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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastewater neutralization facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission) Jump to: navigation, search Name Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission)...

2

Energy Efficiency Strategies for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water and wastewater systems are significant energy consumers with an estimated 3%-4% of total U.S. electricity consumption used for the movement and treatment of water and wastewater. Water-energy issues are of growing importance in the context of water shortages, higher energy and material costs, and a changing climate. In this economic environment, it is in the best interest for utilities to find efficiencies, both in water and energy use. Performing energy audits at water and wastewater treatment facilities is one way community energy managers can identify opportunities to save money, energy, and water. In this paper the importance of energy use in wastewater facilities is illustrated by a case study of a process energy audit performed for Crested Butte, Colorado's wastewater treatment plant. The energy audit identified opportunities for significant energy savings by looking at power intensive unit processes such as influent pumping, aeration, ultraviolet disinfection, and solids handling. This case study presents best practices that can be readily adopted by facility managers in their pursuit of energy and financial savings in water and wastewater treatment. This paper is intended to improve community energy managers understanding of the role that the water and wastewater sector plays in a community's total energy consumption. The energy efficiency strategies described provide information on energy savings opportunities, which can be used as a basis for discussing energy management goals with water and wastewater treatment facility managers.

Daw, J.; Hallett, K.; DeWolfe, J.; Venner, I.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Montana Facilities Which Do Not Discharge Process Wastewater...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Which Do Not Discharge Process Wastewater (MDEQ Form 2E) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: Montana Facilities Which Do Not Discharge Process...

4

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wastewater treatment is an energy intensive process which, together with water treatment, comprises about three percent of U.S. annual energy use. Yet, since wastewater treatment facilities are often peripheral to major electricity-using industries, they are frequently an overlooked area for automated demand response opportunities. Demand response is a set of actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies or congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, and/or market conditions occur that raise electric supply costs. Demand response programs are designed to improve the reliability of the electric grid and to lower the use of electricity during peak times to reduce the total system costs. Open automated demand response is a set of continuous, open communication signals and systems provided over the Internet to allow facilities to automate their demand response activities without the need for manual actions. Automated demand response strategies can be implemented as an enhanced use of upgraded equipment and facility control strategies installed as energy efficiency measures. Conversely, installation of controls to support automated demand response may result in improved energy efficiency through real-time access to operational data. This paper argues that the implementation of energy efficiency opportunities in wastewater treatment facilities creates a base for achieving successful demand reductions. This paper characterizes energy use and the state of demand response readiness in wastewater treatment facilities and outlines automated demand response opportunities.

Thompson, Lisa; Song, Katherine; Lekov, Alex; McKane, Aimee

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

5

Applications of Energy Efficiency Technologies in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Depending on the level and type of treatment, municipal wastewater treatment (WWT) can be an energy intensive process, constituting a major cost for the municipal governments. According to a 1993 study wastewater treatment plants consume close to 1...

Chow, S.; Werner, L.; Wu, Y. Y.; Ganji, A. R.

6

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

05CH11231. References EPRI, Energy Audit Manual for Water/Research Institute, Energy Audit Manual for Water/Wastewater

Thompson, Lisa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure,study of automated demand response in wastewater treatmentopportunities for demand response control strategies in

Thompson, Lisa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

EPA ENERGY STAR Webcast: Benchmarking Water/Wastewater Treatment Facilities in Portfolio Manager  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Learn how to track the progress of energy efficiency efforts and compare the energy use of wastewater treatment plants to other peer facilities across the country. Attendees will learn how to...

9

Source Characterization and Pretreatment Evaluation of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products in Healthcare Facility Wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Healthcare facility wastewaters are a potentially important and under characterized source of pharmaceuticals and personal care products to the environment. In this study the composition and magnitude of pharmaceuticals and personal care products...

Nagarnaik, Pranav Mukund

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

10

Cryosorption Pumps for a Neutral Beam Injector Test Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the experiences of the manufacturing and the operating of a system of two identical cryosorption pumps used in a neutral beam injector test facility for fusion reactors. Calculated and measured heat loads of the cryogenic liquid helium and liquid nitrogen circuits of the cryosorption pumps are discussed. The design calculations concerning the thermo-hydraulics of the helium circuit are compared with experiences from the operation of the cryosorption pumps. Both cryopumps are integrated in a test facility of a neutral beam injector that will be used to heat the plasma of a nuclear fusion reactor with a beam of deuterium or hydrogen molecules. The huge gas throughput into the vessel of the test facility results in challenging needs on the cryopumping system.The developed cryosorption pumps are foreseen to pump a hydrogen throughput of 20 - 30 mbar{center_dot}l/s. To establish a mean pressure of several 10-5 mbar in the test vessel a pumping speed of about 350 m3/s per pump is needed. The pressure conditions must be maintained over several hours pumping without regeneration of the cryopanels, which necessitates a very high pumping capacity. A possibility to fulfill these requirements is the use of charcoal coated cryopanels to pump the gasloads by adsorption. For the cooling of the cryopanels, liquid helium at saturation pressure is used and therefore a two-phase forced flow in the cryopump system must be controlled.

Dremel, M.; Mack, A.; Day, C.; Jensen, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Technische Physik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

2006-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

11

2010 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2009, through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: • Site description • Facility and system description • Permit required monitoring data and loading rates • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2010 permit year, approximately 2.2 million gallons of treated wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area at Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment plant.

Mike lewis

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

2012 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2011, through October 31, 2012. The report contains the following information: • Site description • Facility and system description • Permit required monitoring data and loading rates • Status of compliance conditions and activities • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2012 permit year, no wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant.

Mike Lewis

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

EIS-0224: Southeast Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant Facilities Improvements  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"This EIS analyzes the Lake County Sanitation District joint venture with the geothermal industry, specifically the Northern California Power Agency, Calpine Corporation (Calpine), and Pacific Gas and Electric Company, to develop a plan for disposal of secondary-treated effluent from the Southeast Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant near the City of Clearlake, California, in the Southeast Geysers Geothermal Steam Field."

14

2011 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2010, through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: (1) Site description; (2) Facility and system description; (3) Permit required monitoring data and loading rates; (4) Status of special compliance conditions and activities; and (5) Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts. During the 2011 permit year, approximately 1.22 million gallons of treated wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area at Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment plant.

Michael G. Lewis

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

2013 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2012, through October 31, 2013. The report contains, as applicable, the following information: • Site description • Facility and system description • Permit required monitoring data and loading rates • Status of compliance conditions and activities • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2013 permit year, no wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant and therefore, no effluent flow volumes or samples were collected from wastewater sampling point WW-014102. However, soil samples were collected in October from soil monitoring unit SU-014101.

Mike Lewis

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California -- Phase I Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

best practices that could be applicable in improving the energy efficiencyEnergy efficiency measures that have been successfully implemented in municipal wastewater treatment facilities can serve as best practices

Lekov, Alex

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California -- Phase I Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory?s research to date in characterizing energy efficiency and automated demand response opportunities for wastewater treatment facilities in California. The report describes the characteristics of wastewater treatment facilities, the nature of the wastewater stream, energy use and demand, as well as details of the wastewater treatment process. It also discusses control systems and energy efficiency and automated demand response opportunities. In addition, several energy efficiency and load management case studies are provided for wastewater treatment facilities.This study shows that wastewater treatment facilities can be excellent candidates for open automated demand response and that facilities which have implemented energy efficiency measures and have centralized control systems are well-suited to shift or shed electrical loads in response to financial incentives, utility bill savings, and/or opportunities to enhance reliability of service. Control technologies installed for energy efficiency and load management purposes can often be adapted for automated demand response at little additional cost. These improved controls may prepare facilities to be more receptive to open automated demand response due to both increased confidence in the opportunities for controlling energy cost/use and access to the real-time data.

Lekov, Alex; Thompson, Lisa; McKane, Aimee; Song, Katherine; Piette, Mary Ann

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Conneaut Wastewater Facility Wind Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentratingRenewable Solutions LLC Jump to: navigation,AreaHigh SchoolFacility Wind Turbine Jump

19

Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Southeast Water Pollution Control Plant Case Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details a study into the demand response potential of a large wastewater treatment facility in San Francisco. Previous research had identified wastewater treatment facilities as good candidates for demand response and automated demand response, and this study was conducted to investigate facility attributes that are conducive to demand response or which hinder its implementation. One years' worth of operational data were collected from the facility's control system, submetered process equipment, utility electricity demand records, and governmental weather stations. These data were analyzed to determine factors which affected facility power demand and demand response capabilities The average baseline demand at the Southeast facility was approximately 4 MW. During the rainy season (October-March) the facility treated 40% more wastewater than the dry season, but demand only increased by 4%. Submetering of the facility's lift pumps and centrifuges predicted load shifts capabilities of 154 kW and 86 kW, respectively, with large lift pump shifts in the rainy season. Analysis of demand data during maintenance events confirmed the magnitude of these possible load shifts, and indicated other areas of the facility with demand response potential. Load sheds were seen to be possible by shutting down a portion of the facility's aeration trains (average shed of 132 kW). Load shifts were seen to be possible by shifting operation of centrifuges, the gravity belt thickener, lift pumps, and external pump stations These load shifts were made possible by the storage capabilities of the facility and of the city's sewer system. Large load reductions (an average of 2,065 kW) were seen from operating the cogeneration unit, but normal practice is continuous operation, precluding its use for demand response. The study also identified potential demand response opportunities that warrant further study: modulating variable-demand aeration loads, shifting operation of sludge-processing equipment besides centrifuges, and utilizing schedulable self-generation.

Olsen, Daniel; Goli, Sasank; Faulkner, David; McKane, Aimee

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

20

Influence of phosphate and silica on U(VI) precipitation from acidic and neutralized wastewaters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium speciation and physical-chemical characteristics were studied in solids precipitated from synthetic acidic to circumneutral wastewaters in the presence and absence of dissolved silica and phosphate to examine thermodynamic and kinetic controls on phase formation. Composition of synthetic wastewater was based on disposal sites 216-U-8 and 216-U-12 Cribs at the Hanford site (WA, USA). In the absence of dissolved silica or phosphate, crystalline or amorphous uranyl oxide hydrates, either compreignacite or meta-schoepite, precipitated at pH 5 or 7 after 30 d of reaction, in agreement with thermodynamic calculations. In the presence of 1 mM dissolved silica representative of groundwater concentrations, amorphous phases dominated by compreignacite precipitated rapidly at pH 5 or 7 as a metastable phase and formation of poorly-crystalline boltwoodite, the thermodynamically stable uranyl silicate phase, was slow. In the presence of phosphate (3 mM), meta-ankoleite initially precipitated as the primary phase at pH 3, 5, or 7 regardless of the presence of 1 mM dissolved silica. Analysis of precipitates by U LIII-edge EXAFS indicated that “autunite-type” sheets of meta-ankoleite transformed to “phosphuranylite-type” sheets after 30 d of reaction, probably due to Ca substitution in the structure. Low solubility of uranyl phosphate phases limits dissolved U(VI) concentrations but differences in particle size, crystallinity, and precipitate composition vary with pH and base cation concentration, which will influence the thermodynamic and kinetic stability of these phases.

Kanematsu, Masakazu; Perdrial, Nicolas; Um, Wooyong; Chorover, Jon; O'Day, Peggy A.

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastewater neutralization facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California -- Phase I Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Embaby, and M. Rao (2006). Refinery Wastewater Treatment: Aand Assessment of Al Ruwais Refinery Wastewater." Journal ofThe Effects of Petroleum Refinery Wastewater on the Rate of

Lekov, Alex

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Neutron measurements from beam-target reactions at the ELISE neutral beam test facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of 2.5 MeV neutron emission from beam-target reactions performed at the ELISE neutral beam test facility are presented in this paper. The measurements are used to study the penetration of a deuterium beam in a copper dump, based on the observation of the time evolution of the neutron counting rate from beam-target reactions with a liquid scintillation detector. A calculation based on a local mixing model of deuterium deposition in the target up to a concentration of 20% at saturation is used to evaluate the expected neutron yield for comparison with data. The results are of relevance to understand neutron emission associated to beam penetration in a solid target, with applications to diagnostic systems for the SPIDER and MITICA Neutral Beam Injection prototypes.

Xufei, X., E-mail: xiexufei@pku.edu.cn; Fan, T. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Nocente, M.; Gorini, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini”, Universitŕ di Milano-Bicocca, Milano 20216 (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola”, Milano 20216 (Italy); Bonomo, F. [Consorzio RFX, Padova 35100 (Italy); Istituto Gas Ionizzati, CNR, Padova 35100 (Italy); Franzen, P.; Fröschle, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching 84518 (Germany); Grosso, G.; Tardocchi, M. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola”, Milano 20216 (Italy); Grünauer, F. [Physics Consulting, Zorneding 85604 (Germany); Pasqualotto, R. [Consorzio RFX, Padova 35100 (Italy)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

23

Estimation of E. coli Concentrations from Failing On-Site Wastewater Treatment Facilities (OWTS) Using GIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Failing Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems (OWTSs) have been identified as a significant threat to water quality, discharging significant amounts of inadequately treated sewage effluents. When developing a Watershed Protection Plan (WPP), OWTS has...

Virani, Afreen Shiraz

2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

24

Determination of Baselines for Evaluation and Promotion of Energy Efficiency in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wastewater treatment plants are one of the largest energy consumers managed by the public sector. As plants expand in the future to accommodate population growth, energy requirements will substantially increase. Thus, implementation of energy...

Chow, S. A.; Ganji, A. R.; Fok, S.

25

EPA ENERGY STAR Webcast: Benchmarking Water/Wastewater Treatment...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Benchmarking WaterWastewater Treatment Facilities in Portfolio Manager EPA ENERGY STAR Webcast: Benchmarking WaterWastewater Treatment Facilities in Portfolio Manager November...

26

Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-6056E Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities Figure 1: Simplified diagram of major processes at a typical wastewater treatment plant #12;Results

27

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California -- Phase I Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biological operations. Tertiary treatment processes wastewaterwastewater treatment system, called the Living Machine, uses natural non-chemical biologicalbiological (Wilkinson 2000). Each type generally refers to a certain point in the wastewater treatment

Lekov, Alex

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Wastewater Construction and Operation Permits (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations describe permit requirements for the construction and operation of facilities treating wastewater, and provide separation distances from other water sources.

29

Channel Design to Increase Wastewater Treatment Wetland Capacity and Connectivity in Stockton, CA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control Facility. Treatment Wetland System Startup PeriodDesign to Increase Wastewater Treatment Wetland Capacity andof wastewater treatment wetlands at the Stockton Regional

Cubbison, Erin O.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

California Food Processing Industry Wastewater Demonstration Project: Phase I Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Efficiency and Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California: Phase I Report, summarizes the status and potential

Lewis, Glen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Using CO2 & Algae to Treat Wastewater and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using CO2 & Algae to Treat Wastewater and Produce Biofuel Feedstock Tryg Lundquist Cal Poly State School, UCSB March 23, 2007 #12;CO2 and Wastewater Treatment · WW Treatment Technologies · Scale Actinastrum sp. #12;Major Wastewater Treatment Technologies in U.S. Activated Sludge 6,800 Facilities 25

Keller, Arturo A.

32

Wastewater sludge management options for Honduras  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sludge management is a fundamental area of concern across wastewater treatment systems in Honduras. The lack of timely sludge removal has led to declining plant performance in many facilities throughout the country. In ...

Bhattacharya, Mahua, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

University Facilities Planning & Con-Project Manager; Bahar Armaghani  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://www.facilities.ufl.edu/ Be sustainable; Do not print, visit us at www.facilities.ufl.edu #12;Sustainable Site No Parking Added; Actually% 100% reclaimed water for irrigation 100% of wastewater treated on site (Campus Wastewater Treatment

Slatton, Clint

34

2001 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2001 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory describe site conditions for the facilities with State of Idaho Wastewater Land Application Permits. Permit-required monitoring data are summarized, and any permit exceedences or environmental impacts relating to the operation of any of the facilities during the 2001 permit year are discussed. Additionally, any special studies performed at the facilities, which related to the operation of the facility or application of the wastewater, are discussed.

Meachum, T.R.; Lewis, M.G.

2002-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

35

2001 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2001 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory describe site conditions for the facilities with State of Idaho Wastewater Land Application Permits. Permit-required monitoring data are summarized, and any permit exceedences or environmental impacts relating to the operation of any of the facilities during the 2001 permit year are discussed. Additionally, any special studies performed at the facilities, which related to the operation of the facility or application of the wastewater, are discussed.

Meachum, Teresa Ray; Lewis, Michael George

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

DECENTRALIZED WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 DECENTRALIZED WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT: A GUIDEBOOK FOR GEORGIA COMMUNITIES Katie Sheehan wastewater treatment technologies. www.njunsystems.com Version 1.0, April 2013 #12; 2 DECENTRALIZED WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT: A GUIDEBOOK FOR GEORGIA COMMUNITIES PART ONE: BACKGROUND, ISSUES, AND PROGRAM

Rosemond, Amy Daum

37

WASTEWATER SYSTEMS Henrik Bechmann  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELLING OF WASTEWATER SYSTEMS Henrik Bechmann Lyngby 1999 ATV Erhvervsforskerprojekt EF 623 IMM, N. K. (1998). Control of sewer systems and wastewater treatment plants using pollutant concentration., and Nielsen, M. K. (1999). Grey box modelling of first flush and incoming wastewater at a wastewater treatment

38

Detection of Wastewater Plumes from the 15 N Isotopic Composition of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detection of Wastewater Plumes from the 15 N Isotopic Composition of Groundwater, Algae that a main source of nutrient loading is due to wastewater contamination of groundwater within the watershed via septic systems and wastewater treatment facilities. 5 Mya arenaria were collected at each

Vallino, Joseph J.

39

Impacts of Shale Gas Wastewater Disposal on Water Quality in Western Pennsylvania  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impacts of Shale Gas Wastewater Disposal on Water Quality in Western Pennsylvania Nathaniel R. In Pennsylvania, oil and gas wastewater is sometimes treated at brine treatment facilities and discharged to local bioaccumulation in localized areas of shale gas wastewater disposal. INTRODUCTION The safe disposal of large

Jackson, Robert B.

40

Imprinted Polymers in Wastewater Treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In wastewater treatment, a method that specifically recognizes a variety of impurities in a flexible manner would be useful for treatment facilities with varying needs. Current purification techniques (i.e. bacteria, oxidation, reduction, precipitation and filtration) are nonspecific and difficult to control in complex mixtures. Heavy metal removal is particularly important in improving the efficiency of wastewater treatment, as they inhibit or even destroy the bacteria used for filtration. Imprinting polymerization is a technique that allows for the efficient removal of specific compounds and has been used in purification of enantiomers. It has potential to be applied in wastewater systems with the impurities acting as the template for the imprinting polymerization. The polymer with the bound impurities intact can then be removed via precipitation. After removal of the impurity the polymer can be reused. Data for the imprinting polymerization of polyacrylates and polyacrylamides for several metal complexes will be presented. Imprinting polymerization in combination with emulsion polymerization to improve the removal of hydrophobic contaminants will be described. Removal efficiencies will be presented and compared with conventional wastewater treatment methods.

Eastman, Christopher; Goodrich, Scott; Gartner, Isabelle; Mueller, Anja

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastewater neutralization facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Implementing Energy Efficiency in Wastewater to Reduce Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the industrial world creating a quality product at minimum cost is the goal. In this environment all expenses are scrutinized, when they are part of the manufacturing process. However, even at the most conscientious facility the wastewater system...

Cantwell, J. C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Wastewater Discharge Program (Maine)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The wastewater discharge regulations require that a license be obtained for the discharge of wastewater to a stream, river, wetland, or lake of the state, or to the ocean. Typical discharges...

43

WASTEWATER SYSTEMS Henrik Bechmann  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELLING OF WASTEWATER SYSTEMS Henrik Bechmann Lyngby 1999 ATV Erhvervsforskerprojekt EF 623 IMM., and Poulsen, N. K. (1998). Control of sewer systems and wastewater treatment plants using pollutant, N. K., and Nielsen, M. K. (1999). Grey box modelling of first flush and incoming wastewater

44

2002 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2002 Wastewater Land Application site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory describe site conditions for the facilities with State of Idaho Wastewater Land Application Permits. Permit-required monitoring data are summarized, and permit exceedences or environmental impacts relating to the operation of the facilities during the 2002 permit year are discussed.

Meachum, T.R.; Lewis, M.G.

2003-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

45

2003 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2003 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory describe the conditions for the facilities with State of Idaho Wastewater Land Application Permits. Permit-required monitoring data are summarized, and permit exceedences or environmental impacts relating to the operations of the facilities during the 2003 permit year are discussed.

Teresa R. Meachum

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

RECOMMENDED GUIDELINES FOR WASTEWATER CHARACTERIZATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;RECOMMENDED GUIDELINES FOR WASTEWATER CHARACTERIZATION IN THE FRASER RIVER BASIN VOLUME II Ont. June 1993 Amended April 1994 #12;GUIDELINES FOR WASTEWATER CHARACTERIZATION PREFACE Ltd., Calgary, Alberta. #12;GUIDELINES FOR WASTEWATER CHARACTERIZATION EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Fraser

47

Presence and Distribution of Organic Wastewater Compounds in Wastewater,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Presence and Distribution of Organic Wastewater Compounds in Wastewater, Surface, Ground.W., Meyer, M.T., and Zaugg, S.D., 2004, Presence and distri- bution of organic wastewater compounds in wastewater, surface, ground, and drinking waters, Minnesota, 2000-02: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific

48

Treated wastewater discharged from municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) contains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Treated wastewater discharged from municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) contains to provide rapid, field-ready, inexpen- sive testing of these chemicals in wastewater is also needed estrogenic chemicals, and 2) develop sensor technology for the rapid measure- ment in wastewater of two key

Fay, Noah

49

Optimization of a biological wastewater treatment process at a petrochemical plant using process simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A research study was conducted on the activated sludge process treating the wastewater from a petrochemical manufacturing facility in Ontario, Canada. The objective of the study was to improve the level of understanding of the process and to evaluate the use of model-based simulation tools as an aid in the optimization of the wastewater treatment facility. Models such as the IAWQ Activated Sludge Model No. 1 (ASM1) have previously been developed and applied to assist in designing new systems and to assist in the optimization of existing systems for the treatment of municipal wastewaters, However, due to significant differences between the characteristics of the petrochemical plant wastewater and municipal wastewaters, this study required the development of a mechanistic model specifically to describe the behavior of the activated sludge treatment of the petrochemical wastewater. This paper outlines the development of the mechanistic model and gives examples of how plant performance issues were investigated through process simulation.

Jones, R.M.; Dold, P.L.; Baker, A.J.; Briggs, T.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

50

2002 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and Associated Documentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2002 Wastewater Land Application site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory describe site conditions for the facilities with State of Idaho Wastewater Land Application Permits. Permit-required monitoring data are summarized, and permit exceedences or environmental impacts relating to the operation of the facilities during the 2002 permit year are discussed.

Meachum, Teresa Ray; Michael G. Lewis

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Harvesting Energy from Wastewater Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Harvesting Energy from Wastewater Treatment Bruce Logan Penn State University #12;Energy Costs? 5-7% of electricity used in USA is for water &wastewater #12;Global Energy & Health Issues 1 Billion people lack #12;Energy content of Wastewaters · Electricity "lost" to water and wastewater treatment= 0.6 quad

52

Harvesting Energy from Wastewater Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Harvesting Energy from Wastewater Treatment Bruce Logan Penn State University #12;Energy Costs? 5-7% of electricity used in USA is for water &wastewater #12;Global Energy & Health IssuesGlobal Energy & Health content of WastewatersEnergy content of Wastewaters ·· ElectricityElectricity ""lostlost"" to water

53

Small Community Wastewater Cluster Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Small Community Wastewater Cluster Systems Don Jones, Jacqui Bauer, Richard Wise, and Alan Dunn* ID-265 #12;Small Community Wastewater Cluster Systems ID-265 2 It is the policy of the Purdue University Community Wastewater Cluster Systems ID-265 3 Small Community Wastewater Cluster Systems Table of Contents

Holland, Jeffrey

54

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into the Use of Solar Aquatic Wastewater Treatment in The new UBC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into the Use of Solar Aquatic Wastewater Treatment in The new UBC Farm Center Building: A Triple Bottom Line Investigation into the Use of Solar Aquatic Wastewater Treatment in The new UBC Farm Center Building: A Triple usage. The Farm would like to employ an onsite wastewater treatment facility that captures rainwater

55

Proceedings ASCE EWRI World Water and Environmental Resources Congress 2005 May 15-19, 2005 Modeling and evaluating temperature dynamics in wastewater treatment plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling and evaluating temperature dynamics in wastewater treatment plants Scott A. Wells1 , Dmitriy into receiving waters, there is much interest in providing a model of temperature dynamics in wastewater using detailed temperature data from a Washington County, Oregon, USA wastewater treatment facility

Wells, Scott A.

56

1997 evaluation of tritium removal and mitigation technologies for Hanford Site wastewaters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains results of a biennial assessment of tritium separation technology and tritium nitration techniques for control of tritium bearing wastewaters at the Hanford Site. Tritium in wastewaters at Hanford have resulted from plutonium production, fuel reprocessing, and waste handling operations since 1944. this assessment was conducted in response to the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order.

Jeppson, D.W.; Biyani, R.K.; Duncan, J.B.; Flyckt, D.L.; Mohondro, P.C.; Sinton, G.L.

1997-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

57

Wastewater Reclamation/Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Towns, and Entities NTMWD Water Supply Sources History of NTMWD ? 1956 - First Delivery of Treated Water ? 1970s - Expanded to Wastewater Service ? 1980s - Expanded to Solid Waste Service WATER PLANNING Regional Water Planning...

Hickey, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Wastewater heat recovery apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat recovery system is described with a heat exchanger and a mixing valve. A drain trap includes a heat exchanger with an inner coiled tube, baffle plate, wastewater inlet, wastewater outlet, cold water inlet, and preheated water outlet. Wastewater enters the drain trap through the wastewater inlet, is slowed and spread by the baffle plate, and passes downward to the wastewater outlet. Cold water enters the inner tube through the cold water inlet and flows generally upward, taking on heat from the wastewater. This preheated water is fed to the mixing valve, which includes a flexible yoke to which are attached an adjustable steel rod, two stationary zinc rods, and a pivoting arm. The free end of the arm forms a pad which rests against a valve seat. The rods and pivoting arm expand or contract as the temperature of the incoming preheated water changes. The zinc rods expand more than the steel rod, flexing the yoke and rotating the pivoting arm. The pad moves towards the valve seat as the temperature of the preheated water rises, and away as the temperature falls, admitting a variable amount of hot water to maintain a nearly constant average process water temperature. 6 figs.

Kronberg, J.W.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Wastewater heat recovery apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat recovery system with a heat exchanger and a mixing valve. A drain trap includes a heat exchanger with an inner coiled tube, baffle plate, wastewater inlet, wastewater outlet, cold water inlet, and preheated water outlet. Wastewater enters the drain trap through the wastewater inlet, is slowed and spread by the baffle plate, and passes downward to the wastewater outlet. Cold water enters the inner tube through the cold water inlet and flows generally upward, taking on heat from the wastewater. This preheated water is fed to the mixing valve, which includes a flexible yoke to which are attached an adjustable steel rod, two stationary zinc rods, and a pivoting arm. The free end of the arm forms a pad which rests against a valve seat. The rods and pivoting arm expand or contract as the temperature of the incoming preheated water changes. The zinc rods expand more than the steel rod, flexing the yoke and rotating the pivoting arm. The pad moves towards the valve seat as the temperature of the preheated water rises, and away as the temperature falls, admitting a variable amount of hot water to maintain a nearly constant average process water temperature.

Kronberg, James W. (108 Independent Blvd., Aiken, SC 29801)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Improved wastewater treatment at Wheeling-Pittsburgh Steel Corporations`s Steubenville East Coke Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wheeling-Pittsburgh Steel Corporation recently improved its wastewater treatment at it`s by-products coke plant. This has led to greatly improved effluent quality. Excess ammonia liquor, along with wastewater from the light oil recovery plant, desulfurization facility, and coal pile runoff, must be treated prior to being discharged into the Ohio River. This is accomplished using a biological wastewater treatment plant to remove 99.99% of the organic contaminants and ammonia. Biologically treated, clarified wastewater is now polished in the newly constructed tertiary treatment plant.

Goshe, A.J.; Nodianos, M.J. [Wheeling-Pittsburgh Steel Corp., Follansbee, WV (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastewater neutralization facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Anaerobic Co-digestion of Chicken Processing Wastewater and Crude Glycerol from Biodiesel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main objective of this thesis was to study the anaerobic digestion (AD) of wastewater from a chicken processing facility and of crude glycerol from local biodiesel operations. The AD of these substrates was conducted in bench-scale reactors...

Foucault, Lucas Jose

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

62

Doctoral Defense "Sustainable Wastewater Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Doctoral Defense "Sustainable Wastewater Management: Modeling and Decision Strategies for Unused Medications and Wastewater Solids" Sherri Cook Date: May 22, 2014 Time: 11:00 AM Location: 2355 GGB Chair to help decision-makers evaluate new practices for sustainable wastewater management. To this end

Kamat, Vineet R.

63

WASTEWATER TREATMENT OVER SAND COLUMNS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

93/0096 WASTEWATER TREATMENT OVER SAND COLUMNS TREATMENT YIELDS, LOCALISATION OF THE BIOMASS Domestic wastewater treatment by infiltration-percolation is a process that becomming common in France, a greater depth for desinfection purposes. KEYWORDS Wastewater treatment, Infiltration-percolation. Sand

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

64

Introduction to Wastewater Bruce J. Lesikar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction to Wastewater Treatment Bruce J. Lesikar Professor Texas AgriLife Extension Service Overview What is wastewater? Why are we concerned about wastewater? The big picture. Goals for wastewater treatment are evolving How do we implement our infrastructure? Wastewater Treatment Processes ­ The end

65

RCRA/UST, superfund, and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Treatment, storage, and disposal facilities (40 CFR parts 264/265, subparts A-E) updated as of July 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The module presents an overview of the general treatment, storage, and disposal facility (TSDF) standards found in 40 CFR parts 264/265, subparts A through E. It identifies and explains each exclusion from parts 264/265, and provides definitions of excluded units, such as wastewater treatment unit and elementary neutralization unit. It locates and describes the requirements for waste analysis and personnel training. It also describes the purpose of a contingency plan and lists the emergency notification procedures. It describes manifest procedures and responsibilities, and lists the unmanifested waste reporting requirements.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Introduction Wetlands are increasingly used for wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Wetlands are increasingly used for wastewater treatment Plant community changes and related nutrient retention within an aridland constructed wastewater treatment wetland How does plant community composition change in an aridland constructed wastewater treatment wetland and how do those

Hall, Sharon J.

67

Integrating farming and wastewater management.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Source separating wastewater systems are often motivated by their integration with farming. It is thus important to scrutinise the critical factors associated with such integration.… (more)

Tidĺker, Pernilla

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Demonstration of Advanced Technologies for Multi-Load Washers in Hospitality and Healthcare – Wastewater Recycling Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this demonstration project was to evaluate market-ready retrofit technologies for reducing the energy and water use of multi-load washers in healthcare and hospitality facilities. Specifically, this project evaluated laundry wastewater recycling technology in the hospitality sector and ozone laundry technology in both the healthcare and hospitality sectors. This report documents the demonstration of a wastewater recycling system installed in the Grand Hyatt Seattle.

Boyd, Brian K.; Parker, Graham B.; Petersen, Joseph M.; Sullivan, Greg; Goetzler, W.; Foley, K. J.; Sutherland, T. A.

2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

69

Neutral beam monitoring  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method and apparatus for monitoring characteristics of a high energy neutral beam. A neutral beam is generated by passing accelerated ions through a walled cell containing a low energy neutral gas, such that charge exchange neutralizes the high energy ion beam. The neutral beam is monitored by detecting the current flowing through the cell wall produced by low energy ions which drift to the wall after the charge exchange. By segmenting the wall into radial and longitudinal segments various beam conditions are further identified.

Fink, Joel H. (Livermore, CA)

1981-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

70

Portable wastewater flow meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A portable wastewater flow meter particularly adapted for temporary use at a single location in measuring the rate of liquid flow in a circular entrance conduit of a sewer manhole both under free flow and submerged, open channel conditions and under fill pipe, surcharged conditions, comprising an apparatus having a cylindrical external surface and an inner surface that constricts the flow through the apparatus in such a manner that a relationship exists between (1) the difference between the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the entrance of the apparatus and the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the constriction, and (2) the rate of liquid flow through the apparatus.

Hunter, Robert M. (320 S. Wilson Ave., Bozeman, MT 59715)

1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

71

Portable wastewater flow meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A portable wastewater flow meter particularly adapted for temporary use at a single location in measuring the rate of liquid flow in a circular entrance conduit of a sewer manhole both under free flow and submerged, open channel conditions and under full pipe, surcharged conditions, comprising an apparatus having a cylindrical external surface and an inner surface that constricts the flow through the apparatus in such a manner that a relationship exists between (1) the difference between the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the entrance of the apparatus and the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the constriction, and (2) the rate of liquid flow through the apparatus.

Hunter, Robert M. (320 S. Wilson Ave., Bozeman, MT 59715)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

STATE ESTIMATION FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROCESSES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHAPTER 1 STATE ESTIMATION FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROCESSES O. Bernard1 , B. Chachuat2 , and J sensors (also called observers) for wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). We give an overview in "Wastewater Quality Monitoring and Wastewater Quality Monitoring and Treatment, Philippe Quevauviller (Ed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

73

Simultaneous wastewater treatment and biological electricity generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simultaneous wastewater treatment and biological electricity generation B.E. Logan Department accomplishing wastewater treatment in processes based on microbial fuel cell technologies. When bacteria oxidize.4 ÂŁ 106 L of wastewater, a wastewater treatment plant has the potential to become a 2.3 MW power plant

74

AEROBIC BIOTRANSFORMATION OF TOXIC ORGANICS IN WASTEWATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;AEROBIC BIOTRANSFORMATION OF TOXIC ORGANICS IN WASTEWATER DOE FRAP 1997-15 Prepared for in both domestic and industrial wastewater. The release of these compounds during wastewater treatment to predict the mass of the VOCs in the wastewater treated by biotransformation and the mass stripped

75

Color Superconducting Neutral Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe the effects of the strange quark mass and of the color and electric neutrality on the superconducing phases of QCD.

R. Casalbuoni

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

76

Ceramic membrane treatment of petrochemical wastewater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ceramic alumina microfiltration membranes were evaluated for treatment of 3 aqueous streams containing heavy metals, oils, and solids at petrochemical manufacturing facilities. To the best of the author's knowledge, this is the first reported use of ceramic alumina membranes for process water and wastewater treatment in a US petrochemical plant. In a pilot test at a vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) plant, precipitated heavy metal solids were filtered with the membranes. On another stream at that site, the ceramic membrane pilot system successfully treated emulsions of 1,2-dichloroethane (EDC), water, and solids. Membrane filtration of a linear alkyl benzene (LAB) oily wastewater stream produced water with less than 5 ppmw oil and grease, after pretreatment with HCl and ferric chloride. A preliminary financial analysis shows that the installed system cost for a ceramic membrane unit is comparable to other membrane technologies, while operating costs are anticipated to be lower. Specific process conditions that are particularly amenable to treatment by ceramic membrane microfiltration are also given in the paper. 10 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs.

Lahiere, R.J. (Vista Chemical Co., Houston, TX (United States)); Goodboy, K.P.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Fischer-Tropsch Wastewater Utilization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is generally directed to handling the wastewater, or condensate, from a hydrocarbon synthesis reactor. More particularly, the present invention provides a process wherein the wastewater of a hydrocarbon synthesis reactor, such as a Fischer-Tropsch reactor, is sent to a gasifier and subsequently reacted with steam and oxygen at high temperatures and pressures so as to produce synthesis gas. The wastewater may also be recycled back to a slurry preparation stage, where solid combustible organic materials are pulverized and mixed with process water and the wastewater to form a slurry, after which the slurry fed to a gasifier where it is reacted with steam and oxygen at high temperatures and pressures so as to produce synthesis gas.

Shah, Lalit S. (Sugar Land, TX)

2003-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

78

Treatment of Wood Preserving Wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The wastewater produced by the wood preserving industry presents a difficult problem to treat economically. A review of the literature indicates the size of the industry has limited the pursuit of an orderly and economic solution. Atmospheric...

Reynolds, T. D.; Shack, P. A.

79

Optimal Siting of Regional Fecal Sludge Treatment Facilities: St. Elizabeth, Jamaica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for rural wastewater treatment. However, there are serious environmental and human health effects associ for wastewater treatment. Fecal sludge FS is defined as the sludge of variable consistency collected from onOptimal Siting of Regional Fecal Sludge Treatment Facilities: St. Elizabeth, Jamaica Ana Martha

Vogel, Richard M.

80

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Spray Distribution System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spray distribution systems for wastewater are much like lawn sprinkler systems, in that they spray treated wastewater over the surface of a yard. This publication explains how spray distribution systems work, what their design requirements are...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastewater neutralization facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Tablet Chlorination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wastewater that is sprayed onto lawns must first be disinfected to prevent odors and remove disease-causing organisms. This publication explains how tablet chlorinators disinfect wastewater and gives tips on how to maintain them....

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

82

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Ultraviolet Light Disinfection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Some onsite wastewater treatment systems include a disinfection component. This publication explains how homeowners can disinfect wastewater with ultraviolet light, what the components of such a system are, what factors affect the performance of a...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

83

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Graywater Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

irrigation and decr,ease the amount of wastewater entering sewers or onsite wastewater treatment systems. Onsite wastewater treatment systems However, homeowners who irrigate their lawns with graywater need to understand the risks and safety issues.... Residential wastewater can be classified as either blackwater (sew- age containing fecal matter or food wastes) or graywater. If graywater is collected separately from blackwater, it can be dispersed as irrigation water with less treatment than...

Melton, Rebecca; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

84

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Aerobic Treatment Unit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wastewater treatment systems use. They remove 85 to 98 percent of the organic matter and solids from the wastewater, producing effluent as clean as that from munici- pal wastewater treatment plants, and cleaner than that from conventional septic tanks.... Onsite wastewater treatment systems Single-compartment trash tank Chlorinator Aerobic treatment unit Spray heads Pump tank Bruce Lesikar Professor and Extension Agricultural Engineer The Texas A&M System Aerobic treatment units, which are certified...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

85

Municipal Wastewater Characteristics of Sylhet City, Bangladesh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biological treatment of the sewage. According to the Metcalf & Eddy (1995), a standard reference for wastewater treatment

Alam, Raquibul; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Chowdhury, Md. Aktarul Islam; Nath, Suman Kanti

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Making wastewater environmentally sustainable: Innovative technology offers new possibilities for wastewater treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Story by Katie Heinrich 16 tx H2O Summer 2013 Making wastewater environmentally sustainable Innovative technology o#30;ers new possibilities for wastewater treatment Municipal wastewater treatment plants may soon become more sustainable... in their treatment of wastewater by pursuing new electron beam (e-beam) technology being researched at a Texas A&M AgriLife Research center in College Station. To help these plants in their move to increased sustainability in wastewater treatment, the National...

Heinrich, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

WASTEWATER CHARACTERIZATION OF' FISH PROCESSING PLANT EFFLUENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;WASTEWATER CHARACTERIZATION OF' FISH PROCESSING PLANT EFFLUENTS TECHNICAL REPORT SERIES FREMP in Publication Data Main entry under title Wastewater characterization of fish processing plant effluents (Canada)); DOE FRAP 1993-39. TD899.F5W37 1994 363.73'942'0971133 C94-960159-4 #12;WASTEWATER

88

CDC Looks at Links Between Wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CDC Looks at Links Between Wastewater and Disease NESC STAFF WRITER Caigan McKenzie Drinking water in food safety, onsite wastewater systems, drinking water safety, recreational water safety, vector con about the public health issues involved in onsite wastewater," Gelting said. "We didn't have much

89

Wastewater management in Kunming, China: a stakeholder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wastewater management in Kunming, China: a stakeholder perspective on measures at the source EDI systems with central wastewater treatment plants were long considered a successful model that could the feasibility of introducing measures at the source for the different urban wastewater contributions in the city

Richner, Heinz

90

STATE ESTIMATION FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROCESSES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHAPTER 1 STATE ESTIMATION FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROCESSES O. Bernard1 , B. Chachuat2 , and J sensors (also called observers) for wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). We give an overview model description (e.g., the 1 #12;2 STATE ESTIMATION FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROCESSES extended Kalman

Bernard, Olivier

91

Central Facilities Area Sewage Lagoon Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Central Facilities Area (CFA), located in Butte County, Idaho, at the Idaho National Laboratory has an existing wastewater system to collect and treat sanitary wastewater and non-contact cooling water from the facility. The existing treatment facility consists of three cells: Cell #1 has a surface area of 1.7 acres, Cell #2 has a surface area of 10.3 acres, and Cell #3 has a surface area of 0.5 acres. If flows exceed the evaporative capacity of the cells, wastewater is discharged to a 73.5-acre land application site that uses a center-pivot irrigation sprinkler system. As flows at CFA have decreased in recent years, the amount of wastewater discharged to the land application site has decreased from 13.64 million gallons in 2004 to no discharge in 2012 and 2013. In addition to the decreasing need for land application, approximately 7.7 MG of supplemental water was added to the system in 2013 to maintain a water level and prevent the clay soil liners in the cells from drying out and “cracking.” The Idaho National Laboratory is concerned that the sewage lagoons and land application site may be oversized for current and future flows. A further concern is the sustainability of the large volumes of supplemental water that are added to the system according to current operational practices. Therefore, this study was initiated to evaluate the system capacity, operational practices, and potential improvement alternatives, as warranted.

Mark R. Cole

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Reciprocating Constructed Wetlands for Treating Industrial, Municipal, and Agricultural Wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For many rural communities, treating domestic wastewater efficiently and cost-effectively is a challenging task. Environmental issues, financing of construction costs, and the bottom-line cost to the consumer complicate this effort. Increasingly stringent discharge standards have resulted in a growing number of permit violations from small, “conventional ” treatment systems. Many rural communities have discovered that their existing systems (e.g., facultative lagoons) provided excellent service in the past but have become obsolete due to new discharge standards. These communities simply cannot afford to own and operate the highly sophisticated tertiary treatment facilities these new regulations require. As a result, funding agencies have looked more favorably to “regional” solutions that can achieve consistent, high-quality discharge. In most cases, the regional solution is a centralized treatment facility to which surrounding communities pump their sewage. In many instances, communities must pump extremely long distances to reach the regional treatment facility. This means that communities, and, therefore, funding agencies, are putting most of their money into pumps and piping instead of treatment. What small rural communities need is a decentralized wastewater treatment system that is inexpensive to construct, simple to operate, and achieves consistently high levels of discharge quality, even with small flows. Having such a system would allow a paradigm shift whereby funding agencies could support decentralized treatment and regional management of numerous decentralized treatment systems.

Go~tiscs~!d P S I; Chuck Donnell; H. Alton Pnvette; Leslie L. Behrends

93

Neutral particle beam intensity controller  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A neutral beam intensity controller is provided for a neutral beam generator in which a neutral beam is established by accelerating ions from an ion source into a gas neutralizer. An amplitude modulated, rotating magnetic field is applied to the accelerated ion beam in the gas neutralizer to defocus the resultant neutral beam in a controlled manner to achieve intensity control of the neutral beam along the beam axis at constant beam energy. The rotating magnetic field alters the orbits of ions in the gas neutralizer before they are neutralized, thereby controlling the fraction of neutral particles transmitted out of the neutralizer along the central beam axis to a fusion device or the like. The altered path or defocused neutral particles are sprayed onto an actively cooled beam dump disposed perpendicular to the neutral beam axis and having a central open for passage of the focused beam at the central axis of the beamline. Virtually zero therough 100% intensity control is achieved by varying the magnetic field strength without altering the ion source beam intensity or its species yield.

Dagenhart, William K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Facility Microgrids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microgrids are receiving a considerable interest from the power industry, partly because their business and technical structure shows promise as a means of taking full advantage of distributed generation. This report investigates three issues associated with facility microgrids: (1) Multiple-distributed generation facility microgrids' unintentional islanding protection, (2) Facility microgrids' response to bulk grid disturbances, and (3) Facility microgrids' intentional islanding.

Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Lime slurry use at the Industrial Wastewater Pretreatment Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of lime slurry at the IWPF demonstrated many benefits. Hazardous chemical use was reduced, solids handling was improved, water quality was enhanced and there has been a cost savings. The lime slurry also enabled the plant to begin treating the soluble oil waste, which we were not able to do in the past.

Rice, L.E. [Allied-Signal Aerospace Co., Kansas City, MO (United States). Kansas City Div.; Hughes, R.W. [Professional Services Group, Inc., Kansas City, MO (United States); Baggett, G. [Genex/Praxair, Inc., Kansas City, MO (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

MHK Projects/Bonnybrook Wastewater Facility Project 1 | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies Jump to:BW2 Tidal < MHKBluemill Sound

97

Hanford Contractor Assumes Responsibility of Three Wastewater Facilities |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA,Fermi National Accelerator LaboratoryHot andguide

98

Opportunities for CHP at Wastewater Treatment Facilities: Market Analysis  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSales LLCDiesel Engines |OpenEnergy 8Operations U.S.forand

99

Opportunities for CHP at Wastewater Treatment Facilities: Market...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2008 EPA CHP Partnership Update Biomass Program Perspectives on Anaerobic Digestion and Fuel Cell Integration at Biorefineries Biogas Technologies and Integration with Fuel Cells...

100

MHK Projects/Bonnybrook Wastewater Facility Project 2 | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowell Point, Alaska:Luz IILynnM Setek85 <

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastewater neutralization facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Metro Wastewater Reclamation District Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte GmbH Jump to: navigation,Metalysis Jump to:DecMethanolMetro

102

Fourche Creek Wastewater Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublicIDAPowerPlantSitingConstruction.pdfNotify98.pdf JumpFlixMapFileFostoria, Ohio:68566°, -95.6577245°Fourche

103

Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6 NoSanEnergy InformationInformationOpen Energy

104

HIRICH et al. Wastewater reuse in the Mediterranean region: Case  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HIRICH et al. Wastewater reuse in the Mediterranean region: Case of Morocco Abdelaziz HIRICH expedient. The extended reuse of reclaimed (treated) wastewater could contribute considerably Water Resources Management (IWRM) approach, focusing on the component wastewater reuse for irrigation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

105

Neutral particle beam intensity controller  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The neutral beam intensity controller is based on selected magnetic defocusing of the ion beam prior to neutralization. The defocused portion of the beam is dumped onto a beam dump disposed perpendicular to the beam axis. Selective defocusing is accomplished by means of a magnetic field generator disposed about the neutralizer so that the field is transverse to the beam axis. The magnetic field intensity is varied to provide the selected partial beam defocusing of the ions prior to neutralization. The desired focused neutral beam portion passes along the beam path through a defining aperture in the beam dump, thereby controlling the desired fraction of neutral particles transmitted to a utilization device without altering the kinetic energy level of the desired neutral particle fraction. By proper selection of the magnetic field intensity, virtually zero through 100% intensity control of the neutral beam is achieved.

Dagenhart, W.K.

1984-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

106

Neutral atom traps.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes progress in designing a neutral atom trap capable of trapping sub millikelvin atom in a magnetic trap and shuttling the atoms across the atom chip from a collection area to an optical cavity. The numerical simulation and atom chip design are discussed. Also, discussed are preliminary calculations of quantum noise sources in Kerr nonlinear optics measurements based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These types of measurements may be important for quantum nondemolition measurements at the few photon limit.

Pack, Michael Vern

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

FAILURE ANALYSIS: WASTEWATER DRUM BULGING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 55 gallon wastewater drum lid was found to be bulged during storage in a remote area. Drum samples were obtained for analysis. The interior surface of these samples revealed blistering and holes in the epoxy phenolic drum liner and corrosion of the carbon steel drum. It is suspected that osmotic pressure drove permeation of the water through the epoxy phenolic coating which was weakened from exposure to low pH water. The coating failed at locations throughout the drum interior. Subsequent corrosion of the carbon steel released hydrogen which pressurized the drum causing deformation of the drum lid. Additional samples from other wastewater drums on the same pallet were also evaluated and limited corrosion was visible on the interior surfaces. It is suspected that, with time, the corrosion would have advanced to cause pressurization of these sealed drums.

Vormelker, P

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Graywater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-6176 3-08 Figure 1: A diagram of separate blackwater and graywater plumbing systems. W ith water reuse gaining popularity, people increasingly consider graywater from their residences as a resource to be separated from the wastewater stream... and reused in their landscapes. Such reuse of graywater reduces the amount of wastewater entering sewers or onsite wastewater treatment systems, reduces demands to use potable water for other residential uses like irrigation and helps preserve limited...

Melton, Rebecca; Lesikar, Bruce J.; Smith, David; O'Neill, Courtney

2008-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

109

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Constructed Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two-compartment septic tank Soil absorption field Constructed wetland Onsite wastewater treatment systems Constructed wetlands Natural wetlands generally have visible water in the system. However, for those at homes, the water flows beneath... the media surface, which limits contact between residents and wastewater. The constructed wetland waste- water treatment system has three main components that work together to purify wastewater: ? A septic tank, which is an en- closed watertight...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

110

Most modern wastewater treatment systems rely on microbial processes to remove contaminants. This makes wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Most modern wastewater treatment systems rely on microbial processes to remove contaminants. This makes wastewater treatment one of the largest biotechnology industries in the world. In New Zealand alone, about 1.5 billion litres of treated domestic wastewater is discharged each day

Auckland, University of

111

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Liquid Chlorination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication explains the process, components, legal requirements, factors affecting performance, and maintenance needs of liquid chlorination systems for onsite wastewater treatment....

Weaver, Richard; Lesikar, Bruce J.; Richter, Amanda; O'Neill, Courtney

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

112

CHP and Bioenergy Systems for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Systems for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants CHP and Bioenergy Systems for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants There are important issues to consider when selecting...

113

File:CDPHE Industrial Individual Wastewater Discharge Permit...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industrial Individual Wastewater Discharge Permit Application.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:CDPHE Industrial Individual Wastewater...

114

CHP and Bioenergy for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants: Market Opportunities CHP and Bioenergy for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants: Market Opportunities This document explores...

115

Iowa Water and Wastewater Operators Seek SEP Certification in...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Iowa Water and Wastewater Operators Seek SEP Certification in New Pilot Program Iowa Water and Wastewater Operators Seek SEP Certification in New Pilot Program September 18, 2014 -...

116

1.85 Water and Wastewater Treatment Engineering, Spring 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theory and design of systems for treating industrial and municipal wastewater and potable water supplies. Methods for characterizing wastewater properties. Physical, chemical, and biological processes, including primary ...

Shanahan, Peter

117

SFU"s Carbon Neutral Action Plan! (Compiled in a B.C. government format) !  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

building. The energy data is being collected to determine the potential for solarJune 2009! SFU"s Carbon Neutral Action Plan! (Compiled in a B.C. government format) ! #12;Executive-campus bike facilities to promote cycling to Burnaby campus Carbon Neutral Action Report Simon Fraser

118

California Food Processing Industry Wastewater Demonstration Project: Phase I Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wastewater treatment is an energy-intensive process and electricity demand is especially high during the utilities summer peak electricity demand periods. This makes wastewater treatment facilities prime candidates for demand response programs. However, wastewater treatment is often peripheral to food processing operations and its demand response opportunities have often been overlooked. Phase I of this wastewater demonstration project monitored wastewater energy and environmental data at Bell-Carter Foods, Inc., California's largest olive processing plant. For this monitoring activity the project team used Green Energy Management System (GEMS) automated enterprise energy management (EEM) technologies. This report presents results from data collected by GEMS from September 15, 2008 through November 30, 2008, during the olive harvest season. This project established and tested a methodology for (1) gathering baseline energy and environmental data at an industrial food-processing plant and (2) using the data to analyze energy efficiency, demand response, daily peak load management, and environmental management opportunities at the plant. The Phase I goals were to demonstrate the measurement and interrelationship of electricity demand, electricity usage, and water quality metrics and to estimate the associated CO{sub 2} emissions.

Lewis, Glen; Atkinson, Barbara; Rhyne, Ivin

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

119

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced hadron facility Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fizyki, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski Collection: Physics 20 arXiv:hepph0112008 B Phenomenology Summary: , facilities for b quark studies, neutral B meson mixing, rare b decays,...

120

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation.

1996-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastewater neutralization facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation.

1995-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

122

Influence of wastewater-treatment effluent on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Influence of wastewater- treatment effluent on concentrations and fluxes of solutes in the Bush of treated effluents from wastewater-treatment plants (WWTPs) will increasingly affect the chemical biological processes associated with very low flow conditions, such as denitrification and sulfate reduction

123

Neutral Beam Power System for TPX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) will utilize to the maximum extent the existing Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) equipment and facilities. This is particularly true for the TFTR Neutral Beam (NB) system. Most of the NB hardware, plant facilities, auxiliary sub-systems, power systems, service infrastructure, and control systems can be used as is. The major changes in the NB hardware are driven by the new operating duty cycle. The TFTR Neutral Beam was designed for operation of the Sources for 2 seconds every 150 seconds. The TPX requires operation for 1000 seconds every 4500 seconds. During the Conceptual Design Phase of TPX every component of the TFTR NB Electrical Power System was analyzed to verify whether the equipment can meet the new operational requirements with our without modifications. The Power System converts 13.8 kV prime power to controlled pulsed power required at the NB sources. The major equipment involved are circuit breakers, auto and rectifier transformers surge suppression components, power tetrodes, HV Decks, and HVDC power transmission to sources. Thermal models were developed for the power transformers to simulate the new operational requirements. Heat runs were conducted for the power tetrodes to verify capability. Other components were analyzed to verify their thermal limitations. This paper describes the details of the evaluation and redesign of the electrical power system components to meet the TPX operational requirements.

Ramakrishnan, S.; Bowen, O.N.; O`Conner, T.; Edwards, J.; Fromm, N.; Hatcher, R.; Newman, R.; Rossi, G.; Stevenson, T.; von Halle, A.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

International Facility Management Association Strategic Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Facility Management Association Strategic Facility Planning: A WhIte PAPer Strategic Facility Planning: A White Paper on Strategic Facility Planning 2009 | International...

125

Energy and Air Emission Implications of a Decentralized Wastewater System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Opportunities for Combined Heat and Power at WastewaterProtection Agency Combined Heat and Power Partnership,

Shehabi, Arman

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Harvesting Energy from Wastewater in a 2-Chamber  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Harvesting Energy from Wastewater in a 2-Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell Sikandar Present day wastewater treatment plants utilize high amounts of energy and are costly to operate. These conventional wastewater treatment plants utilize aerobic bacteria. Organic material in wastewater contains energy that can

127

Computing the Resilience of a Wastewater Treatment Bioreactor Nabil Mabrouk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computing the Resilience of a Wastewater Treatment Bioreactor Nabil Mabrouk Laboratory guillaume.deffuant@cemagref.fr Abstract--Biological wastewater treatment reactor are de- signed to reduce the pollutant content of a wastewater to an acceptable level often fixed by wastewater discharge regula- tions

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

128

Production of Electricity during Wastewater Treatment Using a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production of Electricity during Wastewater Treatment Using a Single Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell H wastewater, while at the same time accomplishing biological wastewater treatment (removal of chemical oxygen of the wastewater. Power output was proportional to the hydraulic retention time over a range of 3-33 h

129

Safe use of wastewater in agriculture and aquaculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safe use of wastewater in agriculture and aquaculture Agriculture and aquaculture in Vietnam often use wastewater, particularly in urban or peri-urban areas. Wastewater provides both moisture and nutrients for crops and fish, and its use generates employment for poor communities. But using wastewater

Richner, Heinz

130

2013 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (WRU-I-0160-01, formerly LA 000160 01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from November 1, 2012 through October 31, 2013. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2013 reporting year, an estimated 9.64 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 17 million gallons per year. The concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the applicable Idaho Department of Environmental Quality’s groundwater quality standard levels.

Mike Lewis

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

2012 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (WRU-I-0160-01, formerly LA 000160 01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from November 1, 2011 through October 31, 2012. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2012 reporting year, an estimated 11.84 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 17 million gallons per year. The concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Primary and Secondary Constituent Standards.

Mike Lewis

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

2010 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000160 01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from May 1, 2010 through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2010 partial reporting year, an estimated 3.646 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 13 million gallons per year. The concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Primary and Secondary Constituent Standards.

David B. Frederick

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Analysis and Characterization of Halogenated Transformation Products of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products in Wastewater Effluent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and biological treatments for wastewater decontamination- Atreatment involves biological degradation of organic wastewaterBiological effects of transformation products. The extent of attenuation of PPCPs through wastewater treatment

Bulloch, Daryl Neil

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Understanding and Maintaining your Septic System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding and maintaining your septic system L-5491 9-08 Figure 1: Components of an on-site wastewater treatment system. Onsite wastewater treatment systems Well 1. Wastewater source 2. Collection and storage 3. Pretreatment Groundwater 4.... Final treatment and dispersal P roper operation and maintenance of your wastewater treatment system is critical for its performance. Taking proper care of your system also: components; and final treatment and dispersal components. Wastewater source...

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Mechell, Justin; Alexander, Rachel

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

135

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Wastewater Treatment Capability Upgrade, Project NO. 96-D-122 Pantex Plant Amarillo, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Assessment (EA) addresses the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposed action regarding an upgrade of the Pantex Plant Wastewater Treatment Facility (WWTF). Potential environmental consequences associated with the proposed action and alternative actions are provided. DOE proposes to design, build, and operate a new WWTF, consistent with the requirements of Title 30 of the Texas Administrative Code (TAC), Chapter 317, ''Design Criteria for Sewage Systems,'' capable of supporting current and future wastewater treatment requirements of the Plant. Wastewater treatment at Pantex must provide sufficient operational flexibility to meet Pantex Plant's anticipated future needs, including potential Plant mission changes, alternative effluent uses, and wastewater discharge permit requirements. Treated wastewater effluent and non-regulated water maybe used for irrigation on DOE-owned agricultural land. Five factors support the need for DOE action: (1) The current WWTF operation has the potential for inconsistent permit compliance. (2) The existing WWTF lies completely within the 100-year floodplain. (3) The Pantex Plant mission has the potential to change, requiring infrastructure changes to the facility. (4) The life expectancy of the existing facility would be nearing its end by the time a new facility is constructed. (5) The treated wastewater effluent and non-regulated water would have a beneficial agricultural use through irrigation. Evaluation during the internal scoping led to the conclusion that the following factors are present and of concern at the proposed action site on Pantex Plant: (1) Periodic wastewater effluent permit exceedances; (2) Wetlands protection and floodplain management; (3) Capability of the existing facility to meet anticipated future needs of Pantex (4) Existing facility design life; and (5) Use of treated wastewater effluent and non-regulated water for irrigation. Evaluation during the internal scoping led to the conclusion that the following conditions are not present, nor of concern at the proposed site on Pantex Plant, and no further analysis was conducted: (1) State or national parks, forests, or other conservation areas; (2) Wild and scenic rivers; (3) Natural resources, such as timber, range, soils, minerals; (4) Properties of historic, archeological, or architectural significance; (5) Native American concerns; (6) Minority and low-income populations; and (7) Prime or unique farmland. In this document, DOE describes the proposed action and a reasonable range of alternatives to the proposed action, including the ''No-Action'' alternative. The proposed action cited in the ''U.S. Department of Energy Application for a Texas Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit Modifying Permit to Dispose of Waste, No. 02296,'' December 1998, included the construction of a new wastewater treatment facility, a new irrigation storage pond, and the conversion of the current wastewater treatment facility into an irrigation storage pond. Although a permit modification application has been filed, if a decision on this EA necessitates it, an amendment to the permit application would be made. The permit application would be required for any of the alternatives and the filing does not preclude or predetermine selection of an alternative considered by this EA. This permit change would allow Pantex to land-dispose treated wastewater by irrigating agricultural land. This construction for the proposed action would include designing two new lagoons for wastewater treatment. One of the lagoons could function as a facultative lagoon for treatment of wastewater. The second lagoon would serve as an irrigation storage impoundment (storage pond), with the alternative use as a facultative lagoon if the first lagoon is out of service for any reason. The new facultative lagoon and irrigation water storage pond would be sited outside of the 100-year flood plain. The existing WWTF lagoon would be used as a storage pond for treated wastewater effluent for irrigation water, as needed. The two new lagoons would be li

N /A

1999-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

136

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for Department of Energy facilities, which includes nuclear and explosives safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards mitigation, and the System Engineer Program. Cancels DOE O 420.1A. DOE O 420.1B Chg 1 issued 4-19-10.

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

137

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Sand Filters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sand filters are beds of granular material, or sand, drained from underneath so that pretreated wastewater can be treated, collected and distributed to a land application system. This publication explains the treatment, design, operation...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

138

Optimization of wastewater stabilization ponds in Honduras  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During the academic year of 2008-2009, three Master of Engineering students from the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) conducted a study of wastewater ...

Kullen, Lisa

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Tritiated wastewater treatment and disposal evaluation for 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses and analyzes information and issues regarding tritium and tritium management. It was prepared in response to the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-26-05A for the evaluation of tritiated wastewater treatment and disposal. The key elements of the report are summarized as follows: Discharge of tritiated water is regulated worldwide. Differences exist in discharge limits and in regulatory philosophy from country to country and from state to state in the United States. Tritium from manmade sources is emitted into the atmosphere and discharged into the ground or directly to the oceans and to waterways that empty into the oceans. In 1989, reported worldwide emissions of tritium from nuclear power generating plants totaled almost 1,000,000 Curies (Ci).

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Wastewater heat recovery method and apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is comprised of a heat recovery system with a heat exchanger and a mixing valve. A drain trap includes a heat exchanger with an inner coiled tube, baffle plate, wastewater inlet, wastewater outlet, cold water inlet, and preheated water outlet. Wastewater enters the drain trap through the wastewater inlet, is slowed and spread by the baffle plate, and passes downward to the wastewater outlet. Cold water enters the inner tube through the cold water inlet and flows generally upward, taking on heat from the wastewater. This preheated water is fed to the mixing valve, which includes a flexible yoke to which are attached an adjustable steel rod, two stationary zinc rods, and a pivoting arm. The free end of the arm forms a pad which rests against a valve seat. The rods and pivoting arm expand or contract as the temperature of the incoming preheated water changes. The zinc rods expand more than the steel rod, flexing the yoke and rotating the pivoting arm. The pad moves towards the valve seat as the temperature of the preheated water rises, and away as the temperature falls, admitting a variable amount of hot water to maintain a nearly constant average process water temperature.

Kronberg, J.W.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastewater neutralization facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish facility safety requirements for the Department of Energy, including National Nuclear Security Administration. Cancels DOE O 420.1. Canceled by DOE O 420.1B.

2002-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

142

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

DOE-STD-1104 contains the Department's method and criteria for reviewing and approving nuclear facility's documented safety analysis (DSA). This review and approval formally document the basis for DOE, concluding that a facility can be operated safely in a manner that adequately protects workers, the public, and the environment. Therefore, it is appropriate to formally require implementation of the review methodology and criteria contained in DOE-STD-1104.

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

143

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for nuclear and explosives safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards (NPH) mitigation, and the System Engineer Program.Chg 1 incorporates the use of DOE-STD-1189-2008, Integration of Safety into the Design Process, mandatory for Hazard Category 1, 2 and 3 nuclear facilities. Cancels DOE O 420.1A.

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

144

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The objective of this Order is to establish facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation. The Order has Change 1 dated 11-16-95, Change 2 dated 10-24-96, and the latest Change 3 dated 11-22-00 incorporated. The latest change satisfies a commitment made to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) in response to DNFSB recommendation 97-2, Criticality Safety.

2000-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

145

2011 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000160-01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from November 1, 2010 through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: (1) Facility and system description; (2) Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates; (3) Groundwater monitoring data; (4) Status of special compliance conditions; and (5) Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts. During the 2011 reporting year, an estimated 6.99 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 13 million gallons per year. Using the dissolved iron data, the concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Primary and Secondary Constituent Standards.

David Frederick

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Rules Governing Water and Wastewater Operator Certification (Tennessee)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Rules Governing Water and Wastewater Operator Certification are applicable to all projects that will require a water treatment site. Everyone who plans to operate a wastewater or water...

147

Gypsum and Polyacrylamide Soil Amendments Used With High Sodium Wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using wastewater for irrigation of crops represents an attractive alternative to disposal. Typically, municipal wastewaters are high in sodium, and the resulting high sodium absorption ratio (SAR) alters the soil structure making it more impermeable...

Gardiner, Duane

148

Modeling Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems in the Dickinson Bayou Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTSs) are a commonly used means of wastewater treatment in the Dickinson Bayou watershed which is located between Houston and Galveston. The Dickinson Bayou is classified as "impaired" by the Texas Commission...

Forbis-Stokes, Aaron

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

149

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Selecting and Permitting (Spanish)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication explains how to select and obtain a permit for an on-site wastewater treatment system in Texas....

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

150

Wastewater treatment and energy : an analysis on the feasibility of using renewable energy to power wastewater treatment plants in Singapore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wastewater treatment is a very energy intensive industry. Singapore has a state-of-the-art wastewater treatment system that uses a number of sustainable techniques that greatly improve its overall efficiency. The centralized ...

Foley, Kevin John

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

K-1435 Wastewater Treatment System for the Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator Wastewater at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, TN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the design and performance of a wastewater treatment system installed to support the operation of a hazardous waste incinerator. The Oak Ridge Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator (TSCAI), located at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), is designed and permitted to treat Resource ConservatioN and Recovery Act (RCRA) wastes including characteristic and listed wastes and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated mixed waste. the incinerator process generates acidic gases and particulates which consist of salts, metals, and radionuclides. These off-gases from the incinerator are treated with a wet off-gas scrubber system. The recirculated water is continuously purged (below down), resulting in a wastewater to be treated. Additional water sources are also collected on the site for treatment, including storm water that infiltrates into diked areas and fire water from the incinerator's suppression system. To meet regulatory requirements for discharge, a wastewater treatment system (WWTS) was designed, constructed, and operated to treat these water sources. The WWTS was designed to provide for periodic fluctuation of contaminant concentrations due to various feed streams to the incinverator. Blow down consists of total suspended solids (TSS) and total dissolved solids (TDS), encompassing metals, radionuclide contamination and trace organics. The system design flow rate range is 35 to 75 gallons per minute (gpm). The system is designed with redundancy to minimize time off-line and to reduce impacts to the TSCAI operations. A novel treatment system uses several unit operations, including chemical feed systems, two-stage chemical reaction treatment, microfiltration, sludge storage and dewatering, neutralization, granular activated carbon, effluent neutralization, and a complete programmable logic controller (PLC) and human-machine interface (HMI) control system. To meet the space requirements and to provide portability of the WWTS to other applications, the system was installed in three, over-the-road semi trailers, and interconnected with piping and power. Trailers were oriented on a small site footprint to facilitate ease of installation. A remote sump pump skid was provided to convey water from two holding sumps adjacent to the treatment process. An accumulation tank and pump were also provided to receive miscellaneous wastewaters for treatment if they meet the waste acceptance criteria. The paper includes details of the technology used in the design, the requirements for compliance, and the initial performance demonstration and jar testing results. The WWTS successfully allowed for highly efficient, high-volume treatment with compliant discharge to off-site surface water.

Swientoniewski M.D.

2008-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

152

Fuzzy predictive control for nitrogen removal in biological wastewater treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuzzy predictive control for nitrogen removal in biological wastewater treatment S. Marsili wastewater is too low, full denitrification is difficult to obtain and an additional source of organic carbon predictive control; wastewater treatment plant Introduction The problem of improving the nitrogen removal

153

Shaping the Future of Water and Wastewater Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shaping the Future of Water and Wastewater Services Jim Conlin Acting GM Long Term Asset Strategy works · 1400 Service reservoirs · >600 Pumping stations · 47,000kms Water pipes Wastewater Assets at an individual or a group of assets #12;Vision AM Strategy Wastewater Pan Scotland Strategy Bathing Waters

Painter, Kevin

154

Applications of nanotechnology in water and wastewater treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applications of nanotechnology in water and wastewater treatment Xiaolei Qu, Pedro J.J. Alvarez and wastewater treatment Water reuse Sorption Membrane processes Photocatalysis Disinfection Microbial control. Nanotechnology holds great potential in advancing water and wastewater treatment to improve treatment efficiency

Alvarez, Pedro J.

155

Modeling of Immobilized Cell Columns for Bioconversion and Wastewater Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling of Immobilized Cell Columns for Bioconversion and Wastewater Treatment Tingyue Gu* and Mei used in bioconversions to produce biological products as well as in wastewater treatment such as solvent removal from wastewater streams. In this work, a rate model is proposed to simulate this kind

Gu, Tingyue

156

Optimized Control Structure for a Wastewater Treatment Benchmark  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimized Control Structure for a Wastewater Treatment Benchmark Michela Mulas , Antonio Carlos wastewater treat- ment, give rise to both technical and economical challenges since most of the existing structure design the efficiency of a wastewater treatment plant can be improved, minimizing operational

Skogestad, Sigurd

157

Selective hydrolysis of wastewater sludge Part 1, September 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report Selective hydrolysis of wastewater sludge Part 1, September 2007 Model calculations and cost "Selective hydrolysis of wastewater sludge" is supported by EnergiNet.DK under the PSO-F&U projects having National Laboratory, Rambøll, the Estate of Overgaard and SamRas. The wastewater treatment plant Esbjerg

158

ADAPTIVE MODEL BASED CONTROL FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ADAPTIVE MODEL BASED CONTROL FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANTS Arie de Niet1 , Maartje van de Vrugt2.j.boucherie@utwente.nl Abstract In biological wastewater treatment, nitrogen and phosphorous are removed by activated sludge considerably to the increase of energy-efficiency in wastewater treatment. To this end, we introduce

Boucherie, Richard J.

159

Removal of Natural Steroid Hormones from Wastewater Using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Removal of Natural Steroid Hormones from Wastewater Using Membrane Contactor Processes J O S H U water resources and increased interest in wastewater reclamation for potable reuse. This interest has in the study of wastewater reuse in advanced life support systems (e.g., space missions) because

160

August 6, 2009 Wastewater Produces Electricity and Desalinates Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

August 6, 2009 Wastewater Produces Electricity and Desalinates Water University Park, Pa. -- A process that cleans wastewater and generates electricity can also remove 90 percent of salt from brackish organic material from wastewater," said Bruce Logan, Kappe Professor of Environmental Engineering, Penn

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastewater neutralization facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Selective hydrolysis of wastewater sludge Part 1, December 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report Selective hydrolysis of wastewater sludge Part 1, December 2008 Revised Model calculations and cost benefit analysis for Esbjerg Vest wastewater treatment plant, Denmark PSO-F&U project nr. 2006 This project "Selective hydrolysis of wastewater sludge" is supported by EnergiNet .DK under the PSO

162

Original article Impact of spreading olive mill wastewater on soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original article Impact of spreading olive mill wastewater on soil characteristics: laboratory 2001) Abstract ­ A dynamic of soil pollution with olive mill wastewater (OMW) was investigated process forms an olive mill wastewater (OMW). The amount of this waste depends on the process used for oil

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

163

Treated Wastewater Effluent Reduces Sperm Motility Along an Osmolality Gradient  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Treated Wastewater Effluent Reduces Sperm Motility Along an Osmolality Gradient H. L. Schoenfuss Ă? 2008 Ă? Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008 Abstract Many toxic effects of treated wastewater environment of treated wastewater effluent frequently differs consider- ably from that of its receiving waters

Julius, Matthew L.

164

ENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY Brewery wastewater treatment using air-cathode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 1994; Parawira et al. 2005). Biological treatment processes are particularly effective for wastewaterENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY Brewery wastewater treatment using air-cathode microbial fuel cells wastewater treatment using microbial fuel cells (MFCs) will require a better understanding of how operational

165

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for DOE and NNSA for nuclear safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards (NPH) mitigation, and System Engineer Program. Cancels DOE O 420.1B, DOE G 420.1-2 and DOE G 420.1-3.

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

166

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation. Cancels DOE 5480.7A, DOE 5480.24, DOE 5480.28 and Division 13 of DOE 6430.1A. Canceled by DOE O 420.1A.

1995-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

167

TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Milking Center Wastewater Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be affected by manure, milk solids, ammonia, phosphorus, and detergents. Wastewater from the dairy milking center is made up of waste from the milking parlor (manure, feed solids, hoof dirt, bulk tank rinse water and detergent used in cleaning), and should... topics: 1. Combining wastes 2. Application methods 3. Slow surface infiltration Combining Wastes When milking center wastes are combined with manure a common disposal system can be used for both types of waste. A liquid manure storage facility, properly...

Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

168

2012 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2011 through October 31, 2012. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Noncompliance issues Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2012 permit year, approximately 183 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

Mike Lewis

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Pump Tank  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pump tanks are concrete, fiberglass or polyethylene containers that collect wastewater to be dosed into the soil at intervals. This publication explains the design and maintenance of pump tanks, and it offers advice on what to do if a pump tank...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

170

Electron-electron interactions in fast neutral-neutral collisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Differential electron emission is studied for 50--500 keV H[sup +] and H atom impact on helium. Using the first Born formulation, it is shown that projectile electron-target electron interactions are expected to dominate the differential cross sections for low energy target electron emission induced by fast neutral projectile impact on any target. Measurements of the 15[degrees] electron emission were made in order to investigate this prediction. For low impact energies, a constant ratio between the hydrogen atom and proton impact cross sections was found for emitted electron velocities less than half the projectile velocity, V[sub p] But as the collision energy increased, for electron velocities less than 0.25 V[sub p], the cross section ratio increased as the emitted electron velocity decreased. This is interpreted as a signature of projectile electron-target electron interactions becoming dominant for distant collisions between neutral particles.

DuBois, R.D. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Manson, S.T. (Georgia State Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Electron-electron interactions in fast neutral-neutral collisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Differential electron emission is studied for 50--500 keV H{sup +} and H atom impact on helium. Using the first Born formulation, it is shown that projectile electron-target electron interactions are expected to dominate the differential cross sections for low energy target electron emission induced by fast neutral projectile impact on any target. Measurements of the 15{degrees} electron emission were made in order to investigate this prediction. For low impact energies, a constant ratio between the hydrogen atom and proton impact cross sections was found for emitted electron velocities less than half the projectile velocity, V{sub p} But as the collision energy increased, for electron velocities less than 0.25 V{sub p}, the cross section ratio increased as the emitted electron velocity decreased. This is interpreted as a signature of projectile electron-target electron interactions becoming dominant for distant collisions between neutral particles.

DuBois, R.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Manson, S.T. [Georgia State Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Thermal sludge dryer demonstration: Bird Island Wastewater Treatment Plant, Buffalo, NY. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Buffalo Sewer Authority (BSA), in cooperation with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (Energy Authority), commissioned a demonstration of a full scale indirect disk-type sludge dryer at the Bird Island Wastewater Treatment Plant (BIWWTP). The purpose of the project was to determine the effects of the sludge dryer on the sludge incineration process at the facility. Sludge incineration is traditionally the most expensive, energy-intensive unit process involving solids handling at wastewater treatment plants; costs for incineration at the BIWWTP have averaged $2.4 million per year. In the conventional method of processing solids, a series of volume reduction measures, which usually includes thickening, digestion, and mechanical dewatering, is employed prior to incineration. Usually, a high level of moisture is still present within sewage sludge following mechanical dewatering. The sludge dryer system thermally dewaters wastewater sludge to approximately 26%, (and as high as 38%) dry solids content prior to incineration. The thermal dewatering system at the BIWWTP has demonstrated that it meets its design requirements. It has the potential to provide significant energy and other cost savings by allowing the BSA to change from an operation employing two incinerators to a single incinerator mode. While the long-term reliability of the thermal dewatering system has yet to be established, this project has demonstrated that installation of such a system in an existing treatment plant can provide the owner with significant operating cost savings.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Operation and Maintenance Manual for the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Operation and Maintenance Manual lists operator and management responsibilities, permit standards, general operating procedures, maintenance requirements and monitoring methods for the Sewage Treatment Plant at the Central Facilities Area at the Idaho National Laboratory. The manual is required by the Municipal Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000141-03) the sewage treatment plant.

Norm Stanley

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Resource Recovery Opportunities at America’s Water Resource Recovery Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 3A—Conversion Technologies III: Energy from Our Waste—Will we Be Rich in Fuel or Knee Deep in Trash by 2025? Resource Recovery Opportunities at America’s Water Resource Recovery Facilities Todd Williams, Deputy Leader for Wastewater Infrastructure Practice, CH2M HILL

175

Negative Ion Based Heating and Diagnostic Neutral Beams for ITER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To meet the requirements of the four operating and one start-up scenarios foreseen in the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) a flexible heating mix will be required, which has to include a reliable contribution from neutral beams. The current baseline of ITER foresees 2 Heating Neutral Beam (HNB) systems based on negative ion technology, each operating at 1 MeV 40 A D{sup -} ions, and each capable of delivering up to 16.7 MW of D deg. to the ITER plasma. A 3rd HNB injector is foreseen as an upgrade option. In addition a dedicated Diagnostic Neutral Beam (DNB) injecting 100 keV 60 A of negative hydrogen ions will be available for charge exchange resonant spectroscopy (CXRS). The significant R and D effort necessary to meet the design requirements will be provided in the Neutral Beam Test Facility (NBTF), which is to be constructed in Padua, Italy. This paper gives an overview of the current status of the neutral beam (NB) systems and the chosen configuration. The ongoing integration effort into the ITER plant is highlighted and open interface issues are identified. It is shown how installation and maintenance logistics has influenced the design. ITER operating scenarios are briefly discussed, including start-up and commissioning. For example it is now envisaged to have a low current hydrogen phase of ITER operations, essentially for commissioning of the many auxiliary systems used on ITER. The low current limits the achievable plasma density, and hence the NB energy due to shine through limitations. Therefore a possible reconfiguration of the auxiliary heating systems is now being discussed. Other NB related issues identified by the ongoing design review process are emphasized and possible impact on the implementations of the HNB and DNB systems is indicated.

Schunke, B.; Bora, D.; Cordier, J.-J.; Hemsworth, R.; Tanga, A. [ITER Organization, Cadarache, 13108 St.-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Antoni, V. [Consorzio RFX, EURATOM-ENEA Association, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 (Italy); Bonicelli, T. [IPR, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat, 382428 (India); Chakraborty, A. [EFDA CSU, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748, Garching (Germany); Inoue, T.; Watanabe, K. [JAEA, 801-1 Mukouyama, Naka-machi, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 311-0193 (Japan)

2008-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

176

Recent worldwide reviews of wastewater irrigation have demonstrated the contribution this widespread, and often  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent worldwide reviews of wastewater irrigation have demonstrated the contribution. Policymakers and planners can maintain or increase the benefits of wastewater irrigation, while minimizing negative health and environmental impacts, by developing a realistic strategy for managing wastewater use

Scott, Christopher

177

Polishing of synthetic electroplating wastewater in microcosm upflow constructed wetlands: Effect of operating conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polishing of synthetic electroplating wastewater in microcosm upflow constructed wetlands: Effect of polishing electroplating wastewater in subsurface vertical flow constructed wetland. Electroplating wastewater treatment or polishing in constructed wetlands (CWs) was studied to a very limited degree. Four

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

178

Characterization of anion diffusion in polymer hydrogels used for wastewater remediation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterization of anion diffusion in polymer hydrogels used for wastewater remediation Dimitri R pollutants, even at extremely low concentrations, from wastewater effluents are a major environmental need of reactive phosphorus, nitrogen, and sulfur anions from aquaculture production wastewater effluents

Rubloff, Gary W.

179

Local Board of Health Guide to On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Local Board of Health Guide to On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems ©2006 National Association Side of Cover and is Blank #12;Local Board of Health Guide to On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems............................................................................................................. 9 WHAT IS WASTEWATER

180

The Attainable Set for a Nonlinear Control Model of Wastewater Biotreatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Attainable Set for a Nonlinear Control Model of Wastewater Biotreatment Ellina Grigorieva;Biotreatment of Wastewater Treatment of wastewater is needed to eliminate pathogens and reduce organic matter

Grigorieva, Ellina V.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastewater neutralization facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Electric Power Generation from Municipal, Food, and Animal Wastewaters Using Microbial Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) technology can replace activated sludge processes for secondary wastewater treatment. We will discuss sustainable technology is attractive. Keywords: Microbial fuel cells, Wastewater treatment, Economical cell technology to wastewater treatment. Motivations of their work were based on the economic

Angenent, Lars T.

182

Author's personal copy Effectiveness of domestic wastewater treatment using microbial fuel cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Conventional biological wastewater treatmentAuthor's personal copy Effectiveness of domestic wastewater treatment using microbial fuel cells 2009 Available online 5 September 2009 Keywords: Domestic wastewater treatment Energy recovery

183

L AREA WASTEWATER STORAGE DRUM EVALUATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the determination of the cause of pressurization that led to bulging deformation of a 55 gallon wastewater drum stored in L-Area. Drum samples were sent to SRNL for evaluation. The interior surface of these samples revealed blistering and holes in the epoxy phenolic drum liner and corrosion of the carbon steel drum. It is suspected that osmotic pressure drove permeation of the water through the epoxy phenolic coating which was weakened from exposure to low pH water. The coating failed at locations throughout the drum interior. Subsequent corrosion of the carbon steel released hydrogen which pressurized the drum causing deformation of the drum lid. Additional samples from other wastewater drums on the same pallet were also evaluated and limited corrosion was visible on the interior surfaces. It is suspected that, with time, the corrosion would have advanced to cause pressurization of these sealed drums.

Vormelker, P; Cynthia Foreman, C; Zane Nelson, Z; David Hathcock, D; Dennis Vinson, D

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

184

2009 EVALUATION OF TRITIUM REMOVAL AND MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1995, a state-approved land disposal site (SALDS) has received tritium contaminated effluents from the Hanford Site Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Tritium in this effluent is mitigated by storage in slow moving groundwater to allow extended time for decay before the water reaches the site boundary. By this method, tritium in the SALDS is isolated from the general environment and human contact until it has decayed to acceptable levels. This report contains the 2009 update evaluation of alternative tritium mitigation techniques to control tritium in liquid effluents and groundwater at the Hanford site. A thorough literature review was completed and updated information is provided on state-of-the-art technologies for control of tritium in wastewaters. This report was prepared to satisfy the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-026-07B (Ecology, EPA, and DOE 2007). Tritium separation and isolation technologies are evaluated periodically to determine their feasibility for implementation to control Hanford site liquid effluents and groundwaters to meet the Us. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40 CFR 141.16, drinking water maximum contaminant level (MCL) for tritium of 20,000 pOll and/or DOE Order 5400.5 as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) policy. Since the 2004 evaluation, there have been a number of developments related to tritium separation and control with potential application in mitigating tritium contaminated wastewater. These are primarily focused in the areas of: (1) tritium recycling at a commercial facility in Cardiff, UK using integrated tritium separation technologies (water distillation, palladium membrane reactor, liquid phase catalytic exchange, thermal diffusion), (2) development and demonstration of Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange (CECE) using hydrogen/water exchange to separate tritium from water, (3) evaporation of tritium contaminated water for dispersion in the atmosphere, and (4) use of barriers to minimize the transport of tritium in groundwater. Continuing development efforts for tritium separations processes are primarily to support the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) program, the nuclear power industry, and the production of radiochemicals. While these applications are significantly different than the Hanford application, the technology could potentially be adapted for Hanford wastewater treatment. Separations based processes to reduce tritium levels below the drinking water MCL have not been demonstrated for the scale and conditions required for treating Hanford wastewater. In addition, available cost information indicates treatment costs for such processes will be substantially higher than for discharge to SALDS or other typical pump and treat projects at Hanford. Actual mitigation projects for groundwater with very low tritium contamination similar to that found at Hanford have focused mainly on controlling migration and on evaporation for dispersion in the atmosphere.

LUECK KJ; GENESSE DJ; STEGEN GE

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

185

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Mound System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Septic tank Pump tank Distribution pipe Sand Gravel Geotextile fabric On-site wastewater treatment systems Mound system Bruce Lesikar and Vance Weynand Associate Professor and Extension Agricultural Engineering Specialist, Extension Assistant... The Texas A&M University System L-5414 4-02 Figure 1: A mound system for distributing treated wastewater to the soil. A mound system for wastewater is a soil absorption system placed above the natural surface of the ground. Mound systems are used...

Lesikar, B.; Waynard, V.

186

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Graywater Use and Water Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their homes in their landscapes. This reuse of graywater can reduce the amount of wastewater entering sewers or treatment systems, reduce the amount of fresh water used on landscapes and help preserve limited fresh water supplies. Onsite wastewater...-washing machines ? The code excludes water that has washed materials soiled with human waste, such as diapers, and water that has been in contact with toilet waste. This water, known as blackwater, includes flush water from toilets and urinals and wastewater...

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Mechell, Justin; Alexander, Rachel

2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

187

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Trickling Filter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil absorption field Septic tank Clarifier/Dosing tank Trickling filter On-site wastewater treatment systems Trickling filter Bruce Lesikar and Russell Persyn Extension Agricultural Engineering Specialist, Extension Assistant-Water Conservation... municipal wastewater before cities began using activated sludge aeration systems. Now, homes and businesses use trickling filters in on-site wastewater treatment systems. Each trickling filter system has several components: 3 A septic tank, which removes...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2000-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

188

Organic removal from domestic wastewater by activated alumina adsorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the major groups of pollutants in wastewaters. Adsorption by granular activated carbon, a non-polar adsorbent, is now the primary treatment process for removal of residual organics from biologically treated wastewater. The ability of activated alumina... to human health if they exist in the water supply at relatively high concentrations. A wide variety of treatment processes are available to remove organic matter from wastewater. Biological treatment is the most cost effective method for removing oxygen...

Yang, Pe-Der

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Plants in constructed wetlands help to treat agricultural processing wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

constructed wetlands help to treat agricultural processingacross the western to treat winery process wastewater Uniteddocumented relative to treat- discharged downstream. ment

Grismer, Mark E; Shepherd, Heather L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Solid-Liquid Separation of Animal Manure and Wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solid-liquid separation is an alternative treatment for animal manure and process-generated wastewater. This publication explains the techniques, equipment, performance and economics of separators....

Mukhtar, Saqib; Sweeten, John M.; Auvermann, Brent W.

1999-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

191

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Constructed Wetland Media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication explains the functions, characteristics, choices, configurations and maintenance needs for constructed wetland media in on-site wastewater treatment systems....

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Weaver, Richard; Richter, Amanda; O'Neill, Courtney

2005-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

192

Formation of aerobic granular sludge biofilms for sustainable wastewater treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENAC/ Formation of aerobic granular sludge biofilms for sustainable wastewater treatment David G Research, Microbiology of Interfaces, Magdeburg (Germany) EDCE 2011 / From activated sludge flocs

193

EA-1190: Wastewater Treatment Capability Upgrade, Amarillo, Texas  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposed upgrade of the U.S. Department of Energy Pantex Plant Wastewater Treatment Plant in Amarillo, Texas.

194

Plants in constructed wetlands help to treat agricultural processing wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation of constructed wetland treatment performance forof a con- structed wetland for treatment of winery effluent.constructed wetlands for process wastewater treatment at two

Grismer, Mark E; Shepherd, Heather L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

2011 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2010 through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Noncompliance and other issues Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts During the 2011 permit year, approximately 166 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

Mike Lewis

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

E-Print Network 3.0 - attack wastewater utilities Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

wastewater utilities Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: attack wastewater utilities Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Treated domestic...

197

E-Print Network 3.0 - acidic wastewater treatment Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

wastewater treatment Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: acidic wastewater treatment Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Ozone: Science &...

198

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated sludge wastewater Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

wastewater Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: activated sludge wastewater Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 The ABC's of EDCs: Endocrine...

199

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative wastewater treatment Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

wastewater treatment Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: alternative wastewater treatment Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 CAB International...

200

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced wastewater treatment Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

wastewater treatment Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced wastewater treatment Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 NCCR North-South...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastewater neutralization facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

E-Print Network 3.0 - australian wastewater treatment Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

wastewater treatment Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: australian wastewater treatment Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Advanced Nitrogen...

202

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic wastewater treatment Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

wastewater treatment Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anaerobic wastewater treatment Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Impact of EPS on...

203

E-Print Network 3.0 - area industrial wastewater Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences and Ecology 3 Harvesting Energy from Wastewater Treatment Summary: Biogas: - 60% H2 - 40% CO2 12;H2 from industrial wastewaters such as food processing...

204

BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

Lazerson, Samuel

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

205

Facilities Services Overview & Discussion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& Finance Facilities Services Director: Jeff Butler Human Resources Administrative Services Engineering) Environmental Services Morrison (3) Admin Services Evans (1) Human Resources Engineering (4) ·EngineeringFacilities Services Overview & Discussion Jeff Butler Director ­ Facilities Services November 2011

Maxwell, Bruce D.

206

$\\tau$ decays with neutral kaons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The branching ratio of the tau lepton to a neutral K meson is measured from a sample of approximately 200,000 tau decays recorded by the OPAL detector at centre-of-mass energies near the Z0 resonance. The measurement is based on two samples which identify one-prong tau decays with KL and KS mesons. The combined branching ratios are measured to be B(tau- -->pi- K0bar nutau) = (9.33+-0.68+-0.49)x10^-3 B(tau- -->pi- K0bar [>=1pi0] nutau) = (3.24+-0.74+-0.66)x10^-3 B(tau- -->K- K0bar [>=0pi0] nutau) = (3.30+-0.55+-0.39)x10^-3 where the first error is statistical and the second systematic.

Abbiendi, G; Ĺkesson, P F; Alexander, Gideon; Allison, J; Anderson, K J; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Ashby, S F; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Bailey, I; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Betts, S; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bock, P; Böhme, J; Boeriu, O; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Bright-Thomas, P G; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Ciocca, C; Clarke, P E L; Clay, E; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Couchman, J; Couyoumtzelis, C; Coxe, R L; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallavalle, G M; Dallison, S; Davis, R; de Roeck, A; Dervan, P J; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; Donkers, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Estabrooks, P G; Etzion, E; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanfani, A; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Feld, L; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fleck, I; Frey, A; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gaycken, G; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Graham, K; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hajdu, C; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hargrove, C K; Harin-Dirac, M; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hobson, P R; Höcker, Andreas; Hoffman, K; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ishii, K; Jacob, F R; Jawahery, A; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Jones, C R; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanaya, N; Kanzaki, J I; Karapetian, G V; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kim, D H; Klier, A; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kowalewski, R V; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kühl, T; Kupper, M; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, Hagar Yaël; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lawson, I; Layter, J G; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Liebisch, R; Lillich, J; List, B; Littlewood, C; Lloyd, A W; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Lü, J; Ludwig, J; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mader, W F; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Marchant, T E; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Méndez-Lorenzo, P; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, I; Michelini, Aldo; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Okpara, A N; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pérez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, James L; Plane, D E; Poli, B; Polok, J; Przybycien, M B; Quadt, A; Rembser, C; Rick, Hartmut; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Rosati, S; Roscoe, K; Rossi, A M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Rust, D R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sahr, O; Sang, W M; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spagnolo, S; Sproston, M; Stahl, A; Stephens, K; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Surrow, B; Talbot, S D; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Towers, S; Trefzger, T M; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Van Kooten, R; Vannerem, P; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Waller, D; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wetterling, D; White, J S; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Wastewater plant takes plunge into demand response  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Commission and the Bonneville Power Administration, the Eugene-Springfield Water Pollution Control Facility in Eugene, Ore., was put through a series of demand response tests....

208

Combustion testing and heat recovery study: Frank E. Van Lare Wastewater Treatment Plant, Monroe County. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the study were to record and analyze sludge management operations data and sludge incinerator combustion data; ascertain instrumentation and control needs; calculate heat balances for the incineration system; and determine the feasibility of different waste-heat recovery technologies for the Frank E. Van Lare (FEV) Wastewater Treatment Plant. As an integral part of this study, current and pending federal and state regulations were evaluated to establish their impact on furnace operation and subsequent heat recovery. Of significance is the effect of the recently promulgated Federal 40 CFR Part 503 regulations on the FEV facility. Part 503 regulations were signed into law in November 1992, and, with some exceptions, affected facilities must be in compliance by February 19, 1994. Those facilities requiring modifications or upgrades to their incineration or air pollution control equipment to meet Part 503 regulations must be in compliance by February 19, 1995.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Neutral Particle Analyzer for Studies of Fast Ion Population in Plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced neutral particles analyzer for plasma diagnostic with possibility of simultaneous measurements of energy distributions of D and H ions has developed in the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics. The analyzer was used in two plasma facilities with injection of fast neutrals - on the MST reversed field pinch (University of Wisconsin) and the field reversed configuration C-2 (Tri Alpha Energy). In this paper, the design of the analyzer, calculation of efficiency of registration, results of analyzer calibration and experimental results from MST and C-2 experiments are presented

Polosatkin, S; Davydenko, V; Clary, R; Fiksel, G; Ivanov, A; Kapitonov, V; Liu, D; Mishagin, V; Tiunov, M; Voskoboynikov, R

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Computation, measurement and mitigation of neutral-to-earth potentials on electrical distribution systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents computer generated profiles of primary-neutral-to-earth potentials of electrical distribution systems which incorporate a variety of techniques used to mitigate neutral-to-earth potential (''stray voltage'') at dairy farm facilities. Techniques available to the power supplier and power user include an Electronic Grounding System which provides voltage reduction factors of as much as 200 to 1. A new method of measuring these voltages using a computer data acquisition system which monitors every cycle of the power-frequency voltages on eight totally independent channels for extended periods is described.

Dick, W.K.; Winter, D.F.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

from Isotope Production Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility April 13, 2012 Isotope Production Facility produces cancer-fighting actinium 2:32 Isotope cancer treatment...

212

Fuel Fabrication Facility  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Construction of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility Construction of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility November 2005 May 2007 June 2008 May 2012...

213

STATUS REPORT: Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems in California jointly presented by:  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, “adequately managed decentralized (onsite) wastewater treatment systems can be a cost effective and long

California Wastewater

214

Reducing effluent discharge and recovering bioenergy in an osmotic microbial fuel cell treating domestic wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

domestic wastewater Zheng Ge, Qingyun Ping, Li Xiao, Zhen He Department of Civil Engineering and Mechanics cell is developed to treat domestic wastewater. Wastewater effluent can be greatly reduced due to osmotic water extraction. Bioenergy recovered from wastewater can potentially support pumping system

215

Winery waste makes fuel Electricity, bacteria break organics in wastewater into hydrogen gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MSNBC.com Winery waste makes fuel Electricity, bacteria break organics in wastewater into hydrogen method for generating hydrogen fuel from wastewater is now operating at a California winery material in the wastewater into hydrogen gas. There is a lot more energy locked in the wastewater than

216

ED-WAVE: an Educational Software for Training on Wastewater Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ED-WAVE: an Educational Software for Training on Wastewater Technologies Using Virtual Application database and case base reasoning in the field of wastewater treatment and water reclamation. ED-WAVE aims education; wastewater technolo- gies; wastewater treatment animations INTRODUCTION SUSTAINABILITY

Gutierrez, Diego

217

Examination of microbial fuel cell start-up times with domestic wastewater and additional amendments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biological process used for wastewater treatment is desirable to avoid discharge of untreated wastewaterExamination of microbial fuel cell start-up times with domestic wastewater and additional Available online 30 April 2011 Keywords: Microbial fuel cell Domestic wastewater Startup time Substrate a b

218

Analytical support for a new, low-level radioactive wastewater treatment plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) located in Aiken, SC, is operated by Westinghouse Savannah River Company under contract with the US Department of Energy. The mission of SRS is to manufacture radioisotopes for use in national defense and space exploration. The F/H Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) is a wastewater treatment plant supporting SRS for low-level radioactive process waste streams. In order to comply with the Federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the facility had to become operational by November 8, 1988. The F/H ETF employs pH adjustment, microfiltration, organic removal, reverse osmosis, evaporation, and ion exchange to remove contaminants prior to discharge to the environment via a state-permitted outfall. Concentrated contaminants removed by these processes are diverted to other facilities for further processing. The ETF is supported by a 24 hr/day facility laboratory for process control and characterization of influent feed, treated effluent water, and concentrated waste. Permit compliance analyses reported to the state of SC are performed by an offsite certified contract laboratory. The support laboratory is efficiently organized to provide: metal analyses by ICP-AES, alpha/beta/gamma activity counting, process ions by Ion Selective Electrode (ISE), oil and grease analyses by IR technique, mercury via cold vapor AA, conductivity, turbidity, and pH. All instrumentation is contained in hoods for radioactive sample handling.

Jones, V.D.; Marsh, J.H.; Ingram, L.M.; Melton, W.L.; Magonigal, E.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Guide to research facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Guide provides information on facilities at US Department of Energy (DOE) and other government laboratories that focus on research and development of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. These laboratories have opened these facilities to outside users within the scientific community to encourage cooperation between the laboratories and the private sector. The Guide features two types of facilities: designated user facilities and other research facilities. Designated user facilities are one-of-a-kind DOE facilities that are staffed by personnel with unparalleled expertise and that contain sophisticated equipment. Other research facilities are facilities at DOE and other government laboratories that provide sophisticated equipment, testing areas, or processes that may not be available at private facilities. Each facility listing includes the name and phone number of someone you can call for more information.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Neutral-current x-distributions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The role of the semi-leptonic neutral current interaction as a probe of nucleon structure is examined. Previous measurements of neutral current x-distributions are reviewed, and new results from the Fermilab - MIT - MSU collaboration are presented. 4 references.

Bogert, D.; Burnstein, R.; Fisk, R.; Fuess, S.; Bofill, J.; Busza, W.; Eldridge, T.; Friedman, J.I.; Abolins, M.; Brock, R.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastewater neutralization facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

2010 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2009 through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of compliance activities • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2010 permit year, approximately 164 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

mike lewis

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

2013 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2012–October 31, 2013. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of compliance activities • Noncompliance issues • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2013 permit year, approximately 238 million gallons of wastewater was discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters are below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

Mike Lewis

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Radiological Instrumentation Assessment for King County Wastewater Treatment Division  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into its combined sanitary and storm sewer system. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material. Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. Volume 2 of PNNL-15163 assesses the radiological instrumentation needs for detection of radiological or nuclear terrorism, in support of decisions to treat contaminated wastewater or to bypass the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP), and in support of radiation protection of the workforce, the public, and the infrastructure of the WPTP. Fixed radiation detection instrumentation should be deployed in a defense-in-depth system that provides 1) early warning of significant radioactive material on the way to the WPTP, including identification of the radionuclide(s) and estimates of the soluble concentrations, with a floating detector located in the wet well at the Interbay Pump Station and telemetered via the internet to all authorized locations; 2) monitoring at strategic locations within the plant, including 2a) the pipe beyond the hydraulic ram in the bar screen room; 2b) above the collection funnels in the fine grit facility; 2c) in the sampling tank in the raw sewage pump room; and 2d) downstream of the concentration facilities that produce 6% blended and concentrated biosolids. Engineering challenges exist for these applications. It is necessary to deploy both ultra-sensitive detectors to provide early warning and identification and detectors capable of functioning in high-dose rate environments that are likely under some scenarios, capable of functioning from 10 microrems per hour (background) up to 1000 rems per hour. Software supporting fixed spectroscopic detectors is needed to provide prompt, reliable, and simple interpretations of spectroscopic outputs that are of use to operators and decision-makers. Software to provide scientists and homeland security personnel with sufficient technical detail for identification, quantification, waste management decisions, and for the inevitable forensic and attribution needs must be developed. Computational modeling using MCNP software has demonstrated that useful detection capabilities can be deployed. In particular, any of the isotopes examined can be detected at levels between 0.01 and 0.1 ?Ci per gallon. General purpose instruments that can be used to determine the nature and extent of radioactive contamination and measure radiation levels for purposes of protecting personnel and members of the public should be available. One or more portable radioisotope identifiers (RIIDs) should be available to WTD personnel. Small, portable battery-powered personal radiation monitors should be widely available WTD personnel. The personal monitors can be used for personal and group radiation protection decisions, and to alert management to the need to get expert backup. All considerations of radiological instrumentation require considerations of training and periodic retraining of personnel, as well as periodic calibration and maintenance of instruments. Routine “innocent” alarms will occur due to medical radionuclides that are legally discharged into sanitary sewers on a daily basis.

Strom, Daniel J.; McConn, Ronald J.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.

2005-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

224

Neutral depletion and the helicon density limit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is straightforward to create fully ionized plasmas with modest rf power in a helicon. It is difficult, however, to create plasmas with density >10{sup 20} m{sup ?3}, because neutral depletion leads to a lack of fuel. In order to address this density limit, we present fast (1 MHz), time-resolved measurements of the neutral density at and downstream from the rf antenna in krypton helicon plasmas. At the start of the discharge, the neutral density underneath the antenna is reduced to 1% of its initial value in 15 ?s. The ionization rate inferred from these data implies that the electron temperature near the antenna is much higher than the electron temperature measured downstream. Neutral density measurements made downstream from the antenna show much slower depletion, requiring 14 ms to decrease by a factor of 1/e. Furthermore, the downstream depletion appears to be due to neutral pumping rather than ionization.

Magee, R. M.; Galante, M. E.; Carr, J. Jr.; Lusk, G.; McCarren, D. W.; Scime, E. E. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)] [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Doublet III neutral beam power system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Doublet III neutral beam power system supplies pulsed power to the neutral beam injectors for plasma heating experiments on the Doublet III tokamak. The power supply system is connected to an ion source where the power is converted to an 80 kV, 80A, 0.5 sec beam of hydrogen ions at maximum power output. These energetic ions undergo partial neutralization via charge exchange in the beamline. The energetic neutral hydrogen atoms pass through the Doublet III toroidal and poloidal magnet fields and deposit their energy in the confined plasma. The unneutralized ions are deflected into a water-cooled dump. The entire system is interfaced through the neutral beam computer instrumentation and control system.

Nerem, A.; Beal, J.W.; Colleraine, A.P.; LeVine, F.H.; Pipkins, J.F.; Remsen, D.B. Jr.; Tooker, J.F.; Varga, H.J.; Franck, J.V.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Future Fixed Target Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We review plans for future fixed target lepton- and hadron-scattering facilities, including the 12 GeV upgraded CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab, neutrino beam facilities at Fermilab, and the antiproton PANDA facility at FAIR. We also briefly review recent theoretical developments which will aid in the interpretation of the data expected from these facilities.

Melnitchouk, Wolodymyr

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Groundwater Treatment at the Fernald Preserve: Status and Path Forward for the Water Treatment Facility - 12320  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operating a water treatment facility at the Fernald Preserve in Cincinnati, Ohio-to support groundwater remediation and other wastewater treatment needs-has become increasingly unnecessary. The Fernald Preserve became a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) site in November 2006, once most of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act environmental remediation and site restoration had been completed. Groundwater remediation is anticipated to continue beyond 2020. A portion of the wastewater treatment facility that operated during the CERCLA cleanup continued to operate after the site was transferred to LM, to support the remaining groundwater remediation effort. The treatment facility handles the site's remaining water treatment needs (for groundwater, storm water, and wastewater) as necessary, to ensure that uranium discharge limits specified in the Operable Unit 5 Record of Decision are met. As anticipated, the need to treat groundwater to meet uranium discharge limits has greatly diminished over the last several years. Data indicate that the groundwater treatment facility is no longer needed to support the ongoing aquifer remediation effort. (authors)

Powel, J. [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Harrison, Ohio (United States); Hertel, B.; Glassmeyer, C.; Broberg, K. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Harrison, Ohio (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Valuation of a Municipal Wastewater Plant Expansion: An Application to a High Growth Resort Area in Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The municipal water and wastewater sector is considered to be the most capital intensive industrial sector. Naturally, any methodology that has the potential to improve capital allocation decision making, has the potential to make a positive financial contribution to this sector. Most managers are aware of the power of calculating the Net Present Value (NPV) of an investment decision using Discounted Cash Flows (DCF). The problem with DCF based NPV analysis is that the inherent value of future project options is not modeled. In this study, we consider a small resort-based municipality faced the question of how big to make their new wastewater treatment facility to meet the expanding demand of 10 % growth in the number of new residential connections to the wastewater treatment infrastructure. Since a significant number of new dwellings are second “weekend ” homes, the planners felt strongly that growth rates were tied to the strength of the market index. Here we set the model framework for considering optimal plant size based on correlation assumptions of municipal growth to the market index. The model takes on the form of an Asian option. The results show that the greater the (assumed) correlation, the smaller the required plant size. Penalty costs associated with not building a large enough plant are hedged in the market. This paper sets that basis for future analysis of staged plant expansion analysis.

Yuri Lawryshyn; Sebastian Jaimungal

229

Beyond ITER: Neutral beams for DEMO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the development of magnetically confined fusion as an economically sustainable power source, ITER is currently under construction. Beyond ITER is the DEMO programme in which the physics and engineering aspects of a future fusion power plant will be demonstrated. DEMO will produce net electrical power. The DEMO programme will be outlined and the role of neutral beams for heating and current drive will be described. In particular, the importance of the efficiency of neutral beam systems in terms of injected neutral beam power compared to wallplug power will be discussed. Options for improving this efficiency including advanced neutralisers and energy recovery are discussed.

McAdams, R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Water Distribution and Wastewater Systems Operators (North Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

All public water supply and wastewater disposal systems are subject to classification and regulation by the State of North Dakota, and must obtain certification from the State Department of Health.

231

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Alternative Collection Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rural Texas communities have new options for wastewater management infrastructure that are cost effective but still protect human health and environmental quality. Such communities now can combine different kinds of systems in a new approach called...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2000-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

232

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Selecting and Permitting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication explains factors to consider when choosing an on-site wastewater treatment system and lists the nine steps required to obtain a permit for one. It includes addresses and phone numbers of Texas Natural Resource Conservation...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

233

Membrane Based intensification of ammonia removal from wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The aim of this research was to study a novel membrane based oxygen intensification system to enhance a biological wastewater treatment process for ammonia removal. Specifically, this work is concerned with the biological nitrification process which...

Almutairi, Azel

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

234

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Homeowner's Guide to Evaluating Service Contracts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This guide helps homeowners who are seeking maintenance services for their onsite wastewater treatment systems (such as septic systems). Included are definitions of common terms used in service contracts, types of service contracts available...

Lesikar, Bruce J.; O'Neill, Courtney; Deal, Nancy; Loomis, George; Gustafson, David; Lindbo, David

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

235

Food service establishment wastewater characterization and management practice evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Food service establishments that use onsite wastewater treatment systems are experiencing hydraulic and organic overloading of pretreatment systems and/or drain fields. Design guidelines for these systems are typically provided in State regulations...

Garza, Octavio Armando

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

236

Chemically enhanced primary treatment of wastewater in Honduran Imhoff tanks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Imhoff tanks represent approximately 40% of the wastewater treatment infrastructure in Honduras. This thesis evaluates the usage of solid aluminum sulfate as a means to achieving national effluent regulations in Imhoff ...

Mikelonis, Anne M. (Anne Marie)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Life-cycle assessment of wastewater treatment plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents a general model for the carbon footprints analysis of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), using a life cycle assessment (LCA) approach. In previous research, the issue of global warming is often related ...

Dong, Bo, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Production of Biogas from Wastewaters of Food Processing Industries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket Process used in converting biodegradable, soluble, organic pollutants in industrial wastewaters to a directly-burnable biogas composed mainly of methane has been developed, tested, and commercially applied...

Sax, R. I.; Holtz, M.; Pette, K. C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Subsurface Drip Distribution (Spanish)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A subsurface drip system distributes wastewater to the lawn through a system of tubing installed below the ground surface. This publication explains the advantages, disadvantages, maintenance steps and estimated costs of subsurface drip distribution...

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

1999-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

240

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Subsurface Drip Distribution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A subsurface drip system distributes wastewater to the lawn through a system of tubing installed below the ground. This publication explains the advantages and disadvantages of subsurface drip distribution systems, as well as estimated costs...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

1999-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastewater neutralization facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Mound System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A mound system is a soil absorption system placed above the natural surface of the ground. The system distributes treated wastewater into the soil. This publication discusses the design and maintenance of mound systems....

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2002-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

242

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Spray Distribution (Spanish)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spray distribution systems for wastewater treated on site are much like lawn irrigation systems. This publication explains the advantages, disadvantages, maintenance steps and estimated costs of spray distribution systems....

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

1999-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

243

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Leaching Chambers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Leaching chambers distribute treated wastewater into the soil. This publication lists the advantages and disadvantages of leaching chamber systems, explains how to maintain them and gives estimates of costs....

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2000-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

244

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Spray Distribution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A spray distribution system is very similar to a lawn irrigation system. Spray heads are used to distribute treated wastewater to the surface of the yard. This publication explains the advantages and disadvantages of spray distribution systems...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

1999-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

245

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Evapotranspiration Bed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evapotranspiration (ET) beds treat wastewater in the soil by evaporation and by transpiration from plants growing there. This publication explains the treatment, design, operation and maintenance of ET beds....

Lesikar, Bruce J.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Gravel-less Pipe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravel-less pipe systems distribute treated wastewater into the soil. This publication lists the advantages and disadvantages of gravel-less pipe systems, explains how to maintain them and gives estimates of costs....

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2000-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

247

Physics and Outlook for Rare, All-neutral Eta Decays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The $\\eta$ meson provides a laboratory to study isospin violation and search for new flavor-conserving sources of C and CP violation with a sensitivity approaching $10^{-6}$ of the isospin-conserving strong amplitude. Some of the most interesting rare $\\eta$ decays are the neutral modes, yet the effective loss of photons from the relatively common decay $\\eta \\rightarrow 3\\pi^0 \\rightarrow 6\\gamma$ (33$\\%$) has largely limited the sensitivity for decays producing 3-5$\\gamma$'s. Particularly important relevant branches include the highly suppressed $\\eta \\rightarrow \\pi^0 2\\gamma \\rightarrow 4\\gamma$, which provides a rare window on testing models of $O(p^6)$ contributions in ChPTh, and $\\eta \\rightarrow 3\\gamma$ and $\\eta \\rightarrow 2\\pi^0 \\gamma \\rightarrow 5\\gamma$ which provide direct constraints on C violation in flavor-conserving processes. The substitution of lead tungstate in the forward calorimeter of the GluEx setup in Jefferson Lab's new Hall D would allow dramatically improved measurements. The main niche of this facility, which we call the JLab Eta Factory (JEF), would be $\\eta$ decay neutral modes. However, this could likely be expanded to rare $\\eta'(958)$ decays for low energy QCD studies as well as $\\eta$ decays involving muons for new physics searches.

Mack, David J. [JLAB

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Treatment of Organic-Contaminated Wastewater by Pervaporation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TREATMENT OF ORGANIC-CONTAMINATED WASTEWATER BY PERVAPORATION J.G. WIJMANS J. KASCHEMEKAT R.W. BAKER V.L. SIMMONS Research Director Design Engineer President Marketing Director Membrane Technology and Research, Inc., Menlo Park, CA ABSTRACT...-CONTAMINATED WASTEWATER BY PERVAPORATION J.G. WIJMANS Research Director J. KASCHEMEKAT R.W. BAKER V.L. SIMMONS Design Engineer President Marketing Director Membrane Technology and Research, Inc., Menlo Park, CA ABSTRACT The removal and recovery of organic contaminants...

Wijmans, J. G.; Kaschemekat, J.; Baker, R. W.; Simmons, V. L.

249

Economic Analysis of Wastewater Treatment Alternatives in Rural Texas Communities.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

)C \\245.7 73 ).l'la\\ J :--7:...---_- r----'??-=--=--::------. I UElRAH ! MAY 16 1985 Texas A&M University Economic Analysis of J. Wastewater Treatment Alternatives IN RURAL TEXAS COMMUNITIES B-1491 January 1985 The Texas Agricultural..., Gary Lightsey, and Charles Hart from the Farmers Home Administration in Temple, Texas, also deserve a special vote of thanks. They provided an orientation to the economics of treatment plant investment. ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF WASTEWATER TREATMENT...

Victurine, Raymond F.; Goodwin, H.L. Jr; Lacewell, Ronald D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

CRAD, Facility Safety- Nuclear Facility Safety Basis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) that can be used for assessment of a contractor's Nuclear Facility Safety Basis.

251

Recycled Water Reuse Permit Renewal Application for the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This renewal application for a Recycled Water Reuse Permit is being submitted in accordance with the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.17 “Recycled Water Rules” and the Municipal Wastewater Reuse Permit LA-000141-03 for continuing the operation of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant located at the Idaho National Laboratory. The permit expires March 16, 2015. The permit requires a renewal application to be submitted six months prior to the expiration date of the existing permit. For the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant, the renewal application must be submitted by September 16, 2014. The information in this application is consistent with the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality’s Guidance for Reclamation and Reuse of Municipal and Industrial Wastewater and discussions with Idaho Department of Environmental Quality personnel.

Mike Lewis

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Neutral Supersymmetric Higgs Boson Searches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In some Supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, including the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), the coupling of Higgs bosons to b-quarks is enhanced. This enhancement makes the associated production of the Higgs with b-quarks an interesting search channel for the Higgs and Supersymmetry at D0. The identification of b-quarks, both online and offline, is essential to this search effort. This thesis describes the author's involvement in the development of both types of b-tagging and in the application of these techniques to the MSSM Higgs search. Work was carried out on the Level-3 trigger b-tagging algorithms. The impact parameter (IP) b-tagger was retuned and the effects of increased instantaneous luminosity on the tagger were studied. An extension of the IP-tagger to use the z-tracking information was developed. A new b-tagger using secondary vertices was developed and commissioned. A tool was developed to allow the use of large multi-run samples for trigger studies involving b-quarks. Offline, a neural network (NN) b-tagger was trained combining the existing offline lifetime based b-tagging tools. The efficiency and fake rate of the NN b-tagger were measured in data and MC. This b-tagger was internally reviewed and certified by the Collaboration and now provides the official b-tagging for all analyses using the Run IIa dataset at D0. A search was performed for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to a b{bar b} pair and produced in association with one or more b-quarks. Limits are set on the cross-section times the branching ratio for such a process. The limits were interpreted in various MSSM scenarios. This analysis uses the NN b-tagger and was the first to use this tool. The analysis also relies on triggers using the Level-3 IP b-tagging tool described previously. A likelihood discriminant was used to improve the analysis and a neural network was developed to cross-check this technique. The result of the analysis has been submitted to PRL and is comparable to the result from CDF in the same channel which uses approximately twice the integrated luminosity.

Robinson, Stephen Luke; /Imperial Coll., London

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Siderite, oxidation, and neutralization potential determination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Due to the nature of native soils overlying lignite seams in Texas, mixed overburden is allowed as a topsoil substitute. Determination of suitable topsoil replacements is based on chemical analysis, including neutralization potential (NP), a...

Porter, Elizabeth Brooke

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Long Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam Charge Neutralization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

neutralizing plasma column the heavy ion beam can focus to aPlasmas are a source of unbound electrons for charge neutralizing intense heavy ion beams to focus

Efthimion, P.C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

A Case for Climate Neutrality: Case Studies on Moving Towards...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Climate Neutrality: Case Studies on Moving Towards a Low Carbon Economy Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: A Case for Climate Neutrality: Case Studies...

256

FACILITY SAFETY (FS)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FACILITY SAFETY (FS) OBJECTIVE FS.1 - (Core Requirement 7) Facility safety documentation in support of SN process operations,is in place and has been implemented that describes the...

257

Technology Transitions Facilities Database  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The types of R&D facilities at the DOE Laboratories available to the public typically fall into three broad classes depending on the mode of access: Designated User Facilities, Shared R&D...

258

Better building: LEEDing new facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Better building: LEEDing new facilities Better building: LEEDing new facilities We're taking big steps on-site to create energy efficient facilities and improve infrastructure....

259

Study of the treatability of wastewater from a coal-gasification plant. Final report, July 15, 1978-July 14, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study focused on the coal gasification facility serving the Holston Army Ammunition Plant in Kingsport, Tennessee. Objectives were to characterize the wastewater produced by the gasification facility, and to evaluate technology for treating the waste in preparation for dischage to the environment. Most wastewater was recycled for scrubbing and cooling the product gas, with the excess requiring disposal found to be an average of only 1170 gallons per day (53 gallons per ton of coal, as received, and 366 gallons per million cubic feet of product gas). Analysis indicated that the waste was warm, high in alkaline material, especially ammonia, high in organic material, especially phenols, and also contaminated with other substances. Sulfides and thiocyanates were especially high in concentration. It was found that pretreatment could be accomplished by stripping (air injection) at high pH, removal of grease and oil (by pH suppression and light aeration) and neutralizatin. Equations were developed to describe the first two steps. Biological treatment through activated sludge was found to be successful, but effected only a moderate degree of treatment, and was troubled with frequent process upset. Attempts to improve treatment efficiency and stability are described. The data indicated the need to study aerated waste stabilization ponds as an alternative to activated sludge. Biological reaction kinetics were studied for activated sludge. Evaluation of the application of granular activated carbon suggested that this could be an effective practical tertiary treatment.

Iglar, A. F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Evaluation of improved techniques for the removal of fission products from process wastewater and groundwater: FY 1997 status  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goals of this effort in FY 1997 were to survey local end users of wastewater treatment technology and then to evaluate recently available treatment processes in light of user needs. Survey results indicate that local sites are confronted with a limited, and shrinking, budget for treating aqueous waste streams. Therefore, a process will be selected primarily on the basis of sorbent costs, use of existing equipment, and disposal costs for spent processing materials. Current laboratory testing and economic studies have been directed toward addressing the technical issues specific to the removal of {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs from groundwater and process wastewater. This year`s efforts have concentrated on evaluating the engineered form of crystalline silicotitanates (CSTs) for near neutral pH applications. Both powder and pellet forms of CST can be obtained through UOP; this task evaluated only the engineered form of the sorbent for wastewater remediation. Preliminary experimental efforts included measuring the average particle size, surface water content, total sodium content, ion exchange capacity, and equilibration mixing time. The as received material contains approximately 10% fines, which adhere to the CST pellet. The cesium and strontium ion-exchange capacities, based on multiple contacts with 50 ppm of the metal, are 0.8 meq/g and 1.1 meq/g, respectively. Batch tests indicated that an equilibrium mixing time of 100 h was required for cesium sorption. Group 2 cations (Sr, Ca, and Mg) required greater than 500 h. Particle diffusion coefficients were estimated for each of these cations from the batch studies.

Bostick, D.T.; DePaoli, S.M.; Guo, B.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastewater neutralization facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

NEUTRALIZED TRANSPORT OF HIGH INTENSITY BEAMS E. Henestroza #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for specific degrees of neutralization. PLASMA NEUTRALIZATION Neutralization is essential for focusing heavy (~ 10-3 Torr). Final focus magnet Target Volumetric plasma Converging ion beam Chamber Wall at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is exploring the performance of neutralized final focus

Gilson, Erik

262

California Food Processing Industry Wastewater Demonstration Project: Phase I Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EE), water quality environmental management, and carbonEnvironmental Protection Agency, Office of Water, Office of Wastewater Management.and Water program by providing a strategic, holistic approach to wastewater energy and environmental management

Lewis, Glen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Pilot Scale Study of Excess Sludge Production Reduction in Wastewater Treatment by Ozone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pilot Scale Study of Excess Sludge Production Reduction in Wastewater Treatment by Ozone Yuan Ma-scale reactors were operated at the LaPrairie Wastewater Treatment plant (one control and one ozonated

Barthelat, Francois

264

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic plant wastewater Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

wastewater Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aquatic plant wastewater Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 1S P R I N G 2 0 1 0 The Magazine...

265

Multidimensional Modeling of the Hydrogen-Based, Membrane Biofilm Reactor for Denitrification of Potable and Wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Potable and Wastewater Kelly Martin, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Notre Dame Monday, February 24, 2013 4 oxidized contaminants from drinking water and wastewater. A promising option, the membrane biofilm reactor

Kamat, Vineet R.

266

EECBG Success Story: Saving Energy at 24/7 Wastewater Treatment...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Saving Energy at 247 Wastewater Treatment Plant EECBG Success Story: Saving Energy at 247 Wastewater Treatment Plant July 29, 2010 - 4:11pm Addthis In the city of Longview,...

267

Water/Wastewater Engineering Report (High Efficiency Pump/Motor Replacement - M2 Model)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pumping water or wastewater is the largest use of electricity for a municipal water supply or wastewater treatment plant. Increasing the overall efficiency of the pumping system can achieve significant energy savings. Overall pump system...

Liu, Z.; Brumbelow, K.; Haberl, J. S.

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

268

Bio PowerBio Power The City of Gresham WastewaterThe City of Gresham Wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reduces the need for fossil fuels.for fossil fuels. #12;Economic BenefitsEconomic Benefits Reduces facility energy costsReduces facility energy costs --$208,000 annually$208,000 annually Provides space heat for building, or Grease (FOG) Program Increase Menthane ProductionIncrease Menthane Production Energy Independent Solar

Prevedouros, Panos D.

269

Small Power Production Facilities (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

For the purpose of these regulations, a small power production facility is defined as a facility that:...

270

TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Household Wastewater Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This publication covers the following topics: 1. Septic tanks/soil absorption systems 2. Quantity of wastewater 3. Quality of wastewater 4. Collection of wastewater 5. Treatment systems 6. Disposal system 7. Assistance with failing systems or new designs 8.... Evaluation table Septic Tanks/Soil Absorption Systems The most common form of on-site waste- water treatment is a septic tank/soil absorption system. In this system, wastewater flows from the household sewage lines into an under- ground septic tank...

Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

271

Methods for neutralizing anthrax or anthrax spores  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention concerns methods, compositions and apparatus for neutralizing bioagents, wherein bioagents comprise biowarfare agents, biohazardous agents, biological agents and/or infectious agents. The methods comprise exposing the bioagent to an organic semiconductor and exposing the bioagent and organic semiconductor to a source of energy. Although any source of energy is contemplated, in some embodiments the energy comprises visible light, ultraviolet, infrared, radiofrequency, microwave, laser radiation, pulsed corona discharge or electron beam radiation. Exemplary organic semiconductors include DAT and DALM. In certain embodiments, the organic semiconductor may be attached to one or more binding moieties, such as an antibody, antibody fragment, or nucleic acid ligand. Preferably, the binding moiety has a binding affinity for one or more bioagents to be neutralized. Other embodiments concern an apparatus comprising an organic semiconductor and an energy source. In preferred embodiments, the methods, compositions and apparatus are used for neutralizing anthrax spores.

Sloan, Mark A; Vivekandanda, Jeevalatha; Holwitt, Eric A; Kiel, Johnathan L

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

272

Montana Facilities Which Do Not Discharge Process Wastewater (MDEQ Form 2E)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 Climate Zone Subtype A. PlacesEnergyProgramPolicy Act Guide| Open

273

Treatability studies on different refinery wastewater samples using high-throughput microbial electrolysis cells (MECs)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Treatability studies on different refinery wastewater samples using high-throughput microbial, University Park, PA 16802, USA h i g h l i g h t s Refinery wastewaters were tested as fuels in MECs effective for treatment or pre-treatment of some refinery wastewaters. The best way to start up MECs

274

Treating refinery wastewaters in microbial fuel cells using separator electrode assembly or spaced electrode configurations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Treating refinery wastewaters in microbial fuel cells using separator electrode assembly or spaced 2013 Available online 5 November 2013 Keywords: Microbial fuel cells Refinery wastewater Biodegradability Separator electrode assembly a b s t r a c t The effectiveness of refinery wastewater (RW

275

03/0924 1 st INTERNATIONAL SEMINAR ON THE USE OF AQUATIC MACROPKYTES FOR WASTEWATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Filters (RBF). "Rustic" and rather simple wastewater treatment systems for such small communities in rural03/0924 1 st INTERNATIONAL SEMINAR ON THE USE OF AQUATIC MACROPKYTES FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS ÂŁ-10 CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT : THE FRENCH EXPERIENCE Catherine

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

276

A consistent modelling methodology for secondary settling tanks in wastewater treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A consistent modelling methodology for secondary settling tanks in wastewater treatment Stefan on a consistent modelling methodology (CMM) of complex real processes in wastewater treatment by utilizing both as a case since this is one of the most complex processes in a wastewater treatment plant and the simulation

BĂĽrger, Raimund

277

Anaerobic Migrating Blanket Reactor Treatment of Low-Strength Wastewater at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anaerobic Migrating Blanket Reactor Treatment of Low-Strength Wastewater at Low Temperatures Largus anaerobic migrating blanket reactor (AMBR) was studied for the treatment of low- strength soluble wastewater milk substrate as a synthetic wastewater at low temperatures (15 and 20 °C). The concentration

Angenent, Lars T.

278

Reducing the Anaerobic Digestion Model N1 for its application to an industrial wastewater treatment plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Anaerobic Digestion Model N°1 for its application to an industrial wastewater treatment plant treating winery effluent wastewater Carlos García-Diéguez 1 , Olivier Bernard 2 , Enrique Roca 1, * 1 USC ­ PRODES for winery effluent wastewater. A new reduced stoichiometric matrix was identified and the kinetic parameters

Boyer, Edmond

279

Endocrine Active Chemicals, Pharmaceuticals, and Other Chemicals of Concern in Surface Water, Wastewater-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Wastewater- Treatment Plant Effluent, and Bed Sediment, and Biological Characteristics in Selected Streams Chemicals, Pharmaceuticals, and Other Chemicals of Concern in Surface Water, Wastewater- Treatment Plant, and Data, 2009 #12;Front cover. Industrial wastewater-treatment plant outflow in Worthington, Minnesota

280

A nonlinear observer design for an activated sludge wastewater treatment process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A nonlinear observer design for an activated sludge wastewater treatment process B. Boulkrounea , M : Activated sludge, wastewater treatment process, Lyapunov function, Lips- chitz singular discrete the recent results of [2] and [5]. In the last decades, the modeling of the activated sludge wastewater

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastewater neutralization facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Analysis of Ammonia Loss Mechanisms in Microbial Fuel Cells Treating Animal Wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARTICLE Analysis of Ammonia Loss Mechanisms in Microbial Fuel Cells Treating Animal Wastewater Jung.interscience.wiley.com). DOI 10.1002/bit.21687 ABSTRACT: Ammonia losses during swine wastewater treatment were examined using manure; electricity; power generation Introduction Wastewater treatment using microbial fuel cells (MFCs

282

Wastewater Effluent Polishing Systems of Anaerobic Baffled Reactor Treating Black-water from Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wastewater Effluent Polishing Systems of Anaerobic Baffled Reactor Treating Black-water from of different integrated low-cost wastewater treatment systems, comprising one ABR as first treatment step filter and a vertical flow constructed wetland. A mixture of septage and domestic wastewater was used

Richner, Heinz

283

MATERIAL FLUX ANALYSIS (MFA) FOR PLANNING OF DOMESTIC WASTES AND WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i MATERIAL FLUX ANALYSIS (MFA) FOR PLANNING OF DOMESTIC WASTES AND WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT: CASE nutrient management, organic waste, wastewater and septage that contained high concentration of nutrients area. The nitrogen fluxes in relation to organic waste and wastewater were chosen as indicators

Richner, Heinz

284

Application of a moving bed biofilm reactor for tertiary ammonia treatment in high temperature industrial wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

industrial wastewater Jennifer L. Shore a,b , William S. M'Coy b , Claudia K. Gunsch a , Marc A. Deshusses a 2012 Available online 17 February 2012 Keywords: Moving bed biofilm reactor Industrial wastewater and industrial wastewater. No biotreatment was observed at 45 °C, although effective nitrification was rapidly

285

BIOENERGY AND BIOFUELS Domestic wastewater treatment using multi-electrode continuous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOENERGY AND BIOFUELS Domestic wastewater treatment using multi-electrode continuous flow MFCs Heidelberg 2012 Abstract Treatment of domestic wastewater using microbial fuel cells (MFCs) will require to large changes in the chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentration within the reactor. Domestic wastewater

286

Coastal pollution hazards in southern California observed by SAR imagery: stormwater plumes, wastewater plumes,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, wastewater plumes, and natural hydrocarbon seeps Paul M. DiGiacomo a,*, Libe Washburn b , Benjamin Holt Abstract Stormwater runoff plumes, municipal wastewater plumes, and natural hydrocarbon seeps are important; Slicks; Southern California; Synthetic aperture radar; Wastewater, plumes 1. Introduction The rapidly

Washburn, Libe

287

Characterization of network morphology in anion binding hydrogels used for wastewater remediation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterization of network morphology in anion binding hydrogels used for wastewater remediation wastewater effluents. The sorbent used was crosslinked polyamine (PAA$HCl) polymeric hydrogels. The surface of crosslinking. q 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Hydrogel; Atomic force microscopy; Wastewater

Rubloff, Gary W.

288

Effectiveness of Mechanical Aerationin Floating Aquatic Macrophyte-Based Wastewater Treatment Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effectiveness of Mechanical Aerationin Floating Aquatic Macrophyte-Based Wastewater Treatment to evaluate its effect on wastewater treatment effi- ciency andplantgrowth. Light aeration (0.003 and0.021Lnr2 tanks. Heavy aeration (1.03 and 3.53 L nr2 min-1 ) raised wastewater dissolved oxygen(DO) concentrations

Florida, University of

289

Spatial differences and temporal changes in illicit drug use in Europe quantified by wastewater analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatial differences and temporal changes in illicit drug use in Europe quantified by wastewater of Chemistry, University of Athens, Athens, Greece21 *Co-first authors. ABSTRACT Aims To perform wastewater population. Design Analyses of raw wastewater over a 1-week period in 2012 and 2013. Setting and Participants

Wehrli, Bernhard

290

Physical and chemical parameters in wastewater and at the water-sediment interface in sewer network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physical and chemical parameters in wastewater and at the water- sediment interface in sewer parameters and concentrations of major ions, trace metals and sulphur species in wastewater but also, to the biogeochemical transformation of inorganic and organic compounds present in the wastewater (Ashley et al., 2004

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

291

A Property-Based Optimization of Direct Recycle Networks and Wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Property-Based Optimization of Direct Recycle Networks and Wastewater Treatment Processes Jose a mathematical programming approach to optimize direct recycle-reuse networks together with wastewater treatment of wastewater treatment units. In addition to composition-based constraints, the formulation also incorporates

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

292

Water Research 39 (2005) 49614968 Electricity generation from swine wastewater using microbial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Research 39 (2005) 4961­4968 Electricity generation from swine wastewater using microbial September 2005 Abstract Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) represent a new method for treating animal wastewaters indicated that electricity could be generated from swine wastewater containing 83207190 mg/L of soluble

293

To appear in Proceedings of ECSCW99 Dynamics in Wastewater Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To appear in Proceedings of ECSCW99 Dynamics in Wastewater Treatment: A Framework for Understanding on the study of unskilled work in a Danish wastewater treatment plant, the problem of formalisation of work at the expense of the other tend to fail. Wastewater treatment plants are highly-distributed technical settings

Bertelsen, Olav W.

294

Fecal coliform accumulation within a river subject to seasonally-disinfected wastewater discharges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fecal coliform accumulation within a river subject to seasonally-disinfected wastewater discharges in the implications of seasonal disinfection practices of wastewater effluents for meeting water quality goals from municipal wastewater outfalls along the river, as well as upstream and downstream of each outfall

Mitch, William A.

295

Pharmaceuticals in wastewater: Behavior, preferences, and willingness to pay for a disposal program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pharmaceuticals in wastewater: Behavior, preferences, and willingness to pay for a disposal program Contingent valuation Willingness to pay Wastewater a b s t r a c t The presence of pharmaceutical compounds in treated wastewater and in surface waters is a growing environmental concern. This paper provides

Kotchen, Matthew J.

296

Journal of Membrane Science 257 (2005) 8598 Membrane contactor processes for wastewater reclamation in space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Membrane Science 257 (2005) 85­98 Membrane contactor processes for wastewater membrane processes for reclamation and reuse of wastewater in future space missions was evaluated and used in estimating the specific energy cost of treating the wastewater generated in space. The weight

297

A Hybrid Microbial Fuel Cell Membrane Bioreactor with a Conductive Ultrafiltration Membrane Biocathode for Wastewater Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biocathode for Wastewater Treatment Lilian Malaeb,,§ Krishna P. Katuri,,§ Bruce E. Logan, Husnul Maab, S. P-biocathode microbial fuel cell- membrane bioreactor (MFC-MBR) system was developed to achieve simultaneous wastewater and the membrane for wastewater filtration. The MFC-MBR used an air-biocathode, and it was shown to have good

298

Design and study of a risk management criterion for an unstable anaerobic wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design and study of a risk management criterion for an unstable anaerobic wastewater treatment an unstable biological process used for wastewater treat- ment. This anaerobic digestion ecosystem can have popular bioprocess (Angelidaki et al., 2003) that treats wastewater and at the same time produces energy

Bernard, Olivier

299

Dynamic estimation of specific growth rates of bacteria for a wastewater treatment process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic estimation of specific growth rates of bacteria for a wastewater treatment process S. Diop1 for specific growth rates for a wastewater treatment process. A 2-stage model of 6 dynamic states is assumed. Steyer, Dynamic model develop- ment and parameter identification for an anaerobic wastewater treatment

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

300

A consistent modelling methodology for secondary settling tanks in wastewater treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A consistent modelling methodology for secondary settling tanks in wastewater treatment Raimund Bu in wastewater treatment by combining classical concepts with results from applied mathematics, and partly was chosen as a case since this is one of the most complex processes in a wastewater treatment plant

BĂĽrger, Raimund

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastewater neutralization facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Journal of Membrane Science 257 (2005) 111119 Membrane contactor processes for wastewater reclamation in space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Membrane Science 257 (2005) 111­119 Membrane contactor processes for wastewater for treatment of metabolic wastewater Tzahi Y. Cath, Dean Adams, Amy E. Childress University of Nevada of an innovative dual membrane contactor process for treatment of combined hygiene and metabolic wastewater

302

Models for Optimization of Energy Consumption of Pumps in a Wastewater Processing Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Models for Optimization of Energy Consumption of Pumps in a Wastewater Processing Plant Zijun Zhang in the wastewater preliminary treatment process is discussed. Data- mining algorithms are utilized to develop pump performance models based on industrial data collected at a municipal wastewater processing plant

Kusiak, Andrew

303

wastewater_sink_disposal_guidance.docx Revision Date: 10/26/2012 Page 1 of 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wastewater_sink_disposal_guidance.docx Revision Date: 10/26/2012 Page 1 of 3 LABORATORY & BUILDING limitations and prohibitions established by the local wastewater treatment authority, the Massachusetts Water for wastewater disposal purposes is strictly prohibited. Hazardous Wastes: Hazardous wastes are prohibited from

Heller, Eric

304

Environmental Impact of Wastewater Disposal in the Florida Keys, Monroe County Tom Higginbotham  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Impact of Wastewater Disposal in the Florida Keys, Monroe County Tom Higginbotham University of Florida Soil and Water Science #12;Environmental Impact of Wastewater Disposal in the Florida affecting the normally oligotrophic marine waters. Typical methods of wastewater disposal include large

Ma, Lena

305

A dynamic estimation scheme of specific growth rates of bacteria for an anaerobic wastewater treatment process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A dynamic estimation scheme of specific growth rates of bacteria for an anaerobic wastewater anal- ysis and estimation schemes for specific growth rates for an anaerobic wastewater treatment the organic and inorganic materials) of municipal or industrial wastewater often needs to be highly reduced

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

306

Performance of a mixing entropy battery alternately flushed with wastewater effluent and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performance of a mixing entropy battery alternately flushed with wastewater effluent and seawater. Coastal wastewater treatment plants discharge a continuous stream of low salinity effluent to the ocean cell, the net energy recovery was 0.11 kW h per m3 of wastewater effluent. When twelve cells were

Cui, Yi

307

Polishing of synthetic electroplating wastewater in microcosm upflow constructed wetlands: Metals removal mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polishing of synthetic electroplating wastewater in microcosm upflow constructed wetlands: Metals in microcosm upflow constructed wetlands used for polishing of synthetic electroplating wastewater. Four types (2014) 53-42" DOI : 10.1016/j.cej.2013.12.075 #12;Keywords electroplating wastewater, metals, cyanides

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

308

Accepted Manuscript High occurrence of Hepatitis E virus in samples from wastewater treatment plants in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accepted Manuscript High occurrence of Hepatitis E virus in samples from wastewater treatment-Bianchi, D., Oppliger, A., High occurrence of Hepatitis E virus in samples from wastewater treatment plants MANUSCRIPT Highlights Hepatitis E virus (HEV) was searched in raw and treated wastewater in Switzerland

Alvarez, Nadir

309

Impact of Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems on Nitrogen and Baseflow in Urban Watersheds of Metropolitan Atlanta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems on Nitrogen and Baseflow in Urban Watersheds 2401, Miller Plant Sciences Building Onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTS) are widely used Septic Wastewater-Treatment Systems on Base Flow in Selected Watersheds in Gwinnett County, Georgia

Arnold, Jonathan

310

Flexible hybrid membrane treatment systems for tailored nutrient management: A new paradigm in urban wastewater treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in urban wastewater treatment D. Vuono a , J. Henkel a , J. Benecke a , T.Y. Cath a , T. Reid b , L: Sequencing batch reactor Membrane bioreactor Water reclamation Distributed wastewater treatment Tailored, decentralized, and satellite wastewater treatment systems into existing urban water infrastructure

311

ACCEPTED BY WATER ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH ODOR AND VOC REMOVAL FROM WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACCEPTED BY WATER ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH _______ ODOR AND VOC REMOVAL FROM WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT of biofilters for sequential removal of H2S and VOCs from wastewater treatment plant waste air. The biofilter volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and toxic air pollutants emitted from wastewater and solids handling

312

Effects of wastewater from an oil-sand-refining operation on survival, hematology, gill histology,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of wastewater from an oil-sand-refining operation on survival, hematology, gill histology the effects of various types of wastewater produced in oil-sand-refining on the survival, hematology, gill. In con- trast, all fish did not survive a 28-day period in any of the wastewaters tested and, in some

Farrell, Anthony P.

313

Optimization of low-cost phosphorus removal from wastewater using co-treatments with constructed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

treatment residual; iron; lime sludge; municipal wastewater Introduction The US-EPA has identified for removing P from wastewater (US-EPA, 1993). However, questions of mechanisms, predictabilityOptimization of low-cost phosphorus removal from wastewater using co-treatments with constructed

Florida, University of

314

Real-time fault detection and isolation in biological wastewater treatment plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Real-time fault detection and isolation in biological wastewater treatment plants F. Baggiani and S@dsi.unifi.it Automatic fault detection is becoming increasingly important in wastewater treatment plant operation, given automation controllers, wastewater treatment INTRODUCTION Real-time monitoring is an increasingly important

315

ON RELIABLE AND UNRELIABLE NUMERICAL METHODS FOR THE SIMULATION OF SECONDARY SETTLING TANKS IN WASTEWATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). In modelling the activated sludge process, biological reactors have IN WASTEWATER TREATMENT RAIMUND B¨URGERA, , STEFAN DIEHLB , SEBASTIAN FAR°ASB , AND INGMAR NOPENSC Abstract wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) for the purification of industrial and domestic sewage is the activated

Bürger, Raimund

316

Science and Technology Facility  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

IBRF Project Lessons Learned Report Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility Lessons Learned - Stage I Acquisition through Stage II Construction Completion August 2011 This...

317

Programs & User Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Facility Climate, Ocean, and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) Terrestrial Ecosystem and Climate Dynamics Fusion Energy Sciences Magnetic Fusion Experiments Plasma Surface...

318

FACILITY SAFETY (FS)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- (Core Requirements 4 and 6) Sufficient numbers of qualified personnel are available to conduct and support operations. Adequate facilities and equipment are available to ensure...

319

ARM Mobile Facilities  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

This video provides an overview of the ARM Mobile Facilities, two portable climate laboratories that can deploy anywhere in the world for campaigns of at least six months.

Orr, Brad; Coulter, Rich

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Existing Facilities Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The NYSERDA Existing Facilities program merges the former Peak Load Reduction and Enhanced Commercial and Industrial Performance programs. The new program offers a broad array of different...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastewater neutralization facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Idaho National Laboratory Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

National Scientific User Facility Center for Advanced Energy Studies Light Water Reactor Sustainability Idaho Regional Optical Network LDRD Next Generation Nuclear Plant Docs...

322

Supercomputing | Facilities | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

facilities, and authorization checks for physical access. An integrated cyber security plan encompasses all aspects of computing. Cyber security plans are risk-based....

323

Facility Survey & Transfer  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

As DOE facilities become excess, many that are radioactively and/or chemically contaminated will become candidate for transfer to DOE-EM for deactivation and decommissioning.

324

Hot Fuel Examination Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Working with INL Community Outreach Visitor Information Calendar of Events ATR National Scientific User Facility Center for Advanced Energy Studies Light Water Reactor...

325

DOE Designated Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reactor** Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Joint Genome Institute - Production Genomics Facility (PGF)** (joint with LLNL, LANL, ORNL and PNNL) Advanced Light Source (ALS)...

326

Synthesis of an optimal wastewater reuse network Y.H. Yang, H.H. Lou, Y.L. Huang*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Synthesis of an optimal wastewater reuse network Y.H. Yang, H.H. Lou, Y.L. Huang* Department regulated. An eective way to minimize wastewater is to design a wastewater reuse network (WWRN Wastewater minimization has been a primary concern for pollution prevention in the process and manu

Huang, Yinlun

327

Comparison of small mammal species diversity near wastewater outfalls, natural streams, and dry canyons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A wide range of plant and wildlife species utilizes water discharged from facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The purpose of this study was to compare nocturnal small mammal communities at wet areas created by wastewater outfalls with communities in naturally created wet and dry areas. Thirteen locations within LANL boundaries were selected for small mammal mark-recapture trapping. Three of these locations lacked surface water sources and were classified as {open_quotes}dry,{close_quotes} while seven sites were associated with wastewater outfalls ({open_quotes}outfall{close_quotes} sites), and three were located near natural sources of surface water ({open_quotes}natural{close_quotes} sites). Data was collected on site type (dry, outfall or natural), location, species trapped, and the tag number of each individual captured. This data was used to calculate mean number of species, percent capture rate, and species diversity at each type of site. When data from each type of site was pooled, there were no significant differences in these variables between dry, outfall, and natural types. However, when data from individual sites was compared, tests revealed significant differences. All sites in natural areas were significantly higher than dry areas in daily mean number of species, percent capture rate, and species diversity. Most outfall sites were significantly higher than dry areas in all three variables tested. When volume of water from each outfall site was considered, these data indicated that the number of species, percent capture rate, and species diversity of nocturnal small mammals were directly related to the volume of water at a given outfall.

Raymer, D.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Biggs, J.R. [Ewing Technical Design, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Privacy Impact Assessment OFEO Facilities Management System Facilities Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Privacy Impact Assessment OFEO Facilities Management System ­ Facilities Center I. System Identification 1. IT System Name: Facilities Management System - FacilityCenter 2. IT System Sponsor: Office. IT System Manager: Michelle T. Gooch, Facilities Management Systems Manager 5. PIA Author: Michelle T. Gooch

Mathis, Wayne N.

329

Facilities Management CAD Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Facilities Management CAD Standards 2011 #12;Facilities Management CAD Standards Providing: Layering Standards 2.1 Layer Name Format 2.2 Layer Name Modifiers 2.3 Layer Attributes 2.4 Special Layer of PDF and DWG Files APPENDIX A: DAL FM CAD Standard Layers APPENDIX B: DAL FM CAD Special Layers

Brownstone, Rob

330

Cornell University Facilities Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

requirements, building code, and sustainability objectives. This plan takes a long- term view, projecting workCornell University Facilities Services Contract Colleges Facilities Fernow and Rice Hall in Fernow, Rice, Bruckner, Bradfield and Plant Science buildings. It includes a surging and phasing plan

Manning, Sturt

331

Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Argonne Leadership Computing Facility 2010 ANNUAL REPORT S C I E N C E P O W E R E D B Y S U P E R C O M P U T I N G ANL-11/15 The Argonne Leadership Computing States Government nor any agency thereof, nor UChicago Argonne, LLC, nor any of their employees

Kemner, Ken

332

A Materials Facilities Initiative -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Materials Facilities Initiative - FMITS & MPEX D.L. Hillis and ORNL Team Fusion & Materials for Nuclear Systems Division July 10, 2014 #12;2 Materials Facilities Initiative JET ITER FNSF Fusion Reactor Challenges for materials: fluxes and fluence, temperatures 50 x divertor ion fluxes up to 100 x neutron

333

Nanotechnology User Facility for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A National Nanotechnology User Facility for Industry Academia Government #12;The National Institute of Commerce's nanotechnology user facility. The CNST enables innovation by providing rapid access to the tools new measurement and fabrication methods in response to national nanotechnology needs. www

334

Science &Technology Facilities Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Science & Technology Facilities Council invite you to The ESA Technology Transfer Network SpaceTech2012Science &Technology Facilities Council Innovations Issue 31 October 2012 This issue: 1 STFC International prize for `no needles' breast cancer diagnosis technique 6 CEOI Challenge Workshop ­ Current

335

Emergency Facilities and Equipment  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This volume clarifies requirements of DOE O 151.1 to ensure that emergency facilities and equipment are considered as part of emergency management program and that activities conducted at these emergency facilities are fully integrated. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-4.

1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

336

Optimiziing the laboratory monitoring of biological wastewater-purification systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Optimization of the laboratory monitoring of biochemical wastewater-treatment systems at coke plants is considered, for the example of OAO Koks. By adopting a methodological approach to determine the necessary data from chemical analysis, it is possible to reduce the time, labor, and materials required for monitoring, without impairing the purification process or compromising the plant's environmental policies.

S.V. Gerasimov [OAO Koks, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Soil Particle Analysis Procedure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil is an important component of an on-site wastewater treatment system. This publication explains the composition of soils, the sizing of soil particles, and the ways soil particles are analyzed to determine whether a site is suitable for a...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2005-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

338

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Responding to Power Outages and Floods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

People and the environment can be harmed if a home's onsite wastewater treatment system does not work properly after a flood or power outage. This publication explains the steps to take after such an event to get the system back into service. 4 pp...

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Mechell, Justin; Alexander, Rachel

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

339

Exergy Optimized Wastewater Heat Recovery: Minimizing Losses and Maximizing Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the heat using a batch process with an insulated tank containing a heat exchanger. The analysis is based on statistical annual hot water usage profiles. The system shows that the exergy available in warm wastewater can be optimized with specific tank size...

Meggers, F.

340

APPLIED ISSUES Effects of stream restoration and wastewater treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPLIED ISSUES Effects of stream restoration and wastewater treatment plant effluent on fish.S.A. Three site types were examined on each stream; two urban (restored and unrestored) and a forested site was not significant. 3. Restored stream sites had significantly higher fish richness and a trend towards greater

Hershey, Anne

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastewater neutralization facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Supporting Information Removal of Natural Steroid Hormones from Wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

curves produced by the kits. An extraction efficiency test was performed to ensure that a high percentage E. Childress Materials and Methods Solution Chemistry ­ Wastewater Ersatz The humidity condensate) Concentrate 3 (10x): Humidity Condensate Acetic acid CH3CO2H 60.05 - 0.441 Benzoic acid C6H5CO2H 122.20 0

342

Energy Recovery Potential from Wastewater Utilities through Innovation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 3A—Conversion Technologies III: Energy from Our Waste—Will we Be Rich in Fuel or Knee Deep in Trash by 2025? Energy Recovery Potential from Wastewater Utilities through Innovation Lauren Fillmore, Senior Program Director, Water Environment Research Foundation

343

Uniformity of wastewater dispersal using subsurface drip emitters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An on-site wastewater treatment project site with two separate drip fields produced data on emitter flow rates and uniformity after 6 years of operation. The site served a two-bedroom residence in Weslaco, Texas, with treatment through a septic...

Persyn, Russell Alan

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Department of Residential Facilities Facilities Student Employment Office  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Residential Facilities Facilities Student Employment Office 1205E Leonardtown Service Updated 3/09 #12;EMPLOYMENT HISTORY Have you worked for Residential Facilities before? Yes No If so list

Hill, Wendell T.

345

EIS-0359: Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This site-specific EIS considers the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning of the proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) conversion facility at three locations within the Paducah site; transportation of depleted uranium conversion products and waste materials to a disposal facility; transportation and sale of the hydrogen fluoride (HF) produced as a conversion co-product; and neutralization of HF to calcium fluoride and its sale or disposal in the event that the HF product is not sold.

346

Facilities and environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, accessibility, energy and aesthetics. With plans to build and grow over the next ten years, the group donations, and campus recruiters. The appearance is reflected in buildings (exterior and interior); campus reveals that the campus is generally viewed as, at best, neutral or acceptable. Only a few areas

Karonis, Nicholas T.

347

Choline for neutralizing naphthenic acid in fuel and lubricating oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is described of neutralizing at least a portion of the naphthenic acids present in fuel and lubricating oils which contain naphthenic acids which comprises treating these oils with a neutralizing amount of choline.

Ries, D.G.; Roof, G.L.

1986-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Neutral zone: World Oil Report 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on the Neutral Zone between Kuwait and Saudi Arabia, much in the news during the Gulf war, that returned to production in June when offshore output resumed at a rate of 100,000 bpd. By this month, offshore production should have attained near its pre-war level of 250,000 bpd. Because of war damage onshore, production will not be restarted onshore for some time. Neutral Zone oil is jointly owned by Kuwait and Saudi Arabia. Texaco's Getty unit operates some 900 mostly pumping wells in South Umm Gudair, Wafra and South Fawaris onshore fields. However, only about 50 were producing 130,000 bpd last August when Iraqis invaded. Japan's Arabian Oil Co. operates 165 wells-all flowing-in offshore Khafji, Hout and Lulu fields that have a maximum productive capacity of about 300,000 bpd.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Electron-impact excitation of neutral oxygen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aims: To calculate transition rates from ground and excited states in neutral oxygen atoms due to electron collisions for non-LTE modelling of oxygen in late-type stellar atmospheres, thus enabling reliable interpretation of oxygen lines in stellar spectra. Methods: A 38-state R-matrix calculation in LS-coupling has been performed. Basis orbitals from the literature (Thomas et al.) are adopted, and a large set of configurations are included to obtain good representations of the target wavefunctions. Rate coefficients are calculated by averaging over a Maxwellian velocity distribution. Results: Estimates for the cross sections and rate coefficients are presented for transitions between the seven lowest LS states of neutral oxygen. The cross sections for excitation from the ground state compare well with existing experimental and recent theoretical results.

P. S. Barklem

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

350

Test Facility Daniil Stolyarov, Accelerator Test Facility User...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Development of the Solid-State Laser System for the Accelerator Test Facility Daniil Stolyarov, Accelerator Test Facility User's Meeting April 3, 2009 Outline Motivation for...

351

Relativistic Landau quantization for a neutral particle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this contribution we study the Landau levels arising within the relativistic quantum dynamics of a neutral particle which possesses a permanent magnetic dipole moment interacting with an external electric field. We consider the Aharonov-Casher coupling of magnetic dipole to the electric field to investigate an an analog of Landau quantization in this system and solve the Dirac equation for two different field configurations. The eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of Hamiltonian in both cases are obtained.

Bakke, K

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Relativistic Landau quantization for a neutral particle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this contribution we study the Landau levels arising within the relativistic quantum dynamics of a neutral particle which possesses a permanent magnetic dipole moment interacting with an external electric field. We consider the Aharonov-Casher coupling of magnetic dipole to the electric field to investigate an an analog of Landau quantization in this system and solve the Dirac equation for two different field configurations. The eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of Hamiltonian in both cases are obtained.

K. Bakke; C. Furtado

2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

353

Feasibility of geothermal heat use in the San Bernardino Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant. Final report, September 1980-June 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A system was developed for utilizing nearby low temperature geothermal energy to heat two high-rate primary anaerobic digesters at the San Bernardino Wastewater Treatment Plant. The geothermal fluid would replace the methane currently burned to fuel the digesters. A summary of the work accomplished on the feasibility study is presented. The design and operation of the facility are examined and potentially viable applications selected for additional study. Results of these investigations and system descriptions and equipment specifications for utilizing geothermal energy in the selected processes are presented. The economic analyses conducted on the six engineering design cases are discussed. The environmental setting of the project and an analysis of the environmental impacts that will result from construction and operation of the geothermal heating system are discussed. A Resource Development Plan describes the steps that the San Bernardino Municipal Water Department could follow in order to utilize the resource. A preliminary well program and rough cost estimates for the production and injection wells also are included. The Water Department is provided with a program and schedule for implementing a geothermal system to serve the wastewater treatment plant. Regulatory, financial, and legal issues that will impact the project are presented in the Appendix. An outline of a Public Awareness Program is included.

Racine, W.C.; Larson, T.C.; Stewart, C.A.; Wessel, H.B.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Optimizing a Modular Expansion of a Wastewater Treatment Plant Using Option Theory and Moment Matching Approximation Abstract  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a municipality faced with the question of how big to make their new wastewater treatment facility to meet the demand of 10 % expected growth in the number of new connections. Previously, we developed a real options framework for determining optimal plant size and showed that the model takes on the form of an Asian option. Furthermore, it was shown that if the connection rate growths are closely correlated with the market growth, then the penalty costs associated with having insufficient capacity to treat the wastewater can be effectively hedged, significantly reducing overall expected costs. In this study, we introduce an approximate analytical solution and optimize the plant size of a staged / modular expansion. Based on the given construction cost estimates, we show that a staged expansion has a minimal (expected) savings when connection growth rates are closely correlated to the market growth rates. However, as the correlation decreases to zero, or, alternatively, no attempt is made to hedge the penalty costs, a staged expansion has an expected savings of 20%.

Yuri Lawryshyn; Sebastian Jaimungal

355

Nucleonic analysis of a preliminary design for the ETF neutral-beam-injector duct shielding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A nucleonic analysis of the Engineering Test Facility Neutral-Beam-Injector duct shielding has been made using a hybrid Monte Carlo/discrete-ordinates method. This method used Monte Carlo to determine internal and external boundary surface sources for a subsequent discrete-ordinates calculation of the neutron and gamma-ray transport through the shield. The analysis also included determination of the energy and angular distribution of neutrons and gamma rays entering the duct from the torus plasma chamber. Confidence in the hybrid method and the results obtained were provided through a comparison with three-dimensional Monte Carlo results.

Urban, W.T.; Seed, T.J.; Dudziak, D.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

ECR plasma source for heavy ion beam charge neutralization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plasmas are being considered as a medium for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams in order to focus beyond resonance. Keywords: Plasma focus; RF plasma; Beam charge neutralization 1. INTRODUCTION A possible heavyECR plasma source for heavy ion beam charge neutralization PHILIP C. EFTHIMION,1 ERIK GILSON,1

Gilson, Erik

357

CCFE-PR(13)44 Beyond ITER: Neutral beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R. McAdams CCFE-PR(13)44 Beyond ITER: Neutral beams for DEMO #12;Enquiries about copyright Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority is the copyright holder. #12;Beyond ITER: Neutral beams for DEMO R. Mc ITER: Neutral beams for DEMOa) R. McAdamsb) EURATOM/CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon

358

E-Print Network 3.0 - acquisition neutral loss-driven Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a neutral beam source were measured. Positive ions... into fast neutrals. The neutral energy distribution was always ... Source: Economou, Demetre J. - Department of Chemical...

359

Photovoltaic Research Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funds photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R&D) at its national laboratory facilities located throughout the country. To encourage further innovation,...

360

NETL - Fuel Reforming Facilities  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Research using NETL's Fuel Reforming Facilities explores catalytic issues inherent in fossil-energy related applications, including catalyst synthesis and characterization, reaction kinetics, catalyst activity and selectivity, catalyst deactivation, and stability.

None

2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastewater neutralization facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

NEW RENEWABLE FACILITIES PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's electricity from renewable resources by 2010. The Guidebook outlines eligibility and legal requirementsCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ` NEW RENEWABLE FACILITIES PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK March 2007 CEC-300 Executive Director Heather Raitt Technical Director RENEWABLE ENERGY OFFICE CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

362

NEW RENEWABLE FACILITIES PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NEW RENEWABLE FACILITIES PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK APRIL 2006 CEC-300 Director Heather Raitt Technical Director Renewable Energy Program Drake Johnson Office Manager Renewable Energy Office Valerie Hall Deputy Director Efficiency, Renewables, and Demand Analysis Division #12;These

363

Liquidity facilities and signaling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation studies the role of signaling concerns in discouraging access to liquidity facilities like the IMF contingent credit lines (CCL) and the Discount Window (DW). In Chapter 1, I analyze the introduction of ...

Arregui, Nicolás

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

NETL - Fuel Reforming Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research using NETL's Fuel Reforming Facilities explores catalytic issues inherent in fossil-energy related applications, including catalyst synthesis and characterization, reaction kinetics, catalyst activity and selectivity, catalyst deactivation, and stability.

None

2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

365

Cornell University Facilities Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Description: The Large Animal Teaching Complex (LATC) will be a joint facility for the College of Veterinary or increase operating costs of the dairy barn; therefore, the College of Veterinary Medicine has agreed

Manning, Sturt

366

B Plant facility description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Buildings 225B, 272B, 282B, 282BA, and 294B were removed from the B Plant facility description. Minor corrections were made for tank sizes and hazardous and toxic inventories.

Chalk, S.E.

1996-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

367

Facilities Management Department Restructuring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ Zone 2 ­ Mission Bay/East Side: Includes Mission Bay, Mission Center Bldg, Buchanan Dental, Hunters Point, 654 Minnesota, Oyster Point 2. Recommendation that UCSF align all Facility Services and O

Mullins, Dyche

368

Hazardous Waste Facilities Siting (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations describe the siting and permitting process for hazardous waste facilities and reference rules for construction, operation, closure, and post-closure of these facilities.

369

Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The first subchapter of the statute concerning Nuclear Power Generating Facilities provides for direct citizen participation in the decision to construct any nuclear power generating facility in...

370

Pollution Control Facilities (South Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

For the purpose of this legislation, pollution control facilities are defined as any facilities designed for the elimination, mitigation or prevention of air or water pollution, including all...

371

THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE FACILITY FOR THE TESTINGS OF THE TFTR NEUTRAL BEAM INJECTOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transformers. Power from this equipment is fed into the building via a transmission line enclosed inside

Haughian, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Neutral Beam Injection Experiments and Related Behavior of Neutral Particles in the GAMMA 10 Tandem Mirror  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of neutral beam injection (NBI) experiments in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror plasmas are presented together with the neutral particle behavior observed in the experiments. A hydrogen neural beam was injected into the hot-ion-mode plasmas by using the injector installed in the central-cell for the plasma heating and fueling. High-energy ions produced by NBI were observed and its energy distribution was measured for the first time with a neutral particle analyzer installed in the central-cell. The temporal and spatial behavior of hydrogen was observed with axially aligned H{sub {alpha}} detectors installed from the central midplane to anchor-cell. Enhancement of hydrogen recycling due to the beam injection and the cause of the observed decrease in plasma diamagnetism are discussed. The Monte-Carlo code DEGAS for neutral transport simulation was applied to the GAMMA 10 central-cell and a 3-dimensional simulation was performed in the NBI experiment. Localization of neutral particle during the beam injection is investigated based on the simulation and it was found that the increased recycling due to the beam injection was dominant near the injection port.

Nakashima, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Watanabe, K. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Higashizono, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Ohki, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Ogita, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Shoji, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science(Japan); Kobayashi, S. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University (Japan); Islam, M.K. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Kubota, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Yoshikawa, M. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Kobayashi, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Yamada, M. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Murakami, R. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Cho, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan)

2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

Intense Diagnostic Neutral Beam for ITER LANL-Park and Wurden Intense Diagnostic Neutral Beam for ITER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for ITER Jaeyoung Park and Glen A. Wurden Plasma Physics Group (P-24) Los Alamos National Laboratory LosIntense Diagnostic Neutral Beam for ITER LANL-Park and Wurden 2 Intense Diagnostic Neutral Beam Alamos, NM 87545 Executive Summary An intense pulsed diagnostic neutral beam (IDNB) is proposed to enable

374

Radiological Risk Assessment for King County Wastewater Treatment Division  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document develops plausible and/or likely scenarios, including the identification of likely radioactive materials and quantities of those radioactive materials to be involved. These include 60Co, 90Sr, 137Cs, 192Ir, 226Ra, plutonium, and 241Am. Two broad categories of scenarios are considered. The first category includes events that may be suspected from the outset, such as an explosion of a "dirty bomb" in downtown Seattle. The explosion would most likely be heard, but the type of explosion (e.g., sewer methane gas or RDD) may not be immediately known. Emergency first responders must be able to quickly detect the radioisotopes previously listed, assess the situation, and deploy a response to contain and mitigate (if possible) detrimental effects resulting from the incident. In such scenarios, advance notice of about an hour or two might be available before any contaminated wastewater reaches a treatment plant. The second category includes events that could go initially undetected by emergency personnel. Examples of such a scenario would be the inadvertent or surreptitious introduction of radioactive material into the sewer system. Intact rogue radioactive sources from industrial radiography devices, well-logging apparatus, or moisture density gages may get into wastewater and be carried to a treatment plant. Other scenarios might include a terrorist deliberately putting a dispersible radioactive material into wastewater. Alternatively, a botched terrorism preparation of an RDD may result in radioactive material entering wastewater without anyone's knowledge. Drinking water supplies may also be contaminated, with the result that some or most of the radioactivity ends up in wastewater.

Strom, Daniel J.

2005-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

375

Working with SRNL - Our Facilities - Glovebox Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun1 Table 1.14Working WithGlovebox Facilities

376

Brookhaven Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBoston Areais a village in Cook County, Illinois. ItBrookhaven Facility

377

Land treatment of contaminated sludge with wastewater irrigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large-scale field experiment was conducted to test the feasibility of land application of sludge from industrial and domestic wastewater treatment to determine the fate and environmental impact of the contaminants. The sludge contained 13 organic priority pollutants, 16 additional environmentally significant organic compounds, and high concentrations of several metals (zinc, copper, lead, nickel, and cadmium). Each compound was monitored as the irrigation water percolated through the soil and the groundwater over time. Most of the organic compounds diminished to non-detectable levels by the end of the study, and the metals proved harmless to the environment. The effectiveness of land application of sludge with wastewater irrigation was clearly demonstrated. 1 figure, 11 tables.

Demirjian, Y.A.; Westman, T.R.; Joshi, A.M.; Rop, D.J.; Buhl, R.V.; Clark, W.R.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Wastewater reclamation and reuse in a petrochemical plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large petrochemical plant located in a water-limited area is a major water user. The plant is facing a critical water problem because of several factors: (1) the raw water total dissolved solids (TDS) content has been increasing, (2) water rationing, which limits plant production, occurs during drought periods, (3) the plant is planning for a major expansion that requires major additional water supply, and (4) there is persistent community pressure for wastewater discharge reduction. A water resource management and planning study was conducted for this plant to resolve the water problem. This chapter describes the results of the study and the design of a pilot plant program for the testing of a wastewater treatment and recycling system.

Wong, J.M. [Brown and Caldwell, Pleasant Hill, CA (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD FAU Research Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Harriet L.Wilkes Honors College FAU Research Facility Expansion Satellite Utility Plant Chiller Lift

Fernandez, Eduardo

380

Hanford facility contingency plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Facility Contingency Plan, together with each TSD unit- specific contingency plan, meets the WAC 173-303 requirements for a contingency plan. Applicability of this plan to Hanford Facility activities is described in the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit, Dangerous Waste Portion, General Condition II.A. General Condition II.A applies to Part III TSD units, Part V TSD units, and to releases of hazardous substances which threaten human health or the environment. Additional information about the applicability of this document may also be found in the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit Handbook (DOE/RL-96-10). This plan includes descriptions of responses to a nonradiological hazardous substance spill or release at Hanford Facility locations not covered by TSD unit-specific contingency plans or building emergency plans. The term hazardous substances is defined in WAC 173-303-040 as: ``any liquid, solid, gas, or sludge, including any material, substance, product, commodity, or waste, regardless of quantity, that exhibits any of the physical, chemical or biological properties described in WAC 173-303-090 or 173-303-100.`` Whenever the term hazardous substances is used in this document, it will be used in the context of this definition. This plan includes descriptions of responses for spills or releases of hazardous substances occurring at areas between TSD units that may, or may not, threaten human health or the environment.

Sutton, L.N.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastewater neutralization facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Measurement of neutral current coherent neutral pion production on carbon in a few-GeV neutrino beam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The SciBooNE Collaboration reports a measurement of neutral current coherent neutral pion production on carbon by a muon neutrino beam with average energy 0.8 GeV. The separation of coherent from inclusive neutral pion production has been improved by detecting recoil protons from resonant neutral pion production. We measure the ratio of the neutral current coherent neutral pion production to total charged current cross sections to be (1.16 +/- 0.24) x 10-2. The ratio of charged current coherent pion to neutral current coherent pion production is calculated to be 0.14+0.30 -0.28, using our published charged current coherent pion measurement.

Kurimoto, Y; Brice, S J; Bugel, L; Catala-Perez, J; Cheng, G; Conrad, J M; Djurcic, Z; Dore, U; Finley, D A; Franke, A J; Giganti, C; Gomez-Cadenas, J J; Guzowski, P; Hanson, A; Hayato, Y; Hiraide, K; Jover-Manas, G; Karagiorgi, G; Katori, T; Kobayashi, Y K; Kobilarcik, T; Kubo, H; Louis, W C; Loverre, P F; Ludovici, L; Mahn, K B M; Mariani, C; Masuike, S; Matsuoka, K; McGary, V T; Metcalf, W; Mills, G B; Mitsuka, G; Miyachi, Y; Mizugashira, S; Moore, C D; Nakajima, Y; Nakaya, T; Napora, R; Nienaber, P; Orme, D; Otani, M; Russell, A D; Sanchez, F; Shaevitz, M H; Shibata, T -A; Sorel, M; Stefanski, R J; Takei, H; Tanaka, H -K; Tanaka, M; Tayloe, R; Taylor, I J; Tesarek, R J; Uchida, Y; Van de Water, R; Walding, J J; Wascko, M O; White, H B; Wilking, M J; Yokoyama, M; Zeller, G P; Zimmerman, E D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Phosphorus Fate and Transport in Wastewater Applied to Rapid Infiltration Basins.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Water reuse is one answer to the problem of water scarcity that present and future generations will face. Wastewater applied to land can intentionally recharge… (more)

Moura, Daniel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Removal of nitrogen and phosphorus from reject water of municipal wastewater treatment plant.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Reject water, the liquid fraction produced after dewatering of anaerobically digested activated sludge on a municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWWTP), contains from 750 to 1500… (more)

Guo, Chenghong

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Assessing nutrient and pharmaceutical removal efficiency from wastewater using shallow wetland treatment mesocosms.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Wastewaters from rural sewage lagoons in Manitoba contain pharmaceuticals that are potentially harmful to non-target organisms and reduce overall water quality when released. An option… (more)

Cardinal, Pascal

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic wastewater biofilms Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Membrane... biofilm reactor Introduction One of the major challenges in wastewater treatment is achieving effective... et al. 2004). Nitrifying bacteria grow in the deep,...

386

Industrial wastewater analysis: A toxicity-directed approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methods of toxicity-directed analysis have been developed for the characterization and identification of toxic organic constituents in industrial wastewater. Sequential solid-phase extraction is followed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fractionation or by automated multiple development thin-layer chromatography fractionation (AMD-TLC) of the toxic extracts. Toxic fractions were finally analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Toxicity was detected before each of the analytical steps by the bioluminescence inhibition of Vibrio fischeri, which was performed on microtiter plates and on the developed TLC plates. While sequential extraction broadens the polarity range of the procedure, the new variants of the luminescence test make the method very versatile and fast. The potential of this kind of toxicity-directed analysis with respect to resolution and polarity of analytes is discussed and applications to partial effluents of a tannery, to molasses wastewater and a spent dyeing bath are presented. A variety of benzothiazoles and more polar organics were identified as major toxic compounds in tannery effluents. It is shown that the procedures are well suited to detect individual toxic components in complex industrial wastewaters. The use of LC-MS is proposed to extend the polarity range of the final identification step.

Reemtsma, T.; Putschew, A.; Jekel, M. [Technical Univ. of Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Water Quality Control] [Technical Univ. of Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Water Quality Control

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

An evaluation of neutralization for processing sodium-bearing liquid waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses an alternative concept for potentially managing the sodium-bearing liquid waste generated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant from the current method of calcining a blend of sodium waste and high-level liquid waste. The concept is based on removing the radioactive components from sodium-bearing waste by neutralization and grouting the resulting low-level waste for on-site near-surface disposal. Solidifying the sodium waste as a remote-handled transuranic waste is not considered to be practical because of excessive costs and inability to dispose of the waste in a timely fashion. Although neutralization can remove most radioactive components to provide feed for a solidified low-level waste, and can reduce liquid inventories four to nine years more rapidly than the current practice of blending sodium-bearing liquid waste with first-cycle raffinite, the alternative will require major new facilities and will generate large volumes of low-level waste. Additional facility and operating costs are estimated to be at least $500 million above the current practice of blending and calcining. On-site, low-level waste disposal may be technically difficult and conflict which national and state policies. Therefore, it is recommended that the current practice of calcining a blend of sodium-bearing liquid waste and high-level liquid waste be continued to minimize overall cost and process complexities. 17 refs., 4 figs., 16 tabs.

Chipman, N.A.; Engelgau, G.O.; Berreth, J.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Nonplanar solitons collision in ultracold neutral plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Collisions between two nonplanar ion-acoustic solitons in strongly coupled ultracold neutral plasmas composed of ion fluid and non-Maxwellian (nonthermal or superthermal) electron distributions are investigated. The extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo method is used to obtain coupled nonplanar Kortweg-de Vries equations for describing the system. The nonplanar phase shifts after the interaction of the two solitons are calculated. It is found that the properties of the nonplanar colliding solitons and its corresponding phase shifts are different from those in the planar case. The polarity of the colliding solitons strongly depends on the type of the non-Maxwellian electron distributions. A critical nonthermality parameter ?{sub c} is identified. For values of ? ? ?{sub c} solitons with double polarity exist, while this behavior cannot occur for superthermal plasmas. The phase shift for nonthermal plasmas increases below ?{sub c} for a positive soliton, but it decreases for ? > ?{sub c} for a negative soliton. For superthermal plasmas, the phase shift enhances rapidly for low values of spectral index ? and higher values of ions effective temperature ratio ?{sub *}. For 2 ? ?<10, the phase shift decreases but does not change for ? > 10. The nonlinear structure, as reported here, is useful for controlling the solitons created in forthcoming ultracold neutral plasma experiments.

El-Tantawy, S. A.; Moslem, W. M.; El-Metwally, M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt)] [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt); Sabry, R. [Theoretical Physics Group, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, New Damietta 34517 (Egypt) [Theoretical Physics Group, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, New Damietta 34517 (Egypt); Department of Physics, College of Science and Humanitarian Studies, Salman Bin Abdulaziz University, Alkharj (Saudi Arabia); El-Labany, S. K. [Theoretical Physics Group, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, New Damietta 34517 (Egypt)] [Theoretical Physics Group, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, New Damietta 34517 (Egypt); Schlickeiser, R. [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Lehrstuhl IV: Weltraum- und Astrophysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)] [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Lehrstuhl IV: Weltraum- und Astrophysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Fitness facilities, facilities for extracurricular activities and other purposes Facility Location Department in charge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Facility Location Department in charge Student Hall (1) Common Facility 1 for Extracurricular Activities (2 tennis courts, Swimming pool (25 m, not officially approved) Rokkodai Area (Tsurukabuto 2 Campus) Martial art training facility, Japanese archery training facility, Playground, 4 tennis courts, Swimming pool

Banbara, Mutsunori

390

RCRA facility stabilization initiative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The RCRA Facility Stabilization Initiative was developed as a means of implementing the Corrective Action Program`s management goals recommended by the RIS for stabilizing actual or imminent releases from solid waste management units that threaten human health and the environment. The overall goal of stabilization is to, as situations warrant, control or abate threats to human health and/or the environment from releases at RCRA facilities, and/or to prevent or minimize the further spread of contamination while long-term remedies are pursued. The Stabilization initiative is a management philosophy and should not be confused with stabilization technologies.

Not Available

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30, 2004 [FacilityMayMarch 1, 2012 [Facility

392

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30, 2004 [FacilityMayMarch 1, 2012 [FacilityMay

393

Facility Data Policy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4:Epitaxial ThinFOR IMMEDIATE5Facilities SomeFacilities Glove

394

Opportunities for Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Phase II Report. San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

your Power. (2008). "Demand Response Programs." RetrievedTool Berkeley, CA, Demand Response Research Center.2008). "What is Demand Response?" Retrieved 10/10/2008, from

Thompson, Lisa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Journal of Materials Education Vol. 31 (3-4): 157 -166 (2009) POLYMERIC FLOCCULANTS FOR WASTEWATER AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Materials Education Vol. 31 (3-4): 157 - 166 (2009) POLYMERIC FLOCCULANTS FOR WASTEWATER important material used by mankind defines the importance of water purification. Wastewater and industrial

North Texas, University of

396

Service & Reliability Equipment & Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

termites E5 Marine applications, panel & block E7 Field Stake tests (FST colonies) E9 Above ground L-joint stake test (Formosan termites & decay), E9 L- joint, E16 (horizontal lap-joint), E18 ground proximity facilities for AWPA test: A9 X-ray, E1 (termites), E10 (soil block), E11 (leaching), E12 metal corrosion

397

Graph algorithms experimentation facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DRAWADJMAT 2 ~e ~l 2. ~f ~2 2 ~t ~& [g H 2 O? Z Mwd a P d ed d Aid~a sae R 2-BE& T C dbms Fig. 2. External Algorithm Handler The facility is menu driven and implemented as a client to XAGE. Our implementation follows very closely the functionality...

Sonom, Donald George

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Strategies for Facilities Renewal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of steam production is from exothermic chem ical processes. A large gas fired cogeneration unit was completed in 1987 and supplies 90% of the facil ities' electrical needs and 25% of total steam demand (the remaining steam is supplied by process heat...

Good, R. L.

399

FACILITIES INSTRUCTIONS, STANDARDS, & TECHNIQUES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the repair of hydraulic turbine runners and large pump impellers. Reclamation operates and maintains a wideFACILITIES INSTRUCTIONS, STANDARDS, & TECHNIQUES VOLUME 2-5 TURBINE REPAIR Internet Version variety of reaction and impulse turbines as well as axial flow, mixed flow, radial flow pumps and pump

Laughlin, Robert B.

400

Magnesium hydroxide as the neutralizing agent for radioactive hydrochloric acid solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current technology at Los Alamos for removing actinides from acidic chloride waste streams is precipitation with approximately 10 M potassium hydroxide. Although successful, there are many inherent drawbacks to this precipitation technique which will be detailed in this paper. Magnesium hydroxide (K{sub sp} = 1.3 x 10{sup -11}) has limited solubility in water and as a result of the common ion effect, cannot generate a filtrate with a pH greater than 9. At a pH of 9, calcium (K{sub sp} = 5.5 x 10{sup -6}) will not coprecipitate as the hydroxide. This is an important factor since many acidic chloride feeds to hydroxide precipitation contain significant amounts of calcium. In addition, neutralization with Mg(OH){sub 2} produces a more filterable precipitate because neutralization occurs as the Mg(OH){sub 2} is dissolved by the acid rather than as a result of the much faster liquid/liquid reaction of KOH with the waste acid. This slower solid/liquid reaction allows time for crystal growth to occur and produces more easily filterable precipitates. On the other hand, neutralization of spent acid with strong KOH that yields numerous hydroxide ions in solution almost instantaneously forming a much larger volume of small crystallites that result in gelatinous, slow-filtering precipitates. Magnesium hydroxide also offers a safety advantage. Although mildly irritating, it is a weak base and safe and easy to handle. From a waste minimization perspective, Mg(OH){sub 2} offers many advantages. First, the magnesium hydroxide is added as a solid. This step eliminates the diluent water used in KOH neutralizations. Secondly, because the particle size of the precipitate is larger, more actinides are caught on the filter paper resulting in a smaller amount of actinide being transferred to the TA-50 Liquid Waste Treatment Facility. Third, the amount of solids that must be reprocessed is significantly smaller resulting in less waste generation from the downstream processes.

Palmer, M.J.; Fife, K.W.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastewater neutralization facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Reactive formulations for a neutralization of toxic industrial chemicals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Decontamination formulations for neutralization of toxic industrial chemicals, and methods of making and using same. The formulations are effective for neutralizing malathion, hydrogen cyanide, sodium cyanide, butyl isocyanate, carbon disulfide, phosgene gas, capsaicin in commercial pepper spray, chlorine gas, anhydrous ammonia gas; and may be effective at neutralizing hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, formaldehyde, ethylene oxide, methyl bromide, boron trichloride, fluorine, tetraethyl pyrophosphate, phosphorous trichloride, arsine, and tungsten hexafluoride.

Tucker, Mark D. (Albuqueruqe, NM); Betty, Rita G. (Rio Rancho, NM)

2006-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

402

The effect of neutralization on compressive strength of stabilized phosphogypsum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is not homogeneously distributed among the solids in phosphcgypsum, neutralization curves were not reproducible. Moreover, the time required to achieve equilibrium pH depends on the type and amount of neutralizer. For portland cement stabilized phosphogypsum..., it was found that during initial stages of strength development (3 days) in partly and fully neutralized phosphogypsum and with low amounts of stabilizers (3 and 6 percent portland cement) after curing for 7 and 28 days the type of alkali has no significant...

Yung, Chung Che

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Innovative pollution prevention program at Air Force owned Raytheon operated facility incorporating Russian technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air Force Plant 44 in Tucson, Arizona is owned by the Air Force and operated by Raytheon Missile Systems Company. A joint Air Force/Raytheon Pollution Prevention Team operates at AFP 44 with the ultimate goal to minimize or eliminate the use of hazardous substances. The team works together to uncover new technologies and methods that will replace chemicals used in the plant's missile manufacturing facilities. The program maximizes pollution prevention by first eliminating hazardous material use, then chemical recycling, next hazardous waste reduction and finally wastewater treatment and recycling. From fiscal years 1994 through 1997, nine pollution prevention projects have been implemented, totaling $2.6 million, with a payback averaging less than two years. A unique wastewater treatment method has been demonstrated as part of this program. This is electroflotation, a Russian technology which removes dispersed particles from liquid with gas bubbles obtained during water electrolysis. A unit was built in the US which successfully removed organic emulsions from wastewater. Operational units are planned for the removal of waste from waterfall paint booths. The pollution prevention joint team continues to be very active with two projects underway in FY 98 and two more funded for FY 99.

Stallings, J.H.; Cepeda-Calderon, S.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

CO adsorption on neutral iridium clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The adsorption of carbon monoxide on neutral iridium clusters in the size range of n = 3 to 21 atoms is investigated with infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy. For each cluster size only a single v(CO) band is present with frequencies in the range between 1962 cm-1 (n = 8) and 1985 cm-1 (n = 18) which can be attributed to an atop binding geometry. This behaviour is compared to the CO binding geometries on clusters of other group 9 and 10 transition metals as well as to that on extended surfaces. The preference of Ir for atop binding is rationalized by relativistic effects on the electronic structure of the later 5d metals.

Kerpal, Christian; Meijer, Gerard; Fielicke, André

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Turbulence attenuation by large neutrally buoyant particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Turbulence modulation by inertial-range-size, neutrally-buoyant particles is investigated experimentally in a von K\\'arm\\'an flow. Increasing the particle volume fraction $\\Phi_\\mathrm{v}$, maintaining constant impellers Reynolds number attenuates the fluid turbulence. The inertial-range energy transfer rate decreases as $\\propto\\Phi_\\mathrm{v}^{2/3}$, suggesting that only particles located on a surface affect the flow. Small-scale turbulent properties, such as structure functions or acceleration distribution, are unchanged. Finally, measurements hint at the existence of a transition between two different regimes occurring when the average distance between large particles is of the order of the thickness of their boundary layers.

Cisse, Mamadou; Gibert, Mathieu; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Bec, Jeremie

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Neutral Beam Injection for Plasma and Magnetic Field Diagnostics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Injection for Plasma and Magnetic Field Diagnostics 1 **diagnostic neutral beam injection system for measuring plasmaplasma v . High proton fraction and small divergence is essential for diagnostic

Vainionpaa, Jaakko Hannes; Leung, Ka Ngo; Kwan, Joe W.; Levinton, Fred

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Magneto-plasmons in Quasi-neutral Epitaxial Graphene Nanoribbons  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Graphene plasmons, the collective oscillations of Dirac fermions, are difficult to probe near charge neutrality where new physics are expected to emerge. Using the NHMFL...

408

artificial neutral network: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

it was proposed that the theory of neutral mutations Fernandez, Thomas 48 Dynamics of artificial spin ice: a continuous honeycomb network MIT - DSpace Summary: We model the...

409

autologous neutralizing antibodies: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ones. We first review the behavior of neutral and charged chains in solution. Then, the adsorption of a single polymer chain is considered. Next, the adsorption and depletion...

410

E-Print Network 3.0 - association differential neutralization...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

modeling of ion and neutral distribution functions in ... Source: Howard, John - Plasma Research Laboratory, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian...

411

Fuel-Neutral Studies of Particulate Matter Transport Emissions...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation ace056stewart2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Fuel-Neutral Studies of Particulate Matter Transport Emissions...

412

Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Indiana Department of Environmental Management requires permits before the construction or expansion of biomass anaerobic digestion or gasification facilities.

413

2005 Borchardt Conference: A Seminar on Advances in Water and Wastewater Treatment February 23-25, Ann Arbor, MI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-25, Ann Arbor, MI Conference Proceedings 1 Membrane Biofilm Reactors for Water and Wastewater Treatment and Wastewater Treatment February 23-25, Ann Arbor, MI Conference Proceedings 2 (sparging) to replenish oxygen: A Seminar on Advances in Water and Wastewater Treatment February 23-25, Ann Arbor, MI Conference Proceedings

Nerenberg, Robert

414

Designing Sustainable Wastewater Systems: Generating Design Alternatives Chamberlain, B., Zarei, A., Taheri, H., Poole, D., Carenini, G. and berg, G.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

alternative wastewater treatment systems, and 3) a preference-elicitation method for guiding decision of a rural wastewater system for use in developing regions. Figure 1 depicts a simplified version of oneDesigning Sustainable Wastewater Systems: Generating Design Alternatives Chamberlain, B., Zarei, A

Carenini, Giuseppe

415

In situ investigation of tubular microbial fuel cells deployed in an aeration tank at a municipal wastewater treatment plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wastewater treatment plant Fei Zhang a , Zheng Ge a , Julien Grimaud b , Jim Hurst b , Zhen He a: Microbial fuel cells Wastewater treatment Organic removal Aeration Activated sludge a b s t r a c of wastewater quality, and other operating conditions. Unlike prior lab stud- ies by others, the results

416

Irrigation with polluted water or wastewater is a widespread reality, especially in low-income countries where it is popularly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Irrigation with polluted water or wastewater is a widespread reality, especially in low are now available to make wastewater use safer and more sustainable without relying on non Partnership (GWP) Advisory Center at IWMI and the GWP Technical Committee. It is based on the book Wastewater

Scott, Christopher

417

Performances evaluation of phosphorus removal by apatite in constructed wetlands treating domestic wastewater: Column and pilot experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wastewater: Column and pilot experiments Najatte Harouiyaa , Stéphanie Prost-Bouclea , Catherine Morlayb.MARTIN@suez-env.com) Abstract In constructed wetlands (CWs) treating domestic wastewater, good treatment performances to improve P removal from wastewater with a low specific filter surface per people equivalent (p. e

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

418

Cey. J. Sci. (Bio. Sci.) 37 (1): 49-59, 2008 SALINITY IMPLICATIONS OF WASTEWATER IRRIGATION IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cey. J. Sci. (Bio. Sci.) 37 (1): 49-59, 2008 SALINITY IMPLICATIONS OF WASTEWATER IRRIGATION and shortage of good quality water, wastewater irrigation is a growing phenomenon in many arid and semi-arid countries. A common characteristic of wastewater is high salinity, with cities typically adding 200 ­ 500 mg

Scott, Christopher

419

Ahmet H. Aydilek, 1 Tuncer B. Edil, 1 Patrick J. Fox2 Consolidation Characteristics of Wastewater Sludge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ahmet H. Aydilek, 1 Tuncer B. Edil, 1 Patrick J. Fox2 Consolidation Characteristics of Wastewater., Edil, T. B., and Fox, P. J., "Consolidation Characteristics of Wastewater Sludge", Geotechnics of High wastewater sludge. Small and large-scale laboratory consolidation tests were conducted and field observations

Aydilek, Ahmet

420

Designing Sustainable Wastewater Systems: Visual, Interactive Preference Elicitation Chamberlain, B., Taheri, H., Carenini, G., Poole, D., and berg, G.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Designing Sustainable Wastewater Systems: Visual, Interactive Preference Elicitation Chamberlain, B., Taheri, H., Carenini, G., Poole, D., and Ă?berg, G. Introduction The majority of water and wastewater and trade-offs made [4-7]. Our work aims to create computational tools for wastewater infrastructure design

Carenini, Giuseppe

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastewater neutralization facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Physical-chemical characterization of sludge and granular materials from a vertical flow constructed wetland for municipal wastewater treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

constructed wetland for municipal wastewater treatment B. Kim1,2 , M. Gautier*1 , P. Michel2 and R. Gourdon1 1, Society of design and production engineering for wastewater purification, 5 Allée Alban Vistel, F-69110 Wetlands (VFCW) is well developed in France and other countries for the treatment of wastewaters from small

Boyer, Edmond

422

Aeration control in a full-scale activated sludge wastewater treatment plant: impact on performances, energy consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for stratospheric ozone [1]. In biological wastewater treatment, microbial processes such as hydroxylamine oxidationAeration control in a full-scale activated sludge wastewater treatment plant: impact strategy on energy consumption and nitrous oxide (N2O) emission in a full-scale wastewater treatment plant

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

423

SOME TCD LICENSEES 2011-12 27. Waste-Water Distribution Device  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development Stage: Licensed Company Contact: Molloy Precast In rural areas wastewater from houses is treatedSOME TCD LICENSEES 2011-12 27. Waste-Water Distribution Device Researcher: Laurence Gill and disposed on-site through a process of septic tank treatment followed by discharge to the subsoil. An even

O'Mahony, Donal E.

424

Occurrence and Implication of dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) in tertiary wastewater Effluents Page 1 of 6  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GU, APRIL Occurrence and Implication of dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) in tertiary wastewater wastewater effluents L. Liu1 , D. S. Smith2 , M. Bracken3 , J.B. Neethling4 , H.D. Stensel5 and S. Murthy6 levels (e.g. TPwastewater treatment plants. A few previous studies (Benisch et al., 2007

Brody, James P.

425

Hydrogen and methane production from swine wastewater using microbial electrolysis cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen and methane production from swine wastewater using microbial electrolysis cells Rachel C in the wastewater as hydrogen gas. Methane was also produced at a maximum of 13 Ă? 4% of total gas volume methane produc- tion, increasing the efficiency of converting the organic matter into current

426

Lagrangian Sampling of Wastewater Treatment Plant Effluent in Boulder Creek, Colorado, and Fourmile Creek,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lagrangian Sampling of Wastewater Treatment Plant Effluent in Boulder Creek, Colorado, and Fourmile of wastewater treatment plant effluent in Boulder Creek, Colorado, and Fourmile Creek, Iowa, during the summer........................................................................................................................................................... 5 Field Measurements, Nutrients, Carbon, Major Ions, Trace Elements, and Biological Components

427

CONTROL OF AN IDEAL ACTIVATED SLUDGE PROCESS IN WASTEWATER TREATMENT VIA AN ODE-PDE MODEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONTROL OF AN IDEAL ACTIVATED SLUDGE PROCESS IN WASTEWATER TREATMENT VIA AN ODE-PDE MODEL STEFAN treatment plants, consists basically of a biological reactor followed by a sedi- mentation tank, which has. 1. Introduction The need for efficient wastewater treatment plants in terms of low effluent con

Diehl, Stefan

428

ORIGINAL RESEARCH PAPER Removal of selenite from wastewater using microbial fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generation Á Microbial fuel cell Á Selenium removal Á Wastewater treatment Introduction Selenium (SeORIGINAL RESEARCH PAPER Removal of selenite from wastewater using microbial fuel cells Tunc Catal Ć; Lenz T. Catal Á H. Liu (&) Department of Biological and Ecological Engineering, Oregon State University

Tullos, Desiree

429

Removal of indicator bacteria from municipal wastewater in an experimental two-stage vertical flow constructed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reasons for wastewater treatment. Constructed wetland systems remove pathogens by factors such as natural that constructed wetlands are generally chosen as a solution for autonomous wastewater treatment and that commonly constructed wetland system C.A. Arias*, A. Cabello*, H. Brix* and N.-H. Johansen** * Department of Plant

Brix, Hans

430

Biomass Feedstock National User Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 1B—Integration of Supply Chains I: Breaking Down Barriers Biomass Feedstock National User Facility Kevin L. Kenney, Director, Biomass Feedstock National User Facility, Idaho National Laboratory

431

The Caterpillar Coal Gasification Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper is a review of one of America's premier coal gasification installations. The caterpillar coal gasification facility located in York, Pennsylvania is an award winning facility. The plant was recognized as the 'pace setter plant of the year...

Welsh, J.; Coffeen, W. G., III

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

30 May 2012 Version Emergency Power Facility Assessment Tool (EPFAT)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as water treatment plants, hospitals, wastewater treatment plants and shelters. The U.S. Army Corps

US Army Corps of Engineers

433

Facilities evaluation report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is a program of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development whose mission is to evaluate different new and existing technologies and determine how well they address DOE community waste remediation problems. Twenty-three Technical Task Plans (TTPs) have been identified to support this mission during FY-92; 10 of these have identified some support requirements when demonstrations take place. Section 1 of this report describes the tasks supported by BWID, determines if a technical demonstration is proposed, and if so, identifies the support requirements requested by the TTP Principal Investigators. Section 2 of this report is an evaluation identifying facility characteristics of existing Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) facilities that may be considered for use in BWID technology demonstration activities.

Sloan, P.A.; Edinborough, C.R.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

PUREX facility preclosure work plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This preclosure work plan presents a description of the PUREX Facility, the history of the waste managed, and addresses transition phase activities that position the PUREX Facility into a safe and environmentally secure configuration. For purposes of this documentation, the PUREX Facility does not include the PUREX Storage Tunnels (DOE/RL-90/24). Information concerning solid waste management units is discussed in the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, General Information Portion (DOE/RL-91-28, Appendix 2D).

Engelmann, R.H.

1997-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

435

Reed Reactor Facility Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the report of the operations, experiments, modifications, and other aspects of the Reed Reactor Facility for the year.

Frantz, Stephen G.

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Lunch & Learn Facilities &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

" 3 #12;What are F&A costs? OMB Circular A-21 provides guidance on F&A costs F&A a.k.a. Overhead a #12;F&A Rate Development Process FSU's process must be designed to ensure that Federal sponsors do usage ­ Allocate facilities costs ­ Provide productivity analysis Space survey tool WebSpace ­ On-line

McQuade, D. Tyler

437

ARM - SGP Intermediate Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC :ProductsSCM Forcing Data DerivedInstrumentsPolarExtended Facility

438

Facilities | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataCombined Heat & PowerEnergy BlogExchangeSummary TableFacilities

439

WAC - 173 - 221A - Wastewater Discharge Standards and Effluent Limitations  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformationSEDS data Jump to: navigation, searchVycon IncInc JumpWastewater|

440

WSDE Report: Wastewater Discharge Permits in Washington State | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformationSEDS data Jump to: navigation,Information Wastewater

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastewater neutralization facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

CFTF | Carbon Fiber Technology Facility | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BTRIC CNMS CSMB CFTF Working with CFTF HFIR MDF NTRC OLCF SNS Carbon Fiber Technology Facility Home | User Facilities | CFTF CFTF | Carbon Fiber Technology Facility SHARE Oak...

442

CRAD, Nuclear Facility Construction - Structural Concrete, May...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CRAD, Nuclear Facility Construction - Structural Concrete, May 29, 2009 CRAD, Nuclear Facility Construction - Structural Concrete, May 29, 2009 May 29, 2009 Nuclear Facility...

443

Neutral Color Superconductivity and Pseudo-Goldstone Modes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Four of the five expected Goldstone modes, which will be eaten up by gauge fields, in neutral two-flavor color superconductor are actually pseudo-Goldstone modes, and their degenerated mass is exactly the magnitude of the color chemical potential, which is introduced to guarantee the color neutrality at moderate baryon density.

Lianyi He; Meng Jin; Pengfei Zhuang

2005-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

444

Ejection of Neutral Molecules from Ion-bombarded Organic Surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In the present study, time-of-flight and energy distribu- tions of various neutral molecules ejected upon keV ionEjection of Neutral Molecules from Ion- bombarded Organic Surfaces Reema Chatterjee, Donald E, 184 Materials Research Institute Building, University Park, PA 16802, USA Time-of-flight distributions

Zbigniew, Postawa

445

MASTERS REPORT ANALYSIS AND MODELING OF ACID NEUTRALIZING CAPACITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

itself against acidification and is used to monitor the effect of acid rain on watersheds. From 1993MASTERS REPORT ANALYSIS AND MODELING OF ACID NEUTRALIZING CAPACITY IN THE MID-ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS UNIVERSITY #12;ABSTRACT Acid Neutralizing Capacity (ANC) is a measure of a solution's ability to buffer

446

Energetic neutral atoms at Mars 4. Imaging of planetary oxygen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energetic neutral atoms at Mars 4. Imaging of planetary oxygen S. Barabash and M. Holmstro of the Martian oxygen exosphere/corona results in the production of planetary oxygen ions. The newborn ions start. The oxygen ions can then charge exchange with the neutral gases (H, H2, and O) of the Martian exosphere

Lukyanov, Alex

447

Neutral gas modeling in divertors Charles F. F. Karney  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutral gas modeling in divertors Charles F. F. Karney Princeton University 1. Introduction: for example, in the "gas target" divertor, the plasma flows into a gas cell and a high-Z element radiates away much of the power. In such a divertor, neutrals also play a central role. In order to model a divertor

Karney, Charles

448

NEUTRAL HYDROGEN IN THE UNIVERSE F. H. BRIGGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NEUTRAL HYDROGEN IN THE UNIVERSE F. H. BRIGGS Australian National University, Mount Stromlo 76, Epping, NSW 1710, Australia E-mail: fbriggs@mso.anu.edu.au Neutral atomic hydrogen is an endangered species at the present age of the Uni- verse. When hydrogen is dispersed at low density

Briggs, Frank H.

449

RMOTC offers unique test facility to oil industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Testing laboratory developed new tools and techniques in actual field conditions before commercialization has long been a significant problem. Working lab models may fail in the first field applications because of handling, incompatibility with existing equipment, or natural elements such as wind, humidity, or temperature. Further, the risk of damage to the operators wellbore, production, or other operations can be costly and embarrassing. As research dollars are becoming harder to obtain, a neutral, non-competitive, and user friendly test site is needed. This type of facility has been developed at the US Department of Energy`s Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), near Casper, Wyoming, through the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC). New technologies and processes field tested at this facility include those related to drilling production/lifting costs, P and A methods, and environmental control and remediation.

Opsal, C.M. [Fluor Daniel NPOSR-CUW, Inc., Casper, WY (United States). Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

450

Ultracold plasma expansion as a function of charge neutrality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultracold plasmas (UCPs) are created under conditions of near but not perfect neutrality. In the limit of zero electron temperature, electron screening results in non-neutrality manifesting itself as an interior region of the UCP with both electrons and ions and an exterior region composed primarily of ions. The interior region is the region of the most scientific interest for 2-component ultracold plasma physics. This work presents a theoretical model through which the time evolution of non-neutral UCPs is calculated. Despite Debye screening lengths much smaller than the characteristic plasma spatial size, model calculations predict that the expansion rate and the electron temperature of the UCP interior is sensitive to the neutrality of the UCP. The predicted UCP dependence on neutrality has implications for the correct measurement of several UCP properties, such as electron temperature, and a proper understanding of evaporative cooling of the electrons in the UCP.

Witte, Craig; Roberts, Jacob L. [Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

451

Status of ITER neutral beam cell remote handling system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ITER neutral beam cell will contain up to three heating neutral beams and one diagnostic neutral beam, and four upper ports. Though manual maintenance work is envisaged within the cell, when containment is breached, or the radiological protection is removed the maintenance must be conducted remotely. This maintenance constitutes the removal and replacement of line replaceable units, and their transport to and from a cask docked to the cell. A design of the remote handling system has been prepared to concept level which this paper describes including the development of a beam line transporter, beam source remote handling equipment, upper port remote handling equipment and equipment for the maintenance of the neutral shield. This equipment has been developed complete the planned maintenance tasks for the components of the neutral beam cell and to have inherent flexibility to enable as yet unforeseen tasks and recovery operations to be performed.

Sykes, N; Choi, C-H; Crofts, O; Crowe, R; Damiani, C; Delavalle, S; Meredith, L; Mindham, T; Raimbach, J; Tesini, A; Van Uffelen, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Surfactant/detergent titration analysis method and apparatus for machine working fluids, surfactant-containing wastewater and the like  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is an improved method and related apparatus for quantitatively analyzing machine working fluids and other aqueous compositions such as wastewater which contain various mixtures of cationic, neutral, and/or anionic surfactants, soluble soaps, and the like. The method utilizes a single-phase, non-aqueous, reactive titration composition containing water insoluble bismuth nitrate dissolved in glycerol for the titration reactant. The chemical reaction of the bismuth ion and glycerol with the surfactant in the test solutions results in formation of micelles, changes in micelle size, and the formation of insoluble bismuth soaps. These soaps are quantified by physical and chemical changes in the aqueous test solution. Both classical potentiometric analysis and turbidity measurements have been used as sensing techniques to determine the quantity of surfactant present in test solutions. This method is amenable to the analysis of various types of new, in-use, dirty or decomposed surfactants and detergents. It is a quick and efficient method utilizing a single-phase reaction without needing a separate extraction from the aqueous solution. It is adaptable to automated control with simple and reliable sensing methods. The method is applicable to a variety of compositions with concentrations from about 1% to about 10% weight. It is also applicable to the analysis of waste water containing surfactants with appropriate pre-treatments for concentration.

Smith, Douglas D. (Knoxville, TN); Hiller, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Surfactant/detergent titration analysis method and apparatus for machine working fluids, surfactant-containing wastewater and the like  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is an improved method and related apparatus for quantitatively analyzing machine working fluids and other aqueous compositions such as wastewater which contain various mixtures of cationic, neutral, and/or anionic surfactants, soluble soaps, and the like. The method utilizes a single-phase, non-aqueous, reactive titration composition containing water insoluble bismuth nitrate dissolved in glycerol for the titration reactant. The chemical reaction of the bismuth ion and glycerol with the surfactant in the test solutions results in formation of micelles, changes in micelle size, and the formation of insoluble bismuth soaps. These soaps are quantified by physical and chemical changes in the aqueous test solution. Both classical potentiometric analysis and turbidity measurements have been used as sensing techniques to determine the quantity of surfactant present in test solutions. This method is amenable to the analysis of various types of new, in-use, dirty or decomposed surfactants and detergents. It is a quick and efficient method utilizing a single-phase reaction without needing a separate extraction from the aqueous solution. It is adaptable to automated control with simple and reliable sensing methods. The method is applicable to a variety of compositions with concentrations from about 1% to about 10% weight. It is also applicable to the analysis of waste water containing surfactants with appropriate pre-treatments for concentration. 1 fig.

Smith, D.D.; Hiller, J.M.

1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

454

Low energy neutral atom imaging techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential scientific return from low energy neutral atom (LENA) imaging of the magnetosphere is extraordinary. The technical challenges of LENA detection include (1) removal of LENAs from the tremendous ambient UV without losing information of their incident trajectories, (2) quantification of their trajectories, and (3) obtaining high sensitivity measurements. Two techniques that have been proposed for this purpose are based on fundamentally different atomic interaction mechanisms between LENAs and a solid: LENA transmission through an ultrathin foil and LENA reflection from a solid surface. Both of these methods provide LENA ionization (for subsequent removal from the UV by electrostatic deflection) and secondary electron emission (for start pulse generation for time-of-flight and/or coincidence). We present a comparative study of the transmission and reflection techniques based on differences in atomic interactions with solids and surfaces. We show that transmission methods yield an order of magnitude greater secondary electron emission than reflection methods. Transmission methods are shown to be sufficient for LENA energies of approximately 1 keV to greater than 30 keV. Reflection methods using low work function surfaces could be employed for LENA ionization for energies less than several keV.

Funsten, H.O. McComas, D.J.; Scime, E.E.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Lyman-alpha Absorption from Heliosheath Neutrals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We assess what information HST observations of stellar Ly-alpha lines can provide on the heliosheath, the region of the heliosphere between the termination shock and heliopause. To search for evidence of heliosheath absorption, we conduct a systematic inspection of stellar Ly-alpha lines reconstructed after correcting for ISM absorption (and heliospheric/astrospheric absorption, if present). Most of the stellar lines are well centered on the stellar radial velocity, as expected, but the three lines of sight with the most downwind orientations relative to the ISM flow (Chi1 Ori, HD 28205, and HD 28568) have significantly blueshifted Ly-alpha lines. Since it is in downwind directions where heliosheath absorption should be strongest, the blueshifts are almost certainly caused by previously undetected heliosheath absorption. We make an initial comparison between the heliosheath absorption and the predictions of a pair of heliospheric models. A model with a complex multi-component treatment of plasma within the heliosphere predicts less absorption than a model with a simple single-fluid treatment, which leads to better agreement with the data. Finally, we find that nonplanetary energetic neutral atom (ENA) fluxes measured by the ASPERA-3 instrument on board Mars Express, which have been interpreted as being from the heliosheath, are probably too high to be consistent with the relative lack of heliosheath absorption seen by HST. This would argue for a local interplanetary source for these ENAs instead of a heliosheath source.

Brian E. Wood; Vladislav V. Izmodenov; Jeffrey L. Linsky; Yury G. Malama

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

456

Permeability of consolidated incinerator facility wastes stabilized with portland cement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Consolidated Incinerator Facility (CIF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) burns low-level radioactive wastes and mixed wastes as a method of treatment and volume reduction. The CIF generates secondary waste, which consists of ash and offgas scrubber solution. Currently the ash is stabilized/solidified in the Ashcrete process. The scrubber solution (blowdown) is sent to the SRS Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) for treatment as wastewater. In the past, the scrubber solution was also stabilized/solidified in the Ashcrete process as blowcrete, and will continue to be treated this way for listed waste burns and scrubber solutions that do not meet the ETF Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). The disposal plan for Ashcrete and special case blowcrete is to bury these containerized waste forms in shallow unlined trenches in E-Area. The WAC for intimately mixed, cement-based wasteforms intended for direct disposal specifies limits on compressive strength and permeability. Simulated waste and actual CIF ash and scrubber solution were mixed in the laboratory and cast into wasteforms for testing. Test results and related waste disposal consequences are given in this report.

Walker, B.W.

2000-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

457

Innovative Treatment Technologies for Natural Waters and Wastewaters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research described in this report focused on the development of novel membrane contactor processes (in particular, forward osmosis (FO), pressure retarded osmosis (PRO), and membrane distillation (MD)) in low energy desalination and wastewater treatment applications and in renewable energy generation. FO and MD are recently gaining national and international attention as viable, economic alternatives for removal of both established and emerging contaminants from natural and process waters; PRO is gaining worldwide attention as a viable source of renewable energy. The interrelationship of energy and water are at the core of this study. Energy and water are inextricably bound; energy usage and production must be considered when evaluating any water treatment process for practical application. Both FO and MD offer the potential for substantial energy and resource savings over conventional treatment processes and PRO offers the potential for renewable energy or energy offsets in desalination. Combination of these novel technologies with each other, with existing technologies (e.g., reverse osmosis (RO)), and with existing renewable energy sources (e.g., salinity gradient solar ponds) may enable much less expensive water production and also potable water production in remote or distributed locations. Two inter-related projects were carried out in this investigation. One focused on membrane bioreactors for wastewater treatment and PRO for renewable energy generation; the other focused on MD driven by a salinity gradient solar pond.

Childress, Amy E.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

(Solar clothes dryer and wastewater heat exchanger). Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first project investigated the technical possibilities of adapting a domestic electric clothes dryer to utilize solar-heated water as the heat source, replacing electric resistance heat. The second project attempted to extract wastewater heat from a commercial dishwasher to preheat fresh water to be used in the next dish washing cycle. It is felt that the clothes dryer project has met all of intended goals. Although a solar application has some real-world practical problems, the application of a dryer connected directly to the home heating system will prove to be cost-beneficial over the life of a dryer. The additional cost of a heat exchanger is not excessive, and the installation cost, if installed with the initial house plumbing is less than $100. From a practical point of view, the complexity of installing a wastewater heat extracter is considered impractical. The environment in which such equipment must operate is difficult at best, and most restaurants prefer to maintain as simple an operation as possible. If problems were to occur in this type of equipment, the kitchen would effectively be crippled. In conclusion, further research in the concept is not recommended. Recent advances in commercial dishwashers have also considerably reduced the heat losses which accompanied equipment only a few years old.

Baer, B.F.

1984-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

459

MIC on stainless steels in wastewater treatment plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Field tests of stainless steels were carried out at five wastewater treatment plants for one year. Three stainless steel grades i.e. AISI 304 (UNS S30400), AISI 316 (UNS S31600) and duplex 2205 (UNS S31803) were tested in the final settling tank in the plants. The time dependence of the open circuit potential (OCP) was measured for all coupons. Ennoblement of the OCP, similar to that reported from investigations in seawater, was found in one of the plants. Waters from three of the exposure sites, containing dispersed deposits from exposed coupons, were chemically analyzed. Pitting corrosion was observed after the field test on steel grade AISI 304 in three of the five plants, and on AISI 316 in one plant. No corrosion was found on 2205 in any of the plants. Laboratory measurements of the OCP were carried out for AISI 304, AISI 316 and 2205 in water collected from one of the plants. Cathodic polarization curves were determined as well in wastewater from the same plant. The cathodic reaction rate increased at the highest OCP. Simulation of the ennoblement was carried out by potentiostatic polarization in a 600 ppm chloride solution. The current response indicated corrosion on AISI 304 welded material and on AISI 304, AISI 316 in crevice assemblies after a long period of induction time.

Iversen, A. [Avesta Sheffield AB (Sweden)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

RECOVERY OF LACTIC ACID FROM AMERICAN CRYSTAL SUGAR COMPANY WASTEWATER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project has shown that the recovery of several valuable lactic acid products is both technically feasible and economically viable. One of the original objectives of this project was to recover lactic acid. However, the presence of a variety of indigenous bacteria in the wastewater stream and technical issues related to recovery and purification have resulted in the production of lactic acid esters. These esters could by hydrolyzed to lactic acid, but only with unacceptable product losses that would be economically prohibitive. The developed process is projected to produce approximately 200,000 lb per day of lactate esters from wastewater at a single factory at costs that compete with conventional solvents. The lactate esters are good solvents for polymers and resins and could replace acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, MIBK, and other polar solvents used in the polymer industry. Because of their low volatility and viscosity-lowering properties, they will be especially useful for inks for jet printers, alkyl resins, and high-solid paints. Owing to their efficiency in dissolving salts and flux as well as oils and sealants, lactate esters can be used in cleaning circuit boards and machine and engine parts. Unlike conventional solvents, lactate esters exhibit low toxicity, are biodegradable, and are not hazardous air pollutants. Another application for lactate esters is in the production of plasticizers. Severe health problems have been attributed to widely used phthalate ester plasticizers. The U.S. Department of Agriculture showed that replacement of these with inexpensive lactate esters is feasible, owing to their superior polymer compatibility properties. A very large market is projected for polymers prepared from lactic acid. These are called polylactides and are a type of polyester. Thermoplastics of this type have a variety of uses, including moldings, fibers, films, and packaging of both manufactured goods and food products. Polylactides form tough, orientable, self-supporting thin films and have, therefore, been used for adhesives, safety glass, and finishes. If the bacterial culture produces the L-lactic acid enanatiomer form exclusively, the L-lactide prepared from this form can be used for making polymers with good fiber-forming properties. We have not currently achieved the exclusive production of L-lactate in our efforts. However, markets in films and structural shapes are available for polymers and copolymers prepared from the mixed D,L-lactide forms that result from processing the D,L-lactic acid obtained from fermentation such as that occurring naturally in sugar beet wastewater. These materials are slowly biodegraded to harmless compounds in the environment, and they burn with a clean blue flame when incinerated. These materials represent excellent opportunities for utilization of the D,L-lactic mixture produced from natural fermentation of the ACS flume water. Esters can be converted into a lactide, and the alcohol released from the ester can be recycled with no net consumption of the alcohol. Lactide intermediates could be produced locally and shipped to polymer producers elsewhere. The polymer and copolymer markets are extremely large, and the role of lactides in these markets is continuously expanding. The overall process can be readily integrated into existing factory wastewater operations. There are several environmental benefits that would be realized at the factories with incorporation of the lactate recovery process. The process reduces the organic loading to the existing wastewater treatment system that should result in enhanced operability with respect to both solids handling and treated-water quality. A higher-quality treated water will also help reduce odor levels from holding ponds. Several water reuse opportunities are probable, depending on the quality of treated water from the FT process.

Daniel J. Stepan; Edwin S. Olson; Richard E. Shockey; Bradley G. Stevens; John R. Gallagher

2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastewater neutralization facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Canyon Facilities - Hanford Site  

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462

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Facilities  

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463

ARM - SGP Extended Facility  

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464

Accelerator Test Facility  

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465

ARM - Facility News Article  

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466

ARM - Facility News Article  

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467

ARM - Facility News Article  

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468

ARM - Facility News Article  

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469

ARM - Facility News Article  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborneOctober 11, 2011 [Facility News] Final Recovery ActJanuary 20, 2015

470

ARM - Facility News Article  

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471

ARM - Facility News Article  

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472

ARM - Facility News Article  

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473

ARM - Facility News Article  

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474

ARM - Guest Instrument Facility  

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475

ARM - Facility News Article  

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476

ARM - Facility News Article  

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477

ARM - Facility News Article  

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478

ARM - Facility News Article  

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479

ARM - Facility News Article  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010 [DataDatastreamstoms3,4,3,October15, 2005 [Facility

480

ARM - Facility News Article  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010 [DataDatastreamstoms3,4,3,October15, 2005 [Facility31,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastewater neutralization facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

ARM - Facility News Article  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30, 2004 [Facility News] New Instrumentation on

482

ARM - Facility News Article  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30, 2004 [Facility News] New Instrumentation

483

ARM - Facility News Article  

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484

ARM - Facility News Article  

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485

ARM - Facility News Article  

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486

ARM - Facility News Article  

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487

ARM - Facility News Article  

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488

ARM - Facility News Article  

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489

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30, 2004 [Facility News] NewNew

490

ARM - Facility News Article  

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491

ARM - Facility News Article  

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492

ARM - Facility News Article  

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493

ARM - Facility News Article  

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494

ARM - Facility News Article  

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495

ARM - Facility News Article  

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496

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30, 2004 [Facility News]

497

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30, 2004 [Facility News]Disaster Plan Deflects

498

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30, 2004 [Facility News]Disaster Plan

499

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30, 2004 [Facility News]Disaster PlanFebruary

500

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30, 2004 [Facility News]Disaster PlanFebruary5,