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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water air soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

E-Print Network 3.0 - air soil water Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

iii. Soil-Plant Relationships iv. Cation exchange IV. Pollution of Water, Soil, and Air: (Lecture... unsaturated unsteady water flow X. Gaseous Phase of Soils (Hillel pages...

2

E-Print Network 3.0 - air water soil Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

iii. Soil-Plant Relationships iv. Cation exchange IV. Pollution of Water, Soil, and Air: (Lecture... unsaturated unsteady water flow X. Gaseous Phase of Soils (Hillel pages...

3

Methods for Determination of Hydrocarbons in Air, Soil & Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many environmental investigations often demand a quick indication of the nature and levels of contamination in air, soil and water. A portable GC for on-site monitoring allows the user to fast screen compounds in...

Hans Ole Andersen

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Federal Guidance No. 12: External Exposure to Radionuclides in Air, Water, and Soil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

402-R-93-081 402-R-93-081 FEDERAL GUIDANCE REPORT NO. 12 EXTERNAL EXPOSURE TO RADIONUCLIDES IN AIR, WATER, AND SOIL Keith F. Eckerman and Jeffrey C. Ryman September 1993 ERRATUM p. 218 Table C.2. Scaled External Bremsstrahlung from Electrons for Water For T = 1000.0 and k/T = 0.10, the table entry .0223 should read 1.0223. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned

5

Applicability of CS616 Soil Water Sensors for South  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

site water balance Image from: (Migliaccio 2007) #12;Background ­ Soil Water Sensors Time DomainApplicability of CS616 Soil Water Sensors for South Florida Urban Soils Kevin Koryto Water: Determine if CS616 soil water sensors are functioning adequately at field site. Hypothesis: Presence of air

Migliaccio, Kati White

6

Surface Environmental Surveillance Project: Locations Manual Volume 1 – Air and Water Volume 2 – Farm Products, Soil & Vegetation, and Wildlife  

SciTech Connect

This report describes all environmental monitoring locations associated with the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project. Environmental surveillance of the Hanford site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Sampling is conducted to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford environs, as required in DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. The environmental surveillance sampling design is described in the Hanford Site Environmental Monitoring Plan, United States Department of Energy, Richland Operation Office (DOE/RL-91-50). This document contains the locations of sites used to collect samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP). Each section includes directions, maps, and pictures of the locations. A general knowledge of roads and highways on and around the Hanford Site is necessary to successfully use this manual. Supplemental information (Maps, Gazetteer, etc.) may be necessary if user is unfamiliar with local routes. The SESP is a multimedia environmental surveillance effort to measure the concentrations of radionuclides and chemicals in environmental media to demonstrate compliance with applicable environmental quality standards and public exposure limits, and assessing environmental impacts. Project personnel annually collect selected samples of ambient air, surface water, agricultural products, fish, wildlife, and sediments. Soil and vegetation samples are collected approximately every 5 years. Analytical capabilities include the measurement of radionuclides at very low environmental concentrations and, in selected media, nonradiological chemicals including metals, anions, volatile organic compounds, and total organic carbon.

Fritz, Brad G.; Patton, Gregory W.; Stegen, Amanda; Poston, Ted M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Soil and Water Conservation (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Indiana Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts is an association of the 92 soil and water conservation districts, each representing one of the 92 Indiana counties.

8

air_water.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

12/2011 12/2011 Air Monitoring Groundwater Monitoring Surface Water Monitoring A continuously operating air monitoring network was in place from 1986 through 2000 for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) to measure levels of gamma radiation, radioactive dust particles, radon gas, and asbestos. With remediation of contaminated materials essentially complete and measurements indistinguishable from background, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ceased perimeter and offsite air monitoring as of December 31, 2000. Groundwater has been routinely monitored at the site since 1986. Separate groundwater monitoring programs were established for the Chemical Plant and Quarry sites because of geographic separation and differences in the hydrogeologic features that influence

9

Air and Water Pollution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Air Pollution.... Many pollutants enter our bodies through the air we breathe at 13,000 l/day ... to quantitatively understand the basic environmental physics of pollution. This chapter covers the foll...

David Hafemeister

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation District, and Council on Soil and Water Conservation Regulations (Connecticut) Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation District, and Council on Soil and Water Conservation Regulations (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity

11

Soil Water and Temperature System (SWATS) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The soil water and temperature system (SWATS) provides vertical profiles of soil temperature, soil-water potential, and soil moisture as a function of depth below the ground surface at hourly intervals. The temperature profiles are measured directly by in situ sensors at the Central Facility and many of the extended facilities of the SGP climate research site. The soil-water potential and soil moisture profiles are derived from measurements of soil temperature rise in response to small inputs of heat. Atmospheric scientists use the data in climate models to determine boundary conditions and to estimate the surface energy flux. The data are also useful to hydrologists, soil scientists, and agricultural scientists for determining the state of the soil.

Bond, D

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

University of Florida Soil and Water Science Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to soil properties, water/soil quality, and water/soil management · Highlight important and/or innovative environmental contamination prevention strategies and remediation techniques that serve to protect and promote

Ma, Lena

13

Ecological Screening Values for Surface Water, Sediment, and Soil  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a comprehensive listing of ecological screening values for surface water, sediment, and soil.

Friday, G. P.

1999-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

WATER AS A REAGENT FOR SOIL REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect

SRI International conducted experiments in a two-year, two-phase process to develop and evaluate hydrothermal extraction technology, also known as hot water extraction (HWE) technology, to separate petroleum-related contaminants and other hazardous pollutants from soil and sediments. In this process, water with added electrolytes (inexpensive and environmentally friendly) is used as the extracting solvent under subcritical conditions (150-300 C). The use of electrolytes allows us to operate reactors under mild conditions and to obtain high separation efficiencies that were hitherto impossible. Unlike common organic solvents, water under subcritical conditions dissolves both organics and inorganics, thus allowing opportunities for separation of both organic and inorganic material from soil. In developing this technology, our systematic approach was to (1) establish fundamental solubility data, (2) conduct treatability studies with industrial soils, and (3) perform a bench-scale demonstration using a highly contaminated soil. The bench-scale demonstration of the process has shown great promise. The next step of the development process is the successful pilot demonstration of this technology. Once pilot tested, this technology can be implemented quite easily, since most of the basic components are readily available from mature technologies (e.g., steam stripping, soil washing, thermal desorption). The implementation of this technology will revolutionize the conventional use of water in soil remediation technologies and will provide a stand-alone technology for removal of both volatile and heavy components from contaminated soil.

Indira S. Jayaweera; Montserrat Marti-Perez; Jordi Diaz-Ferrero; Angel Sanjurjo

2001-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

15

CHAPTER ____ THE AIR-WATER INTERFACE: TURBULENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.g. from paper mills. The desorption of dissolved substances, like PCBs, from inland and coastal water at an unsheared air-water interface, i.e., a situation in which the winds are light and the fluid motions category, we consider situations with significant wind shear at the surface. In this case, the turbulence

California at Santa Barbara, University of

16

Air and water cooled modulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact high power magnetic compression apparatus and method for delivering high voltage pulses of short duration at a high repetition rate and high peak power output which does not require the use of environmentally unacceptable fluids such as chlorofluorocarbons either as a dielectric or as a coolant, and which discharges very little waste heat into the surrounding air. A first magnetic switch has cooling channels formed therethrough to facilitate the removal of excess heat. The first magnetic switch is mounted on a printed circuit board. A pulse transformer comprised of a plurality of discrete electrically insulated and magnetically coupled units is also mounted on said printed board and is electrically coupled to the first magnetic switch. The pulse transformer also has cooling means attached thereto for removing heat from the pulse transformer. A second magnetic switch also having cooling means for removing excess heat is electrically coupled to the pulse transformer. Thus, the present invention is able to provide high voltage pulses of short duration at a high repetition rate and high peak power output without the use of environmentally unacceptable fluids and without discharging significant waste heat into the surrounding air.

Birx, Daniel L. (Oakley, CA); Arnold, Phillip A. (Livermore, CA); Ball, Don G. (Livermore, CA); Cook, Edward G. (Livermore, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Air and water cooled modulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact high power magnetic compression apparatus and method are disclosed for delivering high voltage pulses of short duration at a high repetition rate and high peak power output which does not require the use of environmentally unacceptable fluids such as chlorofluorocarbons either as a dielectric or as a coolant, and which discharges very little waste heat into the surrounding air. A first magnetic switch has cooling channels formed therethrough to facilitate the removal of excess heat. The first magnetic switch is mounted on a printed circuit board. A pulse transformer comprised of a plurality of discrete electrically insulated and magnetically coupled units is also mounted on said printed board and is electrically coupled to the first magnetic switch. The pulse transformer also has cooling means attached thereto for removing heat from the pulse transformer. A second magnetic switch also having cooling means for removing excess heat is electrically coupled to the pulse transformer. Thus, the present invention is able to provide high voltage pulses of short duration at a high repetition rate and high peak power output without the use of environmentally unacceptable fluids and without discharging significant waste heat into the surrounding air. 9 figs.

Birx, D.L.; Arnold, P.A.; Ball, D.G.; Cook, E.G.

1995-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

18

Mathematics: Food, Soil, Water, Air, Free Speech  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, you should take note that it has an "Achilles heel;" it runs on fossil fuel. Fossil fuel supplies anything to do with health or disease, there is a definite pattern that has come to dominate the "food

Russo, Bernard

19

Soil and Water Conservation (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Texas) (Texas) Soil and Water Conservation (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Schools Institutional Nonprofit Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board The Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board is established to encourage and oversee soil-conserving land-use practices, and to provide for the conservation of soil and related resources and the control and prevention of soil erosion, and thereby to preserve natural resources,

20

Crude oil contaminated soil washing in air sparging assisted stirred tank reactor using biosurfactants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigated the removal of crude oil from soil using air sparging assisted stirred tank reactors. Two surfactants (rhamnolipid and sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS) were tested and the effects of different parameters (i.e. temperature, surfactant concentrations, washing time, volume/mass ratio) were investigated under varying washing modes namely, stirring only, air sparging only and the combination of stirring and air sparging. The results showed that SDS removed more than 80% crude oil from non-weathered soil samples, whist rhamnolipid showed similar oil removal at the third and fourth levels of the parameters tested. The oil removal ability of the seawater prepared solutions were better than those of the distilled water solutions at the first and second levels of temperature and concentration of surfactant solutions. This approach of soil washing was noted to be effective in reducing the amount of oil in soil. Therefore we suggested that a field scale test be conducted to assess the efficiency of these surfactants.

Kingsley Urum; Turgay Pekdemir; David Ross; Steve Grigson

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water air soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Water Modeling of Steel Flow, Air Entrainment and Filtration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Modeling of Steel Flow, Air Entrainment and Filtration Christoph Beckermann Associate Beckermann, C., "Water Modeling of Steel Flow, Air Entrainment and Filtration," in Proceedings of the 46th, 1992. #12;Abstract This paper presents an analysis of water modeling of steel pouring to study (1) air

Beckermann, Christoph

22

Soil-Water Characteristic Curve Modeling at Low Water Content: Empirical and Semi-Empirical Approaches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil-Water Characteristic Curve Modeling at Low Water Content: Empirical and Semi model, the Modified Kovacs (MK) model for the determination of soil-water characteristic curve at the low water contents of two horizons of a soil from Burkina Faso. Combining terms from capillary state

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

23

E-Print Network 3.0 - air dried soil Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

soil analysis. Soil Tests: CEC, pH, organic matter, phosphorus... clay loam Bhorizon Lost seal with pipe wall Removed, air dried, and repacked Leetonia Loamy Sand Well... 1062009...

24

Soil and Water Conservation (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Soil and Water Conservation (Florida) Soil and Water Conservation (Florida) Soil and Water Conservation (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Florida Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Florida's 62 Soil and Water Conservation Districts were established in

25

WATER AS A REAGENT FOR SOIL REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect

SRI International is conducting experiments to develop and evaluate hydrothermal extraction technology or hot water extraction (HWE) technology for remediating petroleum-contaminated soils. Most current remediation practices either fail to remove the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) found in petroleum-contaminated sites, are too costly, or require the use of organic solvents at the expense of additional contamination and with the added cost of recycling solvents. Hydrothermal extraction offers the promise of efficiently extracting PAHs and other kinds of organics from contaminated soils at moderate temperatures and pressures, using only water and inorganic salts such as carbonate. SRI has conducted experiments to measure the solubility and rate of solubilization of selected PAHs (fluoranthene, pyrene, chrysene, 9,10-dimethylanthracene) in water using SRI's hydrothermal optical cell with the addition of varying amounts of sodium carbonate to evaluate the efficiency of the technology for removing PAHs from the soil. SRI data shows a very rapid increase in solubility of PAHs with increase in temperature in the range 25-275 C. SRI also measured the rate of solubilization, which is a key factor in determining the reactor parameters. SRI results for fluoranthene, pyrene, chrysene, and 9,10-dimethylanthracene show a linear relationship between rate of solubilization and equilibrium solubility. Also, we have found the rate of solubilization of pyrene at 275 C to be 6.5 ppm/s, indicating that the equilibrium solubilization will be reached in less than 3 min at 275 C; equilibrium solubility of pyrene at 275 C is 1000 ppm. Also, pyrene and fluoranthene appear to have higher solubilities in the presence of sodium carbonate. In addition to this study, SRI studied the rate of removal of selected PAHs from spiked samples under varying conditions (temperature, pore sizes, and pH). We have found a higher removal of PAHs in the presence of sodium carbonate in both sand and bentonite systems. Also, sodium carbonate greatly reduces the possible reactor corrosion under hydrothermal conditions. Our results show that a water-to-sand ratio of at least 3:1 is required to efficiently remove PAH from soil under static conditions.

Indira S. Jayaweera; Montserrat Marti-Perez; Jordi Diaz-Ferrero; Angel Sanjurjo

2001-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

26

New Air and Water-Resistive Barrier Technologies for Commercial...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

New Air and Water-Resistive Barrier Technologies for Commercial Buildings Lead Performer: Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Oak Ridge, TN Partners: 3M - Minneapolis, MN DOE Funding:...

27

Analysis of soil and water for TATB content  

SciTech Connect

A reverse-phase liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was developed for the analysis of TATB in soil samples. The soil samples were extracted with dimethylformamide (DMF). The extract was analyzed to determine the TATB content in the soil. The detection limit using this procedure was 2 parts/million (ppm) for TATB in the soil. An organic free sample of water was saturated with TATB. The water was filtered through a 0.2-{mu} filter, then injected into both a reverse-phase and normal-phase liquid chromatograph system. No peaks were detected. Therefore, the solubility of TATB in water is less than the detection limits of the chromatograph methods.

Schaffer, C.L.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Shor Lab "Soil Water" Project Undergraduate Research Opportunity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Their approach is to emulate the physical structure of the soil using a combination of microfluidic flow cells microfluidic devices to systematically emulate different soil physical structures. Manipulate water content biofilm EPS level, drying condition and water retention. 5. Use microfluidic devices to systematically

Shor, Leslie McCabe

29

On the infiltration of rain water through the soil with runo# of the excess water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the infiltration of rain water through the soil with runo# of the excess water Iacopo Borsi '' Viale Morgagni 67/A, 50134 Firenze, Italy Abstract This paper deals with the modelling of the rain water infiltration through the soil above the aquifer in case of runo# of the excess water. The main feature

Fasano, Antonio

30

MHK Technologies/Water Air Pump WAP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pump WAP Pump WAP < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Water Air Pump WAP.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Shamil Ayntrazi Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Submerged Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The Water Air Pump WAP uses a partially submerged funnel shaped air pump to compress air collect it in a piping network and feed it to an air turbine Mooring Configuration Gravity base installed at the sea bed Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 11:50.0 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/Water_Air_Pump_WAP&oldid=681697"

31

Florida Air and Water Pollution Control Act (Florida) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida Air and Water Pollution Control Act (Florida) Florida Air and Water Pollution Control Act (Florida) Florida Air and Water Pollution Control Act (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Transportation Utility Program Info State Florida Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Florida Department of Environmental Protection It is the policy of the state of Florida to protect, maintain, and improve the quality of the air and waters of the state. This Act authorizes the Department of Environmental Protection to enact and implement regulations designed to control and abate activities which may contribute to air and

32

ENVXR 202: EARTH, AIR, WATER EXPERIMENTAL PROJECTS for Water (W) 25 Feb 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENVXR 202: EARTH, AIR, WATER EXPERIMENTAL PROJECTS for Water (W) 25 Feb 2003 As we said about water and in deep water, watching the increase in amplitude of the motion when waves approach a shore...and make waves in deep water (at least 25 cm deep). How do they differ from waves in shallower water, say 5

33

Soil and Vegetation Management: Keys to Water Conservation on Rangeland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The amount of water that soaks into the soil largely determines plant productivity. We can manage and conserve water where and when it falls, and by controlling the kind of vegetation we can make the fullest use of rain water. This publication...

Schuster, Joseph L.

2001-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

34

CCA Training : Soil and Water Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dry 25,000,000 acresa Includes both external surfaces and surfaces between crystal plates. #12;The and nutrient transformations · Associated with soil porosity #12;Soil Physical Properties: Structure Properties: Structure · Structure type = aggregation has different shape and varies with depth ­Granular

Balser, Teri C.

35

Water Transfer from Soil to the Atmosphere as Related to Climate and Soil Properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/sec. Conductivity Studies - The conductivity of the Olton loam soil is very low at fairly low soil water pressures corresponding to high contents. This is an asset in preventing evaporation losses, but may be detrimental to crop production in that the crops need...

Wendt, C. W.

36

CO2 CH4 flux Air temperature Soil temperature and Soil moisture, Barrow, Alaska 2013 ver. 1  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This dataset consists of field measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux, as well as soil properties made during 2013 in Areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux made from June to September (ii) Calculation of corresponding Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and CH4 exchange (transparent minus opaque) between atmosphere and the ecosystem (ii) Measurements of Los Gatos Research (LGR) chamber air temperature made from June to September (ii) measurements of surface layer depth, type of surface layer, soil temperature and soil moisture from June to September.

Margaret Torn

37

Soils Collections Project Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soil Collections Soil Collections Soil Collections Overview Soil covers a major portion of the Earth's surface, and is an important natural resource that either directly or indirectly supports most of the planet's life. Soil is a mixture of mineral and organic materials plus air and water. The contents of soil vary by location and are constantly changing. The ORNL DAAC Soil Collections archive contains data on the physical and chemical properties of soils, including: soil carbon and nitrogen soil water-holding capacity soil respiration soil texture Most data sets are globally gridded, while a few are of a regional nature. Get Soils Data Find and order data sets: See list of data sets and download data Browse Soils Data Holdings by selected attributes Retrieve Soils data by FTP browse

38

Soil and Water Conservation Districts (South Carolina) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Districts (South Carolina) Districts (South Carolina) Soil and Water Conservation Districts (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider South Carolina Department of Natural Resources Soil and Water Conservation Districts are local governmental subdivisions

39

Soil and Water Conservation Policy (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy (Minnesota) Policy (Minnesota) Soil and Water Conservation Policy (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting This statute establishes that it is the responsibility of land occupiers to implement practices that conserve soil and water resources, and the policy

40

Soil and Water Conservation (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Virginia) Virginia) Soil and Water Conservation (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation Soil and water conservation districts (SWCDs) were established in the 1930s

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water air soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Applying a Domestic Water-cooled Air-conditioner in Subtropical Cities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water-cooled air-conditioning systems (WACS) are in general more energy efficient than air-cooled air-conditioning systems (AACS), especially in subtropical climates where the outdoor air is hot and humid. Related studies focused on evaluating...

Lee, W.; Chen, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Surfactant-enhanced remediation of organic contaminated soil and water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Surfactant based remediation technologies for organic contaminated soil and water (groundwater or surface water) is of increasing importance recently. Surfactants are used to dramatically expedite the process, which in turn, may reduce the treatment time of a site compared to use of water alone. In fact, among the various available remediation technologies for organic contaminated sites, surfactant based process is one of the most innovative technologies. To enhance the application of surfactant based technologies for remediation of organic contaminated sites, it is very important to have a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in this process. This paper will provide an overview of the recent developments in the area of surfactant enhanced soil and groundwater remediation processes, focusing on (i) surfactant adsorption on soil, (ii) micellar solubilization of organic hydrocarbons, (iii) supersolubilization, (iv) density modified displacement, (v) degradation of organic hydrocarbon in presence surfactants, (vi) partitioning of surfactants onto soil and liquid organic phase, (vii) partitioning of contaminants onto soil, and (viii) removal of organics from soil in presence of surfactants. Surfactant adsorption on soil and/or sediment is an important step in this process as it results in surfactant loss reduced the availability of the surfactants for solubilization. At the same time, adsorbed surfactants will retained in the soil matrix, and may create other environmental problem. The biosurfactants are become promising in this application due to their environmentally friendly nature, nontoxic, low adsorption on to soil, and good solubilization efficiency. Effects of different parameters like the effect of electrolyte, pH, soil mineral and organic content, soil composition etc. on surfactant adsorption are discussed here. Micellar solubilization is also an important step for removal of organic contaminants from the soil matrix, especially for low aqueous solubility organic contaminants. Influences of different parameters such as single and mixed surfactant system, hydrophilic and hydrophobic chain length, HLB value, temperature, electrolyte, surfactant type that are very important in micellar solubilization are reviewed here. Microemulsion systems show higher capacity of organic hydrocarbons solubilization than the normal micellar system. In the case of biodegradation of organic hydrocarbons, the rate is very slow due to low water solubility and dissolution rate but the presence of surfactants may increase the bioavailability of hydrophobic compounds by solubilization and hence increases the degradation rate. In some cases the presence of it also reduces the rate. In addition to fundamental studies, some laboratory and field studies on removal of organics from contaminated soil are also reviewed to show the applicability of this technology.

Santanu Paria

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Characterization of Soil Water Content Variability and Soil Texture using GPR Groundwave Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

measurements. Precipitation and irrigation were both shown to increase the spatial variability of water content the soil water content is well character- ized across a field. In addition to crop yield, the quality JEEG, September 2010, Volume 15, Issue 3, pp. 93­110 #12;of some crops, such as wine grapes, partially

Hubbard, Susan

44

Effects of Woody Vegetation Removal on Soil Water Dynamics in a South Texas Shrubland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

removal on various soil textures we studied changes in soil water, rooting depth, and the role of water redistribution by woody vegetation. Woody vegetation was removed using common methods of cut-stump and roller chop across three soil types. Soil water...

Mattox, April Marie

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

45

System analysis of membrane facilitated water generation from air humidity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The use of water vapor selective membranes can reduce the energy requirement for extracting water out of humid air by more than 50%. We performed a system analysis of a proposed unit, that uses membranes to separate water vapor from other atmospheric gases. This concentrated vapor can then be condensed specifically, rather than cooling the whole body of air. The driving force for the membrane permeation is maintained with a condenser and a vacuum pump. The pump regulates the total permeate side pressure by removing non-condensable gases that leak into the system. We show that by introducing a low-pressure, recirculated, sweep stream, the total permeate side pressure can be increased without impairing the water vapor permeation. This measure allows energy efficiency even in the presence of leakages, as it significantly lowers the power requirements of the vacuum pump. Such a constructed atmospheric water generator with a power of 62 kW could produce 9.19 m3/day of water (583 MJ/m3) as compared to 4.45 m3/day (1202 MJ/m3) that can be condensed without membranes. Due to the physical barrier the membrane imposes, fresh water generated in this manner is also cleaner and of higher quality than water condensed directly out of the air.

D. Bergmair; S.J. Metz; H.C. de Lange; A.A. van Steenhoven

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Impact of alfalfa on soil and water quality  

SciTech Connect

Dominance of row crop agriculture in rolling landscapes of western and Southwestern Minnesota is identified as a primary, non-point source of sediments and associated pollutants reaching the Minnesota River. Currently as a biomass energy project, alfalfa is being promoted in western Minnesota to harvest the leaves for animal feed and stems to generate electricity. As a perennial, leguminous crop grown with minimum inputs, introduction of alfalfa in row cropped lands has potential to improve both in-situ soil productivity and downstream water quality. A field study was initiated in 1996 to compare the volume of runoff and pollutants coming from alfalfa an com-soybean fields in western Minnesota. Two pair of alfalfa and corn-soybean watersheds were instrumented at Morris in the Fall of 1996 to measure rainfall, runoff, and sample water for sediment load, phosphorus, nitrogen, biochemical oxygen demand, and chemical oxygen demand. Simulated rainfall-runoff experiments were conducted on an existing crop rotation - input management study plots at Lamberton to evaluate soil quality effects of the inclusion of alfalfa in a corn-soybean rotation under manure and fertilization management schemes. Alfalfa soil water use as a function of frequency of harvest was also monitored at Morris to evaluate the effect of cutting schedule on soil water use. During the growing season of 1997, alfalfa under a two-cut management scheme used about 25-mm (an inch) more soil water than under a three-cut schedule. The mean differences between the treatments were not significant. The conclusions drawn in this report come from analysis of data collected during one winter-summer hydrologic and crop management cycle. Continued observations through a period of at least 3-5 years is recommended to improve the instrumentation robustness and discern the variability due to climate, soil, and crop management factors.

Sharma, P.; Moncrief, J.; Gupta, S.

1997-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

47

Water-to-Air Heat Pump Performance with Lakewater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance of water-to-air heat pumps using lakewater as the heat source and sink has been investigated. Direct cooling with deep lakewater has also been considered. Although the emphasis of the work was with southern lakes, many results also...

Kavanaugh, S.; Pezent, M. C.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

GIS IN SOIL & WATER SCIENCE On-Campus Section 8197  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with and create GIS maps in ArcMap Access and query a GIS database Describe two common GIS data structures Change the coordinate system and map projection used to display a dataset Query and analyze GIS dataSWS 4720C GIS IN SOIL & WATER SCIENCE On-Campus Section 8197 Fall 2014 Instructor Wade Ross wader

Ma, Lena

49

GIS IN SOIL & WATER SCIENCE On-Campus Section 8197  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

it can do. Work with and create GIS maps in ArcMap. Access and query a GIS database. Describe two a dataset. Query and analyze GIS data. Create presentation-quality maps and graphs DELIVERY MODE: · CourseSWS 4720C GIS IN SOIL & WATER SCIENCE On-Campus Section 8197 Fall 2013 Instructor Susan Curry

Ma, Lena

50

GIS IN SOIL & WATER SCIENCE Distance Education Sections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is and what it can do. Work with and create GIS maps in ArcMap. Access and query a GIS database. Describe a dataset. Query and analyze GIS data. Create presentation-quality maps and graphs DELIVERY MODE: · CourseSWS 4720C GIS IN SOIL & WATER SCIENCE Distance Education Sections Fall 2013 Instructor Susan Curry

Ma, Lena

51

Why air bubbles in water glow so easily  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sound driven gas bubbles in water can emit light pulses (sonoluminescence). Experiments show a strong dependence on the type of gas dissolved in water. Air is found to be one of the most friendly gases towards this phenomenon. Recently, \\cite{loh96} have suggested a chemical mechanism to account for the strong dependence on the gas mixture: the dissociation of nitrogen at high temperatures and its subsequent chemical reactions to highly water soluble gases such as NO, NO$_2$, and/or NH$_3$. Here, we analyze the consequences of the theory and offer detailed comparison with the experimental data of Putterman's UCLA group. We can quantitatively account for heretofore unexplained results. In particular, we understand why the argon percentage in air is so essential for the observation of stable SL.

Michael Brenner; Sascha Hilgenfeldt; Detlef Lohse; ;

1996-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

52

Spatial association between the locations of roots and water flow paths in highly structured soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Considerable evidence exists that the majority of low tension water flow through highly structured clayey soil occurs in a small fraction of total pore space and that the flow paths converge as depth increases. In structured clayey soils, water...

Gardiner, Nathan Thomas

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

53

Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

impact or flowing water. They seal the soil surface, reduce the rate of water infiltration, and can into individual particles that clog soil pores, seal the surface, and form a layer that is dense when dry of physical crust with many small, unconnected air pockets or spaces similar to those in a sponge

54

Air-To-Water Heat Pumps with Radiant Delivery in Low Load Homes...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Air-to-Water Heat Pumps With Radiant Delivery in Low Load Homes Tucson, Arizona and Chico, California PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Field testing of air-to-water heat pump...

55

Relationship between formation water rate, equivalent penetration rate and volume flow rate of air in air drilling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Formation water invasion is the most troublesome problem associated with air drilling. However, it is not economical to apply mist drilling when only a small amount of water flows into wellbore from formation dur...

Wang Kexiong; Zhang Laibin; Jiang Hongwei

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

The Concentration and Distribution of Depleted Uranium (DU) and Beryllium (Be) in Soil and Air on Illeginni Island at Kwajalein Atoll  

SciTech Connect

Re-entry vehicles on missiles launched at Vandenberg Air Force base in California re-enter at the Western Test Range, the Regan Test Site (RTS) at Kwajalein Atoll. An environmental Assessment (EA) was written at the beginning of the program to assess potential impact of Depleted Uranium (DU) and Beryllium (Be), the major RV materials of interest from a health and environmental perspective. The chemical and structural form of DU and Be in RVs is such that they are insoluble in soil water and sea water. Consequently, residual concentrations of DU and Be observed in soil on the island are not expected to be toxic to plant life because there is essentially no soil to plant uptake. Similarly, due to their insolubility in sea water there is no uptake of either element by marine biota including fish, mollusks, shellfish and sea mammals. No increase in either element has been observed in sea life around Illeginni Island where deposition of DU and Be has occurred. The critical terrestrial exposure pathway for U and Be is inhalation. Concentration of both elements in air over the test period (1989 to 2006) is lower by a factor of 10,000 than the most restrictive U.S. guideline for the general public. Uranium concentrations in air are also lower by factors of 10 to 100 than concentrations of U in air in the U.S. measured by the EPA (Keith et al., 1999). U and Be concentrations in air downwind of deposition areas on Illeginni Island are essentially indistinguishable from natural background concentrations of U in air at the atolls. Thus, there are no health related issues associated with people using the island.

Robison, W L; Hamilton, T F; Martinelli, R E; Gouveia, F J; Lindman, T R; Yakuma, S C

2006-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

57

QUANTIFYING ACCELERATED SOIL EROSION THROUGH ECOLOGICAL SITE-BASED ASSESSMENTS OF WIND AND WATER EROSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

QUANTIFYING ACCELERATED SOIL EROSION THROUGH ECOLOGICAL SITE- BASED ASSESSMENTS OF WIND AND WATER change and intensification have resulted in accelerated rates of soil erosion in many areas of the world quantification of accelerated soil erosion. Ecological site soil erosion Variation in the simulated erosion rates

58

UF/IFAS Soil and Water Science 2181 McCarty Hall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agriculture and Environmental Quality 3 aom 3732 Agricultural Water Management 3 aom 4643 Environmental Soils, Water & Public Health 3 sws 4715c Environmental Pedology 4 sws 4720c GIS in Soil and Water to undergraduate students interested in managing water resources in a wide range of ecosystems including

Jawitz, James W.

59

The Coordinated Control of a Central Air Conditioning System Based on Variable Chilled Water Temperature and Variable Chilled Water Flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At present, regulation of water flow by means of pump frequency conversion is one of the major methods for power-saving in central air conditioning systems. In this article, optimization regulation for central air conditioning system on the basis...

Liu, J.; Mai, Y.; Liu, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Influence of air-filled porosity of soils on air permeability and gaseous dispersion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transverse dispersion to be neglected. Equation (2) can then be simplified to: ac a*c ac D ? ? v at " az' az (4) Determination of the longitudinal dispersion coefficient of a soil is based on analysis of the miscible displacement of two fluids... Z ? v, t VEZ [ezfc( ) + exp( ? ) erfc( Co 2 2 (D t)" D? Z + v, t )) (6) 2 (D?t) ' where ezfc( ) = complimentary error function of the argument in parentheses. The second term is very small in comparison to the first term and may be neglected...

McCarthy, Kevin P.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water air soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Strawberry Nursery Plant Propagation in Relation to Soil Phosphorus and Water Variation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

related to low soil pH and fruit tree decline (Li et al. ,content (SWC) and pH levels in tree orchards (Li et al. ,with citrus tree decline and variability of soil pH, water,

Li, Hong; Li, Tingxian; Gordon, Robert J.; Asiedu, Samuel K.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Cavitand-Based Solid-Phase Microextraction Coating for the Selective Detection of Nitroaromatic Explosives in Air and Soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A selective cavitand-based solid-phase microextraction coating was synthesized for the determination of nitroaromatic explosives and explosive taggants at trace levels in air and soil. A quinoxaline cavitand functionalized with a carboxylic group at the ...

Federica Bianchi; Alessandro Bedini; Nicolò Riboni; Roberta Pinalli; Adolfo Gregori; Leonard Sidisky; Enrico Dalcanale; Maria Careri

2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

63

Use of Air2Air Technology to Recover Fresh-Water from the Normal Evaporative Cooling Loss at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

This program was undertaken to build and operate the first Air2Air{trademark} Water Conservation Cooling Tower at a power plant, giving a validated basis and capability for water conservation by this method. Air2Air{trademark} water conservation technology recovers a portion of the traditional cooling tower evaporate. The Condensing Module provides an air-to-air heat exchanger above the wet fill media, extracting the heat from the hot saturated moist air leaving in the cooling tower and condensing water. The rate of evaporate water recovery is typically 10%-25% annually, depending on the cooling tower location (climate).

Ken Mortensen

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

64

Instrumented Water Tanks can Improve Air Shower Detector Sensitivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous works have shown that water Cherenkov detectors have superior sensitivity to those of scintillation counters as applied to detecting extensive air showers (EAS). This is in large part due to their much higher sensitivity to EAS photons which are more than five times more numerous than EAS electrons. Large area water Cherenkov detectors can be constructed relatively cheaply and operated reliably. A sparse detector array has been designed which uses these types of detectors to substantially increase the area over which the Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory collects EAS information. Improvements to the Milagro detector's performance characteristics and sensitivity derived from this array and preliminary results from a prototype array currently installed near the Milagro detector will be presented.

R. Atkins; W. Benbow; D. Berley; M. -L. Chen; D. G. Coyne; R. S. Delay; B. L. Dingus; D. E. Dorfan; R. W. Ellsworth; D. Evans; A. Falcone; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; G. Gisler; J. A. Goodman; T. J. Haines; C. M. Hoffman; S. Hugenberger; L. A. Kelley; I. Leonor; J. Macri; M. McConnell; J. F. McCullough; J. E. McEnery; R. S. Miller; A. I. Mincer; M. F. Morales; P. Nemethy; J. M. Ryan; M. Schneider; B. Shen; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; T. N. Thompson; O. T. Tumer; K. Wang; M. O. Wascko; S. Westerhoff; D. A. Williams; T. Yang; G. B. Yodh

1999-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

Economic Analysis of a Waste Water Resource Heat Pump Air-Conditioning System in North China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the situation of waste water resource in north China and the characteristics and styles of a waste water resource heat pump system, and analyzes the economic feasibility of a waste water resource heat pump air...

Chen, H.; Li, D.; Dai, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Unsteady aspects of sodium–water–air reaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One important issue for the Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) concept is the reactivity of metallic sodium and its exothermal reaction with water. In particular during equipments washing operations, sodium needs to be firstly converted (‘destroyed’) into non reactive species via a chemical reaction with water. Today, such operations are performed in tanks that confine the system and mitigate the consequences of any possible abnormal condition. Some data were obtained from experiments run by the French Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA) and were used as a basis for modelling. Among the principal phenomena identified so far are rapid water vaporization, hydrogen emission and explosion in air. High explosive-like pressure waves are generated from which sodium fragmentation and dispersion in water may ensue increasing the overall reactivity. It is extremely important to clarify the phenomenology to allow realistic extrapolation to full scale plants. A state of the art is proposed in this paper, starting from available experimental data and present perception of the physics. A comparison with present modelling strategy is also performed, underlining the necessity to improve a different and more physical approach aimed to well represent dynamic aspects of reaction.

Sofia Carnevali; Christophe Proust; Michel Soucille

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Soil Minerals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soil Minerals Soil Minerals Nature Bulletin No. 707 March 2, 1963 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor SOIL MINERALS We all depend upon the land Our food is obtained from plants and animals -- bread and meat, potatoes and fish, fruit and eggs and milk and the rest of it. Our livestock feed on plants and plant products such as grass and grain. Plants, by means of their root systems, take moisture and nutrients from the soils on which they grow. Their food values, for us or for animals that furnish us food, depend upon the available nutrients in those soils. Soils contain solids, water and air. The solids, the bulk of a soil -- except in purely organic types such as peat and muck -- are mostly mineral materials. Ordinarily they also contain some organic material: decayed and decaying remains of plants and animals.

68

Quantitative imaging of the air-water flow fields formed by unsteady breaking waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental method for simultaneously measuring the velocity fields on the air and water side of unsteady breaking waves is presented. The method is applied to breaking waves to investigate the physics of the air and ...

Belden, Jesse (Jesse Levi)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Study on consumption efficiency of soil water resources in the Yellow River Basin based on regional ET structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on the regional water resources character, the concept of soil water resources is first redefined, and then associated...ET)-based consumption structure and consumption efficiency of soil water resources ar...

Hao Wang; GuiYu Yang; YangWen Jia; DaYong Qin

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Mechanism for the Water-to-Air Transfer and Concentration of Bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Mechanism for the Water-to-Air Transfer...Lawrence Syzdek Atmospheric Sciences Research...breaking at the air-water interface can remove...A.H., GIANT CONDENSATION NUCLEI FROM BURSTING...bubbling through water that contained several...The ratios of the recoveries of some of the bacteria...

Duncan C. Blanchard; Lawrence Syzdek

1970-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

71

Cattle Feedlot Waste Management Practices -For Water and Air Pollution Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cattle Feedlot Waste Management Practices - For Water and Air Pollution Control John M. Sweeten in the potential for both water and air pollution. To prevent potential problems from developinginto real problems* Water Pollution and Wastewater Management This bulletin outlines some of the basic regulatory

Mukhtar, Saqib

72

E-Print Network 3.0 - air-water bubbly flow Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

; Chemistry 6 Hydrodynamic and statistical parameters of slug flow Lev Shemer * Summary: identification from dynamic void fraction measurements in vertical air-water flows. Int....

73

E-Print Network 3.0 - air conditioners water Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water... EECBG Direct Equipment Purchase Air Conditioner Guide ... Source: California Energy Commission Collection: Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization 2 June 30, 2011...

74

Non-invasive field measurements of soil water content using a pulsed 14 MeV neutron generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-invasive field measurements of soil water content using a pulsed 14 MeV neutron generator S to the atmosphere. Soil water sensors routinely are used in applications such as research on crop production, water-3120, United States 1. Introduction Knowledge of soil water content is critical to agricultural, hydrological

Johnson, Peter D.

75

Feasibility of Municipal Water Mains as Heat Sink for Residential Air-Conditioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been proposed that municipal water mains be used as the heat sink or the heat source for air-conditioning or heating, respectively. This paper addresses the extent of thermal contamination associated with the use of municipal water...

Vliet, G. C.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Water on Crop Biomass and Soil Permeability FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irrigating with Treated Oil and Gas Product Irrigating with Treated Oil and Gas Product Water on Crop Biomass and Soil Permeability FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT Prepared By Terry Brown, Jeffrey Morris, Patrick Richards and Joel Mason Western Research Institute October 1, 2008 to September 1, 2010 DOE Award Number: DE-NT0005681 Report Issued December, 2010 Western Research Institute 365 N 9 th Street Laramie WY 82072 ii DOE DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government, nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus,

77

The moisture retention characteristic of four soils from Niger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of air at the surface is relatively facile. Hydraulic Conductivity Redistribution of soil water affects plant growth, and the rate and duration of internal moisture flow determines 19 effective soil water storage. This is important to remember when... in sorption (wetting). This characteristic of wetting versus drying for a soil is known as the hysteresis effect (Lal 1979a). Hillel (1980) notes that hysteresis is important for coarse-textured soils in the process of redistribution of soil water...

Landeck, Jonathon Keith

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Estimation of distribution coefficient of natural radionuclides in soil around uranium mines and its effect with ionic strength of water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......which may contaminate the soil and ground water around uranium mining areas, have been considered. Soil and ground water samples were collected from a...release, accidental, disposal or remediation scenarios requires the availability......

S. Mishra; S. Maity; G. G. Pandit

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Excess electron relaxation dynamics at water/air interfaces dm Madarsz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the relaxation of a ground state excess electron at interfaces of different phases of water with air with the surrounding water bath. The systems exhibiting the most stable SB excess electron states supercooled water to contain double acceptor-type water molecules in the close vicinity of the electron. These surface states

Simons, Jack

80

Ground-based measurements of soil water storage in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Landslides EROSION Dust Weak SOIL STRENGTH Hard Latent heat SOLAR ENERGY Sensible heat Energy Stevens' HydraProbe Soil T, q, and ECapparent ADVANTAGES Lower initial cost Spatial distribution SDI

Yang, Zong-Liang

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water air soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Responses of Grain Sorghum to Profile and Temporal Dynamics of Soil Water in a Semi-arid Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of efficient irrigation strategies is a priority for producers faced with water shortages. Managed deficit irrigation attempts to optimize water use efficiency (WUE) by synchronizing crop water use with reproductive stages. Soil water...

Bell, Jourdan M

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

82

The effect of soil water content on the phytotoxicity of diuron, fluridone, metribuzin and trifluralin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Soil Water Content on the Phytotoxicity of Diuron, Fluridone, Netribuzin and Trifluralin (August 1979) Paul Alan Baumann, B. S. Southwest Missouri State (kuversity, Springfield Chairman of Advisory Ccnrnittee: Qr. Norris G. Nerkle 'The effect... that simazine hect less effective in reducing top growth of oats (Avena sativa L. var. "Rodney") as the moisture level of the soil decreased. Almost three times as much simazine was required to give 50% reduction in growth when the xoisture level of the soil...

Baumann, Paul A

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

83

E-Print Network 3.0 - air pollutants radioactive Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

health Summary: Chapter 19 Geology, Society and the Future 12; Environmental health Air pollution Waste... , such as soil and water; (2) others are released into the...

84

E-Print Network 3.0 - air pollutant production Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

health Summary: Chapter 19 Geology, Society and the Future 12; Environmental health Air pollution Waste... , such as soil and water; (2) others are released into the...

85

E-Print Network 3.0 - air pollutant concentrations Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

health Summary: Chapter 19 Geology, Society and the Future 12; Environmental health Air pollution Waste... , such as soil and water; (2) others are released into the...

86

E-Print Network 3.0 - air pollutants based Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

health Summary: Chapter 19 Geology, Society and the Future 12; Environmental health Air pollution Waste... , such as soil and water; (2) others are released into the...

87

Optimization of hybrid-water/air-cooled condenser in an enhanced turbine geothermal ORC system  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE Geothermal Program Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objective: To improve the efficiency and output variability of geothermal-based ORC power production systems with minimal water consumption by deploying: 1) a hybrid-water/air cooled condenser with low water consumption and 2) an enhanced turbine with high efficiency.

88

OG 4.4.06 1 Use of Instrumented Water Tanks for the Improvement of Air  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OG 4.4.06 1 Use of Instrumented Water Tanks for the Improvement of Air Shower Detector Sensitivity (5m 2 ), water Cherenkov detectors (tanks) will be deployed around the pond to effectively extend its from the Milagro pond. 2 Water Tank Detector & Array The criteria for selecting a detector design

California at Santa Cruz, University of

89

1 Copyright 2006 by ASME A NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF GROWING WATER DROPLET INSIDE AN AIR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to generate electrical energy while water is produced as a byproduct. Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cells. According to him the flow through the channels on the cathode side of the fuel cell where water is produced1 Copyright © 2006 by ASME A NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF GROWING WATER DROPLET INSIDE AN AIR SUPPLY

Kandlikar, Satish

90

Assessment of soil and water conservation methods applied to the cultivated steeplands of southern Honduras  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conservation methods. These methods include use of mulch management, vegetative barriers, and agroforestry in place of the traditional burning practice. To demonstrate the effectiveness of these soil and water conservation methods, LUPE needs quantifiable...

Smith, James E

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Biosensor Control of Acute Total Toxicity of Water and Soil Polluted by Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this article a short analysis of total toxicity of different samples of water and soil (obtained from some Azerbaijan mud bobbling volcanoes, region of oil production, railway lines, Dnieper river and prepa...

Nikolay F. Starodub

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Comparing Time Domain Reflectometry and Electrical Resistivity Tomography Measurements for Estimating Soil Water Distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

511 Comparing Time Domain Reflectometry and Electrical Resistivity Tomography Measurements compared with electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) measurements along the same cross's interior for the measurements. However, determining the soil water content from the resulting electrical

Sailhac, Pascal

93

Tropical air mass modification over water (Gulf of Mexico Region)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TROPICAL AIR MASS MODIFICATION OVER WA~ (Gulf of Mexico Region) By Ernest Frederick Sorgnit A Thesis Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fu]Afillment of the requirements...

Sorgnit, Ernest Frederick

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Nuclear tanker producing liquid fuels from air and water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emerging technologies in CO? air capture, high temperature electrolysis, microchannel catalytic conversion, and Generation IV reactor plant systems have the potential to create a shipboard liquid fuel production system ...

Galle-Bishop, John Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Performance Analysis of Air-Source Variable Speed Heat Pumps and Various Electric Water Heating Options  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analysis of Air- Analysis of Air- Source Variable Speed Heat Pumps and Various Electric Water Heating Options Jeffrey Munk Oak Ridge National Laboratory 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Presentation_name Acknowledgements * Tennessee Valley Authority - David Dinse * U.S. Department of Energy * Roderick Jackson * Tony Gehl * Philip Boudreaux * ZEBRAlliance 3 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Presentation_name Overview * Electric Water Heating Options - Conventional Electric Water Heaters - Heat Pump Water Heaters * Air-Source * Ground-Source - Solar Thermal Water Heater * Variable Speed Heat Pumps - Energy Use Analysis - Measured Performance - Operational Characteristics 4 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Presentation_name Water Heating Options

96

Modeling Miscanthus in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to Simulate Its Water Quality Effects As a Bioenergy Crop  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modeling Miscanthus in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to Simulate Its Water Quality Effects As a Bioenergy Crop ... There is increasing interest in perennial grasses as a renewable source of bioenergy and feedstock for second-generation cellulosic biofuels. ... Due to global warming and energy independence concerns, there is increasing interest in perennial grasses as a renewable source of bioenergy. ...

Tze Ling Ng; J. Wayland Eheart; Ximing Cai; Fernando Miguez

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

97

Supercritical CO2 extraction of organic compounds from soil-water slurries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUPERCRITICAL COi EXTRACTION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM SOIL-WATER SLURRIES A Thesis by BRIAN DEAN CARTER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering SUPERCRITICAL COz FXTRACTION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM SOIL-WATER SLURRIES A Thesis by BRIAN DEAN CARTER Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

Carter, Brian Dean

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

98

E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting soil fauna Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on florafauna or human health; *affect on landscape and natural... result in : *air pollution; *soil and water pollution; *affect on florafauna or human health; *affect... ......

99

Economic Analysis and Comparison of Waste Water Resource Heat Pump Heating and Air-Conditioning System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Renewable Energy Resources and a Greener Future, Vol.VIII-8-1 Economic Analysis and Comparison of Waste Water Resource Heat Pump Heating and Air-conditioning System Chunlei Zhang Suilin Wang Hongbing Chen...

Zhang, C.; Wang, S.; Chen, H.; Shi, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Energy Comparison Between Conventional and Chilled Water Thermal Storage Air Conditioning Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, encouraged by government subsidies and driven by the rapid and continual expansion in building construction, urban development, and the heavy reliance on Air Conditioning (AC) systems for the cooling of buildings. The Chilled Water Thermal Storage (CWTS...

Sebzali, M.; Hussain, H. J.; Ameer, B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water air soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Fiber Optic Evanescent Field Sensor for Hydrocarbon Monitoring in Air and Water applying UV Absorption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A fiber optic sensor for the monitoring of organic pollutants in air and water is presented. The UV absorption spectra of hydrocarbon soluble in special polymer fiber claddings are...

Schwotzer, G; Latka, I; Lehmann, H; Willsch, R

102

Lecture Session (LeS): E.4 REMEDIATION Thermal techniques -1 STEAM-AIR-INJECTION FOR IN-SITU GROUNDWATER AND SOIL REMEDIATION: PILOT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lecture Session (LeS): E.4 REMEDIATION Thermal techniques -1 STEAM-AIR-INJECTION FOR IN@iws.uni-stuttgart.de Keywords: Partial Source removal, thermally enhanced soil vapor extraction, steam-air-injection, pilot methods (steam-air injection and thermal wells), developed and verified in several field applications

Cirpka, Olaf Arie

103

Effects of soil water deficits on carbon partitioning in sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) and cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.): experiments and computer simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

through stomatal closure in cowpea plants. Although these two species have different strategies for facing a soil water deficiency, McCree and Richardson (1987) surprisingly showed that in a long term experiment (17 days), both plants ended up with a... provided a windspeed of 1. 0 m s-1 at the center of the plants, was used to blow air across the plants. This ventilation helped to keep plant-air temperature gradients to a minimum and to minimize temperature gradients along and across the plant...

Oliveira, Ricardo Ferraz de

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

104

The mutagenic potential of soil and runoff water from land treatment of three hazardous industrial wastes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE MUTAGENIC POTENTIAL OF SOIL AND RUNOFF WATER FROM LAND TREATMENT OF THREE HAZARDOUS INDUSTRIAL WASTES A Thesis by PHEBE DAYOL Submitted to the Graduate College of Te xa s ASM Un i ver s i ty in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1987 Major Subject: Soil Science THE MUTAGENIC POTENTIAL OF SOIL AND RUNOFF WATER FROM LAND TREATMENT OF THREE HAZARDOUS INDUSTRIAL WASTES A Thesis by PHEBE DAVDL Approved. s to style and content by: Kirk W...

Davol, Phebe

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

105

The relationship between soil water utilization and the phosphorus status of sorghum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SOIL WATER UTILIZATION AND THE PHOSPHORUS S'rATUS OF SORGHUM A Thesis ABDOUL ABDOULAYE SOW Submitted to the Office of Gi adua. e Stuches of Texas A8-M University in partial fulfillment nf the requirements... for the desmee of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1990 Major Subject: Soil Science THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SOIL WATER UTILIZATION AND THE PHOSPHORUS STATUS OF SORGHUM A Thesis ABDOUL ABDOULAYE SOW Approved as to style and content, by: I loyd R. Hossner (Chair of...

Sow, Abdoul Abdoulaye

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Energy and Air Emission Effects of Water Supply  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Breakdown of energy comsumption of a water utility: (a) life-cycle phase, (b) water supply phase, (c) life-cycle activity, and (d) material production category. ... The Water?Energy Sustainability Tool (WEST) can evaluate the construction, operation, and maintenance of water systems and compare the direct and indirect (supply chain) energy and environmental effects of alternative water sources in terms of material production (e.g., concrete, pipe, and chemicals), material delivery, construction and maintenance equipment use, energy production (electricity and fuel), and sludge disposal. ... The difference is due to fossil fuels, especially coal, which make up a larger portion of the U.S. electricity mix. ...

Jennifer R. Stokes; Arpad Horvath

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

107

Two-phase air-water stratified flow measurement using ultrasonic techniques  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, a time resolved ultrasound system was developed for investigating two-phase air-water stratified flow. The hardware of the system includes a pulsed wave transducer, a pulser/receiver, and a digital oscilloscope. The time domain cross correlation method is used to calculate the velocity profile along ultrasonic beam. The system is able to provide velocities with spatial resolution of around 1mm and the temporal resolution of 200?s. Experiments were carried out on single phase water flow and two-phase air-water stratified flow. For single phase water flow, the flow rates from ultrasound system were compared with those from electromagnetic flow (EM) meter, which showed good agreement. Then, the experiments were conducted on two-phase air-water stratified flow and the results were given. Compared with liquid height measurement from conductance probe, it indicated that the measured velocities were explainable.

Fan, Shiwei; Yan, Tinghu; Yeung, Hoi [School of Engineering, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire MK43 0AL (United Kingdom)

2014-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

108

Mass Transport within Soils  

SciTech Connect

Contaminants in soil can impact human health and the environment through a complex web of interactions. Soils exist where the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere converge. Soil is the thin outer zone of the earth's crust that supports rooted plants and is the product of climate and living organisms acting on rock. A true soil is a mixture of air, water, mineral, and organic components. The relative proportions of these components determine the value of the soil for agricultural and for other human uses. These proportions also determine, to a large extent, how a substance added to soil is transported and/or transformed within the soil (Spositio, 2004). In mass-balance models, soil compartments play a major role, functioning both as reservoirs and as the principal media for transport among air, vegetation, surface water, deeper soil, and ground water (Mackay, 2001). Quantifying the mass transport of chemicals within soil and between soil and atmosphere is important for understanding the role soil plays in controlling fate, transport, and exposure to multimedia pollutants. Soils are characteristically heterogeneous. A trench dug into soil typically reveals several horizontal layers having different colors and textures. As illustrated in Figure 1, these multiple layers are often divided into three major horizons: (1) the A horizon, which encompasses the root zone and contains a high concentration of organic matter; (2) the B horizon, which is unsaturated, lies below the roots of most plants, and contains a much lower organic carbon content; and (3) the C horizon, which is the unsaturated zone of weathered parent rock consisting of bedrock, alluvial material, glacial material, and/or soil of an earlier geological period. Below these three horizons lies the saturated zone - a zone that encompasses the area below ground surface in which all interconnected openings within the geologic media are completely filled with water. Similarly to the unsaturated zone with three major horizons, the saturated zone can be further divided into other zones based on hydraulic and geologic conditions. Wetland soils are a special and important class in which near-saturation conditions exist most of the time. When a contaminant is added to or formed in a soil column, there are several mechanisms by which it can be dispersed, transported out of the soil column to other parts of the environment, destroyed, or transformed into some other species. Thus, to evaluate or manage any contaminant introduced to the soil column, one must determine whether and how that substance will (1) remain or accumulate within the soil column, (2) be transported by dispersion or advection within the soil column, (3) be physically, chemically, or biologically transformed within the soil (i.e., by hydrolysis, oxidation, etc.), or (4) be transported out of the soil column to another part of the environment through a cross-media transfer (i.e., volatilization, runoff, ground water infiltration, etc.). These competing processes impact the fate of physical, chemical, or biological contaminants found in soils. In order to capture these mechanisms in mass transfer models, we must develop mass-transfer coefficients (MTCs) specific to soil layers. That is the goal of this chapter. The reader is referred to other chapters in this Handbook that address related transport processes, namely Chapter 13 on bioturbation, Chapter 15 on transport in near-surface geological formations, and Chapter 17 on soil resuspention. This chapter addresses the following issues: the nature of soil pollution, composition of soil, transport processes and transport parameters in soil, transformation processes in soil, mass-balance models, and MTCs in soils. We show that to address vertical heterogeneity in soils in is necessary to define a characteristic scaling depth and use this to establish process-based expressions for soil MTCs. The scaling depth in soil and the corresponding MTCs depend strongly on (1) the composition of the soil and physical state of the soil, (2) the chemical and physic

McKone, Thomas E.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Methane Consumption in Temperate and Subarctic Forest Soils: Rates, Vertical Zonation, and Responses to Water and Nitrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...diffusive gas transport...sphere and the water content of...29). Soil nitrogen content and...Influence of nitrogen fertilization...in mineral waters with resorcinol...Low-pressure solubility of gases in liquid water. Chem. Rev...

A. P. S. Adamsen; G. M. King

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Guidelines for Developing Soil and Water Management Programs: Irrigated Pecans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The book describes the performance of pecan trees; water testing; determining how water quality may affect tree growth; improving drainage; selecting an irrigation system, and water conditioning to manage nutrients. It also describes how to estimate...

Miyamoto, S.

111

Supercritical extraction of organic mixtures from soil-water slurries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for hazardous waste remediation. One such innovative technology that has been shown to be an efflcient means by which to remove high molecular weight organics &om soil is supercritical fluid extraction (SCFE). A supercritical fluid (SCF) exists in the region... for hazardous waste remediation. One such innovative technology that has been shown to be an efflcient means by which to remove high molecular weight organics &om soil is supercritical fluid extraction (SCFE). A supercritical fluid (SCF) exists in the region...

Green, Lynda Ann

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

112

Optimization of hybrid-water/air-cooled condenser in an enhanced turbine  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Optimization of hybrid-water/air-cooled condenser in an enhanced turbine Optimization of hybrid-water/air-cooled condenser in an enhanced turbine geothermal ORC system Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Optimization of hybrid-water/air-cooled condenser in an enhanced turbine geothermal ORC system Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Air-Cooling Project Description The technical approaches are: -UTRC shall develop a lab-based analysis of hybrid-water/air-cooled condensers with minimal water consumption, focusing on combined mist evaporative pre-cooling and mist deluge evaporative cooling technology applied to microchannel heat exchangers. Models to predict evaporative cooling performance will be validated by sub-scale testing. The predicted performance will be compared to that of state-of-the-art commercial evaporative coolers. -UTRC shall analyze the interaction of turbine design and cooling needs and specifically address how an enhanced turbine, which features variable nozzles and diffuser boundary layer suction, would further improve the ORC system performance and enable full utilization of the hybrid-cooled system. UTRC shall design, procure and test the enhanced turbine in an existing 200 kW geothermal ORC system for a technology demonstration. -UTRC shall complete a detailed design of the hybrid-cooled geothermal ORC system with an enhanced turbine that complies with its performance, cost, and quality requirements, and use this system design to prescribe subsystem/component technology requirements and interfaces. UTRC shall optimize UTC's PureCycle® geothermal ORC system integrated with a hybrid-water/air-cooled condenser and an enhanced turbine for net power output, efficiency and water consumption. -UTRC shall analyze the feasibility of addressing pure water supply for hybrid-water/aircooled condenser by using geothermal-driven Liquid-Gap-Membrane-Distillation (LGMD) technology, as an alternative to conventional Reverse Osmosis/De-Ionized treatment.

113

Evaluation of the CRITERIA Irrigation Scheme Soil Water Balance Model in Texas – Initial Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The CRITERIA model was created in the 1990s in Italy, and is based on the soil water balance computation procedures developed at the Wageningen University in the Netherlands in the 1980s. CRITERIA has been used as an analysis and regional water...

Bonaiti, G.; Fipps, G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing soil pollution Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

along an urban-rural gradient in southeastern New York, USA. Water, Air, & Soil Pollution 57-58, 797... Jartun M, Ottesen RT, Steinnes E (2003): Urban soil ... Source:...

115

Air-cooled condensers eliminate plant water use  

SciTech Connect

River or ocean water has been the mainstay for condensing turbine exhaust steam since the first steam turbine began generating electricity. A primary challenge facing today's plant developers, especially in drought-prone regions, is incorporating processes that reduce plant water use and consumption. One solution is to shed the conventional mindset that once-through cooling is the only option and adopt dry cooling technologies that reduce plant water use from a flood to a few sips. A case study at the Astoria Energy plant, New York City is described. 14 figs.

Wurtz, W.; Peltier, R. [SPX Cooling Technologies Inc. (United States)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

Radiological conditions at Bikini Atoll: Radionuclide concentrations in vegetation, soil, animals, cistern water, and ground water  

SciTech Connect

This report is intended as a resource document for the eventual cleanup of Bikini Atoll and contains a summary of the data for the concentrations of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 239 +240/Pu, and /sup 241/Am in vegetation through 1987 and in soil through 1985 for 14 islands at Bikini Atoll. The data for the main residence island, Bikini, and the most important island, Eneu, are extensive; these islands have been the subject of a continuing research and monitoring program since 1974. Data for radionuclide concentrations in ground water, cistern water, fish and other marine species, and pigs from Bikini and Eneu Islands are presented. Also included are general summaries of our resuspension and rainfall data from Bikini and Eneu Islands. The data for the other 12 islands are much more limited because samples were collected as part of a screening survey and the islands have not been part of a continuing research and monitoring program. Cesium-137 is the radionuclide that produces most of the estimated dose for returning residents, mostly through uptake by terrestrial foods and secondly by direct external gamma exposure. Remedial measures for reducing the /sup 137/Cs uptake in vegetation are discussed. 40 refs., 32 figs., 131 tabs.

Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Stuart, M.L.

1988-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

117

Boiler Upgrades and Decentralizing Steam Systems Save Water and Energy at Naval Air Station Oceana  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Location at NAS Oceana. Location at NAS Oceana. by these changes, including bachelor housing, hangers, the galley, office buildings, the chapel, and maintenance facilities. This ESPC also included installing ground source heat pumps in three buildings, adding digital control systems to increase heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) efficiency, efficient lighting retrofits, and other water conservation measures. These other water conservation measures include over 5,000 water efficient domestic fixtures, includ- ing faucets, showerheads, and toilets

118

Boiler Upgrades and Decentralizing Steam Systems Save Water and Energy at Naval Air Station Oceana  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Location at NAS Oceana. Location at NAS Oceana. by these changes, including bachelor housing, hangers, the galley, office buildings, the chapel, and maintenance facilities. This ESPC also included installing ground source heat pumps in three buildings, adding digital control systems to increase heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) efficiency, efficient lighting retrofits, and other water conservation measures. These other water conservation measures include over 5,000 water efficient domestic fixtures, includ- ing faucets, showerheads, and toilets

119

Water and element fluxes calculated in a sandy forest soil taking spatial variability into account  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water and element fluxes in the unsaturated zone of soils are most often calculated on the basis of average water fluxes and average soil solution concentrations. However, if the input of water and elements exhibit a strong systematic variability, this will most likely be reflected in the flow of water and elements in the soil. In such cases the ‘average’ based calculations will be subjected to significant errors. In order to overcome this problem, the present paper describes a method to calculate the water and element fluxes in the soil of a Norway spruce plantation taking into account the known stem-distance related variability in both water and element fluxes. The calculations are based on studies and previous findings of spatial variability in a Norway spruce plantation in Denmark. The suggested method leads to an improved Cl-balance when calculated for 6 years. The possible factors responsible for the errors in water and element fluxes are discussed and preferential flow paths, sampling under big trees, errors in modelling evapotranspiration and incorrect weighing between subareas are concluded to be most important.

Claus Beier

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Effects of large-scale Amazon forest degradation on climate and air quality through fluxes of carbon dioxide, water, energy, mineral dust and isoprene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...on climate and air quality through fluxes of carbon dioxide, water, energy, mineral dust and...The climate and air quality in Amazonia depend...on climate and air quality through fluxes of carbon dioxide, water, energy, mineral dust and...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water air soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The potential for solubilizing agents to enhance the remediation of hydrophobic organic solutes in soil-water suspensions. [Quarterly report  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the feasibility for use of surfactant solubilizing agents to enhance the solubility and the rate of microbial degradation of hydrophobic organic solutes in soil-water suspensions. Hydrophobic organic contaminants are strongly sorbed to soil or sediment material, and as a consequence the rate of microbial degradation may depend greatly on the desorption of the sorbed-phase contaminant and the accessibility of the contaminant to soil microorganisms. Chemical solubilizing agents may enhance the rate of hydrophobic organic solute degradation by increasing the rate of solute desorption from soil and the extent of solute partitioning to the aqueous phase. The presentation will review on-going research on: surfactant solubilization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds in clean water, and in soil-water suspensions; and experiments to assess if the addition of surfactant to soil-water suspension results in faster rate of mineralization of PAH compounds in soil.

Laha, S.; Liu, Z.; Edwards, D.; Luthy, R.G.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

The potential for solubilizing agents to enhance the remediation of hydrophobic organic solutes in soil-water suspensions  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the feasibility for use of surfactant solubilizing agents to enhance the solubility and the rate of microbial degradation of hydrophobic organic solutes in soil-water suspensions. Hydrophobic organic contaminants are strongly sorbed to soil or sediment material, and as a consequence the rate of microbial degradation may depend greatly on the desorption of the sorbed-phase contaminant and the accessibility of the contaminant to soil microorganisms. Chemical solubilizing agents may enhance the rate of hydrophobic organic solute degradation by increasing the rate of solute desorption from soil and the extent of solute partitioning to the aqueous phase. The presentation will review on-going research on: surfactant solubilization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds in clean water, and in soil-water suspensions; and experiments to assess if the addition of surfactant to soil-water suspension results in faster rate of mineralization of PAH compounds in soil.

Laha, S.; Liu, Z.; Edwards, D.; Luthy, R.G.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

A2809 IX: 50 years in Soil, Water, & Nutrient  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

YP soils in the following counties will be Medium YP in SnapPlus · Ashland · Bayfield · Burnett · Douglas · Florence · Forest · Iron · Langlade · Lincoln · Marinette · Oneida · Price · Sawyer · Vilas

Balser, Teri C.

124

Soil Water Retention and Relative Permeability for Full Range of Saturation  

SciTech Connect

Common conceptual models for unsaturated flow often rely on the oversimplified representation of medium pores as a bundle of cylindrical capillaries and assume that the matric potential is attributed to capillary forces only. The adsorptive surface forces are ignored. It is often assumed that aqueous flow is negligible when a soil is near or at the residual water content. These models are successful at high and medium water contents but often give poor results at low water contents. These models do not apply to conditions at which water content is less than the residual water content. We extend the lower bound of existing water-retention functions and conductivity models from residual water content to the oven-dry condition (i.e., zero water content) by defining a state-dependent, residual-water content for a soil drier than a critical value. Furthermore, a hydraulic conductivity model for smooth uniform spheres was modified by introducing a correction factor to describe the film flow-induced hydraulic conductivity for natural porous media. The total unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is the sum of those due to capillary and film flow. The extended retention and conductivity models were verified with six datasets from the literature. Results show that, when the soil is at high and intermediate water content, there is no difference between the un-extended and the extended models; when the soil is at low water content, the un-extended models overestimate the water content but under-estimate the conductivity while the extended models match the retention and conductivity measurements well.

Zhang, Z. F.

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

125

Special challenges in design and construction of concrete structures in shallow water and soft soil  

SciTech Connect

The paper summarizes briefly the trends in offshore concrete structures in the North Sea and reviews the main decisive design requirements. General design process and foundation design with emphasis on soft soil conditions are described and discussed. Further the paper presents 3 gravity based concrete platforms for soft soil in 145 m, 75 m and 20 m water depths, respectively. Particulars on the construction site and work, and main items on project execution model are discussed.

Loset, O. [Kvaerner Concrete Construction, Hovik (Norway); Schroder, K. [Norwegian Geotechnical Inst., Oslo (Norway)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

126

Electrochemistry and Water Pollution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article reviews both the pollution by the electrochemical industry and the use of electrochemistry to clean water, air and soils. Main pollutants include Pd, Cd, Ni, Hg and other metals, SO2, CO2 and cyanide...

Subramanyan Vasudevan; Mehmet A. Oturan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

AIR-FLOW STRUCTURE IN THE VERY CLOSE VICINITY OF WIND GENERATED WATER-WAVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to : , with the air-density, u and w the horizontal and vertical components of the wind speed, u* the friction and the viscous drag at the sea sur- face, we build two new microphysical devices: 1) the wind-speed vertical of the vertical profile of the normalized phase-averaged wind-speed in the air-viscous layer (1mm above water

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

128

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Improvement to Air2Air® Technology to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novel Adsorbent-Reactants for Treatment of Ash and Scrubber Pond Effluents - Novel Adsorbent-Reactants for Treatment of Ash and Scrubber Pond Effluents - Texas A&M University The overall goal of this project will be to evaluate the ability of novel adsorbent/reactants to remove arsenic, selenium and mercury from ash and scrubber pond effluents while producing stable residuals for ultimate disposal. The adsorbent/reactants to be evaluated include micro- and nano-sized iron sulfides (FeS) and disulfides (FeS2). These compounds have the ability to remove arsenic, selenium and mercury from solution as well as to react with them to produce solid phases that are stable when disposed in landfills. Stability after disposal is important so that removal of these compounds from wastewaters will not result in contamination of soils and groundwaters. Methods for reliably and economically producing these materials will be developed.

129

Transmission of acoustic?gravity waves through air?water interface.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It was demonstrated recently that air?water interface which is usually an almost perfect reflector of acoustic waves becomes anomalously transparent and the power flux in the wave transmitted into air increases dramatically when a compact sound source in water approaches the interface within a fraction of wavelength [O. A. Godin Phys. Rev. Lett. 97 164301 (2006)]. Powerful underwater explosions and certain natural sources such as underwater landslides generate very low?frequency waves in water and air for which both fluid buoyancy and compressibility simultaneously serve as restoring forces. In this paper analysis of sound transmission through air?water interface is extended to acoustic?gravity waves (AGWs). It is found that as for sound the interface becomes anomalously transparent for sufficiently shallow compact sources of AGWs. Depending on the source type the increase in wave power flux into air due to diffraction effects can reach several orders of magnitude. Physical mechanisms responsible for the anomalous transparency are discussed. Excitation of an interfacewave by an underwater source is shown to be an important channel of AGW transmission into atmosphere which has no counterpart in the case of sound.

Iosif M. Fuks; Oleg A. Godin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

The effect of water application rate on the formation of a soil crust  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE EFFECT OF WATER APPLICATION RATE ON THE FOR11ATION OF A SOIL CRUST A Thesis by FAUSTO DANIEL BOGRAN CARCA1'10 Subni tted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillnent of the requlrenents for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1985 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering THE EFFECT OF WATER APPLICATION RATE ON THE FORMATION OF A SOIl. CRUST A Thesi s by FAUSTO DANIEL BOGRAN CARCAMO Approved as to style and content by: ars a . McFar an (Chairman...

Bogran Carcamo, Fausto Daniel

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Indicators for Soil and Water Conservation on Rangelands M.G. "SHERM" KARL, D.A. PYKE, P.T. TUELLER, J.D. STEDNICK, S.J. BORCHARD, AND W.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Specialist, National Wildlife Refuge System, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, U.S. Department of the Interior by the Soil and Water Resources Criterion Group. Soil erosion from water and wind, soil organic matter, soil

Wyoming, University of

132

The Full Water Disposal Ways and Study on Central Air-conditioning Circulation Cooling Water System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with automatic inspection, control the condense times and installing toroidal swirl type filtering water purifier. We have solved the water quality fundamentally of the circulation cooling water. This way will make the chem..with medicine more reliable...

Zhang, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

UUnlocking secrets of the vadose zone: Researchers say this layer of soil holds keys to tracking water’s every move  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Story by Leslie Lee 6 tx H2O Fall 2012 Unlocking secrets of the vadose zone Researchers say this layer of soil holds keys to tracking water?s every move Fall 2012 tx H2O 7 ] Sayena Farid-Marandi collects ground- based soil moisture data...

Lee, Leslie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

STATE OF CALIFORNIA AIR, WATER SIDE SYSTEM, SERVICE HOT WATER & POOL REQUIREMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Cool 144(d) Economizer 144(e) Heat and Cool Air Supply Reset 144(f) Electric Resistance Heating1 144(g) Heat Rejection System §144 (h) Air Cooled Chiller Limitation §144 (i) Duct Leakage Sealing. If Yes, a MECH-4-A must be submitted 144(k) 1. Total installed capacity (MBtu/hr) of all electric heat

135

Heavy Metal Contamination In Soil Under The Application Of Polluted Sewage Water Across Vrishabhavathi River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main aim in this study is to assess the level of heavy metals concentration in soil profile and their mobility in the presence of pH and organic carbon,where polluted water is used in agriculture. The samples of soil collected at different sites across Vrishabhavathi river valley have been analyzed for heavy metals, viz. Pb, Zn, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Fe and Mn using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. These values assessed with respect to reference soil taken from unpolluted soil profile. The heavy metals studied at all sampling sites compared with Indian Standards and all heavy metals are below permissible limits. The concentration of all the metals is high compared to the soil sample taken from unpolluted site shows the build up of heavy metal concentration using polluted water in irrigation. The % of organic carbon varies from 1.9 to 2.9 % in top layer and 1 to 1.6 % in the subsequent layer. The pH value is higher on top layer soil and decreases in subsequent layer.

Jayadev E. T. Puttaih

136

Soil and Water Assessment Tool Theoretical Documentation Version 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the runoff volume and a partitioning factor. Sediment transport of P is simulated with a loading function as described in organic N transport. INTRODUCTION 19 Figure 0.7: Partitioning of Phosphorus in SWAT 0.2.1.6 PESTICIDES Although SWAT...:1.9 NITRATE IN THE SHALLOW AQUIFER 199 3:1.10 NOMENCLATURE 201 3:1.11 REFERENCES 203 CHAPTER 3:2 EQUATIONS: PHOSPHORUS 206 3:2.1 PHOSPHORUS CYCLE 207 INITIALIZATION OF SOIL PHOSPHORUS LEVELS 208 3:2.2 MINERALIZATION...

Neitsch, S.L.; Arnold, J.G.; Kiniry, J.R.; Williams, J.R.

137

Phosphorus nutrition of rice in relation to flooding and temporary loss of soil-water saturation in two lowland soils of Cambodia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the rainfed lowlands, temporary loss of soil-water saturation during crop growth is a common factor limiting rice (Oryza sativa L.) yield but its effects on phosphorus (P) availability are poorly understood...

Vang Seng; R.W. Bell; I.R. Willett; 1>H.J. Nesbitt

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Abstract: Air, Thermal and Water Management for PEM Fuel Cell Systems  

SciTech Connect

PEM fuel cells are excellent candidates for transportation applications due to their high efficiencies. PEM fuel cell Balance of Plant (BOP) components, such as air, thermal, and water management sub-systems, can have a significant effect on the overall system performance, but have traditionally not been addressed in research and development efforts. Recognizing this, the U.S. Department of Energy and Honeywell International Inc. are funding an effort that emphasizes the integration and optimization of air, thermal and water management sub-systems. This effort is one of the major elements to assist the fuel cell system developers and original equipment manufacturers to achieve the goal of an affordable and efficient power system for transportation applications. Past work consisted of: (1) Analysis, design, and fabrication of a motor driven turbocompressor. (2) A systematic trade study to select the most promising water and thermal management systems from five different concepts (absorbent wheel humidifier, gas to gas membrane humidifier, porous metal foam humidifier, cathode recycle compressor, and water injection pump.) This presentation will discuss progress made in the research and development of air, water and thermal management sub-systems for PEM fuel cell systems in transportation applications. More specifically, the presentation will discuss: (1) Progress of the motor driven turbocompressor design and testing; (2) Progress of the humidification component selection and testing; and (3) Progress of the thermal management component preliminary design. The programs consist of: (1) The analysis, design, fabrication and testing of a compact motor driven turbocompressor operating on foil air bearings to provide contamination free compressed air to the fuel cell stack while recovering energy from the exhaust streams to improve system efficiency. (2) The analysis, design, fabrication and testing of selected water and thermal management systems and components to improve system efficiency and reduce packaging size.

Mark K. Gee

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Forage, soil and water quality responses to animal waste application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

result in a net surplus of P and potential nutrient escape to surface waters (Dudzinsky et al. , 1983). Dairy effluent poses a lesser risk of phosphorus loading than does poultry litter since the concentration of nutrients in dairy effluent averages...

Johnson, Andrew Floyd

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Remedial Costs for MTBE in Soil and Ground Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The contamination of MTBE in ground water has introduced concerns about the increased cost of remediating MTBE/BTEX releases compared to remediating sites with BTEX only contamination. In an attempt to evaluat...

Barbara H. Wilson; John T. Wilson Ph.D.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water air soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The mobility of water soluble organic compounds in soils from the land application of petroleum waste sludge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE MOBILITY OF WATER SOLUBLE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN SOILS FROM THE LAND APPLICATION OF PETROLEUM WASTE SLUDGE A Thesis by GORDON BARCUS EVANS, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&l1 University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979 Major Subject: Soil Science THE MOBILITY OF WATER SOLUBLE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN SOILS FROM THE LAND APPLICATION OF PETROLEUM WASTE SLUDGE A Thesis by GORDON BARCUS EVANS, JR. Approved...

Evans, Gordon Barcus

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Variation of stomatal resistance with leaf age in Quercus petraea: effect on the soil-water balance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on stomatal resistance and on the morphology of the leaf epidermis. Materials and Methods Study site: 2 standsVariation of stomatal resistance with leaf age in Quercus petraea: effect on the soil-water balance); soil-water balance measurements: rain gauges, stemflow collars, neutron probe; stomatal resistance

Boyer, Edmond

143

Analysis of soil and water at the Four Mile Creek seepline near the F- and H-Areas of SRS  

SciTech Connect

Several soil and water samples were collected along the Four Mile Creek (FMC) seepline at the F and H Areas of the Savannah River Site. The samples were analyzed for concentrations of metals, radionuclides, and inorganic constituents. The results of the analyses are summarized for the soil and water samples.

Haselow, J.S.

2000-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

144

E-Print Network 3.0 - air-lift water-pumping wind-turbines Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

water-pumping wind-turbines Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air-lift water-pumping wind-turbines Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Review...

145

Water soluble graphene as electrolyte additive in magnesium-air battery system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Magnesium-air (Mg-air) batteries are an important energy source used to power electronic equipment and automobiles. Metal-air batteries give more energy density due to surplus air involved in reduction reaction at air cathode. In this study, the scope of improvements in the efficiency of Metal-air batteries is investigated through addition of water soluble graphene (WSG) as inhibitor in NaCl electrolyte. The discharge performance, corrosion behaviour and electrochemical impedance are studied for (i) the conventional Mg-air battery using 3.5% NaCl and (ii) Mg-air battery with WSG-based 3.5% NaCl electrolyte. X-ray diffraction analysis for WSG is carried out and it shows the crystalline nature of WSG by an intense sharp peak at 26.3°. Scanning electron microscope study is also performed and shows the flake-like structure of WSG denoted by thin layers of carbon. The immersion of WSG in 3.5% NaCl electrolyte increased the current density from 13.24 to 19.33 mA cm?2. Meanwhile, the WSG-based Mg-air battery was found to hold specific discharge capacity of 1030.71 mAh g?1, which was higher than that obtained in 3.5% NaCl electrolyte (i.e., 822.85 mAh g?1). The WSG-based Mg-air battery shows good self-discharge capacity and higher electrochemical activity during discharge.

K. Saminathan; M. Mayilvel Dinesh; M. Selvam; S.R. Srither; V. Rajendran; Karan V.I.S. Kaler

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

An air-to-air heat pump (COP-3.11 at 470 F (8.30C)) run alternately with an electric-resistance water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- ter than that of the system using electric resistance water heating. An analytical tinclel predicts of a high-efficiency heat pump'/electric-resistance .waterheater (IIP/IZR) system. TEST FACILITIES#12;/ ABSTRACT An air-to-air heat pump (COP-3.11 at 470 F (8.30C)) run alternately with an electric

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

147

Self-Assembly of CdTe Tetrapods into Network Monolayers at the Air/Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Self-Assembly of CdTe Tetrapods into Network Monolayers at the Air/Water Interface Matthew D present a versatile method for cadmium telluride (CdTe) tetrapod syn- thesis by utilizing multiple Te the tetrapod shape. CdTe tetra- pods are a promising inorganic semicon- ductor for photovoltaic cells due

Lin, Zhiqun

148

Boiler Upgrades and Decentralizing Steam Systems Save Water and Energy at Naval Air Station Oceana  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Case study details Naval Air Station Oceana findings that its heating needs could be met more efficiently by replacing its central plant with a combination of distributed boilers and ground source heat pumps. The results saved more than 1 million MBtu in energy and 19,574 Kgal of water annually.

149

Feasibility Study of Developing a Virtual Chilled Water Flow Meter at Air Handling Unit Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, a virtual Air handling unit (AHU) level water flow meter is explored by using a control valve as a measurement device. The flow through the valve is indirectly calculated using differential pressure over both the valve and its...

Song, L.; Swamy, A.; Shim, G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Numerical simulation of air/water multiphase flows for ceramic sanitary ware design by multiple GPUs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and kitchen fittings. Facing the increasing demands for saving energy and water, TOTO has always targeted schemes and port the code to the GPU platforms to accelerate the large scale computations for real** Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of energy sciences Numerical simulation of air

Furui, Sadaoki

151

Air-Assisted Liquid Liquid–Microextraction for the Analysis of Fungicides from Environmental Water and Juice Samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......2014 research-article Article Air-Assisted Liquid Liquid-Microextraction...work, a rapid method based on air-assisted liquid liquid microextraction...the continuous injection of air by a 20-mL glass syringe...resulting in the possible pollution of water, fruits and vegetables......

Shiju Wu; Tingting Jin; Jing Cheng; Hongbin Zhou; Min Cheng

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Barrier erosion control test plan: Gravel mulch, vegetation, and soil water interactions  

SciTech Connect

Soil erosion could reduce the water storage capacity of barriers that have been proposed for the disposal of near-surface waste at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Gravel mixed into the top soil surface may create a self-healing veneer that greatly retards soil loss. However, gravel admixtures may also enhance infiltration of rainwater, suppress plant growth and water extraction, and lead to the leaching of underlying waste. This report describes plans for two experiments that were designed to test hypotheses concerning the interactive effects of surface gravel admixtures, revegetation, and enhanced precipitation on soil water balance and plant abundance. The first experiment is a factorial field plot set up on the site selected as a soil borrow area for the eventual construction of barriers. The treatments, arranged in a a split-split-plot design structure, include two densities of gravel admix, a mixture of native and introduced grasses, and irrigation to simulate a wetter climate. Changes in soil water storage and plant cover are monitored with neutron moisture probes and point intercept sampling, respectively. The second experiment consists of an array of 80 lysimeters containing several different barrier prototypes. Surface treatments are similar to the field-plot experiment. Drainage is collected from a valve at the base of each lysimeter tube, and evapotranspiration is estimated by subtraction. The lysimeters are also designed to be coupled to a whole-plant gas exchange system that will be used to conduct controlled experiments on evapotranspiration for modeling purposes. 56 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

Waugh, W.J.; Link, S.O. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Soil and Water Science Department University of Florida RECYLCING OF GUYPSUM DRYWALL IN FLORIDA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil and Water Science Department University of Florida RECYLCING OF GUYPSUM DRYWALL IN FLORIDA of landfills in Florida, it is more cost- effective to reuse them. However, there are some concerns the recycling of three important solid wastes in Florida, i.e. #1 cement kiln dust (CKD) and #16 gypsum drywalls

Ma, Lena

154

Civil Engineering: Soil and Water Resource Engineering Concentration Flowchart Colorado State University Effective Spring 2014  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Civil Engineering: Soil and Water Resource Engineering Concentration Flowchart Colorado State University Effective Spring 2014 Prerequisites and (co-requisites) are shown above the class. Technical) Spring CIVE 103 - 3 S Eng Graphics & Comp MATH 161 - 4 Calculus II PH 142 - 5 Physics II Science Tech

155

Navier-Stokes simulations of steep breaking water waves with a coupled air-water interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wave breaking on the ocean surface significantly facilitates the transfer of mass, momentum, heat and energy across the air-sea interface. In the context of the near field flow about a surface ship, the breaking bow wave ...

Hendrickson, Kelli L

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Does hydrocarbon contamination induce water repellency and changes in hydraulic properties in inherently wettable tropical sandy soils?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Hydrophobicity influences soil hydrological and ecological functions. Compared to naturally-occurring and fire-induced hydrophobicity, limited information is available on the impacts of hydrocarbon contamination on water repellency and hydraulic properties. Water repellency and hydraulic properties were measured on laboratory simulated, and field contaminated soils, 1 and 5 years after an accidental petroleum hydrocarbon spill. The objectives were; (1) to compare the water droplet penetration test (WDPT) to the molarity of ethanol droplet (MED) test, (2) to investigate the effect of hydrocarbon contamination on water repellency and hydraulic properties, and (3) to evaluate the performance of pedotransfer functions for hydraulic properties. The WDPT and MED tests gave qualitatively similar water repellency results as evidenced by a significant positive correlation (p hydrocarbon contamination induced soil water repellency. Saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) increased linearly with level of contamination (p water attributed to a reduction of the dielectric constant, and hence water–soil matrix interactions. No water repellency was observed in contaminated field soils (WDPT hydrocarbon contamination was evident in other soil properties particularly electrical conductivity. This indicates that natural soils were inherently wettable and that hydrocarbon-induced hydrophobicity could be transient. This non-persistence was attributed to high decomposition rates stimulated by tropical conditions and nutrients added to promote revegetation. Predictions of pedotransfer functions were comparable to measured hydraulic data (p  0.8), confirming their general validity for water and solute transport modeling even on contaminated soils. The study confirmed the hypothesis that hydrocarbon contamination induces water repellency and reduces soil moisture retention at low suction (water repellency and hydraulic properties under field conditions.

Ammishaddai Takawira; Willis Gwenzi; Phillip Nyamugafata

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Treatability test of a stacked-tray air stripper for VOC in water  

SciTech Connect

A common strategy for hydraulic containment and mass removal at VOC contaminated sites is `pump and treat (P&T)`. In P&T operations, contaminated ground water is pumped from wells, treated above ground, and discharged. Many P&T remediation systems at VOC sites rely on air stripping technology because VOCs are easily transferred to the vapor phase. In stacked-tray air strippers, contaminated water is aerated while it flows down through a series of trays. System operations at LLNL are strictly regulated by the California and federal Environmental Protection Agencies (Cal/EPA and EPA), the Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD), the California Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB) and the Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC). These agencies set discharge limits, require performance monitoring, and assess penalties for non-compliance. National laboratories are also subject to scrutiny by the public and other government agencies. This extensive oversight makes it necessary to accurately predict field treatment performance at new extraction locations to ensure compliance with all requirements prior to facility activation. This paper presents treatability test results for a stacked- tray air stripper conducted at LLNL and compares them to the vendor`s modeling software results.

Pico, T., LLNL

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Soil and water dynamics in a microcatchment system for range improvement in West Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

desert environments since it can be applied in granular form and allowed to melt to seal pores in the soil surface. Frasier et al. (1979), using a sprinkler system to create runoff on a four year old paraffin coated catchment area, found a runoff...SOIL AND WATER DYNAMICS IN A MICROCATCHMENT SYSTEM FOR RANGE IMPROVEMENT IN WEST TEXAS A Thesis by STEVEN JAY MARANZ Submitted to the office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

Maranz, Steven Jay

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Ozonized water generator based on coaxial dielectric-barrier-discharge in air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A coaxial dielectric-barrier-discharge (DBD) as an ozonized water reactor system has been developed and described. It operates in the air at an atmospheric pressure. In the reactor one of the dielectric layers is flowing water. Ozone and ozonized water are generated in the same volume of the discharge. The ozone production and its dissolution in the water simultaneously occur leading to increases of the reactor efficiency. Filamentary 50 Hz DBD has been performed using up to 20 kV applied voltage. The obtained ozone concentrations correspond to the values typically suggested for the treatment of potable and wastewater. The efficiency can be further increased by addition of small amount of the oxygen in the DBD device. The periodical time dependence of the dissolved ozone concentration in Danube water is found and discussed.

Milorad M. Kuraica; Bratislav M. Obradovi?; Dragan Manojlovi?; Daliborka R. Ostoji?; Jagoš Puri?

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Application of a solar desiccant/collector system for water recovery from atmospheric air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An integrated desiccant/solar collector system for production of fresh water from atmospheric air is described. The solar driven system provided about 1.5 l of fresh water per square meter per day. The system involves the absorption of water vapor from ambient air during the night and simultaneous desiccant regeneration and water vapor condensation during the day. To enhance the mass transfer surface, a thick corrugated layer of cloth was used as a bed to carry the liquid absorbent. In the nocturnal phase of operation, air is allowed to penetrate the desiccant bed. The airflow is driven by fans supported on one side of the desiccant/solar collector unit. In this study, the effects of different parameters on the absorption and regeneration processes are discussed, and operational conditions for the proposed equipment evaluated. Radiation intensity, ambient temperature, bed temperature and temperature of the glass surface were recorded. Also, the productivity of the system during the day and under the given operation conditions was plotted. A mathematical model was prepared and its output compared with the analyzed experimental data.

H.E Gad; A.M Hamed; I.I El-Sharkawy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water air soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation process for in situ destruction of chlorinated hydrocarbon and fuel hydrocarbon contaminants in water and soil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In situ hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation process is useful for in situ degradation of hydrocarbon water and soil contaminants. Fuel hydrocarbons, chlorinated hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, petroleum distillates and other organic contaminants present in the soil and water are degraded by the process involving hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation into non-toxic products of the degradation. The process uses heat which is distributed through soils and water, optionally combined with oxygen and/or hydrocarbon degradation catalysts, and is particularly useful for remediation of solvent, fuel or other industrially contaminated sites.

Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA); Copenhaver, Sally C. (Livermore, CA); Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Large-scale recrystallization of the S-layer of Bacillus coagulans E38-66 at the air/water interface and on lipid films.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...into two-dimensional arrays either...air/water interface and on lipid...recrystallization at the interface could be monitored by measuring the increase...transfer of two-dimensional crystals from the air/ water interface to specimen...

D Pum; M Weinhandl; C Hödl; U B Sleytr

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Bibliography of work on the photocatalytic removal of hazardous compounds from water and air  

SciTech Connect

This is a bibliography of information in the open literature on work that has been done to date on the photocatalytic oxidation of compounds, principally organic compounds. The goal of the listing is removing hazardous oompounds from water or air. It contains lists of substances and literature citations. The bibliography includes information obtained through the middle of 1993 and some selected references for the balance of that year.

Blake, D.M.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Leaf water potential in Pinus taeda L. as related to fluctuating soil water and atmospheric conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chamber method of estimating leaf water potential (Scholander et al. 1965) shows promise as a field t'. echnique for evaluating plant water stress. As a portion of a larger project (A Field Investigation of Water Stress and Growth of Pfnus tneda L... solutions of known osmotic ccncentrstions. Water exchange between the tissue and solution results in a change of the solu- tion's specific gravity. This change is detected by adding a drop of dye colored sample of the original solution...

Ellison, Stanley Lee

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Soil Water Balance and Recharge Monitoring at the Hanford Site - FY09 Status Report  

SciTech Connect

Recharge provides the primary driving force for transporting contaminants from the vadose zone to underlying aquifer systems. Quantification of recharge rates is important for assessing contaminant transport and fate and for evaluating remediation alternatives. This report describes the status of soil water balance and recharge monitoring performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at the Hanford Site for Fiscal Year 2009. Previously reported data for Fiscal Years 2004 - 2008 are updated with data collected in Fiscal Year 2009 and summarized.

Rockhold, Mark L.; Saunders, Danielle L.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Waichler, Scott R.; Clayton, Ray E.

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

166

ENVIR 202: EARTH, AIR, WATER PERSPECTIVES ON EXPERIMENTAL PROJECTS for Water (W)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the basic questions from the first hand-out (25 Feb 2003..on the class web-page), please pose some of your-water' and `deep-water' waves. This shallow and deep is measured in comparison to the wavelength. The wavespeed that the fastest gravity waves in the deep ocean can move at (9.8 x 4000) or 200 m/sec (450 m.p.h.). When

167

IEA Heat Pump Conference 2011, 16 -19 May 2011, Tokyo, Japan DYNAMIC MODELING OF AN AIR SOURCE HEAT PUMP WATER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Compared to those water heaters, heat pump water heating systems can supply much more heat just with the same amount of electric input used for electric water heaters. The ASHPWH absorbs heat from the ambient- 1 - 10th IEA Heat Pump Conference 2011, 16 - 19 May 2011, Tokyo, Japan DYNAMIC MODELING OF AN AIR

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

168

Oxygen isotope fractionation effects in soil water via interaction with cations (Mg, Ca, K, Na) adsorbed to phyllosilicate clay minerals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) adsorbed to phyllosilicate clay minerals Erik Oerter a, , Kari Finstad a , Justin Schaefer b , Gregory R approaches to the measurement of the d18 O value of soil water. The adsorbed cation isotope effect may bear

Goldsmith, Greg

169

Seasonal dynamics of water and air chemistry in an indoor chlorinated swimming pool  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Although swimming is known to be beneficial in terms of cardiovascular health, as well as for some forms of rehabilitation, swimming is also known to present risks to human health, largely in the form of exposure to microbial pathogens and disinfection byproducts (DBPs). Relatively little information is available in the literature to characterize the seasonal dynamics of air and water chemistry in indoor chlorinated swimming pools. To address this issue, water samples were collected five days per week from an indoor chlorinated swimming pool facility at a high school during the academic year and once per week during summer over a fourteen-month period. The samples were analyzed for free and combined chlorine, urea, volatile DBPs, pH, temperature and total alkalinity. Membrane Introduction Mass Spectrometry (MIMS) was used to identify and measure the concentrations of eleven aqueous-phase volatile DBPs. Variability in the concentrations of these \\{DBPs\\} was observed. Factors that influenced variability included bather loading and mixing by swimmers. These compounds have the ability to adversely affect water and air quality and human health. A large fraction of the existing literature regarding swimming pool air quality has focused on trichloramine (NCl3). For this work, gas-phase \\{NCl3\\} was analyzed by an air sparging-DPD/KI method. The results showed that gas-phase \\{NCl3\\} concentration is influenced by bather loading and liquid-phase \\{NCl3\\} concentration. Urea is the dominant organic-N compound in human urine and sweat, and is known to be an important precursor for producing \\{NCl3\\} in swimming pools. Results of daily measurements of urea indicated a link between bather load and urea concentration in the pool.

Mehrnaz Zare Afifi; Ernest R. Blatchley III

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Fine Particles in Soils  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fine Particles in Soils Fine Particles in Soils Nature Bulletin No. 582 November 28, 1959 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist FINE PARTICLES IN SOILS If a farmer, while plowing, is visited in the field by another farmer, invariably the visitor will pick up a handful of turned over earth and knead it with his fingers while they talk. The "feel" of it tells him a lot about the texture and structure of that soil. He knows that both are important factors in the growth of plants and determine the crops that may be obtained from the land. Soil is a combination of three different things About half of it is solid matter; the other half consists of air and water The solid portion is composed of organic and inorganic materials.

171

Uranium-238 and thorium-232 series concentrations in soil, radon-222 indoor and drinking water concentrations and dose assessment in the city of Aldama, Chihuahua, Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-resolution gamma spectrometry was used to determine the concentration of 40K, 238U and 232Th series in soil samples taken from areas surrounding the city of Aldama, in Chihuahua. Results of indoor air short-time sampling, with diffusion barrier charcoal detectors, revealed relatively high indoor radon levels, ranging from 29 to 422 Bq/m3; the radon concentrations detected exceeded 148 Bq/m3 in 76% of the homes tested. Additionally, liquid scintillation counting showed concentrations of radon in drinking water ranging from 4.3 to 42 kBq/m3. The high activity of 238U in soil found in some places may be a result of the uranium milling process performed 20 years ago in the area. High radon concentrations indoor and in water may be explained by assuming the presence of uranium-bearing rocks underneath of the city, similar to a felsic dike located near Aldama. The estimated annual effective dose of gamma radiation from the soil and radon inhalation was 3.83 mSv.

L. Colmenero Sujo; M.E. Montero Cabrera; L. Villalba; M. Rentería Villalobos; E. Torres Moye; M. García León; R. García-Tenorio; F. Mireles García; E.F. Herrera Peraza; D. Sánchez Aroche

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Summary of research and development effort on air and water cooling of gas turbine blades  

SciTech Connect

The review on air- and water-cooled gas turbines from the 1904 Lemale-Armengaud water-cooled gas turbine, the 1948 to 1952 NACA work, and the program at GE indicates that the potential of air cooling has been largely exploited in reaching temperatures of 1100/sup 0/C (approx. 2000/sup 0/F) in utility service and that further increases in turbine inlet temperature may be obtained with water cooling. The local heat flux in the first-stage turbine rotor with water cooling is very high, yielding high-temperature gradients and severe thermal stresses. Analyses and tests indicate that by employing a blade with an outer cladding of an approx. 1-mm-thick oxidation-resistant high-nickel alloy, a sublayer of a high-thermal-conductivity, high-strength, copper alloy containing closely spaced cooling passages approx. 2 mm in ID to minimize thermal gradients, and a central high-strength alloy structural spar, it appears possible to operate a water-cooled gas turbine with an inlet gas temperature of 1370/sup 0/C. The cooling-water passages must be lined with an iron-chrome-nickel alloy must be bent 90/sup 0/ to extend in a neatly spaced array through the platform at the base of the blade. The complex geometry of the blade design presents truly formidable fabrication problems. The water flow rate to each of many thousands of coolant passages must be metered and held to within rather close limits because the heat flux is so high that a local flow interruption of only a few seconds would lead to a serious failure.Heat losses to the cooling water will run approx. 10% of the heat from the fuel. By recoverying this waste heat for feedwater heating in a command cycle, these heat losses will give a degradation in the power plant output of approx. 5% relative to what might be obtained if no cooling were required. However, the associated power loss is less than half that to be expected with an elegant air cooling system.

Fraas, A.P.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Particle-Size Dependent Sorption and Desorption of Pesticides within a Water?Soil?Nonionic Surfactant System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although nonionic surfactants have been considered in surfactant-aided soil washing systems, there is little information on the particle-size dependence of these processes, and this may have significant implications for the design of these systems. ... The ability of surfactants to enhance the water solubility of HOCs provides a potential means of remediating pesticide-contaminated soils and sediments by surfactant-aided soil washing (2, 3). ... Cationic surfactants, due to their positive charge, tend to significantly sorb onto the soil particles via cation exchange (6, 7), resulting in significant surfactant loss. ...

Peng Wang; Arturo A. Keller

2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

174

Development of minimum efficiency standards for large capacity air conditioners, and commercial water heaters, refrigerators, and freezers. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission has promulgated appliance energy efficiency standards and energy conservation standards for new construction with the objective of reducing energy consumption in the State of California. The following appliance categories are specifically addressed: large capacity air conditioners; commercial water heaters; and commercial refrigerators and freezers. The tasks that have been performed include: an energy use pattern study for the subject equipment; an examination of the size distribution of commercial air conditioning equipment; an examination of the different types of commercial air conditioning systems; an evaluation of the effectiveness of economizers in reducing commercial air conditioning system energy consumption in California; an examination of the effects of oversizing commercial air conditioners; a detailed study of supermarket refrigeration and air conditioning equipment; an evaluation of the economic feasibility of utilizing air conditioner waste heat to heat water; an assessment of the applicability of existing test procedures for small water heaters to large water heaters; and a brief investigation of the marketing and distribution systems for air conditioning and refrigeration equipment. Results of the efforts are described.

Merrill, P.S.; Rettberg, R.J.; Erickson, R.C.; Toor, J.S.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Effect of pH, phosphorus, and water-extractable zinc of soil on plant growth and zinc absorption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EFFECT OF pH~ PHOSPHORilS, AND WATER-EXTRACTABLE ZINC OF SOIL ON PLANT GROWTH AND ZINC ABSORPT1ON A Thesis Najafali Karimian Submitted to the Graduate College cf Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1970 Major Sub ject: Soil Chemistry EFFECT OF pH, PHOSPHORUS, AND WATER-EXTRACTABLE ZINC OF SOIL ON PLANT GROWTH AND ZINC ABSORPTION A Thesis by NajafaIi Karimian Approved as to sty1e and content by: Chairman Committee...

Karimian, Najafali

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

176

Soil radioactivity levels and radiological risk assessment in the highlands of Hunza, Pakistan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......will require some additional remediation of the soil. Similar to external...dose rate in air at 1 m above ground level. It is calculated as...gamma-dose at 1 m height above the ground level due to the presence of...gamma-ray spectrometry. Water Air Soil Pollut. (2010......

Manzoor Ali; Sajid Iqbal; Mohammad Wasim; Mohammad Arif; Farhan Saif

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

A Computational Analysis of Smart Timing Decisions for Heating Based on an Air-to-Water Heat pump SMARTER EUROPE E-world energy & water 2014 Proceedings page 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Computational Analysis of Smart Timing Decisions for Heating Based on an Air-to-Water Heat pump Decisions for Heating Based on an Air-to-Water Heat pump Jan Treur VU University Amsterdam, Agent Systems be most efficient to use this energy in these periods. For air to water heat pumps a similar issue occurs

Treur, Jan

178

Advances in the development of energy efficient technologies: Sea Water Air Conditioning (SWAC)  

SciTech Connect

Sea water air conditioning (SWAC) is a cost effective and environmentally friendly alternative to and/or enhancement of air conditioning from mechanical chillers. SWAC pumps cold sea water from the appropriate ocean depths (50 to 3,000 feet depending on the climate and local characteristics) to the shore where it replaces (by direct cooling) or enhances (through use as condenser water) large mechanical chillers found in coastal facilities. SWAC direct cooling uses less than twenty per cent of the electricity of a mechanical chiller and uses no refrigerants whatsoever. Indirect cooling also offers substantial energy savings. Both systems dispense with the need for a cooling tower. Technical advances over the last twenty years in corrosion resistant alloys (titanium or aluminum), bio-fouling deterrence, and deep ocean pipeline deployment allow SWAC installations to use reliable, off-the-shelf technology. SWAC works in a variety of climates (existing installations are in Hawaii and Halifax, Nova Scotia), giving it significant domestic and international potential. Economy-of-scale advantages make it attractive to district cooling schemes.

Coony, J.E. [Boston Pacific Co., Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

A comparison of measured and simulated soil water depletion in the crop root zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(w) aH/ax) - r(x). [1/s] (8) If a single value relationship between h and w is assumed, and the diffusivity D in m /s is represented by K(w). ah/aw, Eq. {8) becomes: 2 aw/at = a/ax (D(w) aw/ax) - ak(w)/ ax - r(x). [I/s] (9) Equation (9... by rL 2 C = T/( ] R(x)D(w)dx) [I/m ] (11) 0 where T is the transpiration rate per unit soil surface area (m water/(m soil, s)) and L is the depth to the bottom of the root zone 2 (m). The e+fective root distribution function is defined as a...

Lascano A., Roberto

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

180

Paraho environmental data. Part I. Process characterization. Par II. Air quality. Part III. Water quality  

SciTech Connect

From 1973 to 1978, Development Engineering, Inc. (DEI), a subsidiary of Paraho Development Corporation, demostrated the Paraho technology for surface oil shale retorting at Anvil Points, Colorado. A considerable amount of environmentally-related research was also conducted. This body of data represents the most comprehensive environmental data base relating to surface retorting that is currently available. In order to make this information available, the DOE Office of Environment has undertaken to compile, assemble, and publish this environmental data. The compilation has been prepared by DEI. This report includes the process characterization, air quality, and water quality categories.

Heistand, R.N.; Atwood, R.A.; Richardson, K.L.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water air soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Modeling Storm Water Runoff and Soil Interflow in a Managed Forest, Upper Coastal Plain of the Southeast US.  

SciTech Connect

The Forest Service-Savannah River is conducting a hectare-scale monitoring and modeling study on forest productivity in a Short Rotation Woody Crop plantation at the Savannah River Site, which is on Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina. Detailed surveys, i.e., topography, soils, vegetation, and dainage network, of small (2-5 ha) plots have been completed in a 2 square-km watershed draining to Fourmile Creek, a tributary of the Savannah River. We wish to experimentally determine the relative importance of interflow on water yield and water quality at this site. Interflow (shallow subsurface lateral flow) can short-circuit rainfall infiltration, preventing deep seepage and resulting in water and chemical residence times in the watershed much shorter than that if deep seepage were the sole component of infiltration. The soil series at the site (Wagram, Dothan, Fuquay, Ogeechee, and Vaucluse) each have a clay-rich B horizon of decimeter-scale thickness at depths of 1-2 m below surface. As interflow is affected by rainfall intensity and duration and soil properties such as porosity, permeability, and antecedent soil moisture, our calculations made using the Green and Ampt equation show that the intensity and duration of a storm event must be greater than about 3 cm per hour and 2 hours, respectively, in order to initiate interflow for the least permeable soils series (Vaucluse). Tabulated values of soil properties were used in these preliminary calculations. Simulations of the largest rainfall events from 1972-2002 data using the Green and Ampt equation provide an interflow: rainfall ratio of 0 for the permeable Wagram soil series (no interflow) compared to 0.46 for the less permeable Vaucluse soil series. These initial predictions will be compared to storm water hydrographs of interflow collected at the outflow point of each plot and refined using more detailed soil property measurements.

Callahan, T.J.; Cook, J.D.; Coleman, Mark D.; Amatya, Devendra M.; Trettin, Carl C.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Groundwater recharge estimates using a soil-water-balance model for the Powder River and Williston structural basins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Groundwater recharge estimates using a soil-water-balance model for the Powder River and Williston for the lower Tertiary and Upper Cretaceous aquifer system in the Powder River and Williston structural basins in the Williston structural basin will require trillions of gallons of water from this aquifer system over the next

Torgersen, Christian

183

Optimized design of a heat exchanger for an air-to-water reversible heat pump working with propane (R290)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimized design of a heat exchanger for an air-to-water reversible heat pump working with propane-to-water reversible heat pump unit was carried out using two different fin-and-tube heat exchanger ``coil'' designs concepts. The performance of the heat pump was evaluated for each coil design at different superheat

Fernández de Córdoba, Pedro

184

On-Line Purge and Trap GC-MS for Monitoring 1,3-Dichloropropene in Agricultural Water and Soil Samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......fumigant 1,3-DCP in water and soil samples by P...3-DCP residues in 10 ground- water samples and in soil samples...dichloropropene isomers in water by HS-SPME and GC-ECD...derived from chemical remediation of cis-1,3-dichloropropene......

Antonia Garrido Frenich; Salvador Cortés Aguado; JoséLuis Martínez Vidal; Francisco Javier Arrebola

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

(Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)  

SciTech Connect

This Removal Action System Design has been prepared as a Phase I Volume for the implementation of the Phase II removal action at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) near Dayton, Ohio. The objective of the removal action is to prevent, to the extent practicable, the migration of ground water contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCS) across the southwest boundary of Area C. The Phase 1, Volume 9 Removal Action System Design compiles the design documents prepared for the Phase II Removal Action. These documents, which are presented in Appendices to Volume 9, include: Process Design, which presents the 30 percent design for the ground water treatment system (GWTS); Design Packages 1 and 2 for Earthwork and Road Construction, and the Discharge Pipeline, respectively; no drawings are included in the appendix; Design Package 3 for installation of the Ground Water Extraction Well(s); Design Package 4 for installation of the Monitoring Well Instrumentation; and Design Package 5 for installation of the Ground Water Treatment System; this Design Package is incorporated by reference because of its size.

Not Available

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Soil Water Content Distributions by Neutron Moderation  

SciTech Connect

Contaminant transport through the vadose zone is a complex process controlled largely by interactions between subsurface lithologic features, water flow, and fluid properties. Understanding the processes controlling transport is an important prerequisite to the development and implementation of effective soil and ground water remediation programs. However, difficulties in directly observing and sampling the subsurface can complicate attempts to better describe subsurface transport processes and is mostly responsible for the large amount of uncertainty associated with vadose zone processes. The reduction of the uncertainty has been identified as a site need at Hanford by the STCG and the National Research Council (2000a) and is a key aspect of the site?s science and technology effort.

Ward, Anderson L.; Caldwell, Todd G.; Gee, Glendon W.

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Environmental impact of APC residues from municipal solid waste incineration: Reuse assessment based on soil and surface water protection criteria  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: > The Dutch Building Material Decree (BMD) was used to APC residues from MSWI. > BMD is a straightforward tool to calculate expectable loads to the environment of common pollutants. > Chloride load to the environment lead to classification of building material not allowed. > At least a pre-treatment (e.g. washing) is required in order to remove soluble salts. > The stabilization with phosphates or silicates eliminate the problem of heavy metals. - Abstract: Waste management and environmental protection are mandatory requirements of modern society. In our study, air pollution control (APC) residues from municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWI) were considered as a mixture of fly ash and fine particulate solids collected in scrubbers and fabric filters. These are hazardous wastes and require treatment before landfill. Although there are a number of treatment options, it is highly recommended to find practical applications rather than just dump them in landfill sites. In general, for using a construction material, beyond technical specifications also soil and surface water criteria may be used to ensure environmental protection. The Dutch Building Materials Decree (BMD) is a valuable tool in this respect and it was used to investigate which properties do not meet the threshold criteria so that APC residues can be further used as secondary building material. To this end, some scenarios were evaluated by considering release of inorganic species from unmoulded and moulded applications. The main conclusion is that the high amount of soluble salts makes the APC residues a building material prohibited in any of the conditions tested. In case of moulding materials, the limits of heavy metals are complied, and their use in Category 1 would be allowed. However, also in this case, the soluble salts lead to the classification of 'building material not allowed'. The treatments with phosphates or silicates are able to solve the problem of heavy metals, but difficulties with the soluble salts are still observed. This analysis suggests that for APC residues to comply with soil and surface water protection criteria to be further used as building material at least a pre-treating for removing soluble salts is absolutely required.

Quina, Margarida J., E-mail: guida@eq.uc.pt [Research Centre on Chemical Processes Engineering and Forest Products, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Coimbra, Rua Silvio Lima, 3030-790 Coimbra (Portugal); Bordado, Joao C.M. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, IBB, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Quinta-Ferreira, Rosa M. [Research Centre on Chemical Processes Engineering and Forest Products, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Coimbra, Rua Silvio Lima, 3030-790 Coimbra (Portugal)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

Polyacrylamide and water quality effects on infiltration in sandy loam soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were evaluated on a Hanford sandy loam soil (coarse-loamy,field tests near Fresno, CA, on Hanford sandy loam soils toA soil sam- ple (Hanford sandy loam) was shaken in 10 mg PAM

Ajwa, Husein A; Trout, T J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

(Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)  

SciTech Connect

In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), initiated an investigation to evaluate a potential Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, the offsite migration of contaminated ground water from WPAFB. WPAFB retained the services of the Environmental Management Operations (EMO) and its principle subcontractor, International Technology Corporation (IT) to complete Phase 1 of the environmental investigation of ground-water contamination at WPAFB. Phase 1 of the investigation involves the short-term evaluation and potential design for a program to remove ground-water contamination that appears to be migrating across the western boundary of Area C, and across the northern boundary of Area B along Springfield Pike. Primarily, Task 4 of Phase 1 focuses on collection of information at the Area C and Springfield Pike boundaries of WPAFB. This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) has been prepared to assist in completion of the Task 4 field investigation and is comprised of the Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) and the Field Sampling Plan (FSP).

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Uncertainty Analysis for a Virtual Flow Meter Using an Air-Handling Unit Chilled Water Valve  

SciTech Connect

A virtual water flow meter is developed that uses the chilled water control valve on an air-handling unit as a measurement device. The flow rate of water through the valve is calculated using the differential pressure across the valve and its associated coil, the valve command, and an empirically determined valve characteristic curve. Thus, the probability of error in the measurements is significantly greater than for conventionally manufactured flow meters. In this paper, mathematical models are developed and used to conduct uncertainty analysis for the virtual flow meter, and the results from the virtual meter are compared to measurements made with an ultrasonic flow meter. Theoretical uncertainty analysis shows that the total uncertainty in flow rates from the virtual flow meter is 1.46% with 95% confidence; comparison of virtual flow meter results with measurements from an ultrasonic flow meter yielded anuncertainty of 1.46% with 99% confidence. The comparable results from the theoretical uncertainty analysis and empirical comparison with the ultrasonic flow meter corroborate each other, and tend to validate the approach to computationally estimating uncertainty for virtual sensors introduced in this study.

Song, Li; Wang, Gang; Brambley, Michael R.

2013-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

191

Effects of aluminosilicate minerals in clay soil fractions on pore water hydroxide ion concentrations in soil/cement matrices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and, consequently, metal attenuation characteristics of soiUcement/waste matrices is necessary to accurately translate bench-scale test results to full-scale applications. Research on soil stabilization indicates that pozzolanic reactions can occur...

Cook, Evan Russell

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

1.8.2001 31.12.2004 SOIL-FROST AND SNOW METAMORPHISM SIMULATIONS FOR THE BALTEX-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Thus, the timing and duration of seasonal snow-cover influence climate conditions, and air-quality assimilation, 4DVAR, water and energy fluxes, BALTEX 1. Summary Modules to consider soil-frost and snow that inclusion of soil-frost and snow processes improves the predictions. The soil-frost and snow modules have

Moelders, Nicole

193

ARSENIC UPTAKE BY TWO HYPERACCUMULATOR FERNS FROM FOUR ARSENIC CONTAMINATED SOILS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Cai et al., 2002). Smelting and mining sites are often significant sources Water, Air, and Soil Pollution (2005) 168: 71­89 C Springer 2005 #12;72 A. O. FAYIGA AND L. Q. MA of arsenic contamination

Ma, Lena

194

Ecological Screening Values for Surface Water, Sediment, and Soil: 2005 Update  

SciTech Connect

One of the principal components of the environmental remediation program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is the assessment of ecological risk. Used to support CERCLA, RCRA, and DOE orders, the ecological risk assessment (ERA) can identify environmental hazards and evaluate remedial action alternatives. Ecological risk assessment is also an essential means for achieving DOE's risk based end state vision for the disposition of nuclear material and waste hazards, the decommissioning of facilities, and the remediation of inactive waste units at SRS. The complexity of an ERA ranges from a screening level ERA (SLERA) to a full baseline ERA. A screening level ecological risk assessments, although abbreviated from a baseline risk assessment, is nonetheless considered a complete risk assessment (EPA, 2001a). One of the initial tasks of any ERA is to identify constituents that potentially or adversely affect the environment. Typically, this is accomplished by comparing a constituent's maximum concentration in surface water, sediment, or soil with an ecological screening value (ESV). The screening process can eliminate many constituents from further consideration in the risk assessment, but it also identifies those that require additional evaluation. This document is an update of a previous compilation (Friday, 1998) and provides a comprehensive listing of ecological screening values for surface water, sediment, and soil. It describes how the screening values were derived and recommends benchmarks that can be used for ecological risk assessment. The sources of these updated benchmarks include the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the State of Florida, the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME), the Dutch Ministry of the Environment (RIVM), and the scientific literature. It should be noted that ESV's are continuously revised by the various issuing agencies. The references in this report provide the citations of each source and, where applicable, the internet address where they can be accessed. Although radiological screening values are not included herein due to space limitations, these have been recently derived by a technical working committee sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE 2002, 2004). The recommended ecological screening values represent the most conservative concentrations of the cited sources, and are to be used for screening purposes only. They do not represent remedial action cleanup levels. Their use at locations other than SRS should take into account environmental variables such as water quality, soil chemistry, flora and fauna, and other ecological attributes specific to the ecosystem potentially at risk.

Friday, G. P.

2005-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

195

Forest and Soil Ecosystem Services University of Florida  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forest and Soil ESs (Sep. 4 to Sep. 14) - Morris a. Water control and yield b. Precipitation c. Air. These services include carbon sequestration, biodiversity, stabilization of hydrologic cycles, removal of air pollutants, aesthetic beauty, moderation of weather extremes and mitigation of natural disasters. Academic

Ma, Lena

196

Trench water-soil chemistry and interactions at the Maxey Flats Site  

SciTech Connect

This report is part of an overall program designed to provide an understanding of and to monitor the behavior of existing low-level sites. This investigation will provide source term data for radionuclides and other solutes in trench waters and will describe the physical, chemical, and biological properties of the geochemical system that controls radionuclide movement. General conclusions can be made from the data in terms of source term information to be used in modeling efforts, as well as processes which may affect radionuclide migration. Trench waters are complex anoxic chemical systems which require more extensive investigation to assess their role in radionuclide retention and mobilization. No overall systematic changes in the disposal site trenches were observed during the brief sampling interval. However, changes in some radionuclide and cation concentrations were observed in several trenches. Numerous organic compounds were identified in trench waters at Maxey Flats, some of which have the potential for chelation with radionuclides. The presence of radionuclides and organic compounds in wells UB1 and UB1-A and in nearby trenches indicates communication between the wells and trench water leachates by subsurface migration. Radionuclides were also measured in the new experimental trench dug parallel to trench 27. Aerobic, anaerobic, sulfate reducing, denitrifying, and methanogenic bacteria are present in the leachate samples, and are able to grow anaerobically in trench leachates. Experimental results indicate that the observed sorption K/sub d/ is a function of both solid and liquid phase compositional variations as well as contact time. The observation that e lowest K/sub d/ results are observed with anoxic trench waters and ultrasonicated soils points to the need to use site specific materials and experimental conditions which simulate in situ conditions as closely as possible.

Weiss, A.J.; Czyscinski, K.S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

31Amarch/april 2011--vol. 66, no. 2journal of soil and water conservation Michael C. Duniway and Jeffrey E. Herrick  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

31Amarch/april 2011--vol. 66, no. 2journal of soil and water conservation Michael C. Duniway lands throughout the world. In develop- ing countries, the replacement of livestock with motor vehicles ecosystem processes, including soil and water conservation, and thus presents one of the greater challenges

198

Operations and maintenance report on Air Force oil/water separators. Final report, September 1985-August 1986  

SciTech Connect

This report is intended to provide general guidance for the routine operation and maintenance of oil/water separators. The report should help managers and operators to recognize and correct problems affecting the separation process of oil and water. The most common types of gravity separators used by the Air Force are discussed. Other topics include operation guidelines, flow measurements, maintenance service, waste disposal and regulations, sampling and testing, recordkeeping and spill-prevention measures.

Kilroy, M.D.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Soil carbon storage and N{sub 2}O emissions from wheat agroecosystems as affected by free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment (FACE) and nitrogen treatments. Final Report - February 12, 1999  

SciTech Connect

Rising atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations have prompted concern about response of plants and crops to future elevated CO{sub 2} levels, and particularly the extent to which ecosystems will sequester carbon and thus impact the rate of rise of CO{sub 2} concentrations. Free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment (FACE) experimentation was used with wheat agroecosystems for two growing seasons to assess effects of CO{sub 2} and soil nitrogen. Over 20 researchers on this experiment variously examined plant production and grain yield, phenology, length of growing season, water-use efficiency ecosystem production, below ground processes (eg, root and microbial activity, carbon and nitrogen cycling), etc.

S. W. Leavitt; A. D. Matthias; T. L. Thompson; R. A. Rauschkolb

1999-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

200

Changing the spatial location of electricity generation to increase water availability in areas with drought: a feasibility study and quantification of air quality impacts in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The feasibility, cost, and air quality impacts of using electrical grids to shift water use from drought-stricken regions to areas with more water availability were examined. Power plant cooling represents a large portion ...

Pacsi, Adam P

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water air soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Kinetics and mechanisms of metal sorption at the soil mineral/water interface: The continuum from adsorption to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GEOC 36 Kinetics and mechanisms of metal sorption at the soil mineral/water interface, Newark, DE 19717-1303 A basic understanding of the kinetics and mechanisms of metal sorption on natural conditions. Using these approaches, major advances have occurred in our understanding of metal sorption

Sparks, Donald L.

202

Surface Tensions in NaCl-Water-Air Systems from MD Simulations Ranjit Bahadur, Lynn M. Russell,*, and Saman Alavi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Surface Tensions in NaCl-Water-Air Systems from MD Simulations Ranjit Bahadur, Lynn M. Russell, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6, Canada ReceiVed: July 9, 2007; In Final Form: July 30, 2007 Surface tensions to the surface tension, while the energy-integral and test area methods provide direct estimates. At 1 atm

Russell, Lynn

203

14 Diffusive CO2 Flux at the Air-Water Interface of the Robert-Bourassa Hydroelectric Reservoir in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

14 Diffusive CO2 Flux at the Air-Water Interface of the Robert-Bourassa Hydroelectric Reservoir Hydroelectric reservoirs and lakes in boreal Québec produce greenhouse gases (GHG) mainly in the form of CO2 of the interface. When applied to the Robert- Bourassa hydroelectric reservoir in boreal Québec, this model

Long, Bernard

204

Assessment of a Solar Assisted Air Source and a Solar Assisted Water Source Heat Pump System in a Canadian Household  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an assessment of two solar assisted heat pump systems integrated into an air distribution system in three different 210 m2 single detached residential houses in Montreal, Canada. The housing types considered are a 1980's house, an energy efficient house and a “net zero ready” house. The advanced heat pump systems considered in the analysis focused on coupling solar energy on the evaporator side of an air source and water source heat pumps to improve performance compared to a standard air source heat pump and provide an alternative to a costly ground source heat pump system. The annual energy consumption and utility cost of the solar assisted heat pump systems were compared to a market available air source heat pump, a ground source heat pump system as well as the typical reference housing heating and cooling system. The results predicted that a solar assisted air source heat pump has a comparable capital cost to a ground source heat pump system in all housing types and the highest energy savings for a “net zero ready” house of 34% compared to the base case. The solar assisted water source heat pump did not yield interesting results, as the solar assisted air source heat pump demonstrated improved energy savings and lower capital costs in all housing types considered. Comparing the 20 year life cycle costs of the solar assisted heat pump systems to the base case, only in the 1980's housing archetype did the solar assisted air source heat pump system demonstrate a lower life cycle cost than the base case. A standard air source heat pump yielded the lowest life cycle cost in the 1980's and energy efficient house considered and the reference base case system had the lowest life cycle cost in the net zero ready house considered.

Martin Kegel; Justin Tamasauskas; Roberto Sunye; Antoine Langlois

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Water infiltration studies of the major rice producing soil series of the Texas Gulf Coast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Description for Sandy Loam Soil at Site W14. Field Profile Description for Sandy Loam So11 at Site F815 Field Profile Description for Sandy Loam Soil at Site C28. Field Profile Descr1ption for Clay Soil at 51te J2 . Field Profile Descr1ption for Clay... Description for Sandy Loam Soil at Site W14. Field Profile Description for Sandy Loam So11 at Site F815 Field Profile Description for Sandy Loam Soil at Site C28. Field Profile Descr1ption for Clay Soil at 51te J2 . Field Profile Descr1ption for Clay...

Nesmith, Douglas M

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

206

Water spray geoengineering to clean air pollution for mitigating haze in China’s cities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the past 30 years, China has suffered from air pollution and heavy haze created by fast industrial ... This article reviews the techniques for remediation of air pollution. Then, I propose a geoengineering met...

Shaocai Yu

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Movement and treatment of water containing Escherichia coli applied to soil by subsurface drip emitters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Drip tubing as a means of applying domestic wastewater to soil is increasing in use, especially in clayey soils that are unsuitable for traditional disposal systems. Experiments were undertaken to evaluate operational constraints of drip tubing...

Franti, Jason M

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

THE DESORPTION OF SILVER AND THALLIUM FROM SOILS IN THE PRESENCE OF A CHELATING RESIN WITH THIOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

isomorphic substitution for potassium leads to its environmental release Water, Air, and Soil Pollution 160 nonferrous mining, metal works, coal combustion, and cement plants (Schoer, 1984). Much more silver

Walter, M.Todd

209

Improvement to Air2Air Technology to Reduce Fresh-Water Evaporative Cooling Loss at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants ProMIS/Project No.:DE-NT0005647  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improvement to AIr2AIr® technology Improvement to AIr2AIr® technology to reduce Fresh-WAter evAporAtIve coolIng loss At coAl-BAsed thermoelectrIc poWer plAnts promIs/project no. :de-nt0005647 Background The production of electricity requires a reliable, abundant, and predictable source of freshwater - a resource that is limited in many parts of the United States and throughout the world. The process of thermoelectric generation from fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and natural gas is water intensive. According to the 2000 U.S. Geological Survey, thermoelectric-power withdrawals accounted for 48 percent of total water use, 39 percent of total freshwater withdrawals (136 billion gallons per day) for all categories, and 52 percent of fresh surface water withdrawals. As a growing economy drives the need for more electricity, demands on freshwater

210

Air/water subchannel measurements of the equilibrium quality and mass-flux distribution in a rod bundle. [BWR  

SciTech Connect

Subchannel measurements were performed in order to determine the equilibrium quality and mass flux distribution in a four rod bundle, using air/water flow. An isokinetic technique was used to sample the flow in the center, side and corner subchannels of this test section. Flow rates of the air and water in each sampled subchannel were measured. Experiments were performed for two test-section-average mass fluxes (0.333x10/sup 6/ and 0.666x10/sup 6/ lb/sub m//h-ft/sup 2/), and the test-section-average quality was varied from 0% to 0.54% for each mass flux. Single-phase liquid, bubbly, slug and churn-turbulent two-phase flow regimes were achieved. The observed data trends agreed with previous diabatic measurements in which the center subchannel had the highest quality and mass flux, while the corner subchannel had the lowest.

Sterner, R.W.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Influence of air humidity and lighting period on growth, vase life and water relations of 14 rose cultivars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of three relative air humidities (RH) (75, 83 and 91% RH corresponding to vapour pressure deficits of 550, 390 and 200 Pa, respectively) and two lighting periods (18 and 24 h day?1) on growth, vase life and leaf–water relations was studied in 14 rose cultivars. Air humidity had no effect on the number of flowering shoots while shoot fresh weight decreased by 11% as a mean of all cultivars when RH was raised from 83 to 91%. An increase in the lighting period (LP) enhanced the number of flowering shoots by 12% and fresh weight per shoot by 5%. A rise in air humidity from 75 to 91% RH reduced the vase life by 30% (varying from 12 to 75% in the different cultivars) at 18 h LP and by 44% (varying from 31 to 78% in the different cultivars) at 24 h LP, while an increase in LP reduced vase life by 23 and 38% at 75 and 91% RH, respectively. The magnitude of the responses differed significantly among cultivars. Generally, a close relationship was found between reduction in vase life and rate of water loss of detached leaves from all cultivars. It is concluded that high air humidity and continuous lighting in general should be avoided in the production of greenhouse roses.

Leiv M Mortensen; Hans R Gislerød

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

A Study of Heat Sink Performance in Air and Soil for Use in a Thermoelectric Energy Harvesting Device  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conductance of a passive heat sink buried in soil. Introduction Solid state thermoelectric generators offer a battery cell at low power. Sensors and communication devices would use the charged battery to operate

213

Use of soil and vegetation spectroradiometry to investigate crop water use efficiency of a drip irrigated tomato  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An agronomic research was conducted in Tuscany (Central Italy) to evaluate the effects of an advanced irrigation system on the water use efficiency (WUE) of a tomato crop and to investigate the ability of soil and vegetation spectroradiometry to detect and map WUE. Irrigation was applied following an innovative approach based on CropSense system. Soil water content was monitored at four soil depths (10, 20, 30 and 50 cm) by a probe. Rainfall during the crop cycle reached 162 mm and irrigation water applied with a drip system amounted to 207 mm, distributed with 16 irrigation events. Tomato yield varied from 7.10 to 14.4 kg m?2, with a WUE ranging from 19.1 to 38.9 kg m?3. The irrigation system allowed a high yield levels and a low depth of water applied, as compared to seasonal ET crop estimated with Hargraves’ formula and with the literature data on irrigated tomato. Measurements were carried out on geo-referenced points to gather information on crop (crop yield, eighteen Vegetation indices, leaf area index) and on soil (spectroradiometric and traditional analysis). Eight VIs, out of nineteen ones analyzed, showed a significant relationship with georeferenced yield data; PVI maps seemed able to return the best response, before harvesting, to improve the knowledge of the area of cultivation and irrigation system. CropSense irrigation system reduced seasonal irrigation volumes. Some vegetation indexes were significantly correlated to tomato yield and well identify, a posteriori, crop area with low WUE; spectroradiometry can be a valuable tool to improve irrigated tomato field management.

S. Marino; M. Aria; B. Basso; A.P. Leone; A. Alvino

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Water Structure at the Air-Aqueous Interface of Divalent Cation and Nitrate Solutions Man Xu, Rick Spinney, and Heather C. Allen*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Structure at the Air-Aqueous Interface of Divalent Cation and Nitrate Solutions Man Xu, Rick, Columbus, Ohio 43210 ReceiVed: July 24, 2008; ReVised Manuscript ReceiVed: December 4, 2008 The water surface structure of aqueous magnesium, calcium, and strontium nitrate solutions with six to seven water

215

THE MOISTURE FROM THE AIR AS WATER RESOURCE IN ARID REGION: HOPES, DOUBTS AND FACTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recovery of clean water from dew has remained a fascinating problem * *in the arid regions, condensation, water collection, arid region. Introduction The demand for fresh water is currently only 7% of the total co* *ndensation. The renewable source of fresh water - the moisture of atmosphere

Trakhtman, Avraham

216

UNSAT-H Version 3.0: Unsaturated Soil Water and Heat Flow Model Theory, User Manual, and Examples  

SciTech Connect

The UNSAT-H model was developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to assess the water dynamics of arid sites and, in particular, estimate recharge fluxes for scenarios pertinent to waste disposal facilities. During the last 4 years, the UNSAT-H model received support from the Immobilized Waste Program (IWP) of the Hanford Site's River Protection Project. This program is designing and assessing the performance of on-site disposal facilities to receive radioactive wastes that are currently stored in single- and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site (LMHC 1999). The IWP is interested in estimates of recharge rates for current conditions and long-term scenarios involving the vadose zone disposal of tank wastes. Simulation modeling with UNSAT-H is one of the methods being used to provide those estimates (e.g., Rockhold et al. 1995; Fayer et al. 1999). To achieve the above goals for assessing water dynamics and estimating recharge rates, the UNSAT-H model addresses soil water infiltration, redistribution, evaporation, plant transpiration, deep drainage, and soil heat flow as one-dimensional processes. The UNSAT-H model simulates liquid water flow using Richards' equation (Richards 1931), water vapor diffusion using Fick's law, and sensible heat flow using the Fourier equation. This report documents UNSAT-H .Version 3.0. The report includes the bases for the conceptual model and its numerical implementation, benchmark test cases, example simulations involving layered soils and plants, and the code manual. Version 3.0 is an, enhanced-capability update of UNSAT-H Version 2.0 (Fayer and Jones 1990). New features include hysteresis, an iterative solution of head and temperature, an energy balance check, the modified Picard solution technique, additional hydraulic functions, multiple-year simulation capability, and general enhancements.

MJ Fayer

2000-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

217

Virial Approximation of the TEOS-10 Equation for the Fugacity of Water in Humid Air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fugacity is considered the proper real-gas substitute for the partial pressure commonly used to describe ideal-gas mixtures. However, in several fields such as geophysics, meteorology, or air conditioning, par...

Rainer Feistel; Jeremy W. Lovell-Smith…

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Experimental investigation of small-scale breaking waves : flow visualization across the air-water interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dynamics of breaking waves significantly affect air-sea fluxes of heat, momentum, mass and energy across the ocean interface. Breaking waves also contribute considerable loading to offshore and coastal structures, and ...

McDonald, Angus Kai

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Changing the spatial location of electricity generation to increase water availability in areas with drought: a feasibility study and quantification of air quality impacts in Texas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The feasibility, cost, and air quality impacts of using electrical grids to shift water use from drought-stricken regions to areas with more water availability were examined. Power plant cooling represents a large portion of freshwater withdrawals in the United States, and shifting where electricity generation occurs can allow the grid to act as a virtual water pipeline, increasing water availability in regions with drought by reducing water consumption and withdrawals for power generation. During a 2006 drought, shifting electricity generation out of the most impacted areas of South Texas (~10% of base case generation) to other parts of the grid would have been feasible using transmission and power generation available at the time, and some areas would experience changes in air quality. Although expensive, drought-based electricity dispatch is a potential parallel strategy that can be faster to implement than other infrastructure changes, such as air cooling or water pipelines.

Adam P Pacsi; Nawaf S Alhajeri; Mort D Webster; Michael E Webber; David T Allen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Variation in soil moisture and N availability modulates carbon and water exchange in a California grassland experiment  

SciTech Connect

Variability in the magnitude and timing of precipitation is predicted to change under future climate scenarios. The primary objective of this study was to understand how variation in precipitation patterns consisting of soil moisture pulses mixed with intermittent dry down events influence ecosystem gas fluxes. We characterized the effects of precipitation amount and timing, N availability, and plant community composition on whole ecosystem and leaf gas exchange in a California annual grassland mesocosm study system that allowed precise control of soil moisture conditions. Ecosystem CO2 and fluxes increased significantly with greater precipitation and were positively correlated with soil moisture. A repeated 10 day dry down period following 11 days of variable precipitation inputs strongly depressed net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) across a range of season precipitation totals, and plant community types. Ecosystem respiration (Re), evapotranspiration (ET) and leaf level photosynthesis (Amax) showed greatest sensitivity to dry down periods in low precipitation plots. Nitrogen additions significantly increased NEE, Re and Amax, particularly as water availability was increased. These results demonstrate that N availability and intermittent periods of soil moisture deficit (across a wide range of cumulative season precipitation totals) strongly modulate ecosystem gas exchange.

St. Clair, S.B.; Sudderth, E.; Fischer, M.L.; Torn, M.S.; Stuart, S.; Salve, R.; Eggett, D.; Ackerly, D.

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water air soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Evaluating Water Vapor in the NCAR CAM3 Climate Model with RRTMG/McICA using Modeled and Observed AIRS Spectral Radiances  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Vapor in the NCAR CAM3 Climate Model with Water Vapor in the NCAR CAM3 Climate Model with RRTMG/McICA using Modeled and Observed AIRS Spectral Radiances Michael J. Iacono, Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc., 131 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421 USA 1. Overview Objectives: * Evaluate water vapor and temperature simulation in two versions of CAM3 by comparing modeled and observed cloud-cleared AIRS spectral radiances. * Use spectral differences to verify comparisons between modeled water vapor and temperature and observed fields retrieved from AIRS radiances. Models: OSS: Optimal Spectral Sampling model developed at AER was used to simulate clear sky AIRS radiance spectra in CAM3. RRTMG/McICA: ARM-supported LW and SW radiative transfer model developed at AER for application to GCMs. RRTMG has been fully

222

Water channel structure of bassanite at high air humidity: crystal structure of CaSO4·0.625H2O  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the presence of high relative air humidity the crystal structure of CaSO4·0.5H2O transforms due to the incorporation of additional water of hydration. The crystal structure of CaSO4·0.625H2O was solved by single-crystal X-ray diffraction at 298 K with 75% relative air humidity.

Schmidt, H.

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

223

Slow-Injection Ultrasound-Assisted Emulsication–Microextraction for Determination of Phthalate Esters in Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the environment during production and incineration (3, 5). Water, soil, air and food products contaminated with PAEs have been reported (6-10), and the pollution they cause has become a matter of public concern. Therefore, the development......

Songqing Li; Tong Li; Peng Gao; Runhua Lu; Wenfeng Zhou; Haixiang Gao

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Spruce roots under heavy machinery loading in two different soil types  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We studied the influence of soil compaction by heavy machinery (two-wheeled trailer with 0.2 MPa pressure) on spruce roots at two sites in the Moravian Highlands with different soil properties to determine whether soil compaction by loading affects root water uptake. We also analysed the effects of the soil type and water-holding capacity with regards to root structure development. Site Jedovnice has a loamy to sandy–loamy soil texture with a shallow groundwater table at approximately 1 m in depth. The roots are mostly distributed in deeper layers. Site Mraveništ? has shallow, sandy–loamy soil overlying a granodiorite. This site has no access to groundwater and a higher proportion of shallow roots. To evaluate the effect of soil compaction, we installed heat-field-deformation sap flow sensors in the superficial roots and stem bases of trees close to machinery trails. Our results showed that loading mainly affected soils with a high proportion of shallow roots (33% of shallow roots at site Mraveništ?; 22% at site Jedovnice). The number of roots treated by loading, verified after root opening with an air spade, depended on root positioning in soil. Acropetal sap flow occurred in roots in soil layers with sufficient available soil water. Some of the sampled trees exhibited decreased daytime sap flow after loading. In the shallower site Mraveništ? the root responses to loading were also accompanied by water redistribution among the roots and between the roots and soil. Basipetal (reverse) flow was recorded in roots in dryer soil layers. Soil compaction due to loading substantially increased the magnitude and duration of redistributed flow between soil layers with different water contents. Determining the soil type and soil water content is recommended before choosing the machinery type for a given forest because the predicted tree root structure can be used to assess possible damage due to loading.

Nadezhda Nadezhdina; Alois Prax; Jan ?ermák; Valerij Nadezhdin; Radomír Ulrich; Jind?ich Neruda; Adolf Schlaghamersky

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Critical loads for soils and waters in a selected Scottish catchment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the UK, critical loads have been mapped for both soils and freshwaters and the maps indicate that discrepancies may occur between these two receptors over sensitive areas of the UK. Freshwater critical load...

K. P. Macphee; S. J. Langan; M. F. Billet

226

Using Soil Water Content Sensors to Characterize Tillage Effects on Preferential Flow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...fields with excessive application of agrochemicals and manure, industrial sites with...contamination due to rapid transport of agrochemicals and, in particular, pathogens through...unsaturated zone, regardless of the composition of the soil, due to less filtering...

Priyantha B. Kulasekera; Gary W. Parkin; Peter von Bertoldi

227

Occurrence of Pesticides in Water, Sediment, and Soil from the Yolo Bypass, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water and sediment from Yolo Bypass, California, 2004-2005.L. 2002. California’s Yolo Bypass: Evidence that floodfish. KEYWORDS pesticides, Yolo Bypass, fish, surface water,

Smalling, Kelly L.; Orlando, James L.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in wetland soils under different land uses in a coastal estuary: Toxic levels, sources and relationships with soil organic matter and water-stable aggregates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The concentrations of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined in the soils from industrial, wharf, cropland, milldam and natural wetland sites to characterize their distributions, toxic levels and possible sources in the Pearl River Estuary and identify their relationships with soil organic matter (SOM) and water-stable aggregates (WSAs). Our results indicate that the average concentration of total \\{PAHs\\} in this region reached a moderate pollution level, which was higher than that in other larger estuaries in Asia. The average level of total \\{PAHs\\} in industrial soils was 1.2, 1.5, 1.6 and 2.3 times higher than those in soils from wharf, cropland, milldam and natural wetland sites, respectively. Greater accumulation of \\{PAHs\\} occurred in the middle and/or bottom soil layers where 3-ring \\{PAHs\\} were dominant. Industrial soils also exhibited the highest toxic levels with the highest toxic equivalent concentrations of PAHs, followed by wharf and milldam soils, and the cropland and wetland soils had the lowest toxicity. The diagnostic ratios suggested that \\{PAHs\\} primarily originated from biomass and coal combustion at industrial and milldam sites, and petroleum combustion was determined to be the primary source of \\{PAHs\\} at the wharf, cropland and wetland sites. Both 3-ring and 4-ring \\{PAHs\\} in the milldam and wharf soils were significantly positively correlated with the SOM, whereas the 4,5,6-ring \\{PAHs\\} and total \\{PAHs\\} in industrial soils and the 2-ring \\{PAHs\\} in cropland soils were significantly negatively correlated with the SOM. In addition, large \\{WSAs\\} also exhibited a significant positive correlation with PAHs.

Rong Xiao; Junhong Bai; Junjing Wang; Qiongqiong Lu; Qingqing Zhao; Baoshan Cui; Xinhui Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Water flow processes in a soil column with a cylindrical macropore: Experiment and hierarchical modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interdomain water transfer could be estimated using mass balance calculations. In a hierarchical modeling

Mohanty, Binayak P.

230

Enhanced Water Use Efficiency in Dry Loess Grassland Species Grown at Elevated Air CO2 Concentration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Net CO2 assimilation rate (PN), stomatal conductance (gs), transpiration rate (E), and water use efficiency (WUE) in four perennial C3 species...

K. Szente; Z. Nagy; Z. Tuba

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

1-Methyl Naphthalene Reorientation at the Air-Liquid Interface upon Water Saturation Studied by Vibrational Broad Bandwidth Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will encounter gas-phase water molecules or may react with atmospheric oxidants. The uptake and reaction1-Methyl Naphthalene Reorientation at the Air-Liquid Interface upon Water Saturation Studied by Vibrational Broad Bandwidth Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy Elizabeth L. Hommel and Heather C. Allen

232

E-Print Network 3.0 - affected granular soils Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

platy, prismlike, and blocklike (see Figure 3... ). Soil structure affects soil water movement when a soil is saturated with water. Water can move quickly... between...

233

The prediction of root zone soil moisture with a water balance - microwave emission model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. T (1-) = T (I-) = T (I + e t &Rz) + ( T (I + e R. ) 8 e el I=2 ei i+ I (II-18) where -2a azi T =T. (1-e ) e. i 1 n = number of layers Rn =0 bz n To describe the brightness temperature above the soil sur face, the effective temperature of emi... and Groundtruth. Analysis of the Surface Flux Approach RADCON Model Scatter Due to Soil Variability . Selection of 21 cm Wavelength over 6 cm Wavelength. V CONCLUSION Summary of Results. Recommendations REFERENCES. 72 72 76 80 83 90 100 109 109...

Smith, Michael Robert

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

234

Recent advances in clean-up strategies of waters polluted with sulfonamide antibiotics: a review of sorbents and related properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and Zea mays L. plants. Water, Air, Soil Pollution , 223 , 5243-5257. Mompelat...cations and anions. Environmental Pollution , 159 , 2616-2621. Zhao, J...different temperatures. Environmental Pollution , 181 , 60-67.

A. Martucci; I. Braschi; L. Marchese; S. Quartieri

235

Development of Interfacial Structure in a Confined Air-Water Cap-Turbulent and Churn-Turbulent Flow  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the present work is to study and model the interfacial structure development of air-water two-phase flow in a confined test section. Experiments of a total of 9 flow conditions in cap-turbulent and churn-turbulent flow regimes are carried out in a vertical air-water upward two-phase flow experimental loop with a test section of 200-mm in width and 10-mm in gap. Miniaturized four-sensor conductivity probes are used to measure local two-phase parameters at three different elevations for each flow condition. The bubbles captured by the probes are categorized into two groups in view of the two-group interfacial area transport equation, i.e., spherical/distorted bubbles as Group 1 and cap/churn-turbulent bubbles as Group 2. The acquired parameters are time-averaged local void fraction, interfacial velocity, bubble number frequency, interfacial area concentration, and bubble Sauter mean diameter for both groups of bubbles. Also, the line-averaged and area-averaged data are presented and discussed. The comparisons of these parameters at different elevations demonstrate the development of interfacial structure along the flow direction due to bubble interactions. (authors)

Xiaodong Sun; Seungjin Kim; Ling Cheng; Mamoru Ishii [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Beus, Stephen G. [Bechtel Bettis, Inc., Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, Post Office Box 79, West Mifflin, PA 15122-0079 (United States)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

[Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 9, Removal action system design  

SciTech Connect

This Removal Action System Design has been prepared as a Phase I Volume for the implementation of the Phase II removal action at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) near Dayton, Ohio. The objective of the removal action is to prevent, to the extent practicable, the migration of ground water contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCS) across the southwest boundary of Area C. The Phase 1, Volume 9 Removal Action System Design compiles the design documents prepared for the Phase II Removal Action. These documents, which are presented in Appendices to Volume 9, include: Process Design, which presents the 30 percent design for the ground water treatment system (GWTS); Design Packages 1 and 2 for Earthwork and Road Construction, and the Discharge Pipeline, respectively; no drawings are included in the appendix; Design Package 3 for installation of the Ground Water Extraction Well(s); Design Package 4 for installation of the Monitoring Well Instrumentation; and Design Package 5 for installation of the Ground Water Treatment System; this Design Package is incorporated by reference because of its size.

Not Available

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Water Loss Control Using Pressure Management: Life-cycle Energy and Air Emission Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pressure management is one cost-effective and efficient strategy for controlling water distribution losses. This paper evaluates the life-cycle energy use and emissions for pressure management zones in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Halifax, Nova Scotia. ...

Jennifer R. Stokes; Arpad Horvath; Reinhard Sturm

2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

238

Nonlinear Phenomena Induced by Millijoule Femtosecond Laser Pulses at an Air-water Interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transformation in water. We find that nonlinear femtosecond pulse propagation begins at a peak pulse intensity of about 1010 W/cm2. This experiment provides a convenient segway into the discussion and investigation of femtosecond laser filaments. We describe...

Strycker, Benjamin

2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

239

Phase relationship equation for moisture induced shrink and swell of soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the w moisture content prior to swell, a = air void coefficient equal to the ratio of air volume change (AV?) to the initial air volume (V?), n(1-S) = ratio of VA to the initial total volume (Vr). The shrinkage form of PREMISS (1. 2), also derived... in Chapter VI, is: AV hw = Sn ? (t + a, ?j r where a? = the air void constant equal to the ratio of dV? to the change in water volume (dV~). The parameters S, n and w are readily obtained from soil samples. Means of obtaining the change im water...

Hoffmann, Stacey Bruemmer

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

240

Simulation of soil water dynamics and rice crop growth as affected by bunding and fertilizer application in inland valley systems of West Africa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rice production in rainfed inland systems is constrained by rainfall distribution and the heterogeneity of the topography that frequently lead to runoff causing erosion and loss of nutrients especially nitrogen. The use of water-saving and nutrient management technologies such as bunding and fertilizer application could help farmers maintain soil moisture and reduce nutrient losses thereby increase rice production. This study used the crop model EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) to assess soil water dynamics and rice crop growth as affected by bunding and fertilizer application in inland valley systems of West Africa. The model was parameterized using observed soil water characteristics and crop parameters and run against observation data collected from 2007 to 2010 in a factorial trial combining bund and fertilizer rate. Simulation of soil water condition was satisfactory for unbunded conditions with coefficients of determination (R2) from comparison between simulated and observed soil water content between 0.64 and 0.68 depending on soil depth. Depth of ponded water during the growing period was adequately predicted in three out of four years. Simulated LAI development, total aboveground biomass and grain yield compared well with field observations in unbunded plots, the MRE (mean relative error) of simulated yield was 6–18%. In bund plots in 2009 and 2010, the grain yield was overestimated by the model when no fertilizer was applied (MRE = 45%). Although negative effect of elevated iron concentration in the rice plant reduces the model performance, it was used to indicate effective effect of iron on the growth of crop the presence of bund in very wet year. The general use of the model for rainfed rice production at a large scale requires identification of areas with iron toxicity risk.

Omonlola Nadine Worou; Thomas Gaiser; Kazuki Saito; Heiner Goldbach; Frank Ewert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water air soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Conservation Division regiulations for appliance-efficiency standards relating to refrigerators and freezers, room air conditioners, central air conditioners, gas space heaters, water heaters, plumbing fittings, gas clothes dryers, and gas cooking appliances  

SciTech Connect

The text of the appliance efficiency standards for certain types of new appliances sold in California is presented. Specifications and test methods to identify complying refrigerators, freezers, air conditioners, gas space heaters, water heaters, plumbing fittings, gas clothes dryers, and gas cooking appliances are covered.

Not Available

1981-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

242

A rapid method for the determination of water in wet soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rockwall Rockwell Rockwell 38 33 47 28 15 15 26 16 12 49 13 28 40 LL PI 27 35 29 25 25 19 25 26 SLd LSe Soil SR Class Bbsder 19 6. 3 1. 82 A-2-4 26 22 11. 5 1. 71 A-7 75 17 132 183 A6 84 21 8. 6 1 69 A-6 39 20 4, 1 1 76 A-2...

Burdick, Robert Linn

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Soil Studies with Isotopes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... reference are even strained to include the use of steam from nuclear reactors for the desalination of water. The proceedings are divided into five sections dealing respectively with equipment and ... moisture profile; soil water movement ; the interaction between soil, vegetation and water; and desalination of water for agriculture. Among the most valuable contributions are comparisons between the performance ...

E. C. CHILDS

1968-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

Impacts of Water Loop Management on Simultaneous Heating and Cooling in Coupled Control Air Handling Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The impacts of the water loop management on the heating and cooling energy consumption are investigated by using model simulation. The simulation results show that the total thermal energy consumption can be increased by 24% for a typical AHU in San...

Guan, W.; Liu, M.; Wang, J.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Potentially Pathogenic Bacteria in Shower Water and Air of a Stem Cell Transplant Unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...E-mail: la249cornell.edu 1 Department of Energy, Environmental Chemical Engineering...141-147. 14 Chate, R. A. 2006. An audit improves the quality of water within the...in background levels. | Department of Energy, Environmental & Chemical Engineering...

Sarah D. Perkins; Jennie Mayfield; Victoria Fraser; Largus T. Angenent

2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

246

Analysis of water and soil from the wetlands of Upper Three Runs Creek. Volume 2A, Analytical data packages September--October 1991 sampling  

SciTech Connect

Shallow water and soils along Upper Three Runs Creek (UTRC) and associated wetlands between SRS Road F and Cato Road were sampled for nonradioactive and radioactive constituents. The sampling program is associated with risk evaluations being performed for various regulatory documents in these areas of the Savannah River Site (SRS). WSRC selected fifty sampling sites bordering the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF), F- and H-Area Seepage Basins (FHSB), and the Sanitary Landfill (SL). The analytical results from this study provided information on the water and soil quality in UTRC and its associated wetlands. The analytical results from this investigation indicated that the primary constituents and radiological indicators detected in the shallow water and soils were tritium, gross alpha, radium 226, total radium and strontium 90. This investigation involved the collection of shallow water samples during the Fall of 1991 and the Spring of 1992 at fifty (50) sampling locations. Sampling was performed during these periods to incorporate high and low water table periods. Samples were collected from three sections along UTRC denoted as Phase I (MWMF), Phase II (FHSB) and Phase III (SL). One vibracored soil sample was also collected in each phase during the Fall of 1991. This document is compiled solely of experimental data obtained from the sampling procedures.

Haselow, L.A.; Rogers, V.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Riordan, C.J. [Metcalf and Eddy, Inc. (United States); Eidson, G.W.; Herring, M.K. [Normandeau Associates, Inc. (United States)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Sensitivity of Low Sloped Roofs Designs to Initial Water and Air Leakage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.Sc. Research Scientist VTT, Espoo, Finland Andre Desjarlais. B.Sc.E Program Manager, Oak Ridge National Laboratory 1 Bethel Valley Rd, Oak Ridge TN, 37831-6070 ABSTRACT Liquid water in low sloped roofs almost always causes problems... roofs in Finland (area varying from 200 m2 up to 5 000 m2). A laboratory hot box apparatus (Kouhia and Nieminen, 1999) was also used to further quantify the performance of the grooved roof ventilation system and to show the thermal consequences...

Karagiozis, A.; Desjarlais, A.; Salonvaara, M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Adsorption of tetrahydrothiophene (THT) onto soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Adsorption is one of the major industrial separation technique nowadays. Although adsorption is most commonly used as a separation method in some cases cause harmful and undesirable effects such as capture odorant from natural gas onto soil. In the event of an accident the gas can leak from pipes in two ways - either directly into the surrounding air or the soil where the odorant can be mostly absorbed depending of type of soil water content and temperature. Design of experimental apparatus for measurement of breakthrough curves is studied in detail. Alternative arrangement of experimental apparatus calibration of measuring devices method of measurement and processing the data are narrowly discussed. Moreover experimental measurements of breakthrough curves are presented. The actual measurement was made to identify the equilibrium adsorption capacity of THT (tetrahydrothiophene) onto soils. Experimental data were evaluated using Linear Freundlich Langmuir and Koble-Corrigan model.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

ISSUANCE 2014-12-23: Energy Conservation Program for Certain Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for Commercial Heating, Air-Conditioning, and Water-Heating Equipment, Notice of Proposed Rulemaking  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Energy Conservation Program for Certain Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for Commercial Heating, Air-Conditioning, and Water-Heating Equipment, Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

250

Discover Jacksonville | Ultimate Jaguars | First Coast Fugitives | Internet Directory | Jax2Go Wireless Water's Edge magazine | H for Health magazine | Jax Air News | Mayport Mirror | Kings Bay Periscope | Ultimate Yellow Pages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wireless Water's Edge magazine | H for Health magazine | Jax Air News | Mayport Mirror | Kings Bay Manatee County Port Authority Central Florida: Furniture Refinishers Sub- Contract Leathersmith

Richardson, Martin C.

251

Determination of streamflow sequences for ungaged subbasins using soil and water assessment tool (SWAT)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

evaporation; (1) Penman- Monteith (Monteith, 1981), Hargreaves and Samani (1985), and Priestley-Taylor (1972). The Penman-Monteith method requires solar radiation, air temperature, wind speed, and relative humidity as input. The Priestley-Taylor method... 11. 2 10. 4 11. 3 13. 3 18. 7 16. 0 Oct. 1943 ? present Jan. 1944 ? present Oct. 1952 - present Aug. 1945 ? present May 1936 - present May 1936 ? present May 1936 - present Oct. 1952 ? present 8068000 809 370, 000 8. 6 July 1939...

Raju, Balasubramaniam

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Effects of land disposal of municipal sewage sludge on soil, streambed sediment, and ground- and surface-water quality at a site near Denver, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The report describes the effects of burial and land application of municipal sewage sludge on soil and streambed sediment and water quality in the underlying aquifers and surface water within and around the Lowry sewage-sludge-disposal area. The existing ground-water observation-well network at the disposal area was expanded for the study. Surface-water-sampling sites were selected so that runoff could be sampled from intense rainstorms or snowmelt. The sampling frequency for ground-water and surface-water runoff was changed from yearly to quarterly, and soil samples were collected. Four years of data were collected from 1984 to 1987 during the expanded monitoring program at the Lowry sewage-sludge-disposal area. These data, in addition to the data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey from 1981 to 1983, were used to determine effects of sewage-sludge-disposal on soil and streambed sediment and surface- and ground-water quality at the disposal area.

Gaggiani, N.G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Assessment of natural and anthropogenic radioactivity levels in soils, rocks and water in the vicinity of Chirano Gold Mine in Ghana  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......gamma-ray exposure from natural radioactivity concentrations...drinking water containing natural radioactivity due to...inhalation of airborne radon gas for the area where both...concentrations in surface soils in Cyprus. J. Environ. Radioact...UNSCEAR. Exposures from natural sources of radiation......

A. Faanu; H. Lawluvi; D. O. Kpeglo; E. O. Darko; G. Emi-Reynolds; A. R. Awudu; O. K. Adukpo; C. Kansaana; I. D. Ali; B. Agyeman; L. Agyeman; R. Kpodzro

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Field Summary Report for Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington, Collection of Surface Water, River Sediments, and Island Soils  

SciTech Connect

This report has been prepared in support of the remedial investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River and describes the 2008/2009 data collection efforts. This report documents field activities associated with collection of sediment, river water, and soil in and adjacent to the Columbia River near the Hanford Site and in nearby tributaries.

L. C. Hulstrom

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

255

Integrated phytobial remediation for sustainable management of arsenic in soil and water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Arsenic (As), cited as the most hazardous substance by the U.S. Agency for Toxic Substance and Disease Registry (ATSDR, 2005), is an ubiquitous metalloid which when ingested for prolonged periods cause extensive health effects leading to ultimate untimely death. Plants and microbes can help mitigate soil and groundwater As problem since they have evolved elaborate detoxification machineries against this toxic metalloid as a result of their coexistence with this since the origin of life on earth. Utilization of the phytoremediation and bioremediation potential of the plants and microbes, respectively, is now regarded as two innovative tools that encompass biology, geology, biotechnology and allied sciences with cutting edge applications for sustainable mitigation of As epidemic. Discovery of As hyperaccumulating plants that uptake and concentrate large amounts of this toxic metalloid in their shoots or roots offered new hope to As phytoremediation, solar power based nature's own green remediation. This review focuses on how phytoremediation and bioremediation can be merged together to form an integrated phytobial remediation which could synergistically achieve the goal of large scale removal of As from soil, sediment and groundwater and overcome the drawbacks of the either processes alone. The review also points to the feasibility of the introduction of transgenic plants and microbes that bring new hope for more efficient treatment of As. The review identifies one critical research gap on the importance of remediation of As contaminated groundwater not only for drinking purpose but also for irrigation purpose and stresses that more research should be conducted on the use of constructed wetland, one of the most suitable areas of application of phytobial remediation. Finally the review has narrowed down on different phytoinvestigation and phytodisposal methods, which constitute the most essential and the most difficult part of pilot scale and field scale applications of phytoremediation programs.

Madhumita Roy; Ashok K. Giri; Sourav Dutta; Pritam Mukherjee

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Trench water-soil chemistry and interactions at the Maxey Flats Site-II  

SciTech Connect

The chemistry of leachates in the Maxey Flats trenches is an important factor in evaluating the site's effectiveness for retaining radionuclides. Trench water composition reflects interactions of the buried waste with infiltrating groundwater and the effects of bacterial decomposition of organic material. Aerobic, anaerobic, sulfate reducing, denitrifying and methanogenic bacteria are present in the leachates. Bacterial processes cause decreases in redox potential (Eh), sulfate and nitrate concentrations, as well as increases in alkalinity and ammonia relative to local groundwater compositions. The major radionuclides of concern present in trench waters include: /sup 3/H, /sup 60/Co, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 134, 137/Cs, /sup 241/Am, and /sup 238, 239, 240/Pu. Several additional laboratory and field analyses were performed on the fourth sampling of trench waters to better characterize the waters and to assure the reliability of some procedures. New procedures include: sulfide ion measurement in the field; laboratory ion chromatographic determinations of sulfate, chloride, and bromide; Eh and pH measurements in the laboratory; and ferrous-ferric concentration ratios by a colorimetric procedure. No overall systematic change in any disposal trench was observed. Analysis of water collected from the experimental interceptor trenches at Maxey Flats shows a chemical composition intermediate between disposal trench water and local groundwater. The existence of organo-radionuclide complexes that may enhance radionuclide mobility is a subject of much concern in waste management. Low concentrations of free EDTA, NTA, and DTPA are present in some leachates. Sorption experiments demonstrated the ability of EDTA to lower the apparent sorption capacity of Maxey Flats shale. 21 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

Weiss, A.J.; Czyscinski, K.S.; Pietrzak, R.F.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Air-to-Water Heat Pumps with Radiant Delivery in Low Load Homes (Fact Sheet)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Researchers from Alliance for Residential Building Initiative worked with two test homes in hot-dry climates to evaluate the in-situ performance of air-to-water heat pump systems, an energy efficient space conditioning solution designed to cost-effectively provide comfort in homes with efficient, safe, and durable operation.

258

2014-02-07 Issuance: Certification of Commercial Heating, Ventilation, and Air-conditioning, Water Heating, and Refrigeration Equipment; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document is a pre-publication Federal Register notice of proposed rulemaking regarding certification of commercial heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning, water-heating, and refrigeration equipment, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on February 7, 2014.

259

Comparison of Short-Term Oxidation Behavior of Model and Commercial Chromia-Forming Ferritic Stainless Steels in Air with Water Vapor  

SciTech Connect

A high-purity Fe-20Cr and commercial type 430 ferritic stainless steel were exposed at 700 and 800 C in dry air and air with 10% water vapor (wet air) and characterized by SEM, XRD, STEM, SIMS, and EPMA. The Fe-20Cr alloy formed a fast growing Fe-rich oxide scale at 700 C in wet air after 24 h exposure, but formed a thin chromia scale at 700 C in dry air and at 800 C in both dry air and wet air. In contrast, thin spinel + chromia base scales with a discontinuous silica subscale were formed on 430 stainless steel under all conditions studied. Extensive void formation was observed at the alloy-oxide interface for the Fe-20Cr in both dry and wet conditions, but not for the 430 stainless steel. The Fe-20Cr alloy was found to exhibit a greater relative extent of subsurface Cr depletion than the 430 stainless steel, despite the former's higher Cr content. Depletion of Cr in the Fe-20Cr after 24 h exposure was also greater at 700 C than 800 C. The relative differences in oxidation behavior are discussed in terms of the coarse alloy grain size of the high-purity Fe-20Cr material, and the effects of Mn, Si, and C on the oxide scale formed on the 430 stainless steel.

Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Keiser, James R [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Fayek, Mostafa [University of Manitoba, Canada; Walker, Larry R [ORNL; Meisner, Roberta Ann [ORNL; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL; Cole, David R [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Central Air Conditioners","Heat Pumps","Individual Air Conditioners","District Chilled Water","Central Chillers","Packaged  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Cooling Equipment, Floorspace, 1999" 5. Cooling Equipment, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Cooled Buildings","Cooling Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Residential-Type Central Air Conditioners","Heat Pumps","Individual Air Conditioners","District Chilled Water","Central Chillers","Packaged Air Conditioning Units","Swamp Coolers","Other" "All Buildings ................",67338,58474,8329,9147,14276,2750,12909,36527,2219,1312 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6774,4879,890,700,962,"Q","Q",2613,253,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",8238,6212,1606,707,1396,"Q","Q",3197,181,"Q"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water air soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Estimated impacts of soil degradation on the African water balance and climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that this is primarily due to changes in the Bowen Ratio (see also Williams & Balling 1996). Mabbutt (1989) also sup- ports the idea that water availability is a primary cause of local climate modification associated with desertifi- cation. Unlike these previous studies...

Feddema, Johannes J.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Process for analyzing CO.sub.2 in air and in water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The process of this invention comprises providing a membrane for separating CO.sub.2 into a first CO.sub.2 sample phase and a second CO.sub.2 analyte phase. CO.sub.2 is then transported through the membrane thereby separating the CO.sub.2 with the membrane into a first CO.sub.2 sample phase and a second CO.sub.2 analyte liquid phase including an ionized, conductive, dissociated CO.sub.2 species. Next, the concentration of the ionized, conductive, dissociated CO.sub.2 species in the second CO.sub.2 analyte liquid phase is chemically amplified using a water-soluble chemical reagent which reversibly reacts with undissociated CO.sub.2 to produce conductivity changes therein corresponding to fluctuations in the partial pressure of CO.sub.2 in the first CO.sub.2 sample phase. Finally, the chemically amplified, ionized, conductive, dissociated CO.sub.2 species is introduced to a conductivity measuring instrument. Conductivity changes in the chemically amplified, ionized, conductive, dissociated CO.sub.2 species are detected using the conductivity measuring instrument.

Atwater, James E. (Eugene, OR); Akse, James R. (Roseburg, OR); DeHart, Jeffrey (Yoncalla, OR)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Process for analyzing CO[sub 2] in air and in water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The process of this invention comprises providing a membrane for separating CO[sub 2] into a first CO[sub 2] sample phase and a second CO[sub 2] analyte phase. CO[sub 2] is then transported through the membrane thereby separating the CO[sub 2] with the membrane into a first CO[sub 2] sample phase and a second CO[sub 2] analyte liquid phase including an ionized, conductive, dissociated CO[sub 2] species. Next, the concentration of the ionized, conductive, dissociated CO[sub 2] species in the second CO[sub 2] analyte liquid phase is chemically amplified using a water-soluble chemical reagent which reversibly reacts with undissociated CO[sub 2] to produce conductivity changes therein corresponding to fluctuations in the partial pressure of CO[sub 2] in the first CO[sub 2] sample phase. Finally, the chemically amplified, ionized, conductive, dissociated CO[sub 2] species is introduced to a conductivity measuring instrument. Conductivity changes in the chemically amplified, ionized, conductive, dissociated CO[sub 2] species are detected using the conductivity measuring instrument. 43 figs.

Atwater, J.E.; Akse, J.R.; DeHart, J.

1999-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

264

Hazard Estimation of Two Emittents as Component Parts of the Data -Combination System “Existing Contamination Load — Soil- Ground Water”  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

After the expert survey of the Saar’s waste deposits -1984- the department Soil of the company ÖKOFEP has recorded by electronic data processing the data combinations of contamination load investigations, soil be...

R. Knop Dipl.-Ing.; K. T. Kirsch Dipl.-Geol.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Soil Water Balance and Recharge Monitoring at the Hanford Site – FY 2010 Status Report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the recharge data collected in FY 2010 at five locations on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Average monthly precipitation and temperature conditions in FY 2010 were near normal and did not present an opportunity for increased recharge. The recharge monitoring data confirmed those conditions, showing normal behavior in water content, matric head, and recharge rates. Also provided in this report is a strategy for recharge estimation for the next 5 years.

Fayer, Michael J.; Saunders, Danielle L.; Herrington, Ricky S.; Felmy, Diana

2010-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

266

Task 15 -- Remediation of organically contaminated soil using hot/liquid (subcritical) water. Semi-annual report, April 1--September 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect

This activity involves a pilot-scale demonstration of the use of hot/liquid water for the removal of organic contaminants from soil at the pilot (20 to 40 kg) scale. Lab-scale studies are being performed to determine the optimum temperature, contact time, and flow rates for removal of the organic contaminants. Initial investigations into using carbon sorbents to clean the extractant water for recycle use and to concentrate the extracted contaminants in a small volume for disposal are also being performed. Liquid water is normally considered to be too polar a solvent to be effective for removal of organic contaminants from contaminated soils and sludges. However, the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) has demonstrated that the polarity of liquid water can be changed from that of a very polar solvent at ambient conditions to that of an organic solvent (e.g., ethanol or acetonitrile) by simply raising the temperature. The EERC has exploited this unique property of liquid water to obtain highly selective extractions of polar (at lower temperatures) to nonpolar (at 200 to 250 C) organics from contaminated soils and sludges. Only moderate pressures (a maximum of about 45 atm at 250 C and lower pressures at lower temperatures) are required. With this procedure, all detectable hazardous organics were removed from the sludge, thus making the remaining material (about 99% of the original mass) a nonhazardous material. The present understanding of hot/liquid water extraction for the removal of hazardous organics from contaminated soils and sludges is being used to develop the engineering parameters needed to perform a pilot-scale demonstration of the remediation technology. Progress during the report period is summarized.

Hawthorne, S.B.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

267

DOE/EA-1673: Environmental Assessment for Energy Conservation Program for Certain Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for Commercial Heating, Air-Conditioning, and Water-Heating Equipment (July 2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 Environmental Assessment for 10 CFR 431 Energy Conservation Program for Certain Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for Commercial Heating, Air- Conditioning, and Water-Heating Equipment July 2009 8-i CHAPTER 8. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT TABLE OF CONTENTS 8.1 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................... 8-1 8.2 AIR QUALITY ANALYSIS ............................................................................................... 8-1 8.3 AIR POLLUTANT DESCRIPTIONS ................................................................................ 8-1 8.4 AIR QUALITY REGULATIONS ...................................................................................... 8-3

268

Deemed Savings Estimates for Legacy Air Conditioning and WaterHeating Direct Load Control Programs in PJM Region  

SciTech Connect

During 2005 and 2006, the PJM Interconnection (PJM) Load Analysis Subcommittee (LAS) examined ways to reduce the costs and improve the effectiveness of its existing measurement and verification (M&V) protocols for Direct Load Control (DLC) programs. The current M&V protocol requires that a PURPA-compliant Load Research study be conducted every five years for each Load-Serving Entity (LSE). The current M&V protocol is expensive to implement and administer particularly for mature load control programs, some of which are marginally cost-effective. There was growing evidence that some LSEs were mothballing or dropping their DLC programs in lieu of incurring the expense associated with the M&V. This project had several objectives: (1) examine the potential for developing deemed savings estimates acceptable to PJM for legacy air conditioning and water heating DLC programs, and (2) explore the development of a collaborative, regional, consensus-based approach for conducting monitoring and verification of load reductions for emerging load management technologies for customers that do not have interval metering capability.

Goldman, Charles

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Air-To-Water Heat Pumps with Radiant Delivery in Low Load Homes: Tucson, Arizona and Chico, California (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Space conditioning represents nearly 50% of average residential household energy consumption, highlighting the need to identify alternative cost-effective, energy-efficient cooling and heating strategies. As homes are better built, there is an increasing need for strategies that are particularly well suited for high performance, low load homes. ARBI researchers worked with two test homes in hot-dry climates to evaluate the in-situ performance of air-to-water heat pump (AWHP) systems, an energy efficient space conditioning solution designed to cost-effectively provide comfort in homes with efficient, safe, and durable operation. Two monitoring projects of test houses in hot-dry climates were initiated in 2010 to test this system. Both systems were fully instrumented and have been monitored over one year to capture complete performance data over the cooling and heating seasons. Results are used to quantify energy savings, cost-effectiveness, and system performance using different operating modes and strategies. A calibrated TRNSYS model was developed and used to evaluate performance in various climate regions. This strategy is most effective in tight, insulated homes with high levels of thermal mass (i.e. exposed slab floors).

Not Available

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Discussion on the Water-Saving Technology of the Green Community  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water utilization. Key words: green building; life cycle assessment (LCA); green community; non-traditional water resource; terms of reference (TOR) 1. INTRODUCTION Many countries in the world have been taking up with the green building... distribution asymmetry, drip and spray used in agriculture irrigation are introduced into urban. Drip irrigation is good at water-saving because water contacts directly with soil without sprayed in the air, especially using non-traditional water resource...

He, Q.; Gou, H.; Dai, Z.; Hao, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Growth Kinetics of Wildlife E. coli Isolates in Soil and Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and used by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to assess bacterial impairment in waterbodies. Bacterial impairment in Texas waterbodies is defined by E. coli concentrations higher than a geometric mean of 126 CFU /100 mL or exceeding 394 CFU/100.... The samples were serially diluted in de-ionized (DI) water. The diluted samples were run through a membrane filtration system, following the EPA method 1603 (USEPA, 2002). The membrane of 0.45 ?m pore size was removed from the filtration system...

Gallagher, Meghan

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

272

Reading Comprehension - Soil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soil Soil What Is Soil? Soil is the loose top layer of Earth's surface. Plants depend on soil. It holds them up. It provides them with food and water. Soil is made of _________ fungi humus particles . These very small pieces mostly come from rocks broken down by weathering. Other soil particles come from rotting remains of plants and animals. The part of soil that comes from living things is called _________ loam organic matter texture . Soil Life Many small organisms live in soil. They include worms, bacteria, and fungi. _________ Fungi Humus Particles are like plants, but they aren't green. And they have no leaves, flowers, or roots. The organisms feed on dead plants and animals. They cause them to _________ decay loam particles , or break down. The decayed plant and animal matter is called _________ fungi humus

273

Cleaning excavated soil using extraction agents: A state-of-the-art review. Final report, June 1985-January 1989  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a state-of-the-art review of soil-washing technologies and their applicability to Superfund sites in the United States. The review includes Superfund site soil and contamination characteristics, as well as soil cleaning technologies, their principles of operation, and process parameters. The technical feasibility of using soil-washing technologies at Superfund sites in the United States is assessed. Contaminants are classified as volatile, hydrophilic, or hydrophobic organics; PCBs; heavy metals; or radioactive material. Soils are classified as either sand, silt, clay, or waste fill. Three generic types of extractive treatments are identified for cleaning excavated soils: water washing augmented with a basic or surfactant agent to remove organics, and water washing with an acidic or chelating agent to remove organics and heavy metals; organics-solvent washing to remove hydrophobic organics and PCBs; and air or steam stripping to remove volatile organics.

Raghaven, R.; Coles, E.; Dietz, D.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Fuzzy control model and simulation of supply air system in a test rig of low-temperature hot-water radiator system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper proposes a typical multi-variable, large time delay and nonlinear system, self-extracting rules fuzzy control (SERFC) method to maintain a stable temperature value in a built environment chamber with supply air system and hot-water system. The parameters of the transfer functions in every control loop were identified by experimental data in a format of time sequences obtained from the experiment of dynamical responding performance. Fuzzy control simulations were implemented based on adjustment of the supply air system and hot-water system by SERFC. The simulation results show that SERFC for environment chamber has satisfied performance. There is no higher overshoot and stable error. The work presented in here can be used to deal with those complex thermal processes with difficulties in modeling of fuzzy control rules and provide a foundation for further application of fuzzy control in HVAC system.

Zhen Lu; Jili Zhang; Yongpan Chen; Tianyi Zhao; Hui Liu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Environmental Tradeoffs in a Desert City: An Investigation of Water Use, Energy Consumption, and Local Air Temperature in Phoenix, AZ  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Tradeoffs in a Desert City: An Investigation of Water Use, Energy Consumption tradeoffs between vegetation cover, microclimate temperature, and water and energy consumption. References, AZ CONCLUSION · Research Observations: · Water Consumption, Energy Use, Vegetation Cover

Hall, Sharon J.

276

Hydrogen oxidation in soils as a possible toxic-effects indicator  

SciTech Connect

Efficient soil bioassays are needed in a screening array to determine the toxicities of industrial products and wastes. Hydrogen consumption is a common soil microbiological process that we evaluated as a possible soil indicator of toxic effects. Elemental tritium was used as a tracer to determine the H/sub 2/ oxidation rates in soils. The H/sub 2/ bioassay can be completed within 24 h using liquid scintillation counting of the tritium tracer. This test was used to evaluate the effects of known toxic chemicals (e.g., heavy metals, herbicides, and air pollutants), as well as a variety of suspected environmentally harmful compounds (e.g., waste waters, particulates, and sludges from industrial processes) on H/sub 2/ oxidation in soils. This bioassay responded to test compounds at concentrations shown to be toxic in other soil microbiological investigations.

Rogers, R.D. (U.S. EPA, Las Vegas); McFarlane, J.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Amending constructed roadside and urban soils with large volume-based compost applications: effects on water quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

field plots on a constructed soil with an 8.5% slope. Three TxDOT compost application methods were tested; incorporation at 25% by volume (CMT), topdressing over vegetation (GUC), and topdressing a 5-cm compost woodchip mix over bare soil (ECC). In 2003...

Hansen, Nels Edward

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

278

The effect of various cropping systems upon the stability of aggregates: the rate of water infiltration, and the organic matter content of three soil conditions in the Texas Blacklands.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for 50 years had more than 75 percent oi' its mass made up of soil granules tbs siss of grains of sand and bits of clay" ~ These small soil granules ars not resistant to the impact of rainfall and vhsn they break dovn? both vater and air lanes... the averages are baseg Tabes 2, Analysis of mricnncs of stable a~tea 0, 20 ssc snd larger in the ccnrfoee her of soil, Rsanirsd ~ of Saene of ccsriatien frasdon Sea of ~s Haan ayah toeni, 01, 05 6 090 35 124e0$085 5o6cc. 3a33 Corot sorn lsgnss ~i oem...

Quintero, Angel H

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Soil Moisture Memory in Climate Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water balance considerations at the soil surface lead to an equation that relates the autocorrelation of soil moisture in climate models to 1) seasonality in the statistics of the atmospheric forcing, 2) the variation of evaporation with soil ...

Randal D. Koster; Max J. Suarez

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

ARM - Measurement - Soil moisture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

moisture moisture ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil moisture The moisture of the soil measured near the surface. This includes soil wetness and soil water potential. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AMC : Ameriflux Measurement Component CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems SOIL : Soil Measurement from the SGP SWATS : Soil Water and Temperature System SEBS : Surface Energy Balance System

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water air soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Overview of different aspects of climate change effects on soils.  

SciTech Connect

Climate change [i.e., high atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations (?400 ppm); increasing air temperatures (2-4°C or greater); significant and/or abrupt changes in daily, seasonal, and inter-annual temperature; changes in the wet/dry cycles; intensive rainfall and/or heavy storms; extended periods of drought; extreme frost; heat waves and increased fire frequency] is and will significantly affect soil properties and fertility, water resources, food quantity and quality, and environmental quality. Biotic processes that consume atmospheric CO2 and create organic carbon (C) that is either reprocessed to CO2 or stored in soils, are the subject of active current investigations with great concern over the influence of climate change. In addition, abiotic C cycling and its influence on the inorganic C pool in soils is a fundamental global process in which acidic atmospheric CO2 participates in the weathering of carbonate and silicate minerals, ultimately delivering bicarbonate and Ca2+ or other cations that precipitate in the form of carbonates in soils or are transported to the rivers, lakes, and oceans. Soil responses to climate change will be complex, and there are many uncertainties and unresolved issues. The objective of the review is to initiate and further stimulate a discussion about some important and challenging aspects of climate-change effects on soils, such as accelerated weathering of soil minerals and resulting C and elemental fluxes in and out of soils, soil/geo-engineering methods used to increase C sequestration in soils, soil organic matter (SOM) protection, transformation and mineralization, and SOM temperature sensitivity. This review reports recent discoveries and identifies key research needs required to understand the effects of climate change on soils.

Qafoku, Nikolla

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Pearl millet (Pennisetum typhoides) response to soil variability in sandy ustalfs near Niamey, Niger, West Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were digested and analyzed as described previously. 20 Table 4. Treatments lo ed in the limin trial 0 lie Rate Factor'r 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 Producnve Pmductive... water extracts (1:1) were taken trom all 26 surface soils and analyzed for Al, K, Ca, and Mg. Soil fmm each site was thoroughly mixed by hand in a large basin before placing it into the pots. Each pot contained 7250 g of air dried soil. Millet...

Wendt, John William

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

283

A study of air flow through saturated porous media and its applications to in-situ air sparging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The efficiency of an in situ air sparging system is controlled by the extent of contact between injected air and contaminated soil and pore fluid. Characterizing the mechanisms governing air propagation through saturated ...

Marulanda, Catalina, 1971-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Relationships between soil CO2 concentration and CO2 production, temperature, water content, and gas diffusivity: implications for field studies through sensitivity analyses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil CO2 levels reflect CO2 production and transport in soil and provide valuable information about soil CO2 dynamics. However, extracting information from soil CO2 profiles is often difficult because of the comp...

Shoji Hashimoto; Hikaru Komatsu

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Elevated critical micelle concentration in soil–water system and its implication on PAH removal and surfactant selecting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Triton X-100 (TX100) and Brij 35 (B35) were used to investigate the elevated critical micelle concentration (CMC) induced by surfactant sorption and its influence on PAH removal in soil washing systems. The surfa...

Helian Li; Jiajun Chen; Lin Jiang

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

STEP 8. The wet well stores filtered water before it is pumped into the air-stripping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, to produce an annual report on the quality of its drinking water. In addition to reminding consumers into the Upper Glacial aquifer (see page 3), the Lab's "finished" drinking water is produced with pride by the staff of BNL's Water Treatment Facility (WTF) of the Energy & Utilities Division. Producing BNL

Ohta, Shigemi

287

Managing Soil Salinity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is high enough, the plants will wilt and die, no matter how much you water them. Routine soil testing can identify your soil?s salinity levels and suggest measures you can take to correct the specific salinity problem in your soil. Salinity and salt... The terms salt and salinity are often used inter- changeably, and sometimes incorrectly. A salt is sim- ply an inorganic mineral that can dissolve in water. Many people associate salt with sodium chloride? common table salt. In reality, the salts that affect...

Provin, Tony; Pitt, John L.

2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

288

An evaluation of hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical behavior of processed oil shale solid waste 2; The use of time domain reflectometry (TDR) for monitoring in-situ volumetric water content in processed oil shale  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the use of time domain reflectometry (TDR) for monitoring volumetric water contents in processed oil shale solid waste. TDR measures soil water content via a correlation between the dielectric constant (K) of the 3 phase (soil-water-air) system and the volumetric water content ({theta}{sub v}). An extensive bench top research program has been conducted to evaluate and verify the use of this technique in processed oil shale solid waste. This study utilizes columns of processed oil shale packed to known densities and varying water contents and compares the columetric water content measured via TDR and the volumetric water content measured through gravimetric determination.

Reeves, T.L.; Elgezawi, S.M. (Wyoming Univ., Laramie, WY (USA). Dept. of Civil Engineering); Kaser, T.G. (GIGO Computer and Electronic, Laramie, WY (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13- Particulate Emissions from Fossil Fuel Fired Steam or Hot Water Generating Units (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this regulation is to limit emissions of particulate matter from fossil fuel fired and wood-fired steam or hot water generating units.

290

The linkage between investments in extension and farmers' adoption of soil and water conservation practices in southern Honduras  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are produced on steepland farms (IICA 1995), the opportunity cost is not only the value of the production lost by the farmer, but also the risk of jeopardizing the food security of the Honduran population. Off-site effects of soil erosion are diverse... locations, the off-site effects of upstream erosion have greater importance than on-site effects. In southern Honduras, preliminary studies are being conducted to estimate the relative importance of on-farm and off-farm effects of soil erosion. Samayoa...

Santos Chavez, Hector Ricardo

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

291

E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting soil erosion Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collection: Mathematics 2 Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Water Erosion Summary: and in roadbeds. Many vegetation and soil properties affect the risk...

292

Reorientation of the ‘free OH’ group in the top-most layer of air/water interface of sodium fluoride aqueous solution probed with sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Many experimental and theoretical studies have established the specific anion, as well as cation effects on the hydrogen-bond structures at the air/water interface of electrolyte solutions. However, the ion effects on the top-most layer of the air/water interface, which is signified by the non-hydrogen-bonded so-called ‘free O-H’ group, has not been discussed or studied. In this report, we present the measurement of changes of the orientational angle of the ‘free O-H’ group at the air/water interface of the sodium fluoride (NaF) solutions at different concentrations using the interface selective sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) in the ssp and ppp polarizations. The polarization dependent SFG-VS results show that the average tilt angle of the ‘free O-H’ changes from about 35.3 degrees ± 0.5 degrees to 43.4 degrees ± 2.1degrees as the NaF concentration increase from 0 to 0.94M (nearly saturated). Such tilt angle change is around the axis of the other O-H group of the same water molecule at the top-most layer at the air/water interface that is hydrogen-bonded to the water molecules below the top-most layer. These results provide quantitative molecular details of the ion effects of the NaF salt on the structure of the water molecules at the top-most layer of the air/water interfacial, even though both the Na+ cation and the F- anion are believed to be among the most excluded ions from the air/water interface.

Feng, Ran-Ran; Guo, Yuan; Wang, Hongfei

2014-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

293

Air Conditioning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Air Conditioning ... CHEMISTS and engineers use air conditioning as a valuable tool in more than two hundred industries. ... Air conditioning is a tool with many facets. ...

MARGARET INGELS

1938-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

294

Effects of Soil Moisture on the Responses of Soil Temperatures to Climate Change in Cold Regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At high latitudes, changes in soil moisture could alter soil temperatures independently of air temperature changes by interacting with the snow thermal rectifier. The authors investigated this mechanism with model experiments in the Community Land ...

Zachary M. Subin; Charles D. Koven; William J. Riley; Margaret S. Torn; David M. Lawrence; Sean C. Swenson

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Results of analyses of fur samples from the San Joaquin Kit Fox and associated soil and water samples from the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Tupman, California  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to determine whether analysis of the elemental content of fur from San Joaquin kit foxes (Vulpes macrotis mutica) and of water and soil from kit fox habitats could be used to make inferences concerning the cause of an observed decline in the kit fox population on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1). Fur samples that had been collected previously from NPR-1, another oil field (NPR-2), and two sites with no oil development were subjected to neutron activation analysis. In addition, soil samples were collected from the home ranges of individual foxes from undisturbed portions of major soil types on NPR-1 and from wastewater samples were collected from tanks and sumps and subjected to neutron activation analysis. Most elemental concentrations in fur were highest at Camp Roberts and lowest on the undeveloped portions of NPR-I. Fur concentrations were intermediate on the developed oil fields but were correlated with percent disturbance and with number of wells on NPR-1 and NPR-2. The fact that most elements covaried across the range of sites suggests that some pervasive source such as soil was responsible. However, fur concentrations were not correlated with soft concentrations. The kit foxes on the developed portion of NPR-1 did not have concentrations of elements in fur relative to other sites that would account for the population decline in the early 1980s. The oil-related elements As, Ba, and V were elevated in fox fur from oil fields, but only As was sufficiently elevated to suggest a risk of toxicity in individual foxes. However, arsenic concentrations suggestive of sublethal toxicity were found in only 0.56% of foxes from developed oil fields, too few to account for a population decline.

Suter, G.W. II; Rosen, A.E.; Beauchamp, J.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kato, T.T. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Use of EIChroM`s TRU resin in the determination of americium, plutonium and uranium in air filter and water samples  

SciTech Connect

TRU Resin, an extraction chromatographic material (octyl (phenyl)-N,Ndiisobutylcarbamoyl-methylphosphene oxide (CMPO) dissolved in tributyl phosphate (TBP)) manufactured by EIChroM Industries, was tested for its actinide sorption and desorption characteristics. A study was initiated to demonstrate the effectiveness of extracting plutonium, americium and uranium from water and air filter samples from the Environmental Measurements Laboratory`s Quality Assessment Program (QAP), and the effectiveness of subsequent desorption of one chemical species at a time in order to prepare each of them for a spectrometry. Crossover of plutonium into the americium fraction with the TRU Resin was observed and could not be eliminated while using TRU Resin only. However, prior extraction of plutonium using an anion exchange resin can overcome this problem. A method for the determination of americium is proposed which combines the extraction of plutonium onto Bio-Rad AG 1-X8 anion exchange resin with the extraction of americium using the TRU Resin. This method was tested on three triplicate sets of QAP air filters and two triplicate sets of QAP water samples. The recoveries ranged from 70 to 90 percent, and the results were identical to those obtained by the existing methods. The time required to perform the analysis for americium was shortened from 5 weeks to 1 week.

Berne, A.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Air Handler Condensate Recovery at the Environmental Protection Agencys Science and Ecosystem Support Division: Best Management Practice Case Study #14: Alternate Water Sources, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) (Fact Sheet)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

drought in the southeastern United States caused drought in the southeastern United States caused the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to address the need for water conservation and develop a water management plan for their Science and Ecosystem Support Division (SESD). The water management plan aimed to reduce SESD's potable water usage (more than 2.4 million gallons in fiscal year 2008) through an air handler condensate recovery project. The EPA SESD encompasses 12 acres in Athens, Georgia. A single laboratory building was constructed in 1996 consisting of 66,200 square feet configured for a mix use of laboratory and office activities. In May 2008, SESD completed an air handler condensate recovery system. The system routes condensate from rooftop air handler units to the facility's cooling tower,

298

Final soil removal report for the remediation of contaminated soils at the Old Burn Area (site 11), Savannah Air National Guard Base, Savannah International Airport, Savannah, Georgia. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

Partial Contents: Source removal requirements, remediation activities, general site activities, excavation and backfilling of pit, excavation and backfilling of PIT, 4.4 off-site soil treatment and disposal, site restoration activities, final site inspection, analytical laboratory results, PIT No. 1, perimeter Sampling - Pit No. 1, Pit Floor Sampling - Pit No. 1, Pit No. 2. Perimeter Sampling - Pit No. 2. Pit Floor Sampling - Pit No. 2. quality assurance/quality control samples.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Occurrence of Livestock-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Turkey and Broiler Barns and Contamination of Air and Soil Surfaces in Their Vicinity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...rainy or windy conditions (wind speed of 5 m/s), no air...in rural areas, contact of wildlife with the sampled ground surfaces...bacteria are carried by the wind and sediment on the ground...thus-far-unknown time. Changing wind directions over time are one...

A. Friese; J. Schulz; K. Zimmermann; B.-A. Tenhagen; A. Fetsch; J. Hartung; U. Rösler

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

Plant responses of drip irrigated trees to climate and water stress  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the atmosphere and by the movement of water within the plant preventing the desiccation of leaf tissue. Thus atmospheric evaporative demand determined by net radiation, vapour pressure deficit, wind speed and air temperatures is the major determinant.... Water vapour diffuses outward through the stomata in the process of transpirat. :on. When absorption of water by the roots equals the rate of transpiration, leaf cells remain turgid and stomata stay open. Iiowever, when the soil around the roots...

Punthakey, Jehangir Framroze

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water air soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Isolating Effects of Water Table Dynamics, Terrain, and Soil Moisture Heterogeneity on the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Using Coupled Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

depth (PBLD), (b) vertical wind speed (w), (c) latent heatdepth (PBLD), (b) vertical wind speed (w), (c) latent heatdepth (PBLD) and (b) vertical wind speed (w) versus water

Rihani, Jehan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Determination of Water Saturation in Relatively Dry Porous Media Using Gas-phase Tracer Tests  

SciTech Connect

Soil desiccation (drying), involving water evaporation induced by dry air injection and extraction, is a potentially robust remediation process to slow migration of inorganic or radionuclide contaminants through the vadose zone. The application of gas-phase partitioning tracer tests has been proposed as a means to estimate initial water volumes and to monitor the progress of the desiccation process at pilot-test and field sites. In this paper, tracer tests have been conducted in porous medium columns with various water saturations using sulfur hexafluoride as the conservative tracer and tricholorofluoromethane and difluoromethane as the water-partitioning tracers. For porous media with minimal silt and/or organic matter fractions, tracer tests provided reasonable saturation estimates for saturations close to zero. However, for sediments with significant silt and/or organic matter fractions, tracer tests only provided satisfactory results when the water saturation was at least 0.1 - 0.2. For dryer conditions, the apparent tracer retardation increases due to air – soil sorption, which is not included in traditional retardation coefficients derived from advection-dispersion equations accounting only for air – water partitioning and water – soil sorption. Based on these results, gas-phase partitioning tracer tests may be used to determine initial water volumes in sediments, provided the initial water saturations are sufficiently large. However, tracer tests are not suitable for quantifying moisture content in desiccated sediments.

Oostrom, Martinus; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Truex, Michael J.; Dane, Jacob H.

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

[Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 3, Sampling and analysis plan (SAP): Phase 1, Task 4, Field Investigation: Draft  

SciTech Connect

In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), initiated an investigation to evaluate a potential Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, the offsite migration of contaminated ground water from WPAFB. WPAFB retained the services of the Environmental Management Operations (EMO) and its principle subcontractor, International Technology Corporation (IT) to complete Phase 1 of the environmental investigation of ground-water contamination at WPAFB. Phase 1 of the investigation involves the short-term evaluation and potential design for a program to remove ground-water contamination that appears to be migrating across the western boundary of Area C, and across the northern boundary of Area B along Springfield Pike. Primarily, Task 4 of Phase 1 focuses on collection of information at the Area C and Springfield Pike boundaries of WPAFB. This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) has been prepared to assist in completion of the Task 4 field investigation and is comprised of the Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) and the Field Sampling Plan (FSP).

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Effect of surface tension on the acoustic radiation pressure-induced motion of the water-air interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effect of surface tension on the acoustic radiation pressure-induced motion of the water to be a function of the surface tension. The time of mound formation measurementsin cleanwaterat low.Our objectiveisto investigatetheeffectsof surface tension on mound formation. We usea boundaryintegralmethodto

Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T. "Pierre"

305

Estimation of mean annual effective dose through radon concentration in the water and indoor air of Islamabad and Murree  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......strength to the energy of alpha particle...particles of different energies. Different isotopes...different alpha energies and produce different...about 30 min, the average radon content is...estimate of water consumption (60 la1), respectively...having ventilated homes structure, though......

N. Ali; E. U. Khan; P. Akhter; F. Khan; A. Waheed

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Changes in the resistance to water movement through the soil/plant pathway in salinized sunflower (Helianthus giganteus)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of transpiration values, resistance to water flow across the roots, and between roots and leaves could be calculated. By 5 and 6 days of salinization, there were increases in the resistance to water flow across roots at the 75 mM and higher salt levels...

Balint, Donna Elizabeth

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

307

Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Revision 1, Demonstration system design  

SciTech Connect

Over the last nine years IIT Research Institute (IITRI) has been developing and testing the in situ heating and soil decontamination process for the remediation of soils containing hazardous organic contaminants. In this process the soil is heated in situ using electrical energy. The contaminants are removed from the soil due to enhanced vaporization, steam distillation and stripping. The vaporized contaminants, water vapor and air are recovered from the heated zone by means of a vacuum manifold system which collects gases from below surface as well as from the soil surface. A vapor barrier is used to prevent fugitive emissions of the contaminants and to control air infiltration to minimize dilution of the contaminant gases and vapors. The recovered gases and vapors are conveyed to an on site vapor treatment system for the clean up of the vent gases. Electrical energy is applied to the soil by forming an array of electrodes in the soil which are electrically interconnected and supplied with power. The electrodes are placed in drilled bore holes which are made through the contaminated zone. There are two versions of the in situ heating and soil treatment process: the f irst version is called the In Situ Radio Frequency (RF) Soil Decontamination Process and the second version is called the In Situ Electromagnetic (EM) Soil Decontamination Process. The first version, the RF Process is capable of heating the soil in a temperature range of 100{degrees} to 400{degrees}C. The soil temperature in the second version, the EM Process, is limited to the boiling point of water under native conditions. Thus the soil will be heated to a temperature of about 85{degrees} to 95{degrees}C. In this project IITRI will demonstrate the EM Process for in situ soil decontamination at K-25 Site due to the fact that most of the contaminants of concern are volatile organics which can be removed by heating the soil to a temperature range of 85{degrees} to 95{degrees}C.

Dev, H.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

308

Bibliography of work on the heterogeneous photocatalytic removal of hazardous compounds from water and air, Update Number 2 to October 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Solar Industrial Program has developed processes that destroy hazardous substances in or remove them from water and air. The processes of interest in this report are based on the application of heterogeneous photocatalysts, principally titanium dioxide or modifications thereof, but work on other heterogeneous catalysts is included in this compilation. This report continues bibliographies that were published in May, 1994, and October, 1995. The previous reports included 663 and 574 citations, respectively. This update contains an additional 518 references. These were published during the period from June 1995 to October 1996, or are references from prior years that were not included in the previous reports. The work generally focuses on removing hazardous contaminants from air or water to meet environmental or health regulations. This report also references work on properties of semiconductor photocatalysts and applications of photocatalytic chemistry in organic synthesis. This report follows the same organization as the previous publications. The first part provides citations for work done in a few broad categories that are generic to the process. Three tables provide references to work on specific substances. The first table lists organic compounds that are included in various lists of hazardous substances identified by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The second table lists compounds not included in those categories, but which have been treated in a photocatalytic process. The third table covers inorganic compounds that are on EPA lists of hazardous materials or that have been treated by a photocatalytic process. A short update on companies that are active in providing products or services based on photocatalytic processes is provided.

Blake, D.M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Analytical solutions for benchmarking cold regions subsurface water flow and energy transport models: One-dimensional soil thaw  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kenzie b , Kerry T.B. MacQuarrie a , Clifford I. Voss c a Department of Civil Engineering, University to impede the migration of contaminated water [30], to simulate the influence of design alternatives

McKenzie, Jeffrey M.

310

A simulation-based soil and water resource evaluation for ratoon cropping grain sorghum in the central blacklands of Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the style of the Transactions of the ASAE (American Society of Agricultural Engineers). This increased production will require greater use of chemicals and of new and existing technology. A practical way to control agricultural non-point sources of water... the style of the Transactions of the ASAE (American Society of Agricultural Engineers). This increased production will require greater use of chemicals and of new and existing technology. A practical way to control agricultural non-point sources of water...

Stinson, David Lawrence

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

311

Availability and distribution of heavy metals, nitrogen, and phosphorus from sewage sludge in the plant-soil-water continuum  

SciTech Connect

Research was conducted during 1984 and 1985 to determine Cd, Cu, N, Ni, P, and Zn availabilities to barley (Hordeum vulgare) and corn (Zea mays) grown on four sludge-amended soils. An aerobically digested sewage sludge, which was dewatered for approximately 2 years on sandbeds, was obtained from a sewage-treatment plant with major industrial inputs. A 14-day anaerobic N incubation study indicated that mineralization of sludge organic N varied from 9.2% at the 42 Mg ha(-1) sludge rate to 4.2% at the 210 Mg ha(-1) rate. This relatively low percentage of N mineralized from the sludge may reflect the inhibitory effects of the high sludge-metal levels on N transformations and the changes in sludge composition during long-term dewatering on sandbeds. Sludge application increased crop yields, except where the amounts of N mineralized from the sludge was inadequate to supply the N requirement of the crop. Crop yields were not decreased by either metal phytotoxity or P deficiency on the four sludge-amended soils.

Rappaport, B.D.; Scott, J.D.; Martens, D.C.; Reneau, R.B.; Simpson, T.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

The effect of a cold-air outbreak on the continental shelf water of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

distribution of sigma-t with waters further offshore. 111 Tixne-averaged local rates of change are used with estimates of advective rates of change determined for both cruise periods to obtain estimates of the xnaterial derivatives of vertically..., for thermal 2 energy the maxximum value, -1500 cal/cm /day, occurred in the deeper offshore region. An estimate of the average latent plus sensible heat flux for 2 four selected stations of -1135 cal/crn /day was obtained from the time-averaged material...

Parker, Charles Allen

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

313

Global Ecology and Biogeography, (Global Ecol. Biogeogr.) (2013) 22, 470482, DOI: 10.1111/geb.12012 Soil water balance performs better than climatic water variables in tree species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Global Ecology and Biogeography, (Global Ecol. Biogeogr.) (2013) 22, 470­482, DOI: 10.1111/geb water balance indices to predict the ecological niches of forest tree species. Location: France Methods aiming to determine the ecological niches of plant species and their responses to climate change. Key

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

314

Compressed Air  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BPA Utility Reimbursement Programs for Compressed Air Projects Customer Proposal Template Measurement & Verification Plan for Compressed Air CA 2006-15 A template for utilities to...

315

Relationship of Soil Respiration to Crop and Landscape in the Walnut Creek Watershed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil respiration is an important component of the carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems. Many factors exert controls on soil respiration, including temperature, soil water content, organic matter, soil texture, and plant root activity. This ...

T. B. Parkin; T. C. Kaspar; Z. Senwo; J. H. Prueger; J. L. Hatfield

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Responses of soil and water chemistry to mountain pine beetle induced tree mortality in Grand County, Colorado, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

impacted by the MPB (Ciesla, 2009). The Colorado-Big Thompson project stores water on the western slope County, Colorado, USA David W. Clow a, , Charles Rhoades b , Jennifer Briggs c , Megan Caldwell c Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA

Lewis Jr., William M.

317

Long-Term Dynamics of Phosphorus Forms and Retention in Manure-Amended Soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

All air-dried samples were stored in a dry and cool storage facility for no longer than a few weeks before processing. ... While these losses are insignificant in agronomic terms, peak concns. of P (?30,000 ?g/L TP) in surface water during a runoff event, could be of considerable concern in sensitive catchments. ... the immediate and long-term effects of animal waste application to soil in lab. ...

Johannes Lehmann; Zhongdong Lan; Charles Hyland; Shinjiro Sato; Dawit Solomon; Quirine M. Ketterings

2005-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

318

Effect of soil freezing on particulate resuspension  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of small scale laboratory tests that were conducted to determine the effect of soil freezing on soil resuspension. Nontransuranic contaminated soil form the Radioactive Waste Management Complex was subjected to a series of test conditions to determine respirable and nonrespirable fractions of airborne dust. A separate fraction of the same soil was spiked with Pu-239 and subjected to the same test conditions. Concentrations of resuspended soil and Pu in air were determined. Test results show that: (a) the largest fraction of soil resuspended is in the nonrespirable size fraction, (b) the concentration of resuspended soil in air is highly dependent on surface air velocity, and (c) freezing is not as effective at reducing resuspension of fine dry soil as it is with coarse soil, and (d) artificially prepared Pu contaminated soil has a high proportion of the total activity distributed on ultrafine material, reacts inversely to the mass movement of soil, and does not adequately imitate Pu movement in an actual contaminated soil. 26 figs., 3 tabs.

Duce, S.W.; Shaw, P.G.; Winberg, M.R.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Maryland Soil Conservation Districts Law (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

It is the policy of the state to conserve the soil, water, and related resources of the state through establishing regulations for land-use practices related to soil erosion. This legislation...

320

Rainwater Harvesting: Soil Storage and Infiltration System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A soil storage and infiltration system collects rainfall runoff from the roofs of buildings and directs it underground where it infiltrates the soil. Such a system conserves water and protects it from surface pollution. This publication describes...

Mechell, Justin; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water air soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Water-Heating Dehumidifier  

A small appliance developed at ORNL dehumidifies air and then recycles heat to warm water in a water heater. The device circulates cool, dry air in summer and warm air in winter. In addition, the invention can cut the energy required to run a conventional water heater by an estimated 50 per cent....

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

322

Water-dispersible soil particles and the transport of nonpoint-source pollutants in the lower Rio Grande Valley  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

complexation and sorption reactions. SUSPENDED PARTICLES IN NATURAL SYSTEMS AND THEIR SUSPENSION STABILITY Colloids are solid particles with a diameter between 0, 01 pm and 10 )tm and very low water solubility which remain in the suspended state due... in operating the transinission electron microscope. TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTE I R INTRODUCIION. Particle-Mediated Transport of Nonpoint-Soutce Pollutants. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Suspended Particles in Natural Systems and Their Suspension...

Przepiora, Andrzej

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission and Opportunities for Applications Users  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water in the soil—both its amount (soil moisture) and its state (freeze/thaw)—plays a key role in water and energy cycles, in weather and climate, and in the carbon cycle. Additionally, soil moisture touches upon human ...

Brown, Molly E.

324

Effects of Phosphorus Application in Different Soil Layers on Root Growth, Yield, and Water-Use Efficiency of Winter Wheat Grown Under Semi-Arid Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Deep phosphorus application can be a usefull measure to improve crops’ performance in semi-arid regions, but more knowledge of both its general effects and effects on specific crops is required to optimize treatments. Thus, the aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of phosphorus (P) application at different soil layers on root growth, grain yield, and water-use efficiency (WUE) of winter wheat grown on the semi-arid Loess Plateau of China and to explore the relationship between root distribution and grain yield. The experiment consisted of four P treatments in a randomized complete block design with three replicates and two cultivars: one drought-sensitive (Xiaoyan 22, XY22) and one drought-tolerant (Changhan 58, CH58). The four P treatments were no P (control, CK), surface P (SP), deep P (DP), and deep-band P application (DBP). CH58 produced larger and deeper root systems, and had higher grain yields and WUE, under the deep P treatments (DP and DBP) than under SP, clearly showing that deep P placement had beneficial effects on the drought-tolerant cultivar. In contrast, the grain yield and root growth of XY22 did not differ between DP or DBP and SP treatments. Further, root dry weight (RW) and root length (RL) in deep soil layer (30-100 cm) were closely positively correlated with grain yield and WUE of CH58 (but not XY22), highlighting the connections between a well-developed subsoil root system and both high grain yield and WUE for the drought-tolerant cultivar. WUE correlated strongly with grain yield for both cultivars (r=0.94, P<0.001). In conclusion, deep application of P fertilizer is a practical and feasible means of increasing grain yield and WUE of rainfed winter wheat in semi-arid regions, by promoting deep root development of drought-tolerant cultivars.

Li-yun KANG; Shan-chao YUE; Shi-qing LI

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Air Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What We Monitor & Why » What We Monitor & Why » Air Quality Air Quality To preserve our existing wilderness-area air quality, LANL implements a conscientious program of air monitoring. April 12, 2012 Real-time data monitoring for particulate matter An air monitoring field team member tests one of LANL's tapered element oscillating microbalance samplers, which collects real-time particulate matter data. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email LANL monitors air quality 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Why we monitor air LANL monitors many different pathways in order to assess their impact on workers, the public, animals, and plants. We monitor the air around the Laboratory to ensure our operations are not affecting the air of nearby

326

Application of the ultrasonic technique and high-speed filming for the study of the structure of air-water bubbly flows  

SciTech Connect

Multiphase flows are very common in industry, oftentimes involving very harsh environments and fluids. Accordingly, there is a need to determine the dispersed phase holdup using noninvasive fast responding techniques; besides, knowledge of the flow structure is essential for the assessment of the transport processes involved. The ultrasonic technique fulfills these requirements and could have the capability to provide the information required. In this paper, the potential of the ultrasonic technique for application to two-phase flows was investigated by checking acoustic attenuation data against experimental data on the void fraction and flow topology of vertical, upward, air-water bubbly flows in the zero to 15% void fraction range. The ultrasonic apparatus consisted of one emitter/receiver transducer and three other receivers at different positions along the pipe circumference; simultaneous high-speed motion pictures of the flow patterns were made at 250 and 1000 fps. The attenuation data for all sensors exhibited a systematic interrelated behavior with void fraction, thereby testifying to the capability of the ultrasonic technique to measure the dispersed phase holdup. From the motion pictures, basic gas phase structures and different flows patterns were identified that corroborated several features of the acoustic attenuation data. Finally, the acoustic wave transit time was also investigated as a function of void fraction. (author)

Carvalho, R.D.M.; Venturini, O.J.; Tanahashi, E.I. [Universidade Federal de Itajuba (UNIFEI), Itajuba (Brazil); Neves, F. Jr. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba (Brazil); Franca, F.A. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas (Brazil)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

327

INDOOR AIR QUALITY QUESTIONNAIRE HUMAN RESOURCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INDOOR AIR QUALITY QUESTIONNAIRE HUMAN RESOURCES FORM Risk and Compliance | One Washington Square THE AIR QUALITY ISSUE AND LOCATION Name: Date: Department: Phone No: Work Location: Suspected Air Quality, humidity, drafts, stagnant air, odors)? Is there a history of flooding or water damage? If so, please list

Eirinaki, Magdalini

328

E-Print Network 3.0 - air source heat Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

air andor water is the source of thermal energy. Thermal energy is transferred from the heating... September 2000; accepted 19 December 2000 Abstract Hot air and hot water...

329

SOME SOIL FACTORS AFFECTING TREE GROWTH  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...characterized by measuring the water held by a soil at varying...1931 ). MATTSON, S, Electrodialysis of the colloidal soil...normal entrance of both water and mineral nutrients...adequately controlled, any treatment which either de-creases...normal entrance of both water and mineral nutrients...

ROBT. M. SALTER

1940-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

330

Phytoremediation of Heavy Metal Toxicity and Role of soil in Rhizobacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract- Our surrounding is filled up with a large number of toxicants in different forms. They contaminate our water, land and atmosphere where we live. Heavy metal pollution of soil is a significant environmental problem and has its negative impact on human health and agriculture. Rhizosphere, as an important interface of soil and plant, plays a significant role in phytoremediation of contaminated soil by heavy metals, in which, microbial populations are known to affect heavy metal mobility and availability to the plant through release of chelating agents, acidification, phosphate solubilization and redox changes. Phytoremediation of toxic heavy metals could be carried out by using specific metallophytes. Green plants are the lungs of nature with unique ability to purifying impure air by photosynthesis and remove or minimize heavy metals toxicity from soil and water ecosystem by absorption, accumulation and biotransformation process. This article paper reviews some recent advances in effect and significance of rhizobacteria in phytoremediation of heavy metal toxicity in contaminated soils. There is also a need to improve our understanding of the mechanisms involved in the transfer and mobilization of heavy metals by rhizobacteria and to conduct research on the selection of microbial isolates from Rhizosphere of plants growing metal contaminated soils for specific restoration programmes. Index Terms- Environmental, heavy metal toxicity,

Rajendra Prasad Bharti; Abhilasha Shri Vastava; Kishor Soni; Asha Tiwari; Shivbhanu More

331

Occurrence of Nitrites in Soils.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capacity for producing nitrates may form large amounts of nitrites. Nitrites may persist in the soil or in soil extracts for several weeks. Magnesium carbonate and calcium car- bonate may favor the formation of nitrites. Water equivaIent to 50 per cent... ............................................. Method of work 5 Nitrites in soils without additions of nitrogenous materials ........ 6 Nitrification capacity as measured by nitric nitrogen alone. and by nitric and nitrous nitrogen combined ....................... 6...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Sterges, A. J.

1930-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Surface Soil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface Soil Surface Soil Surface Soil We compare local soil samples with samples collected from northern New Mexico locations that are beyond the range of potential influence from normal Laboratory operations. April 12, 2012 Farm soil sampling Two LANL environmental field team members take soil samples from a farm. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Measurements are compared to samples from the regional sites and compared to averages over time to see if there are changes in concentrations. Monitoring surface soil LANL has monitored surface soils since the early 1970s. Institutional surface soil samples are collected from 17 on-site, 11 perimeter, and six regional (background) locations every three years.

333

Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Soil Biota  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

powerhouse of soil, include an incredible diversity of organisms. Tons of soil biota, including micro

334

Consolidation theories for saturated-unsaturated soils and numerical simulation of residential buildings on expansive soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to perform uncoupled two or three dimensional consolidation calculation for both expansive soils and collapsible soils. From the analysis, the equivalent effective stress and excessive pore water pressure can be easily calculated. At the same time...

Zhang, Xiong

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Modelling location-dependent environmental impacts in life cycle assessment: water use, desertification and soil erosion. Application to energy crops grown in Spain.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Soil and freshwater are two absolutely essential resources for ecosystems and humanity. Agriculture depends very much on these resources, and so, without their correct management,… (more)

Núñez Pineda, Montse

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Spectroscopic Studies of Atmospheric Relevant Air-Aqueous and Air-Silica DISSERTATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

process in the atmosphere. As models of these phenomena, interfacial water vapor uptake by #12;iii to the air-water interface were examined. Sum frequency generation (SFG), a surface specific techniqueSpectroscopic Studies of Atmospheric Relevant Air-Aqueous and Air-Silica Interfaces DISSERTATION

337

ARM - Lesson Plans: Air Pressure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

activity to work. It is important that students work carefully and slowly. A break in the seal between the cup and card allows air into the cup, causing the water to fall. Note: If...

338

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in road-deposited sediments, water sediments, and soils in Sydney, Australia: Comparisons of concentration distribution, sources and potential toxicity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Sixteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) considered as priority environmental pollutants were analysed in surface natural soils (NS), road-deposited sediments (RDS), and water sediments (WS) at Kogarah in Sydney, Australia. Comparisons were made of their concentration distributions, likely sources and potential toxicities. The concentrations (mg/kg) in NS, RDS, and WS ranged from 0.40 to 7.49 (mean 2.80), 1.65 to 4.00 (mean 2.91), and 0.49 to 5.19 (mean 1.76), respectively. \\{PAHs\\} were dominated by relatively high molecular weight compounds with more than three fused benzene rings, indicating that high temperature combustion processes were their predominant sources. The proportions of high molecular weight \\{PAHs\\} with five or six fused benzene rings were higher in NS than in RDS, whereas the low molecular weight \\{PAHs\\} were higher in RDS. Concentrations of all \\{PAHs\\} compounds were observed to be the lowest in WS. The concentrations of most of the high molecular weight \\{PAHs\\} significantly correlated with each other in RDS and WS. All \\{PAHs\\} (except naphthalene) were significantly correlated in NS suggesting a common PAH source. Ratios for individual diagnostic \\{PAHs\\} demonstrated that the primary source of \\{PAHs\\} in WS and NS was of pyrogenic origin (combustion of petroleum (vehicle exhaust), grass, and wood) while in RDS it was petrogenic (i.e. unburned or leaked fuel and oil, road asphalt, and tyre particles) as well as pyrogenic. The potential toxicities of \\{PAHs\\} calculated using a toxicity equivalent quotient (TEQ) were all low but higher for NS compared to WS and RDS.

Thuy Chung Nguyen; Paripurnanda Loganathan; Tien Vinh Nguyen; Saravanamuthu Vigneswaran; Jaya Kandasamy; Danny Slee; Gavin Stevenson; Ravi Naidu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Materials that Improve the Cost-Effectiveness of Air Barrier...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Cost-Effectiveness of Air Barrier Systems Addthis 1 of 3 3M has developed a primer-less self-adhered membrane that serves as an air, liquid water, and water vapor...

340

MICROCHEMICALJOURNAL39, 160-165Hydrocarbons in Air  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from Waters Associates. Water used was deionized, distilled, and hydrocarbon filtered (BarnsteadMICROCHEMICALJOURNAL39, 160-165Hydrocarbons in Air to extract polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from air particulate sampleswas investigated. High

Canberra, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water air soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Soil separator and sampler and method of sampling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A soil sampler includes a fluidized bed for receiving a soil sample. The fluidized bed may be in communication with a vacuum for drawing air through the fluidized bed and suspending particulate matter of the soil sample in the air. In a method of sampling, the air may be drawn across a filter, separating the particulate matter. Optionally, a baffle or a cyclone may be included within the fluidized bed for disentrainment, or dedusting, so only the finest particulate matter, including asbestos, will be trapped on the filter. The filter may be removable, and may be tested to determine the content of asbestos and other hazardous particulate matter in the soil sample.

O'Brien, Barry H. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Ritter, Paul D. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

342

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soil...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

soil... hydrocarbon degraders, and polycyclic aromatic ... Source: Ma, Lena - Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and...

343

Engineered Polymeric Nanoparticles for Soil Remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

compds. in soil-water systems in which surfactants play a role in contaminant remediation or facilitated transport. ... (9)?Abdul, A. S.; Ang, C. C. Ground Water 1994, 32, 727. ...

Warapong Tungittiplakorn; Leonard W. Lion; Claude Cohen; Ju-Young Kim

2004-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

344

Supply fan energy use in pressurized underfloor air distribution systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

air-water devices like fan coil units and water source heatsuch as VAV boxes and fan coil units. One fairly typical

Webster, Tom P.E.; Bauman, Fred P.E.; Ring, Erik P.E.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Irrigation and Management of Texas Soils.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is available, soil micro- organisms will change ammonium nitrogen in- to nitrate nitrogen and then be taken up by plants. Nitrate nitrogen (NO,-) is not at- tached to clay particles ; it is water-soluble and it moves with soil moisture. On coarse... is unevenly distributed. If nitrogen is applied in irrigation water as the ammonium form to alkaline soils, there is a possibility of 25 to 30 percent loss of the nitrogen as a gas. Phosphorus applied in irrigation water will not move into the soil too...

Box, John; Bennett, William F.

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Multimedia fate of petroleum hydrocarbons in the soil: Oil matrix of constructed biopiles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A dynamic multimedia fugacity model was used to evaluate the partitioning and fate of petroleum hydrocarbon fractions and aromatic indicator compounds within the soil: oil matrix of three biopiles. Each biopile was characterised by four compartments: air, water, soil solids and non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL). Equilibrium partitioning in biopile A and B suggested that most fractions resided in the NAPL, with the exception of the aromatic fraction with an equivalent carbon number from 5 to 7 (EC5?7). In Biopile C, which had the highest soil organic carbon content (13%), the soil solids were the most important compartment for both light aliphatic fractions (EC5?6 and EC6?8) and aromatic fractions, excluding the EC16?21 and EC21?35. Our starting hypothesis was that hydrocarbons do not degrade within the NAPL. This was supported by the agreement between predicted and measured hydrocarbon concentrations in Biopile B when the degradation rate constant in NAPL was set to zero. In all scenarios, biodegradation in soil was predicted as the dominant removal process for all fractions, except for the aliphatic EC5?6 which was predominantly lost via volatilization. The absence of an explicit NAPL phase in the model yielded a similar prediction of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) behaviour; however the predicted concentrations in the air and water phases were significantly increased with consequent changes in potential mobility. Further comparisons between predictions and measured data, particularly concentrations in the soil mobile phases, are required to ascertain the true value of including an explicit NAPL in models of this kind.

Frédéric Coulon; Michael J. Whelan; Graeme I. Paton; Kirk T. Semple; Raffaella Villa; Simon J.T. Pollard

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Water Bugs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bugs Bugs Nature Bulletin No. 221-A March 12, 1966 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WATER BUGS It is fascinating to lie in a boat or on a log at the edge of the water and watch the drama that unfolds among the small water animals. Among the star performers in small streams and ponds are the Water Bugs. These are aquatic members of that large group of insects called the "true bugs", most of which live on land. Moreover, unlike many other types of water insects, they do not have gills but get their oxygen directly from the air. Those that do go beneath the surface usually carry an oxygen supply with them in the form of a shiny glistening sheath of air imprisoned among a covering of fine waterproof hairs. The common water insect known to small boys at the "Whirligig Bug" is not a water bug but a beetle.

348

Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium in Soil and Ground Water Using Zero-Valent Iron Under Batch and Semi-Batch Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical remediation of soil and groundwater containing hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) was carried out under batch and semi-batch conditions using different iron species: (Fe(II) (sulphate solution); Fe0 ...

Débora V. Franco; Leonardo M. Da Silva; Wilson F. Jardim

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Soil surface stabilization using an in situ plutonium coating techniuqe at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP), in collaboration with the University of Nevada at Reno (UNR), has developed and is investigating an in situ plutonium treatment for soils at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The concept, conceived by Dr. T. Tamura and refined at HAZWRAP, was developed during the Nevada Applied Ecology Program investigation. In analyzing for plutonium in soils, it was noted that the alpha emanation of plutonium was greatly attenuated if traces of iron or manganese oxides were present in the final electroplating stage. The technique would reduce resuspension of alpha particles into the air by coating the contaminants in soils in situ with an environmentally compatible, durable, and nontoxic material. The coating materials (calcium hydroxide, ferrous sulfate) reduce resuspension by providing a cementitious barrier against radiation penetration while retaining soil porosity. This technique not only stabilizes plutonium-contaminated soils, but also provides an additional protection from worker exposure to radiation during remediation activities. Additionally, the coating would decrease the water solubility of the contaminant and, thus, reduce its migration through soil and uptake by plants.

Lew, J.; Snipes, R. [Environmental Management and Enrichment Facilities, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tamura, T.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

350

Integration of a "Passive Water Recovery" MEA into a Portable...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fan Water Storage Water Separator Water Pump Condenser Cooling Fan Air Exhaust Radiator heat exchanger requires large surface area Water recovery components are heavy and bulky -...

351

Air Pollution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Both natural processes and human activities contribute to air pollution, with the combustion of fossil fuels being the largest anthropogenic source of air pollutants. Adverse health effects (above all respiratory and cardiovascular complications), damage to crops, natural vegetation and materials, reduced visibility and changed radiation balance of the atmosphere are the major consequences of high concentrations of air pollutants. Technical fixes can sharply reduce emissions from large stationary sources and lower the rates of automotive emissions, but the rising number of vehicles and longer time spent on the road will call for more radical solutions to traffic-generated photochemical smog now present in all major urban areas.

V. Smil

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Sorption-desorption characteristics of uranium, cesium and strontium in typical podzol soils from Ukraine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......mobility in the soil-water system. The K d values...diffusion in the soil-water system. Sorption includes...accident, disposal or remediation(1). In addition...distribution in soil water system due to CNPP accident...between both samples. The ground water used for the estimation......

S. Mishra; H. Arae; P. V. Zamostyan; T. Ishikawa; H. Yonehara; S. K. Sahoo

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

ENHANCEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING THROUGH AN IMPROVED AIR MONITORING TECHNIQUE  

SciTech Connect

Environmental sampling (ES) is a key component of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguarding approaches throughout the world. Performance of ES (e.g. air, water, vegetation, sediments, soil and biota) supports the IAEAs mission of drawing conclusions concerning the absence of undeclared nuclear material or nuclear activities in a State and has been available since the introduction of safeguards strengthening measures approved by the IAEA Board of Governors (1992-1997). A recent step-change improvement in the gathering and analysis of air samples at uranium/plutonium bulk handling facilities is an important addition to the international nuclear safeguards inspector's toolkit. Utilizing commonly used equipment throughout the IAEA network of analytical laboratories for particle analysis, researchers are developing the next generation of ES equipment for air grab and constant samples. Isotopic analysis of collected particles from an Aerosol Contaminant Extractor (ACE) silicon substrate has been performed with excellent results in determining attribute and isotopic composition of chemical elements present in an actual test-bed sample. The new collection equipment will allow IAEA nuclear safeguards inspectors to develop enhanced safeguarding approaches for complicated facilities. This paper will explore the use of air monitoring to establish a baseline environmental signature of a particular facility that could be used for comparison of consistencies in declared operations. The implementation of air monitoring will be contrasted against the use of smear ES when used during unannounced inspections, design information verification, limited frequency unannounced access, and complementary access visits at bulk handling facilities. Technical aspects of the air monitoring device and the analysis of its environmental samples will demonstrate the essential parameters required for successful application of the system.

Hanks, D.

2010-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

354

Bos > AIR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The advent of air travel has produced a building typology completely new to the 20th century. The outdated planning of regions for airports render most existing airports as isolated, autonomous instances in the urban ...

Lee, Kevin Young

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of Air2Air™ Technology to Recover Fresh-Water from the Normal Evaporative Cooling Loss at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants – SPX Cooling Systems Use of Air2Air™ Technology to Recover Fresh-Water from the Normal Evaporative Cooling Loss at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants – SPX Cooling Systems In this project, SPX Cooling Systems, formerly Marley Cooling Technologies, Inc., evaluates the performance of its patented Air2Air(tm) condensing technology in cooling tower applications at coal-fired electric power plants. Researchers quantify Air2Air(tm) water conservation capabilities with results segmented by season and time of day. They determine the pressure drop and energy use during operation. Additionally, SPX Cooling Systems develops a collection method for the recovered water, analyzes water quality, and identifies potential on-site processes capable of utilizing the recovered water.

356

Pneumatic soil removal tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw. 3 figs.

Neuhaus, J.E.

1992-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

357

HEXOS—Humidity Exchange Over the Sea A Program for Research on Water-Vapor and Droplet Fluxes from Sea of Air at Moderate to High Wind Speeds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

HEXOS is an international program for the study of evaporation and spray-droplet flux from sea to air. The program includes measurements in the field at moderate-to-high wind speeds, wind-tunnel studies, instrument development, boundary-layer ...

Kristina B. Katsaros; Stuart D. Smith; Wiebe A. Oost

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Water Balance in Terrestrial PlantsWater Balance in Terrestrial Plants Water Regulation on LandWater Regulation on Land --PlantsPlants WWipip= W= Wrr + W+ Waa --WWtt --WWss  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Water Balance in Terrestrial PlantsWater Balance in Terrestrial Plants Water Regulation on LandWater waters internal water WWrr =Roots=Roots WWaa = Air= Air WWtt = Transpiration= Transpiration WWss = Secretions= Secretions Water Regulation on Land - Plants Water Balance in Terrestrial PlantsWater Balance

Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

359

Soil & Groundwater Remediation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Soil & Groundwater Soil & Groundwater Remediation Soil & Groundwater Remediation Soil & Groundwater Remediation The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil remediation effort in the world. The inventory at the DOE sites includes 6.5 trillion liters of contaminated groundwater, an amount equal to about four times the daily U.S. water consumption, and 40 million cubic meters of soil and debris contaminated with radionuclides, metals, and organics. The Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation is working with DOE site managers around the country regarding specific technical issues. At the large sites such as Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge, the Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation has conducted research and demonstration projects to test new technologies and remediation

360

300-FF-1 Operable Unit physical separation of soils pilot plant study  

SciTech Connect

Alternative Remedial Technologies, Inc. (ART) was selected in a competitive selection process to conduct a pilot study for the physical separation of soils in the North Process Pond of the 300 Area at the Hanford Site. In January 1994, ART mobilized its 15 tons-per-hour pilot plant to the site. The plant was initially staged in a commercial area to allow for pretest inspections and minor modifications. The plant was specifically designed for use as a physical separations unit and consisted of a feed hopper, wet screens, hydrocyclones, as well as settling and dewatering equipment. The plant was supported in the field with prescreening equipment, mobile generators, air compressors, and water storage tanks. The plant was moved into the surface contamination area on March 24, 1994. The testing was conducted during the period March 23, 1994 through April 13, 1994. Two soil types were treated during the testing: a natural soil contaminated with low levels of uranium, cesium, cobalt, and heavy metals, and a natural soil contaminated with a uranium carbonate material that was visually recognizable by the presence of a green sludge material in the soil matrix. The ``green`` material contained significantly higher levels of the same contaminants. Both source materials were treated by the plant in a manner that fed the material, produced clean gravel and sand fractions, and concentrated the contaminants in a sludge cake. Process water was recycled during the operations. The testing was extremely successful in that for both source waste streams, it was demonstrated that volume reductions of greater than 90% could be achieved while also meeting the test performance criteria. The volume reduction for the natural soils averaged a 93.8%, while the ``green`` soils showed a 91.4% volume reduction.

Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

1994-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water air soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

ARM - Measurement - Soil surface temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

surface temperature surface temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil surface temperature The temperature of the soil measured near the surface. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AMC : Ameriflux Measurement Component CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems SOIL : Soil Measurement from the SGP SWATS : Soil Water and Temperature System MET : Surface Meteorological Instrumentation

362

Thermal Removal Of Tritium From Concrete And Soil To Reduce Groundwater Impacts  

SciTech Connect

Legacy heavy-water moderator operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have resulted in the contamination of equipment pads, building slabs, and surrounding soil with tritium. At the time of discovery the tritium had impacted the shallow (< 3-m) groundwater at the facility. While tritium was present in the groundwater, characterization efforts determined that a significant source remained in a concrete slab at the surface and within the associated vadose zone soils. To prevent continued long-term impacts to the shallow groundwater a CERCLA non-time critical removal action for these source materials was conducted to reduce the leaching of tritium from the vadose zone soils and concrete slabs. In order to minimize transportation and disposal costs, an on-site thermal treatment process was designed, tested, and implemented. The on-site treatment consisted of thermal detritiation of the concrete rubble and soil. During this process concrete rubble was heated to a temperature of 815 deg C (1,500 deg F) resulting in the dehydration and removal of water bound tritium. During heating, tritium contaminated soil was used to provide thermal insulation during which it's temperature exceeded 100 deg C (212 deg F), causing drying and removal of tritium. The thermal treatment process volatiles the water bound tritium and releases it to the atmosphere. The released tritium was considered insignificant based upon Clean Air Act Compliance Package (CAP88) analysis and did not exceed exposure thresholds. A treatability study evaluated the effectiveness of this thermal configuration and viability as a decontamination method for tritium in concrete and soil materials. Post treatment sampling confirmed the effectiveness at reducing tritium to acceptable waste site specific levels. With American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding three additional treatment cells were assembled utilizing commercial heating equipment and common construction materials. This provided a total of four units to batch treat concrete rubble and soil. Post treatment sampling verified that the activity in the treated soil and concrete met the treatment standards for each medium which allowed the treated concrete rubble and soil to be disposed of on site as backfill. During testing and operations a total of 1,261-m{sup 3} (1,650-yd{sup 3}) of contaminated concrete and soils were treated with an actual incurred cost of $3,980,000. This represents a unit treatment cost of $3,156/m{sup 3} ($2,412/yd{sup 3}). In 2011 the project was recognized with an e-Star Sustainability Award by DOE's Office of Environmental Management.

Jackson, Dennis G.; Blount, Gerald C.; Wells, Leslie H.; Cardoso-Neto, Joao E.; Kmetz, Thomas F.; Reed, Misty L.

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

363

On the Clouds of Bubbles Formed by Breaking Wind-Waves in Deep Water, and their Role in Air -- Sea Gas Transfer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...than in the fresh-water loch, even at smaller...presence of oxygen (or gases other than nitrogen) in the gas composing the bubbles...of turbulence in the water also appears unlikely...and the effects of solubility of the gas within the...

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Unsaturated soil behavior under monotonic and cyclic stress states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on triaxial apparatus and helping me on the calibration of equipment. I would like to say thank to Dr. Lianxi Ma for providing me USD testing knowledge and test results. I also would like to thank the Korean students in the Geotechnical Engineering.................. 6 2.1 Soil Suction in Unsaturated Soil....................................................... 6 2.2 Pore Water in Unsaturated Soil and Degrees of Saturation.............. 8 2.3 Soil-Water Characteristic Curve...

Mun, Byoung-Jae

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

365

ORIGINAL PAPER On-farm effects of no-till versus occasional tillage on soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

under occasional tillage had somewhat lower soil organic carbon of 16.0 versus 19.2 gkg-1 , soil water-farm conditions. Keywords Field moisture capacity. Soil aggregation . Soil organic carbon . Sustainable farming process and by sequestering soil organic carbon (Lal et al., 2004). Thus, structural stability and quality

Boyer, Edmond

366

Air Monitoring Leads to Discovery of New Contamination at Radioactive Waste Disposal Site (Area G) at LANL  

SciTech Connect

Air monitoring at Area G, the low-level radioactive waste disposal area at Los Alamos National Laboratory, revealed increased air concentrations of {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Am at one location along the north boundary. This air monitoring location is a couple of meters north of a dirt road used to access the easternmost part of Area G. Air concentrations of {sup 238}Pu were essentially unaffected, which was puzzling because the {sup 238}Pu and {sup 239}Pu are present in the local, slightly contaminated soils. Air concentrations of these radionuclides increased about a factor of ten in early 1995 and remained at those levels until the first quarter of 1996. During the spring of 1996 air concentrations again increased by a factor of about ten. No other radionuclides were elevated and no other Area G stations showed elevations of these radionuclides. After several formal meetings didn't provide an adequate cause for the elevations, a gamma survey was performed and showed a small area of significant contamination just south of the monitor location. We found in February, 1995, a trench for a water line had been dug within a meter of so of the air stations. Then, during early 1996, the dirt road was rerouted such that its new path was directly over the unknown contamination. It appears that the trenching brought contaminated material to the surface and caused the first rise in air concentrations and then the rerouting of the road over the contamination caused the second rise, during 1996. We also found that during 1976 and 1977 contaminated soils from the clean-up of an old processing facility had been spread over the filled pits in the vicinity of the air monitors. These soils were very low in 238Pu which explains why we saw very little {sup 238}Pu in the increased air concentrations. A layer of gravel and sand was spread over the contaminated area. Although air concentrations of {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Am dropped considerably, the y have not returned to pre-1995 levels.

Kraig, D.H.; Conrad, R.C.

1999-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

367

Ecosystem water use efficiency for a sparse vineyard in arid northwest China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Ecosystem water use efficiency (WUE) can be defined as the ratio of net CO2 exchange to evapotranspiration, which implicates the interactions between carbon sequestration and water consumption. Previous studies mainly focused on ecosystem WUE for forests, grasslands and farmlands, but paid little attention to the sparse vineyard. How the vineyard WUE varied on daily and seasonal time scales remains uncertain. The vineyard CO2 and water fluxes were measured by the eddy covariance method during 2008 in arid northwest China to address the issues. Results indicate that the seasonal variation of vineyard WUE presented a downward-parabolic trend, with a mean value of 4 mg g?1and a maximum value of 10 mg g?1. Compared with other ecosystems, WUE for vineyard was lower than that for forests, maize, wheat and wetlands, but higher than grasslands and Savannas. The severely dry climate and the sparse vegetation led the results. Such factors as radiation, air temperature and humidity, soil moisture, canopy conductance and leaf area index all exerted significant influences on vineyard WUE. However, the vineyard WUE was highly sensitive to solar radiation and air temperature changes, and it decreased significantly with the rising radiation and temperature, which is remarkably different from previous studies. Such results were mainly due to the great impact on CO2 exchange exerted by soil layer in the sparse vineyard, and the high sensitivity of soil respiration to temperature changes induced by radiation and air temperature. The CO2 assimilation reduced with the increasing radiation and air temperature, however the vineyard evapotranspiration increased rapidly, thus the vineyard WUE declined significantly with the rising radiation and air temperature. These results provided a new insight for understanding the carbon and water cycles over the sparse vegetation.

Sien Li; Shaozhong Kang; Lu Zhang; Taisheng Du; Ling Tong; Risheng Ding; Weihua Guo; Peng Zhao; Xia Chen; Huan Xiao

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Pollution, Air Quality Classifications and Standards, and Air Quality Area Classifications (New York) Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Pollution, Air Quality Classifications and Standards, and Air Quality Area Classifications (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations establish emissions limits and permitting and operational

369

E-Print Network 3.0 - air filter condition Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fans... , water treatment equipment, elevators (electric and hydraulic), sewer lift pumps, filter servicing in air... : Use of mechanical equipment such as refrigeration, air...

370

E-Print Network 3.0 - air filters Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: , water treatment equipment, elevators (electric and hydraulic), sewer lift pumps, filter servicing in air... lift pumps, filter servicing in air-handling units and...

371

E-Print Network 3.0 - air activity variations Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: Chapter 19 Geology, Society and the Future 12; Environmental health Air pollution Waste... The water we drink The air we breathe Geologic factors in environmental...

372

E-Print Network 3.0 - air force journal Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

although these types of interaction... -fluid interaction based on the Smoothed Particle Hydro- dynamics (SPH) method. For the simulation of air... -water interaction, air...

373

Phosphorus release and retention by soils of natural isolated wetlands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrological restoration of historically isolated wetlands may mitigate phosphorus (P) loss. The objectives of this study were to quantify P in soil, and to determine the effect of (1) soil characteristics on P release, and (2) antecedent soil hydrological conditions on P dynamics. Humic/fulvic acid bound P and residual P accounted for majority of P (>78%) in surface soils. Soils with highest nutrient status and labile P fractions released most P during initial flooding. Phosphorus dynamics during additional flooding were dependent on soil characteristics, antecedent soil hydrological conditions, and P levels in the water. Phosphorus retention varied between 0.3 and 8 mg m-2 d-1.

E.J. Dunne; K.R. Reddy; M.W. Clark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Presented By: WALTER E. JOHNSTON, PE Presented By: WALTER E. JOHNSTON, PE CEM, CEA, CLEP, CDSM, CPE Air Conditioning (HVAC) system is to provide and maintain a comfortable environment within a building for the occupants or for the process being conducted Many HVAC systems were not designed with energy efficiency as one of the design factors 3 Air Air is the major conductor of heat. Lack of heat = air conditioning OR 4 Btu - Amount of heat required to raise one pound of water 1 F = 0.252 KgCal 1 Pound of Water = About 1 Pint of Water ~ 1 Large Glass 1 Kitchen Match Basics of Air Conditioning = 1 Btu 5 = 6 Low Cost Cooling Unit 7 8 Typical Design Conditions 75 degrees F temperature 50% relative humidity 30 - 50 FPM air movement

375

Atmospheric Water Vapor Pressure over Land Surfaces: A Generic Algorithm with Data Input Limited to Air Temperature, Precipitation and Geographic Location  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A lack of information for surface water vapor pressure (WVP) represents a major impediment to model-assisted ecosystem analysis for understanding plant-environment interactions or for projecting biospheric re...

X. Yin

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Root-Water-Uptake Based upon a New Water Stress Reduction and an Asymptotic Root Distribution Function  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A water stress–compensating root-water-uptake module was developed based upon a newly proposed water stress reduction function and an asymptotic root distribution function. The water stress reduction function takes into account both soil water ...

K. Y. Li; R. De Jong; M. T. Coe; N. Ramankutty

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

100 Area Hanford soil washing treatability tests  

SciTech Connect

Soil washing laboratory tests performed at Hanford in support of 100 Area Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) feasibility studies included characterization of soils, physical separation, chemical extraction, and water treatment. Results to date show that < 20 % of the soil is finer than 0.25 mm ({minus}40 mesh). The highest concentration of {sup 60}Co, {sup 152}Eu, and {sup 137}Cs contaminants is generally associated with fine soil particles. However, measurable concentrations of contaminants were found in all sizes of soil particles. In initial testing, attrition scrubbing was generally sufficient to treat soils to meet selected performance levels for {sup 60}Co and {sup 152}Eu. However, more intense attrition scrubbing, autogenous grinding, or chemical extraction was required to enhance removal of {sup 137}Cs. Additional tests and assessment of the feasibility of using soil washing techniques are in progress.

Field, J.G.; Belden, R.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Serne, R.J.; Mattigod, S.V.; Freeman, H.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Scheck, R.W. [Mactec/Dames and Moore (United States); Goller, E.D. [USDOE Richland Operations Office, WA (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Innovative Water Reuse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

? Variable Frequency Drive Air Cooled ? Geothermal ? Thermal absorption and desiccant systems Direct Expansion Air Cooling Hybrid Cooling Tower Old Chiller Replaced With Geothermal Loop Other Ways to Reduce Water Use ? Energy Conservation...Air Conditioning & Refrigeration ? Energy Meets Water H.W. (Bill)Hoffman, P.E. H.W. (Bill)Hoffman & Associates, LLC 512-294-7193 billhoffmantx@earthlink.net Cooling Towers The purpose of a cooling tower is to get rid of unwanted...

Hoffman, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Synthesis of Longtime Water/Air-Stable Ni Nanoparticles and Their High Catalytic Activity for Hydrolysis of Ammonia?Borane for Hydrogen Generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soluble starch (amylose), a renewable polymer, is the main component of starch which is the main energy reserve of all higher plants, and can form a dispersion in water. ... The TEM samples were prepared by depositing one or two droplets of the nanoparticle suspensions onto the amorphous carbon coated copper grids, which were dried in argon atmosphere. ... Nitrogen sorption measurements were carried out on an automatic volumetric adsorption equipment (BEL mini, Japan) using the Brunauer?Emmett?Teller (BET) method to test the surface areas of the in situ synthesized catalysts with/without starch after washing with water and vacuum drying at 90 °C. ...

Jun-Min Yan; Xin-Bo Zhang; Song Han; Hiroshi Shioyama; Qiang Xu

2009-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

380

Federal Energy and Water Management Awards 2014  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Air Force Hurlburt Field, Florida In FY 2013 Hurlburt Field Air Force Base modified its water reuse system to improve capacity, resulting in savings of 13 million gallons of water...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water air soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Determination of Water Saturation in Relatively Dry Porous Media...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

dryer conditions, the apparent tracer retardation increases due to air – soil sorption, which is not included in traditional retardation coefficients derived from...

382

Critical micellar concentrations for three surfactants and their diesel-removal efficiencies in petroleum-contaminated soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2001) studied the surfactant-aided soil washing. They proposed the following...Modeling two stages of surfactant aided soil washing: Water Research, v...2001) studied the surfactant-aided soil washing. They proposed the following...

Luis G. Torres; José Luis Orantes; Rosario Iturbe

383

Impact of Soiling and Pollution on PV Generation Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This 5-page technical letter addresses air pollution effects on PV performance by quantifying, based on a literature search, the average annual loss due to soiling, the impact of cleaning, and a recommended cleaning schedule.

384

Addressing Water Contamination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biobed to become water-logged, which compromises the efficiency of the degradation mechanism. Technology of space. Moreover, the VG Biobed is more efficient. It relies on "evapo- transpiration" of water by plants, rather than simple evaporation, and soil activity, to clean the water; under this approach, efficient

Loewith, Robbie

385

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and soils were extracted with deionized water and solublereactive P (SRP) was determined. SRP levels sulfate under favorable pH conditions. SRP levels in the soils were reduced from approximately 5 mg P KgH conditions. Gypsum and sodium aluminate reduced SRP levels in litter by 50 to 60 percent while calcitic

Soerens, Thomas

386

Soil Building as a Climate Mitigation Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capacity? Promote soil formation Prevent erosion (increase cohesion, shield water and wind energy, The City College of New York nkrakauer@ccny.cuny.edu #12;"drought may become so widespread and so severe

Krakauer, Nir Y.

387

Soil Moisture Sensor - Energy Innovation Portal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marketing SummaryIn the agriculture industry, it is critical to know the water content in the soil in order to maintain the viability and profitability of an agriculture...

388

Final report on the project entitled "The Effects of Disturbance & Climate on Carbon Storage & the Exchanges of CO2 Water Vapor & Energy Exchange of Evergreen Coniferous Forests in the Pacific Northwest: Integration of Eddy Flux, Plant and Soil Measurements at a Cluster of Supersites"  

SciTech Connect

This is the final technical report containing a summary of all findings with regard to the following objectives of the project: (1) To quantify and understand the effects of wildfire on carbon storage and the exchanges of energy, CO2, and water vapor in a chronosequence of ponderosa pine (disturbance gradient); (2) To investigate the effects of seasonal and interannual variation in climate on carbon storage and the exchanges of energy, CO2, and water vapor in mature conifer forests in two climate zones: mesic 40-yr old Douglas-fir and semi-arid 60-yr old ponderosa pine (climate gradient); (3) To reduce uncertainty in estimates of CO2 feedbacks to the atmosphere by providing an improved model formulation for existing biosphere-atmosphere models; and (4) To provide high quality data for AmeriFlux and the NACP on micrometeorology, meteorology, and biology of these systems. Objective (1): A study integrating satellite remote sensing, AmeriFlux data, and field surveys in a simulation modeling framework estimated that the pyrogenic carbon emissions, tree mortality, and net carbon exchange associated with four large wildfires that burned ~50,000 hectares in 2002-2003 were equivalent to 2.4% of Oregon statewide anthropogenic carbon emissions over the same two-year period. Most emissions were from the combustion of the forest floor and understory vegetation, and only about 1% of live tree mass was combusted on average. Objective (2): A study of multi-year flux records across a chronosequence of ponderosa pine forests yielded that the net carbon uptake is over three times greater at a mature pine forest compared with young pine. The larger leaf area and wetter and cooler soils of the mature forest mainly caused this effect. A study analyzing seven years of carbon and water dynamics showed that interannual and seasonal variability of net carbon exchange was primarily related to variability in growing season length, which was a linear function of plant-available soil moisture in spring and early summer. A multi-year drought (2001-2003) led to a significant reduction of net ecosystem exchange due to carry-over effects in soil moisture and carbohydrate reserves in plant-tissue. In the same forest, the interannual variability in the rate carbon is lost from the soil and forest floor is considerable and related to the variability in tree growth as much as it is to variability in soil climatic conditions. Objective (3): Flux data from the mature ponderosa pine site support a physical basis for filtering nighttime data with friction velocity above the canopy. An analysis of wind fields and heat transport in the subcanopy at the mesic 40-year old Douglas site yielded that the non-linear structure and behavior of spatial temperature gradients and the flow field require enhanced sensor networks to estimate advective fluxes in the subcanopy of forest to close the surface energy balance in forests. Reliable estimates for flux uncertainties are needed to improve model validation and data assimilation in process-based carbon models, inverse modeling studies and model-data synthesis, where the uncertainties may be as important as the fluxes themselves. An analysis of the time scale dependence of the random and flux sampling error yielded that the additional flux obtained by increasing the perturbation timescale beyond about 10 minutes is dominated by random sampling error, and therefore little confidence can be placed in its value. Artificial correlation between gross ecosystem productivity (GEP) and ecosystem respiration (Re) is a consequence of flux partitioning of eddy covariance flux data when GEP is computed as the difference between NEE and computed daytime Re (e.g. using nighttime Re extrapolated into daytime using soil or air temperatures). Tower-data must be adequately spatially averaged before comparison to gridded model output as the time variability of both is inherently different. The eddy-covariance data collected at the mature ponderosa pine site and the mesic Douglas fir site were used to develop and evaluate a new method to extra

Beverly E. Law (PI), Christoph K. Thomas (CoI)

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

389

Hydrologic transport of depleted uranium associated with open air dynamic range testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico, and Eglin Air Force Base, Florida  

SciTech Connect

Hydrologic investigations on depleted uranium fate and transport associated with dynamic testing activities were instituted in the 1980`s at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Eglin Air Force Base. At Los Alamos, extensive field watershed investigations of soil, sediment, and especially runoff water were conducted. Eglin conducted field investigations and runoff studies similar to those at Los Alamos at former and active test ranges. Laboratory experiments complemented the field investigations at both installations. Mass balance calculations were performed to quantify the mass of expended uranium which had transported away from firing sites. At Los Alamos, it is estimated that more than 90 percent of the uranium still remains in close proximity to firing sites, which has been corroborated by independent calculations. At Eglin, we estimate that 90 to 95 percent of the uranium remains at test ranges. These data demonstrate that uranium moves slowly via surface water, in both semi-arid (Los Alamos) and humid (Eglin) environments.

Becker, N.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Vanta, E.B. [Wright Laboratory Armament Directorate, Eglin Air Force Base, FL (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Soils | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soils Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleSoils&oldid612253" Category: NEPA Resources...

391

Assessing inhalation exposure from airborne soil contaminants  

SciTech Connect

A method of estimation of inhalation exposure to airborne soil contaminants is presented. this method is derived from studies of airborne soil particles with radioactive tags. The concentration of contaminants in air (g/m{sup 3}) can be derived from the product of M, the suspended respirable dust mass concentration (g/m{sup 3}), S, the concentration of contaminant in the soil (g/g), and E{sub f}, an enhancement factor. Typical measurement methods and values of M, and E{sub f} are given along with highlights of experiences with this method.

Shinn, J.H.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Determination of Selected Herbicides and Phenols in Water and Soils by Solid-Phase Extraction and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......1987). 6. G.E. Batley. Applications of liquid chromatography with electro- chemical detection to the analysis of oil shale process waters. J. Chromatogr. 382: 409416 (1987). 7. H. Farber, K. Nick, and H.F. Scoeler. Determination......

Irena Baranowska; Celina Pieszko

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Enrichment of Heavy Metals in Sediment Resulting from Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ, U.K. Heavy metal pollution of soil and water is often associatedEnrichment of Heavy Metals in Sediment Resulting from Soil Erosion on Agricultural Fields J O H N N concentrations of these heavy metals were up to 3.98 times higher in the sediment than in the parent soil

Quinton, John

394

Water Management for Evaporatively Cooled Condensers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Management for Evaporatively Cooled Condensers Theresa Pistochini May 23rd, 2012 ResearchAirCapacity,tons Gallons of Water Continuous Test - Outdoor Air 110-115 Deg F Cyclic Test - Outdoor Air 110-115 Deg F #12 AverageWaterHardness(ppm) Cooling Degree Days (60°F Reference) 20% Population 70% Population 10

California at Davis, University of

395

Soil Sterilization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... received the notice they deserved. Among them is soil sterilization as a factor in food production. How to produce the greatest amount of good food has become an urgent problem ... proper consideration. Pests and diseases, for example, not only cause serious losses in food production, but they also waste time, labour and materials. Thus, by employing measures for ...

W. J. C. L.

1944-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

396

A heuristic model to predict earthworm biomass in agroecosystems based on selected management and soil properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Earthworm burrows can be significant preferential flow paths for water and contaminants to move to subsurface drainage networks and groundwater. Thus earthworm biomass could serve as an indicator of such transport potential, and therefore, inform risk assessments associated with water contamination resulting from land application of fertilizer amendments. In this study, we evaluated relationships and interactions between earthworm biomass, soil properties (bulk density, particle size, organic matter, surface residue), land management (crop type, tillage approach), and soil hydraulic properties (field saturated hydraulic conductivity and air-entry tension) for the purpose of building regionally based models to predict earthworm biomass. Data were collected from 43 fields distributed throughout eastern Ontario, Canada. Earthworm biomass was measured using “hot mustard” methods (early autumn) and in situ soil hydraulic properties were determined using pressure infiltrometers (late summer/early fall). Classification and Regression Tree (CART) data mining techniques were used to develop tree-structured models to predict biomass from site environmental data. CART regression tree models had coefficients of determination between 0.50 (not including soil hydraulic properties) and 0.55 (including soil hydraulic properties). Both regression trees split all earthworm biomass data (N = 243) into two groupings defined on the basis of tillage treatment. No-tilled field biomass averaged 192.1 g m?2 (S.D. = 71.5 g m?2), and biomass data for conventionally tilled sites subdivided into terminal groupings on the basis of “higher surface residue cover” (biomass average = 107.9 g m?2 (S.D. = 81.1 g m?2) and ‘lower surface residue cover’ (62.4 g m?2 (S.D. = 54.6 g m?2)) classes. Soil physical and hydraulic data were not important predictors of biomass for tilled datasets; whereas they were more important for no-tilled datasets. For both regression trees, no-till biomass stratified into terminal biomass groupings defined on the basis of bulk density, clay content, and silt content; and for the model including soil hydraulic properties, additionally by soil air-entry tension and surface residue cover. However, bulk density was deemed in the model to be a proxy for years a field was in no-tillage; a positive relationship existed between bulk density and biomass. Overall, the terminal tree groups with the highest average earthworm biomasses were for no-till soils with bulk densities >1.4 g cm?3 (longer term no-tillage). Regression tree variance reductions associated with the in situ measurements of field saturated hydraulic conductivity and air-entry tension were insignificant or small. Generally, empirical models predicting earthworm biomass at large spatial scales in agroecosystems using soils and land management information, should consider utilizing variables that express tillage practice, surface residue coverage, years in no-tillage, and soil particle size; however, variable interactions should be considered.

G. Ouellet; D.R. Lapen; E. Topp; M. Sawada; M. Edwards

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Researching power plant water recovery  

SciTech Connect

A range of projects supported by NETl under the Innovations for Existing Plant Program are investigating modifications to power plant cooling systems for reducing water loss, and recovering water from the flue gas and the cooling tower. This paper discusses two technologies showing particular promise condense water that is typically lost to evaporation, SPX technologies' Air2Air{sup trademark} condenses water from a cooling tower, while Lehigh University's process condenses water and acid in flue gas. 3 figs.

NONE

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Process for removing polychlorinated biphenyls from soil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a method of removing polychlorinated biphenyls from soil. The polychlorinated biphenyls are extracted from the soil by employing a liquid organic solvent dispersed in water in the ratio of about 1:3 to 3:1. The organic solvent includes such materials as short-chain hydrocarbons including kerosene or gasoline which are immiscible with water and are nonpolar. The organic solvent has a greater affinity for the PCB's than the soil so as to extract the PCB's from the soil upon contact. The organic solvent phase is separated from the suspended soil and water phase and distilled for permitting the recycle of the organic solvent phase and the concentration of the PCB's in the remaining organic phase. The present process can be satisfactorily practiced with soil containing 10 to 20% petroleum-based oils and organic fluids such as used in transformers and cutting fluids, coolants and the like which contain PCB's. The subject method provides for the removal of a sufficient concentration of PCB's from the soil to provide the soil with a level of PCB's within the guidelines of the Environmental Protection Agency.

Hancher, C.W.; Saunders, M.B.; Googin, J.M.

1984-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

399

Contaminant bioavailability in soils, sediments, and aquatic environments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...well as in surface and ground water, typically are regulated...assessment and environmental remediation. Adoption of an environmental...allows one to consider remediation strategies based...including surface and ground waters and soil solutions, as well as gastrointestinal...

Samuel J. Traina; Valérie Laperche

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Comparison of methods for determining soil hydraulic characteristics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Soil cores were centrifuged and the redistribution of water was measured as change in weight with time. Inconsistent results and limited data obtained with this method, consequently, prevented ade- quate conclusions from being made. Hydraulic... storage capacity of a soil is determined by infiltration, redistribution and drainage processes which also rely on knowledge of soil moisture movement. Three approaches used to determine the relevant hydraulic properties utitilized in describing soil...

Byrd Humphreys, Kathryn

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water air soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Systematic Variability of Soil Hydraulic Conductivity Across Three Vertisol Catenas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of soil measured on small samples is log-normally distributed and related to physical properties of that soil sample (Mapa, 1995; Reynolds and Zebchuk, 1996; Lin et al., 1998; Baldock and Nelson, 2000). The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA... structure and water content for clayey soils (Mapa, 1995; Baldock and Nelson, 2000). 6 Measurement Methods A variety of laboratory and field methods of measuring Ks are available. Laboratory measurements are typically conducted on undisturbed soil...

Rivera, Leonardo Daniel

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

402

ESPC Success Story - Dyess Air Force Base | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

(FEMP) Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) Success Story on water conservation and green energy at Dyess Air Foce Base at Dyess, Texas. espcssdyess.pdf More Documents &...

403

Saxton soil remediation project  

SciTech Connect

The Saxton Nuclear Experimental Facility (SNEF) consists of a 23-MW(thermal) pressurized light water thermal reactor located in south central Pennsylvania. The Saxton Nuclear Experimental Corporation (SNEC), a wholly owned subsidiary of the General Public Utilities (GPU) Corporation, is the licensee for the SNEF. Maintenance and decommissioning activities at the site are conducted by GPU Nuclear, also a GPU subsidiary and operator of the Three Mile Island and Oyster Creek nuclear facilities. The remediation and radioactive waste management of contaminated soils is described.

Holmes, R.D. [GPU Nuclear Corporation, Middletown, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

404

In search for sustainable globally cost-effective energy efficient building solar system – Heat recovery assisted building integrated PV powered heat pump for air-conditioning, water heating and water saving  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Obtained as a research result of conducted project, this paper presents an innovative, energy efficient multipurpose system for a sustainable globally cost-effective building's solar energy use and developed methodology for its dynamic analysis and optimization. The initial research and development goal was to create a cost-effective technical solution for replacing fossil fuel and electricity with solar energy for water heating for different purposes (for pools, sanitary water, washing) in one SPA. After successful realization of the initial goal, the study was proceeded and as a result, the created advanced system has been enriched with AC performance. The study success was based on understanding and combined measurements and by BPS made predictions of AC loads and solar radiation dynamics as well as on the determination of the synergetic relations between all relevant quantities. Further, by the performed BPS dynamic simulations for geographically spread buildings locations, it has been shown that the final result of the conducted scientific engineering R&D work has been the created system of confirmed prestigious to the sustainability relevant performance – globally cost-effective building integrated photovoltaic powered heat pump (HP), assisted by waste water heat recovery, for solar AC, water heating and saving.

Marija S. Todorovic; Jeong Tai Kim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Environment - Nano soil science | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment - Nano soil science Environment - Nano soil science Cross-disciplinary research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is yielding new insight into the carbon cycle, contaminated soils and soil fertility. An ORNL team is using a novel combination of neutron reflectometry experiments and supercomputer simulations to provide a detailed view of the interactions between organic matter and minerals in soil. The research suggests that relationships among these compounds are governed by simpler principles than previously thought. "It changes the whole way we think about how carbon, nutrients and contaminants interact with soils, which therefore affects fertility, water quality, and the terrestrial carbon cycle," said ORNL's Loukas Petridis. "We don't understand these topics very well because until now we haven't had the techniques capable

406

2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner David Morin  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Poster features 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award winner David Morin of the U.S. Air Force's Laughlin Air Force Base in Texas.

407

Air-Quality Improvement Tax Incentives | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air-Quality Improvement Tax Incentives Air-Quality Improvement Tax Incentives Air-Quality Improvement Tax Incentives < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Bioenergy Buying & Making Electricity Solar Water Heating Wind Program Info State Ohio Program Type Other Incentive Provider Ohio Air Quality Development Authority The Ohio Air Quality Development Authority (OAQDA) provides assistance for new air quality projects in Ohio, for both small and large businesses. For qualifying projects, the OAQDA also projects tax benefits. For qualifying projects, the Ohio Air Quality Development Authority (OAQDA) can provide a 100 percent exemption from the tangible personal property tax

408

Field determination of hydraulic conductivity of Norwood silt loam soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil-water pressure (cb) at different depths during the redistribution of the fourth water application 102 Moisture volume percentage at different depths during the first water application Moisture volume percentage at different depths during... the soil surface 106 12. Moisture volume percentage at different depths during the redistribution of the fourth water application 107 13 Moisture volume percentage at different depths outside the plot 108 LIST OF TABLES CONT'D. TABLE PAGE 14...

Saffaf, Adham Yassin

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

E-Print Network 3.0 - air treatment system Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Last Updated: 41702 Summary: , including refrigeration, air conditioning, heating systems, ventilating fans, roof ventilators, exhaust fans... , water treatment equipment,...

410

E-Print Network 3.0 - air handling systems Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Last Updated: 41702 Summary: , including refrigeration, air conditioning, heating systems, ventilating fans, roof ventilators, exhaust fans... , water treatment equipment,...

411

Thermal decay in underfloor air distribution (UFAD) systems: Fundamentals and influence on system performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

zones. Variable-speed fan coil units ( FCU) supply air tounit (AHU) including an economizer, chilled water cooling coil, hot water heating coil and supply fan.

Lee, Kwang Ho; Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred; Webster, Tom

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Simplified calculation method for design cooling loads in underfloor air distribution (UFAD) systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the outlet side of fan coil units (FCU) served by variableunit (AHU) including a return air economizer, chilled water cooling coil, hot water heating coil and supply fan.

Schiavon, Stefano; Lee, Kwang Ho; Bauman, Fred; Webster, Tom

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Healthy soils for food system resiliency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, air, and point sources like lead paint chips. This duality, emphasized in urban areas where more sources of pollution exist, means that urban gardeners must know their soils to participate effectively in sustainability. Gardeners must investigate... of mining and metallurgy ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- 37 3.2. History of waste management --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 38 3.3. History of industrial...

Jackson, Trisha L.

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

414

Assessment of Bioavailability of Soil-Sorbed Atrazine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and access to the pool of sorbed atrazine...which efficiently reduce concentrations of...pesticides at the soil-water interface has analogy...complete access to the pool of soil-sorbed...determination of oxygen consumption. J. Appl. Microbiol...synthetic sorbents. Water Res. 32: 1504-1512...

Jeong-Hun Park; Yucheng Feng; Pingsheng Ji; Thomas C. Voice; Stephen A. Boyd

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Suelo: Human-assisted Sensing for Exploratory Soil Monitoring Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and animal depends on soil ecosystems for nutrients, food, and water. Permission to make digital or hard@virginia.edu tharmon@ucmerced.edu destrin@cs.ucla.edu Abstract Soil contains vast ecosystems that play a key role in the Earth's water and nutrient cycles, but scientists cannot cur- rently collect the high-resolution data

Kohler, Eddie

416

Modeling Elution Histories of Copper and Lead from Contaminated Soil Treated by Poly,,amidoamine... Dendrimers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

procedures; Heavy metals; Soil pollution; Soil treatment. In recent years, extraction of heavy metals from transport models do not simulate the dynamic leaching process of heavy metals desorbed by the water soluble soil treated by poly amidoamine dendrimers. In the model, the metal sorption sites of the soil were

Clement, Prabhakar

417

Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers Title Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-5553E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Walker, Iain S., Mile Lubliner, Darryl J. Dickerhoff, and William W. Delp Journal 2010 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings The Climate for efficiency is now Date Published 08/2010 Abstract In recent years, great strides have been made in reducing air leakage in residential and to a lesser extent small commercial forced air duct systems. Several authorities have introduced low leakage limits for thermal distribution systems; for example, the State of California Energy Code for Buildings gives credit for systems that leak less than 6% of the total air flow at 25 Pa.

418

Water Wizdom Marsha M. Wright1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in their drinking water. Go to 6 3 What contaminant in drinking water affects mostly babies less than one year old. Lead can be a hazard in drinking water, but #12;does not become airborne if it is present in water. GoSR-IWM-5 Water Wizdom By Marsha M. Wright1 R. Craig Runyan2 1 Soil & Water Conservation Specialist

419

Effects of water quality and nitrogen on yield, yield components and water use efficiency of barley  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A field study was carried out on sandy soil to determine the effects of water quality and nitrogen on yield and water use efficiency of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Ardhaoui). Two irrigation water qualities wer...

K. Nagaz; N. Ben Mechlia

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Effect of Drip Irrigation with Saline Water on Water Use Efficiency and Quality of Watermelons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High ground water salinity, high water table and secondary soil salinization are dominant ... the purposes of eliminating secondary salinity and enhancing water use efficiency, drip irrigation of watermelons with...

Lei Tingwu; Xiao Juan; Li Guangyong; Mao Jianhua…

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water air soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Cyanide leaching from soil developed from coking plant purifier waste as influenced by citrate  

SciTech Connect

Soils in the vicinity of manufactured gas plants and coal coking plants are often highly contaminated with cyanides in the form of the compound Prussian blue. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of citrate on the leaching of iron-cyanide complexes from an extremely acidic soil (pH 2.3) developed from gas purifier waste near a former coking plant. The soil contained 63 g kg{sup -1} CN, 148 g kg{sup -1} Fe, 123 g kg{sup -1} S, and 222 g kg{sup -1} total C. Analysis of the soil by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy revealed the presence of Prussian blue, gypsum, elemental sulfur, jarosite, and hematite. For column leaching experiments, air-dried soil was mixed with purified cristabolite sand at a ratio of 1:3 and packed into chromatography columns. The soil was leached with dilute (0.1 or 1 mM) CaCl{sub 2} solutions and the effluent was collected and analyzed for total and dissolved CN, Ca, Fe, SO{sub 4}, pH, and pe. In the absence of citrate, the total dissolved CN concentration in the effluent was always below current drinking water limits (< 1.92 {mu}M), indicating low leaching potential. Adding citrate at a concentration of 1 mM had little effect on the CN concentrations in the column effluent. Addition of 10 or 100 mM citrate to the influent solution resulted in strong increases in dissolved and colloidal CN concentrations in the effluent.

Tim Mansfeldt; Heike Leyer; Kurt Barmettler; Ruben Kretzschmar [Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum (Germany). Soil Science and Soil Ecology Group, Faculty of Geosciences

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Metal-Air Batteries  

SciTech Connect

Metal-air batteries have much higher specific energies than most currently available primary and rechargeable batteries. Recent advances in electrode materials and electrolytes, as well as new designs on metal-air batteries, have attracted intensive effort in recent years, especially in the development of lithium-air batteries. The general principle in metal-air batteries will be reviewed in this chapter. The materials, preparation methods, and performances of metal-air batteries will be discussed. Two main metal-air batteries, Zn-air and Li-air batteries will be discussed in detail. Other type of metal-air batteries will also be described.

Zhang, Jiguang; Bruce, Peter G.; Zhang, Gregory

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Ammonia volatilization and nitrogen transformations in high pH soils used for beef manure disposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RESEARCH INSTALLATION, EQUIPMENT, AND PROCEDURES Research Installation Equipment . Soil Water Equipment Redox Potential Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . , Laboratory Equipment Procedures Soil Column Installation Procedure Ammonia and Carbon... Dioxide Collection Procedure Redox Potential Measurement Procedure . . . . Irrigation and Soil Water Content Measurement Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . , , . . . . Sampling and Sample Handling and Storage Procedure . Ammonia and Carbon Dioxide...

Peters, Robert Edgar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

424

Using TDR and Inverse Modeling to Characterize Solute Transport in a Layered Agricultural Volcanic Soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ranges from 7 to 9 depending on the composition and degree of crystallinity (van Olphen...Assessing temporal variations in soil water composition with time domain reflectometry. Soil...mathematical model for simulating water and agrochemicals in the soil and vadose environment...

A. Ritter; R. Muñoz-Carpena; C. M. Regalado; M. Javaux; M. Vanclooster

425

Field studies of in-situ soil washing  

SciTech Connect

The EPA and US Air Force conducted a research test program to demonstrate the removal of hydrocarbons and chlorinated hydrocarbons from a sandy soil by in situ soil washing using surfactants. Contaminated soil from the fire-training area of Volk Air National Guard Base, WI, was first taken to a laboratory for characterization. At the laboratory, the soil was recompacted into glass columns creating a simulated in-situ environment. Under gravity flow, 12 pore volumes of aqueous surfactant solutions were passed through each of the columns. Gas chromatograph (GC) analyses were used on the washing effluent and soil to determine removal efficiency (RE). The results of these tests were highly encouraging. Treated effluent was discharged directly to the on-base aerobic-treatment lagoons.

Nash, J.H.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Solar air heating system for combined DHW and space heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar air heating system for combined DHW and space heating solar air collector PV-panel fannon-return valve DHW tank mantle cold waterhot water roof Solar Energy Centre Denmark Danish Technological Institute SEC-R-29 #12;Solar air heating system for combined DHW and space heating Søren �stergaard Jensen

427

Soil temperature, soil moisture and thaw depth, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1  

SciTech Connect

This dataset consists of field measurements of soil properties made during 2012 and 2013 in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) weekly measurements of thaw depth, soil moisture, presence and depth of standing water, and soil temperature made during the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons (June - September) and ii) half-hourly measurements of soil temperature logged continuously during the period June 2012 to September 2013.

Sloan, V.L.; J.A. Liebig; M.S. Hahn; J.B. Curtis; J.D. Brooks; A. Rogers; C.M. Iversen; R.J. Norby

2014-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

428

Air Pollution Control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Petroleum and chemical processes are responsible for many emissions both into the air. Most relevant emissions into the air are nitrous oxides (NOx), sulfur oxides ... compounds (VOC).The major cause of all air pollution

Alireza Bahadori

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Hickam Air Force Base  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Hickam Air Force Base spans 2,850 acres in Honolulu, Hawaii. The military base is home to the 15th Airlift Wing, the Hawaii Air National Guard, and the Pacific Air Forces headquarters.

430

OLYMPIC AIR QUALITY QUESTIONABLE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

OLYMPIC AIR QUALITY QUESTIONABLE ... Athletes GOING FOR GOLD worry about Beijing’s air ... Atmospheric chemists say the air quality during the Beijing Games literally rests on which direction the winds blow. ...

RACHEL PETKEWICH

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

431

Air Quality and Pollution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Air quality refers to the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of air, both in outside space and in enclosed ... other non?industrial working places, and residencies. Air pollution is the abnormal ...

Zoran Marmut

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Automated Monitoring of Soil Respiration: A Moving Chamber Design Nelson T. Edwards* and Jeffery S. Riggs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

growthdifferential mode, and equivalent flow rates of reference gas (ambient air) and sample gas (air exiting chamber by establishing chamber when closed, provided an airtight seal. This feature and the temperature response rates continuously monitored soil temperature, or air temper- even in an environment with highly

433

Air Resources Laboratory The Air Resources Laboratory (ARL) is a research laboratory within the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the atmospheric transport, transformation and fate of air pollutants. To support air quality decision makers, ARL the interaction of air pollutants in the atmosphere and between the atmosphere and the underlying land and water the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). ARL is headquartered at the NOAA Center for Weather

434

UV water disinfector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A UV disinfector with a gravity driven feed water delivery system and an air-suspended bare UV lamp are disclosed. The disinfector is hydrodynamically optimized with a laminerizing, perforated baffle wall, beveled treatment chamber, and outlet weir. 7 figs.

Gadgil, A.; Garud, V.

1998-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

435

Report on Produced Water  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

of the pond, as well as the quality of the produced water. In semiarid regions, hot, dry air moving from a land surface will result in high evaporation rates for smaller ponds. As...

436

Primary zone air proportioner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An air proportioner is provided for a liquid hydrocarbon fueled gas turbine of the type which is convertible to oil gas fuel and to coal gas fuel. The turbine includes a shell for enclosing the turbine, an air duct for venting air in said shell to a gasifier, and a fuel injector for injecting gasified fuel into the turbine. The air proportioner comprises a second air duct for venting air from the air duct for mixing with fuel from the gasifier. The air can be directly injected into the gas combustion basket along with the fuel from the injector or premixed with fuel from the gasifier prior to injection by the fuel injector.

Cleary, Edward N. G. (San Diego, CA)

1982-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

437

Soil engineering in vivo: harnessing natural biogeochemical systems for sustainable, multi-functional engineering solutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...solution for remediation of metal-contaminated ground water and soil in...g. land and ground water remediation). Extensive...filtration of ground water while supporting...following site remediation), alter...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Supporting Information for: Chromate reduction in Fe(II)-containing soil affected by hyperalkaline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electrodes [2]. Water soluble Cr(VI) content in soils was measured using 10:1 suspension of soil to deionised support grid (Agar Scientific, UK) and carbon coated (~5 um) prior to (S)TEM analysis. The specimen

Burke, Ian

439

Initial-phase optimization for bioremediation of munition compound-contaminated soils.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...for the first stage of remediation was between 6.5 and...of the first stage of remediation of munition compound-contaminated...bioremediation explosives ground water herbicides Oregon organic...pollutants pollution remediation soil treatment soils...

S B Funk; D J Roberts; D L Crawford; R L Crawford

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Extraction agents for the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from soil in soil washing technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil have been recognised as a serious health and environmental issue due to their carcinogenic, mutagenic and teratogenic properties. One of the commonly employed soil remediation techniques to clean up such contamination is soil washing or solvent extraction. The main factor which governs the efficiency of this process is the solubility of \\{PAHs\\} in the extraction agent. Past field-scale soil washing treatments for PAH-contaminated soil have mainly employed organic solvents or water which is either toxic and costly or inefficient in removing higher molecular weight PAHs. Thus, the present article aims to provide a review and discussion of the alternative extraction agents that have been studied, including surfactants, biosurfactants, microemulsions, natural surfactants, cyclodextrins, vegetable oil and solution with solid phase particles. These extraction agents have been found to remove \\{PAHs\\} from soil at percentages ranging from 47 to 100% for various PAHs.

Ee Von Lau; Suyin Gan; Hoon Kiat Ng; Phaik Eong Poh

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water air soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Soil degradation, global warming and climate impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will demonstrate one methodology for assessing the potential large-scale impacts of soil degradation on African climates and water resources. In addition it will compare and contrast these impacts to those expected from global warming and compare impacts for differ...- ent watershed regions on the continent. 2. METHODS In order to make a similar comparison between pro- jected climate change scenarios due to global warming © Inter-Research 2001 *E-mail: feddema@ku.edu Soil degradation, global warming and climate...

Feddema, Johannes J.; Freire, Sergio Carneiro

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

RAPID/Geothermal/Water Use/Nevada | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Systems NAC 445A - Water Controls NAC 445A Water Controls NAC 445B.287 et seq - Air Pollution Control Operating Permits NAC 445B.3361 et seq - Air Pollution Control:...

443

THE ROLE OF MICROORGANISMS IN ELEMENTAL MERCURY FORMATION IN NATURAL WATERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,Air, and Soil PoUution 80: 775-787, 1995. 9 1995 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. #12;776

Morel, François M. M.

444

Air Pollution Spring 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and control. 6. Examine regional and global air pollution issues. Prerequisite: CHEM 113 and (MATH 261 or MATHATS 555 Air Pollution Spring 2010 T Th 11:00 ­ 12:15, NESB 101 Instructor: Prof. Sonia Kreidenweis an understanding of types and sources of air pollution. 2. Examine concentrations of air pollutants

445

Washing of soils spiked with various pollutants by surfactant solutions  

SciTech Connect

In this study, the batch-type of washing with surfactant solutions was employed for the treatment of soils artificially contaminated with various volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and heavy metals. 15 industrial grade surfactants were tested. Washing was conducing by adding surfactant solution to the soils and mixing for one hour, then centrifuging it and analyzing the supernatant. Deionized water was used for soil washing for comparison. Results indicated that deionized water performed as well as Surfactant No. 1 in washing VOC-contaminated soils. Therefore, it is concluded that the VOCs tested can be easily washed from soils by rain water. In washing PAH-contaminated soils, nonionic surfactants performed better than anionic surfactants in terms of removal efficiency. The amphoteric surfactant performed worst in washing PAH-contaminated soils. Generally, surfactants are useful in removing cadmium from soils, but are not useful for the removal of lead and copper. Amphoteric, anionic, and low pH cationic surfactants were the most effective of those tested. For PAH/heavy metals-contaminated soils, removal efficiencies were lower than that of soils containing a single contaminant.

Yang, G.C.C.; Chang, J.H. [National Sun Yat-Sen Univ., Kaohsiung (Taiwan, Province of China)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

446

Ethylene and soil fungistasis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... SMITH1 has reported that ethylene is a causative agent of soil fungistasis, that its production in soil varies with ... earlier work3; more recent observations4 suggest that soil anaerobiosis is necessary to mobilise substrates3 for ethylene formation by soil microorganisms.

J. M. LYNCH; S. H. T. HARPER

1974-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

447

Water Protection Projects and Practices (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute calls on soil and water conservation districts to carry out district-wide and multiple-district projects to support water protection practices, including projects to protect the state...

448

Activities of Pu and Am Isotopes and Isotopic Ratios in a Soil Contaminated by Weapons-Grade Plutonium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Radiation Division of the Surveillance Directorate for the U.S. Air Force Institute for Environment, Safety and Occupational Health Risk Analysis collected soil samples at the BOMARC site in June, 2000. ... with a mean value of 0.19, which is close to the value reported from the BOMARC WGP contaminated soil (6) and the Rocky Flats WGP contaminated soil (27). ...

M. H. Lee; S. B. Clark

2005-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

449

The role of science in solving the world's emerging water problems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...toxic waste have created a serious ground water contamination problem in many...waste still lies in the soil. Ground water contamination is extremely expensive...future to support significant remediation efforts. Soil salinization will...

William A. Jury; Henry Vaux; Jr

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

E-Print Network 3.0 - air purifying respirator Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irvine Collection: Chemistry 46 A 25-Year Modeling Study on Soil CO2 Efflux from a Conifer and a Hardwood Forest Summary: the validity of a hypothetical air temperature -...

451

Soil moisture content estimation using ground-penetrating radar reflection data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in water-deprived regions with high value crops, such as premium winegrapes. As wine- grape quality of soil water content within a vineyard could lead to increased agricultural competitiveness as well as increased water use efficiency. Variations in soil texture, topography, crop cover and irrigation practices

Hubbard, Susan

452

Subsurface Gasoline Contamination: An Indoor Air Quality Field Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Subsurface Gasoline Contamination: An Indoor Air Quality Field Study Schematic of soil-gas and contaminant transport into a slab-on-grade building at a former service station site. Three effects are illustrated that can contribute to reducing the amount of contaminant available for entry into the building: biodegradation by soil microorganisms; a layer of soil that limits diffusive movement of the contaminant; and wind-driven ventilation of the soil below the building. Not illustrated are the effects of ventilation on contaminant concentrations inside the building. The transport of soil-gas-borne contaminants into buildings has been documented as a significant source of human exposure to some pollutants indoors; one example is radon, which has received widespread public

453

Dances with waves Air-sea interaction The generation and growth of waves due to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the atmosphere fuels to a large extent the atmospheric and oceanic circulation. The release of water vapourDances with waves Air-sea interaction · The generation and growth of waves due to wind blowing over water, is a well-known example of air-sea interaction. Momentum transported downwards from the air

Haak, Hein

454

Water Rock Interaction [WRI 14] Macroscopic thermodynamics of interfaces at the water pore  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

they should be relevant. 2. Liquid-air interfacial curvature Capillary water in non-saturated porous system 7327, BP 36009, 45060 Orléans, France Abstract The possible role of liquid-air and solid-liquid (liquid-air concave curvature toward air), and curved solid as a function of pore sizes (solid-liquid

Boyer, Edmond

455

Soil Erosion (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Minnesota) (Minnesota) Soil Erosion (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting The Board of Water and Soil Resources has adopted a model ordinance to serve as the minimum standard for local governments, which are asked to

456

Dehumidifying water heater  

SciTech Connect

The indoor swimming pool at the Glen Cove YMCA in Glen Cove, New York, has been selected for the dehumidification/water heating system demonstration project. This report provides the specifications for this system which includes a dehumidifier/air handler, condenser/water heater, and outdoor condenser. Current progress underway includes construction, vendor selection, and control system selection. (SM)

Stark, W.

1991-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

457

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic-contaminated soils anexperimental...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 2 Soil and Water Science Department University of...

458

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic contaminated soils Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 2 Soil and Water Science Department University of...

459

E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting soil microbial Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for microbial communities in oligotrophic ... Source: Jawitz, James W. - Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and...

460

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkali sodic soil Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

; Renewable Energy 29 ECOSYSTEM ECOLOGY The effects of tree establishment on water and salt dynamics Summary: of sodic soils in the Caspian region and India (Mishra and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water air soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

E-Print Network 3.0 - apparently soil antibiotics-dependant Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

. 213 Response of soil CO2 efflux to water manipulation in a tallgrass prairie ecosystem ... Source: Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Botany, Research Center of...

462

Supersonic Air Jets Preserve Tree Roots in Underground Pipeline Installation1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supersonic Air Jets Preserve Tree Roots in Underground Pipeline Installation1 Rob Gross 2 trenching operations for pipeline installation. Although mechanical soil excavation using heavy equipment are routinely installed, repaired, and replaced underground. During soil excavation, tree and other plant roots

Standiford, Richard B.

463

Soiling of building envelope surfaces and its effect on solar reflectance - Part II: Development of an accelerate aging method for roofing materials  

SciTech Connect

Highly reflective roofs can decrease the energy required for building air conditioning, help mitigate the urban heat island effect, and slow global warming. However, these benefits are diminished by soiling and weathering processes that reduce the solar reflectance of most roofing materials. Soiling results from the deposition of atmospheric particulate matter and the growth of microorganisms, each of which absorb sunlight. Weathering of materials occurs with exposure to water, sunlight, and high temperatures. This study developed an accelerated aging method that incorporates features of soiling and weathering. The method sprays a calibrated aqueous soiling mixture of dust minerals, black carbon, humic acid, and salts onto preconditioned coupons of roofing materials, then subjects the soiled coupons to cycles of ultraviolet radiation, heat and water in a commercial weatherometer. Three soiling mixtures were optimized to reproduce the site-specific solar spectral reflectance features of roofing products exposed for 3 years in a hot and humid climate (Miami, Florida); a hot and dry climate (Phoenix, Arizona); and a polluted atmosphere in a temperate climate (Cleveland, Ohio). A fourth mixture was designed to reproduce the three-site average values of solar reflectance and thermal emittance attained after 3 years of natural exposure, which the Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC) uses to rate roofing products sold in the US. This accelerated aging method was applied to 25 products?single ply membranes, factory and field applied coatings, tiles, modified bitumen cap sheets, and asphalt shingles?and reproduced in 3 days the CRRC's 3-year aged values of solar reflectance. This accelerated aging method can be used to speed the evaluation and rating of new cool roofing materials.

Sleiman, Mohamad; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Berdahl, Paul; Gilbert, Haley; Quelen, Sarah; Marlot, Lea; Preble, Chelsea; Chen, Sharon; Montalbano, Amadine; Rosseler, Olivier; Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Destaillats, Hugo

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

464

Soil washing technology evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Environmental Restoration Engineering (ERE) continues to review innovative, efficient, and cost effective technologies for SRS soil and/or groundwater remediation. As part of this effort, this technical evaluation provides review and the latest information on the technology for SRS soil remediation. Additional technology evaluation reports will be issued periodically to update these reports. The purpose of this report is to review the soil washing technology and its potential application to SRS soil remediation. To assess whether the Soil Washing technology is a viable option for SRS soil remediation, it is necessary to review the technology/process, technology advantages/limitations, performance, applications, and cost analysis.

Suer, A.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Method for the Analysis of Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, including phosphorus (P) recycling by soil microorganisms, uptake by plants and P adsorption, precipitation.Twoagriculturalsoilsamples receiving reclaimed wastewater or fresh water were analyzed, and results indicate that all soil fractions, where rates of biological uptake and recycling through the biomass are relatively low, 18 OP (the ratio

Paytan, Adina

466

In-Situ Thermal Remediation of Contaminated Soil1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

differentials at the electrodes. Water is also pumped into the soil via the injection well and out of the groundChapter 1 In-Situ Thermal Remediation of Contaminated Soil1 Written by Huaxiong Huang,2 Serguei meters under the ground) has been proposed by McMillan-McGee Corp. The process can be described

Lapin, Sergey

467

Surfactant screening of diesel-contaminated soil  

SciTech Connect

At one installation, approximately 60,000 gal of No. 2 diesel fuel leaked into the subsurface environment, with contamination at depths of 6 to 34 m below the surface. Argonne National Laboratory was contracted to perform treatability studies for site remediation. The treatability studies focused on four separate phases: (1) leachability studies on the various contaminated soil borings, (2) air stripping studies, (3) bioremediation studies, and (4) surfactant screening/surfactant flooding studies. This paper summarizes the fourth phase of the research program in which twenty-one surfactants were screened for possible use to mobilize the organics from the contaminated soil prior to bioremediation. Anionic surfactants resulted in the greatest degree of diesel mobilization. The most promising surfactants will be employed on actual contaminated soil samples obtained from the site. 18 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

Peters, R.W.; Montemagno, C.D.; Shem, L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Lewis, B.A. (Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (USA). Dept. of Civil Engineering)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING USING LOCATION SPECIFIC AIR MONITORING IN BULK HANDLING FACILITIES  

SciTech Connect

Since the introduction of safeguards strengthening measures approved by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Board of Governors (1992-1997), international nuclear safeguards inspectors have been able to utilize environmental sampling (ES) (e.g. deposited particulates, air, water, vegetation, sediments, soil and biota) in their safeguarding approaches at bulk uranium/plutonium handling facilities. Enhancements of environmental sampling techniques used by the IAEA in drawing conclusions concerning the absence of undeclared nuclear materials or activities will soon be able to take advantage of a recent step change improvement in the gathering and analysis of air samples at these facilities. Location specific air monitoring feasibility tests have been performed with excellent results in determining attribute and isotopic composition of chemical elements present in an actual test-bed sample. Isotopic analysis of collected particles from an Aerosol Contaminant Extractor (ACE) collection, was performed with the standard bulk sampling protocol used throughout the IAEA network of analytical laboratories (NWAL). The results yielded bulk isotopic values expected for the operations. Advanced designs of air monitoring instruments such as the ACE may be used in gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEP) to detect the production of highly enriched uranium (HEU) or enrichments not declared by a State. Researchers at Savannah River National Laboratory in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory are developing the next generation of ES equipment for air grab and constant samples that could become an important addition to the international nuclear safeguards inspector's toolkit. Location specific air monitoring to be used to establish a baseline environmental signature of a particular facility employed for comparison of consistencies in declared operations will be described in this paper. Implementation of air monitoring will be contrasted against the use of smear ES when used during unannounced inspections, design information verification, limited frequency unannounced access, and complementary access visits at bulk handling facilities. Analysis of technical features required for tamper indication and resistance will demonstrate the viability of successful application of the system in taking ES within a bulk handling location. Further exploration of putting this technology into practice is planned to include mapping uranium enrichment facilities for the identification of optimal for installation of air monitoring devices.

Sexton, L.; Hanks, D.; Degange, J.; Brant, H.; Hall, G.; Cable-Dunlap, P.; Anderson, B.

2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

469

Convection Initiation along Soil Moisture Boundaries in the Southern Great Plains  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Boundaries between two dissimilar air masses have been shown to be the focus region for convection initiation. One feature that has been shown to create these boundaries, as well as mesoscale circulation patterns conducive for convection, is soil ...

John D. Frye; Thomas L. Mote

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Healthy Air Act (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Maryland Healthy Air Act was developed with the purpose of bringing Maryland into attainment with the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ozone and fine particulate matter by the...

471

Aesculap, Inc. Air Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aesculap, Inc. Air Products Air Products Foundation Alaric Compliance Services, LLC Alvin H. Butz & Herger, Inc. Sodexo Campus Services Sodexo Inc. and Affiliates Stupp Bros., Inc. Sugarbush Products, Inc

Napier, Terrence

472

E-Print Network 3.0 - austrian mineral water Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mines may affect air quality. As with water pollution, mines can contribute to air pollution... Chapter 15 Mineral Resources and the Environment 12;Minerals ... Source: Pan,...

473

Georgia Air Quality Control Act (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Quality Control Act (Georgia) Air Quality Control Act (Georgia) Georgia Air Quality Control Act (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Climate Policies Environmental Regulations Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Georgia Air Quality Control Act (AQCA) is a set of environmental regulations, permitting requirements, and air quality standards that control the amount of pollutants emitted and who emits them. The AQCA

474

Water quality Water quantity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

01-1 · Water quality · Water quantity · Remediation strategies MinE 422: Water Resources: Younger, Banwart and Hedin. 2002. Mine Water. Hydrology, Pollution, Remediation. Impacts of mining on water mining ­ Often the largest long term issue ­ Water quality affected, surface/ground water pollution

Boisvert, Jeff

475

Water quality Water quantity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Water quality · Water quantity · Remediation strategies MinE 422: Water Resources: Younger, Banwart and Hedin. 2002. Mine Water. Hydrology, Pollution, Remediation. Impacts of mining on water mining ­ Often the largest long term issue ­ Water quality affected, surface/ground water pollution

Boisvert, Jeff

476

Minimize Compressed Air Leaks  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This tip sheet outlines a strategy for compressed air leak detection and provides a formula for cost savings calculations.

477

Water Efficiency Case Studies | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

demonstrating technologies, and creating specifications for high-efficiency fixtures. Boiler Upgrades and Decentralizing Steam Systems Save Water and Energy at Naval Air Station...

478

ARM - Lesson Plans: Dissolved Gases in Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

released into the air, additional CO2 Would intensify an already-problematic greenhouse effect. Preparation Demonstrate that water contains invisible gases. Collect and cover...

479

Ethylene-induced volatile inhibitors causing soil fungistasis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... To test the hypothesis that ethylene is the main inhibitor involved in soil fungistasis5, nutrient-free water agar disks 2 ... oligospora were incubated at 22 C in atmospheres containing up to 50% (v/v) ethylene ( ...

C. BALIS

1976-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

480

Comparison of Methods for Determining Soil Hydraulic Characteristics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Alemi, et al., 1972). Soil cores were centrifuged and the redistribution of water was measured as change in weight with time. Inconsistent results and limited data obtained with this method, consequently, prevented adequate conclusions from being made...

Howell, T. A.; McFarland, M. J.; Reddell, D. L.; Brown, K. W.; Newton, R. J.; Humphreys, K. B.

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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Course Name: Environmental Soil Physics Credits: 3 credit-hours  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and the potential for agrochemicals to pollute groundwater. 2. Comprehend transport processes for water, gases parameters of agrochemicals, gases, and heat in soils. 4. Use mathematical models to quantify transport

Ma, Lena

482

Air Products effective way  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PE O A e s a b O T A O ENNST Overview Air Products effective way standard me Departm Shipping has recently y of shipping eans. Air Pro ontainer that es of this pro onduct mark eep accelera eep the cost tilize widely a earch and m m visited Air er needs wer model was cr m approache ms

Demirel, Melik C.

483

Taking the “Waste” Out of “Wastewater” for Human Water Security and Ecosystem Sustainability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...than finding infrastructure solutions to water scarcity...freshwater resources: Soft-path solutions for the 21st century . Science...Horvath A. , Energy and air emission effects of water...Waste Disposal, Fluid Water Pollution Water Purification Water Quality...

Stanley B. Grant; Jean-Daniel Saphores; David L. Feldman; Andrew J. Hamilton; Tim D. Fletcher; Perran L. M. Cook; Michael Stewardson; Brett F. Sanders; Lisa A. Levin; Richard F. Ambrose; Ana Deletic; Rebekah Brown; Sunny C. Jiang; Diego Rosso; William J. Cooper; Ivan Marusic

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

484

68A journal of soil and water conservationMaY/june 2010--vol. 65, no. 3 Cynthia Rosenzweig, Sarah Bartges, Alison Powell, Jake Garcia, Peter Neofotis, Judith LaBelle,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMET-VR doi:10.2489/jswc.65.3.68A Cynthia Rosenzweig and Daniel Hillel are senior research scientists agricultural lands by sequestering carbon (C) in the soil. Methods of agricultural C seques- tration include

485

Extractable soil phosphorus in Blackland Prairie soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Texas Agricultural Extension Service (TAEX) Soil Testing Laboratory currently utilizes a single phosphorus (P) extractant consisting of 1.43 M NH4OAc, 1. 0 M HCl, and 0.025 M EDTA-PH 4.2 to estimate plant available P for all soils in Texas...

Byrd, Robert Claude

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

486

Irrigation Monitoring with Soil Water Sensors (Spanish)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

determinado por experimentos en invernaderos. Este punto se logra cuando la tensi?n del agua en el suelo alcanza entre 10 y 20 bars (de 102 a 204 m de tensi?n). Generalmente se utiliza un valor medio de 15 bars (153 m). El agua higrosc?pica es cuando el... de humedad del suelo en pulgadas de agua por pie de suelo y en porcentaje. Textura del suelo Capacidad de campo (1/3 bars) Punto de marchitamiento permanente (15 bars) Agua disponible para la planta Arena 1.2 (10)* 0.5 (4) 0.7 (6) Arena margosa...

Enciso, Juan; Porter, Dana; Peries, Xavier

2007-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

487

Field Devices for Monitoring Soil Water Content  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.1. Volumetric Field Methods 2.1.1. Neutron Moderation 2.1.2. Dielectric Methods 2.1.2.1. Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) 2.1.2.2. Frequency Domain (FD): Capacitance and FDR 2.1.2.3. Amplitude Domain Reflectometry

488

Aquatic Botany 64 (1999) 381398 Controls on soil cellulose decomposition along a salinity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aquatic Botany 64 (1999) 381­398 Controls on soil cellulose decomposition along a salinity gradient gradient, where nutrients, soil moisture, temperature and salinity among other factors also varied. Our placed at seven marsh sites along the salinity gradient, and soil and in- terstitial water samples were

Brix, Hans

489

Sorption and Desorption of Atrazine and Diuron onto Primary Soil Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sorption and Desorption of Atrazine and Diuron onto Primary Soil Particles Peng Wang and Arturo A soil particles and soil sorption has a profound impact on the fate and transport of the pesticides to receiving water bodies. The objectives of this study were to: · Compare sorption and desorption behavior

Keller, Arturo A.

490

A Modeling Study of Irrigation Effects on Surface Fluxes and Land-Air-Cloud Interactions in the Southern Great Plains  

SciTech Connect

In this study, the authors incorporate an operational-like irrigation scheme into the Noah land surface model as part of the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF). A series of simulations, with and without irrigation, is conducted over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) for an extremely dry (2006) and wet (2007) year. The results show that including irrigation reduces model bias in soil moisture and surface latent heat (LH) and sensible heat (SH) fluxes, especially during a dry year. Irrigation adds additional water to the surface, leading to changes in the planetary boundary layer. The increase in soil moisture leads to increases in the surface evapotranspiration and near-surface specific humidity but decreases in the SH and surface temperature. Those changes are local and occur during daytime. There is an irrigation-induced decrease in both the lifting condensation level (ZLCL) and mixed-layer depth. The decrease in ZLCL is larger than the decrease in mixed-layer depth, suggesting an increasing probability of shallow clouds. The simulated changes in precipitation induced by irrigation are highly variable in space, and the average precipitation over the SGP region only slightly increases. A high correlation is found among soil moisture, SH, and ZLCL. Larger values of soil moisture in the irrigated simulation due to irrigation in late spring and summer persist into the early fall, suggesting that irrigation-induced soil memory could last a few weeks to months. The results demonstrate the importance of irrigation parameterization for climate studies and improve the process-level understanding on the role of human activity in modulating land–air–cloud interactions.

Qian, Yun; Huang, Maoyi; Yang, Ben; Berg, Larry K.

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

491

Determining the Right Air Quality for Your Compressed Air System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This tip sheet outlines the main factors for determining the right air quality for compressed air systems.

492

Sources for Pu in near surface air  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides evidence that most of the Pu in the near surface air today is due to resuspension. Vertical and particle size distribution in near surface air over a period of three years were measured. The seasonal variations of Pu in air and the influence of meteorological parameters on these variations are shown. Samples were taken before the Chernobyl accident in an area where only Pu fallout from the atmospheric nuclear tests of the early sixties occurs. The comparison of the behavior of Pu with other trace elements, which were also measured, showed similar behavior of Pu and elements like Ca, Ti and Fe in near surface air. This confirms that most Pu is resuspended because the main source for these elements in air is the soil surface. Resuspension factors and resuspension rate are estimated for all measured elements. A resuspension factor of 0.8 X 10(-8) m-1 and a resuspension rate of 0.09 X 10(-9) s-1 is calculated for Pu.

Hartmann, G.; Thom, C.; Baechmann, K.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Water vapour, sonoluminescence and sonochemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...air bubble, the nitrogen reacts with water vapour, producing...is soon devoid of nitrogen due to the ease...present results on water-vapour chemistry...than a monatomic gas and water. Finally...drastically change the gas solubility. The change in...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Production of CO2 in Soil Profiles of a California Annual Grassland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production of CO2 in Soil Profiles of a California Annual Grassland Noah Fierer,1 * Oliver A play a key role in the global cycling of carbon (C), storing organic C, and releasing CO2 to the atmosphere. Although a large number of studies have focused on the CO2 flux at the soil­air inter- face

Fierer, Noah

495

Thin Air Breathing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thin Air Breathing Thin Air Breathing Name: Amy Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Why is it hard to breathe in thin air? What health dangers do mountain climbers face at high altitudes? Replies: Among the obvious dangers of losing ones footing, the oxygen available in the air is considerable less at higher altitudes. If I recall correctly, 21% of the atmosphere at standard temperature and pressure at sea level is composed of oxygen. This is less at higher altitudes. One can lose consciousness and even die in an oxygen deficient environment with changes from oxygen content to lower than 19.5%. This can unfortunate effect can occur within minutes. Dr. Myron The air is not really thin at high altitudes. The problem is that air pressure is lower. As altitude increases, air pressure decreases. In order for your lungs to fill with air, the air pressure in your lungs has to be less than the pressure of the air outside your lungs. Air moves from areas of higher pressure to lower pressure. As your diaphragm (the muscle that separates your chest cavity from your abdominal cavity) moves downward, the size of your chest cavity increases. This decreases the pressure in your chest and air flows in. When the diaphragm is up, it puts pressure on the chest cavity and the pressure in the lungs is greater than outside the lungs. Air flows out. This is an example of Boyle's Law. The movement of the diaphragm is controlled by the brainstem. Anyway-the reason that it is harder for some people to breathe at higher altitudes is that the air pressure differences aren't as great between the inside of the lungs and outside.

496

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Innovative Fresh Water Production Process for Fossil Fired Power Plants An Innovative Fresh Water Production Process for Fossil Fired Power Plants Using Energy Stored in Main Condenser Cooling Water - University of Florida This project replaces the cooling tower in a fossil fired power plant with an innovative diffusion driven desalination (DDD) plant that will render the power plant a net producer of fresh water. The energy required to drive the desalination process comes from the main condenser cooling water, which would otherwise be discharged. Saline water is used to condense the low pressure steam exiting the turbine. The hot, saline water exiting the condenser is sprayed into the top of a diffusion tower. The diffusion tower is filled with high surface area packing material such as that used in air stripping towers to enhance the water/air surface area. Air is blown through the bottom of the tower and becomes humidified. The humidified air goes to a direct-contact condenser where the fresh water is condensed. This process has an advantage over conventional desalination technology in that it may be driven by waste heat with very low thermodynamic availability. Also, cold air is a byproduct of this process which can be used to cool buildings.

497

Sitewide feasibility study Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

The Sitewide Feasibility Study (FS) is required under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), the National Contingency Plan (NCP), and the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for Eielson Air Force Base (AFB). It is based on findings presented in the Sitewide Remedial Investigation (RI) Report (USAF 1995a), and the Sitewide Baseline Risk Assessment (BLRA) Report (USAF 1995b). Under the FFA, 64 potential source areas were placed in one of six operable units, based on similar contaminant and environmental characteristics, or were included for evaluation under a Source Evaluation Report (SER). The sitewide RI was directed at contamination that was not confined to an operable unit (OU) or SER source area. The objectives of the sitewide RI were to: Provide information about site characteristics to support individual OU RI/FS efforts and the sitewide RI/FS, including site hydrogeology and determination of background soil and groundwater characteristics; identify and characterize contamination that is not confined or attributable to a specific source area through sitewide monitoring of groundwater and surface water; evaluate cumulative risks to human health and the environment from contamination on a sitewide basis; and provide a mechanism for continued cohesive sitewide monitoring.

Last, G.V.; Lanigan, D.C.; Josephson, G.B.; Bagaasen, L.M.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Sonoluminescing air bubbles rectify argon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dynamics of single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) strongly depends on the percentage of inert gas within the bubble. We propose a theory for this dependence, based on a combination of principles from sonochemistry and hydrodynamic stability. The nitrogen and oxygen dissociation and subsequent reaction to water soluble gases implies that strongly forced air bubbles eventually consist of pure argon. Thus it is the partial argon (or any other inert gas) pressure which is relevant for stability. The theory provides quantitative explanations for many aspects of SBSL.

Detlef Lohse; Michael P. Brenner; Todd F. Dupont; Sascha Hilgenfeldt; Blaine Johnston

1996-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

499

EXPERIMENTAL I KM SOIL MOISTURE PRODUCTS FROM ENVISAT ASAR FOR SOUTHERN AFRICA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil moisture is an important environmental variable and a key element in the Earths energy, water and carbon cycle. Monitoring soil moisture over large areas is only feasible using remote sensing. In this paper, a change detection approach based on an extensive Envisat ASAR Global Mode data archive is presented. Actual backscatter measurements are compared to two reference values representing dry and wet soil conditions. Maps showing the surface soil moisture are generated. First validation showed a good agreement with precipitation data and soil moisture measurements. However, the lack of large scale soil moisture monitoring sites makes validation difficult. 1

unknown authors

500

Influence of Rhamnolipids and Triton X-100 on the Desorption of Pesticides from Soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At dosages below soil saturation, surfactants sorbed onto soil, increasing its hydrophobicity and enhancing the sorption of the pesticides by a factor of 2. Similar values of water?soil partition coefficients (Ksol* ) for aged and fresh added pesticides to soils indicate that the aging process used did not significantly alter the capability of either surfactant to desorb the pesticides. ... Although nonionic surfactants have been considered in surfactant-aided soil washing systems, there is little information on the particle-size dependence of these processes, and this may have significant implications for the design of these systems. ... Enhanced Soil Washing of Phenanthrene by Mixed Solutions of TX100 and SDBS ...

Juan C. Mata-Sandoval; Jeffrey Karns; Alba Torrents

2002-09-25T23:59:59.000Z