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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastes include paint" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Conversion of geothermal waste to commercial products including silica  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the treatment of geothermal residue includes contacting the pigmented amorphous silica-containing component with a depigmenting reagent one or more times to depigment the silica and produce a mixture containing depigmented amorphous silica and depigmenting reagent containing pigment material; separating the depigmented amorphous silica and from the depigmenting reagent to yield depigmented amorphous silica. Before or after the depigmenting contacting, the geothermal residue or depigmented silica can be treated with a metal solubilizing agent to produce another mixture containing pigmented or unpigmented amorphous silica-containing component and a solubilized metal-containing component; separating these components from each other to produce an amorphous silica product substantially devoid of metals and at least partially devoid of pigment. The amorphous silica product can be neutralized and thereafter dried at a temperature from about 25.degree. C. to 300.degree. C. The morphology of the silica product can be varied through the process conditions including sequence contacting steps, pH of depigmenting reagent, neutralization and drying conditions to tailor the amorphous silica for commercial use in products including filler for paint, paper, rubber and polymers, and chromatographic material.

Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Solar-absorber-selective paint research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research and development on thickness-sensitive and thickness-insensitive solar paints are discussed. The thickness-sensitive paints include reverse roll coated, gravure printed, and spray coated paints. The coating methods and optical properties of the thickness-sensitive paints are discussed. The thickness-insensitive solar paints include a low emittance flake such as aluminium-flake, and pigment. Durability tests are discussed, including accelerated weathering and humidity durability tests, for the thickness-sensitive coatings. (LEW)

Moore, S.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Pollution Prevention Procedure and Case Studies for Utility Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities are working to eliminate or minimize the production of waste in all of their operations. This report presents a six-step process for pollution prevention and seven case studies demonstrating successful application of the process to eight utility wastes, including oily absorbents, municipal wastes, paint solvents, waste paint, blast grit, wood waste, unused chemicals, and unknown drum contents. The procedures for each waste are applicable to any utility site.

1996-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

4

CHEMICAL WASTE RECYCLING PROGRAM EMPTY CHEMICAL BOTTLES: which include all glass, plastic and metal bottles that  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHEMICAL WASTE RECYCLING PROGRAM EMPTY CHEMICAL BOTTLES: which include all glass, plastic and metal bottles that previously contained chemicals (hazardous or non-hazardous) are collected by CWS for recycling. Bottles should be dry and empty without chemical residue. Rinse and collect rinsate in chemical

Ungerleider, Leslie G.

5

Paint Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 4   Test requirements and time to failure of various coatings...20??30 0.8??1.2 150 200??500 Light zinc phosphate+lacquer paint 23??28 0.9??1.1 120 150??250 Dry film lubrication, air cured 8??13 0.3??0.5 ? 50??100 Heavy zinc phosphate+dry film lubrication, baked 12??25 0.5??1.0 100 500??1000 CARC topcoat 46??56 1.8??2.2 ? 25??50 Light zinc phosphate+CARC primer+topcoat 76??127 3??5...

6

Microwave technology for waste management applications including disposition of electronic circuitry  

SciTech Connect

Microwave technology is being developed nationally and internationally for a variety of environmental remediation purposes. These efforts include treatment and destruction of a vast array of gaseous, liquid and solid hazardous wastes as well as subsequent immobilization of selected components. Microwave technology provides an important contribution to an arsenal of existing remediation methods that are designed to protect the public and environment from undesirable consequences of hazardous materials. Applications of microwave energy for environmental remediation will be discussed. Emphasized will be a newly developed microwave process designed to treat discarded electronic circuitry and reclaim the precious metals within for reuse.

Wicks, G.G. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Clark, D.E.; Schulz, R.L.; Folz, D.C. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Method and system including a double rotary kiln pyrolysis or gasification of waste material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for destructively distilling an organic material in particulate form wherein the particulates are introduced through an inlet into one end of an inner rotating kiln ganged to and coaxial with an outer rotating kiln. The inner and outer kilns define a cylindrical annular space with the inlet being positioned in registry with the axis of rotation of the ganged kilns. During operation, the temperature of the wall of the inner rotary kiln at the inlet is not less than about 500 C to heat the particulate material to a temperature in the range of from about 200 C to about 900 C in a pyrolyzing atmosphere to reduce the particulate material as it moves from the one end toward the other end. The reduced particulates including char are transferred to the annular space between the inner and the outer rotating kilns near the other end of the inner rotating kiln and moved longitudinally in the annular space from near the other end toward the one end in the presence of oxygen to combust the char at an elevated temperature to produce a waste material including ash. Also, heat is provided which is transferred to the inner kiln. The waste material including ash leaves the outer rotating kiln near the one end and the pyrolysis vapor leaves through the particulate material inlet. 5 figs.

McIntosh, M.J.; Arzoumanidis, G.G.

1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

8

A method and system including a double rotary kiln pyrolysis or gasification of waste material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for destructively distilling an organic material in particulate form wherein the particulates are introduced through an inlet into one end of an inner rotating kiln ganged to and coaxial with an outer rotating kiln. The inner and outer kilns define a cylindrical annular space with the inlet being positioned in registry with the axis of rotation of the ganged kilns. During operation, the temperature of the wall of the inner rotary kiln at the inlet is not less than about 500 C to heat the particulate material to a temperature in the range of from about 200 C to about 900 C in a pyrolyzing atmosphere to reduce the particulate material as it moves from the one end toward the other end. The reduced particulates including char are transferred to the annular space between the inner and the outer rotating kilns near the other end of the inner rotating kiln and moved longitudinally in the annular space from near the other end toward the one end in the presence of oxygen to combust the char at an elevated temperature to produce a waste material including ash. Also, heat is provided which is transferred to the inner kiln. The waste material including ash leaves the outer rotating kiln near the one end and the pyrolysis vapor leaves through the particulate material inlet.

McIntosh, M.J.; Arzoumanidis, G.G.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

9

Method and system including a double rotary kiln pyrolysis or gasification of waste material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of destructively distilling an organic material in particulate form wherein the particulates are introduced through an inlet into one end of an inner rotating kiln ganged to and coaxial with an outer rotating kiln. The inner and outer kilns define a cylindrical annular space with the inlet being positioned in registry with the axis of rotation of the ganged kilns. During operation, the temperature of the wall of the inner rotary kiln at the inlet is not less than about 500.degree. C. to heat the particulate material to a temperature in the range of from about 200.degree. C. to about 900.degree. C. in a pyrolyzing atmosphere to reduce the particulate material as it moves from the one end toward the other end. The reduced particulates including char are transferred to the annular space between the inner and the outer rotating kilns near the other end of the inner rotating kiln and moved longitudinally in the annular space from near the other end toward the one end in the presence of oxygen to combust the char at an elevated temperature to produce a waste material including ash. Also, heat is provided which is transferred to the inner kiln. The waste material including ash leaves the outer rotating kiln near the one end and the pyrolysis vapor leaves through the particulate material inlet.

McIntosh, Michael J. (Bolingbrook, IL); Arzoumanidis, Gregory G. (Naperville, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

DISPOSAL OF TRU WASTE FROM THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT IN PIPE OVERPACK CONTAINERS TO WIPP INCLUDING NEW SECURITY REQUIREMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is responsible for the safe management and cleanup of the DOE complex. As part of the cleanup and closure of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) located on the Hanford site, the nuclear material inventory was reviewed to determine the appropriate disposition path. Based on the nuclear material characteristics, the material was designated for stabilization and packaging for long term storage and transfer to the Savannah River Site or, a decision for discard was made. The discarded material was designated as waste material and slated for disposal to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Prior to preparing any residue wastes for disposal at the WIPP, several major activities need to be completed. As detailed a processing history as possible of the material including origin of the waste must be researched and documented. A technical basis for termination of safeguards on the material must be prepared and approved. Utilizing process knowledge and processing history, the material must be characterized, sampling requirements determined, acceptable knowledge package and waste designation completed prior to disposal. All of these activities involve several organizations including the contractor, DOE, state representatives and other regulators such as EPA. At PFP, a process has been developed for meeting the many, varied requirements and successfully used to prepare several residue waste streams including Rocky Flats incinerator ash, Hanford incinerator ash and Sand, Slag and Crucible (SS&C) material for disposal. These waste residues are packed into Pipe Overpack Containers for shipment to the WIPP.

Hopkins, A.M.; Sutter, C.; Hulse, G.; Teal, J.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

11

Physically based virtual painting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tapping the compelling illusion of physical interaction with paints, brushes, surfaces, color, and light, users express the nuances of their visual and emotional imaginations.

Ming Lin; William Baxter; Vincent Scheib; Jeremy Wendt

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Process for removing and detoxifying cadmium from scrap metal including mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

Cadmium-bearing scrap from nuclear applications, such as neutron shielding and reactor control and safety rods, must usually be handled as mixed waste since it is radioactive and the cadmium in it is both leachable and highly toxic. Removing the cadmium from this scrap, and converting it to a nonleachable and minimally radioactive form, would greatly simplify disposal or recycling. A process now under development will do this by shredding the scrap; leaching it with reagents which selectively dissolve out the cadmium; reprecipitating the cadmium as its highly insoluble sulfide; then fusing the sulfide into a glassy matrix to bring its leachability below EPA limits before disposal. Alternatively, the cadmium may be recovered for reuse. A particular advantage of the process is that all reagents (except the glass frit) can easily be recovered and reused in a nearly closed cycle, minimizing the risk of radioactive release. The process does not harm common metals such as aluminum, iron and stainless steel, and is also applicable to non-nuclear cadmium-bearing scrap such as nickel-cadmium batteries.

Kronberg, J.W.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Electrochemical Decontamination of Painted and Heavily Corroded Metals  

SciTech Connect

The radioactive metal wastes that are generated from nuclear fuel plants and radiochemical laboratories are mainly contaminated by the surface deposition of radioactive isotopes. There are presently several techniques used in removing surface contamination involving physical and chemical processes. However, there has been very little research done in the area of soiled, heavily oxidized, and painted metals. Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory have been developing electrochemical procedures for the decontamination of bare and painted metal objects. These methods have been found to be effective on highly corroded as well as relatively new metals. This study has been successful in decontaminating projectiles and shrapnel excavated during environmental restoration projects after 40+ years of exposure to the elements. Heavily corroded augers used in sampling activities throughout the area were also successfully decontaminated. This process has demonstrated its effectiveness and offers several advantages over the present metal decontamination practices of media blasting and chemical solvents. These advantages include the addition of no toxic or hazardous chemicals, low operating temperature and pressure, and easily scaleable equipment. It is in their future plans to use this process in the decontamination of gloveboxes destined for disposal as TRU waste.

Marczak, S.; Anderson, J.; Dziewinski, J.

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

14

Method for warning of radiological and chemical substances using detection paints on a vehicle surface  

SciTech Connect

A system for warning of corrosion, chemical, or radiological substances. The system comprises painting a surface with a paint or coating that includes an indicator material and monitoring the surface for indications of the corrosion, chemical, or radiological substances.

Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA)

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

15

Types of Paints for Structural Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 14   Paint compatibility...or weathered paint Topcoat Solvent thinned Lacquer Water thinned

16

Method for contamination control and barrier apparatus with filter for containing waste materials that include dangerous particulate matter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A container for hazardous waste materials that includes air or other gas carrying dangerous particulate matter has incorporated barrier material, preferably in the form of a flexible sheet, and one or more filters for the dangerous particulate matter sealably attached to such barrier material. The filter is preferably a HEPA type filter and is preferably chemically bonded to the barrier materials. The filter or filters are preferably flexibly bonded to the barrier material marginally and peripherally of the filter or marginally and peripherally of air or other gas outlet openings in the barrier material, which may be a plastic bag. The filter may be provided with a backing panel of barrier material having an opening or openings for the passage of air or other gas into the filter or filters. Such backing panel is bonded marginally and peripherally thereof to the barrier material or to both it and the filter or filters. A coupling or couplings for deflating and inflating the container may be incorporated. Confining a hazardous waste material in such a container, rapidly deflating the container and disposing of the container, constitutes one aspect of the method of the invention. The chemical bonding procedure for producing the container constitutes another aspect of the method of the invention. 3 figs.

Pinson, P.A.

1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

17

Causes of Paint Film Defects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 9   Common causes of paint film defects...Dip, flow, roller, spray Improper applicator/metering roll speeds Roller Undesirable pattern Swelling of roll Roller Roll improperly ground Roller Foreign material on roll Roller Poor spray gun technique Spray Runs (curtains, sags) Too much solvent Dip, flow, spray Paint surface or drying atmosphere...

18

Incineration of Residue from Paint Stripping Operations Using Plastic Media Blasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A preliminary investigation has been performed on the environmental consequences of incinerating plastic-media-blasting (PHB) wastes from paint removal operations. PHB is similar to sandblasting although blasting takes place at a much lower pressure. The blasted media can be recovered and recycled several times, but ultimately a residue of paint dust/chips and attrited media dust are left for disposal. This residue is a dry solid that may potentially be classified as a hazardous waste. One possible alternative to depositing the waste residue directly into a hazardous waste landfill is incineration. Incineration would provide desirable volume reduction. However, the fate of heavy metals from the entrained paint waste is not known. Samples of PHB residue were combusted at temperatures between 690C and 815C with approximately 125% of stoichiometric air. The ash remaining after combustion was then analyzed for heavy metal content and tested for leachability using the EPA toxicity characteristics leaching procedures (TCLP).

Helt, J. E.; Mallya, N.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

SRS Public Involvement in Waste Management Has Resulted in Effective Decisions Supported by the Public Including Disposal Changes and Top-to-Bottom Review Initiative Consensus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Savannah River Site's (SRS') Solid Waste Management Program, a key to success is the Public Involvement Program. The Solid Waste Division at SRS manages the site's transuranic, low-level, mixed, and hazardous wastes. All decisions associated with management of this waste are of interest to the public and successful program implementation would be impossible without a vigorous public involvement program. The SRS Solid Waste Division (SWD) and its Department of Energy (DOE) customer developed, implemented, and maintain a comprehensive public participation and communications program. It is staffed by public participation and technical specialists to ensure information is presented in a manner that is technically accurate while being tailored for understanding by people without a technical background. The program provides the public with accurate, complete, timely information and early meaningful participation opportunities. It also fulfills the public participation activities required by laws, regulations, DOE Orders, and negotiated agreements. The primary goal of the SWD Public Participation Program is to fulfill the objectives of the SWD and SRS Strategic Plans to ''build trust and communicate openly, honestly, and responsibly with employees, customers, stakeholders, and regulators,'' and to ''work to extend the support of external stakeholders for the pursuit of SRS and DOE Complex business goals.'' This paper focuses on the public participation program goals, the implementation through formal plans and objectives, targeted waste management programs and specific audiences, and specific effects of the program on waste management activities. A discussion of the DOE and contractor teaming along with how plans are carried out is also included.

Goldston, W. T.; Villasor, H. P.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

20

The Girl in the Painting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The work presented in this thesis explores the idea of embracing, interpreting, and utilizing preexisting art work as source material for new investigations that address the changing relevance of appropriation and self-portraiture in today's culture. By recreating these paintings with photography, 'mistakes' in the form of conflicting perspectives, multiple viewpoints, and impossible lighting situations were discovered and addressed. In addition, RGB levels and color channels for both the original image and the recreated photograph were analyzed to compare overall brightness and bright spots. The photographs in this series provide new insights into the emotional content of paintings throughout the vast range of art history by placing one's self into the metaphorical shoes of 'the girl in the painting.'

Kiel, Emily Lauren

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastes include paint" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Two computational approaches for creating Chinese painting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis two computational approaches for creating Chinese painting are developed. The first approach uses an expressive paint tool that enables anyone to paint 2D Chinese paintings in real-time. The realistic rendering of paint strokes is achieved by creating a software model that mimics real ink and brushes. The input devices are a pressure-sensitive pen and tablet. This interface design is similar to painting with a real brush on paper. The second approach uses procedural shaders and commercially available 3D modeling and animation packages to create the look of ink on paper. This approach facilitates the efficient production of 3D Chinese painting animations as well as the ability to create stereoscopic Chinese paintings.

Chan, Ching

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Making digital leaf collages with blow painting!  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a novel play interface called Blow Painting that enables people to create leaf collage paintings on a digital canvas by blowing at a toy windmill. The toy windmill detects the blowing action and direction with its embedded microphone and rotation ... Keywords: blowing, collage, daily experience, embodiment, interaction, leaf stencils, painting, play, rfid, tangible object

Yang-Ting Shen; Ellen Yi-Luen Do

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

UNDERWATER PAINT MARKING OF PORPOISES1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNDERWATER PAINT MARKING OF PORPOISES1 Identification of individual animals has always been underwater. Applica- tion of these paints was easiest by pressurized spray. We experimented with spray. Paint bounced off most hard-surface materials before it could set underwater, unlike human or porpoise

24

Task 12: Laser cleaning of contaminated painted surfaces. Semi-annual report, April 1, 1996--September 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

Paint contaminated with radionuclides and other hazardous materials is common in Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Facility decommissioning and decontamination requires the removal of contaminated paint. Paint removal technologies include laser- and abrasive-based systems. F2 Associates are utilizing a pulsed-repetition CO{sub 2} laser that produces a 2.5-cm x 2.5-cm beam which can be scanned across a 30- x 100-cm raster and, when placed on a robot, can be designed to clean any surface that the robot can be programmed to follow. Causing little or no damage to the substrate (concrete, steel, etc.), the laser ablates the material to be removed from a given surface. Ablated material is then pulled into a filtration and collection (VAC-PAC) system to prevent the hazardous substances from entering into the atmosphere. The VAC-PAC system deposits the ablated material into waste drums which may be removed from the system without compromising the integrity of the seal, allowing a new drum to be set up for collection without leakage of the ablated material into the atmosphere.

Grisanti, A.A.; Hassett, D.J.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Risk-Based Disposal Plan for PCB Paint in the TRA Fluorinel Dissolution Process Mockup and Gamma Facilities Canal  

SciTech Connect

This Toxic Substances Control Act Risk-Based Polychlorinated Biphenyl Disposal plan was developed for the Test Reactor Area Fluorinel Dissolution Process Mockup and Gamma Facilities Waste System, located in Building TRA-641 at the Reactor Technology Complex, Idaho National Laboratory Site, to address painted surfaces in the empty canal under 40 CFR 761.62(c) for paint, and under 40 CFR 761.61(c) for PCBs that may have penetrated into the concrete. The canal walls and floor will be painted with two coats of contrasting non-PCB paint and labeled as PCB. The canal is covered with open decking; the access grate is locked shut and signed to indicate PCB contamination in the canal. Access to the canal will require facility manager permission. Protective equipment for personnel and equipment entering the canal will be required. Waste from the canal, generated during ultimate Decontamination and Decommissioning, shall be managed and disposed as PCB Bulk Product Waste.

R. A. Montgomery

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

The contact-temperature ignition (CTI) criteria for propagating chemical reactions including the effect of moisture and application to Hanford waste  

SciTech Connect

To assure the continued absence of uncontrolled condensed-phase chemical reactions in connection with the Hanford waste materials, efforts have been underway including both theoretical and experimental investigations to clarify the requirements for such reactions. This document defines the differences and requirements for homogeneous runaway and propagating chemical reactions incuding a discussion of general contact-temperature ignition (CTI) condition for propagating reactions that include the effect of moisture. The CTI condition implies that the contact temperature or interface temperature between reacted and unreacted materials must exceed the ignition temperature and is compared to experimental data including both synthetic ferrocyanide and surrogate organic materials. In all cases, the occurrences of ignition accompanied by self-propagating reactions are consistent with the theoretical anticipations of the CTI condition.

Cash, R.J.

1995-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

27

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 410: Waste Disposal Trenches, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 0 (includes ROTCs 1, 2, and 3)  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 410 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 410 is located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), which is included in the Nevada Test and Training Range (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range) approximately 140 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. This CAU is comprised of five Corrective Action Sites (CASs): TA-19-002-TAB2, Debris Mound; TA-21-003-TANL, Disposal Trench; TA-21-002-TAAL, Disposal Trench; 09-21-001-TA09, Disposal Trenches; 03-19-001, Waste Disposal Site. This CAU is being investigated because contaminants may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and/or the environment, and waste may have been disposed of with out appropriate controls. Four out of five of these CASs are the result of weapons testing and disposal activities at the TTR, and they are grouped together for site closure based on the similarity of the sites (waste disposal sites and trenches). The fifth CAS, CAS 03-19-001, is a hydrocarbon spill related to activities in the area. This site is grouped with this CAU because of the location (TTR). Based on historical documentation and process know-ledge, vertical and lateral migration routes are possible for all CASs. Migration of contaminants may have occurred through transport by infiltration of precipitation through surface soil which serves as a driving force for downward migration of contaminants. Land-use scenarios limit future use of these CASs to industrial activities. The suspected contaminants of potential concern which have been identified are volatile organic compounds; semivolatile organic compounds; high explosives; radiological constituents including depleted uranium, beryllium, total petroleum hydrocarbons; and total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals. Field activities will consist of geophysical and radiological surveys, and collecting soil samples at biased locations by appropriate methods. A two-step data quality objective strategy will be followed: (1) define the nature of contamination at each CAS location by identifying any contamination above preliminary action levels (PALs); and, (2) determine the extent of contamination identified above PALs. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

NNSA /NV

2002-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

28

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 128-B-2, 100-B Burn Pit #2 Waste Site, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2005-038  

SciTech Connect

The 128-B-2 waste site was a burn pit historically used for the disposal of combustible and noncombustible wastes, including paint and solvents, office waste, concrete debris, and metallic debris. This site has been remediated by removing approximately 5,627 bank cubic meters of debris, ash, and contaminated soil to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

R. A. Carlson

2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

29

Chapter 3. Volume and Characteristics of Uranium Mine Wastes Uranium has been found and mined in a wide variety of rocks, including sandstone, carbonates1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3-1 Chapter 3. Volume and Characteristics of Uranium Mine Wastes Uranium has been found and mined conventional mining, solution extraction, and milling of uranium, a principal focus of this report is TENORM from conventional mining, and in particular, wastes from abandoned mines that have not been reclaimed

30

Waste minimization assessment for a manufacturer of iron castings and fabricated sheet metal parts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. Waste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) were established at selected universities and procedures were adapted from the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual. That document has been superseded by the Facility Pollution Prevention Guide. The WMAC team at the University of Louisville performed an assessment at a plant that manufactures iron castings and fabricated sheet metal parts. Foundry operations include mixing and mold formation, core making, metal pouring, shakeout, finishing, and painting. Cutting, shaping, and welding are the principal metal fabrication operations. The team`s report, detailing findings and recommendations indicated that paint-related wastes are generated in large quantities, and that significant waste reduction and cost savings could be realized by installing a dry powder coating system or by replacing conventional air spray paint guns with high-volume low-pressure spray guns. This research brief was developed by the principal investigators and EPA`s National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH, to announce key findings of an ongoing research project that is fully documented in a separate report of the same title available from University City Science Center.

Fleischman, M.; Harris, J.J.; Handmaker, A.; Looby, G.P.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Restoration of X-ray fluorescence images of hidden paintings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes our methods for repairing and restoring images of hidden paintings (paintings that have been painted over and are now covered by a new surface painting) that have been obtained via noninvasive X-ray fluorescence imaging of their ... Keywords: Art restoration, Artifact correction, Image restoration, Underdetermined source separation

Anila Anitha; Andrei Brasoveanu; Marco Duarte; Shannon Hughes; Ingrid Daubechies; Joris Dik; Koen Janssens; Matthias Alfeld

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

New and Underutilized Technology: Colored Paint | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Colored Paint Colored Paint New and Underutilized Technology: Colored Paint October 8, 2013 - 2:51pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for colored paints within the Federal sector. Benefits Colored paints have the potential to optimize heat reflective properties or decrease heat absorptive applications. New technologies allow the paint to be any color within the visible spectrum with either the absorptive or the reflective properties optimized for specific applications (disassociating it from the traditional color properties). Application Colored paints are appropriate for deployment within most building categories. Key Factors for Deployment Colored paint technologies and applications have come quite far. One application example for colored paints is to reduce the heat load on a wall

33

Framework for managing wastes from oil and gas exploration and production (E&P) sites.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil and gas companies operate in many countries around the world. Their exploration and production (E&P) operations generate many kinds of waste that must be carefully and appropriately managed. Some of these wastes are inherently part of the E&P process; examples are drilling wastes and produced water. Other wastes are generic industrial wastes that are not unique to E&P activities, such as painting wastes and scrap metal. Still other wastes are associated with the presence of workers at the site; these include trash, food waste, and laundry wash water. In some host countries, mature environmental regulatory programs are in place that provide for various waste management options on the basis of the characteristics of the wastes and the environmental settings of the sites. In other countries, the waste management requirements and authorized options are stringent, even though the infrastructure to meet the requirements may not be available yet. In some cases, regulations and/or waste management infrastructure do not exist at all. Companies operating in these countries can be confronted with limited and expensive waste management options.

Veil, J. A.; Puder, M. G.; Environmental Science Division

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Business Plan : Residential Solid Waste Collection.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Residential solid waste means all the solid wastes produced in household level, which includes bio-waste, metal, mixed wastes, organic and inorganic waste. The inability of (more)

Mazengo, Dorice

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Energy Conservation and Waste Reduction in the Metal Fabrication Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reductions of energy use and waste generation can help manufacturers to be more profitable and more environmentally acceptable. Industrial Assessment Centers located at universities throughout the United States, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, are conducting combined energy and waste assessments for small and medium-size manufacturers. The Industrial Technology and Energy Management (ITEM) division of University City Science Center is field manager for the western region of the Industrial Assessment Center program. These case studies present results from three assessments of manufacturing plants in the metal fabrication industry. Primary processing operations include machining, painting, plating, and assembly. Energy conservation opportunities chiefly involved motor systems, compressed air systems, and heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems. Typically, pollution prevention opportunities involved the painting lines. For each of the three plants studied, processes are described; the specific energy conserving and waste-reducing measures are identified; the energy savings and waste reductions are quantified; and financial analyses are presented, including cost savings and paybacks. In addition, actual implementation results reported by the manufacturers are provided.

Kirk, M. C. Jr.; Looby, G. P.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Primer/Paint System for Thermal Insulation of Vehicles  

Disclosure Number 200902299 Technology Summary The present invention comprises an improved primer/paint system for providing enhanced thermal ...

37

Painting and rendering textures on unparameterized models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a solution for texture mapping unparameterized models. The quality of a texture on a model is often limited by the model's parameterization into a 2D texture space. For models with complex topologies or complex distributions of structural ... Keywords: level of detail algorithms, paint systems, rendering systems, spatial data structures, texture mapping

David (grue) DeBry; Jonathan Gibbs; Devorah DeLeon Petty; Nate Robins

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Capturing Optical Properties of Paint Polymerization Roman Durikovic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the resin. Figure 1: The paint finish depends on resin and particle density. The craftsman grasps timing to painted side and its disappearance in time. The Lambert-Beer's Law [4, 5] states that a reflective intensity changes as hardening of paint progresses. If we prove that change of reflectance intensity due

Durikovic, Roman

39

Polymer Solidification and Stabilization: Adaptable Processes for Atypical Wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vinyl Ester Styrene (VES) and Advanced Polymer Solidification (APS{sup TM}) processes are used to solidify, stabilize, and immobilize radioactive, pyrophoric and hazardous wastes at US Department of Energy (DOE) and Department of Defense (DOD) sites, and commercial nuclear facilities. A wide range of projects have been accomplished, including in situ immobilization of ion exchange resin and carbon filter media in decommissioned submarines; underwater solidification of zirconium and hafnium machining swarf; solidification of uranium chips; impregnation of depth filters; immobilization of mercury, lead and other hazardous wastes (including paint chips and blasting media); and in situ solidification of submerged demineralizers. Discussion of the adaptability of the VES and APS{sup TM} processes is timely, given the decommissioning work at government sites, and efforts by commercial nuclear plants to reduce inventories of one-of-a-kind wastes. The VES and APS{sup TM} media and processes are highly adaptable to a wide range of waste forms, including liquids, slurries, bead and granular media; as well as metal fines, particles and larger pieces. With the ability to solidify/stabilize liquid wastes using high-speed mixing; wet sludges and solids by low-speed mixing; or bead and granular materials through in situ processing, these polymer will produce a stable, rock-hard product that has the ability to sequester many hazardous waste components and create Class B and C stabilized waste forms for disposal. Technical assessment and approval of these solidification processes and final waste forms have been greatly simplified by exhaustive waste form testing, as well as multiple NRC and CRCPD waste form approvals. (authors)

Jensen, C. [Diversified Technologies Services, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Get the Lead Out of Paints for Children's Products Video ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... products. That is for children of age 12 or younger. 90 parts per million is 90 milligrams of lead per kilogram of paint. The ...

2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastes include paint" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

New Reference Material to Help Get the Lead Out of Paints for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The law requires that paints used on children's products contain no more than 90 milligrams of lead per kilogram of paint, a marked decrease from ...

2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

42

Annual Transuranic Waste Inventory Report - 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

contain both combustible and noncombustible waste items. Combustible waste may include wood, plastics, paper, and rags. Noncombustible waste items may include metals, glass,...

43

TYPES OF PAINT DIY CHECKLIST Consists of pigments, additives and binders in an oil or  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TYPES OF PAINT DIY CHECKLIST PAINT · Consists of pigments, additives and binders in an oil or water more available. The most commonly used paints in DIY projects are water- and oil-based. Most.Choosingthecorrectpainttypeforyour jobwillrequiredecisionsbasedonbothaestheticandtechnicalrequirements. #12;TYPES OF PAINT DIY CHECKLIST WATER-BASED ADVANTAGES · Quick drying time (1 - 6 hours

Peters, Richard

44

Life cycle cost modeling of automotive paint systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vehicle coating is an important component of automotive manufacturing. The paint shop constitutes the plurality of initial investment in an automotive assembly plant, consumes the majority of energy used in the plant's ...

Leitz, Christopher W. (Christopher William), 1976-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Waste Disposal Matrix Type of Chemical University-related Waste Personal Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Disposal Matrix Type of Chemical University-related Waste Personal Waste Batteries, used or unwanted including lithium, alkaline, lead ­ acid or lithium aluminum hydride Chemical Waste Check Disposal of Toxics website for disposal options or Take to Bookstore Biological Waste Biological Waste Residential

Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

46

Bioenergy development from agricultural waste on Northern ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Summary This project will convert agricultural waste, including food waste, rice straw, and other organic farm waste to bioethanol through bacterial ...

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

47

Management of offshore wastes in the United States.  

SciTech Connect

During the process of finding and producing oil and gas in the offshore environment operators generate a variety of liquid and solid wastes. Some of these wastes are directly related to exploration and production activities (e.g., drilling wastes, produced water, treatment workover, and completion fluids) while other types of wastes are associated with human occupation of the offshore platforms (e.g., sanitary and domestic wastes, trash). Still other types of wastes can be considered generic industrial wastes (e.g., scrap metal and wood, wastes paints and chemicals, sand blasting residues). Finally, the offshore platforms themselves can be considered waste materials when their useful life span has been reached. Generally, offshore wastes are managed in one of three ways--onsite discharge, injection, or transportation to shore. This paper describes the regulatory requirements imposed by the government and the approaches used by offshore operators to manage and dispose of wastes in the US.

Veil, J. A.

1998-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

48

Infectious waste feed system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An infectious waste feed system for comminuting infectious waste and feeding the comminuted waste to a combustor automatically without the need for human intervention. The system includes a receptacle for accepting waste materials. Preferably, the receptacle includes a first and second compartment and a means for sealing the first and second compartments from the atmosphere. A shredder is disposed to comminute waste materials accepted in the receptacle to a predetermined size. A trough is disposed to receive the comminuted waste materials from the shredder. A feeding means is disposed within the trough and is movable in a first and second direction for feeding the comminuted waste materials to a combustor.

Coulthard, E. James (York, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

High-energy X-rays shine light on mystery of Picasso's paints | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

energy X-rays shine light on mystery of Picasso's paints energy X-rays shine light on mystery of Picasso's paints By Tona Kunz * February 6, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint LEMONT, Ill. - The Art Institute of Chicago teamed up with Argonne National Laboratory to help unravel a decades-long debate among art scholars about what kind of paint Picasso used to create his masterpieces. The results published last month in the journal Applied Physics A: Materials Science & Processing add significant weight to the widely held theory that Picasso was one of the first master painters to use common house paint rather than traditional artists' paint. That switch in painting material gave birth to a new style of art marked by canvasses covered in glossy images with marbling, muted edges, and occasional errant paint drips, but devoid of brush marks. Fast-drying enamel house paint enabled

50

Industrial Uses of Vegetable OilsChapter 8 Vegetable Oils in Paint and Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils Chapter 8 Vegetable Oils in Paint and Coatings Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 8 Vegetable Oils in Paint and Coatings from the book ...

51

Nuclear waste solidification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High level liquid waste solidification is achieved on a continuous basis by atomizing the liquid waste and introducing the atomized liquid waste into a reaction chamber including a fluidized, heated inert bed to effect calcination of the atomized waste and removal of the calcined waste by overflow removal and by attrition and elutriation from the reaction chamber, and feeding additional inert bed particles to the fluidized bed to maintain the inert bed composition.

Bjorklund, William J. (Richland, WA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

When Van Gogh meets Mandelbrot: Multifractal classification of painting's texture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, a growing interest has emerged for examining the potential of Image Processing tools to assist Art Investigation. Simultaneously, several research works showed the interest of using multifractal analysis for the description of homogeneous textures ... Keywords: Forgery detection, Image processing, Multifractal analysis, Paintings, Period dating, Regularity, Texture classification, Van Gogh, Wavelet leaders

P. Abry; H. Wendt; S. Jaffard

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Knowledge based lacunas detection and segmentation for ancient paintings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lacunas are a common form of the damage that can occur to paintings and more often to murals. Taking Dunhuang murals as research background, a new algorithm to detect and segment the lacuna area from mural images is proposed, which consists of a training ... Keywords: bayesian classification, concurrent detection and segmentation, deterioration murals, graph cuts, image segmentation, mean shift

Jianming Liu; Dongming Lu

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Langley 16-Ft. Transonic Tunnel Pressure Sensitive Paint System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the NASA Langley 16-Ft. Transonic Tunnel Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) System and presents results of a test conducted June 22-23, 2000 in the tunnel to validate the PSP system. The PSP system provides global surface pressure measurements ...

Sprinkle Danny R.; Obara Clifford J.; Amer Tahani R.; Leighty Bradley D.; Carmine Michael T.; Burkett Cecil G.; Sealey Bradley S.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 357: Mud Pits and Waste Dump, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) plan was prepared as a characterization and closure report for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 357, Mud Pits and Waste Dump, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The CAU consists of 14 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 1, 4, 7, 8, 10, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). All of the CASs are found within Yucca Flat except CAS 25-15-01 (Waste Dump). Corrective Action Site 25-15-01 is found in Area 25 in Jackass Flat. Of the 14 CASs in CAU 357, 11 are mud pits, suspected mud pits, or mud processing-related sites, which are by-products of drilling activities in support of the underground nuclear weapons testing done on the NTS. Of the remaining CASs, one CAS is a waste dump, one CAS contains scattered lead bricks, and one CAS has a building associated with Project 31.2. All 14 of the CASs are inactive and abandoned. Clean closure with no further action of CAU 357 will be completed if no contaminants are detected above preliminary action levels. A closure report will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for review and approval upon completion of the field activities. Record of Technical Change No. 1 is dated 3/2004.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2003-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

56

Degradation of transuranic waste drums in underground storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford site is one of several U.S. Department of Energy locations that has transuranic radioactive Waste in storage, resulting from nuclear weapons material production. Transuranic waste has extremely long-lived radionuclides requiring great care in management; such waste is slated for eventual disposal in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. Most of this waste is stored in 208-{ell} (55-gal) drums below ground. At the Hanford site 37 641 drums are stored in several trenches. The drums were stacked up to five high with plywood sheeting between the layers and on top of the stacks. Plastic tarps were used to cover the drums and the plywood, with several feet of earth backfilled on top of the plastic. A fraction of the drums ({approximately}20%) were covered only with earth, not with plywood and plastic. The drums are either painted low-carbon steel or galvanized low-carbon steel. They have been placed in storage from 1970 to 1988, resulting in between 7 and 25 yr of storage. The environment is either soil or air atmosphere. The air atmosphere environment also includes, for some drum surfaces, contact with the underside of the tarp. The temperature of the air atmosphere is relatively uniform. Year-round measurements have not been taken, but available data suggest that the temperature span should be from {approximately} 10 to 30{degrees}C (50 to 86{degrees}F). Humidity in underground storage module mock-ups has been measured at nearly 90% during testing in the summer months. Subsequent tests have shown that the humidity probably drops to 50 to 60% during other seasons. This report describes results of a project to inspect the condition of the waste drums.

Duncan, D.; DeRosa, D.C.; Demiter, J.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland, WA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

57

WIPP TRANSURANIC WASTE How has the WIPP TRU Waste Inventory Changed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of tank waste from the Hanford site that is currently managed as high-level waste. None of this waste has that these Hanford tank wastes will be treated and will eventually be able to meet the WIPP waste acceptance criteria on the Hanford Tank Waste and K-Basin Sludges that were included in the waste inventory for recertifica- tion

58

Tritium Transfer in Porous Concrete Materials Coated with Hydrophobic Paints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contamination and Waste / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology

S. Fukada et al.

59

Analysis of pollution controls for bridge painting. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Research was performed to evaluate pollution control measures for bridge painting. A field comparison was performed to evaluate the following techniques: abrasive blasting with low dusting abrasive; abrasive blasting with metallic abrasive; vacuum blasting with recyclable abrasive; vacuum blasting with slag abrasive; and power tool cleaning. Technical feasibility, productivity and cost were analyzed for the different techniques. Impact on air, water, sediment and soil was measured. A literature and information search was performed on surface preparation techniques for cleaning bridge steel and environmental impact from bridge cleaning activities. The results from the research were used to make recommendations to PennDOT on changes to their Guidelines for Environmental Pollution Controls for Bridge Painting Contracts.

Smith, L.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

A visual language for color-based painting retrieval  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The availability of large image databases is emphasizing the relevance of filters, which permit one to focus on a small subset of data. Visual specification of such filters provides a natural way to express content-oriented queries. To support a high ... Keywords: art, color arrangement, color quality, color semantics, color-based painting retrieval, content-oriented queries, data subsets, expressiveness, filters, grammar, large image databases, symbolic representation, visual language, visual querying paradigm, visual specification

J. M. Corridoni; A. Del Bimbo; S. De Magistris; E. Vicario

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastes include paint" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

NATURE OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES  

SciTech Connect

The integrated processes of nuclear industry are considered to define the nature of wastes. Processes for recovery and preparation of U and Th fuels produce wastes containing concentrated radioactive materials which present problems of confinement and dispersal. Fundamentals of waste treatment are considered from the standpoint of processes in which radioactive materials become a factor such as naturally occurring feed materials, fission products, and elements produced by parasitic neutron capture. In addition, the origin of concentrated fission product wastes is examined, as well as characteristics of present wastes and the level of fission products in wastes. Also, comments are included on high-level wastes from processes other than solvent extraction, active gaseous wastes, and low- to intermediate-level liquid wastes. (J.R.D.)

Culler, F.L. Jr.

1959-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

62

Hazardous Waste Management Training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hazardous Waste Management Training Persons (including faculty, staff and students) working be thoroughly familiar with waste handling and emergency procedures ap- plicable to their job responsibilities before handling hazardous waste. Departments are re- quired to keep records of training for as long

Dai, Pengcheng

63

Waste disposal package  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This is a claim for a waste disposal package including an inner or primary canister for containing hazardous and/or radioactive wastes. The primary canister is encapsulated by an outer or secondary barrier formed of a porous ceramic material to control ingress of water to the canister and the release rate of wastes upon breach on the canister. 4 figs.

Smith, M.J.

1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

64

TSA waste stream and final waste form composition  

SciTech Connect

A final vitrified waste form composition, based upon the chemical compositions of the input waste streams, is recommended for the transuranic-contaminated waste stored at the Transuranic Storage Area of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The quantities of waste are large with a considerable uncertainty in the distribution of various waste materials. It is therefore impractical to mix the input waste streams into an ``average`` transuranic-contaminated waste. As a result, waste stream input to a melter could vary widely in composition, with the potential of affecting the composition and properties of the final waste form. This work examines the extent of the variation in the input waste streams, as well as the final waste form under conditions of adding different amounts of soil. Five prominent Rocky Flats Plant 740 waste streams are considered, as well as nonspecial metals and the ``average`` transuranic-contaminated waste streams. The metals waste stream is the most extreme variation and results indicate that if an average of approximately 60 wt% of the mixture is soil, the final waste form will be predominantly silica, alumina, alkaline earth oxides, and iron oxide. This composition will have consistent properties in the final waste form, including high leach resistance, irrespective of the variation in waste stream. For other waste streams, much less or no soil could be required to yield a leach resistant waste form but with varying properties.

Grandy, J.D.; Eddy, T.L.; Anderson, G.L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Mixed Waste Treatment Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of an ongoing integrated mixed waste program, EPRI has documented nuclear utility industry experience in the on-site treatment of mixed waste. This report reviews all available exclusions/exceptions to EPA permitting requirements for environmentally responsible on-site management of mixed waste. Included is a description of emerging mixed waste treatment technologies along with a detailed evaluation of off-site treatment/disposal facilities.

1996-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

66

DOE SEEKS CONTRACTOR TO DISPOSITION WASTE AT THE ADVANCED MIXED...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The waste includes DOE laboratory and processing wastes from the now closed Rocky Flats in Colorado, and various DOE facilities. The waste is stored in drums, boxes, and...

67

Solid Waste Rules (New Hampshire) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

by the solid waste rules for authorizing construction, operation, and closure of solid waste management facilities. The act includes rules for waste-to-energy operations...

68

High Flux Isotopes Reactor (HFIR) Cooling Towers Demolition Waste Management  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of a joint initiative between Oak Ridge National Laboratory, operated by UT-Battelle, and Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC (BJC) to characterize, package, transport, treat, and dispose of demolition waste from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), Cooling Tower. The demolition and removal of waste from the site was the first critical step in the planned HFIR beryllium reflector replacement outage scheduled. The outage was scheduled to last a maximum of six months. Demolition and removal of the waste was critical because a new tower was to be constructed over the old concrete water basin. A detailed sampling and analysis plan was developed to characterize the hazardous and radiological constituents of the components of the Cooling Tower. Analyses were performed for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) heavy metals and semi-volatile constituents as defined by 40 CFR 261 and radiological parameters including gross alpha, gross beta, gross gamma, alpha-emitting isotopes and beta-emitting isotopes. Analysis of metals and semi-volatile constituents indicated no exceedances of regulatory limits. Analysis of radionuclides identified uranium and thorium and associated daughters. In addition 60Co, 99Tc, 226Rm, and 228Rm were identified. Most of the tower materials were determined to be low level radioactive waste. A small quantity was determined not to be radioactive, or could be decontaminated. The tower was dismantled October 2000 to January 2001 using a detailed step-by-step process to aid waste segregation and container loading. The volume of waste as packaged for treatment was approximately 1982 cubic meters (70,000 cubic feet). This volume was comprised of plastic ({approx}47%), wood ({approx}38%) and asbestos transite ({approx}14%). The remaining {approx}1% consisted of the fire protection piping (contaminated with lead-based paint) and incidental metal from conduit, nails and braces/supports, and sludge from the basin. The waste, except for the asbestos, was volume reduced via a private contract mechanism established by BJC. After volume reduction, the waste was packaged for rail shipment. This large waste management project successfully met cost and schedule goals.

Pudelek, R. E.; Gilbert, W. C.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

69

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 168: Areas 25 and 26 Contaminated Materials and Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's selection of recommended corrective action alternatives (CAAs) to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU)168: Areas 25 and 26 Contaminated Materials and Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Areas 25 and 26 at the NTS in Nevada, CAU 168 is comprised of twelve Corrective Action Sites (CASs). Review of data collected during the corrective action investigation, as well as consideration of current and future operations in Areas 25 and 26 of the NTS, led the way to the development of three CAAs for consideration: Alternative 1 - No Further Action; Alternative 2 - Clean Closure; and Alternative 3 - Close in Place with Administrative Controls. As a result of this evaluation, a combination of all three CAAs is recommended for this CAU. Alternative 1 was the preferred CAA for three CASs, Alternative 2 was the preferred CAA for six CASs (and nearly all of one other CAS), and Alternative 3 was the preferred CAA for two CASs (and a portion of one other CAS) to complete the closure at the CAU 168 sites. These alternatives were judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated as well as all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the sites and elimination of potential future exposure pathways to the contaminated soils at CAU 168.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2003-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

70

Chapter 19 - Nuclear Waste Fund  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Waste Fund 19-1 Nuclear Waste Fund 19-1 CHAPTER 19 NUCLEAR WASTE FUND 1. INTRODUCTION. a. Purpose. This chapter establishes the financial, accounting, and budget policies and procedures for civilian and defense nuclear waste activities, as authorized in Public Law 97-425, the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended, referred to hereafter as the Act. b. Applicability. This chapter applies to all Departmental elements, including the National Nuclear Security Administration, and activities that are funded by the Nuclear Waste Fund (NWF) or the Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal appropriation. c. Background. The Act established the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) and assigned it responsibility for the management

71

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transuranic Waste Baseline inventory report. Volume 2. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This document is the Baseline Inventory Report for the transuranic (alpha-bearing) wastes stored at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. Waste stream profiles including origin, applicable EPA codes, typical isotopic composition, typical waste densities, and typical rates of waste generation for each facility are presented for wastes stored at the WIPP.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Secondary Waste Cast Stone Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Cast Stone a cementitious waste form, has been selected for solidification of this secondary waste stream after treatment in the ETF. The secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. This secondary waste Cast Stone waste form qualification testing plan outlines the testing of the waste form and immobilization process to demonstrate that the Cast Stone waste form can comply with the disposal requirements. Specifications for the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form have not been established. For this testing plan, Cast Stone specifications are derived from specifications for the immobilized LAW glass in the WTP contract, the waste acceptance criteria for the IDF, and the waste acceptance criteria in the IDF Permit issued by the State of Washington. This testing plan outlines the testing needed to demonstrate that the waste form can comply with these waste form specifications and acceptance criteria. The testing program must also demonstrate that the immobilization process can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. This testing plan also outlines the testing needed to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support performance assessment analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form in the IDF

Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

73

Waste canister for storage of nuclear wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A waste canister for storage of nuclear wastes in the form of a solidified glass includes fins supported from the center with the tips of the fins spaced away from the wall to conduct heat away from the center without producing unacceptable hot spots in the canister wall.

Duffy, James B. (Fullerton, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

A Characteristics-Based Approach to Radioactive Waste Classification in Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water reactor mixed low-?level waste viii MOX includes mixed low-?level waste (MLLW) and These include mixed low-?level wastes (MLLW), for

Djokic, Denia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

TRU Waste Sampling Program: Volume I. Waste characterization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Volume I of the TRU Waste Sampling Program report presents the waste characterization information obtained from sampling and characterizing various aged transuranic waste retrieved from storage at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The data contained in this report include the results of gas sampling and gas generation, radiographic examinations, waste visual examination results, and waste compliance with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant-Waste Acceptance Criteria (WIPP-WAC). A separate report, Volume II, contains data from the gas generation studies.

Clements, T.L. Jr.; Kudera, D.E.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

WRAP Module 1 waste analysis plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this waste analysis plan is to document the necessary characterization, sampling, screening, analysis, and waste acceptance criteria for waste received at the WRAP Module 1. Waste expected to be received at WRAP Module 1 includes newly generated and retrieved waste. The newly generated waste will undergo verification prior to treatment, storage, or disposal. Retrieved waste from the burial grounds or above ground storage will undergo further characterization (as needed), treatment, supercompaction, and repackaging

Mayancsik, B.A.

1995-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

77

Simulation of Sparkling and Depth Effect in Paints Roman Durikovic William L. Martens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

particles. The 3D geometry of the simulated flakes creates a view-dependent reflectance pattern that makes or the base coat [Glausch et al. 1998]. Sparkle paint catches the light and reflects it back. It sparkles - exposed particles are embedded in but not fully covered by the resin. Figure 1: The paint finish depends

Durikovic, Roman

78

Analytical Study of High Concentration PCB Paint at the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This report provides results of an analytical study of high concentration PCB paint in a shutdown nuclear test reactor located at the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). The study was designed to obtain data relevant for an evaluation of potential hazards associated with the use of and exposure to such paints.

Lowry, N.J.

1998-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

79

The maintenance of equipment painting in maritime oil platforms is an expensive and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the platform in order to evaluate the conditions of the equipment, estimate the necessary amount of paint on the platform, simplifying and reducing the costs of the process. This work presents the solution createdAbstract The maintenance of equipment painting in maritime oil platforms is an expensive

Barbosa, Alberto

80

Sams Teach Yourself Paint Shop Pro 6 in 24 Hours, 1st edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the Publisher:This easily accessible tutorial uses a friendly, conversational approach to teach you the basics of Paint Shop Pro 6. With its careful, step-by-step approach, Sams Teach Yourself Paint Shop Pro 6 in 24 Hours makes it easy even for ...

T. Michael Clark; Michael Clark / Kris Tufto

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastes include paint" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Pressure Sensitive Paint Evaluation on a Supercritical Wing at Cruise Speed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparative wind tunnel test of various Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) formulations has been performed at the Institute for Aerospace Research (IAR) 1.5 m 1.5 m Trisonic Blowdown Wind Tunnel. The model under study is a prototype supercritical ... Keywords: pressure sensitive paint, wind tunnel testing

Y. Mbarki; Y. Le Sant

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Literature survey of tritiated waste characterization and disposal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterizing, handling, and storing tritiated waste is challenging because of the physical and chemical properties of tritium. Tritium is soluble in many materials, including structural materials such as, stainless steel, structural steel, polymers, concrete and paints. Tritium permeates rapidly into these materials compared to other species, and so parts exposed to tritium are normally contaminated to some degree throughout the bulk. The relatively low kinetic energy of the {beta}-decay causes detecting tritium anywhere but very near the surface of materials to be impossible, because the {beta}-particle is absorbed by the material. Tritium readily exchanges with hydrogen in water vapor, and the resulting tritiated water can permeate polymers, concrete, oil, and the oxide surface films normally present on metals. Most of the tritium contamination in structural metals resides in the surface oxide film and in organic films at the surface, when metals are exposed to tritium at ambient temperature and pressure, whether the exposure is to gas or tritiated water. The most reliable method of assaying tritium is to dissolve samples in a proper liquid scintillant and use {beta}-scintillation counting. Other methods that require less time or are non-destructive (such as smear/counting) are significantly less reliable, but they can be used for routine waste characterization if sample dissolution/liquid scintillation counting is regularly employed to benchmark them.

Clark, E.A.

1996-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

83

Solid Waste and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) Solid Waste and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter of the law that establishes the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency establishes the rules and regulations regarding solid waste. The chapter establishes specific regulations for biomass facilities, which includes permitting, siting, operation, safety guidelines, and closing requirements. Siting regulations include setbacks from waste handling areas for state facilities (1000 feet from jails, schools), requirements for not siting

84

Mixed waste: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the peer-reviewed and edited versions of papers submitted for presentation a the Second International Mixed Waste Symposium. Following the tradition of the First International Mixed Waste Symposium, these proceedings were prepared in advance of the meeting for distribution to participants. The symposium was organized by the Mixed Waste Committee of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The topics discussed at the symposium include: stabilization technologies, alternative treatment technologies, regulatory issues, vitrification technologies, characterization of wastes, thermal technologies, laboratory and analytical issues, waste storage and disposal, organic treatment technologies, waste minimization, packaging and transportation, treatment of mercury contaminated wastes and bioprocessing, and environmental restoration. Individual abstracts are catalogued separately for the data base.

Moghissi, A.A.; Blauvelt, R.K.; Benda, G.A.; Rothermich, N.E. [eds.] [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Safety and Health

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

85

Geophysical investigations of the Baltazor Hot Springs known geothermal resource area and the Painted Hills thermal area, Humboldt County, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geophysical investigations of the Baltazor Hot Springs KGRA and the Painted Hills thermal area, Humboldt Co., Nevada are described. The study includes a gravity survey of 284 stations covering 750 sq km, numerical modeling and interpretation of five detailed gravity profiles, numerical modeling and inerpretation of 21.8 line-km of dipole-dipole electrical resistivity data along four profiles, and a qualitative inerpretation of 38 line-km of self-potential data along eight profiles. The primary purpose of the investigation is to try to determine the nature of the geologic controls of the thermal anomalies at the two areas.

Edquist, R.K.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Delaware Solid Waste Authority (Delaware)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Delaware Solid Waste Authority (DSWA) runs three landfills, all of which recover methane and generate electricity with a total capacity of 24 MWs. The DSWA Solid Waste Plan includes goals,...

87

Mixed waste characterization reference document  

SciTech Connect

Waste characterization and monitoring are major activities in the management of waste from generation through storage and treatment to disposal. Adequate waste characterization is necessary to ensure safe storage, selection of appropriate and effective treatment, and adherence to disposal standards. For some wastes characterization objectives can be difficult and costly to achieve. The purpose of this document is to evaluate costs of characterizing one such waste type, mixed (hazardous and radioactive) waste. For the purpose of this document, waste characterization includes treatment system monitoring, where monitoring is a supplement or substitute for waste characterization. This document establishes a cost baseline for mixed waste characterization and treatment system monitoring requirements from which to evaluate alternatives. The cost baseline established as part of this work includes costs for a thermal treatment technology (i.e., a rotary kiln incinerator), a nonthermal treatment process (i.e., waste sorting, macronencapsulation, and catalytic wet oxidation), and no treatment (i.e., disposal of waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)). The analysis of improvement over the baseline includes assessment of promising areas for technology development in front-end waste characterization, process equipment, off gas controls, and monitoring. Based on this assessment, an ideal characterization and monitoring configuration is described that minimizes costs and optimizes resources required for waste characterization.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Certification Plan, low-level waste Hazardous Waste Handling Facility  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan also incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end-product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; an executive summary of the Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP) for the HWHF and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification. This plan provides guidance from the HWHF to waste generators, waste handlers, and the Waste Certification Specialist to enable them to conduct their activities and carry out their responsibilities in a manner that complies with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Waste generators have the primary responsibility for the proper characterization of LLW. The Waste Certification Specialist verifies and certifies that LBL LLW is characterized, handled, and shipped in accordance with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Certification is the governing process in which LBL personnel conduct their waste generating and waste handling activities in such a manner that the Waste Certification Specialist can verify that the requirements of WHC-WAC are met.

Albert, R.

1992-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

89

Selective paint development. Technical progress report, 5 December 1978-31 July 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eighteen hundred square feet of aluminum foil were coated with thickness-sensitive selective paint. The feasibility of a high speed, large-scale roller coating technique was demonstrated. Coating thermal stability, weathering and humidity resistance, and effects of pigment particle size on coating optical properties were studied. Thickness-insensitive paint with urethane binder was evaluated. A medium scale (1 kg) of thickness-insensitive paint solution was prepared which achieved an ..cap alpha../sub s/ of 0.90 and epsilon of 0.35.

McKelvey, W D; Zimmer, P B; Lin, R J.H.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

ZERO WASTE.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of the thesis was to develop a clear vision on better waste management system. The thesis introduced the sustainable waste management along with (more)

Upadhyaya, Luv

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, 616 Nonradioactive dangerous waste storage facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter provides information on the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of the waste stored at the 616 NRDWSF. A waste analysis plan is included that describes the methodology used for determining waste types.

Price, S.M.

1997-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

92

Certification plan transuranic waste: Hazardous Waste Handling Facility  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of transuranic (TRU) waste handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). The plan incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end-product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; an executive summary of the Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP) for the HWBF; and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Heterogeneous waste processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combination of treatment methods are provided for treatment of heterogeneous waste including: (1) treatment for any organic compounds present; (2) removal of metals from the waste; and, (3) bulk volume reduction, with at least two of the three treatment methods employed and all three treatment methods emplyed where suitable.

Vanderberg, Laura A. (Los Alamos, NM); Sauer, Nancy N. (Los Alamos, NM); Brainard, James R. (Los Alamos, NM); Foreman, Trudi M. (Los Alamos, NM); Hanners, John L. (Los Alamos, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

18 18 19 T he WIPP's first waste receipt, 11 years later than originally planned, was a monumental step forward in the safe management of nuclear waste. Far from ending, however, the WIPP story has really just begun. For the next 35 years, the DOE will face many challenges as it manages a complex shipment schedule from transuranic waste sites across the United States and continues to ensure that the repository complies with all regulatory requirements. The DOE will work to maintain the highest level of safety in waste handling and trans- portation. Coordination with sites Disposal operations require coordination with sites that will ship transuranic waste to the WIPP and include periodic certification of waste characterization and handling practices at those facilities. During the WIPP's

95

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 168: Areas 25 and 26 Contaminated Materials and Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. 0) includes Record of Technical Change No. 1 (dated 8/28/2002), Record of Technical Change No. 2 (dated 9/23/2002), and Record of Technical Change No. 3 (dated 6/2/2004)  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit 168 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 168 consists of a group of twelve relatively diverse Corrective Action Sites (CASs 25-16-01, Construction Waste Pile; 25-16-03, MX Construction Landfill; 25-19-02, Waste Disposal Site; 25-23-02, Radioactive Storage RR Cars; 25-23-18, Radioactive Material Storage; 25-34-01, NRDS Contaminated Bunker; 25-34-02, NRDS Contaminated Bunker; CAS 25-23-13, ETL - Lab Radioactive Contamination; 25-99-16, USW G3; 26-08-01, Waste Dump/Burn Pit; 26-17-01, Pluto Waste Holding Area; 26-19-02, Contaminated Waste Dump No.2). These CASs vary in terms of the sources and nature of potential contamination. The CASs are located and/or associated wit h the following Nevada Test Site (NTS) facilities within three areas. The first eight CASs were in operation between 1958 to 1984 in Area 25 include the Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility; the Missile Experiment Salvage Yard; the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility; the Radioactive Materials Storage Facility; and the Treatment Test Facility Building at Test Cell A. Secondly, the three CASs located in Area 26 include the Project Pluto testing area that operated from 1961 to 1964. Lastly, the Underground Southern Nevada Well (USW) G3 (CAS 25-99-16), a groundwater monitoring well located west of the NTS on the ridgeline of Yucca Mountain, was in operation during the 1980s. Based on site history and existing characterization data obtained to support the data quality objectives process, contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) for CAU 168 are primarily radionuclide; however, the COPCs for several CASs were not defined. To address COPC uncertainty, the analytical program for most CASs will include volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and radionuclides. Upon reviewing historical data and current site conditions, it has been determined that no further characterization is required at USW G3 (CAS 25-99-16) to select the appropriate corrective action. A cesium-137 source was encased in cement within the vadous zone during the drilling of the well (CAS 25-99-16). A corrective action of closure in place with a land-use restriction for drilling near USW G3 is appropriate. This corrective action will be documented in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) for CAU 168. The results of the remaining field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives for the other CASs within CAU 168 in this CADD.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada

2001-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

96

Feed Materials Production Center Waste Management Plan  

SciTech Connect

In the process of producing uranium metal products used in Department of Energy (DOE) defense programs at other DOE facilities, various types of wastes are generated at the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC). Process wastes, both generated and stored, are discussed in the Waste Management Plan and include low-level radioactive waste (LLW), mixed hazardous/radioactive waste, and sanitary/industrial waste. Scrap metal waste and wastes requiring special remediation are also addressed in the Plan. The Waste Management Plan identifies the comprehensive programs developed to address safe storage and disposition of all wastes from past, present, and future operations at the FMPC. Waste streams discussed in this Plan are representative of the waste generated and waste types that concern worker and public health and safety. Budgets and schedules for implementation of waste disposition are also addressed. The waste streams receiving the largest amount of funding include LLW approved for shipment by DOE/ORO to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) (MgF/sub 2/, slag leach filter cake, and neutralized raffinate); remedial action wastes (waste pits, K-65 silo waste); thorium; scrap metal (contaminated and noncontaminated ferrous and copper scrap); construction rubble and soil generated from decontamination and decommissioning of outdated facilities; and low-level wastes that will be handled through the Low-Level Waste Processing and Shipping System (LLWPSS). Waste Management milestones are also provided. The Waste Management Plan is divided into eight major sections: Introduction; Site Waste and Waste Generating Process; Strategy; Projects and Operations; Waste Stream Budgets; Milestones; Quality Assurance for Waste Management; and Environmental Monitoring Program.

Watts, R.E.; Allen, T.; Castle, S.A.; Hopper, J.P.; Oelrich, R.L.

1986-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

Waste Pickup Form User's Guide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Pickup Form User's Guide Updated: 3/13/12 #12;Introduction: Welcome to the Cal State University Fullerton Online Waste Pickup Form User's Guide. In this guide you will learn what you can use phosphorus-32) 3. To request a pickup of universal waste including light bulbs, aerosol cans, batteries

de Lijser, Peter

98

Painting a theoretical world : Stuart Davis and the politics of common experience in the 1930s  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) relationship with American Scene painting. His engagement with these themes suggests that the pictorial reorganization of spatial experience that anchored his practice as a socially engaged artist is inextricably ...

Christ, John X., 1974-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Certification Plan, Radioactive Mixed Waste Hazardous Waste Handling Facility  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of radioactive mixed waste (RMW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). RMW is low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or transuranic (TRU) waste that is co-contaminated with dangerous waste as defined in the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) and the Washington State Dangerous Waste Regulations, 173-303-040 (18). This waste is to be transferred to the Hanford Site Central Waste Complex and Burial Grounds in Hanford, Washington. This plan incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end-product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; an executive summary of the Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP) for the HWHF (Section 4); and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification.

Albert, R.

1992-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

100

Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities Project Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility  

SciTech Connect

This feasibility study report presents a draft design of the Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility (VWISF), which is one of three subprojects of the Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities (IWVF) project. The primary goal of the IWVF project is to design and construct a treatment process system that will vitrify the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) to a final waste form. The project will consist of three subprojects that include the Waste Collection Tanks Facility, the Waste Vitrification Facility (WVF), and the VWISF. The Waste Collection Tanks Facility will provide for waste collection, feed mixing, and surge storage for SBW and newly generated liquid waste from ongoing operations at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The WVF will contain the vitrification process that will mix the waste with glass-forming chemicals or frit and turn the waste into glass. The VWISF will provide a shielded storage facility for the glass until the waste can be disposed at either the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as mixed transuranic waste or at the future national geological repository as high-level waste glass, pending the outcome of a Waste Incidental to Reprocessing determination, which is currently in progress. A secondary goal is to provide a facility that can be easily modified later to accommodate storage of the vitrified high-level waste calcine. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of the VWISF, which would be constructed in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local laws. This project supports the Department of Energys Environmental Management missions of safely storing and treating radioactive wastes as well as meeting Federal Facility Compliance commitments made to the State of Idaho.

Bonnema, Bruce Edward

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastes include paint" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Drilling Waste Management Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Drilling Waste Management Information System is an online resource for technical and regulatory information on practices for managing drilling muds and cuttings, including...

102

Next Generation Waste Glass Melters  

activities as described in EM Tank Waste R&D Plan. Melter project in support of this activity. Facets of WTP processing being investigated/enhanced include:

103

1993 Solid Waste Reference Forecast Summary  

SciTech Connect

This report, which updates WHC-EP-0567, 1992 Solid Waste Reference Forecast Summary, (WHC 1992) forecasts the volumes of solid wastes to be generated or received at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site during the 30-year period from FY 1993 through FY 2022. The data used in this document were collected from Westinghouse Hanford Company forecasts as well as from surveys of waste generators at other US Department of Energy sites who are now shipping or plan to ship solid wastes to the Hanford Site for disposal. These wastes include low-level and low-level mixed waste, transuranic and transuranic mixed waste, and nonradioactive hazardous waste.

Valero, O.J.; Blackburn, C.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Kaae, P.S.; Armacost, L.L.; Garrett, S.M.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Summary Notes from 28 May 2008 Generic Technical Issue...

105

Mixed waste characterization, treatment & disposal focus area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mission of the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (referred to as the Mixed Waste Focus Area or MWFA) is to provide treatment systems capable of treating DOE`s mixed waste in partnership with users, and with continual participation of stakeholders, tribal governments, and regulators. The MWFA deals with the problem of eliminating mixed waste from current and future storage in the DOE complex. Mixed waste is waste that contains both hazardous chemical components, subject to the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and radioactive components, subject to the requirements of the Atomic Energy Act. The radioactive components include transuranic (TRU) and low-level waste (LLW). TRU waste primarily comes from the reprocessing of spent fuel and the use of plutonium in the fabrication of nuclear weapons. LLW includes radioactive waste other than uranium mill tailings, TRU, and high-level waste, including spent fuel.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Nuclear Utility Mixed Waste Stream Characterization Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents industry experience at nuclear utilities in characterizing the hazardous component of potential mixed waste streams. It identifies key considerations for characterizing mixed waste; provides background information, including actual sample results, on the majority of plant processes with a potential to generate mixed waste; and presents a methodology for characterizing mixed waste.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

107

An evaluation of chemical screening test kits for lead in paint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Residential Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction Act (Title X) requires abatement and management of lead-based paint. The purpose of this study was to evaluate three chemical screening test kits using materials and methods from one study and subjecting the results to the statistical analysis of another. The three kits were used to predict the presence of lead in paint at ten weight concentrations from 0.04 to 3.97%. Paint was applied to four wood boards yielding a sample size of 40. Four boards were painted with lead-free paint and used as blanks. All of the boards were tested with the three test kits by an untrained individual having no knowledge of the actual lead content. Sensitivity, specificity, and false positive and negative rates were calculated for the test kit results. The manufactures` detection limits, the observed sensitivity ranged from 1.00 to 0.80, specificity ranged from 1.00 to 0.42, false positive ranged from 0 to 58%, and false negatives ranged from 0 to 20%. At the 0.5% Federal threshold level, the observed sensitivity ranged from 1.00 to 0.94, specificity ranged from 1.00 to 0.5, false positives ranged from 0 to 11.1%, and false negatives ranged from 0 to 20%. The observed false positive and false negative rates for all three kits were found to be significantly lower than those reported in a previous study. These results indicate that the kits perform very well at the Federal threshold, with two of the kits having false negative rates below 12.5% and false positive rates of 3.13%. These results indicate that these two kits would probably be acceptable screening tests for lead in paint.

Oglesby, L.S.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Hazardous Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 6   General refractory disposal options...D landfill (b) Characterized hazardous waste by TCLP

109

Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation: Second Worldwide Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High level wastes Decommissioning of Installations Progessresulting from e.g decommissioning and/or site restorationdo not yet include the decommissioning waste. glass concrete

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Waste-to-Energy Biomass Digester with Decreased Water Consumption  

Waste-to-Energy Biomass Digester with Decreased Water Consumption ... Able to digest multiple types of waste, including bovine, equine, and poultry manure

111

Lesson 7 - Waste from Nuclear Power Plants | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 - Waste from Nuclear Power Plants 7 - Waste from Nuclear Power Plants Lesson 7 - Waste from Nuclear Power Plants This lesson takes a look at the waste from electricity production at nuclear power plants. It considers the different types of waste generated, as well as how we deal with each type of waste. Specific topics covered include: Nuclear Waste Some radioactive Types of radioactive waste Low-level waste High-level waste Disposal and storage Low-level waste disposal Spent fuel storage Waste isolation Reprocessing Decommissioning Lesson 7 - Waste.pptx More Documents & Publications National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management

112

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 534) and identity of liquid waste Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 534

Russell, Lynn

113

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2/2009 Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 200 West Arbor Dr. San Diego, CA 92103 (619 (9:1) OR Biohazard symbol (if untreated) and identity of liquid waste Biohazard symbol Address

Firtel, Richard A.

114

Twelfth annual US DOE low-level waste management conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The papers in this document comprise the proceedings of the Department of Energy's Twelfth Annual Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Conference, which was held in Chicago, Illinois, on August 28 and 29, 1990. General subjects addressed during the conference included: mixed waste, low-level radioactive waste tracking and transportation, public involvement, performance assessment, waste stabilization, financial assurance, waste minimization, licensing and environmental documentation, below-regulatory-concern waste, low-level radioactive waste temporary storage, current challenges, and challenges beyond 1990.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Solid Waste Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities (Rhode  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities (Rhode Island) Solid Waste Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Management Facilities which compost putrescible waste and/or leaf and yard waste are subject to these regulations. The regulations establish permitting, registration, and operational requirements for composting facilities. Operational requirements for putrescible waste facilities include siting, distance, and buffer requirements, as well as standards for avoiding harm to endangered species and contamination of air and water sources. Specific

116

Adaptation of Lighting Styles from Traditional Paintings to Computer Generated Scenes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Image making using Computer Graphics has become extremely popular. Great advances in computer graphics have led to an increasing number of people using this medium. But Computer Graphics on its own is not art unless art principles are applied to it, as is the case with any other art medium. Studying art principles used in traditional paintings is an invaluable way of learning how to create images that tell a story, look believable, evoke appropriate emotions, and remain aesthetically alluring too. With that motivation in mind, a visual analysis of paintings of John Register, Jules Breton and Chris Peters was conducted to better understand their styles. Two paintings by each of the three artists were then selected for an in depth study and based on those, computer generated renderings were produced. Inspired by each artist's style, digital scenes were modeled, lit and rendered using 3D authoring tools. The final rendered images exhibit the lighting style unique to each of the three artists.

Malik, Muzammil Abdul

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Mixed Low-Level Radioactive Waste (MLLW) Primer  

SciTech Connect

This document presents a general overview of mixed low-level waste, including the regulatory definitions and drivers, the manner in which the various kinds of mixed waste are regulated, and a discussion of the waste treatment options.

W. E. Schwinkendorf

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Central waste complex interim safety basis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim safety basis provides the necessary information to conclude that hazards at the Central Waste Complex are controlled and that current and planned activities at the CWC can be conducted safely. CWC is a multi-facility complex within the Solid Waste Management Complex that receives and stores most of the solid wastes generated and received at the Hanford Site. The solid wastes that will be handled at CWC include both currently stored and newly generated low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, contact-handled transuranic, and contact-handled TRU mixed waste.

Cain, F.G.

1995-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document establishes the U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal. Mixed waste generated within the State of Nevada by NNSA/NSO activities is accepted for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site for storage or disposal.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, NEVADA SITE OFFICE

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Acceptable knowledge document for INEEL stored transuranic waste -- Rocky Flats Plant waste. Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document and supporting documentation provide a consistent, defensible, and auditable record of acceptable knowledge for waste generated at the Rocky Flats Plant which is currently in the accessible storage inventory at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The inventory consists of transuranic (TRU) waste generated from 1972 through 1989. Regulations authorize waste generators and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities to use acceptable knowledge in appropriate circumstances to make hazardous waste determinations. Acceptable knowledge includes information relating to plant history, process operations, and waste management, in addition to waste-specific data generated prior to the effective date of the RCRA regulations. This document is organized to provide the reader a comprehensive presentation of the TRU waste inventory ranging from descriptions of the historical plant operations that generated and managed the waste to specific information about the composition of each waste group. Section 2 lists the requirements that dictate and direct TRU waste characterization and authorize the use of the acceptable knowledge approach. In addition to defining the TRU waste inventory, Section 3 summarizes the historical operations, waste management, characterization, and certification activities associated with the inventory. Sections 5.0 through 26.0 describe the waste groups in the inventory including waste generation, waste packaging, and waste characterization. This document includes an expanded discussion for each waste group of potential radionuclide contaminants, in addition to other physical properties and interferences that could potentially impact radioassay systems.

NONE

1998-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastes include paint" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

REGULATORY STRATEGIES TO MINIMIZE GENERATION OF REGULATED WASTES FROM CLEANUP, CONTINUED USE OR DECOMMISSIONING OF NUCLEAR FACILITIES CONTAMINATED WITH POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (PCBS) - 11198  

SciTech Connect

Disposal costs for liquid PCB radioactive waste are among the highest of any category of regulated waste. The high cost is driven by the fact that disposal options are extremely limited. Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) regulations require most liquids with PCBs at concentration of {ge} 50 parts-per-million to be disposed by incineration or equivalent destructive treatment. Disposal fees can be as high as $200 per gallon. This figure does not include packaging and the cost to transport the waste to the disposal facility, or the waste generator's labor costs for managing the waste prior to shipment. Minimizing the generation of liquid radioactive PCB waste is therefore a significant waste management challenge. PCB spill cleanups often generate large volumes of waste. That is because the removal of PCBs typically requires the liberal use of industrial solvents followed by a thorough rinsing process. In a nuclear facility, the cleanup process may be complicated by the presence of radiation and other occupational hazards. Building design and construction features, e.g., the presence of open grating or trenches, may also complicate cleanup. In addition to the technical challenges associated with spill cleanup, selection of the appropriate regulatory requirements and approach may be challenging. The TSCA regulations include three different sections relating to the cleanup of PCB contamination or spills. EPA has also promulgated a separate guidance policy for fresh PCB spills that is published as Subpart G of 40 CFR 761 although it is not an actual regulation. Applicability is based on the circumstances of each contamination event or situation. Other laws or regulations may also apply. Identification of the allowable regulatory options is important. Effective communication with stakeholders, particularly regulators, is just as important. Depending on the regulatory path that is taken, cleanup may necessitate the generation of large quantities of regulated waste. Allowable options must be evaluated carefully in order to reduce compliance risks, protect personnel, limit potential negative impacts on facility operations, and minimize the generation of wastes subject to TSCA. This paper will identify critical factors in selecting the appropriate TSCA regulatory path in order to minimize the generation of radioactive PCB waste and reduce negative impacts to facilities. The importance of communicating pertinent technical issues with facility staff, regulatory personnel, and subsequently, the public, will be discussed. Key points will be illustrated by examples from five former production reactors at the DOE Savannah River Site. In these reactors a polyurethane sealant was used to seal piping penetrations in the biological shield walls. During the intense neutron bombardment that occurred during reactor operation, the sealant broke down into a thick, viscous material that seeped out of the piping penetrations over adjacent equipment and walls. Some of the walls were painted with a PCB product. PCBs from the paint migrated into the degraded sealant, creating PCB 'spill areas' in some of these facilities. The regulatory cleanup approach selected for each facility was based on its operational status, e.g., active, inactive or undergoing decommissioning. The selected strategies served to greatly minimize the generation of radioactive liquid PCB waste. It is expected that this information would be useful to other DOE sites, DOD facilities, and commercial nuclear facilities constructed prior to the 1979 TSCA ban on most manufacturing and uses of PCBs.

Lowry, N.

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

122

Nuclear waste incineration technology status  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The incinerators developed and/or used for radioactive waste combustion are discussed and suggestions are made for uses of incineration in radioactive waste management programs and for incinerators best suited for specific applications. Information on the amounts and types of radioactive wastes are included to indicate the scope of combustible wastes being generated and in existence. An analysis of recently developed radwaste incinerators is given to help those interested in choosing incinerators for specific applications. Operating information on US and foreign incinerators is also included to provide additional background information. Development needs are identified for extending incinerator applications and for establishing commercial acceptance.

Ziegler, D.L.; Lehmkuhl, G.D.; Meile, L.J.

1981-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

Waste Management | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Management Waste Management Nuclear Materials Disposition In fulfilling its mission, EM frequently manages and completes disposition of surplus nuclear materials and spent nuclear fuel. These are not waste. They are nuclear materials no longer needed for national security or other purposes, including spent nuclear fuel, special nuclear materials (as defined by the Atomic Energy Act) and other Nuclear Materials. Read more Tank Waste and Waste Processing The Department has approximately 88 million gallons of liquid waste stored in underground tanks and approximately 4,000 cubic meters of solid waste derived from the liquids stored in bins. The current DOE estimated cost for retrieval, treatment and disposal of this waste exceeds $50 billion to be spent over several decades.

124

Commercialization of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for lead-in-paint inspection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was undertaken to determine if laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) can be a practical and competitive alternative to x-ray fluorescence (XRF) methods for lead-in-paint inspection. Experiments in the laboratory confirmed that LIBS is suitable for detecting lead in paint at the hazard levels defined by federal agencies. Although we compared speed, function, and cost, fundamental differences between the XRF and LIBS measurements limited our ability to make a quantitative performance comparison. While the LIBS method can achieve the required sensitivity and offers a way to obtain unique information during inspection, the current component costs will likely restrict interest in the method to niche applications.

Myers, Richard A.; Kolodziejski, Noah J.; Squillante, Michael R

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Hazardous Waste Program (Alabama)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This rule states criteria for identifying the characteristics of hazardous waste and for listing hazardous waste, lists of hazardous wastes, standards for the management of hazardous waste and...

126

EPA streamlines requirements for universal wastes  

SciTech Connect

The Universal Waste rule issued Feb. 11, 1993, fosters the recycling of certain universal wastes typically discarded by consumers. Because these wastes are disposed of from households, they are excluded from hazardous waste regulation under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). However, any commercial entity that accepts these wastes is subject to full RCRA regulation. Hence, there has been little incentive to recycle these wastes. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has concluded certain universal wastes are hazardous and are predominantly generated in municipal settings both household and commercial. These wastes could benefit from and safely be managed under a regulatory scheme less burdensome than the full RCRA Subtitle C program now applicable to these waters. The Universal Waste rule proposes requirements for used nickel-cadmium and small, sealed lead-acid batteries and canceled pesticides. The Agency is considering expanding the scope of the rule to other forms of universal wastes, including antifreeze and light bulbs.

Bryant, C. (Technical Group Inc., Washington, DC (United States))

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Treatment of organic waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An organic waste containing at least one element selected from the group consisting of strontium, cesium, iodine and ruthenium is treated to achieve a substantial reduction in the volume of the waste and provide for fixation of the selected element in an inert salt. The method of treatment comprises introducing the organic waste and a source of oxygen into a molten salt bath maintained at an elevated temperature to produce solid and gaseous reaction products. The gaseous reaction products comprise carbon dioxide and water vapor, and the solid reaction products comprise the inorganic ash constituents of the organic waste and the selected element which is retained in the molten salt. The molten salt bath comprises one or more alkali metal carbonates, and may optionally include from 1 to about 25 wt.% of an alkali metal sulfate.

Grantham, LeRoy F. (Calabasas, CA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Waste= Capital.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The evolution of manufacturing practices over the last century has led to the creation of excess waste during the production process, depleting resources and overwhelming (more)

Stidham, Steve P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Painted Hills B&C Wind Farm I | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Painted Hills B&C Wind Farm I Painted Hills B&C Wind Farm I Jump to: navigation, search Name Painted Hills B&C Wind Farm I Facility Painted Hills B&C Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Developer Zond Systems Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location San Gorgonio CA Coordinates 33.9095°, -116.734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9095,"lon":-116.734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

130

Painted Hills B&C Wind Farm II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Painted Hills B&C Wind Farm II Painted Hills B&C Wind Farm II Jump to: navigation, search Name Painted Hills B&C Wind Farm II Facility Painted Hills B&C Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Developer Zond Systems Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location San Gorgonio CA Coordinates 33.9095°, -116.734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9095,"lon":-116.734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

131

Geology and alteration of the Baltazor Hot Springs and Painted Hills Thermal Areas, Humboldt County, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Baltazor Hot Springs KGRA and nearby Painted Hills thermal area are situated in Humboldt County, northwestern Nevada along the northwestern margin of the Basin and Range province. The oldest rocks exposed in the Baltazor area are eugeosynclinal metasedimentary and subordinate metavolcanic rocks of Permian to Triassic age intruded by Cretaceous diorite and quartz diorite. These are overlain by a thick volcanic and volcaniclastic sequence of Miocene through Pliocene age. Pre-Tertiary rocks are not exposed in the Painted Hills. Principal structures in the Baltazor area are intersecting high-angle normal faults which trend northerly and northwesterly. Quaternary landslides are dominant in the Painted Hills, although northerly- and northwesterly-trending high-angle faults are also present. Hydrothermal alteration and mineralization at Baltazor and in the Painted Hills are of several different styles and ages. Copper-bearing quartz veins in pre-Tertiary rocks antedate Cenozoic volcanism and sedimentation. The heat source for thermal phenomena and alteration in both areas is probably deep fault-controlled fluid circulation coupled with an abnormally high regional thermal gradient. (MHR)

Hulen, J.B.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Treatment of halogen-containing waste and other waste materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for treating a halogen-containing waste material. The process provides a bath of molten glass containing a sacrificial metal oxide capable of reacting with a halogen in the waste material. The sacrificial metal oxide is present in the molten glass in at least a stoichiometric amount with respect to the halogen in the waste material. The waste material is introduced into the bath of molten glass to cause a reaction between the halogen in the waste material and the sacrificial metal oxide to yield a metal halide. The metal halide is a gas at the temperature of the molten glass. The gaseous metal halide is separated from the molten glass and contacted with an aqueous scrubber solution of an alkali metal hydroxide to yield a metal hydroxide or metal oxide-containing precipitate and a soluble alkali metal halide. The precipitate is then separated from the aqueous scrubber solution. The molten glass containing the treated waste material is removed from the bath as a waste glass. The process of the invention can be used to treat all types of waste material including radioactive wastes. The process is particularly suited for separating halogens from halogen-containing wastes. 3 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

133

Treatment of halogen-containing waste and other waste materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for treating a halogen-containing waste material. The process provides a bath of molten glass containing a sacrificial metal oxide capable of reacting with a halogen in the waste material. The sacrificial metal oxide is present in the molten glass in at least a stoichiometric amount with respect to the halogen in the waste material. The waste material is introduced into the bath of molten glass to cause a reaction between the halogen in the waste material and the sacrificial metal oxide to yield a metal halide. The metal halide is a gas at the temperature of the molten glass. The gaseous metal halide is separated from the molten glass and contacted with an aqueous scrubber solution of an alkali metal hydroxide to yield a metal hydroxide or metal oxide-containing precipitate and a soluble alkali metal halide. The precipitate is then separated from the aqueous scrubber solution. The molten glass containing the treated waste material is removed from the bath as a waste glass. The process of the invention can be used to treat all types of waste material including radioactive wastes. The process is particularly suited for separating halogens from halogen-containing wastes.

Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Beahm, Edward C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Parker, George W. (Concord, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT PHASE I: AUDIT OF CURRENT PRACTICE The Mushroom Waste Management Project (MWMP) was initiated by Environment Canada, the BC Ministry of solid and liquid wastes generated at mushroom producing facilities. Environmental guidelines

135

Waste management system alternatives for treatment of wastes from spent fuel reprocessing  

SciTech Connect

This study was performed to help identify a preferred TRU waste treatment alternative for reprocessing wastes with respect to waste form performance in a geologic repository, near-term waste management system risks, and minimum waste management system costs. The results were intended for use in developing TRU waste acceptance requirements that may be needed to meet regulatory requirements for disposal of TRU wastes in a geologic repository. The waste management system components included in this analysis are waste treatment and packaging, transportation, and disposal. The major features of the TRU waste treatment alternatives examined here include: (1) packaging (as-produced) without treatment (PWOT); (2) compaction of hulls and other compactable wastes; (3) incineration of combustibles with cementation of the ash plus compaction of hulls and filters; (4) melting of hulls and failed equipment plus incineration of combustibles with vitrification of the ash along with the HLW; (5a) decontamination of hulls and failed equipment to produce LLW plus incineration and incorporation of ash and other inert wastes into HLW glass; and (5b) variation of this fifth treatment alternative in which the incineration ash is incorporated into a separate TRU waste glass. The six alternative processing system concepts provide progressively increasing levels of TRU waste consolidation and TRU waste form integrity. Vitrification of HLW and intermediate-level liquid wastes (ILLW) was assumed in all cases.

McKee, R.W.; Swanson, J.L.; Daling, P.M.; Clark, L.L.; Craig, R.A.; Nesbitt, J.F.; McCarthy, D.; Franklin, A.L.; Hazelton, R.F.; Lundgren, R.A.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Treatment of mercury containing waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for the treatment of mercury containing waste in a single reaction vessel which includes a) stabilizing the waste with sulfur polymer cement under an inert atmosphere to form a resulting mixture and b) encapsulating the resulting mixture by heating the mixture to form a molten product and casting the molten product as a monolithic final waste form. Additional sulfur polymer cement can be added in the encapsulation step if needed, and a stabilizing additive can be added in the process to improve the leaching properties of the waste form.

Kalb, Paul D. (Wading River, NY); Melamed, Dan (Gaithersburg, MD); Patel, Bhavesh R (Elmhurst, NY); Fuhrmann, Mark (Babylon, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Management of Solid Waste (Oklahoma) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management of Solid Waste (Oklahoma) Management of Solid Waste (Oklahoma) Management of Solid Waste (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality The Solid Waste Management Division of the Department of Environmental Quality regulates solid waste disposal or any person who generates, collects, transports, processes, and/or disposes of solid waste and/or waste tires. The following solid waste disposal facilities require a solid waste permit prior to construction and/or operation: land disposal facilities; solid waste processing facilities, including: transfer stations; solid waste incinerators receiving waste from off-site sources; regulated medical waste

138

Lead Speciation in Indoor Dust: A Case Study to Assess Old Paint Contribution in a Canadian Urban House  

SciTech Connect

Residents in older homes may experience increased lead (Pb) exposures due to release of lead from interior paints manufactured in past decades, especially pre-1960s. The objective of the study was to determine the speciation of Pb in settled dust from an urban home built during WWII. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and micro-X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were performed on samples of paint (380-2,920 mg Pb kg{sup -1}) and dust (200-1,000 mg Pb kg{sup -1}) collected prior to renovation. All dust samples exhibited a Pb XANES signature similar to that of Pb found in paint. Bulk XANES and micro-XRD identified Pb species commonly found as white paint pigments (Pb oxide, Pb sulfate, and Pb carbonate) as well as rutile, a titanium-based pigment, in the <150 m house dust samples. In the dust fraction <36 {mu}m, half of the Pb was associated with the Fe-oxyhydroxides, suggesting additional contribution of outdoor sources to Pb in the finer dust. These results confirm that old paints still contribute to Pb in the settled dust for this 65-year-old home. The Pb speciation also provided a clearer understanding of the Pb bioaccessibility: Pb carbonate > Pb oxide > Pb sulfate. This study underscores the importance of taking precautions to minimize exposures to Pb in house dust, especially in homes where old paint is exposed due to renovations or deterioration of painted surfaces.

S Beauchemin; L MacLean; P Rasmussen

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

Lead speciation in indoor dust: a case study to assess old paint contribution in a Canadian urban house  

SciTech Connect

Residents in older homes may experience increased lead (Pb) exposures due to release of lead from interior paints manufactured in past decades, especially pre-1960s. The objective of the study was to determine the speciation of Pb in settled dust from an urban home built during WWII. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and micro-X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were performed on samples of paint (380-2,920 mg Pb kg{sup -1}) and dust (200-1,000 mg Pb kg{sup -1}) collected prior to renovation. All dust samples exhibited a Pb XANES signature similar to that of Pb found in paint. Bulk XANES and micro-XRD identified Pb species commonly found as white paint pigments (Pb oxide, Pb sulfate, and Pb carbonate) as well as rutile, a titanium-based pigment, in the <150 {micro}m house dust samples. In the dust fraction <36 {micro}m, half of the Pb was associated with the Fe-oxyhydroxides, suggesting additional contribution of outdoor sources to Pb in the finer dust. These results confirm that old paints still contribute to Pb in the settled dust for this 65-year-old home. The Pb speciation also provided a clearer understanding of the Pb bioaccessibility: Pb carbonate > Pb oxide > Pb sulfate. This study underscores the importance of taking precautions to minimize exposures to Pb in house dust, especially in homes where old paint is exposed due to renovations or deterioration of painted surfaces.

Beauchemin, Suzanne; MacLean, Lachlan C.W.; Rasmussen, Pat E. (Health Canada); (NRC)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

140

SRS - Programs - Liquid Waste Disposition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquid Waste Disposition Liquid Waste Disposition This includes both the solidification of highly radioactive liquid wastes stored in SRS's tank farms and disposal of liquid low-level waste generated as a by-product of the separations process and tank farm operations. This low-level waste is treated in the Effluent Treatment Facility. High-activity liquid waste is generated at SRS as by-products from the processing of nuclear materials for national defense, research and medical programs. The waste, totaling about 36 million gallons, is currently stored in 49 underground carbon-steel waste tanks grouped into two "tank farms" at SRS. While the waste is stored in the tanks, it separates into two parts: a sludge that settles on the bottom of the tank, and a liquid supernate that resides on top of the sludge. The waste is reduced to about 30 percent of its original volume by evaporation. The condensed evaporator "overheads" are transferred to the Effluent Treatment Project for final cleanup prior to release to the environment. As the concentrate cools a portion of it crystallizes forming solid saltcake. The concentrated supernate and saltcake are less mobile and therefore less likely to escape to the environment in the event of a tank crack or leak.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastes include paint" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE January 2010 Prepared for the Interagency DE-AC05-76RL01830 Waste Disposal Workshops: Anthrax-Contaminated Waste AM Lesperance JF Upton SL #12;#12;PNNL-SA-69994 Waste Disposal Workshops: Anthrax- Contaminated Waste AM Lesperance JF Upton SL

142

Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal.

U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan  

SciTech Connect

As a generator of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the Hanford Site must ensure that its TRU waste meets the requirements of US. Department of Energy (DOE) 0 435.1, ''Radioactive Waste Management,'' and the Contact-Handled (CH) Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP-WAC). WIPP-WAC requirements are derived from the WIPP Technical Safety Requirements, WIPP Safety Analysis Report, TRUPACT-II SARP, WIPP Land Withdrawal Act, WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 191/194 Compliance Certification Decision. The WIPP-WAC establishes the specific physical, chemical, radiological, and packaging criteria for acceptance of defense TRU waste shipments at WIPP. The WPP-WAC also requires that participating DOE TRU waste generator/treatment/storage sites produce site-specific documents, including a certification plan, that describe their program for managing TRU waste and TRU waste shipments before transferring waste to WIPP. Waste characterization activities provide much of the data upon which certification decisions are based. Waste characterization requirements for TRU waste and TRU mixed waste that contains constituents regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) are established in the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Waste Analysis Plan (WAP). The Hanford Site Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) (HNF-2599) implements the applicable requirements in the WAP and includes the qualitative and quantitative criteria for making hazardous waste determinations. The Hanford Site must also ensure that its TRU waste destined for disposal at WPP meets requirements for transport in the Transuranic Package Transporter-11 (TRUPACT-11). The US. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) establishes the TRUPACT-11 requirements in the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package (TRUPACT-11 SARP). In addition, a TRU waste is eligible for disposal at WIPP only if it has been generated in whole or in part by one or more of the activities listed in Section 10101(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. DOE sites must determine that each waste stream to be disposed of at WIPP is ''defense'' TRU waste. (See also the definition of ''defense'' TRU waste.). Only CH TRU wastes meeting the requirements of the QAPjP, WIPP-WAP, WPP-WAC, and other requirements documents described above will be accepted for transportation and disposal at WIPP.

GREAGER, T.M.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan  

SciTech Connect

As a generator of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the Hanford Site must ensure that its TRU waste meets the requirements of US. Department of Energy (DOE) 0 435.1, ''Radioactive Waste Management,'' and the Contact-Handled (CH) Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP-WAC). WIPP-WAC requirements are derived from the WIPP Technical Safety Requirements, WIPP Safety Analysis Report, TRUPACT-II SARP, WIPP Land Withdrawal Act, WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 191/194 Compliance Certification Decision. The WIPP-WAC establishes the specific physical, chemical, radiological, and packaging criteria for acceptance of defense TRU waste shipments at WIPP. The WPP-WAC also requires that participating DOE TRU waste generator/treatment/storage sites produce site-specific documents, including a certification plan, that describe their program for managing TRU waste and TRU waste shipments before transferring waste to WIPP. Waste characterization activities provide much of the data upon which certification decisions are based. Waste characterization requirements for TRU waste and TRU mixed waste that contains constituents regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) are established in the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Waste Analysis Plan (WAP). The Hanford Site Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) (HNF-2599) implements the applicable requirements in the WAP and includes the qualitative and quantitative criteria for making hazardous waste determinations. The Hanford Site must also ensure that its TRU waste destined for disposal at WPP meets requirements for transport in the Transuranic Package Transporter-11 (TRUPACT-11). The US. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) establishes the TRUPACT-11 requirements in the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package (TRUPACT-11 SARP). In addition, a TRU waste is eligible for disposal at WIPP only if it has been generated in whole or in part by one or more of the activities listed in Section 10101(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. DOE sites must determine that each waste stream to be disposed of at WIPP is ''defense'' TRU waste. (See also the definition of ''defense'' TRU waste.). Only CH TRU wastes meeting the requirements of the QAPjP, WIPP-WAP, WPP-WAC, and other requirements documents described above will be accepted for transportation and disposal at WIPP.

GREAGER, T.M.

2000-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

145

Energy and solid/hazardous waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report addresses the past and potential future solid and hazardous waste impacts from energy development, and summarizes the major environmental, legislation applicable to solid and hazardous waste generation and disposal. A glossary of terms and acronyms used to describe and measure solid waste impacts of energy development is included. (PSB)

None

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Environmental evaluation of municipal waste prevention  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: > Influence of prevention on waste management systems, excluding avoided production, is relatively minor. > Influence of prevention on overall supply chain, including avoided production is very significant. > Higher relative benefits of prevention are observed in waste management systems relying mainly on landfills. - Abstract: Waste prevention has been addressed in the literature in terms of the social and behavioural aspects, but very little quantitative assessment exists of the environmental benefits. Our study evaluates the environmental consequences of waste prevention on waste management systems and on the wider society, using life-cycle thinking. The partial prevention of unsolicited mail, beverage packaging and food waste is tested for a 'High-tech' waste management system relying on high energy and material recovery and for a 'Low-tech' waste management system with less recycling and relying on landfilling. Prevention of 13% of the waste mass entering the waste management system generates a reduction of loads and savings in the waste management system for the different impacts categories; 45% net reduction for nutrient enrichment and 12% reduction for global warming potential. When expanding our system and including avoided production incurred by the prevention measures, large savings are observed (15-fold improvement for nutrient enrichment and 2-fold for global warming potential). Prevention of food waste has the highest environmental impact saving. Prevention generates relatively higher overall relative benefit for 'Low-tech' systems depending on landfilling. The paper provides clear evidence of the environmental benefits of waste prevention and has specific relevance in climate change mitigation.

Gentil, Emmanuel C.; Gallo, Daniele [Department of Environmental Engineering, Building 115, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H., E-mail: thho@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Building 115, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

Waste Hoist  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

45-ton Rope-Guide Friction Hoist Completely enclosed (for contamination control), the waste hoist at WIPP is a modern friction hoist with rope guides. With a 45-ton capacity, it...

148

WEB RESOURCE: Radioactive Waste Management in Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 8, 2007 ... A glossary of terms and public discussion papers on current and past projects are included. Citation: "Radioactive Waste Management in...

149

Management and Technology Overview of Electronic Wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 28, 2011 ... The current paper reviewed the recycling process for waste PWB materials, including mechanical recycling, combustion for energy recovery...

150

Physical and chemical characteristics of candidate wastes for tailored ceramics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tailored Ceramics offer a potential alternative to glass as an immobilization form for nuclear waste disposal. The form is applicable to the wide variety of existing wastes and may be tailored to suit the diverse environments being considered as disposal sites. Consideration of any waste product form, however, require extensive knowledge of the waste to be incorporated. A varity of waste types are under consideration for incorporation into a Tailored Ceramic form. This report integrates and summarizes chemical and physical characteristics of the candidate wastes. Included here are data on Savannah River Purex Process waste; Hanford bismuth phosphate, uranium recovery, redox, Purex, evaporator and residual liquid wastes; Idaho Falls calcine; Nuclear Fuel Services Purex and Thorex wastes and miscellaneous waste including estimated waste stream compositions produced by possible future commercial fuel reprocessing.

Mitchell, M.E.

1980-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Waste form product characteristics  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy has operated nuclear facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to support national interests for several decades. Since 1953, it has supported the development of technologies for the storage and reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels (SNF) and the resultant wastes. However, the 1992 decision to discontinue reprocessing of SNF has left nearly 768 MT of SNF in storage at the INEL with unspecified plans for future dispositioning. Past reprocessing of these fuels for uranium and other resource recovery has resulted in the production of 3800 M{sup 3} calcine and a total inventory of 7600 M{sup 3} of radioactive liquids (1900 M{sup 3} destined for immediate calcination and the remaining sodium-bearing waste requiring further treatment before calcination). These issues, along with increased environmental compliance within DOE and its contractors, mandate operation of current and future facilities in an environmentally responsible manner. This will require satisfactory resolution of spent fuel and waste disposal issues resulting from the past activities. A national policy which identifies requirements for the disposal of SNF and high level wastes (HLW) has been established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) Sec.8,(b) para(3)) [1982]. The materials have to be conditioned or treated, then packaged for disposal while meeting US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. The spent fuel and HLW located at the INEL will have to be put into a form and package that meets these regulatory criteria. The emphasis of Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) future operations has shifted toward investigating, testing, and selecting technologies to prepare current and future spent fuels and waste for final disposal. This preparation for disposal may include mechanical, physical and/or chemical processes, and may differ for each of the various fuels and wastes.

Taylor, L.L.; Shikashio, R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Hanford Site solid waste acceptance criteria  

SciTech Connect

Order 5820.2A requires that each treatment, storage, and/or disposal facility (referred to in this document as TSD unit) that manages low-level or transuranic waste (including mixed waste and TSCA PCB waste) maintain waste acceptance criteria. These criteria must address the various requirements to operate the TSD unit in compliance with applicable safety and environmental requirements. This document sets forth the baseline criteria for acceptance of radioactive waste at TSD units operated by WMH. The criteria for each TSD unit have been established to ensure that waste accepted can be managed in a manner that is within the operating requirements of the unit, including environmental regulations, DOE Orders, permits, technical safety requirements, waste analysis plans, performance assessments, and other applicable requirements. Acceptance criteria apply to the following TSD units: the Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBG) including both the nonregulated portions of the LLBG and trenches 31 and 34 of the 218-W-5 Burial Ground for mixed waste disposal; Central Waste Complex (CWC); Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP); and T Plant Complex. Waste from all generators, both from the Hanford Site and from offsite facilities, must comply with these criteria. Exceptions can be granted as provided in Section 1.6. Specific waste streams could have additional requirements based on the 1901 identified TSD pathway. These requirements are communicated in the Waste Specification Records (WSRds). The Hanford Site manages nonradioactive waste through direct shipments to offsite contractors. The waste acceptance requirements of the offsite TSD facility must be met for these nonradioactive wastes. This document does not address the acceptance requirements of these offsite facilities.

Ellefson, M.D.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Investigation about the effects of exterior surface paint color on temperature development in aboveground pipeline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A practical analytical model for predicting temperature development of incompressible flow inside an aboveground pipeline has been constructed and presented in this research work. The outer surface of the pipeline is exposed to solar radiation and wind stream. The radiation heat exchange with ambient is also taken into account. The effects of exterior surface paint color represented by emissivity and absorptivity, have been studied. The model has been developed to study crude oil flow temperature development through a specific pipeline. The results obtained by the model show that the bulk temperature inclined to a limiting value in some distance which affected mainly by Reynolds numbers. It is found that emissivity and absorptivity of surface are predominant parameters in temperature development in an aboveground pipeline flow which can increase or decrease pipe surface and fluid temperature especially for low Reynolds number flow. Based on the results which indicated significantly of exterior surface paint color, one should choose the paint color by considering its effects on temperature development. (author)

Farzaneh-Gord, Mahmood; Rasekh, Alireza; Nabati, Amin; Saadat, Morteza [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Shahrood University of Technology, Shahrood (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Solvent Extraction of Chemical Attribution Signature Compounds from Painted Wall Board: Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes work that developed a robust solvent extraction procedure for recovery of chemical attribution signature (CAS) compound dimethyl methyl phosphonate (DMMP) (as well as diethyl methyl phosphonate (DEMP), diethyl methyl phosphonothioate (DEMPT), and diisopropyl methyl phosphonate (DIMP)) from painted wall board (PWB), which was selected previously as the exposed media by the chemical attribution scientific working group (CASWG). An accelerated solvent extraction approach was examined to determine the most effective method of extraction from PWB. Three different solvent systems were examined, which varied in solvent strength and polarity (i.e., 1:1 dichloromethane : acetone,100% methanol, and 1% isopropanol in pentane) with a 1:1 methylene chloride : acetone mixture having the most robust and consistent extraction for four original target organophosphorus compounds. The optimum extraction solvent was determined based on the extraction efficiency of the target analytes from spiked painted wallboard as determined by gas chromatography x gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCxGC-MS) analysis of the extract. An average extraction efficiency of approximately 60% was obtained for these four compounds. The extraction approach was further demonstrated by extracting and detecting the chemical impurities present in neat DMMP that was vapor-deposited onto painted wallboard tickets.

Wahl, Jon H.; Colburn, Heather A.

2009-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

155

Light response of pure CsI calorimeter crystals painted with wavelength-shifting lacquer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have measured scintillation properties of pure CsI crystals used in the shower calorimeter built for a precise determination of the pi+ -> pi0 e+ nu decay rate at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). All 240 individual crystals painted with a special wavelength-shifting solution were examined in a custom-build detection apparatus (RASTA=radioactive source tomography apparatus) that uses a 137Cs radioactive gamma source, cosmic muons and a light emitting diode as complementary probes of the scintillator light response. We have extracted the total light output, axial light collection nonuniformities and timing responses of the individual CsI crystals. These results predict improved performance of the 3 pi sr PIBETA calorimeter due to the painted lateral surfaces of 240 CsI crystals. The wavelength-shifting paint treatment did not affect appreciably the total light output and timing resolution of our crystal sample. The predicted energy resolution for positrons and photons in the energy range of 10-100 MeV was nevertheless improved due to the more favorable axial light collection probability variation. We have compared simulated calorimeter ADC spectra due to 70 MeV positrons and photons with a Monte Carlo calculation of an ideal detector light response.

E. Frlez; Ch. Broennimann; B. Krause; D. Pocanic; D. Renker; S. Ritt; P. L. Slocum; I. Supek; H. P. Wirtz

2000-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

156

Advanced Electrochemical Waste Forms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes ... Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b.

157

Hanford Facility Annual Dangerous Waste Report Calendar Year 2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hanford CY 2002 dangerous waste generation and management forms. The Hanford Facility Annual Dangerous Waste Report (ADWR) is prepared to meet the requirements of Washington Administrative Code Sections 173-303-220, Generator Reporting, and 173-303-390, Facility Reporting. In addition, the ADWR is required to meet Hanford Facility RCRA Permit Condition I.E.22, Annual Reporting. The ADWR provides summary information on dangerous waste generation and management activities for the Calendar Year for the Hanford Facility EPA ID number assigned to the Department of Energy for RCRA regulated waste, as well as Washington State only designated waste and radioactive mixed waste. The Solid Waste Information and Tracking System (SWITS) database is utilized to collect and compile the large array of data needed for preparation of this report. Information includes details of waste generated on the Hanford Facility, waste generated offsite and sent to Hanford for management, and other waste management activities conducted at Hanford, including treatment, storage, and disposal. Report details consist of waste descriptions and weights, waste codes and designations, and waste handling codes. In addition, for waste shipped to Hanford for treatment and/or disposal, information on manifest numbers, the waste transporter, the waste receiving facility, and the original waste generators are included. In addition to paper copies, electronic copies of the report are also transmitted to the regulatory agency.

FREEMAN, D.A.

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Proceedings: 1994 EPRI International Low Level Waste Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's third annual International Low Level Waste Conference focused on key economic, regulatory, and technical interests associated with low level waste. Topics discussed included advanced wet waste processing and technology, radwaste cost reduction, storage and disposal issues, mixed waste, advanced ion-exchange technology, decontamination, and source term reduction.

1995-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

159

OFFICE WASTE DATA 2010 Recyclable Materials 1680 tons / 62%  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is used to stabilise temperatures within conventional Energy from Waste incineration plants as well waste from high temperature incineration (Clinical waste) to incineration with energy recovery (Offensive and hygiene waste). Benefits include: Lower CO2 emissions. Energy recovered in process. Direct

Gannarelli, Ché

160

Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste for disposal. The NNSSWAC includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NNSS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex for disposal. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project at (702) 295-7063 or fax to (702) 295-1153.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastes include paint" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 562: Waste Systems, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 562, Waste Systems, and provides documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and confirmation that closure objectives for CAU 562 were met. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; the U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (FFACO, 1996 as amended). CAU 562 consists of the following 13 Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Areas 2, 23, and 25 of the Nevada National Security Site: CAS 02-26-11, Lead Shot CAS 02-44-02, Paint Spills and French Drain CAS 02-59-01, Septic System CAS 02-60-01, Concrete Drain CAS 02-60-02, French Drain CAS 02-60-03, Steam Cleaning Drain CAS 02-60-04, French Drain CAS 02-60-05, French Drain CAS 02-60-06, French Drain CAS 02-60-07, French Drain CAS 23-60-01, Mud Trap Drain and Outfall CAS 23-99-06, Grease Trap CAS 25-60-04, Building 3123 Outfalls Closure activities began in October 2011 and were completed in April 2012. Activities were conducted according to the Corrective Action Plan for CAU 562 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2011). The corrective actions included No Further Action and Clean Closure. Closure activities generated sanitary waste and hazardous waste. Some wastes exceeded land disposal limits and required offsite treatment prior to disposal. Other wastes met land disposal restrictions and were disposed in appropriate onsite or offsite landfills. NNSA/NSO requests the following: A Notice of Completion from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to NNSA/NSO for closure of CAU 562 The transfer of CAU 562 from Appendix III to Appendix IV, Closed Corrective Action Units, of the FFACO

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Appendix F Cultural Resources, Including  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appendix F Appendix F Cultural Resources, Including Section 106 Consultation STATE OF CALIFORNIA - THE RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN, JR., Governor OFFICE OF HISTORIC PRESERVATION DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION 1725 23 rd Street, Suite 100 SACRAMENTO, CA 95816-7100 (916) 445-7000 Fax: (916) 445-7053 calshpo@parks.ca.gov www.ohp.parks.ca.gov June 14, 2011 Reply in Reference To: DOE110407A Angela Colamaria Loan Programs Office Environmental Compliance Division Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave SW, LP-10 Washington, DC 20585 Re: Topaz Solar Farm, San Luis Obispo County, California Dear Ms. Colamaria: Thank you for seeking my consultation regarding the above noted undertaking. Pursuant to 36 CFR Part 800 (as amended 8-05-04) regulations implementing Section

163

Bases for solid waste volume estimates for tank waste remediation system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents the background and basis for the Tank Waste Remediation System forecast for solid waste submitted in June 1996. The forecast was generated for single-shell tank and double-shell tank activities including operations through retrieval and disposal of chemical tank waste.

Reddick, G.W., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Understanding Cement Waste Forms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 29, 2009 ... Ongoing nuclear operations, decontamination and decommissioning, salt waste disposal, and closure of liquid waste tanks result in...

165

Waste Minimization Contents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About the 1996 International Symposium on Extraction and Processing for the Treatment and Minimization of Wastes: Waste Minimization Contents...

166

Countries Gasoline Prices Including Taxes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Date Belgium France Germany Italy Netherlands UK US 01/13/14 7.83 7.76 7.90 8.91 8.76 8.11 3.68 01/06/14 8.00 7.78 7.94 8.92 8.74 8.09 3.69 12/30/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.68 12/23/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.63 12/16/13 7.86 7.79 8.05 9.00 8.78 8.08 3.61 12/9/13 7.95 7.81 8.14 8.99 8.80 8.12 3.63 12/2/13 7.91 7.68 8.07 8.85 8.68 8.08 3.64 11/25/13 7.69 7.61 8.07 8.77 8.63 7.97 3.65 11/18/13 7.99 7.54 8.00 8.70 8.57 7.92 3.57 11/11/13 7.63 7.44 7.79 8.63 8.46 7.85 3.55 11/4/13 7.70 7.51 7.98 8.70 8.59 7.86 3.61 10/28/13 8.02 7.74 8.08 8.96 8.79 8.04 3.64 10/21/13 7.91 7.71 8.11 8.94 8.80 8.05 3.70 10/14/13 7.88 7.62 8.05 8.87 8.74 7.97 3.69

167

HNPF LIQUID WASTE DISPOSAL COST STUDY  

SciTech Connect

The HNPF cost analysis for waste disposal was made on the basis of 10,000 gallons of laundry waste and 9,000 gallons of other plant waste per year. The costs are compared for storage at HNPF site for 10 yr, packaging and shipment to AEC barial ground, packaging and shipment for sea disposal, and disposal by licensed vendor. A graphical comparison is given for the yearly costs of disposal by licensed vendor and the evaporator system as a function of waste volume. Recommendations are included for the handling of the wastes expected from HNPF operations. (B.O.G.)

Piccot, A.R.

1959-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

An Introduction to Waste Heat Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recovery of waste heat energy is one element of a complete energy conservation plan. In addition to contributing to the goal of saving energy, utilization of waste heat is also an important source of cost savings. This presentation details the steps necessary to develop a good waste heat recovery plan. The necessity of performing a complete waste heat audit is detailed, together with guidelines to selecting waste heat recovery projects. The economic analysis of potential projects, and the art of selling these projects to management are discussed. Also included are brief descriptions of the various types of heat exchangers commonly used in industry today.

Darby, D. F.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 2, Technology Logic Diagram: Part C, Waste Management  

SciTech Connect

This report documents site remediation at ORNL, including ORNL site characterization technologies, waste management and robotics and automation of the laboratory for waste processing and analysis.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Radioactive and mixed waste management plan for the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Hazardous Waste Handling Facility  

SciTech Connect

This Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management Plan for the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is written to meet the requirements for an annual report of radioactive and mixed waste management activities outlined in DOE Order 5820.2A. Radioactive and mixed waste management activities during FY 1994 listed here include principal regulatory and environmental issues and the degree to which planned activities were accomplished.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Remote Handling Equipment for a High-Level Waste Waste Package Closure System  

SciTech Connect

High-level waste will be placed in sealed waste packages inside a shielded closure cell. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has designed a system for closing the waste packages including all cell interior equipment and support systems. This paper discusses the material handling aspects of the equipment used and operations that will take place as part of the waste package closure operations. Prior to construction, the cell and support system will be assembled in a full-scale mockup at INL.

Kevin M. Croft; Scott M. Allen; Mark W. Borland

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Categorical Exclusion 4565, Waste Management Construction Support  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FornI FornI Project Title: Waste Management Construction Support (4565) Program or Program Office: Y -12 Site Office Location: Oak Ridge Tennessee Project Description: This work scope is an attempt to cover the general activities that construction would perform in support of Waste Management activities. Work includes construction work performed in support of Waste Management Sustainability and Stewardship projects and programs to include: load waste into containers; open, manipulate containers; empty containers; decommission out-of-service equipment (includes removal of liquids, hazardous, and universal wastes); apply fabric and gravel to ground; transport equipment; transport materials; transport waste; remove vegetation; place barriers; place erosion controls; operate wheeled and tracked equipment; general carpentry. Work will be performed on dirt, vegetated, graveled, or paved surfaces in

173

Strategic environmental assessment as an approach to assess waste management systems. Experiences from an Austrian case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste management has evolved from the simple transportation of waste to landfills to complex systems, including waste prevention and waste recycling as well as several waste treatment and landfill technologies. To assess the environmental, economical ... Keywords: Life cycle assessment, Participation, Strategic environmental assessment, Waste management

Stefan Salhofer; Gudrun Wassermann; Erwin Binner

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Customer service model for waste tracking at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The goal is to transition from five legacy database systems that have reached end-of-life to a single inventory system that supports workflow, data, and reporting for all waste streams. Plutonium Processing Facility (TA-55) Waste Team provides a high quality system that insures safe, efficient and compliant management of all radioactive and hazardous wastes generated, including waste characterization and repackaging of Transuranic Waste (TRU) and TRU mixed waste for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP).

Dorries, Alison M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

175

Waste | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste Waste Dataset Summary Description The Planning Database Project provides the UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) with regular data to track progress towards achieving EU targets for electricity generation from renewable energy (RE) sources. Extracts from the database are available each month. Information collected in the database includes: name, location and installed capacity of RE projects over 0.1MW; environmental designations; planning status; and construction status. Included here is the October 2010 Progress Datasheet, and an extract from December, 15, 2010 (i.e. Source UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Date Released December 15th, 2010 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords biomass co-firing installed capacity

176

Tritium waste package  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A containment and waste package system for processing and shipping tritium oxide waste received from a process gas includes an outer drum and an inner drum containing a disposable molecular sieve bed (DMSB) seated within outer drum. The DMSB includes an inlet diffuser assembly, an outlet diffuser assembly, and a hydrogen catalytic recombiner. The DMSB adsorbs tritium oxide from the process gas and converts it to a solid form so that the tritium is contained during shipment to a disposal site. The DMSB is filled with type 4A molecular sieve pellets capable of adsorbing up to 1000 curies of tritium. The recombiner contains a sufficient amount of catalyst to cause any hydrogen and oxygen present in the process gas to recombine to form water vapor, which is then adsorbed onto the DMSB.

Rossmassler, R.; Ciebiera, L.; Tulipano, F.J.; Vinson, S.; Walters, R.T.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

177

Tritium waste package  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A containment and waste package system for processing and shipping tritium xide waste received from a process gas includes an outer drum and an inner drum containing a disposable molecular sieve bed (DMSB) seated within outer drum. The DMSB includes an inlet diffuser assembly, an outlet diffuser assembly, and a hydrogen catalytic recombiner. The DMSB absorbs tritium oxide from the process gas and converts it to a solid form so that the tritium is contained during shipment to a disposal site. The DMSB is filled with type 4A molecular sieve pellets capable of adsorbing up to 1000 curies of tritium. The recombiner contains a sufficient amount of catalyst to cause any hydrogen add oxygen present in the process gas to recombine to form water vapor, which is then adsorbed onto the DMSB.

Rossmassler, Rich (Cranbury, NJ); Ciebiera, Lloyd (Titusville, NJ); Tulipano, Francis J. (Teaneck, NJ); Vinson, Sylvester (Ewing, NJ); Walters, R. Thomas (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Tritium waste package  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A containment and waste package system for processing and shipping tritium oxide waste received from a process gas includes an outer drum and an inner drum containing a disposable molecular sieve bed (DMSB) seated within the outer drum. The DMSB includes an inlet diffuser assembly, an outlet diffuser assembly, and a hydrogen catalytic recombiner. The DMSB absorbs tritium oxide from the process gas and converts it to a solid form so that the tritium is contained during shipment to a disposal site. The DMSB is filled with type 4A molecular sieve pellets capable of adsorbing up to 1000 curies of tritium. The recombiner contains a sufficient amount of catalyst to cause any hydrogen and oxygen present in the process gas to recombine to form water vapor, which is then adsorbed onto the DMSB. 1 fig.

Rossmassler, R.; Ciebiera, L.; Tulipano, F.J.; Vinson, S.; Walters, R.T.

1995-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

179

Utilization of biocatalysts in cellulose waste minimization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cellulose, a polymer of glucose, is the principal component of biomass and, therefore, a major source of waste that is either buried or burned. Examples of biomass waste include agricultural crop residues, forestry products, and municipal wastes. Recycling of this waste is important for energy conservation as well as waste minimization and there is some probability that in the future biomass could become a major energy source and replace fossil fuels that are currently used for fuels and chemicals production. It has been estimated that in the United States, between 100-450 million dry tons of agricultural waste are produced annually, approximately 6 million dry tons of animal waste, and of the 190 million tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) generated annually, approximately two-thirds is cellulosic in nature and over one-third is paper waste. Interestingly, more than 70% of MSW is landfilled or burned, however landfill space is becoming increasingly scarce. On a smaller scale, important cellulosic products such as cellulose acetate also present waste problems; an estimated 43 thousand tons of cellulose ester waste are generated annually in the United States. Biocatalysts could be used in cellulose waste minimization and this chapter describes their characteristics and potential in bioconversion and bioremediation processes.

Woodward, J.; Evans, B.R.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Hanford site transuranic waste certification plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a generator of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the Hanford Site must ensure that its TRU waste meets the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A, ''Radioactive Waste Management, and the Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant' (DOE 1996d) (WIPP WAC). The WIPP WAC establishes the specific physical, chemical, radiological, and packaging criteria for acceptance of defense TRU waste shipments at WIPP. The WIPP WAC also requires that participating DOE TRU waste generator/treatment/storage sites produce site-specific documents, including a certification plan, that describe their management of TRU waste and TRU waste shipments before transferring waste to WIPP. The Hanford Site must also ensure that its TRU waste destined for disposal at WIPP meets requirements for transport in the Transuranic Package Transporter41 (TRUPACT-11). The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) establishes the TRUPACT-I1 requirements in the ''Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package'' (NRC 1997) (TRUPACT-I1 SARP).

GREAGER, T.M.

1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastes include paint" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Characterization of household waste in Greenland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The composition of household waste in Greenland was investigated for the first time. About 2 tonnes of household waste was sampled as every 7th bag collected during 1 week along the scheduled collection routes in Sisimiut, the second largest town in Greenland with about 5400 inhabitants. The collection bags were sorted manually into 10 material fractions. The household waste composition consisted primarily of biowaste (43%) and the combustible fraction (30%), including anything combustible that did not belong to other clean fractions as paper, cardboard and plastic. Paper (8%) (dominated by magazine type paper) and glass (7%) were other important material fractions of the household waste. The remaining approximately 10% constituted of steel (1.5%), aluminum (0.5%), plastic (2.4%), wood (1.0%), non-combustible waste (1.8%) and household hazardous waste (1.2%). The high content of biowaste and the low content of paper make Greenlandic waste much different from Danish household waste. The moisture content, calorific value and chemical composition (55 elements, of which 22 were below detection limits) were determined for each material fraction. These characteristics were similar to what has been found for material fractions in Danish household waste. The chemical composition and the calorific value of the plastic fraction revealed that this fraction was not clean but contained a lot of biowaste. The established waste composition is useful in assessing alternative waste management schemes for household waste in Greenland.

Eisted, Rasmus, E-mail: raei@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

Optimization of solar-selective paint coatings. Final report, September 15, 1980-June 15, 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program was the development of low-cost, high-performance, solar-selective paint coatings for solar flat-plate collector (FPC) use and passive thermal wall application. Thickness-sensitive selective paint (TSSP) coating development was intended to demonstrate large-scale producibility. Thickness-insensitive selective paint (TISP) coating development was intended to develop and optimize the coating for passive solar systems and FPC applications. Low-cost, high-performance TSSP coatings and processes were developed to demonstrate large-scale producibility and meet all program goals. Dip, spray, roll, laminating and gravure processes were investigated and used to produce final samples. High-speed gravure coating was selected as the most promising process for solar foil fabrication. Development and optimization of TISP coatings was not completely successful. A variation in reflective metal pigment was suspected of being the primary problem, although other variables may have contributed. Consistent repeating of optical properties of these coatings achieved on the previous program was not achieved. However, a new method of achieving better control of coating components was conceived and preliminary development initiated. The new concept was described as an engineered pigment approach. The engineered pigment approach uses TSSP-coated metal foil particles instead of uncoated aluminum flakes in a liquid TSSP coating. The approach offers many advantages over the use of uncoated aluminum flakes: control of particle flatness, size, and thickness; control of the optical selectivity of each particle; and control of the liquid TSSP coating surrounding the coated particles.

McChesney, M.A.; Zimmer, P.B.; Lin, R.J.H.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

CRAD, Radioactive Waste Management - June 22, 2009 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radioactive Waste Management - June 22, 2009 Radioactive Waste Management - June 22, 2009 CRAD, Radioactive Waste Management - June 22, 2009 June 22, 2009 Radioactive Waste Management, Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry (HSS CRAD 64-33, Rev. 0) The following provides an overview of the typical activities that will be performed to collect information to evaluate the management of radioactive wastes and implementation of integrated safety management. The following Inspection Activities apply to all Inspection Criteria listed below: Review radioactive waste management and control processes and implementing procedures. Interview personnel including waste management supervision, staff, and subject matter experts. Review project policies, procedures, and corresponding documentation related to ISM core function

184

Improved Consolidation Process for Producing Ceramic Waste forms  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the consolidation and containment of solid or semisolid hazardous waste, which process comprises closing an end of a circular hollow cylinder, filling the cylinder with the hazardous waste, and then cold working the cylinder to reduce its diameter while simultaneously compacting the waste. The open end of the cylinder can be sealed prior to or after the cold working process. The preferred method of cold working is to draw the sealed cylinder containing the hazardous waste through a plurality of dies to simultaneously reduce the diameter of the tube while compacting the waste. This process provides a quick continuous process for consolidating hazardous waste, including radioactive waste.

Hash, Harry C.; Hash, Mark C.

1998-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

185

Revisions to guidelines for environmental pollution controls for bridge-painting contracts  

SciTech Connect

The recommended Guideline is issued as a supplement to the Final Report for Research Project 86-23 'Pollution Controls for Bridge Painting.' The objective of the research project was to evaluate various surface preparation methods for their effect on air, water, soil and sediment as well as their technical suitability for use on bridges. The methods evaluated were: open abrasive blasting with metallic abrasive, power tool cleaning, vacuum blasting with recyclable abrasive, vacuum blasting with slag abrasive, and open abrasive blasting with low dusting abrasive. Other surface preparation techniques were evaluated by analyzing information in the literature and discussing surface preparation with other highway agencies.

Smith, L.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

A brief analysis and description of transuranic wastes in the Subsurface Disposal Area of the radioactive waste management complex at INEL  

SciTech Connect

This document presents a brief summary of the wastes and waste types disposed of in the transuranic contaminated portions of the Subsurface Disposal Area of the radioactive waste management complex at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory from 1954 through 1970. Wastes included in this summary are organics, inorganics, metals, radionuclides, and atypical wastes. In addition to summarizing amounts of wastes disposed and describing the wastes, the document also provides information on disposal pit and trench dimensions and contaminated soil volumes. The report also points out discrepancies that exist in available documentation regarding waste and soil volumes and make recommendations for future efforts at waste characterization. 19 refs., 3 figs., 17 tabs.

Arrenholz, D.A.; Knight, J.L.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

HANFORD FACILITY ANNUAL DANGEROUS WASTE REPORT CY2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Facility Annual Dangerous Waste Report (ADWR) is prepared to meet the requirements of Washington Administrative Code Sections 173-303-220, Generator Reporting, and 173-303-390, Facility Reporting. In addition, the ADWR is required to meet Hanford Facility RCR4 Permit Condition I.E.22, Annual Reporting. The ADWR provides summary information on dangerous waste generation and management activities for the Calendar Year for the Hanford Facility EPA ID number assigned to the Department of Energy for RCRA regulated waste, as well as Washington State only designated waste and radioactive mixed waste. An electronic database is utilized to collect and compile the large array of data needed for preparation of this report. Information includes details of waste generated on the Hanford Facility, waste generated offsite and sent to Hanford for management, and other waste management activities conducted at Hanford, including treatment, storage, and disposal. Report details consist of waste descriptions and weights, waste codes and designations, and waste handling codes, In addition, for waste shipped to Hanford for treatment and/or disposal, information on manifest numbers, the waste transporter, the waste receiving facility, and the original waste generators are included. In addition to paper copies, the report is also transmitted electronically to a web site maintained by the Washington State Department of Ecology.

SKOLRUD, J.O.

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource! energy forum Case Studies from Estonia, Switzerland, Germany BREFs and their BATs Next Generation of Waste Fired Power Plants: Getting the most out of your trash Bossart,· ABB Waste-to-Energy Plants Edmund Fleck,· ESWET Marcel van Berlo,· Afval Energie Bedrijf From

Columbia University

189

Stochastic Consequence Analysis for Waste Leaks  

SciTech Connect

This analysis evaluates the radiological consequences of potential Hanford Tank Farm waste transfer leaks. These include ex-tank leaks into structures, underneath the soil, and exposed to the atmosphere. It also includes potential misroutes, tank overflow

HEY, B.E.

2000-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

190

River Protection Project (RPP) Tank Waste Retrieval and Disposal Mission Technical Baseline Summary Description  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is one of the several documents prepared by Lockheed Martin Hanford Corp. to support the U. S. Department of Energy's Tank Waste Retrieval and Disposal mission at Hanford. The Tank Waste Retrieval and Disposal mission includes the programs necessary to support tank waste retrieval; waste feed, delivery, storage, and disposal of immobilized waste; and closure of the tank farms.

DOVALLE, O.R.

1999-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

191

In-situ vitrification of waste materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the in-situ vitrification of waste materials in a disposable can that includes an inner container and an outer container is disclosed. The method includes the steps of adding frit and waste materials to the inner container, removing any excess water, heating the inner container such that the frit and waste materials melt and vitrify after cooling, while maintaining the outer container at a significantly lower temperature than the inner container. The disposable can is then cooled to ambient temperatures and stored. A device for the in-situ vitrification of waste material in a disposable can is also disclosed.

Powell, James R. (Shoreham, NY); Reich, Morris (Kew Gardens Hills, NY); Barletta, Robert (Wading River, NY)

1997-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

192

In-situ vitrification of waste materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the in-situ vitrification of waste materials in a disposable can that includes an inner container and an outer container is disclosed. The method includes the steps of adding frit and waste materials to the inner container, removing any excess water, heating the inner container such that the frit and waste materials melt and vitrify after cooling, while maintaining the outer container at a significantly lower temperature than the inner container. The disposable can is then cooled to ambient temperatures and stored. A device for the in-situ vitrification of waste material in a disposable can is also disclosed. 7 figs.

Powell, J.R.; Reich, M.; Barletta, R.

1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

193

Hazardous waste management in the Pacific basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hazardous waste control activities in Asia and the Pacific have been reviewed. The review includes China (mainland, Hong Kong, and Taiwan), Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand. It covers the sources of hazardous waste, the government structure for dealing with hazardous waste, and current hazardous waste control activities in each country. In addition, the hazardous waste program activities of US government agencies, US private-sector organizations, and international organizations are reviewed. The objective of these reviews is to provide a comprehensive picture of the current hazardous waste problems and the waste management approaches being used to address them so that new program activities can be designed more efficiently.

Cirillo, R.R.; Chiu, S.; Chun, K.C.; Conzelmann, G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Carpenter, R.A.; Indriyanto, S.H. [East-West Center, Honolulu, HI (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Waste Hoist  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Primary Hoist: 45-ton Rope-Guide Friction Hoist Largest friction hoist in the world when it was built in 1985 Completely enclosed (for contamination control), the waste hoist at WIPP is a modern friction hoist with rope guides (uses a balanced counterweight and tail ropes). With a 45-ton capacity, it was the largest friction hoist in the world when it was built in 1986. Hoist deck footprint: 2.87m wide x 4.67m long Hoist deck height: 2.87m wide x 7.46m high Access height to the waste hoist deck is limited by a high-bay door at 4.14m high Nominal configuration is 2-cage (over/under), with bottom (equipment) cage interior height of 4.52m The photo, at left, shows the 4.14m high-bay doors at the top collar of the waste hoist shaft. The perpendicular cross section of the opening is 3.5m x 4.14m, but the bottom cage cross section is 2.87m x 4.5m (and 4.67m into the plane of the photo).

195

Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group Manual  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Revision 3 of the Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group (LFRG) Manual was prepared primarily to include review criteria for the review of transuranic (TRU) waste disposal...

196

Waste management models and their application to sustainable waste management  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to review the types of models that are currently being used in the area of municipal waste management and to highlight some major shortcomings of these models. Most of the municipal waste models identified in the literature are decision support models and for the purposes of this research, are divided into three categories--those based on cost benefit analysis, those based on life cycle assessment and those based on multicriteria decision making. Shortcomings of current waste management models include that they are concerned with refinements of the evaluation steps (e.g. stage four of AHP or the improvement of weight allocations in ELECTRE) rather than addressing the decision making process itself. In addition, while many models recognise that for a waste management model to be sustainable, it must consider environmental, economic and social aspects, no model examined considered all three aspects together in the application of the model.

Morrissey, A.J.; Browne, J

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

EM Waste Acceptance Product Specification (WAPS) for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM Waste Acceptance Product EM Waste Acceptance Product Specification (WAPS) for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms Presentation to the HLW Corporate Board July 24, 2008 By Tony Kluk/Ken Picha 2 Background * Originally Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specifications were Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (RW) documents and project specific: - Defense Waste Processing Facility (PE-03, July 1989) - West Valley Demonstration Project (PE-04, January 1990) * Included many of same specifications as current version of WAPS * First version of RW Waste Acceptance System Requirements Document in January 1993 (included requirements for both SNF and HLW) * EM decided to extract requirements for HLW and put into the WAPS document 3 Background (Cont'd) * Lists technical specifications for acceptance of borosilicate HLW

198

Fusion fuel cycle solid radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect

Eight conceptual deuterium-tritium fueled fusion power plant designs have been analyzed to identify waste sources, materials and quantities. All plant designs include the entire D-T fuel cycle within each plant. Wastes identified include radiation-damaged structural, moderating, and fertile materials; getter materials for removing corrosion products and other impurities from coolants; absorbents for removing tritium from ventilation air; getter materials for tritium recovery from fertile materials; vacuum pump oil and mercury sludge; failed equipment; decontamination wastes; and laundry waste. Radioactivity in these materials results primarily from neutron activation and from tritium contamination. For the designs analyzed annual radwaste volume was estimated to be 150 to 600 m/sup 3//GWe. This may be compared to 500 to 1300 m/sup 3//GWe estimated for the LMFBR fuel cycle. Major waste sources are replaced reactor structures and decontamination waste.

Gore, B.F.; Kaser, J.D.; Kabele, T.J.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Selective paint and black chrome coatings development. Semiannual report, June 5-December 5, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar selective black chrome and paint coatings were investigated to improve their performance and to develop techniques for large-scale applications. Formulations and processing conditions for thickness sensitive paint coatings were defined which consistently provide solar absorptance (..cap alpha..) of 0.90 and emittance (epsilon) of 0.10 on low emittance substrates. A significant improvement in abrasion resistance was achieved by decreasing the pigment volume concentration. Addition of aluminum flake to these formulations has resulted in a thickness insensitive coating with ..cap alpha.. = 0.90 and epsilon = 0.30. The critical bath components of a commercial black chrome plating process have been identified as hexavalent chromium, trivalent chromium, acetic acid and ferric ion. These components were varied and their effect on coating optical properties and durability at temperatures of 350-400/sup 0/C were studied. Coating thermal stability was significantly improved by reducing the trivalent chromium concentration from the normal 16 g/l to 12 g/l or less. Initial efforts have begun to optimize black chrome systems on aluminum substrates in terms of cost and durability.

Lin, R J.H.; Zimmer, P B

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Medical School Biomedical Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medical School Biomedical Waste Labware, gloves, pipets, pipet tips Stock cultures, bacterial with or without needles, razor blades, scalpel blades) Key: Pathological waste BL1 & BL2 waste (low risk ­ LR) BL2 waste (moderate risk - MR)/BL3 waste Blood Blood Autoclave Needle box Metal Cart Must either bleach

Cooley, Lynn

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastes include paint" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Waste Sorting Activity Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Sorting Activity Introduction: This waste sorting game was originally designed to be one have completed the waste sorting activity quickly, no team was able to complete the waste sorting task who were unfamiliar with Dalhousie's waste management system. Goals: The primary goal of the activity

Beaumont, Christopher

202

University of Waste Procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Maryland Hazardous And Regulated Waste Procedures Manual Revised July 2001 #12;Review II. HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT III. BIOLOGICAL, PATHOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL WASTE (BPMW) MANAGEMENT IV. LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE (LLRW) MANAGEMENT V. EMERGENCY PROCEDURES VI. WASTE MINIMIZATION VII

Rubloff, Gary W.

203

Radioactive waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for use in processing radioactive waste materials for shipment and storage in solid form in a container is disclosed. The container includes a top, and an opening in the top which is smaller than the outer circumference of the container. The apparatus includes an enclosure into which the container is placed, solution feed apparatus for adding a solution containing radioactive waste materials into the container through the container opening, and at least one rotatable blade for blending the solution with a fixing agent such as cement or the like as the solution is added into the container. The blade is constructed so that it can pass through the opening in the top of the container. The rotational axis of the blade is displaced from the center of the blade so that after the blade passes through the opening, the blade and container can be adjusted so that one edge of the blade is adjacent the cylindrical wall of the container, to insure thorough mixing. When the blade is inside the container, a substantially sealed chamber is formed to contain vapors created by the chemical action of the waste solution and fixant, and vapors emanating through the opening in the container.

Nelson, Robert E. (Lombard, IL); Ziegler, Anton A. (Darien, IL); Serino, David F. (Maplewood, MN); Basnar, Paul J. (Western Springs, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Technology transfer in hazardous waste management  

SciTech Connect

Hazardous waste is a growing problem in all parts of the world. Industrialized countries have had to deal with the treatment and disposal of hazardous wastes for many years. The newly industrializing countries of the world are now faced with immediate problems of waste handling. The developing nations of the world are looking at increasing quantities of hazardous waste generation as they move toward higher levels of industrialization. Available data are included on hazardous waste generation in Asia and the Pacific as a function of Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Although there are many inconsistencies in the data (inconsistent hazardous waste definitions, inconsistent reporting of wastes, etc.) there is definite indication that a growing economy tends to lead toward larger quantities of hazardous waste generation. In developing countries the industrial sector is growing at a faster rate than in the industrialized countries. In 1965 industry accounted for 29% of GDP in the developing countries of the world. In 1987 this had grown to 37% of GDP. In contrast, industry accounted for 40% of GDP in 1965 in industrialized countries and dropped to 35% in 1987. This growth in industrial activity in the developing countries brings an increase in the need to handle hazardous wastes. Although hazardous wastes are ubiquitous, the control of hazardous wastes varies. The number of regulatory options used by various countries in Asia and the Pacific to control wastes are included. It is evident that the industrialized countries, with a longer history of having to deal with hazardous wastes, have found the need to use more mechanisms to control them. 2 refs., 2 figs.

Drucker, H.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Radioactive Waste Management (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section regulates the transportation and disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Minnesota, and establishes a Nuclear Waste Council to monitor the federal high-level radioactive waste...

206

Waste Management Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Management Facility ISO 14001 Registered A wide range of wastes are generated during the normal course of business at BNL. These waste streams are common to many businesses...

207

The King County Solid Waste Division handles 100 % of the mixed solid waste generated in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(PSAPCA)) Regulation I, Article 7. Unlike the permit, this document is not a legally enforceable document. It includes references to the applicable statutory or regulatory provisions that relate to King County Solid Waste Divisions air emissions, and provides a description of King County Solid Waste Divisions activities, including a short compliance history. Statement of Basis January 4, 2001

unknown authors

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Waste Logic Decommissioning Waste Manager 2.0 Users Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Decommissioning Waste Manager, part of EPRI's Waste Logic series of computer programs, analyzes decommissioning waste cost and volume reduction strategies with the intent of quantifying the existing waste management program for any given waste generator.

2001-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

209

Solid Waste (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The New Mexico Environment Department's Solid Waste Bureau manages solid waste in the state. The Bureau implements and enforces the rules established by the Environmental Improvement Board.

210

Industrial Waste Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9) Page 2 of 7 Industrial Waste Generation Work with Engineered Nanomaterials Power Consumption Historical Contamination (groundwater, soil) Hazardous Waste Generation Atmospheric...

211

Recycling Electronic Waste - Website  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 18, 2010 ... Joined: 2/13/2007. Below is a link to a website that has articles on recycling electronic waste. http://www.scientificamerican....ectronic-waste-...

212

International Trade with Waste.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In this thesis, trade with waste between developed countries and the third world will be presented to analyze whether waste?trading can create a possible (more)

Willn, Jenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Recovery, recycle and reuse of industrial wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book discusses the elimination of industrial wastes through the application of recycle, recovery and reuse technology. An overview is provided of how various processes can recover potential contaminants for eventual reuse. Chapters include resource recovery from hazardous waste, sorption, molecular separation, phase transition, chemical modifications, physical dispersion and separation.

Noll, K.E.; Haas, C.N.; Schmidt, C.; Kodukula, P.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

PAIRWISE BLENDING OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE (HLW)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate a mission scenario that uses pairwise and incidental blending of high level waste (HLW) to reduce the total mass of HLW glass. Secondary objectives include understanding how recent refinements to the tank waste inventory and solubility assumptions affect the mass of HLW glass and how logistical constraints may affect the efficacy of HLW blending.

CERTA, P.J.

2006-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

215

Waste Heat Recapture from Supermarket Refrigeration Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to determine the potential energy savings associated with improved utilization of waste heat from supermarket refrigeration systems. Existing and advanced strategies for waste heat recovery in supermarkets were analyzed, including options from advanced sources such as combined heat and power (CHP), micro-turbines and fuel cells.

Fricke, Brian A [ORNL

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Mixed Waste Focus Area program management plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes the program management principles and functions to be implemented in the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA). The mission of the MWFA is to provide acceptable technologies that enable implementation of mixed waste treatment systems developed in partnership with end-users, stakeholders, tribal governments and regulators. The MWFA will develop, demonstrate and deliver implementable technologies for treatment of mixed waste within the DOE Complex. Treatment refers to all post waste-generation activities including sampling and analysis, characterization, storage, processing, packaging, transportation and disposal.

Beitel, G.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Hanford Site waste treatment/storage/disposal integration  

SciTech Connect

In 1998 Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc. began the integration of all low-level waste, mixed waste, and TRU waste-generating activities across the Hanford site. With seven contractors, dozens of generating units, and hundreds of waste streams, integration was necessary to provide acute waste forecasting and planning for future treatment activities. This integration effort provides disposition maps that account for waste from generation, through processing, treatment and final waste disposal. The integration effort covers generating facilities from the present through the life-cycle, including transition and deactivation. The effort is patterned after the very successful DOE Complex EM Integration effort. Although still in the preliminary stages, the comprehensive onsite integration effort has already reaped benefits. These include identifying significant waste streams that had not been forecast, identifying opportunities for consolidating activities and services to accelerate schedule or save money; and identifying waste streams which currently have no path forward in the planning baseline. Consolidation/integration of planned activities may also provide opportunities for pollution prevention and/or avoidance of secondary waste generation. A workshop was held to review the waste disposition maps, and to identify opportunities with potential cost or schedule savings. Another workshop may be held to follow up on some of the long-term integration opportunities. A change to the Hanford waste forecast data call would help to align the Solid Waste Forecast with the new disposition maps.

MCDONALD, K.M.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

218

Treating water-reactive wastes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some compounds and elements, such as lithium hydride, magnesium, sodium, and calcium react violently with water to generate much heat and produce hydrogen. The hydrogen can ignite or even form an explosive mixture with air. Other metals may react rapidly only if they are finely divided. Some of the waste produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory includes these metals that are contaminated with radioactivity. By far the greatest volume of water-reactive waste is lithium hydride contaminated with depleted uranium. Reactivity of the water-reactive wastes is neutralized with an atmosphere of humid nitrogen, which prevents the formation of an explosive mixture of hydrogen and air. When we adjust the temperature of the nitrogen and the humidifier, the nitrogen can be more or less humid, and the rate of reaction can be adjusted and controlled. Los Alamos has investigated the rates of reaction of lithium hydride as a function of the temperature and humidity, and, as anticipated, they in with in temperature and humidity. Los Alamos will investigate other variables. For example, the nitrogen flow will be optimized to conserve nitrogen and yet keep the reaction rates high. Reaction rates will be determined for various forms of lithium waste, from small chips to powder. Bench work will lead to the design of a skid-mounted process for treating wastes. Other water-reactive wastes will also be investigated.

Lussiez, G.W.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Treating water-reactive wastes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some compounds and elements, such as lithium hydride, magnesium, sodium, and calcium react violently with water to generate much heat and produce hydrogen. The hydrogen can ignite or even form an explosive mixture with air. Other metals may react rapidly only if they are finely divided. Some of the waste produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory includes these metals that are contaminated with radioactivity. By far the greatest volume of water-reactive waste is lithium hydride contaminated with depleted uranium. Reactivity of the water-reactive wastes is neutralized with an atmosphere of humid nitrogen, which prevents the formation of an explosive mixture of hydrogen and air. When we adjust the temperature of the nitrogen and the humidifier, the nitrogen can be more or less humid, and the rate of reaction can be adjusted and controlled. Los Alamos has investigated the rates of reaction of lithium hydride as a function of the temperature and humidity, and, as anticipated, they in with in temperature and humidity. Los Alamos will investigate other variables. For example, the nitrogen flow will be optimized to conserve nitrogen and yet keep the reaction rates high. Reaction rates will be determined for various forms of lithium waste, from small chips to powder. Bench work will lead to the design of a skid-mounted process for treating wastes. Other water-reactive wastes will also be investigated.

Lussiez, G.W.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Waste management fiscal year 1998 progress report  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Management Program is pleased to issue the Fiscal Year 1998 Progress Report presenting program highlights and major accomplishments of the last year. This year-end update describes the current initiatives in waste management and the progress DOE has made toward their goals and objectives, including the results of the waste management annual performance commitments. One of the most important program efforts continues to be opening the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located near Carlsbad, New Mexico, for the deep geologic disposal of transuranic waste. A major success was achieved this year by the West Valley Demonstration Project in New York, which in June completed the project`s production phase of high-level waste processing ahead of schedule and under budget. Another significant accomplishment this year was the award of two privatization contracts for major waste management operations, one at Oak ridge for transuranic waste treatment, and one at Hanford for the Tank Waste Remediation System privatization project. DOE is proud of the progress that has been made, and will continue to pursue program activities that allow it to safely and expeditiously dispose of radioactive and hazardous wastes across the complex, while reducing worker, public, and environmental risks.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastes include paint" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Hazardous chemical waste abatement, reduction, reuse, and recycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of waste abatement, reduction, reuse, and recycle processes is to minimize the need for waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. In many cases, this can be accomplished in a cost-effective manner since the economics of recovery and reuse are often more favorable than the disposal of the waste and purchase of new raw material. Consequently, there is increasing interest in technologies that produce less waste and provide for the recovery of resources from some waste streams. This paper discusses some of these technologies. Waste abatement (the substitution of a new low-waste process or material to reduce waste quantities) is discussed, and four examples are given. Waste reduction or modification (decreasing wastes by housekeeping practices, concentration methods, or simple in-plant treatment) technologies are presented with a focus on metals recovery and waste volume reduction. Waste reuse (direct reuse of a waste as a raw material, either as is, or with minor modification) examples discussed include solvent reuse and the utilization of fly ash in structural materials. Waste recycle and recovery (the recovery of resources from waste streams through the application of reprocessing technologies) is discussed using examples of solvent recovery and drum reclamation.

Rodgers, B.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

DOE mixed waste treatment capacity analysis  

SciTech Connect

This initial DOE-wide analysis compares the reported national capacity for treatment of mixed wastes with the calculated need for treatment capacity based on both a full treatment of mixed low-level and transuranic wastes to the Land Disposal Restrictions and on treatment of transuranic wastes to the WIPP waste acceptance criteria. The status of treatment capacity is reported based on a fifty-element matrix of radiation-handling requirements and functional treatment technology categories. The report defines the classifications for the assessment, describes the models used for the calculations, provides results from the analysis, and includes appendices of the waste treatment facilities data and the waste stream data used in the analysis.

Ross, W.A.; Wehrman, R.R.; Young, J.R.; Shaver, S.R.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Double-shell tank waste pretreatment  

SciTech Connect

Double-shell tanks contain most of the transuranic/high-level chemical processing waste generated at the Hanford Site in recent years. A small mass fraction of this waste is responsible for its characterization as transuranic/high-level waste. Pretreatment will partition the waste into a small fraction containing most of the transuranic/high-level components and a large fraction that is a low-level waste. The operations for achieving this objective include dissolution of water-soluble salts, dissolution of precipitated metal oxides in acid, clarification of the resulting dissolver liquors, transuranium element removal by solvent extraction and cesium removal by ion exchange. The primary benefit of pretreatment is a reduction in the overall cost of waste disposal.

Orme, R.M.; Appel, J.N.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Ground freezing for containment of hazardous waste  

SciTech Connect

The freezing of ground for the containment of subsurface hazardous waste is a promising method that is environmentally friendly and offers a safe alternative to other methods of waste retention in many cases. The frozen soil method offers two concepts for retaining waste. One concept is to freeze the entire waste area into a solid block of frozen soil thus locking the waste in situ. For small areas where the contaminated soil does not include vessels that would rupture from frost action, this concept may be simpler to install. A second concept, of course, is to create a frozen soil barrier to confine the waste within prescribed unfrozen soil boundaries; initial research in this area was funded by EPA, Cincinnati, OH, and the Army Corps of Engineers. The paper discusses advantages and limitations, a case study from Oak Ridge, TN, and a mesh generation program that simulates the cryogenic technology.

Sayles, F.N.; Iskandar, I.K.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Evaluation of Management of Water Release for Painted Rocks Reservoir, Bitterroot River, Montana, 1984 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Baseline fisheries and habitat data were gathered during 1983 and 1984 to evaluate the effectiveness of supplemental water releases from Painted Rocks Reservoir in improving the fisheries resource in the Bitterroot River. Discharge relationships among main stem gaging stations varied annually and seasonally. Flow relationships in the river were dependent upon rainfall events and the timing and duration of the irrigation season. Daily discharge monitored during the summers of 1983 and 1984 was greater than median values derived at the U.S.G.S. station near Darby. Supplemental water released from Painted Rocks Reservoir totaled 14,476 acre feet in 1983 and 13,958 acre feet in 1984. Approximately 63% of a 5.66 m{sup 3}/sec test release of supplemental water conducted during April, 1984 was lost to irrigation withdrawals and natural phenomena before passing Bell Crossing. A similar loss occurred during a 5.66 m{sup 3}/sec test release conducted in August, 1984. Daily maximum temperature monitored during 1984 in the Bitterroot River averaged 11.0, 12.5, 13.9 and 13.6 C at the Darby, Hamilton, Bell and McClay stations, respectively. Chemical parameters measured in the Bitterroot River were favorable to aquatic life. Population estimates conducted in the Fall, 1983 indicated densities of I+ and older rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) were significantly greater in a control section than in a dewatered section (p < 0.20). Numbers of I+ and older brown trout (Salmo trutta) were not significantly different between the control and dewatered sections (p > 0.20). Population and biomass estimates for trout in the control section were 631/km and 154.4 kg/km. In the dewatered section, population and biomass estimates for trout were 253/km and 122.8 kg/km. The growth increments of back-calculated length for rainbow trout averaged 75.6 mm in the control section and 66.9mm in the dewatered section. The growth increments of back-calculated length for brown trout averaged 79.5 mm in the control section and 82.3mm in the dewatered section. Population estimates conducted in the Spring, 1984 indicated densities of mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni) greater than 254 mm in total length were not significantly different between the control and dewatered sections (p > 0.20). Young of the year rainbow trout and brown trout per 10m of river edge electrofished during 1984 were more abundant in the control section than the dewatered section and were more abundant in side channel habitat than main channel habitat. Minimum flow recommendations obtained from wetted perimeter-discharge relationships averaged 8.5m{sup 3}/sec in the control section and 10.6m{sup 3}/sec in the dewatered section of the Bitterroot River. The quantity of supplemental water from Painted Rocks Reservoir needed to maintain minimum flow recommendations is discussed in the Draft Water Management Plan for the Proposed Purchase of Supplemental Water from Painted Rocks Reservoir, Bitterroot River, Montana (Lere 1984).

Lere, Mark E. (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Missoula, MT)

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Waste analysis plan for central waste complex  

SciTech Connect

This waste analysis plan (WAP) has been prepared for the Central Waste Complex which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. This WAP documents the methods used to characterize, and obtain and analyze representative samples of waste managed at this unit.

Weston, N.L.

1996-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

227

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 361: Siting of Industrial Hazardous  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Siting of Industrial 1: Siting of Industrial Hazardous Waste Facilities (New York) Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 361: Siting of Industrial Hazardous Waste Facilities (New York) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations describe the siting of new industrial hazardous waste facilities located wholly or partially within the State. Industrial hazardous waste facilities are defined as facilities used for the purpose of treating, storing, compacting, recycling, exchanging or disposing of industrial hazardous waste materials, including treatment, compacting,

228

NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA, JUNE 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION NEVADA SITE OFFICE

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Waste Class B/C Reduction Guide, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low level waste (LLW) Class B/C wet waste, including filter and ion exchange media, is one of the most expensive radioactive wastes routinely generated by U.S. commercial reactors8212up to a factor of 10 higher than lower activity waste streams. This report is a continuation of the EPRI initiative to evaluate techniques and technologies that reduce the generation and packaged volume of Class B/C wastes. In addition to reducing Class B/C waste generation, several techniques described in this study also su...

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

230

Cooling tower waste reduction  

SciTech Connect

At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the two main cooling tower systems (central and northwest) were upgraded during the summer of 1997 to reduce the generation of hazardous waste. In 1996, these two tower systems generated approximately 135,400 lbs (61,400 kg) of hazardous sludge, which is more than 90 percent of the hazardous waste for the site annually. At both, wet decks (cascade reservoirs) were covered to block sunlight. Covering the cascade reservoirs reduced the amount of chemical conditioners (e.g. algaecide and biocide), required and in turn the amount of waste generated was reduced. Additionally, at the northwest cooling tower system, a sand filtration system was installed to allow cyclical filtering and backflushing, and new pumps, piping, and spray nozzles were installed to increase agitation. the appurtenance upgrade increased the efficiency of the cooling towers. The sand filtration system at the northwest cooling tower system enables operators to continuously maintain the cooling tower water quality without taking the towers out of service. Operational costs (including waste handling and disposal) and maintenance activities are compared for the cooling towers before and after upgrades. Additionally, the effectiveness of the sand filter system in conjunction with the wet deck covers (northwest cooling tower system), versus the cascade reservoir covers alone (south cooling tower south) is discussed. the overall expected return on investment is calculated to be in excess of 250 percent. this upgrade has been incorporated into the 1998 DOE complex-wide water conservation project being led by Sandia National Laboratory/Albuquerque.

Coleman, S.J.; Celeste, J.; Chine, R.; Scott, C.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Radioactive waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for use in processing radioactive waste materials for shipment and storage in solid form in a container is disclosed. The container includes a top, and an opening in the top which is smaller than the outer circumference of the container. The apparatus includes an enclosure into which the container is placed, solution feed apparatus for adding a solution containing radioactive waste materials into the container through the container opening, and at least one rotatable blade for blending the solution with a fixing agent such as cement or the like as the solution is added into the container. The blade is constructed so that it can pass through the opening in the top of the container. The rotational axis of the blade is displaced from the center of the blade so that after the blade passes through the opening, the blade and container can be adjusted so that one edge of the blade is adjacent the cylindrical wall of the container, to insure thorough mixing. When the blade is inside the container, a substantially sealed chamber is formed to contain vapors created by the chemical action of the waste solution and fixant, and vapors emanating through the opening in the container. The chamber may be formed by placing a removable extension over the top of the container. The extension communicates with the apparatus so that such vapors are contained within the container, extension and solution feed apparatus. A portion of the chamber includes coolant which condenses the vapors. The resulting condensate is returned to the container by the force of gravity.

Nelson, R.E.; Ziegler, A.A.; Serino, D.F.; Basnar, P.J.

1985-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

232

Disposal Activities and the Unique Waste Streams at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS)  

SciTech Connect

This slide show documents waste disposal at the Nevada National Security Site. Topics covered include: radionuclide requirements for waste disposal; approved performance assessment (PA) for depleted uranium disposal; requirements; program approval; the Waste Acceptance Review Panel (WARP); description of the Radioactive Waste Acceptance Program (RWAP); facility evaluation; recent program accomplishments, nuclear facility safety changes; higher-activity waste stream disposal; large volume bulk waste streams.

Arnold, P.

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

233

Lab sets new record for waste volume removed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lab Sets New Record for Waste Volume Removed Lab Sets New Record for Waste Volume Removed Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest Issue:Dec. 2013 - Jan. 2014 All Issues » submit Lab sets new record for waste volume removed The Transuranic Waste Program has met its commitment to ship 800 cubic meters of TRU waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant during fiscal year 2012. November 1, 2012 dummy image Read our archives Contacts Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus Email A lot of people worked together to make this happen, including our partners at the State of New Mexico and WIPP, as well as NNSA, the Los Alamos Site Office, and the Laboratory. The LANL Transuranic (TRU) Waste Program has met its commitment to ship 800 cubic meters of TRU waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during

234

Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) Agency/Company /Organization: Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Waste to Energy Phase: Create a Vision Resource Type: Dataset, Publications, Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.wte.org/ Cost: Free The Energy Recovery Council is a national trade organization representing the waste-to-energy industry and communities that own waste-to-energy facilities. Overview The Energy Recovery Council is a national trade organization representing the waste-to-energy industry and communities that own waste-to-energy facilities. The website includes information on waste-to-energy basics

235

Feed Materials Production Center waste management plan (Revision to NLCO-1100, R. 6)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the process of producing uranium metal products used in Department of Energy (DOE) defense programs at other DOE facilities, various types of wastes are generated at the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC). Process wastes, both generated and stored, are discussed in the Waste Management Plan and include low-level radioactive waste (LLW), mixed hazardous/radioactive waste, and sanitary/industrial waste. Scrap metal waste and wastes requiring special remediation are also addressed in the Plan. The Waste Management Plan identifies the comprehensive programs developed to address safe storage and disposition of all wastes from past, present, and future operations at the FMPC. Waste streams discussed in this Plan are representative of the wastes generated and waste types that concern worker and public health and safety. Budgets and schedules for implementation of waste disposition are also addressed. The waste streams receiving the largest amount of funding include LLW approved for shipment by DOE/ORO to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) (MgF/sub 2/, slag leach filter cake, and neutralized raffinate); remedial action wastes (waste pits, K-65 silo waste); thorium; scrap metal (contaminated and noncontaminated ferrous and copper scrap); construction rubble and soil generated from decontamination and decommissioning of outdated facilities; and low-level wastes that will be handled through the Low-Level Waste Processing and Shipping System (LLWPSS). Waste Management milestones are also provided. The Waste Management Plan is divided into eight major sections: Introduction; Site Waste and Waste Generating Process; Strategy; Projects and Operations; Waste Stream Budgets; Milestones; Quality Assurance for Waste Management; and Environmental Monitoring Program.

Watts, R.E.; Allen, T.; Castle, S.A.; Hopper, J.P.; Oelrich, R.L.

1986-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

Analysis of waste treatment requirements for DOE mixed wastes: Technical basis  

SciTech Connect

The risks and costs of managing DOE wastes are a direct function of the total quantities of 3wastes that are handled at each step of the management process. As part of the analysis of the management of DOE low-level mixed wastes (LLMW), a reference scheme has been developed for the treatment of these wastes to meet EPA criteria. The treatment analysis in a limited form was also applied to one option for treatment of transuranic wastes. The treatment requirements in all cases analyzed are based on a reference flowsheet which provides high level treatment trains for all LLMW. This report explains the background and basis for that treatment scheme. Reference waste stream chemical compositions and physical properties including densities were established for each stream in the data base. These compositions are used to define the expected behavior for wastes as they pass through the treatment train. Each EPA RCRA waste code was reviewed, the properties, chemical composition, or characteristics which are of importance to waste behavior in treatment were designated. Properties that dictate treatment requirements were then used to develop the treatment trains and identify the unit operations that would be included in these trains. A table was prepared showing a correlation of the waste physical matrix and the waste treatment requirements as a guide to the treatment analysis. The analysis of waste treatment loads is done by assigning wastes to treatment steps which would achieve RCRA compliant treatment. These correlation`s allow one to examine the treatment requirements in a condensed manner and to see that all wastes and contaminant sets are fully considered.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 4, Waste Management Facility report, Radioactive mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, handling method and containment vessel, waste number, waste designation and amount of waste.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

238

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

239

Apparatus for incinerating hazardous waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is described for incinerating wastes, including an incinerator having a combustion chamber, a fluid-tight shell enclosing the combustion chamber, an afterburner, an off-gas particulate removal system and an emergency off-gas cooling system. The region between the inner surface of the shell and the outer surface of the combustion chamber forms a cavity. Air is supplied to the cavity and heated as it passes over the outer surface of the combustion chamber. Heated air is drawn from the cavity and mixed with fuel for input into the combustion chamber. The pressure in the cavity is maintained at least approximately 2.5 cm WC higher than the pressure in the combustion chamber. Gases cannot leak from the combustion chamber since the pressure outside the chamber (inside the cavity) is higher than the pressure inside the chamber. The apparatus can be used to treat any combustible wastes, including biological wastes, toxic materials, low level radioactive wastes, and mixed hazardous and low level transuranic wastes. 1 figure.

Chang, R.C.W.

1994-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

240

Apparatus for incinerating hazardous waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for incinerating wastes, including an incinerator having a combustion chamber, a fluidtight shell enclosing the combustion chamber, an afterburner, an off-gas particulate removal system and an emergency off-gas cooling system. The region between the inner surface of the shell and the outer surface of the combustion chamber forms a cavity. Air is supplied to the cavity and heated as it passes over the outer surface of the combustion chamber. Heated air is drawn from the cavity and mixed with fuel for input into the combustion chamber. The pressure in the cavity is maintained at least approximately 2.5 cm WC (about 1" WC) higher than the pressure in the combustion chamber. Gases cannot leak from the combustion chamber since the pressure outside the chamber (inside the cavity) is higher than the pressure inside the chamber. The apparatus can be used to treat any combustible wastes, including biological wastes, toxic materials, low level radioactive wastes, and mixed hazardous and low level transuranic wastes.

Chang, Robert C. W. (Martinez, GA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastes include paint" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Waste Calcining Facility remote inspection report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) remote inspections was to evaluate areas in the facility which are difficult to access due to high radiation fields. The areas inspected were the ventilation exhaust duct, waste hold cell, adsorber manifold cell, off-gas cell, calciner cell and calciner vessel. The WCF solidified acidic, high-level mixed waste generated during nuclear fuel reprocessing. Solidification was accomplished through high temperature oxidation and evaporation. Since its shutdown in 1981, the WCFs vessels, piping systems, pumps, off-gas blowers and process cells have remained contaminated. Access to the below-grade areas is limited due to contamination and high radiation fields. Each inspection technique was tested with a mock-up in a radiologically clean area before the equipment was taken to the WCF for the actual inspection. During the inspections, essential information was obtained regarding the cleanliness, structural integrity, in-leakage of ground water, indications of process leaks, indications of corrosion, radiation levels and the general condition of the cells and equipment. In general, the cells contain a great deal of dust and debris, as well as hand tools, piping and miscellaneous equipment. Although the building appears to be structurally sound, the paint is peeling to some degree in all of the cells. Cracking and spalling of the concrete walls is evident in every cell, although the east wall of the off-gas cell is the worst. The results of the completed inspections and lessons learned will be used to plan future activities for stabilization and deactivation of the facility. Remote clean-up of loose piping, hand tools, and miscellaneous debris can start immediately while information from the inspections is factored into the conceptual design for deactivating the facility.

Patterson, M.W.; Ison, W.M.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Heat Recovery From Solid Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

More opportunity exists today for the successful implementation of resource recovery projects than at any other period. However, that doesn't mean that energy/resource recovery exists for everyone. You must have a favorable match of all the critical areas of evaluation, including the cost of fuel, cost of solid waste disposal, plant energy requirements, available technology, etc.

Underwood, O. W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Bioconversion of waste biomass to useful products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for converting waste biomass to useful products by gasifying the biomass to produce synthesis gas and converting the synthesis gas substrate to one or more useful products. The present invention is directed to the conversion of biomass wastes including municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, plastic, tires, agricultural residues and the like, as well as coal, to useful products such as hydrogen, ethanol and acetic acid. The overall process includes the steps of gasifying the waste biomass to produce raw synthesis gas, cooling the synthesis gas, converting the synthesis gas to the desired product or products using anaerobic bioconversion, and then recovering the product or products. In accordance with a particular embodiment of the present invention, waste biomass is converted to synthesis gas containing carbon monoxide and, then, the carbon monoxide is converted to hydrogen by an anaerobic microorganism ERIH2, bacillus smithii ATCC No. 55404.

Grady, James L. (Fayetteville, AR); Chen, Guang Jiong (Fayetteville, AR)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Bioconversion of waste biomass to useful products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for converting waste biomass to useful products by gasifying the biomass to produce synthesis gas and converting the synthesis gas substrate to one or more useful products. The present invention is directed to the conversion of biomass wastes including municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, plastic, tires, agricultural residues and the like, as well as coal, to useful products such as hydrogen, ethanol and acetic acid. The overall process includes the steps of gasifying the waste biomass to produce raw synthesis gas, cooling the synthesis gas, converting the synthesis gas to the desired product or products using anaerobic bioconversion, and then recovering the product or products. In accordance with a particular embodiment of the present invention, waste biomass is converted to synthesis gas containing carbon monoxide and, then, the carbon monoxide is converted to hydrogen by an anaerobic microorganism ERIH2, Bacillus smithii ATCC No. 55404. 82 figs.

Grady, J.L.; Chen, G.J.

1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

245

Proceedings: 1996 EPRI International Low Level Waste Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the changing business environment, U.S. utilities are evaluating methods to improve operations while minimizing costs. EPRI's fifth annual International Low Level Waste (LLW) Conference featured 65 papers on a variety of topics. More than a third of the papers emphasized liquid-wet waste processing enhancements, new or improved technologies, and LLW program cost reduction. Other subjects included dry active waste processing cost reduction, the new DOT/NRC transport regulations, mixed waste, vitrif...

1996-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

246

The Mixed Waste Management Facility. Preliminary design review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents information about the Mixed Waste Management Facility. Topics discussed include: cost and schedule baseline for the completion of the project; evaluation of alternative options; transportation of radioactive wastes to the facility; capital risk associated with incineration; radioactive waste processing; scaling of the pilot-scale system; waste streams to be processed; molten salt oxidation; feed preparation; initial operation to demonstrate selected technologies; floorplans; baseline revisions; preliminary design baseline; cost reduction; and project mission and milestones.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

247

Understanding radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect

This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

Murray, R.L.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Radioactive Waste Management, Inspection Criteria; Approach,...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

include the applicable elements identified in the specific waste-type chapters of DOE M 435.1-1; and be developed using the graded approach process? Has a process been...

249

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Thermal Treatment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

range from 75 to 150ton (Bansal and Sugiarto 1999). Many factors can impact treatment costs, including oil and moisture content of the waste, particle size distribution of the...

250

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Slurry Injection of Drilling Wastes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Slurry Injection Slurry Injection Fact Sheet - Slurry Injection of Drilling Wastes Underground Injection of Drilling Wastes Several different approaches are used for injecting drilling wastes into underground formations for permanent disposal. Salt caverns are described in a separate fact sheet. This fact sheet focuses on slurry injection technology, which involves grinding or processing solids into small particles, mixing them with water or some other liquid to make a slurry, and injecting the slurry into an underground formation at pressures high enough to fracture the rock. The process referred to here as slurry injection has been given other designations by different authors, including slurry fracture injection (this descriptive term is copyrighted by a company that provides slurry injection services), fracture slurry injection, drilled cuttings injection, cuttings reinjection, and grind and inject.

251

Development and testing of the Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization (MAWS) system for Fernald wastes. Phase 1, Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents results of a treatability study for the evaluation of the MAWS process for wastes stored at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) site. Wastes included in the study were FEMP Pit 5 sludges, soil-wash fractions, and ion exchange media from a water treatment system supporting a soil washing system. MAWS offers potential for treating a variety of waste streams to produce a more leach resistant waste form at a lower cost than, say, cement stabilization.

Fu, S.S.; Matlack, K.S.; Mohr, R.K.; Brandys, M. Hojaji, H.; Bennett, S.; Ruller, J.; Pegg, I.L. [GTS Duratek, Columbia, MD (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Draft Title 40 CFR 191 compliance certification application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 3: Appendix BIR Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Transuranic Waste Baseline Inventory Report (WTWBIR) establishes a methodology for grouping wastes of similar physical and chemical properties, from across the US Department of Energy (DOE) transuranic (TRU) waste system, into a series of ``waste profiles`` that can be used as the basis for waste form discussions with regulatory agencies. The majority of this document reports TRU waste inventories of DOE defense sites. An appendix is included which provides estimates of commercial TRU waste from the West Valley Demonstration Project. The WIPP baseline inventory is estimated using waste streams identified by the DOE TRU waste generator/storage sites, supplemented by information from the Mixed Waste Inventory Report (MWIR) and the 1994 Integrated Data Base (IDB). The sites provided and/or authorized all information in the Waste Stream Profiles except the EPA (hazardous waste) codes for the mixed inventories. These codes were taken from the MWIR (if a WTWBIR mixed waste stream was not in MWIR, the sites were consulted). The IDB was used to generate the WIPP radionuclide inventory. Each waste stream is defined in a waste stream profile and has been assigned a waste matrix code (WMC) by the DOE TRU waste generator/storage site. Waste stream profiles with WMCs that have similar physical and chemical properties can be combined into a waste matrix code group (WMCG), which is then documented in a site-specific waste profile for each TRU waste generator/storage site that contains waste streams in that particular WMCG.

NONE

1995-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

253

Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) Eligibility...

254

Portsmouth Site Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Eckert, Anthony Howard and Chris Ashley. These drums containing radioactive waste from uranium enrichment operations were included in the Portsmouth site's first shipment to...

255

Environmental Restoration and Waste Management: Strategic plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) site is currently divided into five major areas, Operable Units (OUs), and several Areas of Concern (AOCs), which are the focus of investigation and clean-up. The primary environmental concern is groundwater contamination and a major emphasis of the restoration activities is focused on this medium. Each year, BNL generates 60 tons of hazardous waste and 7,000 to 8,000 cubic feet of radioactive waste that result from research activities. These wastes are collected at a central location, packaged and shipped off site for disposal. The operations for Hazardous and Radioactive Waste Management are conducted in compliance with EPA and DOE regulations. BNL has continued to actively pursue means by which these wastes may be minimized. Activities in both the remediation and waste management arenas are intimately connected with the future vision of BNL. The long-range goal for remediation in conjunction with vigorous monitoring of BNL`s activities is to restore the site and maintain strong environmental controls. The goals of the waste minimization program include activities to find environmentally safe alternatives to materials currently in use. By careful planning, BNL will minimize the amount of all waste, including sanitary, that is generated on site.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Evaluation of waste crate counter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel nondestructive measurement system has been developed to perform combined gamma-ray, passive neutron, and active neutron analyses of radioactive waste packaged in large crates. The system will be used to examine low level and transuranic waste at the Waste Receiving and Processing facility at Westinghouse-Hanford Corp. Prior to delivery of the system, an extensive evaluation of its performance characteristics will be conducted. The evaluation is to include an assessment of the mechanical properties of the system, gamma-ray attenuation correction algorithms, instrument response as a function of source positions, performance of the high resolution gamma-ray detector for ``hot spot`` and isotopic analyses, active and passive neutron counter response, instrument sensitivity, matrix effects, and packaging effects. This report will discuss the findings of the evaluation program, to date, and indicate future directions for the program.

Wachter, J.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Nuclear Materials Measurement and Accountability; Bieri, J.M. [Pajarito Scientific Corp., Los Alamos, NM (United States); Shaw, S.W. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Science Accelerator content now includes multimedia  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Science Accelerator content now includes multimedia Science Accelerator has expanded its suite of collections to include ScienceCinema, which contains videos produced by the U.S....

258

Tank farms solid waste characterization guide with sampling and analysis plan attachment  

SciTech Connect

This document describes methods used, including sampling and analysis, to characterize hazardous chemical constituent in Tank Farms containerized solid waste.

Quigley, J.T.

1997-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

259

Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Raya James Johnson Rad/Mixed Waste** Steve Bakhtiar Leadhazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste at the Hazardoustraining. Radioactive and mixed waste generators must take

Waste Management Group

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Waste Minimization Plan Prepared by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Minimization Plan Prepared by: Environmental Health and Safety Department Revised February 2012 #12;Waste Minimization Plan Table of Contents Policy Statement........................................................... 3 Centralized Waste Management Program

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastes include paint" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Hazardous Waste Act (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

"Hazardous waste" means any solid waste or combination of solid wastes that because of their quantity, concentration or physical, chemical or infectious characteristics may: cause or significantly...

262

DOE Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes 30-mile Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco to Hanford DOE Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes 30-mile Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco to Hanford January 23, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE , (509) 376-5365, Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering natural gas transportation and distribution requirements to support the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) and evaporator operations at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. DOE awarded a task order worth up to $5 million to the local, licensed supplier of natural gas in the Hanford area, Cascade Natural Gas Corporation (Cascade). Cascade will support DOE and its Environmental

263

Waste Management Project fiscal year 1998 multi-year work plan, WBS 1.2  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Management Project manages and integrates (non-TWRS) waste management activities at the site. Activities include management of Hanford wastes as well as waste transferred to Hanford from other DOE, Department of Defense, or other facilities. This work includes handling, treatment, storage, and disposal of radioactive, nonradioactive, hazardous, and mixed solid and liquid wastes. Major Waste Management Projects are the Solid Waste Project, Liquid Effluents Project, and Analytical Services. Existing facilities (e.g., grout vaults and canyons) shall be evaluated for reuse for these purposes to the maximum extent possible.

Jacobsen, P.H.

1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

264

Preliminary waste acceptance criteria for the ICPP spent fuel and waste management technology development program  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to identify requirements to be met by the Producer/Shipper of Spent Nuclear Fuel/High-LeveL Waste SNF/HLW in order for DOE to be able to accept the packaged materials. This includes defining both standard and nonstandard waste forms.

Taylor, L.L.; Shikashio, R.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Proceedings of the eighteenth mid-Atlantic industrial waste conference on toxic and hazardous wastes  

SciTech Connect

This book presents the papers given at a conference on the management of hazardous materials. Topics considered at the conference included underground storage tanks, underground industrial waste tank releases, regulations, cost estimation, metal leaching, spent oil shales, siting power plant ash disposal areas, phosphorous removal by a coal media filter, and waste water characterization and treatment for the coal slurry pipeline industry.

Boardman, G.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Robust Solution to Difficult Hydrogen Issues When Shipping Transuranic Waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) has been open, receiving, and disposing of transuranic (TRU) waste since March 26, 1999. The majority of the waste has a path forward for shipment to and disposal at the WIPP, but there are about two percent (2%) or approximately 3,020 cubic meters (m{sup 3}) of the volume of TRU waste (high wattage TRU waste) that is not shippable because of gas generation limits set by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This waste includes plutonium-238 waste, solidified organic waste, and other high plutonium-239 wastes. Flammable gases are potentially generated during transport of TRU waste by the radiolysis of hydrogenous materials and therefore, the concentration at the end of the shipping period must be predicted. Two options are currently available to TRU waste sites for solving this problem: (1) gas generation testing on each drum, and (2) waste form modification by repackaging and/or treatment. Repackaging some of the high wattage waste may require up to 20:1 drum increase to meet the gas generation limits of less than five percent (5%) hydrogen in the inner most layer of confinement (the layer closest to the waste). (This is the limit set by the NRC.) These options increase waste handling and transportation risks and there are high costs and potential worker exposure associated with repackaging this high-wattage TRU waste. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) is pursuing a twofold approach to develop a shipping path for these wastes. They are: regulatory change and technology development. For the regulatory change, a more detailed knowledge of the high wattage waste (e.g., void volumes, gas generation potential of specific chemical constituents) may allow refinement of the current assumptions in the gas generation model for Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging for Contact-Handled (CH) TRU waste. For technology development, one of the options being pursued is the use of a robust container, the ARROW-PAK{trademark} System. (1) The ARROW-PAK{trademark} is a macroencapsulation treatment technology, developed by Boh Environmental, LLC, New Orleans, Louisiana. This technology has been designed to withstand any unexpected hydrogen deflagration (i.e. no consequence) and other benefits such as criticality control.

Countiss, S. S.; Basabilvazo, G. T.; Moody, D. C. III; Lott, S. A.; Pickerell, M.; Baca, T.; CH2M Hill; Tujague, S.; Svetlik, H.; Hannah, T.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

267

Petroleum Gasoline & Distillate Needs Including the Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum Gasoline & Distillate Needs Including the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) Impacts

268

Petroleum Gasoline & Distillate Needs Including the Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Petroleum > Analysis > Petroleum Gasoline & Distillate Needs Including the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) ...

269

CRAD, Hazardous Waste Management - December 4, 2007 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CRAD, Hazardous Waste Management - December 4, 2007 CRAD, Hazardous Waste Management - December 4, 2007 CRAD, Hazardous Waste Management - December 4, 2007 December 4, 2007 Hazardous Waste Management Implementation Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry (HSS CRAD 64-30) Line management ensures that the requirements for generating, storing, treating, transporting, and disposing of hazardous waste, universal waste, and used oil, established under 40 CFR Subchapter I, applicable permits, and DOE requirements have been effectively implemented for federal and contractor employees, including subcontractors. Written programs and plans are in place and updated when conditions or requirements change. Employees have been properly trained for the wastes they handle. Documentation of waste characterizations, manifests, land disposal restrictions,

270

TRU Waste Sampling Program: Volume II. Gas generation studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Volume II of the TRU Waste Sampling Program report contains the data generated from evaluating the adequacy of venting/filtering devices for maintaining safe hydrogen levels in plutonium contaminated waste drums. Additional studies reported in this volume include gas generation rates, selected waste form monitoring, and evaluation of hydrogen migration from sealed 90-mil rigid polyethylene drum liners containing /sup 238/Pu-contaminated wastes. All wastes used in the studies were newly-generated, and the waste drums were under controlled, experimental conditions. Studies using /sup 239/Pu-contaminated wastes were conducted at the Rocky Flats Plant. Studies using /sup 238/Pu-contaminated wastes were conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Clements, T.L. Jr.; Kudera, D.E.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Defining a metal-based waste form for IFR pyroprocessing wastes  

SciTech Connect

Pyrochemical electrorefining to recover actinides from metal nuclear fuel is a key element of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle. The process separates the radioactive fission products from the long-lived actinides in a molten LiCl-KCl salt, and it generates a lower waste volume with significantly less long-term toxicity as compared to spent nuclear fuel. The process waste forms include a mineral-based waste form that will contain fission products removed from an electrolyte salt and a metal-based waste form that will contain metallic fission products and the fuel cladding and process materials. Two concepts for the metal-based waste form are being investigated: (1) encapsulating the metal constituents in a Cu-Al alloy and (2) alloying the metal constituents into a uniform stainless steel-based waste form. Results are given from our recent studies of these two concepts.

McDeavitt, S.M.; Park, J.Y.; Ackerman, J.P.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Conceptual waste package interim product specifications and data requirements for disposal of borosilicate glass defense high-level waste forms in salt geologic repositories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conceptual waste package interim product specifications and data requirements presented are applicable specifically to the normal borosilicate glass product of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). They provide preliminary numerical values for the defense high-level waste form parameters and properties identified in the waste form performance specification for geologic isolation in salt repositories. Subject areas treated include containment and isolation, operational period safety, criticality control, waste form/production canister identification, and waste package performance testing requirements. This document was generated for use in the development of conceptual waste package designs in salt. It will be revised as additional data, analyses, and regulatory requirements become available.

Not Available

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Handbook of high-level radioactive waste transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Handbook serves as a reference to which state officials and members of the general public may turn for information on radioactive waste transportation and on the federal government`s system for transporting this waste under the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The Handbook condenses and updates information contained in the Midwestern High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Primer. It is intended primarily to assist legislators who, in the future, may be called upon to enact legislation pertaining to the transportation of radioactive waste through their jurisdictions. The Handbook is divided into two sections. The first section places the federal government`s program for transporting radioactive waste in context. It provides background information on nuclear waste production in the United States and traces the emergence of federal policy for disposing of radioactive waste. The second section covers the history of radioactive waste transportation; summarizes major pieces of legislation pertaining to the transportation of radioactive waste; and provides an overview of the radioactive waste transportation program developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE). To supplement this information, a summary of pertinent federal and state legislation and a glossary of terms are included as appendices, as is a list of publications produced by the Midwestern Office of The Council of State Governments (CSG-MW) as part of the Midwestern High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Project.

Sattler, L.R.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities March 2010  

SciTech Connect

This Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) for the Waste Storage Facilities was developed in accordance with 10 CFR 830, Subpart B, 'Safety Basis Requirements,' and utilizes the methodology outlined in DOE-STD-3009-94, Change Notice 3. The Waste Storage Facilities consist of Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area portion of the DWTF complex. These two areas are combined into a single DSA, as their functions as storage for radioactive and hazardous waste are essentially identical. The B695 Segment of DWTF is addressed under a separate DSA. This DSA provides a description of the Waste Storage Facilities and the operations conducted therein; identification of hazards; analyses of the hazards, including inventories, bounding releases, consequences, and conclusions; and programmatic elements that describe the current capacity for safe operations. The mission of the Waste Storage Facilities is to safely handle, store, and treat hazardous waste, transuranic (TRU) waste, low-level waste (LLW), mixed waste, combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL (as well as small amounts from other DOE facilities).

Laycak, D T

2010-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

275

Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This documented safety analysis (DSA) for the Waste Storage Facilities was developed in accordance with 10 CFR 830, Subpart B, 'Safety Basis Requirements', and utilizes the methodology outlined in DOE-STD-3009-94, Change Notice 3. The Waste Storage Facilities consist of Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area portion of the DWTF complex. These two areas are combined into a single DSA, as their functions as storage for radioactive and hazardous waste are essentially identical. The B695 Segment of DWTF is addressed under a separate DSA. This DSA provides a description of the Waste Storage Facilities and the operations conducted therein; identification of hazards; analyses of the hazards, including inventories, bounding releases, consequences, and conclusions; and programmatic elements that describe the current capacity for safe operations. The mission of the Waste Storage Facilities is to safely handle, store, and treat hazardous waste, transuranic (TRU) waste, low-level waste (LLW), mixed waste, combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL (as well as small amounts from other DOE facilities).

Laycak, D

2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

276

Mixed low-level waste form evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A scoping level evaluation of polyethylene encapsulation and vitreous waste forms for safe storage of mixed low-level waste was performed. Maximum permissible radionuclide concentrations were estimated for 15 indicator radionuclides disposed of at the Hanford and Savannah River sites with respect to protection of the groundwater and inadvertent intruder pathways. Nominal performance improvements of polyethylene and glass waste forms relative to grout are reported. These improvements in maximum permissible radionuclide concentrations depend strongly on the radionuclide of concern and pathway. Recommendations for future research include improving the current understanding of the performance of polymer waste forms, particularly macroencapsulation. To provide context to these estimates, the concentrations of radionuclides in treated DOE waste should be compared with the results of this study to determine required performance.

Pohl, P.I.; Cheng, Wu-Ching; Wheeler, T.; Waters, R.D.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

High-Level Waste Melter Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is faced with a massive cleanup task in resolving the legacy of environmental problems from years of manufacturing nuclear weapons. One of the major activities within this task is the treatment and disposal of the extremely large amount of high-level radioactive (HLW) waste stored at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The current planning for the method of choice for accomplishing this task is to vitrify (glassify) this waste for disposal in a geologic repository. This paper describes the results of the DOE-chartered independent review of alternatives for solidification of Hanford HLW that could achieve major cost reductions with reasonable long-term risks, including recommendations on a path forward for advanced melter and waste form material research and development. The potential for improved cost performance was considered to depend largely on increased waste loading (fewer high-level waste canisters for disposal), higher throughput, or decreased vitrification facility size.

Ahearne, J.; Gentilucci, J.; Pye, L. D.; Weber, T.; Woolley, F.; Machara, N. P.; Gerdes, K.; Cooley, C.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

278

Development of Cementitious Waste Forms for Nuclear Waste ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials Solutions for the Nuclear Renaissance. Presentation Title, Development of Cementitious Waste Forms for Nuclear Waste Immobilization.

279

How to deal with laboratory waste Radioactive waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How to deal with laboratory waste Radioactive waste: Any laboratory waste, whether chemical or biological, containing radioactive material, should be disposed as radioactive waste. Radioactive waste should be removed from the laboratory to the departmental waste area, soon after finishing the experiment

Maoz, Shahar

280

Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization (MAWS). Technology summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization(MAWS) concept, actual waste streams are utilized as additive resources for vitrification, which may contain the basic components (glass formers and fluxes) for making a suitable glass or glassy slag. If too much glass former is present, then the melt viscosity or temperature will be too high for processing; while if there is too much flux, then the durability may suffer. Therefore, there are optimum combinations of these two important classes of constituents depending on the criteria required. The challenge is to combine these resources in such a way that minimizes the use of non-waste additives yet yields a processable and durable final waste form for disposal. The benefit to this approach is that the volume of the final waste form is minimized (waste loading maximized) since little or no additives are used and vitrification itself results in volume reduction through evaporation of water, combustion of organics, and compaction of the solids into a non-porous glass. This implies a significant reduction in disposal costs due to volume reduction alone, and minimizes future risks/costs due to the long term durability and leach resistance of glass. This is accomplished by using integrated systems that are both cost-effective and produce an environmentally sound waste form for disposal. individual component technologies may include: vitrification; thermal destruction; soil washing; gas scrubbing/filtration; and, ion-exchange wastewater treatment. The particular combination of technologies will depend on the waste streams to be treated. At the heart of MAWS is vitrification technology, which incorporates all primary and secondary waste streams into a final, long-term, stabilized glass wasteform. The integrated technology approach, and view of waste streams as resources, is innovative yet practical to cost effectively treat a broad range of DOE mixed and low-level wastes.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastes include paint" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Delivery system for molten salt oxidation of solid waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a delivery system for safety injecting solid waste particles, including mixed wastes, into a molten salt bath for destruction by the process of molten salt oxidation. The delivery system includes a feeder system and an injector that allow the solid waste stream to be accurately metered, evenly dispersed in the oxidant gas, and maintained at a temperature below incineration temperature while entering the molten salt reactor.

Brummond, William A. (Livermore, CA); Squire, Dwight V. (Livermore, CA); Robinson, Jeffrey A. (Manteca, CA); House, Palmer A. (Walnut Creek, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Transuranic (TRU) Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Defined by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act as "waste containing more than 100 nanocuries of alpha-emitting transuranic isotopes per gram of waste with half-lives greater than 20 years, except for (A)...

283

Transuranic Waste Screener  

The TRU waste screener (TRU-WS) is a multifunctional system for the rapid screening of transuranic material for criticality safety or screening for TRU content in open trays or waste containers.

284

Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is being designed to immobilize pretreated Hanford high-level waste and transuranic waste in borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters. Testing is being conducted in the HWVP Technology Development Project to ensure that adapted technologies are applicable to the candidate Hanford wastes and to generate information for waste form qualification. Empirical modeling is being conducted to define a glass composition range consistent with process and waste form qualification requirements. Laboratory studies are conducted to determine process stream properties, characterize the redox chemistry of the melter feed as a basis for controlling melt foaming and evaluate zeolite sorption materials for process waste treatment. Pilot-scale tests have been performed with simulated melter feed to access filtration for solids removal from process wastes, evaluate vitrification process performance and assess offgas equipment performance. Process equipment construction materials are being selected based on literature review, corrosion testing, and performance in pilot-scale testing. 3 figs., 6 tabs.

Larson, D.E.; Allen, C.R. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Kruger, O.L.; Weber, E.T. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Pet Waste Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

About 1 million pounds of dog waste is deposited daily in North Texas alone. That's why proper disposal of pet waste can make a big difference in the environment. 5 photos, 2 pages

Mechell, Justin; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

286

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy (DOE) is closing the circle on the generation, management, and disposal of transuranic waste. But the WIPP story is not just about radioactive waste. It is...

287

Immobilization of Nuclear Wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 20, 2010 ... Glassy and Glass Composite Nuclear Wasteforms: Michael Ojovan1; Bill Lee2; ... wastes which should be solidified for safe storage and disposal. ... has been vitrifying the Department of Energy's High Level Waste (HLW) at...

288

HANFORD FACILITY ANNUAL DANGEROUS WASTE REPORT CY2003 [SEC 1 & 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Facility Annual Dangerous Waste Report (ADWR) is prepared to meet the requirements of Washington Administrative Code Sections 173-303-220, Generator Reporting, and 173-303-390, Facility Reporting. In addition, the ADWR is required to meet Hanford Facility RCRA Permit Condition I.E.22, Annual Reporting. The ADWR provides summary information on dangerous waste generation and management activities for the Calendar Year for the Hanford Facility EPA ID number assigned to the Department of Energy for RCRA regulated waste, as well as Washington State only designated waste and radioactive mixed waste. The Solid Waste Information and Tracking System (SWITS) database is utilized to collect and compile the large array of data needed for preparation of this report. Information includes details of waste generated on the Hanford Facility, waste generated offsite and sent to Hanford for management, and other waste management activities conducted at Hanford, including treatment, storage, and disposal. Report details consist of waste descriptions and weights, waste codes and designations, and waste handling codes. In addition, for waste shipped to Hanford for treatment and or disposal, information on manifest numbers, the waste transporter, the waste receiving facility, and the original waste generators are included. In addition to paper copies, the report is also transmitted electronically to a web site maintained by the Washington State Department of Ecology.

FREEMAN, D.A.

2004-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

289

The wild wild waste: e-waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

E-Waste is a popular, informal name for discarded electronic products such as computers, VCRs, cameras, which have reached the end of their "useful life". Discarded electronic products contain a stew of toxic metals and chemicals such as lead, mercury, ... Keywords: donate, e-waste, ecology, efficiency, environment, green computing, hazardous material, re-use, recycle, reduce, thin-client, upgrade, virtualization

Scott E. Hanselman; Mahmoud Pegah

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Hazardous waste management and pollution prevention  

SciTech Connect

The management of hazardous wastes is one of the most critical environmental issues that faces many developing countries. It is one of the areas where institutional control and treatment and disposal technology has not kept pace with economic development. This paper reviews the development of hazardous waste management methods over the past decades, and provides the information on the status and trends of hazardous waste management strategy in selected western nations. Several issues pertinent to hazardous waste management will be reviewed, including: (1) definition of hazard; (2) why are we concerned with hazardous wastes; (3) aspects of hazardous waste management system; and (4) prioritization of hazardous waste management options. Due to regulatory and economic pressure on hazardous waste management, pollution prevention has become a very important environmental strategy in many developed countries. In many developed countries, industry is increasingly considering such alternative approaches, and finding many opportunities for their cost effective implementation. This paper provides a review of the status and trends of pollution prevention in selected western nations.

Chiu, Shen-yann.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Hazardous waste management and pollution prevention  

SciTech Connect

The management of hazardous wastes is one of the most critical environmental issues that faces many developing countries. It is one of the areas where institutional control and treatment and disposal technology has not kept pace with economic development. This paper reviews the development of hazardous waste management methods over the past decades, and provides the information on the status and trends of hazardous waste management strategy in selected western nations. Several issues pertinent to hazardous waste management will be reviewed, including: (1) definition of hazard; (2) why are we concerned with hazardous wastes; (3) aspects of hazardous waste management system; and (4) prioritization of hazardous waste management options. Due to regulatory and economic pressure on hazardous waste management, pollution prevention has become a very important environmental strategy in many developed countries. In many developed countries, industry is increasingly considering such alternative approaches, and finding many opportunities for their cost effective implementation. This paper provides a review of the status and trends of pollution prevention in selected western nations.

Chiu, Shen-yann

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Recovery of fissile materials from nuclear wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for recovering fissile materials such as uranium, and plutonium, and rare earth elements, from complex waste feed material, and converting the remaining wastes into a waste glass suitable for storage or disposal. The waste feed is mixed with a dissolution glass formed of lead oxide and boron oxide resulting in oxidation, dehalogenation, and dissolution of metal oxides. Carbon is added to remove lead oxide, and a boron oxide fusion melt is produced. The fusion melt is essentially devoid of organic materials and halogens, and is easily and rapidly dissolved in nitric acid. After dissolution, uranium, plutonium, and rare earth elements are separated from the acid and recovered by processes such as PUREX or ion exchange. The remaining acid waste stream is vitrified to produce a waste glass suitable for storage or disposal. Potential waste feed materials include plutonium scrap and residue, miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and uranium fissile wastes. The initial feed materials may contain mixtures of metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, halides, organic material and other carbon-containing material.

Forsberg, Charles W.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Recovery of fissile materials from nuclear wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for recovering fissile materials such as uranium, and plutonium, and rare earth elements, from complex waste feed material, and converting the remaining wastes into a waste glass suitable for storage or disposal. The waste feed is mixed with a dissolution glass formed of lead oxide and boron oxide resulting in oxidation, dehalogenation, and dissolution of metal oxides. Carbon is added to remove lead oxide, and a boron oxide fusion melt is produced. The fusion melt is essentially devoid of organic materials and halogens, and is easily and rapidly dissolved in nitric acid. After dissolution, uranium, plutonium and rare earth elements are separated from the acid and recovered by processes such as PUREX or ion exchange. The remaining acid waste stream is vitrified to produce a waste glass suitable for storage or disposal. Potential waste feed materials include plutonium scrap and residue, miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and uranium fissile wastes. The initial feed materials may contain mixtures of metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, halides, organic material and other carbon-containing material.

Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Crystallization of sodium nitrate from radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect

From the 1940s to the 1980s, the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IPC/RAS) conducted research and development on processes to separate acetate and nitrate salts and acetic acid from radioactive wastes by crystallization. The research objective was to decrease waste volumes and produce the separated decontaminated materials for recycle. This report presents an account of the IPC/RAS experience in this field. Details on operating conditions, waste and product compositions, decontamination factors, and process equipment are described. The research and development was generally related to the management of intermediate-level radioactive wastes. The waste solutions resulted from recovery and processing of uranium, plutonium, and other products from irradiated nuclear fuel, neutralization of nuclear process solutions after extractant recovery, regeneration of process nitric acid, equipment decontamination, and other radiochemical processes. Waste components include nitric acid, metal nitrate and acetate salts, organic impurities, and surfactants. Waste management operations generally consist of two stages: volume reduction and processing of the concentrates for storage, solidification, and disposal. Filtration, coprecipitation, coagulation, evaporation, and sorption were used to reduce waste volume. 28 figs., 40 tabs.

Krapukhin, V.B.; Krasavina, E.P. Pikaev, A.K. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Institute of Physical Chemistry

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

FAQS Qualification Card - Waste Management | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Management Waste Management FAQS Qualification Card - Waste Management A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-WasteManagement.docx Description Waste Management Qualification Card More Documents & Publications FAQS Qualification Card - General Technical Base

296

CRYSTALLINE CERAMIC WASTE FORMS: REFERENCE FORMULATION REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research conducted in this work package is aimed at taking advantage of the long term thermodynamic stability of crystalline ceramics to create more durable waste forms (as compared to high level waste glass) in order to reduce the reliance on engineered and natural barrier systems. Durable ceramic waste forms that incorporate a wide range of radionuclides have the potential to broaden the available disposal options and to lower the storage and disposal costs associated with advanced fuel cycles. Assemblages of several titanate phases have been successfully demonstrated to incorporate radioactive waste elements, and the multiphase nature of these materials allows them to accommodate variation in the waste composition. Recent work has shown that they can be successfully produced from a melting and crystallization process. The objective of this report is to explain the design of ceramic host systems culminating in a reference ceramic formulation for use in subsequent studies on process optimization and melt property data assessment in support of FY13 melter demonstration testing. The waste stream used as the basis for the development and testing is a combination of the projected Cs/Sr separated stream, the Trivalent Actinide - Lanthanide Separation by Phosphorous reagent Extraction from Aqueous Komplexes (TALSPEAK) waste stream consisting of lanthanide fission products, the transition metal fission product waste stream resulting from the transuranic extraction (TRUEX) process, and a high molybdenum concentration with relatively low noble metal concentrations. In addition to the combined CS/LN/TM High Mo waste stream, variants without Mo and without Mo and Zr were also evaluated. Based on the results of fabricating and characterizing several simulated ceramic waste forms, two reference ceramic waste form compositions are recommended in this report. The first composition targets the CS/LN/TM combined waste stream with and without Mo. The second composition targets with CS/LN/TM combined waste stream with Mo and Zr removed. Waste streams that contain Mo must be produced in reducing environments to avoid Cs-Mo oxide phase formation. Waste streams without Mo have the ability to be melt processed in air. A path forward for further optimizing the processing steps needed to form the targeted phase assemblages is outlined in this report. Processing modifications including melting in a reducing atmosphere, and controlled heat treatment schedules are anticipated to improve the targeted elemental partitioning.

Brinkman, K.; Fox, K.; Marra, J.

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

Waste Acceptance Testing of Secondary Waste Forms: Cast Stone, Ceramicrete and DuraLith  

SciTech Connect

To support the selection of a waste form for the liquid secondary wastes from WTP, Washington River Protection Solutions has initiated secondary-waste-form testing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In anticipation of a down-selection process for a waste form for the Solidification Treatment Unit to be added to the ETF, PNNL is conducting tests on four candidate waste forms to evaluate their ability to meet potential waste acceptance criteria for immobilized secondary wastes that would be placed in the IDF. All three waste forms demonstrated compressive strengths above the minimum 3.45 MPa (500 psi) set as a target for cement-based waste forms. Further, none of the waste forms showed any significant degradation in compressive strength after undergoing thermal cycling (30 cycles in a 10 day period) between -40 C and 60 C or water immersion for 90 days. The three leach test methods are intended to measure the diffusion rates of contaminants from the waste forms. Results are reported in terms of diffusion coefficients and a leachability index (LI) calculated based on the diffusion coefficients. A smaller diffusion coefficient and a larger LI are desired. The NRC, in its Waste Form Technical Position (NRC 1991), provides recommendations and guidance regarding methods to demonstrate waste stability for land disposal of radioactive waste. Included is a recommendation to conduct leach tests using the ANS 16.1 method. The resulting leachability index (LI) should be greater than 6.0. For Hanford secondary wastes, the LI > 6.0 criterion applies to sodium leached from the waste form. For technetium and iodine, higher targets of LI > 9 for Tc and LI > 11 for iodine have been set based on early waste-disposal risk and performance assessment analyses. The results of these three leach tests conducted for a total time between 11days (ASTM C1308) to 90 days (ANS 16.1) showed: (1) Technetium diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that all the waste forms had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium; (2) Rhenium diffusivity: Cast Stone 2M specimens, when tested using EPA 1315 protocol, had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium based on rhenium as a surrogate for technetium. All other waste forms tested by ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 test methods had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 9 for Tc based on rhenium release. These studies indicated that use of Re(VII) as a surrogate for 99Tc(VII) in low temperature secondary waste forms containing reductants will provide overestimated diffusivity values for 99Tc. Therefore, it is not appropriate to use Re as a surrogate 99Tc in future low temperature waste form studies. (3) Iodine diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that the three waste forms had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 11 for iodine. Therefore, it may be necessary to use a more effective sequestering material than silver zeolite used in two of the waste forms (Ceramicrete and DuraLith); (4) Sodium diffusivity: All the waste form specimens tested by the three leach methods (ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315) exceeded the target LI value of 6; (5) All three leach methods (ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308 and EPA 1315) provided similar 99Tc diffusivity values for both short-time transient diffusivity effects as well as long-term ({approx}90 days) steady diffusivity from each of the three tested waste forms (Cast Stone 2M, Ceramicrete and DuraLith). Therefore, any one of the three methods can be used to determine the contaminant diffusivities from a selected waste form.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Lindberg, Michael J.; Parker, Kent E.

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

298

Recycle Plastic Waste Recommended Action  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AR No. 5 Recycle Plastic Waste Recommended Action Separate scrap plastic bag waste from solid waste stream and recycle. This can be accomplished by either arranging for no-cost pick-up of loose waste or by selling baled waste material. Assessment Recommendation Summary Recommended Waste Cost Implementation

Tullos, Desiree

299

Waste Management and WasteWaste Management and Waste--toto--EnergyEnergy Status in SingaporeStatus in Singapore  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Management and WasteWaste Management and Waste--toto--EnergyEnergy Status in Singapore #12;Singapore's Waste Management · In 2003, 6877 tonnes/day (2.51 M tonnes/year) of MSW collected plants · 8% (non-incinerable waste) and incineration ash goes to the offshore Semakau Landfill · To reach

Columbia University

300

The Savannah River Site's liquid radioactive waste operations involves the man  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site's liquid radioactive waste operations involves the management of space in the Site's Site's liquid radioactive waste operations involves the management of space in the Site's 49 underground waste tanks, including the removal of waste materials. Once water is removed from the waste tanks, two materials remain: salt and sludge waste. Removing salt waste, which fills approximately 90 percent of the tank space in the SRS tank farms, is a major step toward closing the Site's waste tanks that currently contain approximately 38 million gallons of waste. Due to the limited amount of tank space available in new-style tanks, some salt waste must be dispositioned in the interim to ensure sufficient tank space for continued sludge washing and to support the initial start-up and salt processing operations at the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastes include paint" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Reducing waste, Photoby stcvcchan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I ' I I t Reducing waste, Photoby stcvcchan AMs President Mike Lee (left to right), Point Grey M U recycling given high priority on campus By GAVIN WILSON UBC is taking stepsto reduce waste and encourageGellatly,Vice-President,Administration and Finance,to develop and recommend university policies on waste recycling. Another task force has submitted

Farrell, Anthony P.

302

Waste acceptance criteria for closure generated waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The PORTS Facility has been operating since 1954. The PORTS Facility is used to enrich uranium for nuclear navy applications and commercial nuclear reactors. The PORTS process uses molecular diffusion techniques to separate the U-235 isotope from the U-238 isotope. The PORTS Facility consists of a complex cascade of compressors and converters through which gaseous uranium hexafluoride feed is processed. The feed contains approximately 0.7 percent U-235 by weight while products contain from 4 to 97 percent U-235 by weight, depending on the final application. In general, the majority of the closure wastes generated at PORTS consists of personal protective equipment (PPE), rags, soils, decontamination solutions, and construction related debris. These hazardous wastes will be predominately characterized on the basis of process knowledge. PORTS assumes its conservative waste characterizations that are based on process knowledge are correct unless and until further investigation and/or analysis proves the constituents are not present or are present at concentrations below characteristic regulatory thresholds. Waste Acceptance Criteria for wastes generated by the closure of active and inactive RCRA facilities at PORTS has been developed. The criteria presented in this document govern the activities that are performed during the closure and subsequent generation of waste and relocation from the closure locations to the storage unit. These criteria are intended to ensure the proper handling, classification, processing, and storage of wastes in order to prevent hazardous waste release that may pose a threat to human health or the environment. Any wastes currently stored at each of the facilities that are to be closed will be transferred to the X-326 or X-7725 Storage Units. The waste transfers will be accomplished in accordance with the Container Transfer Plan.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Energy aspects of solid waste management: Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Eighteenth Annual Illinois Energy Conference entitled Energy Aspects of Solid Waste Management'' was held in Chicago, Illinois on October 29--30, 1990. The conference program was developed by a planning committee that drew upon Illinois energy and environmental specialists from the major sectors including energy industries, environmental organizations, research universities, utility companies, federal, state and local government agencies, and public interest groups. Within this framework, the committee identified a number of key topic areas surrounding solid waste management in Illinois which were the focus of the conference. These issues included: review of the main components of the solid waste cycle in the Midwest and what the relative impact of waste reduction, recycling, incineration and land disposal might be on Illinois' and the Midwest's solid waste management program. Investigation of special programs in the Midwest dealing with sewage sludge, combustion residuals and medical/infectious wastes. Review of the status of existing landfills in Illinois and the Midwest and an examination of the current plans for siting of new land disposal systems. Review of the status of incinerators and waste-to-energy systems in Illinois and the Midwest, as well as an update on activities to maximize methane production from landfills in the Midwest.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Solid Waste Program (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program (Alabama) Program (Alabama) Solid Waste Program (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer General Public/Consumer Industrial Residential Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Environmental Regulations This article states the authority of the department, regulations for the control of unauthorized dumping, disposal fees, violations and penalties. Solid waste refers to any garbage, rubbish, construction or demolition debris, ash, or sludge from a waste treatment facility, water supply plant, or air pollution control facility, and any other discarded materials, including solid, liquid, semisolid, or contained gaseous material resulting

305

Transuranic Waste Tabletop | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transuranic Waste Tabletop Transuranic Waste Tabletop Transuranic Waste Tabletop OBJECTIVES Given a simulated radioactive materials transportation accident, applicable procedures, and map references, demonstrate through participatory discussion a working knowledge of the following emergency response and concept of operations elements: „ Concept of operations for the emergency response to a radioactive materials transportation accident, including the Unified Incident Command System utilized in the field. „ Initial and extended response of emergency personnel and the interface between these organizations and Federal and State Regulatory agencies (i.e., Environmental Protection Agency [EPA], Department of Transportation [DOT], and the appropriate State agency). „ Communications between the Incident Commander (IC) and the

306

Texas facility treats, recycles refinery, petrochemical wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A US Gulf Coast environmental services company is treating refinery and petrochemical plant wastes to universal treatment standards (UTS). DuraTherm Inc.`s recycling center uses thermal desorption to treat a variety of refinery wastes and other hazardous materials. The plant is located in San Leon, Tex., near the major Houston/Texas City refining and petrochemical center. DuraTherm`s customers include major US refining companies, plus petrochemical, terminal, pipeline, transportation, and remediation companies. Examples of typical contaminant concentrations and treatment levels for refinery wastes are shown. The paper discusses thermal desorption, the process description and testing.

NONE

1996-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

307

Liquid low level waste management expert system  

SciTech Connect

An expert system has been developed as part of a new initiative for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) systems analysis program. This expert system will aid in prioritizing radioactive waste streams for treatment and disposal by evaluating the severity and treatability of the problem, as well as the final waste form. The objectives of the expert system development included: (1) collecting information on process treatment technologies for liquid low-level waste (LLLW) that can be incorporated in the knowledge base of the expert system, and (2) producing a prototype that suggests processes and disposal technologies for the ORNL LLLW system. 4 refs., 9 figs.

Ferrada, J.J.; Abraham, T.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Jackson, J.R. (Southwest Baptist Univ., Bolivar, MO (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Fossil energy waste management. Technology status report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the current status and recent accomplishments of the Fossil Energy Waste Management (FE WM) projects sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The primary goal of the Waste Management Program is to identify and develop optimal strategies to manage solid by-products from advanced coal technologies for the purpose of ensuring the competitiveness of advanced coal technologies as a future energy source. The projects in the Fossil Energy Waste Management Program are divided into three types of activities: Waste Characterization, Disposal Technologies, and Utilization Technologies. This technology status report includes a discussion on barriers to increased use of coal by-products. Also, the major technical and nontechnical challenges currently being addressed by the FE WM program are discussed. A bibliography of 96 citations and a list of project contacts is included if the reader is interested in obtaining additional information about the FE WM program.

Bossart, S.J.; Newman, D.A.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Commercial radioactive waste minimization program development guidance  

SciTech Connect

This document is one of two prepared by the EG G Idaho, Inc., Waste Management Technical Support Program Group, National Low-Level Waste Management Program Unit. One of several Department of Energy responsibilities stated in the Amendments Act of 1985 is to provide technical assistance to compact regions Host States, and nonmember States (to the extent provided in appropriations acts) in establishing waste minimization program plans. Technical assistance includes, among other things, the development of technical guidelines for volume reduction options. Pursuant to this defined responsibility, the Department of Energy (through EG G Idaho, Inc.) has prepared this report, which includes guidance on defining a program, State/compact commission participation, and waste minimization program plans.

Fischer, D.K.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Commercial radioactive waste minimization program development guidance  

SciTech Connect

This document is one of two prepared by the EG&G Idaho, Inc., Waste Management Technical Support Program Group, National Low-Level Waste Management Program Unit. One of several Department of Energy responsibilities stated in the Amendments Act of 1985 is to provide technical assistance to compact regions Host States, and nonmember States (to the extent provided in appropriations acts) in establishing waste minimization program plans. Technical assistance includes, among other things, the development of technical guidelines for volume reduction options. Pursuant to this defined responsibility, the Department of Energy (through EG&G Idaho, Inc.) has prepared this report, which includes guidance on defining a program, State/compact commission participation, and waste minimization program plans.

Fischer, D.K.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Characteristics of potential repository wastes. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document, and its associated appendices and microcomputer (PC) data bases, constitutes the reference OCRWM data base of physical and radiological characteristics data of radioactive wastes. This Characteristics Data Base (CDB) system includes data on spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste (HLW), which clearly require geologic disposal, and other wastes which may require long-term isolation, such as sealed radioisotope sources. The data base system was developed for OCRWM by the CDB Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Various principal or official sources of these data provided primary information to the CDB Project which then used the ORIGEN2 computer code to calculate radiological properties. The data have been qualified by an OCRWM-sponsored peer review as suitable for quality-affecting work meeting the requirements of OCRWM`s Quality Assurance Program. The wastes characterized in this report include: light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel and immobilized HLW.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Waste treatment at the La Hague and Marcoule sites  

SciTech Connect

In this report, an overview of waste treatment and solidification facilities located at the La Hague and Marcoule sites, which are owned and/or operated by Cogema, provided. The La Hague facilities described in this report include the following: The STE3 liquid effluent treatment facility (in operation); the AD2 solid waste processing facility (also in operation); and the UCD alpha waste treatment facility (under construction). The Marcoule facilities described in this report, both of which are in operation, include the following: The STEL-EVA liquid effluent treatment facilities for the entire site; and the alpha waste incinerator of the UPI plant. This report is organized into four sections: this introduction, low-level waste treatment at La Hague, low-level waste treatment at Marcoule, and new process development. including the solvent pyrolysis process currently in the development stage for Cogema`s plants.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Municipal solid waste generation in municipalities: Quantifying impacts of household structure, commercial waste and domestic fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste management planning requires reliable data concerning waste generation, influencing factors on waste generation and forecasts of waste quantities based on facts. This paper aims at identifying and quantifying differences between different municipalities' municipal solid waste (MSW) collection quantities based on data from waste management and on socio-economic indicators. A large set of 116 indicators from 542 municipalities in the Province of Styria was investigated. The resulting regression model included municipal tax revenue per capita, household size and the percentage of buildings with solid fuel heating systems. The model explains 74.3% of the MSW variation and the model assumptions are met. Other factors such as tourism, home composting or age distribution of the population did not significantly improve the model. According to the model, 21% of MSW collected in Styria was commercial waste and 18% of the generated MSW was burned in domestic heating systems. While the percentage of commercial waste is consistent with literature data, practically no literature data are available for the quantity of MSW burned, which seems to be overestimated by the model. The resulting regression model was used as basis for a waste prognosis model (Beigl and Lebersorger, in preparation).

Lebersorger, S. [Institute of Waste Management, Department of Water, Atmosphere and Environment, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Muthgasse 107, A-1190 Wien (Austria); Beigl, P., E-mail: peter.beigl@boku.ac.at [Institute of Waste Management, Department of Water, Atmosphere and Environment, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Muthgasse 107, A-1190 Wien (Austria)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

314

Method for treating liquid wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The method of treating liquid waste in a media is accomplished by exposing the media to phosphinimines and sequestering .sup.99 Tc from the media by the phosphinimine (PN) functionalities. The system for treating the liquid waste in the media includes extraction of .sup.99 TcO.sub.4.sup.- from aqueous solutions into organic solvents or mixed organic/polar media, extraction of .sup.99 Tc from solutions on a solid matrix by using a container containing PN functionalities on solid matrices including an inlet and outlet for allowing flow of media through an immobilized phosphinimine ligand system contained within the container. Also, insoluble suspensions of phosphinimine functionalities on solid matrices in liquid solutions or present on supported liquid membranes (SLM) can be used to sequester .sup.99 Tc from those liquids.

Katti, Kattesh V. (Columbia, MO); Volkert, Wynn A. (Columbia, MO); Singh, Prahlad (Columbia, MO); Ketring, Alan R. (Columbia, MO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Method for treating liquid wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The method of treating liquid waste in a media is accomplished by exposing the media to phosphinimines and sequestering {sup 99}Tc from the media by the phosphinimine (PN) functionalities. The system for treating the liquid waste in the media includes extraction of {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} from aqueous solutions into organic solvents or mixed organic/polar media, extraction of {sup 99}Tc from solutions on a solid matrix by using a container containing PN functionalities on solid matrices including an inlet and outlet for allowing flow of media through an immobilized phosphinimine ligand system contained within the container. Also, insoluble suspensions of phosphinimine functionalities on solid matrices in liquid solutions or present on supported liquid membranes (SLM) can be used to sequester {sup 99}Tc from those liquids. 6 figs.

Katti, K.V.; Volkert, W.A.; Singh, P.; Ketring, A.R.

1995-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

316

MANAGING HANFORD'S LEGACY NO-PATH-FORWARD WASTES TO DISPOSITION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office (RL) has adopted the 2015 Vision for Cleanup of the Hanford Site. This vision will protect the Columbia River, reduce the Site footprint, and reduce Site mortgage costs. The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company's (CHPRC) Waste and Fuels Management Project (W&FMP) and their partners support this mission by providing centralized waste management services for the Hanford Site waste generating organizations. At the time of the CHPRC contract award (August 2008) slightly more than 9,000 m{sup 3} of waste was defined as 'no-path-forward waste.' The majority of these wastes are suspect transuranic mixed (TRUM) wastes which are currently stored in the low-level Burial Grounds (LLBG), or stored above ground in the Central Waste Complex (CWC). A portion of the waste will be generated during ongoing and future site cleanup activities. The DOE-RL and CHPRC have collaborated to identify and deliver safe, cost-effective disposition paths for 90% ({approx}8,000 m{sup 3}) of these problematic wastes. These paths include accelerated disposition through expanded use of offsite treatment capabilities. Disposal paths were selected that minimize the need to develop new technologies, minimize the need for new, on-site capabilities, and accelerate shipments of transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico.

WEST LD

2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

317

Possible global environmental impacts of solid waste practices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pollutants resulting from the management of solid waste have been shown to affect the air, land, oceans, and waterways. In addition, solid wastes have other, more indirect impacts such as reduction in feedstocks of natural resources, because useful materials are disposed of rather than recycled. The objective of this study is to evaluate solid waste management practices that have negative implications on the global environment and develop recommendations for reducing such impacts. Recommendations identifying needed changes are identified that will reduce global impacts of solid waste practices in the future. The scope of this study includes the range of non-hazardous solid wastes produced within our society, including municipal solid waste (MSW) and industrial solid waste (ISW), as well as industry-specific wastes from activities such as construction, demolition, and landclearing. Most solid waste management decisions continue to be made and implemented at very local levels, predominantly with a short-term focus to respond to relatively immediate pressures of landfill shortages, funding problems, political considerations, and the like. In this rush to address immediate local problems, little consideration is being given to potential impacts, either short- or long-term, at the national or global level resulting from solid waste management practices. More and more, the cumulative impacts from local decisions concerning solid waste management are beginning to manifest themselves in broader, longer-term impacts than are being addressed by the decision-makers or, at the very least, are presenting a greater and greater potential for such impacts.

Davis, M.M.; Holter, G.M.; DeForest, T.J.; Stapp, D.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Dibari, J.C. [Heritage College, Toppenish, WA (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Radioactive Waste Management Basis  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

Perkins, B K

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

319

Municipal waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to apparatus for processing municipal waste, and more particularly to vibrating mesh screen conveyor systems for removing grit, glass, and other noncombustible materials from dry municipal waste. Municipal waste must be properly processed and disposed of so that it does not create health risks to the community. Generally, municipal waste, which may be collected in garbage trucks, dumpsters, or the like, is deposited in processing areas such as landfills. Land and environmental controls imposed on landfill operators by governmental bodies have increased in recent years, however, making landfill disposal of solid waste materials more expensive. 6 figs.

Mayberry, J.L.

1988-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

320

Biological production of products from waste gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are designed for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, and carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various products, such as organic acids, alcohols, hydrogen, single cell protein, and salts of organic acids by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified.

Gaddy, James L. (Fayetteville, AR)

2002-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastes include paint" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

HARMONIC IN-PAINTING OF COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND SKY BY CONSTRAINED GAUSSIAN REALIZATION  

SciTech Connect

The presence of astrophysical emissions between the last scattering surface and our vantage point requires us to apply a foreground mask on cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky maps, leading to large cuts around the Galactic equator and numerous holes. Since many CMB analysis, in particular on the largest angular scales, may be performed on a whole-sky map in a more straightforward and reliable manner, it is of utmost importance to develop an efficient method to fill in the masked pixels in a way compliant with the expected statistical properties and the unmasked pixels. In this Letter, we consider the Monte Carlo simulation of a constrained Gaussian field and derive it CMB anisotropy in harmonic space, where a feasible implementation is possible with good approximation. We applied our method to simulated data, which shows that our method produces a plausible whole-sky map, given the unmasked pixels, and a theoretical expectation. Subsequently, we applied our method to the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe foreground-reduced maps and investigated the anomalous alignment between quadrupole and octupole components. From our investigation, we find that the alignment in the foreground-reduced maps is even higher than the Internal Linear Combination map. We also find that the V-band map has higher alignment than other bands, despite the expectation that the V-band map has less foreground contamination than other bands. Therefore, we find it hard to attribute the alignment to residual foregrounds. Our method will be complementary to other efforts on in-painting or reconstructing the masked CMB data, and of great use to Planck surveyor and future missions.

Kim, Jaiseung; Naselsky, Pavel [Niels Bohr Institute and Discovery Center, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Mandolesi, Nazzareno, E-mail: jkim@nbi.dk [INAF/IASF, Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Bologna, Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

HANFORD WASTE MINERALOGY REFERENCE REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report lists the observed mineral phases present in the Hanford tanks. This task was accomplished by performing a review of numerous reports that used experimental techniques including, but not limited to: x-ray diffraction, polarized light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and particle size distribution analyses. This report contains tables that can be used as a quick reference to identify the crystal phases observed in Hanford waste.

DISSELKAMP RS

2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

323

HANFORD WASTE MINEROLOGY REFERENCE REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report lists the observed mineral phase phases present in the Hanford tanks. This task was accomplished by performing a review of numerous reports using experimental techniques including, but not limited to: x-ray diffraction, polarized light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and particle size distribution analyses. This report contains tables that can be used as a quick reference to identify the crystal phases present observed in Hanford waste.

DISSELKAMP RS

2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

324

ASSEMBLAGES ON WASTE ROCK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Natural regeneration on waste rock was investigated at the old Wangaloa coal mine, south-east Otago. A 450-m long waste rock stack had been created 4050 years ago, and has had little anthropogenic intervention since. The stack is made up of a gradient of three main waste rock types, defined as silt-rich, mixed, and quartz-rich, which reflect different proportions of loess siltstone and quartz gravel conglomerate. Plant species assemblages were quantified in four 5-m 2 quadrats in each waste rock type. Invertebrates were heat extracted from substrate cores (7 cm diameter; depth 5 cm) collected from quadrats over an eight-week period in spring 2003. Ordination analysis showed statistically distinct plant and invertebrate assemblages had arisen on each waste rock type. Revegetation patterns were dominated by native, woody individuals on all waste rock types, particularly manuka (Leptospermum scoparium) and kanuka (Kunzea ericoides). Plant cover on silt-rich waste rock was four-fold that on quartz-rich waste rock. Total numbers of invertebrates were highest on quartz-rich waste rock, but richness greatest on silt-rich waste rock. Collembola dominated the fauna but their numbers were proportionally greatest in poorly vegetated areas. Further work is required to explain the absence of plants and invertebrates from local areas of waste rock. ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

C. G. Rufaut; S. Hammit; D. Craw; S. G. Clearwater

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department annual operating report CY 1996  

SciTech Connect

This annual report summarizes operating activities dealing with the process waste system, the liquid low-level waste system, and the gaseous waste system. It also describes upgrade activities dealing with the process and liquid low-level waste systems, the cathodic protection system, a stack ventilation system, and configuration control. Maintenance activities are described dealing with nonradiological wastewater treatment plant, process waste treatment plant and collection system, liquid low-level waste system, and gaseous waste system. Miscellaneous activities include training, audits/reviews/tours, and environmental restoration support.

Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended with appropriations acts appended  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 provides for the development of repositories for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel, to establish a program of research, development and demonstration regarding the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. Titles 1 and 2 cover these subjects. Also included in this Act are: Title 3: Other provisions relating to radioactive waste; Title 4: Nuclear waste negotiation; Title 5: Nuclear waste technical review board; and Title 6: High-level radioactive waste. An appendix contains excerpts from appropriations acts from fiscal year 1984--1994.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

GEOTECHNICAL/GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ADVANCED COAL PROCESS WASTE STREAMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thirteen solid wastes, six coals and one unreacted sorbent produced from seven advanced coal utilization processes were characterized for task three of this project. The advanced processes from which samples were obtained included a gas-reburning sorbent injection process, a pressurized fluidized-bed coal combustion process, a coal-reburning process, a SO{sub x}, NO{sub x}, RO{sub x}, BOX process, an advanced flue desulfurization process, and an advanced coal cleaning process. The waste samples ranged from coarse materials, such as bottom ashes and spent bed materials, to fine materials such as fly ashes and cyclone ashes. Based on the results of the waste characterizations, an analysis of appropriate waste management practices for the advanced process wastes was done. The analysis indicated that using conventional waste management technology should be possible for disposal of all the advanced process wastes studied for task three. However, some wastes did possess properties that could present special problems for conventional waste management systems. Several task three wastes were self-hardening materials and one was self-heating. Self-hardening is caused by cementitious and pozzolanic reactions that occur when water is added to the waste. All of the self-hardening wastes setup slowly (in a matter of hours or days rather than minutes). Thus these wastes can still be handled with conventional management systems if care is taken not to allow them to setup in storage bins or transport vehicles. Waste self-heating is caused by the exothermic hydration of lime when the waste is mixed with conditioning water. If enough lime is present, the temperature of the waste will rise until steam is produced. It is recommended that self-heating wastes be conditioned in a controlled manner so that the heat will be safely dissipated before the material is transported to an ultimate disposal site. Waste utilization is important because an advanced process waste will not require ultimate disposal when it is put to use. Each task three waste was evaluated for utilization potential based on its physical properties, bulk chemical composition, and mineral composition. Only one of the thirteen materials studied might be suitable for use as a pozzolanic concrete additive. However, many wastes appeared to be suitable for other high-volume uses such as blasting grit, fine aggregate for asphalt concrete, road deicer, structural fill material, soil stabilization additives, waste stabilization additives, landfill cover material, and pavement base course construction.

Edwin S. Olson; Charles J. Moretti

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Vitrified waste option study report  

SciTech Connect

A {open_quotes}Settlement Agreement{close_quotes} between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho mandates that all radioactive high-level waste (HLW) now stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) will be treated so that it is ready to be moved out of Idaho for disposal by a target date of 2035. This report investigates vitrification treatment of all ICPP calcine, including the existing and future HLW calcine resulting from calcining liquid Sodium-Bearing Waste (SBW). Currently, the SBW is stored in the tank farm at the ICPP. Vitrification of these wastes is an acceptable treatment method for complying with the Settlement Agreement. This method involves vitrifying the calcined waste and casting the vitrified mass into stainless steel canisters that will be ready to be moved out of the Idaho for disposal by 2035. These canisters will be stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) until they are sent to a HLW national repository. The operating period for vitrification treatment will be from 2013 through 2032; all HLW will be treated and in storage by the end of 2032.

Lopez, D.A.; Kimmitt, R.R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory code assessment of the Rocky Flats transuranic waste  

SciTech Connect

This report is an assessment of the content codes associated with transuranic waste shipped from the Rocky Flats Plant in Golden, Colorado, to INEL. The primary objective of this document is to characterize and describe the transuranic wastes shipped to INEL from Rocky Flats by item description code (IDC). This information will aid INEL in determining if the waste meets the waste acceptance criteria (WAC) of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The waste covered by this content code assessment was shipped from Rocky Flats between 1985 and 1989. These years coincide with the dates for information available in the Rocky Flats Solid Waste Information Management System (SWIMS). The majority of waste shipped during this time was certified to the existing WIPP WAC. This waste is referred to as precertified waste. Reassessment of these precertified waste containers is necessary because of changes in the WIPP WAC. To accomplish this assessment, the analytical and process knowledge available on the various IDCs used at Rocky Flats were evaluated. Rocky Flats sources for this information include employee interviews, SWIMS, Transuranic Waste Certification Program, Transuranic Waste Inspection Procedure, Backlog Waste Baseline Books, WIPP Experimental Waste Characterization Program (headspace analysis), and other related documents, procedures, and programs. Summaries are provided of: (a) certification information, (b) waste description, (c) generation source, (d) recovery method, (e) waste packaging and handling information, (f) container preparation information, (g) assay information, (h) inspection information, (i) analytical data, and (j) RCRA characterization.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Nuclear Waste Assessment System for Technical Evaluation (NUWASTE)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NWTRB NWTRB www.nwtrb.gov U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board: Roles and Priorities Presented by: Nigel Mote, Executive Director, U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board May 14, 2013 Hyatt Regency Buffalo, Buffalo, NY. Presented to: National Transportation Stakeholders' Forum NWTRB www.nwtrb.gov U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board The Board's Statutory Mandate * The 1987 amendments to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) established the U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board. * The Board evaluates the technical and scientific validity of DOE activities related to implementing the NWPA, including: - transportation, packaging, and storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW)

331

Slurry growth and gas retention in synthetic Hanford waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work seeks to establish chemical and physical processes responsible for the generation and retention of gases within waste from a particular high-level waste tank on the Hanford Site, Tank 101-SY, through the use of synthetic wastes on a laboratory scale. The goal of these activities is to support the development of mitigation/remediation strategies for Tank 101-SY. Laboratory studies of aged synthetic waste have shown that gas generation occurs thermally at a significant level at current tank temperatures. Gas compositions include the same gases produced in actual tank waste, primarily N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, and H{sub 2}. Gas stoichiometries have been shown to be greatly influenced by several organic and inorganic constituents within the synthetic waste. Retention of gases in the synthetic waste is in the form of bubble attachment to solid particles.

Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.; Scheele, R.D.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Alternatives Implementation Study  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to discuss issues related to the implementation of each of the five down-selected INEEL/INTEC radioactive liquid waste (sodium-bearing waste - SBW) treatment alternatives and summarize information in three main areas of concern: process/technical, environmental permitting, and schedule. Major implementation options for each treatment alternative are also identified and briefly discussed. This report may touch upon, but purposely does not address in detail, issues that are programmatic in nature. Examples of these include how the SBW will be classified with respect to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA), status of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) permits and waste storage availability, available funding for implementation, stakeholder issues, and State of Idaho Settlement Agreement milestones. It is assumed in this report that the SBW would be classified as a transuranic (TRU) waste suitable for disposal at WIPP, located in New Mexico, after appropriate treatment to meet transportation requirements and waste acceptance criteria (WAC).

Charles M. Barnes; James B. Bosley; Clifford W. Olsen

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Slurry growth and gas retention in synthetic Hanford waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work seeks to establish chemical and physical processes responsible for the generation and retention of gases within waste from a particular high-level waste tank on the Hanford Site, Tank 101-SY, through the use of synthetic wastes on a laboratory scale. The goal of these activities is to support the development of mitigation/remediation strategies for Tank 101-SY. Laboratory studies of aged synthetic waste have shown that gas generation occurs thermally at a significant level at current tank temperatures. Gas compositions include the same gases produced in actual tank waste, primarily N[sub 2], N[sub 2]O, and H[sub 2]. Gas stoichiometries have been shown to be greatly influenced by several organic and inorganic constituents within the synthetic waste. Retention of gases in the synthetic waste is in the form of bubble attachment to solid particles.

Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.; Scheele, R.D.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

PASSIVATION LAYER STABILITY OF A METALLIC ALLOY WASTE FORM  

SciTech Connect

Alloy waste form development under the Waste Forms Campaign of the DOE-NE Fuel Cycle Research & Development program includes the process development and characterization of an alloy system to incorporate metal species from the waste streams generated during nuclear fuel recycling. This report describes the tests and results from the FY10 activities to further investigate an Fe-based waste form that uses 300-series stainless steel as the base alloy in an induction furnace melt process to incorporate the waste species from a closed nuclear fuel recycle separations scheme. This report is focused on the initial activities to investigate the formation of oxyhydroxide layer(s) that would be expected to develop on the Fe-based waste form as it corrodes under aqueous repository conditions. Corrosion tests were used to evaluate the stability of the layer(s) that can act as a passivation layer against further corrosion and would affect waste form durability in a disposal environment.

Williamson, M.; Mickalonis, J.; Fisher, D.; Sindelar, R.

2010-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

335

New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the issues of conducting debris treatment in the New Waste Calcine Facility (NWCF) decontamination area and the methods currently being used to decontaminate material at the NWCF.

K. E. Archibald

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Waste Package Component Design Methodology Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Executive Summary provides an overview of the methodology being used by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) to design waste packages and ancillary components. This summary information is intended for readers with general interest, but also provides technical readers a general framework surrounding a variety of technical details provided in the main body of the report. The purpose of this report is to document and ensure appropriate design methods are used in the design of waste packages and ancillary components (the drip shields and emplacement pallets). The methodology includes identification of necessary design inputs, justification of design assumptions, and use of appropriate analysis methods, and computational tools. This design work is subject to ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description''. The document is primarily intended for internal use and technical guidance for a variety of design activities. It is recognized that a wide audience including project management, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and others are interested to various levels of detail in the design methods and therefore covers a wide range of topics at varying levels of detail. Due to the preliminary nature of the design, readers can expect to encounter varied levels of detail in the body of the report. It is expected that technical information used as input to design documents will be verified and taken from the latest versions of reference sources given herein. This revision of the methodology report has evolved with changes in the waste package, drip shield, and emplacement pallet designs over many years and may be further revised as the design is finalized. Different components and analyses are at different stages of development. Some parts of the report are detailed, while other less detailed parts are likely to undergo further refinement. The design methodology is intended to provide designs that satisfy the safety and operational requirements of the YMP. Four waste package configurations have been selected to illustrate the application of the methodology during the licensing process. These four configurations are the 21-pressurized water reactor absorber plate waste package (21-PWRAP), the 44-boiling water reactor waste package (44-BWR), the 5 defense high-level radioactive waste (HLW) DOE spent nuclear fuel (SNF) codisposal short waste package (5-DHLWDOE SNF Short), and the naval canistered SNF long waste package (Naval SNF Long). Design work for the other six waste packages will be completed at a later date using the same design methodology. These include the 24-boiling water reactor waste package (24-BWR), the 21-pressurized water reactor control rod waste package (21-PWRCR), the 12-pressurized water reactor waste package (12-PWR), the 5 defense HLW DOE SNF codisposal long waste package (5-DHLWDOE SNF Long), the 2 defense HLW DOE SNF codisposal waste package (2-MC012-DHLW), and the naval canistered SNF short waste package (Naval SNF Short). This report is only part of the complete design description. Other reports related to the design include the design reports, the waste package system description documents, manufacturing specifications, and numerous documents for the many detailed calculations. The relationships between this report and other design documents are shown in Figure 1.

D.C. Mecham

2004-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

337

Tank Waste and Waste Processing | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing The Defense Waste Processing Facility set a record by producing 267 canisters filled with glassified waste in a year. New bubbler technology and other enhancements will increase canister production in the future. The Defense Waste Processing Facility set a record by producing 267 canisters filled with glassified waste in a year. New bubbler technology and other enhancements will increase canister production in the future. A Savannah River Remediation employee uses a manipulator located inside a shielded enclosure at the Defense Waste Processing Facility where the melter is pouring molten glass inside a canister. A Savannah River Remediation employee uses a manipulator located inside a

338

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

339

BLENDING OF LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To provide the Commission with the results of the staffs analysis of issues associated with the blending of low-level radioactive waste (LLRW), as directed in Chairman Jaczkos October 8, 2009, memorandum to the staff. The closure of the Barnwell waste disposal facility to most U.S. generators of Class B and C LLRW has caused industry to examine methods for reducing the amount of these wastes, including the blending of some types of Class B and C waste with similar Class A wastes to produce a Class A mixture that can be disposed of at a currently licensed facility. This paper identifies policy, safety, and regulatory issues associated with LLRW blending, provides options for a U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) blending position, and makes a recommendation for a future blending policy. This paper does not address any new commitments. SUMMARY: In this paper, the staff examines the blending or mixing of LLRW with higher concentrations of radionuclides with LLRW with lower concentrations of radionuclides to form a final homogeneous mixture. While recognizing that some mixing of waste is unavoidable, and may even be necessary and appropriate for efficiency or dose reduction purposes, NRC has historically discouraged mixing LLRW to lower the classification of waste in other circumstances.

R. W. Borchardt; Contacts James; E. Kennedy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Hot isostatic press waste option study report  

SciTech Connect

A Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho mandates that all high-level radioactive waste now stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant be treated so that it is ready to move out of Idaho for disposal by the target date of 2035. This study investigates the immobilization of all Idaho Chemical Processing Plant calcine, including calcined sodium bearing waste, via the process known as hot isostatic press, which produces compact solid waste forms by means of high temperature and pressure (1,050 C and 20,000 psi), as the treatment method for complying with the settlement agreement. The final waste product would be contained in stainless-steel canisters, the same type used at the Savannah River Site for vitrified waste, and stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory until a national geological repository becomes available for its disposal. The waste processing period is from 2013 through 2032, and disposal at the High Level Waste repository will probably begin sometime after 2065.

Russell, N.E.; Taylor, D.D.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastes include paint" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

RECENT PROGRESS IN DOE WASTE TANK CLOSURE  

SciTech Connect

The USDOE complex currently has over 330 underground storage tanks that have been used to process and store radioactive waste generated from the production of weapons materials. These tanks contain over 380 million liters of high-level and low-level radioactive waste. The waste consists of radioactively contaminated sludge, supernate, salt cake or calcine. Most of the waste exists at four USDOE locations, the Hanford Site, the Savannah River Site, the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center and the West Valley Demonstration Project. A summary of the DOE tank closure activities was first issued in 2001. Since then, regulatory changes have taken place that affect some of the sites and considerable progress has been made in closing tanks. This paper presents an overview of the current regulatory changes and drivers and a summary of the progress in tank closures at the various sites over the intervening six years. A number of areas are addressed including closure strategies, characterization of bulk waste and residual heel material, waste removal technologies for bulk waste, heel residuals and annuli, tank fill materials, closure system modeling and performance assessment programs, lessons learned, and external reviews.

Langton, C

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Integrated Waste Services Association National Solid Wastes Management Association  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Can Help Meet Our Energy Needs October 5, 2006 - WASHINGTON, DC--A broad coalition of government-244-4700 Evan Von Leer, SWANA 240-494-2252 John Varrasi, ASME 212-591-8158 Don't Waste Waste! Waste-Based Energy and utilization of energy produced from waste, or waste-based energy (WBE). The United States Conference of Mayors

Columbia University

343

WIPP Waste Information System Waste Container Data Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIPP Waste Information System Waste Container Data Report 06/06/2008 07:50 2.6 % LASB00411 % % Report Date Run by Report Site Id Container Number Waste Stream Data Status Code PEARCYM Version RP0360 Selection Criteria - Total Pages PRD02Instance 5 #12;Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Container Data Report

344

8-Waste treatment and disposal A. Responsibility for waste management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8- Waste treatment and disposal A. Responsibility for waste management 1. Each worker is responsible for correctly bagging and labeling his/her own waste. 2. A BSL3 technician will be responsible for transporting and autoclaving the waste. Waste will be autoclaved once or twice per day, depending on use

345

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is collected by the RSO. 2. Dry radioactive waste must be segregated by isotope. 3. Liquid radioactive waste must be separated by isotope. 4. Liquid scintillation vials must be collected separately. 5. Any "mixed waste" must be cleared with the RSO and labeled

346

WIPP Waste Information System Waste Container Data Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIPP Waste Information System Waste Container Data Report 06/06/2008 07:49 2.6 % LAS817174 % % Report Date Run by Report Site Id Container Number Waste Stream Data Status Code PEARCYM Version RP0360 Selection Criteria - Total Pages PRD02Instance 5 #12;Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Container Data Report

347

Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste Read more overleaf Introduction Energy from waste provides us with an opportunity for a waste solution and a local source of energy rolled,itcan onlyaddressaportionofthewastestream andisnotsufficientonitsown. Energy obtained from the combustion of residual waste (Energy from

348

Waste Confidence Discussion | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Confidence Discussion Waste Confidence Discussion Long-Term Waste Confidence Update. Waste Confidence Discussion More Documents & Publications Status Update: Extended Storage...

349

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 1, Technology Evaluation: Part C, Waste Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents activities at ORNL including waste management and remedial action at the site; also waste processing and disposal; robotics and automation of the laboratory; and regulatory compliance

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

National Waste Terminal Storage Program: potenial problems in the waste transportation system  

SciTech Connect

Potential problems are identified which may impact the planning, organization, and operation of nuclear waste transportation systems serving federal repositories. These system-level problems have the potential of seriously interfering with the overall OWI Transportation/Logistics Study objective of having a viable nuclear waste transportation system in 1985. This report includes recommended action and priority judgments to address these problems and minimize their impact. The potential problems identified as most important have consequences which may impact the overall state of future preparedness for transporting nuclear waste. Other important concerns relate to the imposition of unnecessarily severe and costly restrictions on nuclear waste transportation, public and carrier acceptance, and the involvement of interested parties in planning and decision-making. The major recommendation of this report is that the planning and development of the waste transportation system should be controlled by a central planning activity which anticipates the impact of uncertainties and undesirable events.

DeSteese, J.G.; Rhoads, R.E.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities  

SciTech Connect

This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 612 (A612) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities (DSA) (LLNL 2006). The analysis presented therein determined that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., drum crushing, size reduction, and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are located in two portions of the LLNL main site. A612 is located in the southeast quadrant of LLNL. The A612 fenceline is approximately 220 m west of Greenville Road. The DWTF Storage Area, which includes Building 693 (B693), Building 696 Radioactive Waste Storage Area (B696R), and associated yard areas and storage areas within the yard, is located in the northeast quadrant of LLNL in the DWTF complex. The DWTF Storage Area fenceline is approximately 90 m west of Greenville Road. A612 and the DWTF Storage Area are subdivided into various facilities and storage areas, consisting of buildings, tents, other structures, and open areas as described in Chapter 2 of the DSA. Section 2.4 of the DSA provides an overview of the buildings, structures, and areas in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, including construction details such as basic floor plans, equipment layout, construction materials, controlling dimensions, and dimensions significant to the hazard and accident analysis. Chapter 5 of the DSA documents the derivation of the TSRs and develops the operational limits that protect the safety envelope defined for the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. This TSR document is applicable to the handling, storage, and treatment of hazardous waste, TRU WASTE, LLW, mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste received or generated in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Section 5, Administrative Controls, contains those Administrative Controls necessary to ensure safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Programmatic Administrative Controls are in Section 5.6. This Introduction to the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES TSRs is not part of the TSR limits or conditions and contains no requirements related to WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES operations or to the safety analyses of the DSA.

Larson, H L

2007-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

352

UK Energy Statistics: Renewables and Waste, Commodity Balances (2010) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

403 403 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142288403 Varnish cache server UK Energy Statistics: Renewables and Waste, Commodity Balances (2010) Dataset Summary Description Annual commodity balances (supply, consumption) for renewables and waste in the UK from 1998 to 2009. Published as part of the Digest of UK energy statistics (DUKES), by the UK Department of Energy & Climate Change (DECC). Waste includes: wood waste, farm waste, sewage gas, landfill gas, waste and tyres. Renewables includes: wood, plant-based biomass, geothermal and active solar heat, hydro, wind, wave and tidal, and liquid biofuels. These data were used to produce Tables 7.1 to 7.3 in the Digest of United Kingdom Energy Statistics 2010 (available: http://decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/Statistics/publications/dukes/348-dukes-2...).

353

Process for removing sulfate anions from waste water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid emulsion membrane process for removing sulfate anions from waste water is disclosed. The liquid emulsion membrane process includes the steps of: (a) providing a liquid emulsion formed from an aqueous strip solution and an organic phase that contains an extractant capable of removing sulfate anions from waste water; (b) dispersing the liquid emulsion in globule form into a quantity of waste water containing sulfate anions to allow the organic phase in each globule of the emulsion to extract and absorb sulfate anions from the waste water and (c) separating the emulsion including its organic phase and absorbed sulfate anions from the waste water to provide waste water containing substantially no sulfate anions.

Nilsen, David N. (Lebanon, OR); Galvan, Gloria J. (Albany, OR); Hundley, Gary L. (Corvallis, OR); Wright, John B. (Albany, OR)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Problems associated with solid wastes from energy systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste streams from many energy-related technologies including coal, oil shale, tar sands, geothermal, oil and gas extraction, and nuclear power generation are reviewed with an emphasis on waste streams from coal and oil shale technologies. This study has two objectives. The first objective is to outline the available information on energy-related solid wastes. Data on chemical composition and hazardous biological characteristics are included, supplemented by regulatory reviews and data on legally designated hazardous waste streams. The second objective is to provide disposal and utilization options. Solid waste disposal and recovery requirements specified under the RCRA are emphasized. Information presented herein should be useful for policy, environmental control, and research and development decision making regarding solid and hazardous wastes from energy production.

Chiu, S.Y.; Fradkin, L.; Barisas, S.; Surles, T.; Morris, S.; Crowther, A.; DeCarlo, V.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Transportation of RCRA hazardous wastes. RCRA Information Brief  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act (HMTA) regulate the transport of hazardous wastes. Under these statutes, specific pretransport regulatory requirements must be met by DOE before the shipment of hazardous wastes, including radioactive mixed wastes. The pretransport requirements are designed to help reduce the risk of loss, leakage, or exposure during shipment of hazardous materials and to communicate information on potential hazards posed by the hazardous material in transport. These goals are accomplished through the tracking of shipments, correctly packaging and labeling containers, and communicating potential hazards. Specific requirements include manifesting, packaging, marking and labeling waste packages; placarding transport vehicles; choosing appropriate waste transporters and shipment destinations; and record keeping and reporting. This information Brief focuses primarily on the transporter requirements both for transportation within a DOE facility and using a commercial transporter to transport RCRA hazardous wastes off-site.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

The Remote-Handled TRU Waste Program  

SciTech Connect

RH TRU Waste is radioactive waste that requires shielding in addition to that provided by the container to protect people nearby from radiation exposure. By definition, the radiation dose rate at the outer surface of the container is greater than 200 millirem per hour and less than 1,000 rem per hour. The DOE is proposing a process for the characterization of RH TRU waste planned for disposal in the WIPP. This characterization process represents a performance-driven approach that satisfies the requirements of the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations for WIPP long-term performance, the transportation requirements of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Department of Transportation, as well as the technical safety requirements of RH TRU waste handling. The transportation, management and disposal of RH TRU waste is regulated by external government agencies as well as by the DOE itself. Externally, the characterization of RH-TRU waste for disposal at the WIPP is regulated by 20.4.1.500 New Mexico Administrative Code (incorporating 40 CFR 261.13) for the hazardous constituents and 40 CFR 194.24 for the radioactive constituents. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission certifies the shipping casks and the transportation system must meet DOT regulations. Internally, the DOE evaluates the environmental impacts of RH TRU waste transportation, handling and disposal through its National Environmental Policy Act program. The operational safety is assessed in the RH TRU Waste Safety Analysis Report, to be approved by the DOE. The WIPP has prepared a modification request to the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit that includes modifications to the WIPP facility for the safe receipt and handling of RH TRU waste and the addition of an RH TRU waste analysis plan. Modifications to the facility include systems and equipment for safe handling of RHTRU containers. Two shipping casks are to be used to optimize RH TRU was te throughput: the RH-72B and the CNS 10-160B transportation casks. Additionally, a draft Notification of Proposed Change to the EPA 40 CFR 194 Certification of the WIPP has been prepared, which contains a proposal for the RH TRU characterization program for compliance with the EPA requirements.

Gist, C. S.; Plum, H. L.; Wu, C. F.; Most, W. A.; Burrington, T. P.; Spangler, L. R.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

357

Los Alamos Waste Management Cost Estimation Model; Final report: Documentation of waste management process, development of Cost Estimation Model, and model reference manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report completes the Los Alamos Waste Management Cost Estimation Project, and includes the documentation of the waste management processes at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for hazardous, mixed, low-level radioactive solid and transuranic waste, development of the cost estimation model and a user reference manual. The ultimate goal of this effort was to develop an estimate of the life cycle costs for the aforementioned waste types. The Cost Estimation Model is a tool that can be used to calculate the costs of waste management at LANL for the aforementioned waste types, under several different scenarios. Each waste category at LANL is managed in a separate fashion, according to Department of Energy requirements and state and federal regulations. The cost of the waste management process for each waste category has not previously been well documented. In particular, the costs associated with the handling, treatment and storage of the waste have not been well understood. It is anticipated that greater knowledge of these costs will encourage waste generators at the Laboratory to apply waste minimization techniques to current operations. Expected benefits of waste minimization are a reduction in waste volume, decrease in liability and lower waste management costs.

Matysiak, L.M.; Burns, M.L.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Final environmental impact statement. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the appendices for the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Alternative geologic environs are considered. Salt, crystalline rock, argillaceous rock, and tuff are discussed. Studies on alternate geologic regions for the siting of WIPP are reviewed. President Carter's message to Congress on the management of radioactive wastes and the findings and recommendations of the interagency review group on nuclear waste management are included. Selection criteria for the WIPP site including geologic, hydrologic, tectonic, physicochemical compatability, and socio-economic factors are presented. A description of the waste types and the waste processing procedures are given. Methods used to calculate radiation doses from radionuclide releases during operation are presented. A complete description of the Los Medanos site, including archaeological and historic aspects is included. Environmental monitoring programs and long-term safety analysis program are described. (DMC)

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Integrated Waste Treatment Facility Fact Sheet | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Management Tank Waste and Waste Processing Integrated Waste Treatment Facility Fact Sheet Integrated Waste Treatment Facility Fact Sheet Waste Management Nuclear...

360

NDAA Section 3116 Waste Determinations with Related Disposal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NDAA Section 3116 Waste Determinations with Related Disposal Performance Assessments Waste Management Nuclear Materials & Waste Tank Waste and Waste Processing Waste...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastes include paint" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

SRS - Programs - Waste Solidification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Solidification Waste Solidification The two primary facilities operated within the Waste Solidification program are Saltstone and the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Each DWPF canister is 10 feet tall and 2 feet in diameter, and typically takes a little over a day to fill. Each DWPF canister is 10 feet tall and 2 feet in diameter, and typically takes a little over a day to fill. The largest radioactive waste glassification plant in the world, DWPF converts the high-level liquid nuclear waste currently stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) into a solid glass form suitable for long-term storage and disposal. Scientists have long considered this glassification process, called "vitrification," as the preferred option for immobilizing high-level radioactive liquids into a more stable, manageable form until a federal

362

Underground waste barrier structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an underground waste barrier structure that consists of waste material, a first container formed of activated carbonaceous material enclosing the waste material, a second container formed of zeolite enclosing the first container, and clay covering the second container. The underground waste barrier structure is constructed by forming a recessed area within the earth, lining the recessed area with a layer of clay, lining the clay with a layer of zeolite, lining the zeolite with a layer of activated carbonaceous material, placing the waste material within the lined recessed area, forming a ceiling over the waste material of a layer of activated carbonaceous material, a layer of zeolite, and a layer of clay, the layers in the ceiling cojoining with the respective layers forming the walls of the structure, and finally, covering the ceiling with earth.

Saha, Anuj J. (Hamburg, NY); Grant, David C. (Gibsonia, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers April 24, 2013 - 4:37pm Addthis Joining Director Dot Harris (second from left) were Marlene Kaplan, the Deputy Director of Education and director of EPP, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Claudia Rankins, a Program Officer with the National Science Foundation and Jim Stith, the past Vice-President of the American Institute of Physics Resources. Joining Director Dot Harris (second from left) were Marlene Kaplan, the Deputy Director of Education and director of EPP, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Claudia Rankins, a Program Officer with the National Science Foundation and Jim Stith, the past Vice-President of the

364

Method and apparatus for incinerating hazardous waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An incineration apparatus and method for disposal of infectious hazardous waste including a fluidized bed reactor containing a bed of granular material. The reactor includes a first chamber, a second chamber, and a vertical partition separating the first and second chambers. A pressurized stream of air is supplied to the reactor at a sufficient velocity to fluidize the granular material in both the first and second chambers. Waste materials to be incinerated are fed into the first chamber of the fluidized bed, the fine waste materials being initially incinerated in the first chamber and subsequently circulated over the partition to the second chamber wherein further incineration occurs. Coarse waste materials are removed from the first chamber, comminuted, and recirculated to the second chamber for further incineration. Any partially incinerated waste materials and ash from the bottom of the second chamber are removed and recirculated to the second chamber for further incineration. This process is repeated until all infectious hazardous waste has been completely incinerated.

Korenberg, Jacob (York, PA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Waste management project fiscal year 1998 multi-year work plan WBS 1.2  

SciTech Connect

The MYWP technical baseline describes the work to be accomplished by the Project and the technical standards which govern that work. The Waste Management Project manages and integrates (non-TWRS) waste management activities at the site. Activities include management of Hanford wastes as well as waste transferred to Hanford from other DOE, Department of Defense, or other facilities. This work includes handling, treatment, storage, and disposition of radioactive, nonradioactive, hazardous, and mixed solid and liquid wastes. Major Waste Management Projects are the Solid Waste Project (SW), Liquid Effluents Project (LEP), and Analytical Services. Existing facilities (e.g., grout vaults and canyons) shall be evaluated for reuse for these purposes to the maximum extent possible. The paper tabulates the major facilities that interface with this Project, identifying the major facilities that generate waste, materials, or infrastructure for this Project and the major facilities that will receive waste and materials from this Project.

Slaybaugh, R.R.

1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

366

Guidelines for mixed waste minimization  

SciTech Connect

Currently, there is no commercial mixed waste disposal available in the United States. Storage and treatment for commercial mixed waste is limited. Host States and compacts region officials are encouraging their mixed waste generators to minimize their mixed wastes because of management limitations. This document provides a guide to mixed waste minimization.

Owens, C.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Transmission line including support means with barriers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas insulated transmission line includes an elongated outer sheath, a plurality of inner conductors disposed within and extending along the outer sheath, and an insulating gas which electrically insulates the inner conductors from the outer sheath. A support insulator insulatably supports the inner conductors within the outer sheath, with the support insulator comprising a main body portion including a plurality of legs extending to the outer sheath, and barrier portions which extend between the legs. The barrier portions have openings therein adjacent the main body portion through which the inner conductors extend.

Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Thermal and chemical remediation of mixed waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and system for treating organic waste materials without venting gaseous emissions to the atmosphere. A fluidized bed including lime particles is operated at a temperature of at least 500.degree. C. by blowing gas having 20%/70% oxygen upwardly through the bed particles at a rate sufficient to fluidize same. A toxic organic waste material is fed into the fluidized bed where the organic waste material reacts with the lime forming CaCO.sub.3. The off gases are filtered and cooled to condense water which is separated. A portion of the calcium carbonate formed during operation of the fluidized bed is replaced with lime particles. The off gases from the fluidized bed after drying are recirculated until the toxic organic waste material in the bed is destroyed.

Nelson, Paul A. (Wheaton, IL); Swift, William M. (Downers Grove, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Thermal and chemical remediation of mixed waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and system for treating organic waste materials without venting gaseous emissions to the atmosphere. A fluidized bed including lime particles is operated at a temperature of at least 500 C by blowing gas having 20%/70% oxygen upwardly through the bed particles at a rate sufficient to fluidize same. A toxic organic waste material is fed into the fluidized bed where the organic waste material reacts with the lime forming CaCO[sub 3]. The off gases are filtered and cooled to condense water which is separated. A portion of the calcium carbonate formed during operation of the fluidized bed is replaced with lime particles. The off gases from the fluidized bed after drying are recirculated until the toxic organic waste material in the bed is destroyed. 3 figs.

Nelson, P.A.; Swift, W.M.

1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

370

Characterization and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 3) and REDOX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 4) Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.(a) The testing program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual wastetesting program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groupsplutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR)are the subjects of this report. Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, requiring caustic leaching. Characterization of the composite Group 3 and Group 4 waste samples confirmed them to be high in gibbsite. The focus of the Group 3 and 4 testing was on determining the behavior of gibbsite during caustic leaching. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

Snow, Lanee A.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

371

Operational Waste Volume Projection  

SciTech Connect

Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of June. 2000.

STRODE, J.N.

2000-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

372

Directions in low-level radioactive waste management: A brief history of commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a history of commercial low-level radioactive waste management in the United States, with emphasis on the history of six commercially operated low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The report includes a brief description of important steps that have been taken during the 1980s to ensure the safe disposal of low-level waste in the 1990s and beyond. These steps include the issuance of Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 61, Licensing Requirements for the Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, and steps taken by states and regional compacts to establish additional disposal sites. 42 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Double Shell Tank (DST) Process Waste Sampling Subsystem Definition Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report defines the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Process Waste Sampling Subsystem (PWSS). This subsystem definition report fully describes and identifies the system boundaries of the PWSS. This definition provides a basis for developing functional, performance, and test requirements (i.e., subsystem specification), as necessary, for the PWSS. The resultant PWSS specification will include the sampling requirements to support the transfer of waste from the DSTs to the Privatization Contractor during Phase 1 of Waste Feed Delivery.

RASMUSSEN, J.H.

2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

374

Standard test method for determining liquidus temperature of immobilized waste glasses and simulated waste glasses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 These practices cover procedures for determining the liquidus temperature (TL) of nuclear waste, mixed nuclear waste, simulated nuclear waste, or hazardous waste glass in the temperature range from 600C to 1600C. This method differs from Practice C829 in that it employs additional methods to determine TL. TL is useful in waste glass plant operation, glass formulation, and melter design to determine the minimum temperature that must be maintained in a waste glass melt to make sure that crystallization does not occur or is below a particular constraint, for example, 1 volume % crystallinity or T1%. As of now, many institutions studying waste and simulated waste vitrification are not in agreement regarding this constraint (1). 1.2 Three methods are included, differing in (1) the type of equipment available to the analyst (that is, type of furnace and characterization equipment), (2) the quantity of glass available to the analyst, (3) the precision and accuracy desired for the measurement, and (4) candi...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

WASTE HANDLING BUILDING ELECTRICAL SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Handling Building Electrical System performs the function of receiving, distributing, transforming, monitoring, and controlling AC and DC power to all waste handling building electrical loads. The system distributes normal electrical power to support all loads that are within the Waste Handling Building (WHB). The system also generates and distributes emergency power to support designated emergency loads within the WHB within specified time limits. The system provides the capability to transfer between normal and emergency power. The system provides emergency power via independent and physically separated distribution feeds from the normal supply. The designated emergency electrical equipment will be designed to operate during and after design basis events (DBEs). The system also provides lighting, grounding, and lightning protection for the Waste Handling Building. The system is located in the Waste Handling Building System. The system consists of a diesel generator, power distribution cables, transformers, switch gear, motor controllers, power panel boards, lighting panel boards, lighting equipment, lightning protection equipment, control cabling, and grounding system. Emergency power is generated with a diesel generator located in a QL-2 structure and connected to the QL-2 bus. The Waste Handling Building Electrical System distributes and controls primary power to acceptable industry standards, and with a dependability compatible with waste handling building reliability objectives for non-safety electrical loads. It also generates and distributes emergency power to the designated emergency loads. The Waste Handling Building Electrical System receives power from the Site Electrical Power System. The primary material handling power interfaces include the Carrier/Cask Handling System, Canister Transfer System, Assembly Transfer System, Waste Package Remediation System, and Disposal Container Handling Systems. The system interfaces with the MGR Operations Monitoring and Control System for supervisory monitoring and control signals. The system interfaces with all facility support loads such as heating, ventilation, and air conditioning, office, fire protection, monitoring and control, safeguards and security, and communications subsystems.

S.C. Khamamkar

2000-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

376

Waste Confidence Discussion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-Term Long-Term Waste Confidence Update Christine Pineda Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission National Transportation Stakeholders Forum May 2012 ♦ Knoxville, Tennessee Long-Term Update Draft Report, "Background and Preliminary Assumptions for an Environmental Impact Statement- Long-Term Waste Confidence Update" Elements of the Long-Term Update - Draft environmental impact statement - Draft Waste Confidence Decision - Proposed Waste Confidence Rule based on the EIS and Decision, if applicable 2 Overview of Draft Report Background and assumptions report is first step in process. Basic topics in the report are:

377

Norcal Waste Systems, Inc.  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet describes the LNG long-haul heavy-duty trucks at Norcal Waste Systems Inc.'s Sanitary Fill Company.

Not Available

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

CLAB Transuranic Waste Spreadsheets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Building 772-F Far-Field Transuranic (TRU) Waste Counting System is used to measure the radionuclide content of waste packages produced at the Central Laboratory Facilities (CLAB). Data from the instrument are entered into one of two Excel spreadsheets. The waste stream associated with the waste package determines which spreadsheet is actually used. The spreadsheets calculate the necessary information required for completion of the Transuranic Waste Characterization Form (OSR 29-90) and the Radioactive Solid Waste Burial Ground Record (OSR 7-375 or OSR 7-375A). In addition, the spreadsheets calculate the associated Low Level Waste (LLW) stream information that potentially could be useful if the waste container is ever downgraded from TRU to LLW. The spreadsheets also have the capability to sum activities from source material added to a waste container after assay. A validation data set for each spreadsheet along with the appropriate results are also presented in this report for spreadsheet verification prior to each use.

Leyba, J.D.

2000-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

379

Solid Waste Permits (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality administers the rules and regulations governing the storage, collection, processing, recovery, and reuse of solid waste protect the air,...

380

The Power of Waste.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Abstract It is estimated that up to 2 percent of the population in Third World countries survives on waste in one way or another. (more)

Frykman, Carina

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastes include paint" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Making waste public.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis questions the boundaries that define waste as a public or private dilemma, investigating these boundaries as productive sites for the imagination of social (more)

Gambetta, Curt

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300.degree. C. to 800.degree. C. to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100.degree. C. to 1400.degree. C. at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Make love not waste.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The purpose of this thesis was to investigate a waste management project and its public awareness components, in the Korca region, Albania. We wanted (more)

Carlsson Engstrm, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Making Waste Public.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis questions the boundaries that define waste as a public or private dilemma, investigating these boundaries as productive sites for the imagination of social (more)

Gambetta, Curt

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

WEB RESOURCE: Radioactive Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 8, 2007 ... This resource offers a a very broad explanation of how the Belgian Agency for Management of Radioactive Waste and Enriched Fissile Material...

386

Integrated waste management.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Integrated waste management is considered from a systems approach, with a particular emphasis on advancing sustainability. The focus of the thesis is to examine the (more)

Seadon, Jeffrey Keith

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300 C to 800 C to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100 C to 1400 C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, G.G.

1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

388

Waste Clean Up 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... deployment and clean-up activities of robot arms into a nuclear contaminated pit at the opening of waste storage tank C-106 at Hanford, Washington ...

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

389

Nuclear Waste Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Management's Yucca Mountain Project and the Office of Nuclear Energy's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) and Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) programs. Efforts...

390

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Update Update J. R. Stroble Director, National TRU Program U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office National Transportation Stakeholder Forum May 11, 2011 Denver, Colorado 2 2 Shipments received at WIPP to date: 9,493 Contact-handled: 9,019 Remote-handled: 474 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 44 84 366 947 818 1,002 98 8 997 1,144 730 1,032 Total Shipments by Calendar Year (Including intersite shipments) 1,194 CH TRU waste shipments only CH and RH TRU waste shipments 472 to date Accomplishments -2010 Shipments Shipments Received - (as of May 2, 2011) Site Shipments Loaded Miles Argonne National Laboratory

391

Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Maximum and Minimum Forecast for SRS  

SciTech Connect

This report is the third phase (Phase III) of the Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Forecast for Facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Phase I of the forecast, Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Forecast for Facilities at SRS, forecasts the yearly quantities of low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste, mixed waste, and transuranic (TRU) wastes generated over the next 30 years by operations, decontamination and decommissioning and environmental restoration (ER) activities at the Savannah River Site. The Phase II report, Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Forecast by Treatability Group (U), provides a 30-year forecast by waste treatability group for operations, decontamination and decommissioning, and ER activities. In addition, a 30-year forecast by waste stream has been provided for operations in Appendix A of the Phase II report. The solid wastes stored or generated at SRS must be treated and disposed of in accordance with federal, state, and local laws and regulations. To evaluate, select, and justify the use of promising treatment technologies and to evaluate the potential impact to the environment, the generic waste categories described in the Phase I report were divided into smaller classifications with similar physical, chemical, and radiological characteristics. These smaller classifications, defined within the Phase II report as treatability groups, can then be used in the Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement process to evaluate treatment options. The waste generation forecasts in the Phase II report includes existing waste inventories. Existing waste inventories, which include waste streams from continuing operations and stored wastes from discontinued operations, were not included in the Phase I report. Maximum and minimum forecasts serve as upper and lower boundaries for waste generation. This report provides the maximum and minimum forecast by waste treatability group for operation, decontamination and decommissioning, and ER activities.

Thomas, L.C.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

DISASTER POLICY Including Extreme Emergent Situations (EES)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the ACGME website with information relating to the ACGME response to the disaster. 3. The University-specific Program Requirements. Defined Responsibilities Following the Declaration of a Disaster or Extreme EmergentPage 123 DISASTER POLICY Including Extreme Emergent Situations (EES) The University of Connecticut

Oliver, Douglas L.

393

Mass Wasting in the Western Galapagos Islands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oceanic island volcanoes such as those in the Hawaiian, Canary and Galapagos Islands are known to become unstable, causing failures of the subaerial and submarine slopes of the volcanic edifices. These mass wasting events appear to be the primary source of destruction and loss of volume of many oceanic islands, but our knowledge of mass wasting is still rudimentary in many seamount and island chains. To better understand mass wasting in the western Galapagos Islands, multi-beam bathymetry and backscatter sidescan sonar images were used to examine topography and acoustic backscatter signatures that are characteristic of mass wasting. Observations show that mass wasting plays an important role in the development of Galapagos volcanoes. While volcanic activity continues to conceal the submarine terrain, the data show that four forms of mass wasting are identified including debris flows, slumps sheets, chaotic slumps, and detached blocks. A total of 23 mass wasting features were found to exist in the western Galapagos Islands, including fourteen debris flows with one that incorporated a set of detached blocks, seven slump sheets, and one chaotic slump. Some of the indentified features have obvious origination zones while the sources of others are not clearly identifiable. Approximately 73 percent of the surveyed coastlines are affected by slumping on the steep upper slopes and ~64 percent are affected by debris flows on the lower slopes. Unlike the giant landslides documented by GLORIA imagery around the Hawaiian Islands, the western Galapagos Islands appear to be characterized by small slump sheets existing along the steep shallow submarine flanks of the island and by debris flows that are flanked by rift zones and extend off the platform. This study indicates that submarine mass wasting is widespread in the western Galapagos, suggesting that the production of small-scale downslope movement is part of the erosive nature of these oceanic volcanic islands.

Hall, Hillary

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Secondary waste form testing : ceramicrete phosphate bonded ceramics.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cleanup activities of the Hanford tank wastes require stabilization and solidification of the secondary waste streams generated from the processing of the tank wastes. The treatment of these tank wastes to produce glass waste forms will generate secondary wastes, including routine solid wastes and liquid process effluents. Liquid wastes may include process condensates and scrubber/off-gas treatment liquids from the thermal waste treatment. The current baseline for solidification of the secondary wastes is a cement-based waste form. However, alternative secondary waste forms are being considered. In this regard, Ceramicrete technology, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, is being explored as an option to solidify and stabilize the secondary wastes. The Ceramicrete process has been demonstrated on four secondary waste formulations: baseline, cluster 1, cluster 2, and mixed waste streams. Based on the recipes provided by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the four waste simulants were prepared in-house. Waste forms were fabricated with three filler materials: Class C fly ash, CaSiO{sub 3}, and Class C fly ash + slag. Optimum waste loadings were as high as 20 wt.% for the fly ash and CaSiO{sub 3}, and 15 wt.% for fly ash + slag filler. Waste forms for physical characterizations were fabricated with no additives, hazardous contaminants, and radionuclide surrogates. Physical property characterizations (density, compressive strength, and 90-day water immersion test) showed that the waste forms were stable and durable. Compressive strengths were >2,500 psi, and the strengths remained high after the 90-day water immersion test. Fly ash and CaSiO{sub 3} filler waste forms appeared to be superior to the waste forms with fly ash + slag as a filler. Waste form weight loss was {approx}5-14 wt.% over the 90-day immersion test. The majority of the weight loss occurred during the initial phase of the immersion test, indicative of washing off of residual unreacted binder components from the waste form surface. Waste forms for ANS 16.1 leach testing contained appropriate amounts of rhenium and iodine as radionuclide surrogates, along with the additives silver-loaded zeolite and tin chloride. The leachability index for Re was found to range from 7.9 to 9.0 for all the samples evaluated. Iodine was below detection limit (5 ppb) for all the leachate samples. Further, leaching of sodium was low, as indicated by the leachability index ranging from 7.6-10.4, indicative of chemical binding of the various chemical species. Target leachability indices for Re, I, and Na were 9, 11, and 6, respectively. Degradation was observed in some of the samples post 90-day ANS 16.1 tests. Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) results showed that all the hazardous contaminants were contained in the waste, and the hazardous metal concentrations were below the Universal Treatment Standard limits. Preliminary scale-up (2-gal waste forms) was conducted to demonstrate the scalability of the Ceramicrete process. Use of minimal amounts of boric acid as a set retarder was used to control the working time for the slurry. Flexibility in treating waste streams with wide ranging compositional make-ups and ease of process scale-up are attractive attributes of Ceramicrete technology.

Singh, D.; Ganga, R.; Gaviria, J.; Yusufoglu, Y. (Nuclear Engineering Division); ( ES)

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

395

Waste minimization for commercial radioactive materials users generating low-level radioactive waste. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this document is to provide a resource for all states and compact regions interested in promoting the minimization of low-level radioactive waste (LLW). This project was initiated by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and Massachusetts waste streams have been used as examples; however, the methods of analysis presented here are applicable to similar waste streams generated elsewhere. This document is a guide for states/compact regions to use in developing a system to evaluate and prioritize various waste minimization techniques in order to encourage individual radioactive materials users (LLW generators) to consider these techniques in their own independent evaluations. This review discusses the application of specific waste minimization techniques to waste streams characteristic of three categories of radioactive materials users: (1) industrial operations using radioactive materials in the manufacture of commercial products, (2) health care institutions, including hospitals and clinics, and (3) educational and research institutions. Massachusetts waste stream characterization data from key radioactive materials users in each category are used to illustrate the applicability of various minimization techniques. The utility group is not included because extensive information specific to this category of LLW generators is available in the literature.

Fischer, D.K.; Gitt, M.; Williams, G.A.; Branch, S. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Otis, M.D.; McKenzie-Carter, M.A.; Schurman, D.L. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Hazardous Waste Code Determination for First/Second-Stage Sludge Waste Stream (IDCs 001, 002, 800)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document, Hazardous Waste Code Determination for the First/Second-Stage Sludge Waste Stream, summarizes the efforts performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to make a hazardous waste code determination on Item Description Codes (IDCs) 001, 002, and 800 drums. This characterization effort included a thorough review of acceptable knowledge (AK), physical characterization, waste form sampling, chemical analyses, and headspace gas data. This effort included an assessment of pre-Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) solidified sampling and analysis data (referred to as preliminary data). Seventy-five First/Second-Stage Sludge Drums, provided in Table 1-1, have been subjected to core sampling and analysis using the requirements defined in the Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP). Based on WAP defined statistical reduction, of preliminary data, a sample size of five was calculated. That is, five additional drums should be core sampled and analyzed. A total of seven drums were sampled, analyzed, and validated in compliance with the WAP criteria. The pre-WAP data (taken under the QAPP) correlated very well with the WAP compliant drum data. As a result, no additional sampling is required. Based upon the information summarized in this document, an accurate hazardous waste determination has been made for the First/Second-Stage Sludge Waste Stream.

Arbon, R.E.

2001-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

397

Transuranic waste baseline inventory report. Revision No. 3  

SciTech Connect

The Transuranic Waste Baseline Inventory Report (TWBIR) establishes a methodology for grouping wastes of similar physical and chemical properties from across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) transuranic (TRU) waste system into a series of {open_quotes}waste profiles{close_quotes} that can be used as the basis for waste form discussions with regulatory agencies. The purpose of Revisions 0 and 1 of this report was to provide data to be included in the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) performance assessment (PA) processes for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Revision 2 of the document expanded the original purpose and was also intended to support the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA) requirement for providing the total DOE TRU waste inventory. The document included a chapter and an appendix that discussed the total DOE TRU waste inventory, including nondefense, commercial, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB)-contaminated, and buried (predominately pre-1970) TRU wastes that are not planned to be disposed of at WIPP.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Record of Decision for the Solid Waste Program, Hanford Site, Richland, WA: Storage and Treatment of Low-Level Waste and Mixed Low-Level Waste; Disposal of Low-Level Waste and Mixed Low-Level Waste, and Storage, Processing, and Certification of Transuran  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 Federal Register / Vol. 69, No. 125 / Wednesday, June 30, 2004 / Notices mixed low-level waste, and TRU waste shipments using Year 2000 census data and an updated version of the RADTRAN computer code to calculate potential risks associated with shipping. This analysis included the route- specific impacts of transporting the West Jefferson TRU waste to Hanford and subsequent shipment of this waste to WIPP. Due to the additional TRU waste generated and identified at West Jefferson subsequent to DOE's September 6, 2002, decision, DOE's currently estimated total number of 18 shipments (3 completed RH-TRU waste shipments, 14 remaining RH-TRU waste shipments, and 1 remaining CH-TRU waste shipment) exceeds DOE's prior estimate of total shipments by 3. However, the currently estimated

399

An assessment of management practices of wood and wood-related wastes in the urban environment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Environmental Protection Agency estimates that yard waste{sup 1} accounts for approximately 16% of the municipal solid waste (MSW) stream (US EPA, 1994). Until recently, specific data and related information on this component of the (MSW) stream has been limited. The purposes of this study, phase two of the three-phase assessment of urban wood waste issues, are to assess and describe current alternatives to landfills for urban wood waste management; provide guidance on the management of urban wood waste to organizations that produce or manage wood waste; and clarify state regulatory and policy positions affecting these organizations. For this study, urban wood waste is defined as solid waste generated by tree and landscape maintenance services (public and private). Urban wood waste includes the following materials: unchipped mixed wood, unchipped logs, and unchipped tops and brush; clearing and grubbing waste; fall leaves and grass clippings; and chips and whole stumps. Construction and demolition debris and consumer-generated yard waste are not included in this study. Generators of urban wood waste include various organizations; municipal, county, and commercial tree care divisions; nurseries, orchards, and golf courses; municipal park and recreation departments; and electric and telephone utility power line maintenance, excavator and land clearance, and landscape organizations. (1) US EPA defines yard waste as ''yard trimmings'' which includes ''grass, leaves and tree brush trimmings from residential, institutional, and commercial sources.''

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

dispose of transuranic radioactive waste, or TRU waste, left over from the production of nuclear weapons. After more than 20 years of scientific study, public input, and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastes include paint" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

The darkening of zinc yellow: XANES speciation of chromium in artist;s paints after light and chemical exposures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The color darkening of selected brushstrokes of the masterpiece A Sunday on La Grande Jatte - 1884 (by Georges Seurat) has been attributed to the alteration of the chromate pigment zinc yellow. The pigment originally displays a bright greenish-yellow color but may undergo, after aging, darkening to a dull, ocher tone. We used XANES to probe the oxidation state of Cr on paint reconstructions, and show that color changes are associated with the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). Paint mixtures containing the pigment and linseed oil to mimic mixtures used in La Grande Jatte were subjected to artificial aging in the presence of light, SO{sub 2}, and variable air humidity - 50 and 90% relative humidity. High relative humidity led to the largest degree of Cr(VI) reduction whereas low relative humidity promoted light-induced alterations. These results are corroborated by visible reflectance measurements on the same laboratory samples and contribute to a better understanding of the chemical reactivity of chromate pigments, which are present in many historical works of art.

Zanella, Luciana; Casadio, Francesca; Gray, Kimberly A.; Warta, Richard; Ma, Qing; Gaillard, Jean-Franois

2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

402

Buildings Included on EMS Reports"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Buildings Included on EMS Reports" "Site","Property Name","Property ID","GSF","Incl. in Water Baseline (CY2007)","Water Baseline (sq. ft.)","Water CY2008 (sq. ft.)","Water CY2009 (sq. ft.)","Water Notes","Incl. in Energy Baseline (CY2003)","Energy Baseline (sq. ft.)","CY2008 Energy (sq. ft.)","CY2009 Energy (sq. ft.)","Energy Notes","Included as Existing Building","CY2008 Existing Building (sq. ft.)","Reason for Building Exclusion" "Column Totals",,"Totals",115139,,10579,10579,22512,,,3183365,26374,115374,,,99476 "Durango, CO, Disposal/Processing Site","STORAGE SHED","DUD-BLDG-STORSHED",100,"no",,,,,"no",,,,"OSF","no",,"Less than 5,000 GSF"

403

Power generation method including membrane separation  

SciTech Connect

A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

1990-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

405

Nuclear reactor shield including magnesium oxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement in nuclear reactor shielding of a type used in reactor applications involving significant amounts of fast neutron flux, the reactor shielding including means providing structural support, neutron moderator material, neutron absorber material and other components as described below, wherein at least a portion of the neutron moderator material is magnesium in the form of magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron.

Rouse, Carl A. (Del Mar, CA); Simnad, Massoud T. (La Jolla, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Virginia Waste Management Act (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Solid waste and hazardous waste are regulated under a number of programs at the Department of Environmental Quality. These programs are designed to encourage the reuse and recycling of solid waste...

407

Solid Waste Act (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The main purpose of the Solid Waste Act is to authorize and direct the establishment of a comprehensive solid waste management program. The act states details about specific waste management...

408

Solid Waste Disposal Act (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality is responsible for the regulation and management of municipal solid waste and hazardous waste. A fee is applied to all solid waste disposed in the...

409

System for handling and storing radioactive waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for handling and storing spent reactor fuel and other solid radioactive waste, including canisters to contain the elements of solid waste, storage racks to hold a plurality of such canisters, storage bays to store these racks in isolation by means of shielded doors in the bays. This system also includes means for remotely positioning the racks in the bays and an access tunnel within which the remotely operated means is located to position a rack in a selected bay. The modular type of these bays will facilitate the construction of additional bays and access tunnel extension.

Anderson, John K. (San Diego, CA); Lindemann, Paul E. (Escondido, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

System for handling and storing radioactive waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method are claimed for handling and storing spent reactor fuel and other solid radioactive waste, including canisters to contain the elements of solid waste, storage racks to hold a plurality of such canisters, storage bays to store these racks in isolation by means of shielded doors in the bays. This system also includes means for remotely positioning the racks in the bays and an access tunnel within which the remotely operated means is located to position a rack in a selected bay. The modular type of these bays will facilitate the construction of additional bays and access tunnel extension.

Anderson, J.K.; Lindemann, P.E.

1982-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

411

Scenarios of the TWRS low-level waste disposal program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a result of past Department of Energy (DOE) weapons material production operations, Hanford now stores nuclear waste from processing facilities in underground tanks on the 200 Area plateau. An agreement between the DOE, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Washington state Department of Ecology (the Tri-Party Agreement, or TPA) establishes an enforceable schedule and a technical framework for recovering, processing, solidifying, and disposing of the Hanford tank wastes. The present plan includes retrieving the tank waste, pretreating the waste to separate into low level and high level streams, and converting both streams to a glass waste form. The low level glass will represent by far the largest volume and lowest quantity of radioactivity (i.e., large volume of waste chemicals) of waste requiring disposal. The low level glass waste will be retrievably stored in sub-surface disposal vaults for several decades. If the low level disposal system proves to be acceptable, the disposal site will be closed with the low level waste in place. If, however, at some time the disposal system is found to be unacceptable, then the waste can be retrieved and dealt with in some other manner. WHC is planning to emplace the waste so that it is retrievable for up to 50 years after completion of the tank waste processing. Acceptability of disposal of the TWRS low level waste at Hanford depends on technical, cultural, and political considerations. The Performance Assessment is a major part of determining whether the proposed disposal action is technically defensible. A Performance Assessment estimates the possible future impact to humans and the environment for thousands of years into the future. In accordance with the TPA technical strategy, WHC plans to design a near-surface facility suitable for disposal of the glass waste.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities  

SciTech Connect

This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities (DSA) (LLNL 2009). The analysis presented therein determined that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., size reduction and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are located in two portions of the LLNL main site. A625 is located in the southeast quadrant of LLNL. The A625 fenceline is approximately 225 m west of Greenville Road. The DWTF Storage Area, which includes Building 693 (B693), Building 696 Radioactive Waste Storage Area (B696R), and associated yard areas and storage areas within the yard, is located in the northeast quadrant of LLNL in the DWTF complex. The DWTF Storage Area fenceline is approximately 90 m west of Greenville Road. A625 and the DWTF Storage Area are subdivided into various facilities and storage areas, consisting of buildings, tents, other structures, and open areas as described in Chapter 2 of the DSA. Section 2.4 of the DSA provides an overview of the buildings, structures, and areas in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, including construction details such as basic floor plans, equipment layout, construction materials, controlling dimensions, and dimensions significant to the hazard and accident analysis. Chapter 5 of the DSA documents the derivation of the TSRs and develops the operational limits that protect the safety envelope defined for the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. This TSR document is applicable to the handling, storage, and treatment of hazardous waste, TRU WASTE, LLW, mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste received or generated in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Section 5, Administrative Controls, contains those Administrative Controls necessary to ensure safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Programmatic Administrative Controls are in Section 5.4.

Laycak, D T

2010-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

413

Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities  

SciTech Connect

This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the 'Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities' (DSA) (LLNL 2008). The analysis presented therein determined that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., size reduction and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are located in two portions of the LLNL main site. A625 is located in the southeast quadrant of LLNL. The A625 fenceline is approximately 225 m west of Greenville Road. The DWTF Storage Area, which includes Building 693 (B693), Building 696 Radioactive Waste Storage Area (B696R), and associated yard areas and storage areas within the yard, is located in the northeast quadrant of LLNL in the DWTF complex. The DWTF Storage Area fenceline is approximately 90 m west of Greenville Road. A625 and the DWTF Storage Area are subdivided into various facilities and storage areas, consisting of buildings, tents, other structures, and open areas as described in Chapter 2 of the DSA. Section 2.4 of the DSA provides an overview of the buildings, structures, and areas in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, including construction details such as basic floor plans, equipment layout, construction materials, controlling dimensions, and dimensions significant to the hazard and accident analysis. Chapter 5 of the DSA documents the derivation of the TSRs and develops the operational limits that protect the safety envelope defined for the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. This TSR document is applicable to the handling, storage, and treatment of hazardous waste, TRU WASTE, LLW, mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste received or generated in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Section 5, Administrative Controls, contains those Administrative Controls necessary to ensure safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Programmatic Administrative Controls are in Section 5.6.

Laycak, D T

2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

414

Sorbent Testing for the Solidification of Unidentified Rocky Flats Laboratory Waste Stored at the Idaho National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) evaluated various commercially available sorbents to solidify unidentified laboratory liquids from Rocky Flats that are stored at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The liquids are a collection of laboratory wastes that were generated from various experiments and routine analytical laboratory activities carried out at Rocky Flats. The liquids are in bottles discovered inside of buried waste drums being exhumed from the subsurface disposal area at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) by the contractor, CH2M Hill Washington International (CWI). Free liquids are unacceptable at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), and some of these liquids cannot be returned to the retrieval pit. Stabilization of the liquids into a solid mass will allow these materials to be sent to an appropriate disposal location. The selected sorbent or sorbent combinations should produce a stabilized mass that is capable of withstanding conditions similar to those experienced during storage, shipping, and burial. The final wasteform should release less than 1% liquid by volume per the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). The absence or presence of free liquid in the solidified waste-forms was detected when tested by SW-846, Method 9095B, Paint Filter Free Liquids, and the amount of liquid released from the wasteform was determined by SW-846, Method 9096, Liquid Release Test. Reactivity testing was also conducted on the solidified laboratory liquids. (authors)

Bickford, J. [MSE Technology Applications, Inc., Butte, MT (United States); Kimmitt, R. [CH2M WG Idaho, LLC, Idaho National Laboratory, CF-601, MF-637, MS4201, Scoville, ID (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

FUEL CYCLE POTENTIAL WASTE FOR DISPOSITION  

SciTech Connect

The United States (U.S.) currently utilizes a once-through fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel (UNF) is stored on-site in either wet pools or in dry storage systems with ultimate disposal in a deep mined geologic repository envisioned. Within the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program (FCR&D) develops options to the current commercial fuel cycle management strategy to enable the safe, secure, economic, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy while minimizing proliferation risks by conducting research and development of advanced fuel cycles, including modified open and closed cycles. The safe management and disposition of used nuclear fuel and/or nuclear waste is a fundamental aspect of any nuclear fuel cycle. Yet, the routine disposal of used nuclear fuel and radioactive waste remains problematic. Advanced fuel cycles will generate different quantities and forms of waste than the current LWR fleet. This study analyzes the quantities and characteristics of potential waste forms including differing waste matrices, as a function of a variety of potential fuel cycle alternatives including: (1) Commercial UNF generated by uranium fuel light water reactors (LWR). Four once through fuel cycles analyzed in this study differ by varying the assumed expansion/contraction of nuclear power in the U.S; (2) Four alternative LWR used fuel recycling processes analyzed differ in the reprocessing method (aqueous vs. electro-chemical), complexity (Pu only or full transuranic (TRU) recovery) and waste forms generated; (3) Used Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel derived from the recovered Pu utilizing a single reactor pass; and (4) Potential waste forms generated by the reprocessing of fuels derived from recovered TRU utilizing multiple reactor passes.

Jones, R.; Carter, J.

2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

416

FUEL CYCLE POTENTIAL WASTE FOR DISPOSITION  

SciTech Connect

The United States (U.S.) currently utilizes a once-through fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel (UNF) is stored on-site in either wet pools or in dry storage systems with ultimate disposal in a deep mined geologic repository envisioned. Within the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program (FCR&D) develops options to the current commercial fuel cycle management strategy to enable the safe, secure, economic, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy while minimizing proliferation risks by conducting research and development of advanced fuel cycles, including modified open and closed cycles. The safe management and disposition of used nuclear fuel and/or nuclear waste is a fundamental aspect of any nuclear fuel cycle. Yet, the routine disposal of used nuclear fuel and radioactive waste remains problematic. Advanced fuel cycles will generate different quantities and forms of waste than the current LWR fleet. This study analyzes the quantities and characteristics of potential waste forms including differing waste matrices, as a function of a variety of potential fuel cycle alternatives including: (1) Commercial UNF generated by uranium fuel light water reactors (LWR). Four once through fuel cycles analyzed in this study differ by varying the assumed expansion/contraction of nuclear power in the U.S. (2) Four alternative LWR used fuel recycling processes analyzed differ in the reprocessing method (aqueous vs. electro-chemical), complexity (Pu only or full transuranic (TRU) recovery) and waste forms generated. (3) Used Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel derived from the recovered Pu utilizing a single reactor pass. (4) Potential waste forms generated by the reprocessing of fuels derived from recovered TRU utilizing multiple reactor passes.

Carter, J.

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

417

Mixed Waste Management Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The management of mixed waste presents serious challenges to nuclear utilities. Regulatory and practical predicaments make compliance with the letter of all applicable regulations extremely difficult. Utility experts developed these guidelines to identify opportunities for improving work practices and regulatory compliance while minimizing any potential adverse impacts of mixed waste management.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

418

Mixed Waste Characterization Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents an overview of the process of characterizing potential mixed waste streams from nuclear power plants. Utility experts developed these guidelines to help guide utility personnel through the characterization process and provide a mechanism for properly documenting the characterization of individual waste streams.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

419

Radioactive waste storage issues  

SciTech Connect

In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state`s boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected.

Kunz, D.E.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

Radioactive waste disposal package  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

Lampe, Robert F. (Bethel Park, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wastes include paint" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Nuclear waste solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High efficiency removal of technetium values from a nuclear waste stream is achieved by addition to the waste stream of a precipitant contributing tetraphenylphosphonium cation, such that a substantial portion of the technetium values are precipitated as an insoluble pertechnetate salt.

Walker, Darrel D. (1684 Partridge Dr., Aiken, SC 29801); Ebra, Martha A. (129 Hasty Rd., Aiken, SC 29801)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

SRS - Programs - Solid Waste Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

manner possible. SRS's waste is categorized as transuranic, low-level, hazardous, mixed, high-level or sanitary waste. SWM is responsible for managing all of these...

423

Animal Waste Technology Fund (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A bill passed in 2012 transferred responsibility for animal waste management technology projects to the Maryland Department of Agriculture. The Department will maintain the Animal Waste Technology...

424

Municipal Waste Combustion (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This rule establishes requirements for emissions from, and design and operation of, municipal waste combustion units. "Municipal waste"means all materials and substances discarded from residential...

425

Hazardous Waste Management (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The New Mexico Environment Department's Hazardous Waste Bureau is responsible for the management of hazardous waste in the state. The Bureau enforces the rules established by the Environmental...

426

Solid waste management of Jakarta.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Solid waste management has been one of the critical issues in Jakarta, Indonesia.With enormous amounts of generated waste per day and limited supportinginfrastructure, the (more)

Trisyanti, Dini

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Treatment of Waste Soils / Solids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About the 1996 International Symposium on Extraction and Processing for the Treatment and Minimization of Wastes: Treatment of Waste Soils / Solids...

428

Drilling Waste Management Technology Descriptions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

skip navigation Drilling Waste Management Information System: The information resource for better management of drilling wastes DWM Logo Search Search you are in this section...

429

Proceedings: 1995 EPRI International Low-Level Waste Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's fourth annual International Low-Level Waste (LLW) Conference featured 72 papers on a variety of topics. Some of the subjects included were interim storage experiences; liquid, wet, and DAW improved processing and technology; mixed waste; decontamination; and building public trust. In addition, a nuclear industry and EPRI LLW projects update was presented.

1995-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

430

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

T h e W a s t e I s o l a t i o n P i l o t P l a n t DOE 1980. Final Environmental Impact Statement, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. DOE/EIS-0026, Washington, DC, Office of Environmental Management, U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1981. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP): Record of Decision. Federal Register, Vol. 46, No. 18, p. 9162, (46 Federal Register 9162), January 28, 1981. U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1990. Final Supplement Environmental Impact Statement, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. DOE/EIS-0026-FS, Washington, DC, Office of Environmental Management, U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1990. Record of Decision: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Federal Register, Vol. 55, No. 121, 25689-25692, U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1994. Comparative Study of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Transportation Alternatives.

431

Salt Waste Processing Initiatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Patricia Suggs Patricia Suggs Salt Processing Team Lead Assistant Manager for Waste Disposition Project Office of Environmental Management Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Initiatives 2 Overview * Current SRS Liquid Waste System status * Opportunity to accelerate salt processing - transformational technologies - Rotary Microfiltration (RMF) and Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) - Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (ARP/MCU) extension with next generation extractant - Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) performance enhancement - Saltstone enhancements * Life-cycle impacts and benefits 3 SRS Liquid Waste Total Volume >37 Million Gallons (Mgal) Total Curies 183 MCi (51% ) 175 MCi (49% ) >358 Million Curies (MCi) Sludge 34.3 Mgal (92% ) 3.0 Mgal (8%)

432

HLW Glass Waste Loadings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HLW HLW Glass Waste Loadings Ian L. Pegg Vitreous State Laboratory The Catholic University of America Washington, DC Overview Overview  Vitrification - general background  Joule heated ceramic melter (JHCM) technology  Factors affecting waste loadings  Waste loading requirements and projections  WTP DWPF  DWPF  Yucca Mountain License Application requirements on waste loading  Summary Vitrification  Immobilization of waste by conversion into a glass  Internationally accepted treatment for HLW  Why glass?  Amorphous material - able to incorporate a wide spectrum of elements over wide ranges of composition; resistant to radiation damage  Long-term durability - natural analogs Relatively simple process - amenable to nuclearization at large  Relatively simple process - amenable to nuclearization at large scale  There

433

Integrated Solid Waste Management Act (Nebraska) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Integrated Solid Waste Management Act (Nebraska) Integrated Solid Waste Management Act (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Environmental Quality This act affirms the state's support for alternative waste management practices, including waste reduction and resource recovery. Each county and

434

Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Utility Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides rules and guidelines for landfills, including those that treat waste to generate electricity. The law provides information for permitting, installing, maintaining, monitoring, and closing landfills. There are no special provisions or exemptions for landfills used to generate electricity. However, the law does apply to landfills that do

435

REVIEW OF RHEOLOGY MODELS FOR HANFORD WASTE BLENDING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The area of rheological property prediction was identified as a technology need in the Hanford Tank Waste ? waste feed acceptance initiative area during a series of technical meetings among the national laboratories, Department of Energy-Office of River Protection, and Hanford site contractors. Meacham et al. delivered a technical report in June 2012, RPP-RPT-51652 ?One System Evaluation of Waste Transferred to the Waste Treatment Plant? that included estimating of single shell tank waste Bingham plastic rheological model constants along with a discussion of the issues inherent in predicting the rheological properties of blended wastes. This report was selected as the basis for moving forward during the technical meetings. The report does not provide an equation for predicting rheological properties of blended waste slurries. The attached technical report gives an independent review of the provided Hanford rheological data, Hanford rheological models for single tank wastes, and Hanford rheology after blending provided in the Meacham report. The attached report also compares Hanford to SRS waste rheology and discusses some SRS rheological model equations for single tank wastes, as well as discussing SRS experience with the blending of waste sludges with aqueous material, other waste sludges, and frit slurries. Some observations of note: Savannah River Site (SRS) waste samples from slurried tanks typically have yield stress >1 Pa at 10 wt.% undissolved solids (UDS), while core samples largely have little or no yield stress at 10 wt.% UDS. This could be due to how the waste has been processed, stored, retrieved, and sampled or simply in the differences in the speciation of the wastes.. The equations described in Meacham?s report are not recommended for extrapolation to wt.% UDS beyond the available data for several reasons; weak technical basis, insufficient data, and large data scatter. When limited data are available, for example two to three points, the equations are not necessarily satisfactory (justified) for interpolations, due to the number of unknown variables equal the number of known data points, resulting in a coefficient of determination of one. SRS has had some success predicting the rheology of waste blends for similar waste types using rheological properties of the individual wastes and empirical blending viscosity equations. Both the Kendall-Monroe and Olney-Carlson equations were used. High accuracy was not obtained, but predictions were reasonable compared to measured flow curves. Blending SRS processed waste with frit slurry (much larger particles and the source of SRS glass formers) is a different sort of problem than that of two similar slurries of precipitated waste particles. A different approach to rheology prediction has had some success describing the incorporation of large frit particles into waste than the one used for blending two wastes. In this case, the Guth-Simha equation was used. If Hanford waste is found to have significant particles in the >100 ?m diameter range, then it might be necessary to handle those particles differently from broadly distributed waste particles that are primarily <30 ?m in diameter. The following are recommendations for the Hanford tank farms: ? Investigate the impact of large-scale mixing operations on yield stress for one or more Hanford tanks to see if Hanford waste rheological properties change to become more like SRS waste during both tank retrieval and tank qualification operations. ? Determine rheological properties of mobilized waste slurries by direct measurement rather than by prediction ? Collect and characterize samples during the waste feed qualification process for each campaign. o From single source tanks that feed the qualification tanks o Blends from the qualification tanks ? Predictive rheological models must be used with caution, due to the lack of data to support such models and the utilization of the results that come from these models in making process decisions (e.g. the lack of actual operation expe

Koopman, D.; Stone, M.

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

436

REVIEW OF RHEOLOGY MODELS FOR HANFORD WASTE BLENDING  

SciTech Connect

The area of rheological property prediction was identified as a technology need in the Hanford Tank Waste ? waste feed acceptance initiative area during a series of technical meetings among the national laboratories, Department of Energy-Office of River Protection, and Hanford site contractors. Meacham et al. delivered a technical report in June 2012, RPP-RPT-51652 ?One System Evaluation of Waste Transferred to the Waste Treatment Plant? that included estimating of single shell tank waste Bingham plastic rheological model constants along with a discussion of the issues inherent in predicting the rheological properties of blended wastes. This report was selected as the basis for moving forward during the technical meetings. The report does not provide an equation for predicting rheological properties of blended waste slurries. The attached technical report gives an independent review of the provided Hanford rheological data, Hanford rheological models for single tank wastes, and Hanford rheology after blending provided in the Meacham report. The attached report also compares Hanford to SRS waste rheology and discusses some SRS rheological model equations for single tank wastes, as well as discussing SRS experience with the blending of waste sludges with aqueous material, other waste sludges, and frit slurries. Some observations of note: Savannah River Site (SRS) waste samples from slurried tanks typically have yield stress >1 Pa at 10 wt.% undissolved solids (UDS), while core samples largely have little or no yield stress at 10 wt.% UDS. This could be due to how the waste has been processed, stored, retrieved, and sampled or simply in the differences in the speciation of the wastes.. The equations described in Meacham?s report are not recommended for extrapolation to wt.% UDS beyond the available data for several reasons; weak technical basis, insufficient data, and large data scatter. When limited data are available, for example two to three points, the equations are not necessarily satisfactory (justified) for interpolations, due to the number of unknown variables equal the number of known data points, resulting in a coefficient of determination of one. SRS has had some success predicting the rheology of waste blends for similar waste types using rheological properties of the individual wastes and empirical blending viscosity equations. Both the Kendall-Monroe and Olney-Carlson equations were used. High accuracy was not obtained, but predictions were reasonable compared to measured flow curves. Blending SRS processed waste with frit slurry (much larger particles and the source of SRS glass formers) is a different sort of problem than that of two similar slurries of precipitated waste particles. A different approach to rheology prediction has had some success describing the incorporation of large frit particles into waste than the one used for blending two wastes. In this case, the Guth-Simha equation was used. If Hanford waste is found to have significant particles in the >100 μm diameter range, then it might be necessary to handle those particles differently from broadly distributed waste particles that are primarily <30 μm in diameter. The following are recommendations for the Hanford tank farms: ? Investigate the impact of large-scale mixing operations on yield stress for one or more Hanford tanks to see if Hanford waste rheological properties change to become more like SRS waste during both tank retrieval and tank qualification operations. ? Determine rheological properties of mobilized waste slurries by direct measurement rather than by prediction ? Collect and characterize samples during the waste feed qualifi