actions. The TRA-604 laboratory components include the TRA-604 laboratory warm wastewater drain piping, undersink drains, subheaders, and the east TRA-604 laboratory drain header. Potentially contaminated surfaces located beneath the TRA-604 laboratory warm wastewater drain piping and beneath the island sinks located in Laboratories 126 and 128 (located in TRA-661) are also addressed in this closure plan. The TRA-604 laboratory components will be closed in accordance with the interim status requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.009 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265, Subparts G and J. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and the methods for achieving those standards.

KIRK WINTERHOLLER

2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

179

Steam Generator Management Program: Effects of Different pH Control Agents on Pressurized Water Reactor Plant Systems and Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrosion of materials in the condensate, feedwater, and drain systems of PWRs generates a significant amount of corrosion products in the secondary cycle. These corrosion products are generally transported into the steam generators and deposit on tubing surfaces, tubesheets, and tube support plates. Increased corrosion results in elevated levels of undesired corrosion products being deposited into the steam generators. To minimize corrosion of the secondary system components, control of pH in the second...

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

180

Developing an Instrumentation Package for in-Water Testing of Marine Hydrokinetic Energy Devices: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ocean-energy industry is still in its infancy and device developers have provided their own equipment and procedures for testing. Currently, no testing standards exist for ocean energy devices in the United States. Furthermore, as prototype devices move from the test tank to in-water testing, the logistical challenges and costs grow exponentially. Development of a common instrumentation package that can be moved from device to device is one means of reducing testing costs and providing normalized data to the industry as a whole. As a first step, the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has initiated an effort to develop an instrumentation package to provide a tool to allow common measurements across various ocean energy devices. The effort is summarized in this paper. First, we present the current status of ocean energy devices. We then review the experiences of the wind industry in its development of the instrumentation package and discuss how they can be applied in the ocean environment. Next, the challenges that will be addressed in the development of the ocean instrumentation package are discussed. For example, the instrument package must be highly adaptable to fit a large array of devices but still conduct common measurements. Finally, some possible system configurations are outlined followed by input from the industry regarding its measurement needs, lessons learned from prior testing, and other ideas.

Nelson, E.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water components test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION PHASE I - PILOT-SCALE TESTING / FEASIBILITY STUDIES FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

Under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC36-00GO10529 for the Department of Energy, General Atomics (GA) is developing Supercritical Water Partial Oxidation (SWPO) as a means of producing hydrogen from low-grade biomass and other waste feeds. The Phase I Pilot-scale Testing/Feasibility Studies have been successfully completed and the results of that effort are described in this report. The Key potential advantages of the SWPO process is the use of partial oxidation in-situ to rapidly heat the gasification medium, resulting in less char formation and improved hydrogen yield. Another major advantage is that the high-pressure, high-density aqueous environment is ideal for reaching and gasifying organics of all types. The high water content of the medium encourages formation of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich products and is especially compatible with high water content feeds such as biomass materials. The high water content of the medium is also effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal. A versatile pilot plant for exploring gasification in supercritical water has been established at GA's facilities in San Diego. The Phase I testing of the SWPO process with wood and ethanol mixtures demonstrated gasification efficiencies of about 90%, comparable to those found in prior laboratory-scale SCW gasification work carreid out at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM) as well as other biomass gasification experience with conventional gasifiers. As in the prior work at UHM, a significant amount of the hydrogen found in the gas phase products is derived from the water/steam matrix. The studies at UHM utilized an indirectly heated gasifier with an acitvated carbon catalyst. In contrast, the GA studies utilized a directly heated gasifier without catalyst, plus a surrogate waste fuel. Attainment of comparable gasification efficiencies without catalysis is an important advancement for the GA process, and opens the way for efficient hydrogen production from low-value, dirty feed materials. The Phase I results indicate that a practical means to overcome limitations on biomass slurry feed concentration and preheat temperatuare is to coprocess an auxiliary high heating value material. SWPO coprocessing of tow hgih-water content wastes, partially dewatered sewage sludge and trap grease, yields a scenario for the production of hydrogen at highly competitive prices. It is estimated that there are hundreds if not thousands of potential sites for this technology across the US and worldwide.

SPRITZER,M; HONG,G

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Evaluation and Test of Improved Fire Resistant Fluid Lubricants for Water Reactor Coolant Pump Motors, Volume 1: Fluid Evaluation, Bearing Model Tests, Motor Tests, and Fire Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commercially available fire-resistant fluid lubricants were evaluated to determine their suitability for use in primary-system pump motors in nuclear reactors. Volume 1 describes the procedures and results of tests of lubrication properties; fire and radiation resistance; and thermal, oxidative, and hydrolytic stability.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION PHASE I - PILOT-SCALE TESTING/FEASIBILTY SUDIES FINAL REPORT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

General Atomics (GA) is developing Supercritical Water Partial Oxidation (SWPO) as a means of producing hydrogen from low-grade biomass and other waste feeds. The Phase I Pilot-scale Testing/Feasibility Studies have been successfully completed and the results of that effort are described in this report. The key potential advantage of the SWPO process is the use of partial oxidation in-situ to rapidly heat the gasification medium, resulting in less char formation and improved hydrogen yield. Another major advantage is that the high-pressure, high-density aqueous environment is ideal for reacting and gasifying organics of all types. The high water content of the medium encourages formation of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich products and is especially compatible with high water content feeds such as biomass materials. The high water content of the medium is also effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal. A versatile pilot plant for exploring gasification in supercritical water has been established at GA's facilities in San Diego. The Phase I testing of the SWPO process with wood and ethanol mixtures demonstrated gasification efficiencies of about 90%, comparable to those found in prior laboratory-scale SCW gasification work carried out at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM), as well as other biomass gasification experience with conventional gasifiers. As in the prior work at UHM, a significant amount of the hydrogen found in the gas phase products is derived from the water/steam matrix. The studies at UHM utilized an indirectly heated gasifier with an activated carbon catalyst. In contrast, the GA studies utilized a directly heated gasifier without catalyst, plus a surrogate waste fuel. Attainment of comparable gasification efficiencies without catalysis is an important advancement for the GA process, and opens the way for efficient hydrogen production from low-value, dirty feed materials. The Phase I results indicate that a practical means to overcome limitations on biomass slurry feed concentration and preheat temperature is to coprocess an auxiliary high heating value material. SWPO coprocessing of two high-water content wastes, partially dewatered sewage sludge and trap grease, yields a scenario for the production of hydrogen at highly competitive prices. It is estimated that there are hundreds if not thousands of potential sites for this technology across the US and worldwide. The economics for plants processing 40 tpd sewage sludge solids augmented with grease trap waste are favorable over a significant range of cost parameters such as sludge disposal credit and capital financing. Hydrogen production costs for SWPO plants of this size are projected to be about $3/GJ or less. Economics may be further improved by future developments such as pumping of higher solids content sludges and improved gasifier nozzle designs to reduce char and improve hydrogen yields. The easiest market entry for SWPO is expected to be direct sales to municipal wastewater treatment plants for use with sewage sludge in conjunction with trap grease, as both of these wastes are ubiquitous and have reasonably well-defined negative value (i.e., the process can take credit for reduction of well-defined disposal costs for these streams). Additionally, waste grease is frequently recovered at municipal wastewater treatment plants where it is already contaminated with sewage. SWPO should also be favorable to other market applications in which low or negative value, high water content biomass is available in conjunction with a low or negative value fuel material. For biomass slurries primary candidates are sewage sludge, manure sludge, and shredded and/or composted organic municipal solid waste (MSW) slurries. For the high heating value stream primary candidates are trap grease, waste plastic or rubber slurries, and coal or coke slurries. Phase II of the SWPO program will be focused on verifying process improvements identified during Phase I, and then performing extended duration testing with the GA pilot plant. Tests of at least 1

SPRITZER.M; HONG,G

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

MIT jar test of the natural polymer chitosan with fresh pond water from the Cambridge Water Department, November-December 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) jar tests of chitosan using CWD (Cambridge Water Department Treatment Plant) water was to demonstrate the effectiveness of chitosan as a coagulant in drinking water applications. The approach was to compare the performance of the natural organic coagulant, chitosan, to the performance of alum and other chemical coagulants in terms of the parameters turbidity, color, pH and alkalinity. Twenty-five jar tests were conducted during November and December, 1992, at Parsons Laboratory, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Murcott, S.; Harleman, D.R.F.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Preliminary Feasibility, Design, and Hazard Analysis of a Boiling Water Test Loop Within the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a pressurized light-water reactor with a design thermal power of 250 MW. The principal function of the ATR is to provide a high neutron flux for testing reactor fuels and other materials. The ATR and its support facilities are located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A Boiling Water Test Loop (BWTL) is being designed for one of the irradiation test positions within the. The objective of the new loop will be to simulate boiling water reactor (BWR) conditions to support clad corrosion and related reactor material testing. Further it will accommodate power ramping tests of candidate high burn-up fuels and fuel pins/rods for the commercial BWR utilities. The BWTL will be much like the pressurized water loops already in service in 5 of the 9 “flux traps” (region of enhanced neutron flux) in the ATR. The loop coolant will be isolated from the primary coolant system so that the loop’s temperature, pressure, flow rate, and water chemistry can be independently controlled. This paper presents the proposed general design of the in-core and auxiliary BWTL systems; the preliminary results of the neutronics and thermal hydraulics analyses; and the preliminary hazard analysis for safe normal and transient BWTL and ATR operation.

Douglas M. Gerstner

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Austin, TexasPARAMETRIC STUDY OF COMPONENT SELECTION AND OPERATION ON GENERIC DRAIN-BACK SOLAR WATER HEATER CERTIFICATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I. Early experimental results of a research program to investigate the practicality of replacing the Solar Rating and Certification Corporation four day rating procedure with a more cost effective rating method for generic solar domestic hot water systems are reported. The generic systems experimental procedure and facility are described. Results from four experiments give an initial indication that the recirculation flow rate has little effect on system rating. Further experiments are required to assess the feasibility of replacing the current rating method with a simulated rating. 1.

W. T. Carlson; J. H. Davidson; W. S. Duff; D. M. Leone

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy for conducting gas tracer tests and measuring water saturations in landfills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy tested for measuring tracer gas in landfills. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurement errors for tracer gases were 1-3% in landfill gas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Background signals from landfill gas result in elevated limits of detection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Technique is much less expensive and easier to use than GC. - Abstract: Gas tracer tests can be used to determine gas flow patterns within landfills, quantify volatile contaminant residence time, and measure water within refuse. While gas chromatography (GC) has been traditionally used to analyze gas tracers in refuse, photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) might allow real-time measurements with reduced personnel costs and greater mobility and ease of use. Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of PAS for conducting gas tracer tests in landfills. Two tracer gases, difluoromethane (DFM) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}), were measured with a commercial PAS instrument. Relative measurement errors were invariant with tracer concentration but influenced by background gas: errors were 1-3% in landfill gas but 4-5% in air. Two partitioning gas tracer tests were conducted in an aerobic landfill, and limits of detection (LODs) were 3-4 times larger for DFM with PAS versus GC due to temporal changes in background signals. While higher LODs can be compensated by injecting larger tracer mass, changes in background signals increased the uncertainty in measured water saturations by up to 25% over comparable GC methods. PAS has distinct advantages over GC with respect to personnel costs and ease of use, although for field applications GC analyses of select samples are recommended to quantify instrument interferences.

Jung, Yoojin; Han, Byunghyun; Mostafid, M. Erfan; Chiu, Pei [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Yazdani, Ramin [Yolo County Planning and Public Works Department, Division of Integrated Waste Management, Yolo County, 44090 County Rd. 28H, Woodland, CA 95776 (United States); Imhoff, Paul T., E-mail: imhoff@udel.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

Task completion report for investigating why output signal-variable values differ from their output component-parameter values in test problem MST2  

SciTech Connect

Signal-variable values and their component-parameter values differ in an end-of-timestep edit to the TRCOUT and TRCGRF files because signal variables have beginning-of-timestep values, and component parameters have end-of-timestep values. Oscillatory divergence in the MST2 standard test problem after 9000 s occurs because of TRAC-P`s numerical evaluation at a 1000 material Courant number. The magnitude of that divergence has diminished by a factor of 3.5 from Version 5.3.01 to 5.4.15 and by a factor of 25 from Version 5.4.15 to 5.4.28. That divergence can be eliminated by evaluating MST2 with a maximum material Courant number of 500.

Steinke, R.G.

1997-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

189

Barrier erosion control test plan: Gravel mulch, vegetation, and soil water interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil erosion could reduce the water storage capacity of barriers that have been proposed for the disposal of near-surface waste at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Gravel mixed into the top soil surface may create a self-healing veneer that greatly retards soil loss. However, gravel admixtures may also enhance infiltration of rainwater, suppress plant growth and water extraction, and lead to the leaching of underlying waste. This report describes plans for two experiments that were designed to test hypotheses concerning the interactive effects of surface gravel admixtures, revegetation, and enhanced precipitation on soil water balance and plant abundance. The first experiment is a factorial field plot set up on the site selected as a soil borrow area for the eventual construction of barriers. The treatments, arranged in a a split-split-plot design structure, include two densities of gravel admix, a mixture of native and introduced grasses, and irrigation to simulate a wetter climate. Changes in soil water storage and plant cover are monitored with neutron moisture probes and point intercept sampling, respectively. The second experiment consists of an array of 80 lysimeters containing several different barrier prototypes. Surface treatments are similar to the field-plot experiment. Drainage is collected from a valve at the base of each lysimeter tube, and evapotranspiration is estimated by subtraction. The lysimeters are also designed to be coupled to a whole-plant gas exchange system that will be used to conduct controlled experiments on evapotranspiration for modeling purposes. 56 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

Waugh, W.J.; Link, S.O. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Water  

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191

SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION PHASE I - PILOT-SCALE TESTING / FEASIBILITY STUDIES FINAL REPORT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Key potential advantages of the SWPO process is the use of partial oxidation in-situ to rapidly heat the gasification medium, resulting in less char formation and improved hydrogen yield. Another major advantage is that the high-pressure, high-density aqueous environment is ideal for reaching and gasifying organics of all types. The high water content of the medium encourages formation of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich products and is especially compatible with high water content feeds such as biomass materials. The high water content of the medium is also effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal. A versatile pilot plant for exploring gasification in supercritical water has been established at GA's facilities in San Diego. The Phase I testing of the SWPO process with wood and ethanol mixtures demonstrated gasification efficiencies of about 90%, comparable to those found in prior laboratory-scale SCW gasification work carreid out at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM) as well as other biomass gasification experience with conventional gasifiers. As in the prior work at UHM, a significant amount of the hydrogen found in the gas phase products is derived from the water/steam matrix. The studies at UHM utilized an indirectly heated gasifier with an acitvated carbon catalyst. In contrast, the GA studies utilized a directly heated gasifier without catalyst, plus a surrogate waste fuel. Attainment of comparable gasification efficiencies without catalysis is an important advancement for the GA process, and opens the way for efficient hydrogen production from low-value, dirty feed materials. The Phase I results indicate that a practical means to overcome limitations on biomass slurry feed concentration and preheat temperatuare is to coprocess an auxiliary high heating value material. SWPO coprocessing of tow hgih-water content wastes, partially dewatered sewage sludge and trap grease, yields a scenario for the production of hydrogen at highly competitive prices. It is estimated that there are hundreds if not thousands of potential sites for this technology across the US and worldwide.

SPRITZER,M; HONG,G

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Interim report VII, production test IP-549-A half-plant low alum feed water treatment at F Reactor  

SciTech Connect

A half-plant low alum water treatment test began at F Reactor on January 16, 1963. The test, which had been prompted by the analysis of ledge corrosion attack on fuel elements, will demonstrate whether or not high alum feed is responsible for increasing the frequency of ledge and groove corrosion attack on fuel element surfaces. The effect will be evaluated by comparing visual examination results obtained from the normal production fuel irradiated in process water treated with two different alum feed rates. Six 20-column fuel discharges, ten columns from each side of the reactor, have been taken during the test as follows: (1) One discharge prior to the start of the test. (2) One discharge such that the test side was exposed to coolant treated with both high and low alum feed. (3) Four discharges under test conditions. This report discusses the results obtained from the fifth discharge under test conditions.

Geier, R.G.

1964-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

193

Superclean coal-water slurry combustion testing in an oil-fired boiler  

SciTech Connect

The Pennsylvania State University is conducting a superclean coal-water slurry (SCCWS) program for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania with the objective of determining the capability of effectively firing SCCWS in an industrial boiler designed for heavy fuel oil. Penn State has entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to determine if SCCWS (a fuel containing coal with 3.0 wt.% ash and 0.9 wt.% sulfur) can effectively be burned in a heavy fuel oil-designed industrial boiler without adverse impact on boiler rating, maintainability, reliability, and availability. The project will provide information on the design of new systems specifically configured to fire these clean coal-based fuels. The project consists of four phases: (1) design, permitting, and test planning, (2) construction and start up, (3) demonstration and evaluation (1,000-hour demonstration), and (4) program expansion (additional 1,000 hours of testing). The boiler testing wig determine if the SCCWS combustion characteristics, heat release rate, fouling and slagging behavior, corrosion and erosion limits, and fuel transport, storage, and handling characteristics can be accommodated in an oil-designed boiler system. In addition, the proof-of-concept demonstration will generate data to determine how the properties of SCCWS and its parent coal affect boiler performance. Economic factors associated with retrofitting boilers will be identified

Miller, B.G.; Pisupati, S.V.; Poe, R.L.; Morrison, J.L.; Xie, J.; Walsh, P.M.; Wincek, R.T.; Clark, D.A.; Scaroni, A.W.

1993-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

194

On-sample water content measurement for a complete local monitoring in triaxial testing of unsaturated soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To provide a complete local monitoring of the state of an unsaturated soil sample during triaxial testing, a local water content measurement device was adapted to a triaxial device comprising the measurement of local displacements (Hall effect transducers) and suction (High capacity transducer). Water content was locally monitored by means of a resistivity probe. The water content/resistivity calibration curves of an intact natural unsaturated loess from Northern France extracted by block sampling at two depths (1 and 3.3 m) were carefully determined, showing good accuracy and repeatability. The validity of two models giving the resistivity of unsaturated soils with respect to their water content was examined.

Munoz-Castelblanco, José; Pereira, Jean-Michel; Cui, Yu-Jun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Investigation of CTBT OSI Radionuclide Techniques at the DILUTED WATERS Nuclear Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), a verification regime that includes the ability to conduct an On-Site Inspection (OSI) will be established. The Treaty allows for an OSI to include many techniques, including the radionuclide techniques of gamma radiation surveying and spectrometry and environmental sampling and analysis. Such radioactivity detection techniques can provide the “smoking gun” evidence that a nuclear test has occurred through the detection and quantification of indicative recent fission products. An OSI faces restrictions in time and manpower, as dictated by the Treaty; not to mention possible logistics difficulties due to the location and climate of the suspected explosion site. It is thus necessary to have a good understanding of the possible source term an OSI will encounter and the proper techniques that will be necessary for an effective OSI regime. One of the challenges during an OSI is to locate radioactive debris that has escaped an underground nuclear explosion (UNE) and settled on the surface near and downwind of ground zero. To support the understanding and selection of sampling and survey techniques for use in an OSI, we are currently designing an experiment, the Particulate Release Experiment (PRex), to simulate a small-scale vent from an underground nuclear explosion. PRex will occur at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The project is conducted under the National Center for Nuclear Security (NCNS) funded by the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA). Prior to the release experiment, scheduled for Spring of 2013, the project scheduled a number of activities at the NNSS to prepare for the release experiment as well as to utilize the nuclear testing past of the NNSS for the development of OSI techniques for CTBT. One such activity—the focus of this report—was a survey and sampling campaign at the site of an old UNE that vented: DILUTED WATERS. Activities at DILUTED WATERS included vehicle-based survey, in situ measurements with high-purity germanium (HPGe) and hand-held LaBr3 systems, soil sampling with a variety of tools, and laboratory gamma spectrometric analysis of those samples. A further benefit of the measurement campaign was to gain familiarity with the many logistical aspects of performing radiological field work at NNSS ahead of the PRex. Many practical lessons concerning the proper methodologies and logistics of using the surveying and sampling equipment were noted. These Lessons Learned are compiled together in Appendix A. The vehicle-based survey was successful in that it found a previously unknown hotspot (determined to be 232Th) while it demonstrated that a better method for keeping a serpentine track without staking was needed. Some of the soil sampling equipment was found to be impractical for the application, though core sampling would not be the correct way to take soil samples for a fresh vent deposit (as opposed to an old site like DILUTED WATERS). Due to the site’s age, 137Cs was the only fission radioisotope identified, though others were searched for. While not enough samples were taken and analyzed to definitively link the 137Cs to DILUTED WATERS as opposed to other NNSS activities, results were consistent with the historical DILUTED WATERS plume. MDAs were compared for soil sampling and in situ measurements.

Baciak, James E.; Milbrath, Brian D.; Detwiler, Rebecca S.; Kirkham, Randy R.; Keillor, Martin E.; Lepel, Elwood A.; Seifert, Allen; Emer, Dudley; Floyd, Michael

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Actinide Sorption in Rainier Mesa Tunnel Waters from the Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sorption behavior of americium (Am), plutonium (Pu), neptunium (Np), and uranium (U) in perched Rainier Mesa tunnel water was investigated. Both volcanic zeolitized tuff samples and groundwater samples were collected from Rainier Mesa, Nevada Test Site, NV for a series of batch sorption experiments. Sorption in groundwater with and without the presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) was investigated. Am(III) and Pu(IV) are more soluble in groundwater that has high concentrations of DOM. The sorption K{sub d} for Am(III) and Pu(IV) on volcanic zeolitized tuff was up to two orders of magnitude lower in samples with high DOM (15 to 19 mg C/L) compared to samples with DOM removed (Rainier Mesa, the low actinide Kd values measured in groundwater with high DOM concentrations must be incorporated in predictive transport models.

Zhao, P; Zavarin, M; Leif, R; Powell, B; Singleton, M; Lindvall, R; Kersting, A

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

197

HVAC and water heating system field test experiences at the Tennessee Energy Conservation in Housing (TECH) complex  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The TECH complex has been utilized since 1976 as a field test site for several novel and conventional space conditioning and water heating systems. Systems tested include the Annual Cycle Energy System (ACES), solar space heating systems (hydronic and air), parallel and series solar assisted heat pumps, air-type solar heating with off-peak storage, passive solar heating, two conventional air-to-air heat pumps, an air-to-air heat pump with desuperheater water heater, and horizontal coil and multiple shallow vertical coil ground-coupled heat pumps. System descriptions and test results are presented as well as performance observations.

Baxter, V.D.; McGraw, B.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Production test IP-338-A, Supp. A, DR-Reactor heat decay test at high outlet water temperatures  

SciTech Connect

This test is identical to the original except that it authorizes the performance of a trial reduction in reactor flow during a prior reactor shutdown. This trial flow reduction will be performed in the same manner as proposed for the actual test, with one exception. This is, that based upon the results of this preliminary test some changes in the timing of the different steps may be indicated. Such changes can readily be handled by making each step dependent upon the observed reactor outlet temperature during the test performance. The other significant change in the production test is the increase in the allowable bulk outlet temperature from Ti + 40 {plus_minus} 3{degrees}C{sup *}. This change is needed to obtain a reasonable extrapolation of the results of tests No. 1 and No.2 to 90{degrees}C, and is justified from a hazards standpoint by the excellent flow control achieved during test No. 1 and by the trial test that will be run prior to the performance of the actual test No. 2. Other aspects of the test basis and justification are presented in the original production test.

Jones, S.S.

1962-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

199

Proposed and existing passive and inherent safety-related structures, systems, and components (building blocks) for advanced light-water reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nuclear power plant is composed of many structures, systems, and components (SSCs). Examples include emergency core cooling systems, feedwater systems, and electrical systems. The design of a reactor consists of combining various SSCs (building blocks) into an integrated plant design. A new reactor design is the result of combining old SSCs in new ways or use of new SSCs. This report identifies, describes, and characterizes SSCs with passive and inherent features that can be used to assure safety in light-water reactors. Existing, proposed, and speculative technologies are described. The following approaches were used to identify the technologies: world technical literature searches, world patent searches, and discussions with universities, national laboratories and industrial vendors. 214 refs., 105 figs., 26 tabs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Moses, D.L.; Lewis, E.B.; Gibson, R.; Pearson, R.; Reich, W.J.; Murphy, G.A.; Staunton, R.H.; Kohn, W.E.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Predevelopment Water-Level Contours for Aquifers in the Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain area of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contaminants introduced into the subsurface of the Nevada Test Site at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain by underground nuclear testing are of concern to the U.S. Department of Energy and regulators responsible for protecting human health and safety. Although contaminants were introduced into low-permeability rocks above the regional flow system, the potential for contaminant movement away from the underground test areas and into the accessible environment is greatest by ground-water transport. The primary hydrologic control on this transport is evaluated and examined through a series of contour maps developed to represent the water-level distribution within each of the major aquifers underlying the area. Aquifers were identified and their extents delineated by merging and analyzing multiple hydrostratigraphic framework models developed by other investigators from existing geologic information. The contoured water-level distribution in each major aquifer was developed from a detailed evaluation and assessment of available water-level measurements. Multiple spreadsheets that accompany this report provide pertinent water-level and geologic data by well or drill hole. Aquifers are mapped, presented, and discussed in general terms as being one of three aquifer types—volcanic aquifer, upper carbonate aquifer, or lower carbonate aquifer. Each of these aquifer types was subdivided and mapped as independent continuous and isolated aquifers, based on the continuity of its component rock. Ground-water flow directions, as related to the transport of test-generated contaminants, were developed from water-level contours and are presented and discussed for each of the continuous aquifers. Contoured water-level altitudes vary across the study area and range from more than 5,000 feet in the volcanic aquifer beneath a recharge area in the northern part of the study area to less than 2,450 feet in the lower carbonate aquifer in the southern part of the study area. Variations in water-level altitudes within any single continuous aquifer range from a few hundred feet in a lower carbonate aquifer to just more than 1,100 feet in a volcanic aquifer. Flow directions throughout the study area are dominantly southward with minor eastward or westward deviations. Primary exceptions are westward flow in the northern part of the volcanic aquifer and eastward flow in the eastern part of the lower carbonate aquifer. Northward flow in the upper and lower carbonate aquifers in the northern part of the study area is possible but cannot be substantiated because data are lacking. Interflow between continuous aquifers is evaluated and mapped to define major flow paths. These flow paths delineate tributary flow systems, which converge to form the regional ground-water flow system. The implications of these tributary flow paths in controlling transport away from the underground test areas at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain are discussed. The obvious data gaps contributing to uncertainties in the delineation of aquifers and development of water-level contours are identified and evaluated.

Joseph M. Fenelon; Randell J. Laczniak; and Keith J. Halford

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

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201

VARIATIONS IN RADON-222 IN SOIL AND GROUND WATER AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table 1 Underground nuclear tests which were studied forunderground nuclear explosions, in "Nevada Test Site," E. B.Underground nuclear explosions at the Nevada Test Site (NTS)

Wollenberg, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

SRAT/SME components: Wear evaluation. Area metallurgical report  

SciTech Connect

Material water of internal components in the Slurry Receipt Adjustment Tank/Slurry Mix Evaporator (SRAT/SME) has been documented. This study consisted of a special wear test of approximately 1,950 hours of simulated run time. Basic dimensions were obtained for components before the test, and they were compared with measurements taken after the exposure. Wear of tank components, the estimated life of design materials of construction, and guidance for design configuration were obtained. The test program is continuing with no basic changes in design.

Jenkins, C.F.

1987-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

203

Advanced Heat Pump Water Heating Technology: Testing Commercial and Residential Systems in the Laboratory and Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) provide electric water heating at a much greater overall efficiency than conventional electric resistance systems. In the residential market, approximately half of all water heaters are electric resistance; these systems can be replaced by HPWHs in most applications with expected savings of 30%–60%. In commercial applications, most systems presently use natural gas or another fuel in direct combustion. Emerging HPWH systems are now able to provide water heating ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

204

Review of International Methods of Test to Rate the Efficiency of Water Heaters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

test procedure load profiles. The equivalent parameters fortable of all the load profiles is included as Appendix 1.to the draws in the load profile, the transitional test

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Actinide Sorption in Rainier Mesa Tunnel Waters from the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The sorption behavior of americium (Am), plutonium (Pu), neptunium (Np), and uranium (U) in perched Rainier Mesa tunnel water was investigated. Both volcanic zeolitized tuff samples and groundwater samples were collected from Rainier Mesa, Nevada Test Site, NV for a series of batch sorption experiments. Sorption in groundwater with and without the presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) was investigated. Am(III) and Pu(IV) are more soluble in groundwater that has high concentrations of DOM. The sorption K{sub d} for Am(III) and Pu(IV) on volcanic zeolitized tuff was up to two orders of magnitude lower in samples with high DOM (15 to 19 mg C/L) compared to samples with DOM removed (< 0.4 mg C/L) or samples with naturally low DOM (0.2 mg C/L). In contrast, Np(V) and U(VI) sorption to zeolitized tuff was much less affected by the presence of DOM. The Np(V) and U(VI) sorption Kds were low under all conditions. Importantly, the DOM was not found to significantly sorb to the zeolitized tuff during these experiment. The concentration of DOM in groundwater affects the transport behavior of actinides in the subsurface. The mobility of Am(III) and Pu(IV) is significantly higher in groundwater with elevated levels of DOM resulting in potentially enhanced transport. To accurately model the transport behavior of actinides in groundwater at Rainier Mesa, the low actinide Kd values measured in groundwater with high DOM concentrations must be incorporated in predictive transport models.

Zhao, P; Zavarin, M; Leif, R; Powell, B; Singleton, M; Lindvall, R; Kersting, A

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

206

Conceptual Engineering Method for Attenuating He Ion Interactions on First Wall Components in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) Employing a Low-Pressure Noble Gas  

SciTech Connect

It has been shown that post detonation energetic helium ions can drastically reduce the useful life of the (dry) first wall of an IFE reactor due to the accumulation of implanted helium. For the purpose of attenuating energetic helium ions from interacting with first wall components in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) target chamber, several concepts have been advanced. These include magnetic intervention (MI), deployment of a dynamically moving first wall, use of a sacrificial shroud, designing the target chamber large enough to mitigate the damage caused by He ions on the target chamber wall, and the use of a low pressure noble gas resident in the target chamber during pulse power operations. It is proposed that employing a low-pressure (~ 1 torr equivalent) noble gas in the target chamber will thermalize energetic helium ions prior to interaction with the wall. The principle benefit of this concept is the simplicity of the design and the utilization of (modified) existing technologies for pumping and processing the noble ambient gas. Although the gas load in the system would be increased over other proposed methods, the use of a "gas shield" may provide a cost effective method of greatly extending the first wall of the target chamber. An engineering study has been initiated to investigate conceptual engineering metmethods for implementing a viable gas shield strategy in the FTF.

C.A.Gentile, W.R.Blanchard, T.Kozub, C.Priniski, I.Zatz, S.Obenschain

2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

207

Comparison of Test Procedures and Energy Efficiency Criteria in Selected International Standards and Labeling Programs for Clothes Washers, Water Dispensers, Vending Machines and CFLs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

etc. ) during which energy consumption is measured, the typedoes not specify energy consumption measurements but rather,test in which water and energy consumption are measured. The

Fridley, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Visualizing microbial pollution in Santa Monica Bay with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and through field-testing a rapid, robust, field-portable water detection sensing system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hic Information Systems (GIS) and Through Field - testing aEngineering, UCLA Introduction: GIS and rapid detection:water quality characterizi ng GIS is a powerful mapping tool

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

WaterTransport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing and Design Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water management in Proton Exchange Membrane, PEM, Fuel Cells is challenging because of the inherent conflicts between the requirements for efficient low and high power operation. Particularly at low powers, adequate water must be supplied to sufficiently humidify the membrane or protons will not move through it adequately and resistance losses will decrease the cell efficiency. At high power density operation, more water is produced at the cathode than is necessary for membrane hydration. This excess water must be removed effectively or it will accumulate in the Gas Diffusion Layers, GDLs, between the gas channels and catalysts, blocking diffusion paths for reactants to reach the catalysts and potentially flooding the electrode. As power density of the cells is increased, the challenges arising from water management are expected to become more difficult to overcome simply due to the increased rate of liquid water generation relative to fuel cell volume. Thus, effectively addressing water management based issues is a key challenge in successful application of PEMFC systems. In this project, CFDRC and our partners used a combination of experimental characterization, controlled experimental studies of important processes governing how water moves through the fuel cell materials, and detailed models and simulations to improve understanding of water management in operating hydrogen PEM fuel cells. The characterization studies provided key data that is used as inputs to all state-of-the-art models for commercially important GDL materials. Experimental studies and microscopic scale models of how water moves through the GDLs showed that the water follows preferential paths, not branching like a river, as it moves toward the surface of the material. Experimental studies and detailed models of water and airflow in fuel cells channels demonstrated that such models can be used as an effective design tool to reduce operating pressure drop in the channels and the associated costs and weight of blowers and pumps to force air and hydrogen gas through the fuel cell. Promising improvements to materials structure and surface treatments that can potentially aid in managing the distribution and removal of liquid water were developed; and improved steady-state and freeze-thaw performance was demonstrated for a fuel cell stack under the self-humidified operating conditions that are promising for stationary power generation with reduced operating costs.

J. Vernon Cole; Abhra Roy; Ashok Damle; Hari Dahr; Sanjiv Kumar; Kunal Jain; Ned Djilai

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

210

Puget Sound Tidal Energy In-Water Testing and Development Project Final Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tidal energy represents potential for the generation of renewable, emission free, environmentally benign, and cost effective energy from tidal flows. A successful tidal energy demonstration project in Puget Sound, Washington may enable significant commercial development resulting in important benefits for the northwest region and the nation. This project promoted the United States Department of Energy�s Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program�s goals of advancing the commercial viability, cost-competitiveness, and market acceptance of marine hydrokinetic systems. The objective of the Puget Sound Tidal Energy Demonstration Project is to conduct in-water testing and evaluation of tidal energy technology as a first step toward potential construction of a commercial-scale tidal energy power plant. The specific goal of the project phase covered by this award was to conduct all activities necessary to complete engineering design and obtain construction approvals for a pilot demonstration plant in the Admiralty Inlet region of the Puget Sound. Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County (The District) accomplished the objectives of this award through four tasks: Detailed Admiralty Inlet Site Studies, Plant Design and Construction Planning, Environmental and Regulatory Activities, and Management and Reporting. Pre-Installation studies completed under this award provided invaluable data used for site selection, environmental evaluation and permitting, plant design, and construction planning. However, these data gathering efforts are not only important to the Admiralty Inlet pilot project. Lessons learned, in particular environmental data gathering methods, can be applied to future tidal energy projects in the United States and other parts of the world. The District collaborated extensively with project stakeholders to complete the tasks for this award. This included Federal, State, and local government agencies, tribal governments, environmental groups, and others. All required permit and license applications were completed and submitted under this award, including a Final License Application for a pilot hydrokinetic license from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The tasks described above have brought the project through all necessary requirements to construct a tidal pilot project in Admiralty Inlet with the exception of final permit and license approvals, and the selection of a general contractor to perform project construction.

Craig W. Collar

2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

211

A Water Vapor-Energy Balance Model Designed for Sensitivity Testing of Climatic Feedback Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A zonal mean water vapor-energy balance (WEB) model is formulated to assess feedback interactions of the hydrologic cycle and lapse rate with the radiative fluxes, snow-dependent albedo and transport mechanisms. The WEB model is designed for ...

Robert G. Gallimore

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Review of International Methods of Test to Rate the Efficiency of Water Heaters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is ?open. ? An open air intake water heater is assigned theof air intake, physical size and load profile of the waterwater heater does not consume a fossil fuel, the air-intake

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Investigations into High Temperature Components and Packaging  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document the work that was performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in support of the development of high temperature power electronics and components with monies remaining from the Semikron High Temperature Inverter Project managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). High temperature electronic components are needed to allow inverters to operate in more extreme operating conditions as required in advanced traction drive applications. The trend to try to eliminate secondary cooling loops and utilize the internal combustion (IC) cooling system, which operates with approximately 105 C water/ethylene glycol coolant at the output of the radiator, is necessary to further reduce vehicle costs and weight. The activity documented in this report includes development and testing of high temperature components, activities in support of high temperature testing, an assessment of several component packaging methods, and how elevated operating temperatures would impact their reliability. This report is organized with testing of new high temperature capacitors in Section 2 and testing of new 150 C junction temperature trench insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBTs) in Section 3. Section 4 addresses some operational OPAL-GT information, which was necessary for developing module level tests. Section 5 summarizes calibration of equipment needed for the high temperature testing. Section 6 details some additional work that was funded on silicon carbide (SiC) device testing for high temperature use, and Section 7 is the complete text of a report funded from this effort summarizing packaging methods and their reliability issues for use in high temperature power electronics. Components were tested to evaluate the performance characteristics of the component at different operating temperatures. The temperature of the component is determined by the ambient temperature (i.e., temperature surrounding the device) plus the temperature increase inside the device due the internal heat that is generated due to conduction and switching losses. Capacitors and high current switches that are reliable and meet performance specifications over an increased temperature range are necessary to realize electronics needed for hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs), fuel cell (FC) and plug-in HEVs (PHEVs). In addition to individual component level testing, it is necessary to evaluate and perform long term module level testing to ascertain the effects of high temperature operation on power electronics.

Marlino, L.D.; Seiber, L.E.; Scudiere, M.B.; M.S. Chinthavali, M.S.; McCluskey, F.P.

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

214

Experimental Verification of SWR 1000 Passive Components and Systems  

SciTech Connect

Many tests were done in different test facilities to verify the passive components and systems of the SWR 1000 BWR. Test results are given here in detail only for the full-scale tests. For these tests, the main test results are: 1. The Passive Pressure Pulse Transmitter activates safety related valves with a time delay of less than 5 seconds. 2. The vent pipes developed for the SWR 1000 avoid chugging completely. 3. The 2-arm quenchers in the SWR 1000 generate good mixing of hot and cold water in the flooding pool. (author)

Meseth, Johann [Framatome ANP GmbH, P.O. Box 10 10 63, D-63010 Offenbach (Germany)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

TEST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an abstract. TEST Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Cras lacinia dui et est venenatis lacinia. Vestibulum lacus dolor, adipiscing id mattis sit amet, ultricies sed purus. Nulla consectetur aliquet feugiat. Maecenas ips

216

How to Make Appliance Standards Work: Improving Energy and Water Efficiency Test Procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

test procedures for appliances. ” Energy and BuildingsEnergy Efficiency In Domestic Appliances And Lighting 4thLBNL # How to Make Appliance Standards Work: Improving

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Preliminary Modeling, Testing, and Analysis of a Gas Tankless Water Heater: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Today's gas tankless water heaters offer significant energy savings over conventional gas storage tank water heaters, but savings depends on the draw pattern. A one-node model incorporating heat exchanger mass is used to address this and other issues. Key model parameters are determined from least-squares regression on short-term data, including burner efficiency, thermal capacitance, and thermal loss coefficient. The calibrated model agrees with data to ~5% on Qgas, with temperature RMS deviation of ~4..deg..C. Efficiency with a standard realistic draw is 71%, compared to 81% predicted from standard energy-factors. Adding a small tank controlled by the tankless heater solves issues of oscillations with solar pre-heat, low-flow and hot-water-delay issues. Future work includes model refinements and developing optimal data protocols for model parameter extraction.

Burch, J.; Hoeschele, M.; Springer, D.; Rudd, A.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Investigation and definition of parameters associated with testing geopressure water: An Interim Report, June 1, 1975--August 31, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Prior to the initiation of this project, considerable literature had appeared in technical journals, particularly geological journals, describing the potential value of the energy contained in hot geopressured waters along the northern Gulf of Mexico coast. The geographic region of interest was identified as the area between Brownsville and Pensacola, approximately 200 miles wide and 750 miles long and therefore containing about 150,000 square miles of surface area. The resource was estimated as lying at depths between 5,000 and 25,000 feet. Although many descriptions of this resource had been written, not much experimental data were available regarding the actual analyses of these waters, especially the methane content. ERDA Geothermal division sponsored the current project to find out the precise analysis of the waters in the geopressured zone in a specific South Louisiana shut in gas well. This information was desired as a prelude to additional resource development projects. If the experimental results of this project were negative, doubts would be raised that there should be serious attempts at other development projects. If the results were positive (i.e., the waters were saturated with methane suggested by hydrogeological theory of this region) then ERDA would feel encouraged to proceed with larger scale projects, especially the drilling and completion of an on-purpose geopressured geothermal well. The project was funded for the purpose of dynamic testing two aquifers tapped by an existing gas well in the Tigre Lagoon field in Vermilion Parish. Some information about the characteristics of the reservoir fluid and the behavior of the reservoir under varying flow conditions was to be obtained. The analyses of the water would be run concurrently with the flow tests.

Karkalits, O.C.; Hodges, Jimmie; Jones, Paul

1976-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

219

Topical report : NSTF facilities plan for water-cooled VHTR RCCS : normal operational tests.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Generation IV roadmapping activity, the gas-cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) has been selected as the principal concept for hydrogen production and other process-heat applications such as district heating and potable water production. On this basis, the DOE has selected the VHTR for additional R&D with the ultimate goal of demonstrating emission-free electricity and hydrogen production with this advanced reactor concept.

Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Tzanos, C. P.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Investigation of the Sensitivity of Water Cycle Components Simulated by the Canadian Regional Climate Model to the Land Surface Parameterization, the Lateral Boundary Data, and the Internal Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the sensitivity of components of the hydrological cycle simulated by the Canadian Regional Climate Model (CRCM) to lateral boundary forcing, the complexity of the land surface scheme (LSS), and the internal variability ...

Biljana Music; Daniel Caya

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water components test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

SOLERAS - Solar-Powered Water Desalination Project at Yanbu: Thermal energy storage tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solar-powered water desalination pilot plant at Yanbu in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is a unique project in terms of its size, purpose, objectives, and scope. The plant uses a combination of solar thermal energy and fossil-fuel energy to provide the shaft horsepower necessary to operate the indirect heat-transfer freeze desalination process developed and patented by Chicago Bridge and Iron Inc. (CBandI) to produce potable water. The thermal storage acts as a buffer between the energy collection subsystem and the energy delivery subsystem. This report describes the thermal storage subsystem. One of the objectives of the desalination research project is to publish a series of reports on the performance of its various subsystems. The authors of this report do not claim that it is exhaustive and complete in all respects, for more than one reason. Any research activity is like an open-ended problem and during the tenure of its investigation it raises more problems than can be solved. However, the authors believe that the storage system behavior has posed no serious problem and that the report adequately covers all the facets of the investigation. 3 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Ratio of produced gas to produced water from DOE's EDNA Delcambre No. 1 geopressured-geothermal aquifer gas well test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A paper presented by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) at the Third Geopressured-Geothermal Energy Conference hypothesized that the high ratio of produced gas to produced water from the No. 1 sand in the Edna Delcambre No. 1 well was due to free gas trapped in pores by imbibition over geological time. This hypothesis was examined in relation to preliminary test data which reported only average gas to water ratios over the roughly 2-day steps in flow rate. Subsequent public release of detailed test data revealed substantial departures from the previously reported computer simulation results. Also, data now in the public domain reveal the existence of a gas cap on the aquifier tested. This paper describes IGT's efforts to match the observed gas/water production with computer simulation. Two models for the occurrence and production of gas in excess of that dissolved in the brine have been used. One model considers the gas to be dispersed in pores by imbibition, and the other model considers the gas as a nearby free gas cap above the aquifier. The studies revealed that the dispersed gas model characteristically gave the wrong shape to plots of gas production on the gas/water ratio plots such that no reasonable match to the flow data could be achieved. The free gas cap model gave a characteristically better shape to the production plots and could provide an approximate fit to the data of the edge of the free gas cap is only about 400 feet from the well.Because the geological structure maps indicate the free gas cap to be several thousand feet away and the computer simulation results match the distance to the nearby Delcambre Nos. 4 and 4A wells, it appears that the source of the excess free gas in the test of the No. 1 sand may be from these nearby wells. The gas source is probably a separate gas zone and is brought into contact with the No. 1 sand via a conduit around the No. 4 well.

Rogers, L.A.; Randolph, P.L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Primary Water SCC Understanding and Characterization Through Fundamental Testing in the Vicinity of the Nickel/Nickel Oxide Phase Transition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper quantifies the nickel alloy stress corrosion crack growth rate (SCCGR) dissolved hydrogen level functionality. SCCGR has been observed to exhibit a maximum in proximity to the nickel/nickel oxide phase transition. The dissolved hydrogen level SCCGR dependency has been quantified in a phenomenological model in terms of the stability of nickel oxide not the dissolved hydrogen level. The observed SCCGR dependency has been extended to lower temperatures through the developed model and Contact Electrical Resistance (CER) measurements of the nickel/nickel oxide phase transition. Understanding obtained from this hydrogen level SCC functionality and complementary SCC subprocesses test results is discussed. Specifically, the possible SCC fundamental subprocesses of corrosion kinetics, hydrogen permeation and pickup have also been measured for nickel alloys. Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis has been performed on SCCGR specimens tested in heavy water (D{sub 2}O).

D.S. Morton; S.A. Attanasio; G.A. Young

2001-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

224

Analysis of Ground-Water Levels and Associated Trends in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, 1951-2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Almost 4,000 water-level measurements in 216 wells in the Yucca Flat area from 1951 to 2003 were quality assured and analyzed. An interpretative database was developed that describes water-level conditions for each water level measured in Yucca Flat. Multiple attributes were assigned to each water-level measurement in the database to describe the hydrologic conditions at the time of measurement. General quality, temporal variability, regional significance, and hydrologic conditions are attributed for each water-level measurement. The database also includes narratives that discuss the water-level history of each well. Water levels in 34 wells were analyzed for variability and for statistically significant trends. An attempt was made to identify the cause of many of the water-level fluctuations or trends. Potential causes include equilibration following well construction or development, pumping in the monitoring well, withdrawals from a nearby supply well, recharge from precipitation, earthquakes, underground nuclear tests, land subsidence, barometric pressure, and Earth tides. Some of the naturally occurring fluctuations in water levels may result from variations in recharge. The magnitude of the overall water-level change for these fluctuations generally is less than 2 feet. Long-term steady-state hydrographs for most of the wells open to carbonate rock have a very similar pattern. Carbonate-rock wells without the characteristic pattern are directly west of the Yucca and Topgallant faults in the southwestern part of Yucca Flat. Long-term steady-state hydrographs from wells open to volcanic tuffs or the Eleana confining unit have a distinctly different pattern from the general water-level pattern of the carbonate-rock aquifers. Anthropogenic water-level fluctuations were caused primarily by water withdrawals and nuclear testing. Nuclear tests affected water levels in many wells. Trends in these wells are attributed to test-cavity infilling or the effects of depressurization following nuclear testing. The magnitude of the overall water-level change for wells with anthropogenic trends can be large, ranging from several feet to hundreds of feet. Vertical water-level differences at 27 sites in Yucca Flat with multiple open intervals were compared. Large vertical differences were noted in volcanic rocks and in boreholes where water levels were affected by nuclear tests. Small vertical differences were noted within the carbonate-rock and valley-fill aquifers. Vertical hydraulic gradients generally are downward in volcanic rocks and from pre-Tertiary clastic rocks toward volcanic- or carbonate-rock units.

J.M. Fenelon

2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

225

Preliminary results from bench-scale testing of a sulfur-iodine thermochemical water-splitting cycle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Portions of a bench-scale model of a sulfur-iodine thermochemical water-splitting cycle have been operated at General Atomic Company as part of a comprehensive program to demonstrate the technology for hydrogen production from nonfossil sources. The hydrogen program is funded by the US Department of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, and General Atomic Company. The bench-scale model consists of three subunits which can be operated separately or together and is capable of producing as much as 4 std liters/min (6.7 x 10/sup -5/ m/sup 3//s at standard conditions) of gaseous hydrogen. One subunit (main solution reaction) reacts liquid water, liquid iodine (I/sub 2/) and gaseous sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) to form two separable liquid phases: 50 wt % sulfuric acid (H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/) and a solution of iodine in hydriodic acid (HI/sub x/). Another subunit (H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ concentration and decomposition) concentrates the H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ phase to the azeotropic composition, then decomposes it at high temperature over a catalyst to form gaseous SO/sub 2/ and oxygen. The third subunit (HI separation and decomposition) separates the HI from water and I/sub 2/ by extractive distillation with phosphoric acid (H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/) and decomposes the HI in the vapor phase over a catalyst to form I/sub 2/ and product hydrogen. This paper presents the results of on-going parametric studies to determine the operating characteristics, performance, and capacity limitations of major components.

O'Keefe, D.; Allen, C.; Besenbruch, G.; McCorkle, K.; Norman, J.; Sharp, R.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Materials Reliability Program: High-Strength Structural Bolting and Nickel-Base Alloy Components in B&W-Design Pressurized Water Rea ctor Internals (MRP-273)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes information pertinent to the seven currently operating B&W-design 177-FA (fuel assembly) pressurized water reactors (PWRs) for the EPRI Materials Reliability Program (MRP).

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

227

Cyclone reburn using coal-water fuel: Pilot-scale development and testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is an ongoing effort to develop retrofit technologies capable of converting oil- and/or gas-fired boilers to coal combustion. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the technical feasibility of an improved portion of a previously developed retrofit system designed for the purpose of converting oil/gas boilers. This improvement would almost entirely eliminate the use of premium fuels, thereby significantly increasing the economical attractiveness of the system. Specifically, the goals in this program were to replace natural gas as a reburning fuel with coal-water fuel (CWF). The advantages of such a system include: (1) increased return on investment (ROI) for conversions; (2) nearly complete elimination of premium oil or gas fuel; (3) a more integrated approach to the conversion of oil- or gas-designed boilers to CWF.

Eckhart, C.F.; DeVault, R.F.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Cyclone reburn using coal-water fuel: Pilot-scale development and testing. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is an ongoing effort to develop retrofit technologies capable of converting oil- and/or gas-fired boilers to coal combustion. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the technical feasibility of an improved portion of a previously developed retrofit system designed for the purpose of converting oil/gas boilers. This improvement would almost entirely eliminate the use of premium fuels, thereby significantly increasing the economical attractiveness of the system. Specifically, the goals in this program were to replace natural gas as a reburning fuel with coal-water fuel (CWF). The advantages of such a system include: (1) increased return on investment (ROI) for conversions; (2) nearly complete elimination of premium oil or gas fuel; (3) a more integrated approach to the conversion of oil- or gas-designed boilers to CWF.

Eckhart, C.F.; DeVault, R.F.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

BWRVIP-186: BWR Vessel and Internals Project, Effect of Water Chemistry and Temperature Transients on the IGSCC Growth Rates in BWR Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The oxidizing nature of the boiling water reactor (BWR) environment, coupled with high tensile residual stresses, have led to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) events. This report summarizes the available information on the effect of water chemistry transients on crack growth rates of Type 304 stainless steel and nickel-base weld metal Alloy 182. The report also provides crack growth rate equations and tables for evaluating the amount of crack extension that may have occurred during a trans...

2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

230

Testing and analysis of load-side immersed heat exchangers for solar domestic hot water systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work to determine the performance of load-side heat exchangers for use in residential solar domestic hot water systems. We measured the performance of four heat exchangers: a smooth coil and a finned coil having heat transfer areas of 2.5 m/sup 2/ (26 ft/sup 2/) and those having areas of 1.7 m/sup 2/ (19 ft/sup 2/). A numerical model using the thermal network program MITAS was constructed, and results were compared to the experimental results. Research showed a smooth coil with only 70% of the surface area of a finned coil performed better than the finned coil. Also, load-side heat exchangers can maintain and enhance stratification in storage tanks, permitting the use of control strategies that take advantage of stratified storage tanks to increase system performance. The analytical model, which agreed reasonably well with the experimental results, was used to vary heat exchanger flow rate and area and initial tank temperature for both a smooth- and a finned-coil heat exchanger. Increasing the heat exchanger flow rate and area results in higher heat transfer rates but not necessarily optimal performance. Lower initial tank temperatures resulted in reduced tank stratification. The smooth heat exchanger outperformed the finned heat exchanger with the same outside surface area. 15 refs., 37 figs., 9 tabs.

Farrington, R.B.; Bingham, C.E.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Detecting and analyzing insecure component usage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Software is commonly built from reusable components that provide desired functionalities. Although component reuse significantly improves software productivity, insecure component usage can lead to security vulnerabilities in client applications. ... Keywords: differential testing, insecure component usage, testing and analysis of real-world software

Taeho Kwon; Zhendong Su

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

A Serendipitous, Long-Term Infiltration Experiment: Water and Tritium Circulation Beneath the CAMBRIC Ditch at the Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Underground nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site introduced numerous radionuclides that may be used to characterize subsurface hydrologic transport processes in arid climates. A sixteen year pumping experiment designed to examine radionuclide migration away from the CAMBRIC nuclear test, conducted in groundwater beneath Frenchman Flat in 1965, gave rise to an unintended second experiment involving radionuclide infiltration through the vadose zone, as induced by seepage of pumping effluents beneath an unlined discharge trench. The combined experiments have been reanalyzed using a detailed, three-dimensional numerical model of transient, variably saturated flow and mass transport, tailored specifically for large scale and efficient calculations. Simulations have been used to estimate radionuclide travel and residence times in various parts of the system for comparison with observations in wells. Model predictions of mass transport were able to clearly demonstrate radionuclide recycling behavior between the ditch and pumping well previously suggested by isotopic age dating information; match travel time estimates for radionuclides moving between the ditch, the water table, and monitoring wells; and provide more realistic ways in which to interpret the pumping well elution curves. Collectively, the results illustrate the utility of integrating detailed numerical modeling with diverse observational data in developing accurate interpretations and forecasts of contaminant migration processes.

Maxwell, R M; Tompson, A B; Kollet, S J

2008-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

233

Experience in the Testing and Application of the EPRI DfD Process: Decontamination for Decommissioning of Reactor Coolant Systems and Plant Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a vendor's perspective on the application of the EPRI DfD (Decontamination for Decommissioning) process. It includes a summary of in-house testing and initial field applications of the process, focusing on lessons learned and the application methodology.

1999-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

234

Guidelines for Fabrication and Assembly of Alloy 690 Components in PWR Primary Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although test data and field experience indicate that Alloy 690 is significantly more resistant to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) degradation than Alloy 600, laboratory testing has shown that thermo-mechanical processing and surface bulk cold work can introduce vulnerabilities to PWSCC. This document provides guidelines for the fabrication, assembly, and installation of heavy section Alloy 690 parts and components in the primary system of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The ...

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

235

Development of wear-resistant ceramic coatings for diesel engine components. Volume 1, Coating development and tribological testing: Final report: DOE/ORNL Ceramic Technology Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The tribological properties of a variety of advanced coating materials have been evaluated under conditions which simulate the piston ring -- cylinder liner environment near top ring reversal in a heavy duty diesel engine. Coated ``ring`` samples were tested against a conventional pearlitic grey cast iron liner material using a high temperature reciprocating wear test rig. Tests were run with a fresh CE/SF 15W40lubricant at 200 and 350{degrees}C, with a high-soot, engine-tested oil at 200{degrees}C and with no lubrication at 200{degrees}C. For lowest wear under boundary lubricated conditions, the most promising candidates to emerge from this study were high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) Cr{sub 3} C{sub 2} - 20% NiCr and WC - 12% Co cermets, low temperature arc vapor deposited (LTAVD) CrN and plasma sprayed chromium oxides. Also,plasma sprayed Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and A1{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} materials were found to give excellent wear resistance in unlubricated tests and at extremely high temperatures (450{degrees}C) with a syntheticoil. All of these materials would offer substantial wear reductions compared to the conventional electroplated hard chromium ring facing and thermally sprayed metallic coatings, especially at high temperatures and with high-soot oils subjected to degradation in diesel environments. The LTAVD CrN coating provided the lowest lubricated wear rates of all the materials evaluated, but may be too thin (4 {mu}m) for use as a top ring facing. Most of the coatings evaluated showed higher wear rates with high-soot, engine-tested oil than with fresh oil, with increases of more than a factor of ten in some cases. Generally, metallic materials were found to be much more sensitive to soot/oil degradation than ceramic and cermet coatings. Thus, decreased ``soot sensitivity`` is a significant driving force for utilizing ceramic or cermet coatings in diesel engine wear applications.

Naylor, M.G.S. [Cummins Engine Co., Inc., Columbus, IN (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Geopressured-geothermal test of the EDNA Delcambre No. 1 well, Tigre Lagoon Field, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana: analysis of water an dissolved natural gas. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Edna Delcambre et al. No. 1 gas well, shut-in since June 1975, was made available for the project. Two geopressured sand-bed aquifers were tested: sand No. 3 at a depth of 12,900 feet and sand No. 1 at a depth of 12,600 feet. Each aquifer was subjected to flow tests which lasted approximately three weeks in each case. Water samples were obtained during flow testing of the two geopressured aquifers. The water contained 11.3 to 13.3% dissolved solids. Several radioactive species were measured. Radium-226 was found to be approximately 10 times more concentrated than the average amount observed in surface waters. No appreciable amount of heavy metals was detected. Recombination studies at bottom-hole conditions indicate the solubility of natural gas per barrel of water to be about 24 SCF. The methane content was 93 to 95%, and the gas had a heating value in the range of 1020 to 1070 Btu/cu.ft. During the flow tests, the gas/water ratio at the well-head was observed to be 45 to 88 SCF/Bbl water produced. (MHR)

Hankins, B.E.; Karkalits, O.C.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Custom Components - Microsystems Science, Technology, and Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Connectors area will help you optimize your choice of connectors for your requirements Passive RF Components Our Passive RF Components area will work with you to identify, specify...

238

Development and testing of a photometric method to identify non-operating solar hot water systems in field settings.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of experimental tests of a concept for using infrared (IR) photos to identify non-operational systems based on their glazing temperatures; operating systems have lower glazing temperatures than those in stagnation. In recent years thousands of new solar hot water (SHW) systems have been installed in some utility districts. As these numbers increase, concern is growing about the systems dependability because installation rebates are often based on the assumption that all of the SHW systems will perform flawlessly for a 20-year period. If SHW systems routinely fail prematurely, then the utilities will have overpaid for grid-energy reduction performance that is unrealized. Moreover, utilities are responsible for replacing energy for loads that failed SHW system were supplying. Thus, utilities are seeking data to quantify the reliability of SHW systems. The work described herein is intended to help meet this need. The details of the experiment are presented, including a description of the SHW collectors that were examined, the testbed that was used to control the system and record data, the IR camera that was employed, and the conditions in which testing was completed. The details of the associated analysis are presented, including direct examination of the video records of operational and stagnant collectors, as well as the development of a model to predict glazing temperatures and an analysis of temporal intermittency of the images, both of which are critical to properly adjusting the IR camera for optimal performance. Many IR images and a video are presented to show the contrast between operating and stagnant collectors. The major conclusion is that the technique has potential to be applied by using an aircraft fitted with an IR camera that can fly over an area with installed SHW systems, thus recording the images. Subsequent analysis of the images can determine the operational condition of the fielded collectors. Specific recommendations are presented relative to the application of the technique, including ways to mitigate and manage potential sources of error.

He, Hongbo (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Vorobieff, Peter V. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Menicucci, David (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Mammoli, Andrea A. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Carlson, Jeffrey J.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Concept Tests for a New Wire Flying Vehicle Designed to Achieve High Horizontal Resolution Profiling in Deep Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efficiently profiling the water column to achieve both high vertical and horizontal resolution from a moving vessel in deep water is difficult. Current solutions, such as CTD tow-yos, moving vessel profilers, and undulating tow bodies, are limited ...

Chris Roman; Dave Hebert

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Hardware-in-the-loop simulation of pressurized water reactor steam-generator water-level control, designed for use within physically distributed testing environments.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A hardware-in-the-loop model was developed to represent digital sensing and control of steam generator water-level. The model was created with an intention to serve as… (more)

Brink, Michael Joseph

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water components test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

BWR Zircaloy Corrosion and Water Chemistry Tests: Joint EPRI/Japan Joint Utility Group/Tokyo Electric Power Company Funded Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Zircaloy-2 cladding was historically susceptible to nodular corrosion, with several cases of corrosion-related fuel failures documented in the 1970s and 1980s. This report summarizes the results of in-core Zircaloy corrosion tests performed in the Halden reactor from 1990 through 1995. Both fuel rod and coupon test results confirmed the effectiveness of cladding processing control on the resistance of Zircaloy-2 to in-reactor nodular corrosion under BWR conditions. Among the various water chemistry impur...

1997-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

242

Assessment of model error in limited-area simulations of shallow water test cases on the C-grid plane and sphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A suite of limited-area test cases for the solution of the shallow water (SW) equations on the plane and sphere are collected and evaluated using the Model for Predication Across Scales (MPAS) modeling system. Included are regional simulations of ...

Christopher A. Jeffery

243

Using Indoor Component Accelerated Stress Testing to ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Silicon”, 38th IEEE PVSC, Austin TX, 2012. Page 27. 27 ... will have different activation energies. ... Department of Energy under Contract No. ...

2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

244

Developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--92 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space heating systems; (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters; (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems; (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project; (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research; and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report.

Not Available

1992-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

245

Materials and Components Technology Division research summary, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This division has the purpose of providing a R and D capability for design, fabrication, and testing of high-reliability materials, components, and instrumentation. Current divisional programs are in support of the Integral Fast Reactor, life extension for light water reactors, fuels development for the new production reactor and research and test reactors, fusion reactor first-wall and blanket technology, safe shipment of hazardous materials, fluid mechanics/materials/instrumentation for fossile energy systems, and energy conservation and renewables (including tribology, high- temperature superconductivity). Separate abstracts have been prepared for the data base.

Not Available

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Tensor Principal Component Analysis via Convex Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dec 9, 2012 ... tensor, known as the tensor principal component analysis (PCA) ...... of RAM, and all the default settings of CVX were used for all the tests.

247

A Transient Numerical Simulation of Perched Ground-Water Flow at the Test Reactor Area, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1952-94  

SciTech Connect

Studies of flow through the unsaturated zone and perched ground-water zones above the Snake River Plain aquifer are part of the overall assessment of ground-water flow and determination of the fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These studies include definition of the hydrologic controls on the formation of perched ground-water zones and description of the transport and fate of wastewater constituents as they moved through the unsaturated zone. The definition of hydrologic controls requires stratigraphic correlation of basalt flows and sedimentary interbeds within the saturated zone, analysis of hydraulic properties of unsaturated-zone rocks, numerical modeling of the formation of perched ground-water zones, and batch and column experiments to determine rock-water geochemical processes. This report describes the development of a transient numerical simulation that was used to evaluate a conceptual model of flow through perched ground-water zones beneath wastewater infiltration ponds at the Test Reactor Area (TRA).

B. R. Orr (USGS)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Demonstration of a heat pump water heater. Volume 3. Design report  

SciTech Connect

Work performed during the pilot run manufacturing and laboratory testing stages of a heat pump water heater for residential installations is described. A general description of the heat pump water heater is provided, as are detailed discussions of individual components. Also included is a description of the pilot run manufacturing facility and experience, laboratory operations, and laboratory test data.

Sloane, B.D.; Krise, R.C.; Kent, D.D.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

A system to test the effects of materials on the electron drift lifetime in liquid argon and observations on the effect of water  

SciTech Connect

A materials test system (MTS) has been developed at FNAL to assess the suitability of materials for use in a large liquid argon time projection chamber. During development of the MTS, it was noted that controlling the cryostat pressure with a 'raining' condenser reduced the electron drift lifetime in the liquid argon. The effect of condensing has been investigated using a series of passive materials to filter the condensate. We report the results of these studies and of tests on different candidate materials for detector construction. The inferred reduction of electron drift lifetime by water concentrations in the parts per trillion is of particular interest.

Andrews, R.; Jaskierny, W.; Jostlein, H.; Kendziora, C.; Pordes, S.; Tope, T.; /Fermilab

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Engineering design and testing of a ground water remediation system using electrolytically generated hydrogen with a palladium catalyst for dehalogenation of chlorinated hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent studies have shown that dissolved hydrogen causes rapid dehalogenation of chlorinated hydrocarbons in the presence of a palladium catalyst. The speed and completeness of these reactions offer advantages in designing remediation technologies for certain ground water contamination problems. However, a practical design challenge arises in the need to saturate the aqueous phase with hydrogen in an expeditious manner. To address this issue, a two-stage treatment reactor has been developed. The first stage consists of an electrolytic cell that generates hydrogen by applying a voltage potential across the influent water stream. The second stage consists of a catalyst column of palladium metal supported on alumina beads. A bench-scale reactor has been used to test this design for treating ground water contaminated with trichloroethene and other chlorinated hydrocarbons. In influent streams containing contaminant concentrations up to 4 ppm, initial results confirm that destruction efficiencies greater than 95% may be achieved with residence times short enough to allow practical implementation in specially designed flow-through treatment wells. Results from the bench-scale tests are being used to design a pilot ground water treatment system.

Ruiz, R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

NREL: Water Power Research - Resource Characterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resource Characterization Resource Characterization Building on its success in wind resource characterization and assessment, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has extended its capabilities to the field of water power. NREL's team of scientists, engineers and computer experts has broad experience in physical oceanography, meteorology, modeling, data analysis, and Geographic Information Systems. Many years of experience in wind assessment have enabled NREL to develop the skills and methodologies to evaluate the development potential of many different water-based energy technologies. Read about NREL's current water power resource characterization projects. Printable Version Water Power Research Home Capabilities Design Review & Analysis Device & Component Testing

252

Materials and Components Technology Division research summary, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The Materials and Components Technology Division (MCT) provides a research and development capability for the design, fabrication, and testing of high-reliability materials, components, and instrumentation. Current divisional programs related to nuclear energy support the development of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR): life extension and accident analyses for light water reactors (LWRs); fuels development for research and test reactors; fusion reactor first-wall and blanket technology; and safe shipment of hazardous materials. MCT Conservation and Renewables programs include major efforts in high-temperature superconductivity, tribology, nondestructive evaluation (NDE), and thermal sciences. Fossil Energy Programs in MCT include materials development, NDE technology, and Instrumentation design. The division also has a complementary instrumentation effort in support of Arms Control Technology. Individual abstracts have been prepared for the database.

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

SOLERAS - Solar Energy Water Desalination Project: DSET Laboratories. Performance testing of the fresnel point focus concentrating dish  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thernal performance of an 80.3 m/sup 2/ (864 ft/sup 2/) Power Kinetics, Inc. (PKI) fresnel point focus concentrating dish was measured over a period of seven months using SYLTHERM 800 as the heat transfer fluid. Three stages of testing were conducted; initial performance, extended all day operational, and final performance testing. The initial and final performance tests each used three different procedures to measure efficiency in order to quantify the solar concentrator's performance. The all day operational testing represented the ''in situ'' performance of the dish. During the seven months of performance testing, the operation of the dish was thoroughly monitored. All significant problems affecting the normal functioning of the PKI solar concentrator are noted in this report along with any corrective action taken to rectify the problems. Also, a small exposure program was conducted on mirror samples to determine if any reduction in total and specular reflectance occurred due to dirt retention on the mirrors.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Drinking Water Problems: Lead  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lead in drinking water can damage the brain, kidneys, nervous system and red blood cells. This publication explains how lead can enter drinking water, how to have your water tested, and how to eliminate lead from drinking water.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

255

Inhibition of IGA/SCC on Alloy 600 Surfaces Exposed to PWR Secondary Water: Volume 3: Precracking Model Boiler Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intergranular attack/stress corrosion cracking (IGA/SCC) of Alloy 600 steam generator tubing in alkaline environments continues to be a serious problem. EPRI has an extensive program devoted to qualifying corrosion inhibitors for use in PWR steam generators. Researchers have identified several potential inhibitor materials in laboratory tests. This report documents testing of these potential inhibitors in model boilers contaminated with sodium hydroxide.

1998-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

256

Performance Testing Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters under South- and Central-Florida Climate Conditions: Hot, Humid Climate and Warm Ground Water Pose Unusual Operating Environment for Heat Pump Water Heaters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) are known to provide considerable energy savings compared with electric resistance devices in many applications. However, as their performance is climate-dependent, it is important to understand their operation in extreme climates. Southern and Central Florida presents an extreme climate for HPWHs, as the air temperature, humidity, and entering water temperatures are all high nearly year-round. This report examines HPWH performance in the Florida Power & Light ...

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

257

Mapping of a reactor coolant effluent ground disposal test using an infrared imaging system and ground water potential and temperature measurements  

SciTech Connect

The concept of reactor effluent disposal to ground in infiltration trenches was proposed by Nelson and Alkire in 1963. At that time the available data indicated that radionuclide infiltration rates were probably adequate for trench disposal and that decontamination factors of 10 to 100 should be obtainable. Field tests at 100-F Area 1965 and 100-D Area 1967 have indicated that the infiltration rates are adequate and DF`s of from 2.5 for {sup 51}Cr to 7276 for {sup 65}Zn were obtained during the 100-D test. The purpose of this report is to present the results and interpretations of data from studies conducted over a reactor coolant effluent disposal test site. Data presented in this report were collected over the 100-C Area test in which a significant percentage of the reactor coolant effluent was disposed to an existing trench for a five-month period. Results of infrared thermal surveys and ground water temperature and potential measurements collected during this test are presented.

Eliason, J.R.

1969-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

258

Field Testing of Behavioral Barriers for Fish Exclusion at Cooling-Water Intake Systems, Ontario Hydro Pickering Nuclear Generating Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Depending on site-specific considerations, behavioral barriers such as sound and lights may be more effective, less expensive, and more environmentally suitable for excluding fish from power plant intakes than physical barriers. Specifically, field tests at Ontario Hydro's Pickering station on Lake Ontario indicated that behavioral barriers excluded alewife, an important prey species in the Great Lakes.

1989-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

259

Materials Reliability Program: Resistance of Alloys 690, 152, and 52 to Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (MRP-237, Rev. 2), Summary of Findings Between 2008 and 2012 from Completed and Ongoing Test Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a result of the long history of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of Alloy 600 components in primary water (PWSCC), thin-walled steam-generator tubing for pressurized water reactors (PWRs) has increasingly been fabricated from the higher-chromium material Alloy 690 during the last 25 years. Service experience with regard to PWSCC has been outstanding, with no cracking reported to date. More recently, thick-section Alloy 690 material has also been widely used, particularly for nozzle penetrations ...

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

260

Beyond Generic Component Parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For flexible use in application contexts, software components should be parameterized, but also extended appropriately. Until now, there is no language mechanism to solve both problems uniformly. This paper presents a new concept, component hooks. Hooks ...

Uwe Aßmann

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water components test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Reactor component automatic grapple  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A grapple for handling nuclear reactor components in a medium such as liquid sodium which, upon proper seating and alignment of the grapple with the component as sensed by a mechanical logic integral to the grapple, automatically seizes the component. The mechanical logic system also precludes seizure in the absence of proper seating and alignment.

Greenaway, Paul R. (Bethel Park, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Results of Water and Sediment Toxicity Tests and Chemical Analyses Conducted at the Central Shops Burning Rubble Pit Waste Unit, January 1999  

SciTech Connect

The Central Shops Burning Rubble Pit Operable Unit consists of two inactive rubble pits (631-1G and 631-3G) that have been capped, and one active burning rubble pit (631-2G), where wooden pallets and other non-hazardous debris are periodically burned. The inactive rubble pits may have received hazardous materials, such as asbestos, batteries, and paint cans, as well as non-hazardous materials, such as ash, paper, and glass. In an effort to determine if long term surface water flows of potentially contaminated water from the 631-1G, 631-3G, and 631-2G areas have resulted in an accumulation of chemical constituents at toxic levels in the vicinity of the settling basin and wetlands area, chemical analyses for significant ecological preliminary constituents of concern (pCOCs) were performed on aqueous and sediment samples. In addition, aquatic and sediment toxicity tests were performed in accordance with U.S. EPA methods (U.S. EPA 1989, 1994). Based on the results of the chemical analyses, unfiltered water samples collected from a wetland and settling basins located adjacent to the CSBRP Operable Unit exceed Toxicity Reference Values (TRVs) for aluminum, barium, chromium, copper, iron, lead, and vanadium at one or more of the four locations that were sampled. The water contained very high concentrations of clay particles that were present as suspended solids. A substantial portion of the metals were present as filterable particulates, bound to the clay particles, and were therefore not biologically available. Based on dissolved metal concentrations, the wetland and settling basin exceeded TRVs for aluminum and barium. However, the background reference location also exceeded the TRV for barium, which suggests that this value may be too low, based on local geochemistry. The detection limits for both total and dissolved mercury were higher than the TRV, so it was not possible to determine if the TRV for mercury was exceeded. Dissolved metal levels of chromium, copper, iron, lead and vanadium were below the TRVs. Metal concentrations in the sediment exceeded the TRVs for arsenic, chromium, copper, and mercury but not for antimony and lead. The results of the water toxicity tests indicated no evidence of acute toxicity in any of the samples. The results of the chronic toxicity tests indicated possible reproductive impairment at two locations. However, the results appear to be anomalous, since the toxicity was unrelated to concentration, and because the concentrations of pCOCs were similar in the toxic and the non-toxic samples. The results of the sediment toxicity tests indicated significant mortality in all but one sample, including the background reference sediment. When the results of the CSBRP sediment toxicity tests were statistically compared to the result from the background reference sediment, there was no significant mortality. These results suggest that the surface water and sediment at the CSBRP Operable Unit are not toxic to the biota that inhabit the wetland and the settling basin.

Specht, W.L.

1999-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

263

Key Issues Related to Corrosion Protection of Brackish Water and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Stainless steel components in cooling water systems, using brackish- ... Crevice conditions produced from consolidated biofilms on component ...

264

Design and development of a test facility to study two-phase steam/water flow in porous media  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The approach taken at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to obtain relative permeability curves and their dependence on fluid and matrix properties is summarized. Thermodynamic studies are carried out to develop the equations governing two-phase steam/water flow in porous media and to analyze the relationship between mass flow rate and flowing enthalpy. These relationships will be verified against experimental results and subsequently will be used to develop a field analysis technique to obtain in-situ relative permeability parameters. Currently our effort is concentrated on thermodynamic analysis and development of an experimental facility. Some of the findings of the theoretical work are presented and also the design and development effort for the experimental facility is described.

Verma, A.K.; Pruess, K.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Tsang, C.F.; Witherspoon, P.A.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Engineering design construction and testing of a salt-water absorption unit optimized for use with a solar collector heat source  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of a 3 ton direct evaporatively cooled LiBr chiller and the construction of three operable field test units suitable for use with flat plate collectors is reported. Compared to conventional LiBr chillers using shell and tube heat exchangers and a separate cooling tower this approach aims to reduce first cost, installation cost and parasitic power. The unit is packaged into a size approximately 94 cm square and 2 meters tall. It produces 7.2/sup 0/C (45F) chilled water with a .72 COP when fired with 89.4/sup 0/C (193F) hot water while rejecting heat to 25.6/sup 0/C (78F) wb ambient air. Power to operate the condenser fan, solution pump and surface wetting pump is 450 watts. This unit deals with water freezing by making the sump and wetting pump freeze resistant so that seasonal draining is not required. Low heat flux through the wetted surfaces yields performance insensitivity to the accumulation of scale.

Ferguson, T.; Merrick, R.H.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

SOLERAS - Solar-Powered Water Desalination Project at Yanbu: CBI Na-Con, Inc. Engineering Test Facility problem assessment and lessons learned  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Solar Energy Water Desalination Engineering Test Facility has been undergoing operation and testing in Yanbu, Saudi Arabia, as part of of the SOLERAS Program. The facility employs a field of point-focus, distributed receiver, solar thermal collectors operating at 388/degree/C (730/degree/F). Thermal energy is collected using a synthetic heat transfer fluid, stored in dual tank molten salt storage, and utilized on demand to generate steam, which provides both mechanical and thermal energy for refrigeration. The refrigeration drives a unique freeze desalination process in which ice is crystallized from concentrated seawater, pumped as a slurry of ice and brine, rinsed of brine in a countercurrent wash column, and melted to produce fresh water. The report presents an executive summary followed by an overview of the facility design and operation. The plant operation, from start-up in December, 1984 through mid-1986, is then briefly summarized. Key problem areas and areas of concern are identified and discussed; in addition to problems encountered, the discussion details problem causes, problem solutions, and in some cases problem avoidance which was accomplished through preventive measures employed during design and/or operation. The problems are grouped into areas corresponding to the facility's main subsystems: energy collection, energy storage, energy delivery, and desalination. 37 refs., 43 figs., 7 tabs.

Not Available

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Component Reliability Extensions for Fractal component model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that the model is an abstraction and, therefore, it may represent behavior not possible in the original program. Consequently, a model checker may then find errors that are not present in the program (i.e., false negatives, a component cannot be checked in isolation because it does not form a complete program (with the main method

268

Full-scale and bench-scale testing of a coal-fueled gas turbine system  

SciTech Connect

Components for a coal-fueled industrial gas turbine were developed and tested at both benchscale and full-scale. The components included a two stage slagging combustor, a particulate rejection impact separator (PRIS), and a secondary particulate filter. The Integrated Bench Scale Test Facility (IBSTF) was used for the filter tests ana some of the PRIS testing. Full-scale combustor testing has been carried-out both with and without the PRIS. Bench-scale testing has included evaluating the feasibility of on-site CWM preparation, developing a water-cooled impactor and an extended run with new secondary candle filters.

Roberts, P.B.; LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; Wen, C.S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Full-scale and bench-scale testing of a coal-fueled gas turbine system  

SciTech Connect

Components for a coal-fueled industrial gas turbine were developed and tested at both benchscale and full-scale. The components included a two stage slagging combustor, a particulate rejection impact separator (PRIS), and a secondary particulate filter. The Integrated Bench Scale Test Facility (IBSTF) was used for the filter tests ana some of the PRIS testing. Full-scale combustor testing has been carried-out both with and without the PRIS. Bench-scale testing has included evaluating the feasibility of on-site CWM preparation, developing a water-cooled impactor and an extended run with new secondary candle filters.

Roberts, P.B.; LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; Wen, C.S.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

270

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study  

SciTech Connect

Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about LWR design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the RISMC Pathway R&D is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced “RISMC toolkit” that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. This report describes the RISMC methodology demonstration where the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was used as a test-bed for purposes of determining safety margins. As part of the demonstration, we describe how both the thermal-hydraulics and probabilistic safety calculations are integrated and used to quantify margin management strategies.

Curtis Smith; David Schwieder; Cherie Phelan; Anh Bui; Paul Bayless

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Design and Development of a Test Facility to Study Two-Phase Steam/Water Flow in Porous Media  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The concept of relative permeability is the key concept in extending Darcy's law for single phase flow through porous media to the two-phase flow regime. Relative permeability functions are needed for simulation studies of two-phase geothermal reservoirs. These are poorly known inspite of considerable theoretical and experimental investigations during the last decade. Since no conclusive results exist, many investigators use ad hoc parametrization, or adopt results obtined from flow of oil and gas (Corey, 1954). It has been shown by Reda and Eaton (1980) that this can lead to serious deficiencies. Sensitivity of the relative permeability curves for prediction of mass flow rate and flowing enthalpy into geothermal wells has been studied by many investigators (e.g. Eaton and Reda (1980), Bodvarsson et al (1980), Sun and Ershagi (1979) etc.). It can be concluded from these studies that the beehavior of a two-phase steam/water reservoir depends greatly on the relative permeability curves used. Hence, there exists a need for obtaining reliable relative permeability functions.

Verma, Ashok K.; Pruess, Karsten; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Tsang, C.F.; Witherspoon, Paul A.

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

Field Validation of Toxicity Tests to Evaluate the Potential for Beneficial Use of Produced Water Final Scientific Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents, that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. This study investigated potential biological effects of produced water contamination derived from occasional surface overflow and possible subsurface intrusion at an oil production site along the shore of Skiatook Lake, Oklahoma. We monitored basic

Joseph R. Bidwell, Ph.D.; Jonathan C. Fisher; Naomi L. Cooper

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Revisions to the SRCC Rating Process for Solar Water Heaters: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the United States, annual performance ratings for solar water heaters are computed with component-based simulation models driven by typical meteorological year weather and specified water draw. Changes in the process are being implemented to enhance credibility through increased transparency and accuracy. Changes to the process include using a graphical rather than text-based model-building tool, performing analytical tests on all components and systems, checking energy balances on every component, loop, and system at every time step, comparing the results to detect outliers and potential errors, and documenting the modeling process in detail. Examples of changes in ratings are shown, along with analytical and comparative testing results.

Burch, J.; Huggins, J.; Long, S.; Thornton, J.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Initial field testing definition of subsurface sealing and backfilling tests in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

This report contains an initial definition of the field tests proposed for the Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program. The tests are intended to resolve various performance and emplacement concerns. Examples of concerns to be addressed include achieving selected hydrologic and structural requirements for seals, removing portions of the shaft liner, excavating keyways, emplacing cementitious and earthen seals, reducing the impact of fines on the hydraulic conductivity of fractures, efficient grouting of fracture zones, sealing of exploratory boreholes, and controlling the flow of water by using engineered designs. Ten discrete tests are proposed to address these and other concerns. These tests are divided into two groups: Seal component tests and performance confirmation tests. The seal component tests are thorough small-scale in situ tests, the intermediate-scale borehole seal tests, the fracture grouting tests, the surface backfill tests, and the grouted rock mass tests. The seal system tests are the seepage control tests, the backfill tests, the bulkhead test in the Calico Hills unit, the large-scale shaft seal and shaft fill tests, and the remote borehole sealing tests. The tests are proposed to be performed in six discrete areas, including welded and non-welded environments, primarily located outside the potential repository area. The final selection of sealing tests will depend on the nature of the geologic and hydrologic conditions encountered during the development of the Exploratory Studies Facility and detailed numerical analyses. Tests are likely to be performed both before and after License Application.

Fernandez, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Case, J.B.; Tyburski, J.R. [I. T. Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The eight-month program for 1990 is separated into seven tasks. There are tasks for each of the three solar houses, a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters, a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems, a management task, and a task funding travel to attend the Field Monitoring for a Purpose'' workshop which was held April 2--5, 1990, in Gothenburg, Sweden. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report. 7 figs., 4 tabs.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--92 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space heating systems, (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters, (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems, (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project, (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research, and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report.

Not Available

1992-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

277

Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) Data related to Air, Soil, and Water Monitoring around the Nevada Test Site  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) is a network of 29 monitoring stations located in communities surrounding and downwind of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) that monitor the airborne environment for manmade radioactivity that could result from NTS activities. The network stations, located in Nevada, Utah, and California are comprised of instruments that collect a variety of environmental radiological and meteorological data. The emphasis of the CEMP is to monitor airborne radioactivity and weather conditions, and make the results available to the public. Instrumentation that records these data is connected to a datalogger, and real-time radiation levels or weather conditions can immediately and easily be seen on a display at each station. These data are transmitted via direct or wireless internet connection, landline or cellular phone, or satellite transmission to DRI's Western Regional Climate Center in Reno, Nevada, and are updated as frequently as every 10 minutes on the World Wide Web at http://www.cemp.dri.edu. DOE and DRI also publish the results of the monitoring program and distribute these reports throughout the network community. The reports provide summaries of average values for each station and the entire network, and show deviations from the expected range values. [Copied from the CEMP website (Introduction) at http://www.cemp.dri.edu/cemp/moreinfo.html

278

Superclean coal-water slurry combustion testing in an oil-fired boiler. Semiannual technical progress report, August 15, 1992--February 15, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pennsylvania State University is conducting a superclean coal-water slurry (SCCWS) program for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania with the objective of determining the capability of effectively firing SCCWS in an industrial boiler designed for heavy fuel oil. Penn State has entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to determine if SCCWS (a fuel containing coal with 3.0 wt.% ash and 0.9 wt.% sulfur) can effectively be burned in a heavy fuel oil-designed industrial boiler without adverse impact on boiler rating, maintainability, reliability, and availability. The project will provide information on the design of new systems specifically configured to fire these clean coal-based fuels. The project consists of four phases: (1) design, permitting, and test planning, (2) construction and start up, (3) demonstration and evaluation (1,000-hour demonstration), and (4) program expansion (additional 1,000 hours of testing). The boiler testing wig determine if the SCCWS combustion characteristics, heat release rate, fouling and slagging behavior, corrosion and erosion limits, and fuel transport, storage, and handling characteristics can be accommodated in an oil-designed boiler system. In addition, the proof-of-concept demonstration will generate data to determine how the properties of SCCWS and its parent coal affect boiler performance. Economic factors associated with retrofitting boilers will be identified

Miller, B.G.; Pisupati, S.V.; Poe, R.L.; Morrison, J.L.; Xie, J.; Walsh, P.M.; Wincek, R.T.; Clark, D.A.; Scaroni, A.W.

1993-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

279

Measured Performance and Analysis of Ground Source Heat Pumps for Space Conditioning and for Water Heating in a Low-Energy Test House Operated under Simulated Occupancy Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present measured performance and efficiency metrics of Ground Source Heat Pumps (GSHPs) for space conditioning and for water heating connected to a horizontal ground heat exchanger (GHX) loop. The units were installed in a 345m2 (3700ft2) high-efficiency test house built with structural insulated panels (SIPs), operated under simulated occupancy conditions, and located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (USA) in US Climate Zone 4 . The paper describes distinctive features of the building envelope, ground loop, and equipment, and provides detailed monthly performance of the GSHP system. Space conditioning needs of the house were completely satisfied by a nominal 2-ton (7.0 kW) water-to-air GSHP (WA-GSHP) unit with almost no auxiliary heat usage. Recommendations for further improvement through engineering design changes are identified. The comprehensive set of data and analyses demonstrate the feasibility and practicality of GSHPs in residential applications and their potential to help achieve source energy and greenhouse gas emission reduction targets set under the IECC 2012 Standard.

Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Recovery of precious metals from military electronic components  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories developed a process to identify and remove the hazardous sub-components from dismantled weapons components utilizing real-time radiography and abrasive water-jet cutting. The components were then crushed, granulated, screened, and separated into an aluminium and a precious-and-base-metals fraction using air-tables. Plastics were further cleaned for disposal as non- hazardous waste.

Gundiler, I.H. [New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, Socorro, NM (United States); Lutz, J.D.; Neiswander, P.G.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water components test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Thermal spray applications for power plant components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power plants usually are located near water and many are in salt water environments. Corrosion occurring in these environments is a problem often solved with thermal spray coatings. The use of thermal spray aluminum and zinc in three power plants for various components is reviewed. Special emphasis is on the cooling tower at the Seabrook, New Hampshire plant. A guide to selection of the coating and process also is given.

Sampson, E.R.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Integrating Program Component Executables  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrating Integrating Program Component Executables on Distributed Memory Architectures via MPH Chris Ding and Yun He Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA chqding@lbl.gov, yhe@lbl.gov Abstract A growing trend in developing large and complex ap- plications on today's Teraflop computers is to integrate stand-alone and/or semi-independent program components into a comprehensive simulation package. One example is the climate system model which consists of atmosphere, ocean, land-surface and sea-ice. Each component is semi- independent and has been developed at different institu- tions. We study how this multi-component multi-executable application can run effectively on distributed memory archi- tectures. We identify five effective execution modes and de- velop the MPH library to support

283

Conventional Storage Water Heater Basics | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conventional Storage Water Heater Basics Conventional Storage Water Heater Basics July 30, 2013 - 3:39pm Addthis Illustration showing the components of a storage water heater. On...

284

Energy Basics: Microhydropower Water Conveyance and Filters  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

These components include the headrace, forebay, and water conveyance (or channel, pipeline, or penstock). The headrace is a waterway that runs parallel to the water source. A...

285

Water, Energy, and Climate Change in California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

change on water and energy prices, (3) evaluate the likely direction and magnitude of price effects on selected components of the water system and (4) suggest priority research...

286

Existing and Past Methods of Test and Rating Standards Related to Integrated Heat Pump Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report evaluates existing and past US methods of test and rating standards related to electrically operated air, water, and ground source air conditioners and heat pumps, 65,000 Btu/hr and under in capacity, that potentiality incorporate a potable water heating function. Two AHRI (formerly ARI) standards and three DOE waivers were identified as directly related. Six other AHRI standards related to the test and rating of base units were identified as of interest, as they would form the basis of any new comprehensive test procedure. Numerous other AHRI and ASHRAE component test standards were also identified as perhaps being of help in developing a comprehensive test procedure.

Reedy, Wayne R. [Sentech, Inc.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems. Project status report, November--December 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--92 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space heating systems; (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters; (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems; (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project; (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research; and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report.

Not Available

1992-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

288

ACDOS1: A COMPUTER CODE TO CALCULATE DOSE RATES FROM NEUTRON ACTIVATION OF NEUTRAL BEAMLINES AND OTHER FUSION REACTOR COMPONENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BEAMLINES AND OTHER FUSION--REACTOR COMPONENTS Gregory S.Beamlines and Other Fusion-Reactor Compon­ ents By Gregoryin the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Test Cell", Nucl.

Keney, G.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Test Automation Test Automation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test Automation Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2013 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Outline Test Automation Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Why? Challenges of Manual Testing Test-case design: Choosing inputs

Mousavi, Mohammad

290

Ultra high temperature instrumentation amplifier components final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to develop a downhole instrumentation amplifier to support geothermal well logging without thermal protection, all the components required were tested over the temperature range of 25 to 500/sup 0/C. The components tested were ceramic vacuum tubes, resistors, capacitors, insulated hook-up wire, circuit boards, terminals, connectors, feedthroughs, thermal switch, magnet wire, and high temperature coatings and cements. Details of the tests are presented for all components. (MHR)

Kelly, R.D.; Morse, C.P.; Cannon, W.L.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Mechanical cutting of irradiated reactor internal components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mechanical cutting methods to volume reduce and package reactor internal components are now a viable solution for stakeholders challenged with the retirement of first generation nuclear facilities. The recent completion of the removal of the Reactor Vessel Internals (RVI) from within the Sacramento Municipal Utility District's (SMUD) Rancho Seco Nuclear Power Plant demonstrates that unlike previous methods, inclusive of plasma arc and abrasive water-jet cutting, mechanical cutting minimizes exposure to workers, costly water cleanup, and excessive secondary waste generation. Reactor internal components were segmented, packaged, and removed from the reactor building for shipment or storage, allowing the reactor cavity to be drained and follow-on reactor segmentation activities to proceed in the dry state. Area exposure rates at the work positions during the segmentation process were generally 1 mR per hr. Radiological exposure documented for the underwater segmentation processes totaled 13 person rem. The reactor internals weighing 343,000 pounds were segmented into over 200 pieces for maximum shipping package efficiency and produced 5,600 lb of stainless steel chips and shavings which were packaged in void spaces of existing disposal containers, therefore creating no additional disposal volume. Because no secondary waste was driven into suspension in the reactor cavity water, the water was free released after one pass through a charcoal bed and ion exchange filter system. Mechanical cutting techniques are capable of underwater segmentation of highly radioactive components on a large scale. This method minimized radiological exposure and costly water cleanup while creating no secondary waste.

Anderson, Michael G. [MOTA Corporation: 3410 Sunset Boulevard, West Columbia, SC, 29169 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

HYDROGEN PIPELINE COMPONENTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

power generation, about one-half for agriculture, and the remainder for domestic use (McKinsey & Company 2009). (For comparison, total water withdrawals in the United States in...

293

A User’s Guide to the Comprehensive Water Quality Database for Groundwater in the Vicinity of the Nevada Test Site, Rev. No.: 1  

SciTech Connect

This water quality database (viz.GeochemXX.mdb) has been developed as part of the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Program with the cooperation of several agencies actively participating in ongoing evaluation and characterization activities under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). The database has been constructed to provide up-to-date, comprehensive, and quality controlled data in a uniform format for the support of current and future projects. This database provides a valuable tool for geochemical and hydrogeologic evaluations of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and surrounding region. Chemistry data have been compiled for groundwater within the NTS and the surrounding region. These data include major ions, organic compounds, trace elements, radionuclides, various field parameters, and environmental isotopes. Colloid data are also included in the database. The GeochemXX.mdb database is distributed on an annual basis. The extension ''XX'' within the database title is replaced by the last two digits of the release year (e.g., Geochem06 for the version released during the 2006 fiscal year). The database is distributed via compact disc (CD) and is also uploaded to the Common Data Repository (CDR) in order to make it available to all agencies with DOE intranet access. This report provides an explanation of the database configuration and summarizes the general content and utility of the individual data tables. In addition to describing the data, subsequent sections of this report provide the data user with an explanation of the quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) protocols for this database.

Farnham, Irene

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Ceramic component for electrodes  

SciTech Connect

A ceramic component suitable for preparing MHD generator electrodes having the compositional formula: Y.sub.x (Mg.sub.y Cr.sub.z).sub.w Al.sub.(1-w) O.sub.3 where x=0.9 to 1.05, y=0.02 to 0.2, z=0.8 to 1.05 and w=1.0 to 0.5. The component is resistant to the formation of hydration products in an MHD environment, has good electrical conductivity and exhibits a lower electrochemical corrosion rate than do comparable compositions of lanthanum chromite.

Marchant, David D. (Richland, WA); Bates, J. Lambert (Richland, WA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Components in the Pipeline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scientists commonly describe their data processing systems metaphorically as software pipelines. These pipelines input one or more data sources and apply a sequence of processing steps to transform the data and create useful results. While conceptually simple, pipelines often adopt complex topologies and must meet stringent quality of service requirements that place stress on the software infrastructure used to construct the pipeline. In this paper we describe the MeDICi Integration Framework, which is a component-based framework for constructing complex software pipelines. The framework supports composing pipelines from distributed heterogeneous software components and provides mechanisms for controlling qualities of service to meet demanding performance, reliability and communication requirements.

Gorton, Ian; Wynne, Adam S.; Liu, Yan (Jenny); Yin, Jian

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

296

EUV testing of multilayer mirrors: critical issues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recently, while performing extensive EUV irradiation endurance testing on Ru-capped multilayer mirrors in the presence of elevated partial pressures of water and hydrocarbons, NIST has observed that the amount of EUV-induced damage actually decreases with increasing levels of water vapor above {approx} 5 x 10{sup -7} Torr. It is thought that the admitted water vapor may interact with otherwise stable, condensed carbonaceous species in an UHV vacuum system to increase the background levels of simple gaseous carbon-containing molecules. Some support for this hypothesis was demonstrated by observing the mitigating effect of very small levels of simple hydrocarbons with the intentional introduction of methyl alcohol in addition to the water vapor. It was found that the damage rate decreased by at least an order of magnitude when the partial pressure of methyl alcohol was just one percent of the water partial pressure. These observations indicate that the hydrocarbon components of the vacuum environment under actual testing conditions must be characterized and controlled to 10{sup -11} Torr or better in order to quantify the damage caused by high levels of water vapor. The possible effects of exposure beam size and out-of-band radiation on mirror lifetime testing will also be discussed.

Hill, S B; Ermanoski, I; Grantham, S; Tarrio, C; Lucatorto, T B; Madey, T E; Bajt, S; Chandhok, M; Yan, P; Wood, O; Wurn, S; Edwards, N V

2006-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

297

Integrity of neutron-absorbing components of LWR fuel systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study of the integrity and behavior of neutron-absorbing components of light-water (LWR) fuel systems was performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The components studies include control blades (cruciforms) for boiling-water reactors (BWRs) and rod cluster control assemblies for pressurized-water reactors (PWRs). The results of this study can be useful for understanding the degradation of neutron-absorbing components and for waste management planning and repository design. The report includes examples of the types of degradation, damage, or failures that have been encountered. Conclusions and recommendations are listed. 84 refs.

Bailey, W.J.; Berting, F.M.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

NREL: Learning - Advanced Vehicle Systems and Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Vehicle Systems and Components Advanced Vehicle Systems and Components Photo of a man checking out an advanced battery using testing equipment that includes a long metal tube on a table top. NREL's researchers test new batteries developed for hybrid electric vehicles. Credit: Warren Gretz Researchers and engineers at the NREL work closely with those in the automotive industry to develop new technologies, such as advanced batteries, for storing energy in cars, trucks, and buses. They also help to develop and test new technologies for using that energy more efficiently. And they work on finding new, energy-efficient ways to reduce the amount of fuel needed to heat and cool the interiors, or cabins, of vehicles. To help develop these new technologies, NREL's researchers are improving the efficiency of vehicle systems and components like these:

299

What's In My Water?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

You can learn about the quality of your water by sending a sample to a laboratory for analysis. This publication will help you understand the lab report by explaining the properties, components and contaminants often found in water. It describes the sources of water contaminants, problems that can be caused by those contaminants, suggestions for correcting problems, and the safe levels of each contaminant in water for household use, for irrigation and for livestock.

Provin, Tony; Pitt, John L.

2003-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

300

A model for improvement of water heating heat exchanger designs for residential heat pump water heaters.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Heat pump water heaters are a promising technology to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. A key component is the water heating heat exchanger.… (more)

Weerawoot, Arunwattana

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water components test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

System for treating produced water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method were used to treat produced water. Field-testing demonstrated the removal of contaminants from produced water from oil and gas wells.

Sullivan, Enid J. (Los Alamos, NM); Katz, Lynn (Austin, TX); Kinney, Kerry (Austin, TX); Bowman, Robert S. (Lemitar, NM); Kwon, Soondong (Kyungbuk, KR)

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

302

HEAVY WATER MODERATED POWER REACTORS PROGRESS REPORT, SEPTEMBER 1961  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the end of September l961, construction of the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor was about 90% complete. Thirty-two compacted tubes of crushed, fused uranium oxide in Zircaloy sheaths were fabricated for irradiation tests and destructive evaluation. lrradiation tests of the tubes were started in the Vallecitos Boiling Water Reactor and at Savannah River. The fabrication process for the tubes included steps designed to exclude hydrogenous material from the oxide cores, thereby eliminating the probable cause of sheath failures in previous irradiations. Additional experimental data on heat transfer burnout of tubes in subcooled water at pressures of about 100 to 1000 psi showed that the burnout heat flux is not affected significantiy by pressure in this range. The data were correlated in terms of water velocity and subcooling. (auth)

Hood, R.R. comp.

1961-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

BNL CRCR LEAF Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A detailed description of the LEAF facility is given in Rev. Sci. Inst. 75, A detailed description of the LEAF facility is given in Rev. Sci. Inst. 75, 4359-4366 (2004), which can be found by following this link. Accelerator System Components The LEAF facility layout indicates the locations of the laser system, the RF components, the electron gun and the beam lines. RF System The modulator cabinet and S-band (2.856 GHz) klystron are located in the laser room. A copper waveguide carries the 15 MW RF pulse from the klystron to the electron gun in the accelerator vault. (A klystron is a high-power RF amplifier. You can visit the ALS MicroWorlds site for more information on klystrons and the principles of RF particle acceleration.) Electron Gun Accelerator and Beam Line 5 psec beam line The electron gun (link to picture) is located in the southwest corner of

304

Small Wind Turbine Testing and Applications Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small wind turbines offer a promising alternative for many remote electrical uses where there is a good wind resource. The National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory helps further the role that small turbines can play in supplying remote power needs. The NWTC tests and develops new applications for small turbines. The NWTC also develops components used in conjunction with wind turbines for various applications. This paper describes wind energy research at the NWTC for applications including battery charging stations, water desalination/purification, and health clinics. Development of data acquisition systems and tests on small turbines are also described.

Corbus, D.; Baring-Gould, I.; Drouilhet, S.; Gevorgian, V.; Jimenez, T.; Newcomb, C.; Flowers, L.

1999-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

305

Component for thermoelectric generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a thermoelectric generator, a component comprises a ceramic insulator, having over limited areas thereof, each area corresponding to a terminal end of thermoelectric wires, a coating of a first metal which adheres to the insulator, and an electrical thermoelectric junction including a second metal which wets said first metal and adheres to said terminal ends but does not wet said insulator, and a cloth composed of electrically insulating threads interlaced with thermoelectric wires.

Purdy, David L. (Indiana, PA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Designing CPV Receivers With Reliability: Early Evaluation of Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Designing CPV Receivers With Reliability: Early Evaluation of Components Objective Materials from power electronics industry must be proven when integrated in PV applications. Pre-qualification tests improves the receiver design and reliability. ANU microconcentrator test&design experience

307

Investigation of the condition of spent-fuel pool components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is currently projected that spent nuclear fuel, which is discharged from the reactor and then stored in water pools, may remain in those pools for several decades. Other studies have addressed the expected integrity of the spent fuel during extended water storage; this study assesses the integrity of metallic spent fuel pool components. Results from metallurgical examinations of specimens taken from stainless steel and aluminum components exposed in spent fuel pools are presented. Licensee Event Reports (LERs) relating to problems with spent fuel components were assessed and are summarized to define the types of operational problems that have occurred. The major conclusions of this study are: aluminum and stainless steel spent fuel pool components have a good history of performance in both deionized and borated water pools. Although some operational problems involving pool components have occurred, these problems have had minimal impacts.

Kustas, F.M.; Bates, S.O.; Opitz, B.E.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Perez, J.M. Jr.; Farnsworth, R.K.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

SIGNAL GROUPING FOR CONDITION MONITORING OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COMPONENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SIGNAL GROUPING FOR CONDITION MONITORING OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COMPONENTS Piero Baraldi between those used to monitor the reactor coolant pump of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) is considered Monitoring, Empirical Modeling, Power Plants, Safety Critical Nuclear Instrumentation, Autoassociative models

309

Conventional Storage Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conventional Storage Water Heaters Conventional Storage Water Heaters July 30, 2013 - 3:39pm Addthis Illustration showing the components of a storage water heater. On top of the...

310

Efficient independent component analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Independent component analysis (ICA) has been widely used for blind source separation in many fields such as brain imaging analysis, signal processing and telecommunication. Many statistical techniques based on M-estimates have been proposed for estimating the mixing matrix. Recently several nonparametric methods have been developed but in-depth analysis on asymptotic efficiency has not been available. We analyze ICA using semiparametric theories and propose a straightforward estimate based on the efficient score function by using B-spline approximations. The estimate is asymptotically efficient under moderate conditions and exhibits better performance than standard ICA methods in a variety of simulations.

Chen, Aiyou

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

An Experimental Test of a Theoretical Model to Determine the Rate at which Freely Falling Water Drops Scavenge SO2 in Air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental method involving the UCLA Rain Shaft is described. This method allows determining the rate at which SO2 is scavenged from air by freely falling water drops. In the present experiment water drops of radii near 300 ?m were allowed ...

C. Walcek; P. K. Wang; J. H. Topalian; S. K. Mitra; H. R. Pruppacher

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems. Project status report, December 1994--January 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This progress report summarizes activities, experiments, and testing performed on a variety of solar heating and cooling systems in conjunction with four technical research tasks. Areas of focus include: Unique solar system components; Rating and certification of domestic water heating systems; and, Advanced residential solar domestic hot water systems.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Cygnus Water Switch Jitter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two identical radiographic sources - Cygnus 1 and Cygnus 2. Each source has the following x-ray output: 1-mm diameter spot size, 4 rad at 1 m, 50-ns Full Width Half Max. The diode pulse has the following electrical specifications: 2.25 MV, 60 kA, 60 ns. This Radiographic Facility is located in an underground tunnel test area at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The sources were developed to produce high-resolution images on subcritical tests which are performed at NTS. Subcritical tests are single-shot, high-value events. For this application, it is desirable to maintain a high level of reproducibility in source output. The major components of the Cygnus machines are: Marx generator, water-filled pulse–forming line (PFL), water-filled coaxial transmission line, three-cell inductive voltage adder, and rod-pinch diode. A primary source of fluctuation in Cygnus shot-to-shot performance is jitter in breakdown of the main PFL switch, which is a “self-break” switch. The PFL switch breakdown time determines the peak PFL charging voltage, which ultimately affects the diode pulse. Therefore, PFL switch jitter contributes to shot-to-shot variation in source endpoint energy and dose. In this paper we will present PFL switch jitter analysis for both Cygnus machines and give the correlation with diode performance. For this analysis the PFL switch on each machine was maintained at a single gap setting which has been used for the majority of shots at NTS. In addition to this analysis, PFL switch performance for different switch gap settings taken recently will be examined. Lastly, implications of source jitter for radiographic diagnosis of subcritical shots will be discussed.

Charles V. Mitton, George D. Corrow, Mark D. Hansen, David J. Henderson, et al.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems. Project status report, January--February 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--92 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space heating systems, (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters, (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems, (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project, (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research, and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report.

Not Available

1992-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

315

Adaptive kernel principal component analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An adaptive kernel principal component analysis (AKPCA) method, which has the flexibility to accurately track the kernel principal components (KPC), is presented. The contribution of this paper may be divided into two parts. First, KPC are recursively ... Keywords: Adaptive method, Kernel principal component, Kernel principal component analysis, Non-stationary data, Recursive algorithm

Mingtao Ding; Zheng Tian; Haixia Xu

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

INVESTIGATION OF USAGE OF VELOCITY AND PRESSURE DATA WITHIN A WATER DISTRIBUTION LAB MODEL FOR CALIBRATING HYDRAULIC MODELS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Water distribution modeling for hydraulics and water quality is an important tool for managing system performance of water utilities. An important component of a water… (more)

Ashby, Robert Craig

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Mechanical Cutting of Irradiated Reactor Internal Components  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the use of mechanical cutting methods to volume reduce and package irradiated reactor internal components. The recent completion of the removal of the Reactor Vessel Internals (RVI) from within the Sacramento Municipal Utility District's (SMUD) Rancho Seco Nuclear Power Plant demonstrates that unlike previous methods used for similar projects, mechanical cutting minimizes exposure to workers, costly water cleanup, and excessive secondary waste generation. (authors)

Anderson, M.G.; Fennema, J.A. [MOTA Corporation, West Columbia, SC (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well a previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--1992 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space hearing systems, (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters, (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems, (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project, (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research, and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Saving Water Saves Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Consumer Products: California Energy Commission PetitionCLOTHES_WASHERS.PDF> California Energy Commission. ApplianceMapTesting.lasso California Energy Commission, The Water

McMahon, James E.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Biermayer, Peter

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Influence of Water Quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...BP. Boffardi, Corrosion Inhibitors in the Water Treatment Industry, Corrosion: Fundamentals, Testing, and Protection, Vol 13A, ASM Handbook, ASM International, 2003, p 891â??906...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water components test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Saving Water Saves Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test Procedure for Dishwashers, Federal Register, Vol. 68,e.g. , ,clothes washers or dishwashers that use less totalhes Washers Toilet s Dishwashers Figure 2a. Household Water

McMahon, James E.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Biermayer, Peter

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Solar bowl component efficiencies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory has published two volumes on the economic evaluation of various proposed configurations and plant sizes for the four solar thermal technologies. These are the latest in a series of publications sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) on plant and operational costs and are more complete in that they include calculations of electrical output. These latest Battelle volumes use the 1976 solar data from Barstow, Calif., and by calculating or estimating the energy conversion efficiency of each element in the process from sun to electricity predict the output and cost of electricity from different plant sizes for each of the four technologies. In this paper a comparison is presented of the component efficiencies developed by Battelle and those of the solar bowl at Crosbyton, Tex.

O'Hair, E.A.; Green, B.L. (College of Engineering, Texas Tech. Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Comparison of EC-Kit with Quanti-Tray[tm] : testing, verification, and drinking water quality mapping in Capiz Province, Philippines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis accomplishes three tasks. First, it verifies the EC-Kit under different water source conditions by comparing it to a laboratory standard method, the IDEXX Quanti-Tray[tm]. The EC-Kit is a simple, inexpensive ...

Chuang, Patty

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

DESTRUCTIVE EXAMINATION OF 3-CYCLE LWR (LIGHT WATER REACTOR) FUEL RODS FROM TURKEY POINT UNIT 3 FOR THE CLIMAX - SPENT FUEL TEST  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The destructive examination results of five light water reactor rods from the Turkey Point Unit 3 reactor are presented. The examinations included fission gas collection and analyses, burnup and hydrogen analyses, and a metallographic evaluation of the fuel, cladding, oxide, and hydrides. The rods exhibited a low fission gas release with all other results appearing representative for pressurized water reator fuel rods with similar burnups (28 GWd/MTU) and operating histories.

ATKIN SD

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Degradation mechanisms and accelerated testing in PEM fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The durability of PEM fuel cells is a major barrier to the commercialization of these systems for stationary and transportation power applications. Although there has been recent progress in improving durability, further improvements are needed to meet the commercialization targets. Past improvements have largely been made possible because of the fundamental understanding of the underlying degradation mechanisms. By investigating component and cell degradation modes; defining the fundamental degradation mechanisms of components and component interactions new materials can be designed to improve durability. Various factors have been shown to affect the useful life of PEM fuel cells. Other issues arise from component optimization. Operational conditions (such as impurities in either the fuel and oxidant stream), cell environment, temperature (including subfreezing exposure), pressure, current, voltage, etc.; or transient versus continuous operation, including start-up and shutdown procedures, represent other factors that can affect cell performance and durability. The need for Accelerated Stress Tests (ASTs) can be quickly understood given the target lives for fuel cell systems: 5000 hours ({approx} 7 months) for automotive, and 40,000 hrs ({approx} 4.6 years) for stationary systems. Thus testing methods that enable more rapid screening of individual components to determine their durability characteristics, such as off-line environmental testing, are needed for evaluating new component durability in a reasonable turn-around time. This allows proposed improvements in a component to be evaluated rapidly and independently, subsequently allowing rapid advancement in PEM fuel cell durability. These tests are also crucial to developers in order to make sure that they do not sacrifice durability while making improvements in costs (e.g. lower platinum group metal [PGM] loading) and performance (e.g. thinner membrane or a GDL with better water management properties). To achieve a deeper understanding and improve PEM fuel cell durability LANL is conducting research to better define fuel cell component degradation mechanisms and correlate AST measurements to component in 'real-world' situations.

Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Solar Water Heating  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

publication provides basic informa- publication provides basic informa- tion on the components and types of solar water heaters currently available and the economic and environmental benefits of owning a system. Although the publica- tion does not provide information on building and installing your own system, it should help you discuss solar water heating systems intelligently with a solar equipment dealer. Solar water heaters, sometimes called

327

DOE/EA-1673: Environmental Assessment for Energy Conservation Program for Certain Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for Commercial Heating, Air-Conditioning, and Water-Heating Equipment (July 2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 Environmental Assessment for 10 CFR 431 Energy Conservation Program for Certain Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for Commercial Heating, Air- Conditioning, and Water-Heating Equipment July 2009 8-i CHAPTER 8. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT TABLE OF CONTENTS 8.1 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................... 8-1 8.2 AIR QUALITY ANALYSIS ............................................................................................... 8-1 8.3 AIR POLLUTANT DESCRIPTIONS ................................................................................ 8-1 8.4 AIR QUALITY REGULATIONS ...................................................................................... 8-3

328

Instrumentation of Current Technology Testing and Replicating Harsh Environments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Abrasion Testing of Critical Components Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices 10/17/2012 University of Alaska Anchorage 2 Project Team o Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC) o Jarlath McEntee o Monty Worthington o University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA) o Faculty o Thomas Ravens o Todd Petersen o Muhammad Ali o Research Assistants o Tim Kirk o Jacob Clark o Angus Bromaghin 10/17/2012 University of Alaska Anchorage 3 ORPC Technology o TideGen Power System (TGU) o Designed to generate electricity at water depths of 50 to 100 feet 10/17/2012 University of Alaska Anchorage 4 ORPC Technology 10/17/2012 University of Alaska Anchorage 5 TGU Performance Test Results o ORPC field testing on TGU prototype in 2008 showed significant wear on bearings and seals. 10/17/2012 University of Alaska Anchorage 6

329

Consistent Interaction Of Software Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Constructing complex software systems by integrating different software components is a promising and challenging approach. With the functionality of software components given by models it is possible to ensure consistency of such models before implementation ...

Gregor Engels; Jochen M. Küuster; Luuk Groenwegen

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Guidelines for Makeup Water Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quality of boiler and heat recovery steam generator HRSG cycle makeup water is central to ensuring the necessary purity of boiler or HRSG water, feedwater, and steam. It plays an important role in ensuring component availability and reliability in fossil and combined cycle plants. This report presents up-to-date guidelines based on proven approaches for producing makeup water from various raw water supplies. Major losses of availability in fossil fuel plants are attributable to water and steam contam...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

331

Argonne TDC: Superconductive Components, Inc.  

Unlocking the Potential of High-Temperature Superconductors . Superconductive Components, Inc. Columbus, Ohio. For bulk applications of high-temperature ...

332

Argonne TDC: Superconductive Components, Inc.  

High-Performance Tailored Materials for Levitation Permanent Magnet Technologies Making materials to help advance flywheel energy storage. Superconductive Components ...

333

Security Components and Mechanisms Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Security Components and Mechanisms Group. Welcome. ... A security checklist is a document that contains instructions for securely configuring … ...

2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

334

Specifying and checking component usage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of today's challenges is producing reliable software in the face of an increasing number of interacting components. Our system CHET lets developers define specifications describing how a component should be used and checks these specifications in ... Keywords: automata, components, finite-state, flow analysis, specifications, verification

Steven P. Reiss

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Materials Reliability Program: Reevaluation of Stainless Steel Components in NUREG/CR-6674 (MRP-172)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NUREG/CR-6674, published June 2000, described a probabilistic fracture mechanics evaluation of light water reactor components subject to environmental fatigue effects.

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

XML-based Test Accelerator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A test accelerator that provides core reusable components, yet allows input and output formats to be defined by the user, will facilitate building ...

2011-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

337

Robust Energy Cost Optimization of Water Distribution System with ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

includes two components: the price of the water depending on the specific source , and the cost of electricity required to pump the water from the source into the ...

338

A hydrologic information system for water availability modeling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Texas water availability modeling has undergone a transition from paper-based documents to digital databases and GIS maps. This results in many discrete components: a water… (more)

Siler, Clark D., 1978-

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

HEAVY WATER MODERATED POWER REACTORS. Progress Report for October 1959  

SciTech Connect

Continued progress is reported on the design and construction of the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor; 78% of the firm design and 17% of the construction were complete at the end of October 1959. Approximateiy 15% of the firm design for the isolated coolant loops of the HWCTR was also complete. The results of further fabrication tests and irradiation tests of fuel tubes of natural uranium metal are reported. One of the metal tubes failed under irradiation, while other irradiations of metal fuels progressed satisfactorily. (auth)

Hood, R.R.; Isakoff, L. comps.

1959-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Evaluation and silicon nitride internal combustion engine components  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of silicon nitride (Si[sub 3]N[sub 4]) use in internal combustion engines was studied by testing three different components for wear resistance and lower reciprocating mass. The information obtained from these preliminary spin rig and engine tests indicates several design changes are necessary to survive high-stress engine applications. The three silicon nitride components tested were valve spring retainers, tappet rollers, and fuel pump push rod ends. Garrett Ceramic Components' gas-pressure sinterable Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] (GS-44) was used to fabricate the above components. Components were final machined from densified blanks that had been green formed by isostatic pressing of GS-44 granules. Spin rig testing of the valve spring retainers indicated that these Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] components could survive at high RPM levels (9,500) when teamed with silicon nitride valves and lower spring tension than standard titanium components. Silicon nitride tappet rollers showed no wear on roller O.D. or I.D. surfaces, steel axles and lifters; however, due to the uncrowned design of these particular rollers the cam lobes indicated wear after spin rig testing. Fuel pump push rod ends were successful at reducing wear on the cam lobe and rod end when tested on spin rigs and in real-world race applications.

Voldrich, W. (Allied-Signal Aerospace Co., Torrance, CA (United States). Garrett Ceramic Components Div.)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water components test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Solar preheating of both domestic hot water and space. Final technical report for the Sea Loft restaurant in Long Branch, New Jersey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stephen Giddio's Sea Loft Restaurant in Long Branch, NJ is equipped with an active solar system for preheating water for both space heating and domestic hot water. Three pumped water loops, each a closed circuit, transfer heat from one major component to another. Solar heat is collected by an array of 83 evacuated tube collectors. The acceptance test results are appended, as well as the operational and maintenance manual. Reference CAPE-2805. (LEW)

Not Available

1982-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

342

Evaluation of Sialon internal combustion engine components and fabrication of several ceramic components for automotive applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fabrication development work was carried out on a push-rod tip having a stepped OD design and a 90[degree] shoulder in the transition area. Spray-dried Sialon premix was used in dry press tooling, and components were densified to about 98% of theoretical density using pressureless sintering conditions. Upon evaluation of the sintered components, it was found that afl components showed defects in the transition area. Modifications of the pressing parameters, incorporation of a 45[degree] angle in the shoulder area, and the use of tailored premix did not lead to the fabrication of defect-free parts. From these observations, it was concluded that the original part design could not easily be adapted to high-volume ceramic manufacturing methods. Subsequently, a modification to the desip was implemented. An SiC material with improved toughness (Hexoloy SX) was used for fabricating several test components with a closely machined, straight OD design. Pressureless-sintered and post-hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) Hexoloy SX components were supplied to The American Ceramic Engine Company (ACE) for assembly and testing. Fuel pump push-rod assemblies with Hemoloy SX tips were prepared by ACE, but no testing has been carried out to date.

McMurtry, C.H.; Ten Eyck, M.O.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Evaluation of Sialon internal combustion engine components and fabrication of several ceramic components for automotive applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fabrication development work was carried out on a push-rod tip having a stepped OD design and a 90{degree} shoulder in the transition area. Spray-dried Sialon premix was used in dry press tooling, and components were densified to about 98% of theoretical density using pressureless sintering conditions. Upon evaluation of the sintered components, it was found that afl components showed defects in the transition area. Modifications of the pressing parameters, incorporation of a 45{degree} angle in the shoulder area, and the use of tailored premix did not lead to the fabrication of defect-free parts. From these observations, it was concluded that the original part design could not easily be adapted to high-volume ceramic manufacturing methods. Subsequently, a modification to the desip was implemented. An SiC material with improved toughness (Hexoloy SX) was used for fabricating several test components with a closely machined, straight OD design. Pressureless-sintered and post-hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) Hexoloy SX components were supplied to The American Ceramic Engine Company (ACE) for assembly and testing. Fuel pump push-rod assemblies with Hemoloy SX tips were prepared by ACE, but no testing has been carried out to date.

McMurtry, C.H.; Ten Eyck, M.O.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

FILTER COMPONENT ASSESSMENT--CERAMIC CANDLES--  

SciTech Connect

Efforts at Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SWPC) have been focused on development of hot gas filter systems as an enabling technology for advanced coal and biomass-based gas turbine power generation applications. SWPC has been actively involved in the development of advanced filter materials and component configuration, has participated in numerous surveillance programs characterizing the material properties and microstructure of field tested filter elements, and has undertaken extended, accelerated filter life testing programs. This report summarizes the results of SWPC's filter component assessment efforts, identifying the performance and stability of porous monolithic, fiber reinforced, and filament wound ceramic hot gas candle filters, potentially for {ge}3 years of viable pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) service operating life.

M.A. Alvin

2004-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

345

Testing Needs for ITER ECH Transmission Line Components (A25513)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proc. Of 31st International Conference On Infrared And Millimeter Waves And 14th International Conference On Terahertz Electronics, Shanghai, PR China, 2006; To Be Published In The Proceedings31st International Conference on Infrared and Millimeter Waves Shanghai, CN, 2006999611605

Olstad, R.A.

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

346

Task 8 -- Design and test of critical components  

SciTech Connect

This report covers tasks 8.1, 8.1.1, and 8.2. The primary objective of Task 8.1, Particulates Flow Deposition, is to characterize the particulate generated in an operating gas turbine combined cycle (GTCC) power plant whose configuration approximates that proposed for an ATS power plant. In addition, the task is to evaluate the use of full-flow filtering to reduce the steam particulate loads. Before the start of this task, GE had already negotiated an agreement with the candidate power plant, piping and a filter unit had already been installed at the power plant site, and major elements of the data acquisition system had been purchased. The objective of Task 8.1.1, Coolant Purity, is to expose typical ATS gas turbine airfoil cooling channel geometries to real steam flow to determine whether there are any unexpected deposit formations. The task is a static analog of the centrifugal deposition rig trials of Task 8.2, in which a bucket channel return bend is exposed to steam flow. Two cooling channel geometries are of primary interest in this static exposure. The primary objective of Task 8.2, Particle Centrifugal Sedimentation, is to determine the settling characteristics of particles in a cooling stream from an operating gas turbine combined cycle (GTCC) power plant when that stream is ducted through a passage experiencing the G-loads expected in a simulated bucket channel specimen representative of designs proposed for an ATS gas turbine.

Chance, T.F.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Test Plan for Heat Cycle Research Program, Phase I Supercritical Cycle Tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 60 kW Heat Cycle Research Facility (HCRF) provides a means of examining different concepts and components associated with the generation of electrical power from a geothermal resource using a binary power cycle. In this power cycle the heat or energy in a hot geothermal fluid is transferred to a secondary working fluid. This working fluid is vaporized in the heat exchange process and the vapor is in turn expanded through a turbine which drives a generator producing electrical power. the heat or energy in the vapor leaving the turbine is transferred to a circulating cooling water in the condenser where the working fluid is condensed to a liquid which can be pumped back to the heaters, completing the cycle. This waste heat load in the condenser is in turn transferred from the cooling water to the atmosphere in a cooling tower. The HCRF allows the different components described in the cycle above to be tested as well as the basic cycle itself. This cycle may vary in that the heaters, condenser, cooling system, pumps, etc. may differ in number and type, however the basic cycle does not change significantly. During this sequence of tests, the HCRF is operated using a supercritical vapor generator and a vertical condenser where the condensation occurs inside of the tubes as opposed to the shell side more commonly used in these applications. In addition to providing the data to be used to evaluate the design of these heat exchangers, these supercritical tests provide cycle and component performance data with both single component working fluids and working fluids comprised of different mixtures of hydrocarbons. The use of these mixtures promises to improve cycle performance, in terms of watt-hours per pound of geothermal fluid, provided the countercurrent flow paths can be maintained between the fluids in both the condenser and the heaters. The supercritical heaters and the condenser to be used in this series of tests were designed to provide the desired countercurrent flow paths.

Mines, Greg L.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Selecting a New Water Heater | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Selecting a New Water Heater Selecting a New Water Heater August 29, 2012 - 7:30pm Addthis Water heater testing facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Water heater testing...

349

Enabling Technologies for Ceramic Hot Section Components  

SciTech Connect

Silicon-based ceramics are attractive materials for use in gas turbine engine hot sections due to their high temperature mechanical and physical properties as well as lower density than metals. The advantages of utilizing ceramic hot section components include weight reduction, and improved efficiency as well as enhanced power output and lower emissions as a result of reducing or eliminating cooling. Potential gas turbine ceramic components for industrial, commercial and/or military high temperature turbine applications include combustor liners, vanes, rotors, and shrouds. These components require materials that can withstand high temperatures and pressures for long duration under steam-rich environments. For Navy applications, ceramic hot section components have the potential to increase the operation range. The amount of weight reduced by utilizing a lighter gas turbine can be used to increase fuel storage capacity while a more efficient gas turbine consumes less fuel. Both improvements enable a longer operation range for Navy ships and aircraft. Ceramic hot section components will also be beneficial to the Navy's Growth Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) and VAATE (Versatile Affordable Advanced Turbine Engines) initiatives in terms of reduced weight, cooling air savings, and capability/cost index (CCI). For DOE applications, ceramic hot section components provide an avenue to achieve low emissions while improving efficiency. Combustors made of ceramic material can withstand higher wall temperatures and require less cooling air. Ability of the ceramics to withstand high temperatures enables novel combustor designs that have reduced NO{sub x}, smoke and CO levels. In the turbine section, ceramic vanes and blades do not require sophisticated cooling schemes currently used for metal components. The saved cooling air could be used to further improve efficiency and power output. The objectives of this contract were to develop technologies critical for ceramic hot section components for gas turbine engines. Significant technical progress has been made towards maturation of the EBC and CMC technologies for incorporation into gas turbine engine hot-section. Promising EBC candidates for longer life and/or higher temperature applications relative to current state of the art BSAS-based EBCs have been identified. These next generation coating systems have been scaled-up from coupons to components and are currently being field tested in Solar Centaur 50S engine. CMC combustor liners were designed, fabricated and tested in a FT8 sector rig to demonstrate the benefits of a high temperature material system. Pretest predictions made through the use of perfectly stirred reactor models showed a 2-3x benefit in CO emissions for CMC versus metallic liners. The sector-rig test validated the pretest predictions with >2x benefit in CO at the same NOx levels at various load conditions. The CMC liners also survived several trip shut downs thereby validating the CMC design methodology. Significant technical progress has been made towards incorporation of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) and environmental barrier coatings (EBC) technologies into gas turbine engine hot-section. The second phase of the program focused on the demonstration of a reverse flow annular CMC combustor. This has included overcoming the challenges of design and fabrication of CMCs into 'complex' shapes; developing processing to apply EBCs to 'engine hardware'; testing of an advanced combustor enabled by CMCs in a PW206 rig; and the validation of performance benefits against a metal baseline. The rig test validated many of the pretest predictions with a 40-50% reduction in pattern factor compared to the baseline and reductions in NOx levels at maximum power conditions. The next steps are to develop an understanding of the life limiting mechanisms in EBC and CMC materials, developing a design system for EBC coated CMCs and durability testing in an engine environment.

Venkat Vedula; Tania Bhatia

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

350

Enabling Technologies for Ceramic Hot Section Components  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Silicon-based ceramics are attractive materials for use in gas turbine engine hot sections due to their high temperature mechanical and physical properties as well as lower density than metals. The advantages of utilizing ceramic hot section components include weight reduction, and improved efficiency as well as enhanced power output and lower emissions as a result of reducing or eliminating cooling. Potential gas turbine ceramic components for industrial, commercial and/or military high temperature turbine applications include combustor liners, vanes, rotors, and shrouds. These components require materials that can withstand high temperatures and pressures for long duration under steam-rich environments. For Navy applications, ceramic hot section components have the potential to increase the operation range. The amount of weight reduced by utilizing a lighter gas turbine can be used to increase fuel storage capacity while a more efficient gas turbine consumes less fuel. Both improvements enable a longer operation range for Navy ships and aircraft. Ceramic hot section components will also be beneficial to the Navy's Growth Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) and VAATE (Versatile Affordable Advanced Turbine Engines) initiatives in terms of reduced weight, cooling air savings, and capability/cost index (CCI). For DOE applications, ceramic hot section components provide an avenue to achieve low emissions while improving efficiency. Combustors made of ceramic material can withstand higher wall temperatures and require less cooling air. Ability of the ceramics to withstand high temperatures enables novel combustor designs that have reduced NO{sub x}, smoke and CO levels. In the turbine section, ceramic vanes and blades do not require sophisticated cooling schemes currently used for metal components. The saved cooling air could be used to further improve efficiency and power output. The objectives of this contract were to develop technologies critical for ceramic hot section components for gas turbine engines. Significant technical progress has been made towards maturation of the EBC and CMC technologies for incorporation into gas turbine engine hot-section. Promising EBC candidates for longer life and/or higher temperature applications relative to current state of the art BSAS-based EBCs have been identified. These next generation coating systems have been scaled-up from coupons to components and are currently being field tested in Solar Centaur 50S engine. CMC combustor liners were designed, fabricated and tested in a FT8 sector rig to demonstrate the benefits of a high temperature material system. Pretest predictions made through the use of perfectly stirred reactor models showed a 2-3x benefit in CO emissions for CMC versus metallic liners. The sector-rig test validated the pretest predictions with >2x benefit in CO at the same NOx levels at various load conditions. The CMC liners also survived several trip shut downs thereby validating the CMC design methodology. Significant technical progress has been made towards incorporation of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) and environmental barrier coatings (EBC) technologies into gas turbine engine hot-section. The second phase of the program focused on the demonstration of a reverse flow annular CMC combustor. This has included overcoming the challenges of design and fabrication of CMCs into 'complex' shapes; developing processing to apply EBCs to 'engine hardware'; testing of an advanced combustor enabled by CMCs in a PW206 rig; and the validation of performance benefits against a metal baseline. The rig test validated many of the pretest predictions with a 40-50% reduction in pattern factor compared to the baseline and reductions in NOx levels at maximum power conditions. The next steps are to develop an understanding of the life limiting mechanisms in EBC and CMC materials, developing a design system for EBC coated CMCs and durability testing in an engine environment.

Venkat Vedula; Tania Bhatia

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

351

FUNDAMENTAL COMPONENTS OF THE "PACE" ANALOG COMPUTER  

SciTech Connect

The analog computer used in this installation was manufactured by Electronics Asscciates, Inc. The installation consists of two consoles and a test rack. Each console is made up of 56 operational amplifiers, 5 electronic multipliers, 5 diode function generators, 1 noise generator, 8 pot padders, 80 attenuators, and the recording equipment. It is possible to "slave" one console to the other for problems that require more equipment than is available on the one console. The test rack is provided for the purpose of checking the components without causing any loss of operating time on the consoles. (W.D.M.)

Scott, W.E.

1959-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Acceptance test report, 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System, Phase 2 testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document summarizes the results of the Phase 2 acceptance test of the 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System (FRS). The FRS is one of six major components of the Equipment Removal System, which has been designed to retrieve, transport, and store the test mixer pump currently installed in Tank 241-SY-101. The purpose of this acceptance test is to verify the strength of the containment bag and bag bottom cinching mechanism. It is postulated that 68 gallons of waste could be trapped inside the pump internals. The bag must be capable of supporting this waste if it shakes loose and drains to the bottom of the bag after the bag bottom has been cinched closed. This acceptance test was performed at the Maintenance and Storage Facility (MASF) Facility in the 400 area on January 23, 1995. The bag assembly supported the weight of 920 kg (2,020 lbs) of water with no leakage or damage to the bag. This value meets the acceptance criteria of 910 kg of water and therefore the results were found to be acceptable. The maximum volume of liquid expected to be held up in the pump internals is 258 L (68 gallons), which corresponds to 410 kg. This test weight gives just over a safety factor of 2. The bag also supported a small shock load while it was filled with water when the crane hoisted the bag assembly up and down. Based on the strength rating of the bag components, the bag assembly should support 2--3 times the test weight of 910 kg.

Ritter, G.A.

1995-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

353

Ceramic Component Development Process Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The development of ceramic components and coatings is critical to the demonstration of advanced fossil energy systems. Ceramic components and coating will play critical role in hot-gas filtration, high- temperature heat exchangers, thermal barrier coatings, and the hot- section of turbines. Continuous-fiber composites (CFCC) are expected to play an increasing role in these applications. This program encompassed five technical areas related to ceramic component development for fossil energy systems.

Boss, D.; Sambasivan, S.; Kuehmann, C. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Basic Industrial Research Lab.; Faber, K. [Northwestern University, MEAS Materials Science & Engineering, Evanston, IL (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

354

Water quality and business aspects of sachet-vended water in Tamale, Ghana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microbial water quality analyses were conducted on 15 samples of factory-produced sachet water and 15 samples of hand-tied sachet water, sold in Tamale, Ghana. The tests included the membrane filtration (MF) test using ...

Okioga, Teshamulwa (Teshamulwa Irene)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

TID Tolerance of Popular CubeSat Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we report total dose test results of COTS components commonly used on CubeSats. We investigate a variety of analog integrated circuits, a popular microcontroller (PIC24) as well as SD memory cards

Kingsbury, Ryan W.

356

System, Stack and Component Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 17, 2011 ... Energy Conversion/Fuel Cells: System, Stack and Component Design ... In fuel cell mode it produces electricity and heat from hydrogen, and in ...

357

SURVEY OF LOS ALAMOS AND PUEBLO CANYON FOR RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINATION AND RADIOASSAY TESTS RUN ON SEWER-WATER SAMPLES AND WATER AND SOIL SAMPLES TAKEN FROM LOS ALAMOS AND PUEBLO CANYONS  

SciTech Connect

Chemical sewers and sanitary lines draining the Tech Area, D. P. Site, CMR-12 Laundry, and surrounding residential areas flow into Pueblo and Los Alamos Canyon streams. In order to determine the extent and sources of radioactive contamination in these localities, fluid samples from each of the sewers, soil samples from each of the sewers, soil samples from the ground surrounding the sewer exits, and water and soil samples from selected spots in or near each of the two canyon streams were collected and analyzed for polonium and . plutonium. (W.D.M.)

Kingsley, W.H.; Fox, A.; Tribby, J.F.

1947-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

358

Hot Corrosion of Shipboard Turbine Components in High Water ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While the resulting degradation for the two types of hot corrosion has been well documented for traditional fuel ... Hardware Materials in Carbonate Fuel Cell.

359

High Efficiency Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy: Laboratory Demonstration of S-I Water-Splitting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the French CEA, US-DOE INERI project is to perform a lab scale demonstration of the sulfur iodine (S-I) water splitting cycle, and assess the potential of this cycle for application to nuclear hydrogen production. The project will design, construct and test the three major component reaction sections that make up the S-I cycle. The CEA will design and test the prime (Bunsen) reaction section. General Atomics will develop and test the HI decomposition section, and SNL will develop and test the H2SO4 decomposition section. Activities for this period included initial program coordination and information exchange, the development of models and analyses that will support the design of the component sections, and preliminary designs for the component reaction sections. The sections are being designed to facilitate integration into a closed loop demonstration in a later stage of the program.

Buckingham, R.; Russ, B.; Brown, L.; Besenbruch, G.E.; Gelbard, F.; Pickard F.S.; Leybros, J.; Le Duigou, A.; Borgard, J.M.

2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

360

APS beamline standard components handbook  

SciTech Connect

It is clear that most Advanced Photon Source (APS) Collaborative Access Team (CAT) members would like to concentrate on designing specialized equipment related to their scientific programs rather than on routine or standard beamline components. Thus, an effort is in progress at the APS to identify standard and modular components of APS beamlines. Identifying standard components is a nontrivial task because these components should support diverse beamline objectives. To assist with this effort, the APS has obtained advice and help from a Beamline Standardization and Modularization Committee consisting of experts in beamline design, construction, and operation. The staff of the Experimental Facilities Division identified various components thought to be standard items for beamlines, regardless of the specific scientific objective of a particular beamline. A generic beamline layout formed the basis for this identification. This layout is based on a double-crystal monochromator as the first optical element, with the possibility of other elements to follow. Pre-engineering designs were then made of the identified standard components. The Beamline Standardization and Modularization Committee has reviewed these designs and provided very useful input regarding the specifications of these components. We realize that there will be other configurations that may require special or modified components. This Handbook in its current version (1.1) contains descriptions, specifications, and pre-engineering design drawings of these standard components. In the future, the APS plans to add engineering drawings of identified standard beamline components. Use of standard components should result in major cost reductions for CATs in the areas of beamline design and construction.

Kuzay, T.M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water components test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Aging behavior of polymeric solar absorber materials: Aging on the component level  

SciTech Connect

Within this study, the aging behavior of a PPE + PS absorber material was investigated on the absorber component level. To indicate aging, characteristic mechanical values were determined by indentation tests of specimens taken from components and exposed to laboratory aging (140 C in air, 80 C in water) and service near outdoor aging conditions (stagnation in northern climate). In addition to the mechanical tests, the unaged and aged specimens were also characterized thermo-analytically via differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results indicate that reductions in both characteristic mechanical values of the indentation tests, i.e., load of the first transition and ultimate indentation, reflect at least some physical aging although chemical aging may also be of importance based on previous analytical investigations of laboratory aged polymer films. While laboratory aging in air at 140 C and service exposure at a test facility in Oslo (N) under stagnation conditions led to a significant reduction in the mechanical indentation resistance, no influence of laboratory aging in water at 80 C on the mechanical behavior of the absorber sheet was found. Depending on the ultimate failure criterion applied (reduction of characteristic mechanical values to 80% and 50%, respectively), the technical service life found for hot air laboratory and stagnation service conditions was found to be less than 51 and 159 h, respectively. As these durations are significantly below the estimated stagnation conditions accumulated in the desired operation lifetime for such a collector, the PPE + PS type investigated does not seem to be a proper material candidate for solar thermal absorbers. Finally, based on the results obtained, a relation between laboratory aging time in air at 140 C and cumulated irradiation energy during exposure on the test facility in Oslo was established. (author)

Kahlen, S. [Polymer Competence Center Leoben GmbH, Roseggerstrasse 12, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Wallner, G.M.; Lang, R.W. [Institute for Polymeric Materials and Testing, University of Linz, Altenbergerstrasse 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Meir, M.; Rekstad, J. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048, Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

362

Guidelines to achieve seals with minimal leak rates for HWR-NPR coolant system components  

SciTech Connect

Seal design practices that are acceptable in pressurized-water and boiling-water reactors in the United States are not usable for the Heavy Water Reactor-New Production Reactor (HWR-NPR) because of the stringent requirement on tritium control for the atmosphere within its containment building. To maintain an atmosphere in which workers do not need protective equipment, the components of the coolant system must have a cumulative leak rate less than 0.00026 L/s. Existing technology for seal systems was reviewed with regard to flange, elastomer, valve, and pump design. A technology data base for the designers of the HWR-NPR coolant system was derived from operating experience and seal development work on reactors in the United States, Canada, and Europe. This data base was then used to generate guidelines for the design of seals and/or joints for the HWR-NPR coolant system. Also discussed are needed additional research and development, as well as the necessary component qualification tests for an effective quality control program. 141 refs., 21 figs., 14 tabs.

Finn, P.A.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Nambe Pueblo Water Budget and Forecasting model.  

SciTech Connect

This report documents The Nambe Pueblo Water Budget and Water Forecasting model. The model has been constructed using Powersim Studio (PS), a software package designed to investigate complex systems where flows and accumulations are central to the system. Here PS has been used as a platform for modeling various aspects of Nambe Pueblo's current and future water use. The model contains three major components, the Water Forecast Component, Irrigation Scheduling Component, and the Reservoir Model Component. In each of the components, the user can change variables to investigate the impacts of water management scenarios on future water use. The Water Forecast Component includes forecasting for industrial, commercial, and livestock use. Domestic demand is also forecasted based on user specified current population, population growth rates, and per capita water consumption. Irrigation efficiencies are quantified in the Irrigated Agriculture component using critical information concerning diversion rates, acreages, ditch dimensions and seepage rates. Results from this section are used in the Water Demand Forecast, Irrigation Scheduling, and the Reservoir Model components. The Reservoir Component contains two sections, (1) Storage and Inflow Accumulations by Categories and (2) Release, Diversion and Shortages. Results from both sections are derived from the calibrated Nambe Reservoir model where historic, pre-dam or above dam USGS stream flow data is fed into the model and releases are calculated.

Brainard, James Robert

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Materials Degradation Issues in Pressurized Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CASL: The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors: A U.S. ... Strategies for Studying High Dose Irradiation Effects in Reactor Components.

365

Supervised probabilistic principal component analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Principal component analysis (PCA) has been extensively applied in data mining, pattern recognition and information retrieval for unsupervised dimensionality reduction. When labels of data are available, e.g., in a classification or regression task, ... Keywords: dimensionality reduction, principal component analysis, semi-supervised projection, supervised projection

Shipeng Yu; Kai Yu; Volker Tresp; Hans-Peter Kriegel; Mingrui Wu

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Performance of Solar Facade Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of these products by developing and applying appropriate methods for assessment of durability, reliability materials · Daylighting products · Solar protection devices (e.g., blinds) · PV windows · Solar collector components are investigated. Physical models are further developed that allow component performance

367

Heat treating of manufactured components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for heat treating manufactured components using microwave energy and microwave susceptor material is disclosed. The system typically includes an insulating vessel placed within a microwave applicator chamber. A moderating material is positioned inside the insulating vessel so that a substantial portion of the exterior surface of each component for heat treating is in contact with the moderating material.

Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN)

2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

368

A robust forward weighted Lagrange multiplier test for conditional heteroscedasticity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Statistical tests routinely adopted for detecting nonlinear components in time series rely on the auxiliary regression of ARMA lagged residuals, and the Lagrange multiplier test to detect ARCH components is an example. The size distortion of such test ...

Luigi Grossi; Fabrizio Laurini

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

The Doe Water Cycle Pilot Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Department of Energy (DOE) multilaboratory Water Cycle Pilot Study (WCPS) investigated components of the local water budget at the Walnut River watershed in Kansas to study the relative importance of various processes and to determine the ...

N. L. Miller; A. W. King; M. A. Miller; E. P. Springer; M. L. Wesely; K. E. Bashford; M. E. Conrad; K. Costigan; P. N. Foster; H. K. Gibbs; J. Jin; J. Klazura; B. M. Lesht; M. V. Machavaram; F. Pan; J. Song; D. Troyan; R. A. Washington-Allen

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Acceptance test report, 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System, Phase 3 testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document summarizes the results of the phase 3 acceptance test of the 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System (FRS). The purpose of this acceptance test is to verify the sealing integrity of the FRS to ensure that the release of waste and aerosols will be minimized during the removal of the test mixer pump from Tank 241-SY-101. The FRS is one of six major components of the Equipment Removal System, which has been designed to retrieve, transport, and store the mixer pump. This acceptance test was performed at the 306E Facility in the 300 area from January 10, 1995 to January 17, 1995. The Phase 3 test consisted of two parts. Part one was a water leak test of the seal between the blast shield and mock load distribution frame (LDF) to ensure that significant contamination of the pump pit and waste interaction with the aluminum impact-limiting material under the LDF are prevented during the pump removal operation. The second part of this acceptance test was an air leak test of the assembled flexible receiver system. The purpose of this test was to verify that the release of hazardous aerosols will be minimized if the tank dome pressure becomes slightly positive during the decontamination of the mixer pump.

Ritter, G.A.

1995-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

371

Par Pond water balance  

SciTech Connect

A water budget for the Par Pond hydrologic system was established in order to estimate the rate of groundwater influx to Par Pond. This estimate will be used in modeling exercises to predict Par Pond reservoir elevation and spillway discharge in the scenario where Savannah River water is no longer pumped and discharged into Par Pond. The principal of conservation of mass was used to develop the water budget, where water inflow was set equal to water outflow. Components of the water budget were identified, and the flux associated with each was determined. The water budget was considered balanced when inflow and outflow summed to zero. The results of this study suggest that Par Pond gains water from the groundwater system in the upper reaches of the reservoir, but looses water to the groundwater system near the dam. The rate of flux of groundwater from the water table aquifer into Par Pond was determined to be 13 cfs. The rate of flux from Par Pond to the water table aquifer near the dam was determined to be 7 cfs.

Hiergesell, R.A.; Dixon, K.L.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Water Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface...

373

Plant Support Engineering: Aging Effects for Structures and Structural Components (Structural Tools)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the application process for license renewal (LR), nuclear utilities must perform an evaluation to confirm that they have appropriately considered any aging effects on plant components within the scope of the License Renewal Rule. This report identifies structures and structural components subject to aging management review (AMR) for generic pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) nuclear plants. The report also describes aging mechanisms that might impact each component.

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

374

Materials Reliability Program: Review of Stress Corrosion Cracking of Alloys 182 and 82 in PWR Primary Water Service (MRP-220)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1999, there have been several incidences involving primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of Alloy 182/82 butt welds in pressurized water reactor (PWR) plants in the United States and abroad. These events resulted in unplanned or extended outages with associated economic costs. This report summarizes the available information on PWSCC of Alloy 182 and 82 weld metals observed in PWR primary circuit components up to the end of 2006. Relevant data from laboratory stress corrosion testing are ...

2007-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

375

Abstract: Air, Thermal and Water Management for PEM Fuel Cell Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PEM fuel cells are excellent candidates for transportation applications due to their high efficiencies. PEM fuel cell Balance of Plant (BOP) components, such as air, thermal, and water management sub-systems, can have a significant effect on the overall system performance, but have traditionally not been addressed in research and development efforts. Recognizing this, the U.S. Department of Energy and Honeywell International Inc. are funding an effort that emphasizes the integration and optimization of air, thermal and water management sub-systems. This effort is one of the major elements to assist the fuel cell system developers and original equipment manufacturers to achieve the goal of an affordable and efficient power system for transportation applications. Past work consisted of: (1) Analysis, design, and fabrication of a motor driven turbocompressor. (2) A systematic trade study to select the most promising water and thermal management systems from five different concepts (absorbent wheel humidifier, gas to gas membrane humidifier, porous metal foam humidifier, cathode recycle compressor, and water injection pump.) This presentation will discuss progress made in the research and development of air, water and thermal management sub-systems for PEM fuel cell systems in transportation applications. More specifically, the presentation will discuss: (1) Progress of the motor driven turbocompressor design and testing; (2) Progress of the humidification component selection and testing; and (3) Progress of the thermal management component preliminary design. The programs consist of: (1) The analysis, design, fabrication and testing of a compact motor driven turbocompressor operating on foil air bearings to provide contamination free compressed air to the fuel cell stack while recovering energy from the exhaust streams to improve system efficiency. (2) The analysis, design, fabrication and testing of selected water and thermal management systems and components to improve system efficiency and reduce packaging size.

Mark K. Gee

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

ANN-based residential water end-use demand forecasting model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bottom-up urban water demand forecasting based on empirical data for individual water end uses or micro-components (e.g., toilet, shower, etc.) for different households of varying characteristics is undoubtedly superior to top-down estimates originating ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, Residential water demand forecasting, Water demand management, Water end use, Water micro-component

Christopher Bennett; Rodney A. Stewart; Cara D. Beal

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

ACDOS1: A COMPUTER CODE TO CALCULATE DOSE RATES FROM NEUTRON ACTIVATION OF NEUTRAL BEAMLINES AND OTHER FUSION REACTOR COMPONENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Test Cell", Nucl. Technol.BEAMLINES AND OTHER FUSION--REACTOR COMPONENTS Gregory S.Beamlines and Other Fusion-Reactor Compon­ ents By Gregory

Keney, G.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Inherently Reliable Boiler Component Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the lessons learned during the last decade in efforts to improve the reliability and availability of boilers used in the production of electricity. The information in this report can assist in component modifications and new boiler designs.

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

379

Binder Formulations Utilizing Furanic Components  

This technology describes the use of furanic components derived from agricultural waste streams, such as hydroxylmethylfurfural (HMF).  When used in combination with a phenolic urethane resin and cured with a gaseous amine catalyst, the resulting ...

380

NREL: Wind Research - Structural Testing Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structural Testing Laboratory Structural Testing Laboratory Photo of NREL's Wind Research User Facility. Shown in front are several test bays that protect proprietary information while companies disassemble turbines to analyze, test, and modify individual components. NREL's Structural Testing Laboratory includes office space for industry researchers, houses experimental laboratories, computer facilities, space for assembling turbines, components, and blades for testing. Credit: Patrick Corkery. NREL's Structural Testing Laboratory at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) provides office space for industry researchers, experimental laboratories, computer facilities for analytical work, and space for assembling components and turbines for atmospheric testing. The facility also houses two blade stands equipped with overhead cranes and

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381

Diffusion Coatings for Corrosion-Resistant Components in Coal Gasification Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat-exchangers, particle filters, turbines, and other components in integrated coal gasification combined cycle system must withstand the highly sulfiding conditions of the high-temperature coal gas over an extended period of time. The performance of components degrades significantly with time unless expensive high alloy materials are used. Deposition of a suitable coating on a low-cost alloy may improve its resistance to such sulfidation attack, and decrease capital and operating costs. The alloys used in the gasifier service include austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, and expensive nickel-cobalt alloys. In previous tests, we had frequently encountered problems with our steam generator that were exacerbated by the very low flow rates that we needed. During this period we installed a new computer-controlled system for injecting water into the steam generator that eliminated this problem. We also tested alloy coupons coated by using the improved procedures described in our last quarterly report. Most of these coatings were nitrided Ti and Ta coatings, either by themselves, or sometimes with barrier layers of Al and Si nitrides. The samples were tested for 300 h at 900 C in a gas stream designed to mimic the environment in the high temperature heat recovery unit (HTHRU). Three samples that showed least corrosion were exposed for an additional 100 h.

Gopala N. Krishnan; Ripudaman Malhotra; Esperanza Alvarez; Kai-Hung Lau; Angel Sanjurjo

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Rocky Mountain Basins Produced Water Database  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Historical records for produced water data were collected from multiple sources, including Amoco, British Petroleum, Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, United States Geological Survey (USGS), Wyoming Oil and Gas Commission (WOGC), Denver Earth Resources Library (DERL), Bill Barrett Corporation, Stone Energy, and other operators. In addition, 86 new samples were collected during the summers of 2003 and 2004 from the following areas: Waltman-Cave Gulch, Pinedale, Tablerock and Wild Rose. Samples were tested for standard seven component "Stiff analyses", and strontium and oxygen isotopes. 16,035 analyses were winnowed to 8028 unique records for 3276 wells after a data screening process was completed. [Copied from the Readme document in the zipped file available at http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/database.html] Save the Zipped file to your PC. When opened, it will contain four versions of the database: ACCESS, EXCEL, DBF, and CSV formats. The information consists of detailed water analyses from basins in the Rocky Mountain region.

383

MSTC - Microsystems Science, Technology, and Components - Trusted  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trusted Microsystems Trusted Microsystems Microsystems Home Custom Microsystems Solutions Microsystems R&D Services Capabilities and Technologies Facilities Trusted Microsystems General Info About Us Awards Contacts Doing Business with Us Fact Sheets MESA News Trusted Microsystems for National Security Customers Trusted R&D Trusted Design Trusted Fabrication Trusted BEOL Trusted Custom Electronic Components Trusted Microsystems "Trusted Microsystems" encompasses the entire product development cycle. Sandia's Microsystems Center affords access to trusted people and facilities for research and development, design, layout, fabrication, characterization, packaging, and test. Trusted Design Secure design facility with disciplined and trusted design flow and methodologies Trusted Structured ASIC

384

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--92 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space heating systems; (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters; (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems; (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project; (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research; and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report. 6 figs.

Not Available

1991-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

385

Columbia Basin Water Transactions Program (Water Entity); National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Annual Report 2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Launched in 2002, the Columbia Basin Water Transactions Program (CBWTP) is anticipated to be a five-year effort to test new strategies for enhancing tributary flows. The premise of the CBWTP is that water can most readily be made available for instream flows not by attempting to regulate senior water users but, instead, by acquiring water rights from willing sellers and transferring those rights to instream flows within the prior appropriation framework ('first in time, first in right'). The primary goals for this water initiative included: (1) To implement Action 151 of the NOAA Fisheries 2000 Biological Opinion on the Operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. (2) To implement Provision A.8 of the Council's 2000 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program related to securing water for instream flows. (3) To integrate components of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Program and Watershed Assessment process with the NOAA Fisheries 2000 Biological Opinion. (4) To ensure actions taken under the program would be effective, fiscally efficient, and biologically beneficial to fish and wildlife in the region. In the spring of 2002, BPA and a group of water experts selected ten local entities in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and western Montana with a demonstrated potential to innovate and implement tributary flow improvements. We also selected the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) to serve as the regional entity for this initiative. BPA then set up the funding agreement and scope of work to establish what is now known as the Columbia Basin Water Transactions Program. In FY 2003, BPA provided over $1.5 million in funding to the CBWTP and approved 33 water transactions. In FY 2004, BPA will provide up to $4 million to the project to enhance habitat. Thanks to the dedicated efforts of partners throughout the Basin, the CBWTP is off to a strong start in improving tributary flows in key areas across the region.

National Fish and Wildlife Foundation

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Automated cleaning of electronic components  

SciTech Connect

Environmental and operator safety concerns are leading to the elimination of trichloroethylene and chlorofluorocarbon solvents in cleaning processes that remove rosin flux, organic and inorganic contamination, and particulates from electronic components. Present processes depend heavily on these solvents for manual spray cleaning of small components and subassemblies. Use of alternative solvent systems can lead to longer processing times and reduced quality. Automated spray cleaning can improve the quality of the cleaning process, thus enabling the productive use of environmentally conscious materials, while minimizing personnel exposure to hazardous materials. We describe the development of a prototype robotic system for cleaning electronic components in a spray cleaning workcell. An important feature of the prototype system is the capability to generate the robot paths and motions automatically from the CAD models of the part to be cleaned, and to embed cleaning process knowledge into the automatically programmed operations.

Drotning, W.; Meirans, L.; Wapman, W.; Hwang, Y.; Koenig, L.; Petterson, B.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

High-temperature turbine technology program hot-gas path development test. Part II. Testing  

SciTech Connect

This topical report of the US Department of Energy High-Temperature Turbine Technology (DOE-HTTT) Phase II program presents the results of testing full-scale water-cooled first-stage and second-stage turbine nozzles at design temperature and pressure to verify that the designs are adequate for operation in a full-scale turbine environment. Low-cycle fatigue life of the nozzles was demonstrated by subjecting cascade assemblies to several hundred simulated startup/shutdown turbine cycles. This testing was accomplished in the Hot-Gas Path Development Test Stand (HGPDTS), which is capable of evaluating full-scale combustion and turbine nozzle components. A three-throat cascade of the first-stage turbine nozzle was successfully tested at a nozzle inlet gas temperature of 2630/sup 0/F and a nozzle inlet pressure of 11.3 atmospheres. In addition to steady-state operation at the design firing temperature, the nozzle cascade was exposed to a simulated startup/shutdown turbine cycle by varying the firing temperature. A total of 42 h at the design point and 617 thermal cycles were accumulated during the test periods. First-stage nozzle test results show that measured metal and coolant temperatures correspond well to the predicted design values. This nozzle design has been shown to be fully satisfactory for the application (2600/sup 0/F), with growth capability to 3000/sup 0/F firing temperature. A post-test metallurgical examination of sectioned portions of the tested nozzles shows a totally bonded structure, confirming the test results and attesting to the successful performance of water-cooled composite nozzle hardware.

Horner, M.W.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Commercial Off-the-Shelf (COTS) Components and Enterprise Component Information System (eCIS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the project was to develop the processes for using commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) parts for WR production and to put in place a system for implementing the data management tools required to disseminate, store, track procurement, and qualify vendors. Much of the effort was devoted to determining if the use of COTS parts was possible. A basic question: How does the Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) begin to use COTS in the weapon Stockpile Life Extension Programs with high reliability, affordability, while managing risk at acceptable levels? In FY00, it was determined that a certain weapon refurbishment program could not be accomplished without the use of COTS components. The elements driving the use of COTS components included decreased cost, greater availability, and shorter delivery time. Key factors that required implementation included identifying the best suppliers and components, defining life cycles and predictions of obsolescence, testing the feasibility of using COTS components with a test contractor to ensure capability, as well as quality and reliability, and implementing the data management tools required to disseminate, store, track procurement, and qualify vendors. The primary effort of this project then was to concentrate on the risks involved in the use of COTS and address the issues of part and vendor selection, procurement and acceptance processes, and qualification of the parts via part and sample testing. The Enterprise Component Information System (eCIS) was used to manage the information generated by the COTS process. eCIS is a common interface for both the design and production of NWC components and systems integrating information between SNL National Laboratory (SNL) and the Kansas City Plant (KCP). The implementation of COTS components utilizes eCIS from part selection through qualification release. All part related data is linked across an unclassified network for access by both SNL and KCP personnel. The system includes not only NWC part information but also includes technical reference data for over 25 Million electronic and electromechanical commercial and military parts via a data subscription. With the capabilities added to the system through this project, eCIS provides decision support, parts list/BOM analysis, editing, tracking, workflows, reporting, and history/legacy information integrating manufacturer reference, company technical, company business, and design data.

John Minihan; Ed Schmidt; Greg Enserro; Melissa Thompson

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

389

In-situ continuous water monitoring system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An in-situ continuous liquid monitoring system for continuously analyzing volatile components contained in a water source comprises: a carrier gas supply, an extraction container and a mass spectrometer. The carrier gas supply continuously supplies the carrier gas to the extraction container and is mixed with a water sample that is continuously drawn into the extraction container by the flow of carrier gas into the liquid directing device. The carrier gas continuously extracts the volatile components out of the water sample. The water sample is returned to the water source after the volatile components are extracted from it. The extracted volatile components and the carrier gas are delivered continuously to the mass spectrometer and the volatile components are continuously analyzed by the mass spectrometer.

Thompson, Cyril V. (Knoxville, TN); Wise, Marcus B. (Kingston, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Two Component Signal Transduction in Desulfovibrio Species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The environmentally relevant Desulfovibrio species are sulfate-reducing bacteria that are of interest in the bioremediation of heavy metal contaminated water. Among these, the genome of D. vulgaris Hildenborough encodes a large number of two component systems consisting of 72 putative response regulators (RR) and 64 putative histidinekinases (HK), the majority of which are uncharacterized. We classified the D. vulgaris Hildenborough RRs based on their output domains and compared the distribution of RRs in other sequenced Desulfovibrio species. We have successfully purified most RRs and several HKs as His-tagged proteins. We performed phospho-transfer experiments to verify relationships between cognate pairs of HK and RR, and we have also mapped a few non-cognate HK-RR pairs. Presented here are our discoveries from the Desulfovibrio RR categorization and results from the in vitro studies using purified His tagged D. vulgaris HKs and RRs.

Luning, Eric; Rajeev, Lara; Ray, Jayashree; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

391

Volatile Components from Packing Matrials, Rev. 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An outgassing study was conducted on five packing materials, comprising two experiments. These materials comprised 277-4 borated concrete, Borobond4 concrete, polyethylene bags, silica-filled silicone rubber seals, and silicone foam padding. The purpose was measure the volume of gases which diffuse from packaging materials when sealed in containers. Two heating profiles were used to study the offgassing quantities in a set of accelerated aging tests. It was determined that the concretes contain a large quantity of water. The plastic materials hold much less moisture, with the silicone materials even consuming water, possibly due to the presence of silica filler. Polyethylene tends to degrade as the temperature is elevated and the foam stiffens.

Smith, R. A.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

The CCSM4 Ocean Component  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ocean component of the Community Climate System Model version 4 (CCSM4) is described, and its solutions from the twentieth-century (20C) simulations are documented in comparison with observations and those of CCSM3. The improvements to the ...

Gokhan Danabasoglu; Susan C. Bates; Bruce P. Briegleb; Steven R. Jayne; Markus Jochum; William G. Large; Synte Peacock; Steve G. Yeager

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Automotive Component Product Development Enhancement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimization In an Integrated Concurrent Engineering Framework by Massimo Usan M. S. Aeronautical Engineering of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science in Engineering and Management at the Massachusetts Institute Engineering Systems Division #12;Automotive Component Product Development Enhancement Through Multi

394

Large Component Removal/Disposal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the removal and disposal of the large components from Maine Yankee Atomic Power Plant. The large components discussed include the three steam generators, pressurizer, and reactor pressure vessel. Two separate Exemption Requests, which included radiological characterizations, shielding evaluations, structural evaluations and transportation plans, were prepared and issued to the DOT for approval to ship these components; the first was for the three steam generators and one pressurizer, the second was for the reactor pressure vessel. Both Exemption Requests were submitted to the DOT in November 1999. The DOT approved the Exemption Requests in May and July of 2000, respectively. The steam generators and pressurizer have been removed from Maine Yankee and shipped to the processing facility. They were removed from Maine Yankee's Containment Building, loaded onto specially designed skid assemblies, transported onto two separate barges, tied down to the barges, th en shipped 2750 miles to Memphis, Tennessee for processing. The Reactor Pressure Vessel Removal Project is currently under way and scheduled to be completed by Fall of 2002. The planning, preparation and removal of these large components has required extensive efforts in planning and implementation on the part of all parties involved.

Wheeler, D. M.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

395

Component-based LR parsing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A language implementation with proper compositionality enables a compiler developer to divide-and-conquer the complexity of building a large language by constructing a set of smaller languages. Ideally, these small language implementations should be ... Keywords: Component-based software development, LR parsing, Parser generator

Xiaoqing Wu; Barrett R. Bryant; Jeff Gray; Marjan Mernik

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

MCFC component development at ANL.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory is developing advanced cathode and electrolyte components for the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). Working in support of the MCFC developers, the goal of this effort is to extend the life of the MCFC cell and to improve its performance.

Bloom, I.

1998-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Waste Package Component Design Methodology Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Executive Summary provides an overview of the methodology being used by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) to design waste packages and ancillary components. This summary information is intended for readers with general interest, but also provides technical readers a general framework surrounding a variety of technical details provided in the main body of the report. The purpose of this report is to document and ensure appropriate design methods are used in the design of waste packages and ancillary components (the drip shields and emplacement pallets). The methodology includes identification of necessary design inputs, justification of design assumptions, and use of appropriate analysis methods, and computational tools. This design work is subject to ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description''. The document is primarily intended for internal use and technical guidance for a variety of design activities. It is recognized that a wide audience including project management, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and others are interested to various levels of detail in the design methods and therefore covers a wide range of topics at varying levels of detail. Due to the preliminary nature of the design, readers can expect to encounter varied levels of detail in the body of the report. It is expected that technical information used as input to design documents will be verified and taken from the latest versions of reference sources given herein. This revision of the methodology report has evolved with changes in the waste package, drip shield, and emplacement pallet designs over many years and may be further revised as the design is finalized. Different components and analyses are at different stages of development. Some parts of the report are detailed, while other less detailed parts are likely to undergo further refinement. The design methodology is intended to provide designs that satisfy the safety and operational requirements of the YMP. Four waste package configurations have been selected to illustrate the application of the methodology during the licensing process. These four configurations are the 21-pressurized water reactor absorber plate waste package (21-PWRAP), the 44-boiling water reactor waste package (44-BWR), the 5 defense high-level radioactive waste (HLW) DOE spent nuclear fuel (SNF) codisposal short waste package (5-DHLWDOE SNF Short), and the naval canistered SNF long waste package (Naval SNF Long). Design work for the other six waste packages will be completed at a later date using the same design methodology. These include the 24-boiling water reactor waste package (24-BWR), the 21-pressurized water reactor control rod waste package (21-PWRCR), the 12-pressurized water reactor waste package (12-PWR), the 5 defense HLW DOE SNF codisposal long waste package (5-DHLWDOE SNF Long), the 2 defense HLW DOE SNF codisposal waste package (2-MC012-DHLW), and the naval canistered SNF short waste package (Naval SNF Short). This report is only part of the complete design description. Other reports related to the design include the design reports, the waste package system description documents, manufacturing specifications, and numerous documents for the many detailed calculations. The relationships between this report and other design documents are shown in Figure 1.

D.C. Mecham

2004-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

398

Fluid Metrology Calibration Services - Gas, Water, or Liquid ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluid Metrology Calibration Services - Gas, Water, Natural Gas, or Liquid Hydrocarbon Flows Special Tests. Fluid Metrology ...

2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

399

Turbid water Clear water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: The submersible laser bathymetric (LBath) optical system is capable of simultaneously providing visual images- dynamical wing. This underwater package is pulled through the water by a single towed cable with fiber optic special high energy density optical fibers. A remote Pentium based PC also at the surface is used

Jaffe, Jules

400

The John Deere E diesel Test & Research Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three non-road Tier II emissions compliant diesel engines manufactured by John Deere were placed on a durability test plan of 2000 hours each at full load, rated speed (FLRS). The fuel was a blend of 10% fuel ethanol and 90% low sulfur #2 diesel fuel. Seven operational failures involving twenty seven fuel system components occurred prior to completion of the intended test plan. Regulated emissions measured prior to component failure indicated compliance to Tier II certification goals for the observed test experience. The program plan included operating three non-road Tier II diesel engines for 2000 hours each monitoring the regulated emissions at 500 hour intervals for changes/deterioration. The program was stopped prematurely due to number and frequency of injection system failures. The failures and weaknesses observed involved injector seat and valve wear, control solenoid material incompatibility, injector valve deposits and injector high pressure seal cavitation erosion. Future work should target an E diesel fuel standard that emphasizes minimum water content, stability, lubricity, cetane neutrality and oxidation resistance. Standards for fuel ethanol need to require water content no greater than the base diesel fuel standard. Lubricity bench test standards may need new development for E diesel.

Fields, Nathan; Mitchell, William E.

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water components test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components" ,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues",,,," " " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related","All"

402

,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.1;" Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.1;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components" ,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues",,,," " " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related","All"

403

Solving Water Quality Problems in the Home  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If your drinking water comes from a private water well, there are certain procedures you can follow to make sure the water is safe. This publication explains how to get your water tested and, if treatment is necessary, to select the correct treatment equipment. Tables display common water problems and the equipment used to treat them.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

404

Dynamic characterization of satellite components through non-invasive methods  

SciTech Connect

The rapid deployment of satellites is hindered by the need to flight-qualify their components and the resulting mechanical assembly. Conventional methods for qualification testing of satellite components are costly and time consuming. Furthermore, full-scale vehicles must be subjected to launch loads during testing. The harsh testing environment increases the risk of component damage during qualification. The focus of this research effort was to assess the performance of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) techniques as replacement for traditional vibration testing. SHM techniques were applied on a small-scale structure representative of a responsive satellite. The test structure consisted of an extruded aluminum space-frame covered with aluminum shear plates, which was assembled using bolted joints. Multiple piezoelectric patches were bonded to the test structure and acted as combined actuators and sensors. Various methods of SHM were explored including impedance-based health monitoring, wave propagation, and conventional frequency response functions. Using these methods in conjunction with finite element modeling, the dynamic properties of the test structure were established and areas of potential damage were identified and localized. The adequacy of the results from each SHM method was validated by comparison to results from conventional vibration testing.

Mullens, Joshua G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wiest, Heather K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mascarenas, David D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

405

Water Intoxication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008, May 14). Too much water raises seizure risk in babies.id=4844 9. Schoenly, Lorry. “Water Intoxication and Inmates:article/246650- overview>. 13. Water intoxication alert. (

Lingampalli, Nithya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

An Assessment of Visual Testing  

SciTech Connect

In response to increasing interest from nuclear utilities in replacing some volumetric examinations of nuclear reactor components with remote visual testing, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has examined the capabilities of remote visual testing for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report describes visual testing and explores the visual acuities of the camera systems used to examine nuclear reactor components. The types and sizes of cracks typically found in nuclear reactor components are reviewed. The current standards in visual testing are examined critically, and several suggestions for improving these standards are proposed. Also proposed for future work is a round robin test to determine the effectiveness of visual tests and experimental studies to determine the values for magnification and resolution needed to reliably image very tight cracks.

Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Anderson, Michael T.; Doctor, Steven R.

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Pharmaceutical Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 3   Water treatment process for water for injection (WFI)...deionization WFI production Evaporation still or vapor compression...

408

Water Snakes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WATER SNAKES Contrary to popular belief, the Water Moccasin commonly known as the...

409

Large scale Li17Pb83/water interaction studies  

SciTech Connect

One current concept in fusion blanket design is to utilize water as the coolant and liquid lithium-lead as the breeding/neutron-multiplier material. Considering the possibility of certain off-normal events it is conceivable that water leakage into the liquid metal may occur due to a tube rupture. The BLAnket Safety Test facility (BLAST) simulates this transient event by injecting sub-cooled water, under high pressure, into a stagnant loop of liquid lithium-lead (Li17Pb83). In this paper the BLAST facility will be described, such as the various mechanical components and the measurement devices. The current results of the data analyses from the first three experiments are also presented.

Kranert, O.; Kottowski, H.M.; Savatteri, C.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint. Small gaps limit horizontal displacement of components during a seismic occurrence and therefore reduce dynamic loadings on the free lower end. The reactor vessel and reactor guard vessel use thicker section roll-forged rings welded between the vessel straight shell sections and the bottom hemispherical head sections. The inside of the reactor guard vessel ring forging contains local vertical dovetail slots and upper ledge pockets to mount and retain field fitted and installed blocks. As an option, the horizontal displacement of the reactor vessel core support cone can be limited by including shop fitted/installed local blocks in opposing alignment with the reactor vessel forged ring. Beams embedded in the wall of the reactor building protrude into apertures in the thermal insulation shell adjacent the reactor guard vessel ring and have motion limit blocks attached thereto to provide to a predetermined clearance between the blocks and reactor guard vessel ring.

Snyder, Glenn J. (Lynchburg, VA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Needs assessment for manufacturing ceramic gas turbine components  

SciTech Connect

An assessment of needs for the manufacturing of ceramic gas turbine components was undertaken to provide a technical basis for planning R&D activities to support DOE`s gas turbine programs. The manufacturing processes for ceramic turbine engine components were examined from design through final inspection and testing. The following technology needs were identified: Concurrent engineering early in the design phase to develop ceramic components that are more readily manufacturable. Additional effort in determining the boundaries of acceptable design dimensions and tolerances through experimental and/or analytical means. Provision, by the designer, of a CAD based model of the component early in the design cycle. Standardization in the way turbine components are dimensioned and toleranced, and in the way component datum features are defined. Rapid means of fabricating hard tooling, including intelligent systems for design of tooling and rapid prototyping of tooling. Determination of process capabilities by manufacturing significant numbers of parts. Development of more robust ceramic manufacturing processes which are tolerant of process variations. Development of intelligent processing as a means of controlling yield and quality of components. Development of computer models of key manufacturing steps, such as green forming to reduce the number of iterations required to manufacture intolerance components. Development of creep feed or other low-damage precision grinding for finish machining of components. Improved means of fixturing components for finish machining. Fewer and lower-cost final inspection requirements. Standard procedures, including consistent terminology and analytical software for dimensional inspection of components. Uniform data requirements from the US turbine engine companies. An agreed-upon system of naming ceramic materials and updating the name when changes have been made.

Johnson, D.R.; McSpadden, S.B.; Morris, T.O.; Pasto, A.E.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Module Encapsulation Materials, Processing and Testing (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Study of PV module encapsulation materials, processing, and testing shows that overall module reliability is determined by all component materials and processing factors.

Pern, J.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Materials Reliability Program: Fracture Toughness Testing of Decommissioned PWR Core Internals Material Samples (MRP-160)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pressurized water reactor (PWR) cores operate under extreme environmental conditions due to coolant chemistry, operating temperature, and neutron exposure. Extending the life of PWRs requires detailed knowledge of the changes in mechanical and corrosion properties of the structural austenitic stainless steel components adjacent to the fuel (internals) that are inherent to such conditions. This report contains the results of PWR environment fracture toughness testing of samples machined from decommissione...

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

414

Method for separating disparate components in a fluid stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides a method of separating a mixed component waste stream in a centrifugal separator. The mixed component waste stream is introduced into the separator and is centrifugally separated within a spinning rotor. A dual vortex separation occurs due to the phase density differences, with the phases exiting the rotor distinct from one another. In a preferred embodiment, aqueous solutions of organics can be separated with up to 100% efficiency. The relatively more dense water phase is centrifugally separated through a radially outer aperture in the separator, while the relatively less dense organic phase is separated through a radially inner aperture.

Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Electrochemical sensor for monitoring electrochemical potentials of fuel cell components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical sensor comprised of wires, a sheath, and a conduit can be utilized to monitor fuel cell component electric potentials during fuel cell shut down or steady state. The electrochemical sensor contacts an electrolyte reservoir plate such that the conduit wicks electrolyte through capillary action to the wires to provide water necessary for the electrolysis reaction which occurs thereon. A voltage is applied across the wires of the electrochemical sensor until hydrogen evolution occurs at the surface of one of the wires, thereby forming a hydrogen reference electrode. The voltage of the fuel cell component is then determined with relation to the hydrogen reference electrode.

Kunz, Harold R. (Vernon, CT); Breault, Richard D. (Coventry, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Application Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Application Components to someone by E-mail Share EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Application Components on Facebook Tweet about EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Application...

417

Ensemble Precipitation and Water-Level Forecasts for Anticipatory Water-System Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is presented for testing weather forecast products for applications in anticipatory water-system control. The applicability of the ensemble prediction system (EPS) of the ECMWF is tested for flood control in a regional water system in ...

Schalk Jan van Andel; Roland K. Price; Arnold H. Lobbrecht; Frans van Kruiningen; Robert Mureau

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The focus of the Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) is to research, develop, test, and evaluate new techniques for thermal energy storage systems that are relevant to utility-scale concentrating solar power plants. The laboratory holds test systems that can provide heat transfer fluids for the evaluation of heat exchangers and thermal energy storage devices. The existing system provides molten salt at temperatures up to 800 C. This unit is charged with nitrate salt rated to 600 C, but is capable of handling other heat transfer fluid compositions. Three additional test bays are available for future deployment of alternative heat transfer fluids such as hot air, carbon dioxide, or steam systems. The Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory performs pilot-scale thermal energy storage system testing through multiple charge and discharge cycles to evaluate heat exchanger performance and storage efficiency. The laboratory equipment can also be utilized to test instrument and sensor compatibility with hot heat transfer fluids. Future applications in the laboratory may include the evaluation of thermal energy storage systems designed to operate with supercritical heat transfer fluids such as steam or carbon dioxide. These tests will require the installation of test systems capable of providing supercritical fluids at temperatures up to 700 C.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

DARHT: Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility DARHT: Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility DARHT, supports a critical component of LANL's primary mission: to ensure...

420

FIRE SUPPRESSION PERFORMANCE TESTING OF WATER ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Instead of a full simulation, only the lower portion of ... Flow to the fuel spray continued until 100 ... the damage potential due to spray cooling utilizes the ...

2011-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water components test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Flow meters tested on dairy lagoon water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for suspended particles. quire 110-volt power. However, theyof electromag- both also have 12-volt battery-powered neticmagmeter con- models, and a 12-volt tube magmeter is sists

Schwankl, Larry; Eagle, Alison; Frate, Carol; Nydam, Ben

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

RMOTC - Testing - Geothermal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geothermal Testing Geothermal Testing Notice: As of July 15th 2013, the Department of Energy announced the intent to sell Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 3 (NPR3). The sale of NPR-3 will also include the sale of all equipment and materials onsite. A decision has been made by the Department of Energy to complete testing at RMOTC by July 1st, 2014. RMOTC will complete testing in the coming year with the currently scheduled testing partners. For more information on the sale of NPR-3 and sale of RMOTC equipment and materials please join our mailing list here. With the existing geologic structure at RMOTC, promising potential exists for Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) testing. The field also has two reliable water resources for supporting low-temperature geothermal testing.

423

Investigating Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This 3-ring binder contains teaching plans for 12 lessons on topics such as "Water in Our Daily Lives," "The Water Cycle," "Amazing Aquifers," "Water and Soil," "Aquatic Ecosystems," and "Water Wise Use." Accompanying each lesson plan are activity and record sheets for hands-on learning experiences. This curriculum is intended for students in about 4th to 8th grades.

Howard Jr., Ronald A.

2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

424

REVIEW OF CLEANING SOLUTIONS FOR USE ON COMPONENTS OF THE 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE  

SciTech Connect

Several candidate cleaning products have been reviewed for use as a disinfectant on 9975 shipping package components which contain or have contacted mold. Following review of the compatibility of these products with each component, ammonia (ammonium hydroxide diluted to 1.5 wt% concentration) appears compatible with all package components that it might contact. Each of the other candidate products is incompatible with one or more package components. Accordingly, ammonia is recommended for this purpose. It is further recommended that all components which are disinfected be subsequently rinsed with di-ionized or distilled water.

Daugherty, W.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

425

Prioritization of reactor control components susceptible to fire damage as a consequence of aging  

SciTech Connect

The Fire Vulnerability of Aged Electrical Components Test Program is to identify and assess issues of plant aging that could lead to an increase in nuclear power plant risk because of fires. Historical component data and prior analyses are used to prioritize a list of components with respect to aging and fire vulnerability and the consequences of their failure on plant safety systems. The component list emphasizes safety system control components, but excludes cables, large equipment, and devices encompassed in the Equipment Qualification (EQ) program. The test program selected components identified in a utility survey and developed test and fire conditions necessary to maximize the effectiveness of the test program. Fire damage considerations were limited to purely thermal effects.

Lowry, W.; Vigil, R. [Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nowlen, S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Load Component Database of Household Appliances and Small Office Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the development of a load component database for household appliances and office equipment. To develop more accurate load models at both transmission and distribution level, a better understanding on the individual behaviors of home appliances and office equipment under power system voltage and frequency variations becomes more and more critical. Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has begun a series of voltage and frequency tests against home appliances and office equipments since 2005. Since 2006, Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has collaborated with BPA personnel and developed a load component database based on these appliance testing results to facilitate the load model validation work for the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC). In this paper, the testing procedure and testing results are first presented. The load model parameters are then derived and grouped. Recommendations are given for aggregating the individual appliance models to feeder level, the models of which are used for distribution and transmission level studies.

Lu, Ning; Xie, YuLong; Huang, Zhenyu; Puyleart, Francis; Yang, Steve

2008-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

427

Status of the Boeing Dish Engine Critical Component Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Boeing Company's Dish Engine Critical Component (DECC) project started in April of 1998. It is a continuation of a solar energy program started by McDonnell Douglas (now Boeing) and United Stirling of Sweden in the mid 1980s. The overall objectives, schedule, and status of this project are presented in this paper. The hardware test configuration, hardware background, operation, and test plans are also discussed. A summary is given of the test data, which includes the daily power performance, generated energy, working-gas usage, mirror reflectivity, solar insolation, on-sun track time, generating time, and system availability. The system performance based upon the present test data is compared to test data from the 1984/88 McDonnell Douglas/United Stirling AB/Southem California Edison test program. The test data shows that the present power, energy, and mirror performance is comparable to when the hardware was first manufactured 14 years ago.

Brau, H.W.; Diver, R.B.; Nelving, H.; Stone, K.W.

1999-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

428

Hydrogen-burn survival: preliminary thermal model and test results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents preliminary Hydrogen Burn Survival (HBS) Program experimental and analytical work conducted through February 1982. The effects of hydrogen deflagrations on safety-related equipment in nuclear power plant containment buildings are considered. Preliminary results from hydrogen deflagration experiments in the Sandia Variable Geometry Experimental System (VGES) are presented and analytical predictions for these tests are compared and discussed. Analytical estimates of component thermal responses to hydrogen deflagrations in the upper and lower compartments of an ice condenser, pressurized water reactor are also presented.

McCulloch, W.H.; Ratzel, A.C.; Kempka, S.N.; Furgal, D.T.; Aragon, J.J.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Assessing regional evapotranspiration and water balance across a Mediterranean montane climate gradient  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water storage anoma- lies) generally rely on assessing one component and inferring the other as a residual (Yeh and

Anderson, R