National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for wastes conventional hydroelectricity

  1. Feasibility of Thermoelectrics for Waste Heat Recovery in Conventional Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, K.; Thornton, M.

    2009-04-01

    Thermoelectric (TE) generators convert heat directly into electricity when a temperature gradient is applied across junctions of two dissimilar metals. The devices could increase the fuel economy of conventional vehicles by recapturing part of the waste heat from engine exhaust and generating electricity to power accessory loads. A simple vehicle and engine waste heat model showed that a Class 8 truck presents the least challenging requirements for TE system efficiency, mass, and cost; these trucks have a fairly high amount of exhaust waste heat, have low mass sensitivity, and travel many miles per year. These factors help maximize fuel savings and economic benefits. A driving/duty cycle analysis shows strong sensitivity of waste heat, and thus TE system electrical output, to vehicle speed and driving cycle. With a typical alternator, a TE system could allow electrification of 8%-15% of a Class 8 truck's accessories for 2%-3% fuel savings. More research should reduce system cost and improve economics.

  2. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainable alternatives to traditional plastics and conventional plastic waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to traditional plastics and conventional plastic waste management in the agricultural setting of the UBC Farm alternatives to traditional plastics and conventional plastic waste management in the agricultural setting ................................................................................................................. 9 Agricultural plastics

  3. EM Prepares Report for Convention on Safety of Spent Fuel and Radioactive Waste Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – EM supported DOE in its role as the lead technical agency to produce a report recently for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management.

  4. Conventional Hydropower Technologies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-07-01

    The US Department of Energy conducts research on conventional hydropower technologies to increase generation and improve existing means of generating hydroelectricity.

  5. Optimizing Profits from Hydroelectricity Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leclercq, Remi

    Optimizing Profits from Hydroelectricity Production Daniel De Ladurantaye Michel Gendreau Jean the profits obtained by the stochastic model. Keywords: Hydroelectricity, electricity market, prices, dams countries deregulate their electricity market, new challenges appear for hydroelectricity producers

  6. Implementation of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, L.; Tonkay, D.

    2004-10-03

    This paper discusses the implementation of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management. The Joint Convention: establishes a commitment with respect to safe management of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste; requires the Parties to ''take appropriate steps'' to ensure the safety of their spent fuel and waste management activities, but does not delineate standards the Parties must meet; and seeks to attain, through its Contracting Parties, a higher level of safety with respect to management of their spent nuclear fuel, disused sealed sources, and radioactive waste.

  7. Conventional Hydropower Technologies, Wind And Water Power Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    US Department of Energy conducts research on conventional hydropower technologies to increase generation and improve existing means of generating hydroelectricity. Conventional...

  8. Proposal for the award of a contract for the collection, transport, removal and treatment of conventional waste produced on the CERN sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    Proposal for the award of a contract for the collection, transport, removal and treatment of conventional waste produced on the CERN sites

  9. Environmental Impacts of Increased Hydroelectric Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impacts of Increased Hydroelectric Development at Existing Dams Environmental Impacts of Increased Hydroelectric Development at Existing Dams This report describes the...

  10. Potential for hydroelectric development in Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Testimony concerning Alaskan hydroelectricity development is presented. Various public and private organizations were represented.

  11. Analysis of ReservoirBased Hydroelectric versus RunofRiver Hydroelectric Energy Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    of ReservoirBased Hydroelectric versus RunofRiver Hydroelectric Energy Production By: Cassie Modal, Morgan hydroelectric projects are economically lucrative due to their sustainable and multifunctional nature. As reservoirbased hydroelectric project utilizes but does not consume a continually flowing river, there is no net

  12. EIS-0456: Cushman Hydroelectric Project, Tacoma, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS is for the design and construction of certain components of the Cushman Hydroelectric Project in Mason County, Washington.

  13. S ENERGY POLICY ACT OF 2005 SECTION 242 HYDROELECTRIC INCENTIVE...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    HYDROELECTRIC INCENTIVE PROGRAM CALENDAR YEAR 2013 INCENTIVE PAYMENTS Payee (Applicant) Hydro Facility Albany Engineering Corporation (AEC) Mechanicville Hydroelectric Project...

  14. Hydroelectric Reservoirs -the Carbon Dioxide and Methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    Hydroelectric Reservoirs - the Carbon Dioxide and Methane Emissions of a "Carbon Free" Energy an overview on the greenhouse gas production of hydroelectric reservoirs. The goals are to point out the main how big the greenhouse gas emissions from hydroelectric reservoirs are compared to thermo-power plants

  15. Hydroelectric Webinar Presentation Slides and Text Version

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Download presentation slides and a text version of the audio from the DOE Office of Indian Energy webinar on hydroelectric renewable energy. 

  16. Vermont Water Quality Certification Application for Hydroelectric...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vermont Water Quality Certification Application for Hydroelectric Facilities Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: Vermont Water Quality...

  17. EPAct 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive Program - 2013...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for Hydroelectric Production Incentives under Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Qualified hydroelectric facilities-existing powered or non-powered dams and conduits...

  18. Final Guidance for EPAct 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final Guidance for EPAct 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive Program Final Guidance for EPAct 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive Program This document contains the Final...

  19. 2014 ELECTRICAL PRODUCTION: EPACT 2005 SECTION 242 HYDROELECTRIC...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2014 ELECTRICAL PRODUCTION: EPACT 2005 SECTION 242 HYDROELECTRIC INCENTIVE PROGRAM 2014 ELECTRICAL PRODUCTION: EPACT 2005 SECTION 242 HYDROELECTRIC INCENTIVE PROGRAM In 2015,...

  20. Fish and hydroelectricity; Engineering a better coexistence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zorpette, G.

    1990-12-01

    This paper reports on the problems that hydroelectric plants have regarding fish populations. The utilities that operate these plants are finding that accommodating migrating fish presents unique engineering challenges, not the least of which involves designing and building systems to protect fish species whose migratory behavior remains something of a mystery. Where such systems cannot be built, the status of hydroelectric dams may be in doubt, as is now the case with several dams in the United States. A further twist in some regions in the possibility that certain migratory fish will be declared threatened or endangered-a development that could wreak havoc on the hydroelectric energy supply in those regions.

  1. Indian River Hydroelectric Project Grant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rebecca Garrett

    2005-04-29

    This Final Technical Report provides a concise retrospective and summary of all facets of the Sheldon Jackson College electrical Infrastructure Renovation portion of the Indian River Hydroelectric Project Grant of the City and Borough of Sitka, Alaska. The Project Overview describes the origins of the project, the original conditions that provided the impetus for the grant funding, how the grant amendment was developed, the conceptual design development, and the actual parameters of the final project as it went out to bid. The Project Overview also describes the ''before and after'' conditions of the project. The Objectives division of this Final Technical Report describes the amendment-funded goals of the project. It also describes the milestones of project development and implementation, as well as, the rationale behind the milestone array. The Description of Activities Performed division of this report provides an in-depth chronological analysis of progressive project implementation. Photographs will provide further illustration of particular functional aspects of the renovation project within project parameters. The Conclusions and Recommendations division of this report provides a comprehensive retrospective analysis of the project.

  2. Low-Infrastructure Hydroelectric Generator To design and build a portable, self

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van den Berg, Jur

    !! Low-Infrastructure Hydroelectric Generator To design and build a portable, self contained, hydroelectric generator that functions without the requisite infrastructure of today's more common hydroelectric

  3. Managing water temperatures below hydroelectric facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, P.L.; Vermeyen, T.B.; O`Haver, G.G.

    1995-05-01

    Due to drought-related water temperature problems in the Bureau of Reclamation`s California Central Valley Project in the early 1990`s, engineers were forced to bypass water from the plants during critical periods. This was done at considerable cost in the form of lost revenue. As a result, an alternative method of lowering water temperature was developed and it has successfully lowered water temperatures downstream from hydroelectric facilities by using flexible rubber curtains. This innovative technology is aiding the survival of endangered fish populations. This article outlines the efforts and discusses the implementation of this method at several hydroelectric facilities in the area.

  4. EPAct 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive Program- 2013 Electrical Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2014, Congress appropriated funds for Hydroelectric Production Incentives under Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Qualified hydroelectric facilities–existing powered or non-powered...

  5. Final Guidance for EPAct 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Policy Act of 2005. Qualified hydroelectric facilities-existing powered or non-powered dams and conduits that added a new turbine or other hydroelectric generating device-may...

  6. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Ecosystem services and hydroelectricity in Central America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Ecosystem services and hydroelectricity in Central America: modelling service services provided to the Costa Rican and Nicaraguan hydroelectric sectors, which are crucial sectors for the conservation and restoration of forests for the services they provide to the hydroelectric sector. As such

  7. Hybrid Modeling and Control of a Hydroelectric Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrari-Trecate, Giancarlo

    Hybrid Modeling and Control of a Hydroelectric Power Plant Giancarlo Ferrari-Trecate, Domenico,mignone,castagnoli,morari}@aut.ee.ethz.ch Abstract In this work we present the model of a hydroelectric power plant in the framework of Mixed Logic with a model predictive control scheme. 1 Introduction The outflow control for hydroelectric power plants

  8. EM Prepares Report for Convention on Safety of Spent Fuel and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Prepares Report for Convention on Safety of Spent Fuel and Radioactive Waste Management EM Prepares Report for Convention on Safety of Spent Fuel and Radioactive Waste Management...

  9. Accepting Applications: $3.96 Million Hydroelectric Production...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of cost-competitive, renewable energy at a lower cost than creating new powered dam structures. Under the Section 242 Hydroelectric Production Incentive program, on December 16,...

  10. 2013 Electrical Production: EPAct 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    generated by the facility during the incentive period. This page contains all 2013 electrical production documentation for the Hydroelectric Production Incentives under Section...

  11. FERC Handbook for Hydroelectric Project Licensing and 5 MW Exemptions...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FERC Handbook for Hydroelectric Project Licensing and 5 MW Exemptions from Licensing Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory...

  12. FERC Hydroelectric Project Handbook for Filings other than Licenses...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FERC Hydroelectric Project Handbook for Filings other than Licenses and Exemptions Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance...

  13. Fifth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fifth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Fifth National Report for the Joint Convention...

  14. National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent...

  15. 8. Hydroelectricity Hydroelectric plants transform the gravitational power of rainfall into

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ernst, Damien

    into electricity For hydroelectricity, you need altitude and rainfall. The upper limit on the amount of energy). Led lamp. Solid-state lamp that uses light-emitting diodes. 5 #12;Luminous efficiency Luminous efficiency is a measure of how well a light source produces light. It is the ratio of luminous power (the

  16. Hydroelectric dams need billions for rehab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, F.H.; Soast, A.

    1993-01-11

    Many of the Corps of Engineers older hydroelectric dams will require major rehabilitation over the next ten years. Preventive maintenance, repair work, and major rehabilitation of the Corp's hydro dams in inadequate because the revenue generated by sales of electricity, by law, is returned to the Treasury. Most multimillion dollar rehabilitation projects require specific approval for funding by Congress and securing it is a long and difficult process. It is hoped the funding problem will soon be addressed by the Clinton administration. Already, nearly one-sixth of the 2,154 Mw of hydro is unavailable because with hydro units are either out of service or operating at less than full capacity.

  17. Marine Hydroelectric Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios TowardsInformationMarietta, Georgia: EnergyHydroelectric

  18. Energy 101: Hydroelectric Power | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas NuclearElectronic StructureElyElectroEnergy Energy 101:Hydroelectric

  19. PP-89-1 Bangor Hydro-Electric Company | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PP-89-1 Bangor Hydro-Electric Company PP-89-1 Bangor Hydro-Electric Company Presidental permit authorizing Bangor Hydro-Electric Company to construc, operate and maintain electric...

  20. Stochastic Co-optimization for Hydro-Electric Power Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Stochastic Co-optimization for Hydro-Electric Power Generation Shi-Jie Deng, Senior Member, IEEE the optimal scheduling problem faced by a hydro-electric power producer that simultaneously participates in multiple markets. Specifically, the hydro-generator participates in both the electricity spot market

  1. GRADUATE RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES IN APPLIED SCIENCE Effects of Hydroelectric Operations in Canadian Aquatic Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooke, Steven J.

    GRADUATE RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES IN APPLIED SCIENCE Effects of Hydroelectric Operations in Canadian with Fisheries and Oceans Canada (6 scientists) and 3 major hydroelectric companies (Nalcor, Manitoba Hydro

  2. Energy Department Seeks Feedback on Draft Guidance for the Hydroelectr...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    period. Any qualified owner or operator of a hydroelectric facility who added hydropower to non-powered dams or conduits between 2005 and 2015, but where the original dam...

  3. Hoopa Valley Small Scale Hydroelectric Feasibility Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Miller

    2009-03-22

    This study considered assessing the feasibility of developing small scale hydro-electric power from seven major tributaries within the Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation of Northern California (http://www.hoopa-nsn.gov/). This study pursued the assessment of seven major tributaries of the Reservation that flow into the Trinity River. The feasibility of hydropower on the Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation has real potential for development and many alternative options for project locations, designs, operations and financing. In order to realize this opportunity further will require at least 2-3 years of intense data collection focusing on stream flow measurements at multiple locations in order to quantify real power potential. This also includes on the ground stream gradient surveys, road access planning and grid connectivity to PG&E for sale of electricity. Imperative to this effort is the need for negotiations between the Hoopa Tribal Council and PG&E to take place in order to finalize the power rate the Tribe will receive through any wholesale agreement that utilizes the alternative energy generated on the Reservation.

  4. Can Fish Morphological Characteristics be Used to Re-design Hydroelectric Turbines?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, G. F.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2011-07-19

    Safe fish passage affects not only migratory species, but also populations of resident fish by altering biomass, biodiversity, and gene flow. Consequently, it is important to estimate turbine passage survival of a wide range of susceptible fish. Although fish-friendly turbines show promise for reducing turbine passage mortality, experimental data on their beneficial effects are limited to only a few species, mainly salmon and trout. For thousands of untested species and sizes of fish, the particular causes of turbine passage mortality and the benefits of fish-friendly turbine designs remain unknown. It is not feasible to measure the turbine-passage survival of every species of fish in every hydroelectric turbine design. We are attempting to predict fish mortality based on an improved understanding of turbine-passage stresses (pressure, shear stress, turbulence, strike) and information about the morphological, behavioral, and physiological characteristics of different fish taxa that make them susceptible to the stresses. Computational fluid dynamics and blade strike models of the turbine environment are re-examined in light of laboratory and field studies of fish passage effects. Comparisons of model-predicted stresses to measured injuries and mortalities will help identify fish survival thresholds and the aspects of turbines that are most in need of re-design. The coupled model and fish morphology evaluations will enable us to make predictions of turbine-passage survival among untested fish species, for both conventional and advanced turbines, and to guide the design of hydroelectric turbines to improve fish passage survival.

  5. Impact of High Wind Power Penetration on Hydroelectric Unit Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, B. M.; Lew, D.; Milligan, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) investigated the operational impacts of very high levels of variable generation penetration rates (up to 35% by energy) in the western United States. This work examines the impact of this large amount of wind penetration on hydroelectric unit operations. Changes in hydroelectric unit operating unit patterns are examined for an aggregation of all hydro generators. The cost impacts of maintaining hydro unit flexibility are assessed and compared for a number of different modes of system operation.

  6. Rent sharing in the Clean Development Mechanism The Case of the Tahumanu Hydroelectric Project in Bolivia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Rent sharing in the Clean Development Mechanism The Case of the Tahumanu Hydroelectric Project a hydroelectric power plant instead of subsidized diesel plants in the Bolivian Pando Province. Simulations show

  7. Impact of High Wind Power Penetration on Hydroelectric Unit Operations: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, B. M.; Lew, D.; Milligan, M.

    2011-10-01

    This paper examines the impact of this large amount of wind penetration on hydroelectric unit operations. Changes in hydroelectric unit operating unit patterns are examined for an aggregation of all hydro generators.

  8. Impact of High Wind Power Penetration on Hydroelectric Unit Operations in the WWSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, B.-M.; Lew, D.; Milligan, M.

    2011-07-01

    This report examines the impact of this large amount of wind penetration on hydroelectric unit operations. Changes in hydroelectric unit operating patterns are examined both for an aggregation of all hydro generators and for select individual plants.

  9. DOWNSTREAM PASSAGE FOR SALMON AT HYDROELECTRIC PROJECTS IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DOWNSTREAM PASSAGE FOR SALMON AT HYDROELECTRIC PROJECTS IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN: DEVELOPMENT ..........................................................................25 Division Barriers Upstream of the Powerhouse

  10. Federal Register Notice EPAct 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive Program: January 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal Register Notice for the EPAct 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive Program application period announcement: January, 2015.

  11. Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Fourth National Report for the Joint...

  12. Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Second National Report for the Joint...

  13. Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Third National Report for the Joint...

  14. Medial design of blades for hydroelectric turbines and ship propellers M. Rossgatterera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jüttler, Bert

    Medial design of blades for hydroelectric turbines and ship propellers M. Rossgatterera , B. J Abstract We present a method for constructing blades of hydroelectric turbines and ship propellers based. Keywords: CAD-model, B-spline representation, hydroelectric turbine blade, propeller blade, medial axis

  15. Model-Free Based Water Level Control for Hydroelectric Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Model-Free Based Water Level Control for Hydroelectric Power Plants Cédric JOIN Gérard ROBERT for hydroelectric run-of-the river power plants. To modulate power generation, a level trajectory is planned, the set-point is followed even in severe operating conditions. Keywords: Hydroelectric power plants

  16. The net carbon footprint of a newly created boreal hydroelectric reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The net carbon footprint of a newly created boreal hydroelectric reservoir Cristian R. Teodoru,1 of a boreal hydroelectric reservoir (Eastmain-1 in northern Québec, Canada). This is the result of a large. Citation: Teodoru, C. R., et al. (2012), The net carbon footprint of a newly created boreal hydroelectric

  17. Abstract --This paper describes the development of a sequential decision support system to promote hydroelectric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Mark

    hydroelectric power in North-West England. The system, composed of integrated models, addresses barriers to the installation of hydroelectric power schemes. Information is linked through an economic assessment which of hydro power technology are considered. Index Terms -- Flow duration curve, Hydroelectric power, North

  18. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 31 JULY 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/NGEO1211 Carbon emission from hydroelectric reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Jonathan J.

    LETTERS PUBLISHED ONLINE: 31 JULY 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/NGEO1211 Carbon emission from hydroelectric * Hydroelectric reservoirs cover an area of 3.4 × 105 km2 and comprise about 20% of all reservoirs. In addition dioxide and methane from hydroelectric reservoirs, on the basis of data from 85 globally distributed

  19. Pricing Hydroelectric Power Plants with/without Operational Restrictions: a Stochastic Control Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forsyth, Peter A.

    Pricing Hydroelectric Power Plants with/without Operational Restrictions: a Stochastic Control of Waterloo, Waterloo ON, Canada N2L 3G1 Abstract. In this paper, we value hydroelectric power plant cash operational constraints may considerably overestimate the value of hydroelectric power plant cashflows. 1

  20. THE LOW-TEMPERATURE THRESHOLD FOR PINK SALMON EGGS IN RELATION TO A PROPOSED HYDROELECTRIC INSTALLATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE LOW-TEMPERATURE THRESHOLD FOR PINK SALMON EGGS IN RELATION TO A PROPOSED HYDROELECTRIC INSTALLATION JACK E. BAILEY' AND DALE R. EVANS' ABSTRACT A proposed hydroelectric installation in southeastern hydroelectric installation could result in temperatures as low as 4.5 0 C during spawning and initial incubation

  1. FUTURE HYDROELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT SECTION 12 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 12-1 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FUTURE HYDROELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT SECTION 12 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 12-1 September 13, 1995 Section 12 FUTURE HYDROELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT Much of this program has focused on mitigating damage done for additional federal hydroelectric projects and to plan for new development in the basin. The Federal Energy

  2. The Impacts of Wind Speed Trends and Long-term Variability in Relation to Hydroelectric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohfeld, Karen

    The Impacts of Wind Speed Trends and Long- term Variability in Relation to Hydroelectric Reservoir and Long-term Variability in Relation to Hydroelectric Reservoir Inflows on Wind Power in the Pacific through diversification. In hydroelectric dominated systems, like the PNW, the benefits of wind power can

  3. Primal-Dual Interior Point Method Applied to the Short Term Hydroelectric Scheduling Including a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliveira, Aurélio R. L.

    Primal-Dual Interior Point Method Applied to the Short Term Hydroelectric Scheduling Including that minimizes losses in the transmission and costs in the generation of a hydroelectric power system, formulated such perturbing parameter. Keywords-- Hydroelectric power system, Network flow, Predispatch, Primal-dual interior

  4. RETURN TO THE RIVER -2000 Chapter 6 Hydroelectric System Development187

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RETURN TO THE RIVER - 2000 Chapter 6 Hydroelectric System Development187 Return to Table of Contents Go to Next Chapter CHAPTER 6. HYDROELECTRIC SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT: EFFECTS ON JUVENILE AND ADULT of the Hydroelectric System Development of the hydropower system in the Columbia River basin began in the late

  5. An Approximate Method to Assess the Peaking Capability of the NW Hydroelectric System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DRAFT 1 An Approximate Method to Assess the Peaking Capability of the NW Hydroelectric System September 26, 2005 The best way to assess the hydroelectric system's peaking capability is to simulate its. This model simulates the operation of the major hydroelectric projects over a one-week (168 hour) period

  6. EIS-0184: South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes the Seattle City Light, a Department of the City of Seattle proposal to construct a hydroelectric project with an installed capacity of 15 MW on the South Fork Tolt River near the town of Carnation located in King County in the State of Washington.

  7. Conventional Hydropower Technologies Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-07-01

    This factsheet gives a description of the U.S. Department of Energy Water Power Program's efforts to increase generating capacity and efficiency at existing hydroelectric facilities, add hydroelectric generating capacity to non-powered dams, and reduce the environmental effects of hydropower.

  8. Hydroelectric power in Hawaii. A report on the statewide survey of potential hydroelectric sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, C. A.

    1981-02-01

    An assessment was made of the hydropower potential in Hawaii. The major conclusion of this study is that hydropower resources in the State of Hawaii are substantial, and they offer the potential for major increases in hydropower generating capacity. Hydropower resources on all islands total about 50 MW of potential generating capacity. Combined with the 18 MW of existing hydropower capacity, hydropower resources potentially could generate about 307 million kWh of electric energy annually. This represents about 28% of the present combined electricity needs of the Neighbor Islands, Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and the Big Island. Hydropower resources on Kauai equal 72% of that island's electricity needs; on Molokai, 40%, on the Big Island, 20%; and on Maui, 18%. The island of Oahu, however, has only small hydropower resources, and could only generate a negligible portion of its electricity needs from this energy source. A summary of existing and future (potential) hydropower capacities and estimated annual outputs for each island is presented. How much of the potential capacity is being actively considered for development and how much is only tentatively proposed at the time is indicated. The economics of hydropower at specific sites were analyzed. The major conclusion of this analysis is that hydropower development costs vary widely among the different sites, but that generally the cost of hydroelectric power is either less than or comparable to the cost of oil-fired power.

  9. A Study of United States Hydroelectric Plant Ownership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas G Hall

    2006-06-01

    Ownership of United States hydroelectric plants is reviewed from several perspectives. Plant owners are grouped into six owner classes as defined by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The numbers of plants and the corresponding total capacity associated with each owner class are enumerated. The plant owner population is also evaluated based on the number of owners in each owner class, the number of plants owned by a single owner, and the size of plants based on capacity ranges associated with each owner class. Plant numbers and corresponding total capacity associated with owner classes in each state are evaluated. Ownership by federal agencies in terms of the number of plants owned by each agency and the corresponding total capacity is enumerated. A GIS application that is publicly available on the Internet that displays hydroelectric plants on maps and provides basic information about them is described.

  10. Bihar State Hydroelectric Power Corp BSHPC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC Jump to:Greece:BajoBelpower SrlHydroelectric Power Corp BSHPC Jump

  11. Qiyang Yangguang Hydroelectric Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,Energy LLCALLETE IncScience and Technology Co LtdHydroelectric

  12. List of Small Hydroelectric Incentives | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History ViewInformationWindsCompressedList of RefuelingRoom AirHydroelectric

  13. Reducing Waste in Memory Hierarchies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Yingying

    2015-05-01

    power consumption by dynamically bypassing zero-reuse blocks. This dissertation exploits waste of data redundancy at the block-level granularity and finds that conventional cache design wastes capacity because it stores duplicate data. This dissertation...

  14. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation at Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Oregon Facilities, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedrossian, Karen L.

    1984-08-01

    The report presents a review and documentation of existing information on wildlife resources at Columbia River Basin hydroelectric facilities within Oregon. Effects of hydroelectric development and operation; existing agreements; and past, current and proposed wildlife mitigation, enhancement, and protection activities were considered. (ACR)

  15. Hydroelectric power: Technology and planning. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning hydroelectric power technology and planning. Reservoir, dam, water tunnel, and hydraulic gate design, construction, and operation are discussed. Water supply, flood control, irrigation programs, and environmental effects of hydroelectric power plants are presented. Mathematical modeling and simulation analysis are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  16. Hydroelectric power: Technology and planning. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning hydroelectric power technology and planning. Reservoir, dam, water tunnel, and hydraulic gate design, construction, and operation are discussed. Water supply, flood control, irrigation programs, and environmental effects of hydroelectric power plants are presented. Mathematical modeling and simulation analysis are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  17. Dam and Hydroelectric Powerplant University of Hawai`i CEE 491University of Hawai`i CEE 491

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prevedouros, Panos D.

    Karun 3 Dam and Hydroelectric Powerplant University of Hawai`i ­ CEE 491University of Hawai`i ­ CEE;Location #12;Description/Background Hydroelectric dam on Karun River Help with national energy needs

  18. Holocene versus modern catchment erosion rates at 300 MW Baspa II hydroelectric power plant (India, NW Himalaya)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bookhagen, Bodo

    Holocene versus modern catchment erosion rates at 300 MW Baspa II hydroelectric power plant (India private hydroelectric facility, located at the Baspa River which is an important left-hand tributary

  19. 51-Mile Hydroelectric Power Project Demonstration of new methodologies to reduce the LCOE for small, hydropower development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    51-Mile Hydroelectric Power Project Demonstration of new methodologies to reduce the LCOE for small, hydropower development

  20. 14 Diffusive CO2 Flux at the Air-Water Interface of the Robert-Bourassa Hydroelectric Reservoir in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    14 Diffusive CO2 Flux at the Air-Water Interface of the Robert-Bourassa Hydroelectric Reservoir Hydroelectric reservoirs and lakes in boreal Québec produce greenhouse gases (GHG) mainly in the form of CO2 of the interface. When applied to the Robert- Bourassa hydroelectric reservoir in boreal Québec, this model

  1. Proceedings of: ''Formal Methods Europe'', March 1996, Oxford, UK, LNCS 1051, Springer Automatic Verification of a Hydroelectric Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tronci, Enrico

    Verification of a Hydroelectric Power Plant 1 Rosario Pugliese Enrico Tronci Dip. di Scienze dell@univaq.it Abstract. We analyze the specification of a hydroelectric power plant by ENEL (the Italian Electric Company we report on the analysis of a hydroelectric power plant by ENEL (the Italian Electric Company). Our

  2. Sources and fluxes of carbon in a large boreal hydroelectric reservoir of eastern Canada: an isotopic approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    Sources and fluxes of carbon in a large boreal hydroelectric reservoir of eastern Canada Hydroelectric reservoirs emit greenhouse gases (GHGs). Although a few hypothesis have been put forward at the surface of a large boreal hydroelectric reservoir of eastern Canada (Robert-Bourassa) as well

  3. Project design criteria manual: Upper Mechanicville Hydroelectric Redevelopment Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-12-01

    The design criteria presented in this manual are to be used as the bases for the detailed design for the Upper Mechanicville (NY) Hydroelectric Redevelopment Project. The manual refers to codes and standards which are to be used in the design of the project. Design approaches not covered by existing codes and standards are also given for all phases of the project. The manual is divided into six sections: civil design, hydraulic design, geotechnical design, electrical systems, mechanical systems, and major equipment. These design criteria are to be used as a guide for design. When changes become necessary, these shall be documented by the engineer responsible for the design. This documentation shall be sent to the Project Engineer and Project Manager for submission to the client for reference. The documentation shall specify the reason for the change and shall be routed to all Department Coordinators.

  4. Aging in American Convents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corwin, Anna I.

    2009-01-01

    Schuster. Snowdon, David 2001 Aging with Grace: What the Nunreligion, devotion, and aging. CSW JAN09 update tocAging in American Convents FIELDWORK REPORT by Anna I.

  5. Table Notes Schedule of Updates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Nuclear Renewables Total Conventional Thermal Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Total Net GenerationHydroelectricNon-Hydroelectric

  6. 2014 Annual AFN Convention

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The AFN Convention is the largest representative annual gathering in the United States of any Native peoples. In addition to the memorable keynote speeches, the expert panels and special reports, the Convention features several evenings of cultural performances known as Quyana Alaska.

  7. Conventional regression models Unlabelled units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCullagh, Peter

    Conventional regression models Unlabelled units Consequences Sampling bias in logistic models Peter effects #12;Conventional regression models Unlabelled units Consequences Outline 1 Conventional regression models Gaussian models Binary regression model Properties of conventional models 2 Unlabelled units Point

  8. ''Rancho Hydro'': a low-head, high volume residential hydroelectric power system, Anahola, Kauai, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harder, J.D.

    1982-07-01

    The site is a 1.75 acre residential site with two households. The Anahola stream intersects the property line. Design of the proposed hydroelectric system is described, along with the permit process. Construction is in progress. (DLC)

  9. Storing hydroelectricity to meet peak-hour demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valenti, M.

    1992-04-01

    This paper reports on pumped storage plants which have become an effective way for some utility companies that derive power from hydroelectric facilities to economically store baseload energy during off-peak hours for use during peak hourly demands. According to the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in Palo Alto, Calif., 36 of these plants provide approximately 20 gigawatts, or about 3 percent of U.S. generating capacity. During peak-demand periods, utilities are often stretched beyond their capacity to provide power and must therefore purchase it from neighboring utilities. Building new baseload power plants, typically nuclear or coal-fired facilities that run 24 hours per day seven days a week, is expensive, about $1500 per kilowatt, according to Robert Schainker, program manager for energy storage at the EPRI. Schainker the that building peaking plants at $400 per kilowatt, which run a few hours a day on gas or oil fuel, is less costly than building baseload plants. Operating them, however, is more expensive because peaking plants are less efficient that baseload plants.

  10. Final Technical Report - Modernization of the Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joe Taddeucci, P E

    2013-03-29

    The Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Project (BCH) was purchased by the City of Boulder, CO (the city) in 2001. Project facilities were originally constructed in 1910 and upgraded in the 1930s and 1940s. By 2009, the two 10 MW turbine/generators had reached or were nearing the end of their useful lives. One generator had grounded out and was beyond repair, reducing plant capacity to 10 MW. The remaining 10 MW unit was expected to fail at any time. When the BCH power plant was originally constructed, a sizeable water supply was available for the sole purpose of hydroelectric power generation. Between 1950 and 2001, that water supply had gradually been converted to municipal water supply by the city. By 2001, the water available for hydroelectric power generation at BCH could not support even one 10 MW unit. Boulder lacked the financial resources to modernize the facilities, and Boulder anticipated that when the single, operational historical unit failed, the project would cease operation. In 2009, the City of Boulder applied for and received a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant for $1.18 million toward a total estimated project cost of $5.155 million to modernize BCH. The federal funding allowed Boulder to move forward with plant modifications that would ensure BCH would continue operation. Federal funding was made available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009. Boulder determined that a single 5 MW turbine/generator would be the most appropriate capacity, given the reduced water supply to the plant. Average annual BCH generation with the old 10 MW unit had been about 8,500 MW-hr, whereas annual generation with a new, efficient turbine could average 11,000 to 12,000 MW-hr. The incremental change in annual generation represents a 30% increase in generation over pre-project conditions. The old turbine/generator was a single nozzle Pelton turbine with a 5-to-1 flow turndown and a maximum turbine/generator efficiency of 82%. The new unit is a double nozzle Pelton turbine with a 10-to-1 flow turndown and a maximum turbine/generator efficiency of 88%. This alone represents a 6% increase in overall efficiency. The old turbine operated at low efficiencies due to age and non-optimal sizing of the turbine for the water flow available to the unit. It was shut down whenever water flow dropped to less than 4-5 cfs, and at that flow, efficiency was 55 to 60%. The new turbine will operate in the range of 70 to 88% efficiency through a large portion of the existing flow range and would only have to be shut down at flow rates less than 3.7 cfs. Efficiency is expected to increase by 15-30%, depending on flow. In addition to the installation of new equipment, other goals for the project included: �¢���¢ Increasing safety at Boulder Canyon Hydro �¢���¢ Increasing protection of the Boulder Creek environment �¢���¢ Modernizing and integrating control equipment into Boulder�¢����s municipal water supply system, and �¢���¢ Preserving significant historical engineering information prior to power plant modernization. From January 1, 2010 through December 31, 2012, combined consultant and contractor personnel hours paid for by both the city and the federal government have totaled approximately 40,000. This equates roughly to seven people working full time on the project from January 2010 through December 2012. This project also involved considerable material expense (steel pipe, a variety of valves, electrical equipment, and the various components of the turbine and generator), which were not accounted for in terms of hours spent on the project. However, the material expense related to this project did help to create or preserve manufacturing/industrial jobs throughout the United States. As required by ARRA, the various components of the hydroelectric project were manufactured or substantially transformed in the U.S. BCH is eligible for nomination to

  11. Recovery Act: Hydroelectric Facility Improvement Project - Replacement of Current Mechanical Seal System with Rope Packing System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, Jessica D.

    2013-05-29

    On January 27, 2010 the City of North Little Rock, Arkansas received notification of the awarding of a Department of Energy (DOE) grant totaling $450,000 in funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) under the Project Title: Recovery Act: Hydroelectric Facility Improvement Project – Automated Intake Clearing Equipment and Materials Management. The purpose of the grant was for improvements to be made at the City’s hydroelectric generating facility located on the Arkansas River. Improvements were to be made through the installation of an intake maintenance device (IMD) and the purchase of a large capacity wood grinder. The wood grinder was purchased in order to receive the tree limbs, tree trunks, and other organic debris that collects at the intake of the plant during high flow. The wood grinder eliminates the periodic burning of the waste material that is cleared from the intake and reduces any additional air pollution to the area. The resulting organic mulch has been made available to the public at no charge. Design discussion and planning began immediately and the wood grinder was purchased in July of 2010 and immediately put to work mulching debris that was gathered regularly from the intake of the facility. The mulch is currently available to the public for free. A large majority of the design process was spent in discussion with the Corps of Engineers to obtain approval for drawings, documents, and permits that were required in order to make changes to the structure of the powerhouse. In April of 2011, the City’s Project Engineer, who had overseen the application, resigned and left the City’s employ. A new Systems Mechanical Engineer was hired and tasked with overseeing the project. The transfer of responsibility led to a re-examination of the original assumptions and research upon which the grant proposal was based. At that point, the project went under review and a trip was booked for July 2011 to visit facilities that currently had an IMD installed. This further study of facilities revealed that the implementation of the project as originally described, while proving the benefits described in the original grant application, would likely intensify sand intake. Increased sand intake would lead to an increase in required shutdowns for maintenance and more rapid depreciation of key equipment which would result in a loss of generation capacity. A better solution to the problem, one that continued to meet the criteria for the original grant and ARRA standards, was developed. A supporting day trip was planned to visit other facilities located on the Arkansas River to determine how they were coping with the same strong amounts of sand, silt, and debris. Upon returning from the trip to other Arkansas River facilities it was extremely clear what direction to go in order to most efficiently address the issue of generator capacity and efficiency. Of the plants visited on the Arkansas River, every one of them was running what is called a rope packing shaft sealing system as opposed to mechanical shaft seals, which the facility was running. Rope packing is a time proven sealing method that has been around for centuries. It has proved to perform very well in dirty water situations just like that of the Arkansas River. In April of 2012 a scope change proposal was submitted to the DOE for approval. In August of 2012 the City received word that the change of scope had been approved. Plans were immediately set in motion to begin the conversion from mechanical seals to a packing box at the facility. Contractors arrived on October 1st, 2012 and the project team began unwatering the unit for disassembly. The seal conversion was completed on February 29th, 2013 with start-up of the unit. Further testing and adjusting was done throughout the first two weeks of March.

  12. America's Bottom-Up Climate Change Mitigation Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01

    large conventional hydroelectric power, municipal solidconventional large hydroelectric power). To quantify thelarge conventional hydroelectric power is not included (this

  13. Conventional Hydropower Technologies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    This fact sheet describes the DOE Water Power Program's conventional hydropower research and development efforts.

  14. Design of a hydro-electric plant on the Mattawamkeag River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Daniel Francis

    1915-01-01

    stream_size 74828 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name hazen_1915_3424074.pdf.txt stream_source_info hazen_1915_3424074.pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 DESIGN of a HYDRO... Engineering. June 5, 1915. DESIGN of a HYDRO-ELECTRIC PLANT on the MATTAWAMKBAG RIVER PREFACE This thesis•contains all the preliminary work necessary to show the feasibility of the construction and operation of a hydro-electric plant on the Mattawamkeag...

  15. Low Infrastructure Hydro-Electric Power Generation Team Trevor Doney, Tyler Hogenson, Ginny Llewellyn, Dean Simmonds, Aaron Wernerehl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van den Berg, Jur

    PowerPail Low Infrastructure Hydro-Electric Power Generation Team Trevor Doney, Tyler Hogenson near potential hydro-electric power generation sources. There are several disadvantages to hydro Pipe PowerPail http://mrenergy.co.in/run-of-river-hydro.html #12;

  16. Effects of Climate Change on the Hydroelectric The Council is not tasked, nor does it have the resources to resolve existing uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effects of Climate Change on the Hydroelectric System SUMMARY The Council is not tasked, nor does at hydroelectric dams when Northwest demands and power market values are likely to grow due to higher air

  17. Image courtesy of the Image Science & Analysis Laboratory, NASA Johnson Space Center (ISS006-E-42326). The hydroelectrical potential of North-Western

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borsdorf, Axel

    -42326). #12;The hydroelectrical potential of North-Western Patagonia ­ balancing economic development and ecological protection axel borsdorf #12;156 The hydroelectrical potential of North-Western Patagonia the rest an expansion of the hydroelectric potential, first proposed 30 years ago (Borsdorf 1987: 156ff), can

  18. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation, Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Columbia River Mainstem Facilities, 1984 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howerton, Jack; Hwang, Diana

    1984-11-01

    This report reviews the status of past, present, and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation programs at existing hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River Basin. The project evaluations will form the basis for determining any needed remedial measures or additional project analysis. Each hydropower facility report is abstracted separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  19. What is the role of hydroelectric power in the United States?

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2011-01-01

    The importance of hydropower as a source of electricity generation varies by geographic region. While hydropower accounted for 6% of total U.S. electricity generation in 2010, it provided over half of the electricity in the Pacific Northwest. Because hydroelectric generation relies on precipitation, it varies widely from month to month and year to year.

  20. Pumped storage for hydroelectric power. (Latest citations from Fluidex data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, development, construction, and characteristics of surface and underground pumped storage for hydroelectric power. Pumped storage projects and facilities worldwide are referenced. There is some consideration of research and experimental results of pumped storage studies, as well as modeling. (Contains a minimum of 192 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  1. Pumped storage for hydroelectric power. (Latest citations from Fluidex (Fluid Engineering Abstracts) database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, development, construction, and characteristics of surface and underground pumped storage for hydroelectric power. Pumped storage projects and facilities worldwide are referenced. There is some consideration of research and experimental results of pumped storage studies, as well as modeling. (Contains a minimum of 198 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  2. The National Hydropower Asset Assessment Program (NHAAP) is an integrated energy, water, and ecosystem research effort for sustainable hydroelectricity generation and water management. The NHAAP conducts research on new

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and ecosystem research effort for sustainable hydroelectricity generation and water management. The NHAAP

  3. Water quality and sedimentation implications of installing a hydroelectric dam on the Río Baker in Chilean Patagonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leandro, Gianna Dee

    2009-01-01

    HidroAysen, a Chilean corporation operated by energy giant Endesa, has proposed to build two hydroelectric dams on the Rio Baker in the Aysin Region of Chilean Patagonia. The proposed dams have been met with a variety of ...

  4. Water management for hydroelectric power generation at Matera and Kidatu in Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matondo, J.I.; Rutashobya, D.G.

    1995-12-31

    The major sources of power in Tanzania are hydropower and thermo power. Most of the hydroelectric power is generated in the Great Ruaha river system (280 MW) and in the Pangani river system (46 MW). However, the generated power (hydro and thermo) does not meet the power demand and as a result, an accute power shortage occurred in August 1992. This paper explores the hydropower generation mechanism at Mtera and Kidatu hydroelectric power plants. It also looks into what measures could have been taken in order to avoid the massive power shedding which officially lasted for about six months, although unofficially, power shedding was continued well beyond that period. Strategies for future water management in the Great Ruaha river system for efficient generation of power are also presented.

  5. Rio Hondo hydroelectric project (Guatemala) Volume 1. Desk-study report. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-12

    The Project is a hydroelectric development on the Rio Colorado, upstream of, but separate from, a small existing hydroelectric system. The Group states that goods and services will be furnished by U.S. sources except for items which are locally produced or unavailable from the U.S. In those terms and round numbers, export of goods would amount to $11.0 million and export of engineering services would amount to $3.3 million. The value of the construction contract would be $11.5 million. Deducting 15 percent for contingencies from those items, the return to the U.S. would amount to $21.9 million. The writer recommends that the U.S. Trade and Development Program (TDP) grant funds for the Feasibility Study.

  6. Legal obstacles and incentives to the development of small scale hydroelectric potential in Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None,

    1980-05-01

    The legal and institutional obstacles to the development of small-scale hydroelectric energy at the state level are discussed. The Federal government also exercises extensive regulatory in the area, and the dual regulatory system from the standpoint of the appropriate legal doctrine, the law of pre-emption, application of the law to the case of hydroelectric development, and an inquiry into the practical use of the doctrine by the FERC is examined. The initial obstacle that all developers confront in Wisconsin is obtaining the authority to utilize the bed, banks, and flowing water at a proposed dam site. This involves a determination of ownership of the stream banks and bed and the manner of obtaining either their title or use; and existing constraints with regard to the use of the water. Wisconsin follows the riparian theory of water law.

  7. Installation of a Low Flow Unit at the Abiquiu Hydroelectric Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jack Q. Richardson

    2012-06-28

    Final Technical Report for the Recovery Act Project for the Installation of a Low Flow Unit at the Abiquiu Hydroelectric Facility. The Abiquiu hydroelectric facility existed with two each 6.9 MW vertical flow Francis turbine-generators. This project installed a new 3.1 MW horizontal flow low flow turbine-generator. The total plant flow range to capture energy and generate power increased from between 250 and 1,300 cfs to between 75 and 1,550 cfs. Fifty full time equivalent (FTE) construction jobs were created for this project - 50% (or 25 FTE) were credited to ARRA funding due to the ARRA 50% project cost match. The Abiquiu facility has increased capacity, increased efficiency and provides for an improved aquatic environment owing to installed dissolved oxygen capabilities during traditional low flow periods in the Rio Chama. A new powerhouse addition was constructed to house the new turbine-generator equipment.

  8. Tanana Chiefs Conference Annual Convention

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tanana Chiefs Conference is holding its annual convention to discuss issues in the region, hold elections, and adopt resolutions presented by Tribes.

  9. Minor actinide waste disposal in deep geological boreholes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sizer, Calvin Gregory

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate a waste canister design suitable for the disposal of vitrified minor actinide waste in deep geological boreholes using conventional oil/gas/geothermal drilling technology. ...

  10. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Hungry Horse Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bissell, Gael

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Hungry Horse hydroelectric project. In this report, mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. Mitigation objectives for each species (group) were established based on the loss estimates but tailored to the recommended projects. 13 refs., 3 figs., 19 tabs.

  11. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Libby Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mundinger, John

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Libby hydroelectric project. Mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. The report describes mitigation that has already taken place and 8 recommended mitigation projects designed to complete total wildlife mitigation. 8 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

  12. Legal obstacles and incentives to the development of small scale hydroelectric power in West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None,

    1980-05-01

    The legal and institutional obstacles to the development of small-scale hydroelectric in West Virginia at the state level are described. The Federal government also exercises extensive regulatory authority in the area. The introductory section examines the dual regulatory system from the standpoint of the appropriate legal doctrine, the law of pre-emption, application of the law to the case of hydroelectric development, and concludes with an inquiry into the practical use of the doctrine by FERC. The development of small-scale hydroelectric energy depends on the selection of a site which will produce sufficient water power capacity to make the project economically attractive to a developer. In West Virginia, the right to use the flowing waters of a stream, creek, or river is appurtenant to the ownership of the lands bordering the watercourse. The lands are known as riparian lands. The water rights are known as riparian rights. Thus, the first obstacle a developer faces involves the acquisition of riparian lands and the subsequent right to the use of the water. The water law in West Virginia is discussed in detail followed by discussions on direct and indirect regulations; continuing obligations; financial considerations; and interstate organizations.

  13. Relative cost and precision of hydroacoustic and net sampling at hydroelectric facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, A.W.; Matousek, J.A.; Metzger, S.G. [Lawler, Matusky & Skelly Engineers, Pearl River, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Estimating the number of fish passing through a hydroelectric facility is often an important aspect of hydroelectric project relicensing. The number of fish per unit volume, and ultimately the total number of fish entrained, is usually obtained from hydroacoustic methods or tailrace nets. Data collected at several small hydroelectric projects in Michigan gave us the opportunity to compare the sampling precision of these two methods. This comparison can be useful in formulating future sampling programs as the degree of sampling precision relates directly to the sampling effort and program cost. Individual hydroacoustic samples covered small volumes of water. This resulted in a high degree of variability among samples and a less precise estimate of total entrainment for a given number of samples. In contrast, net samples filtered greater volumes of water and had lower variability among samples. To examine the trade-off between precision and program cost, we computed the 95% confidence interval for the annual estimated entrainment and cost of the associated sampling program. The results suggested that the most cost-effective sampling method depends on the desired precision of the entrainment estimate. For low precision estimates, hydroacoustic sampling was most advantageous. Net sampling would be advantageous when precise entrainment estimates are required and when species composition must be obtained.

  14. Essays in Applied Microeconomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Severnini, Edson Roberto

    2013-01-01

    of the advantage of cheap local hydroelectricity. "includes conventional hydroelectricity and pumped storage. "advantages of cheap local hydroelectricity were attenuated,

  15. Sandia Energy - Conventional Water Power: Technology Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Development Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Water Power Conventional Water Power: Technology Development Conventional Water Power: Technology...

  16. ITCN 49th Annual Convention

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Inter-Tribal Council of Nevada, Inc. will be hosting its 49th Annual Convention, themed "Making a Difference for Nevada Tribes," December 8-11, 2014 at John Ascuaga’s Nugget in Sparks, Nevada.

  17. Solid Waste as an Energy Source 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erlandsson, K. I.

    1979-01-01

    The cost history of conventional fuels over the past several years has forced a hard search for alternate energy sources. One alternate energy source that has gained more and more acceptance is solid waste. This is the case particularly...

  18. Hot Issue and Burning Options in Waste Management: A Social Cost Benefit Analysis of Waste-to-Energy in the UK.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamasb, Tooraj; Kiamil, H.; Nepal, R.

    significant share of total cost from conventional thermal energy sources. Meanwhile, most renewable energy generation (such as wind, solar, marine, and hydroelectric) is capital intensive, but has no direct fuel cost. A notable exception is biomass energy... transaction costs prohibitively high. The alternatives are either market-based incentives or command-and-control policies. These instruments are capable of achieving a Pareto optimal outcome under the assumptions of a first-best world, in which government...

  19. Legal obstacles and incentives to the development of small scale hydroelectric power in Maryland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None,

    1980-05-01

    The legal and institutional obstacles to the development of small-scale hydroelectric energy at the state level in Maryland are described. The Federal government also exercises extensive regulatory authority in the area. The dual regulatory system is examined with the aim of creating a more orderly understanding of the vagaries of the system, focusing on the appropriate legal doctrine, the law of pre-emption, application of the law to the case of hydroelectric development, and an inquiry into the practical use of the doctrine by the FERC. In Maryland, by common law rule, title to all navigable waters and to the soil below the high-water mark of those waters is vested in the state as successor to the Lord Proprietary who had received it by grant from the Crown. Rights to non-navigable water, public trust doctrine, and eminent domain are also discussed. Direct and indirect regulations, continuing obligations, loan programs, and regional organizations are described in additional sections.

  20. Audio Engineering Society Convention Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Poland This Convention paper was selected based on a submitted abstract and 750-word precis that have the sound quality of a music performer in real-time. It consists of a software tool that computes a score is carried out to assess the correlation between systems predictions and musicians criteria. Results show

  1. Radioactive waste material melter apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Newman, D.F.; Ross, W.A.

    1990-04-24

    An apparatus for preparing metallic radioactive waste material for storage is disclosed. The radioactive waste material is placed in a radiation shielded enclosure. The waste material is then melted with a plasma torch and cast into a plurality of successive horizontal layers in a mold to form a radioactive ingot in the shape of a spent nuclear fuel rod storage canister. The apparatus comprises a radiation shielded enclosure having an opening adapted for receiving a conventional transfer cask within which radioactive waste material is transferred to the apparatus. A plasma torch is mounted within the enclosure. A mold is also received within the enclosure for receiving the melted waste material and cooling it to form an ingot. The enclosure is preferably constructed in at least two parts to enable easy transport of the apparatus from one nuclear site to another. 8 figs.

  2. Radioactive waste material melter apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Newman, Darrell F. (Richland, WA); Ross, Wayne A. (Richland, WA)

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus for preparing metallic radioactive waste material for storage is disclosed. The radioactive waste material is placed in a radiation shielded enclosure. The waste material is then melted with a plasma torch and cast into a plurality of successive horizontal layers in a mold to form a radioactive ingot in the shape of a spent nuclear fuel rod storage canister. The apparatus comprises a radiation shielded enclosure having an opening adapted for receiving a conventional transfer cask within which radioactive waste material is transferred to the apparatus. A plasma torch is mounted within the enclosure. A mold is also received within the enclosure for receiving the melted waste material and cooling it to form an ingot. The enclosure is preferably constructed in at least two parts to enable easy transport of the apparatus from one nuclear site to another.

  3. S. 737: A Bill to extend the deadlines applicable to certain hydroelectric projects, and for other purposes. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First session

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-31

    This bill was proposed to extend the deadlines applicable to certain hydroelectric projects, and for other purposes. The bill proposes extending the deadlines applying to certain hydroelectric projects in West Virginia, Kentucky, Washington, Oregon, and Arkansas. It proposes limited exemptions for licensing provisions for a power transmission project in New Mexico, extends Alaska`s state jurisdiction over small hydroelectric projects in the state, and amends the jurisdiction of FERC for licensing fresh water hydroelectric projects in Hawaii.

  4. Sandia Energy - Conventional Water Power: Market Acceleration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Market Acceleration Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Water Power Conventional Water Power: Market Acceleration Conventional Water Power: Market AccelerationTara...

  5. Japanese Ratify Convention on Supplementary Compensation for...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Japanese Ratify Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC) Japanese Ratify Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC) January 15, 2015...

  6. Turbulence at Hydroelectric Power Plants and its Potential Effects on Fish.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, Glenn F.; Odeh, Mufeed

    2001-01-01

    The fundamental influence of fluid dynamics on aquatic organisms is receiving increasing attention among aquatic ecologists. For example, the importance of turbulence to ocean plankton has long been a subject of investigation (Peters and Redondo 1997). More recently, studies have begun to emerge that explicitly consider the effects of shear and turbulence on freshwater invertebrates (Statzner et al. 1988; Hart et al. 1996) and fishes (Pavlov et al. 1994, 1995). Hydraulic shear stress and turbulence are interdependent natural fluid phenomena that are important to fish, and consequently it is important to develop an understanding of how fish sense, react to, and perhaps utilize these phenomena under normal river flows. The appropriate reaction to turbulence may promote movement of migratory fish or prevent displacement of resident fish. It has been suggested that one of the adverse effects of flow regulation by hydroelectric projects is the reduction of normal turbulence, particularly in the headwaters of reservoirs, which can lead to disorientation and slowing of migration (Williams et al. 1996; Coutant et al. 1997; Coutant 1998). On the other hand, greatly elevated levels of shear and turbulence may be injurious to fish; injuries can range from removal of the mucous layer on the body surface to descaling to torn opercula, popped eyes, and decapitation (Neitzel et al. 2000a,b). Damaging levels of fluid stress can occur in a variety of circumstances in both natural and man-made environments. This paper discusses the effects of shear stress and turbulence on fish, with an emphasis on potentially damaging levels in man-made environments. It defines these phenomena, describes studies that have been conducted to understand their effects, and identifies gaps in our knowledge. In particular, this report reviews the available information on the levels of turbulence that can occur within hydroelectric power plants, and the associated biological effects. The final section provides the preliminary design of an experimental apparatus that will be used to expose fish to representative levels of turbulence in the laboratory.

  7. ORNL nuclear waste programs annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-05-01

    Research progress is reported in 20 activities under the headings: spent fuels, defense waste management, commercial waste management, remedial action, and conventional reactors. Separate entries were prepared for each activity.

  8. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, Waste Analysis Plan The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, Waste Analysis Plan This...

  9. Conventional power sources for colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, M.A.

    1987-07-01

    At SLAC we are developing high peak-power klystrons to explore the limits of use of conventional power sources in future linear colliders. In an experimental tube we have achieved 150 MW at 1 ..mu..sec pulse width at 2856 MHz. In production tubes for SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) we routinely achieve 67 MW at 3.5 ..mu..sec pulse width and 180 pps. Over 200 of the klystrons are in routine operation in SLC. An experimental klystron at 8.568 GHz is presently under construction with a design objective of 30 MW at 1 ..mu..sec. A program is starting on the relativistic klystron whose performance will be analyzed in the exploration of the limits of klystrons at very short pulse widths.

  10. Conventional regression models Auto-generated units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCullagh, Peter

    Conventional regression models Auto-generated units Consequences of auto-generation Arguments pro-generated units #12;Conventional regression models Auto-generated units Consequences of auto-generation Arguments pro and con Outline 1 Conventional regression models Gaussian models Binary regression model

  11. Conventional regression models Auto-generated units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCullagh, Peter

    Conventional regression models Auto-generated units Consequences of auto-generation Inference Royal Statistical Society Feb 6, 2008 Peter McCullagh Auto-generated units #12;Conventional regression Conventional regression models Gaussian models Binary regression model Properties of regression models Problems

  12. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01

    large conventional hydroelectric power, municipal solidconventional large hydroelectric power in the percentage).large conventional hydroelectric power is not included (this

  13. Kainji hydroelectric project: a socio-economic post-impact assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ugochuku, R.O.

    1987-01-01

    The Kainji hydroelectric dam was conceived in the early 1950s as a solution to Nigeria's urgent power needs. Considerable controversy surrounded the dam project. The initial controversial issue associated with the dam was centered on a decision whether to develop a thermal or hydro technology and whether the Federal Government's money was being used to develop a particular region to the economic disadvantage of other regions. When the power problems persisted even after the dam started operation, the question of whether the dam was delivering its projected functions also became an issue. This study is in the area of Social Management of Technology which is a concept that deals with decision processes for guiding technological changes such as those associated with the Kainji Dam, to derive maximum socioeconomic benefit from the technology and to minimize the undersirable side effects. The study found that electric power problems of Nigeria can be attributed to institutional problems and the general level of the country's development. This study also found that all the additional benefits of the dam have been overestimated and those reaping the additional benefits are different from those bearing the cost.

  14. Observations of Velocity Conditions near a Hydroelectric Turbine Draft Tube Exit using ADCP Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, Christopher B.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

    2007-10-01

    Measurement of flow characteristics near hydraulic structures is an ongoing challenge because of the need to obtain rapid measurements of time-varying velocity over a relatively large spatial domain. This paper discusses use of an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) to measure the rapidly diverging flow exiting from an operating hydroelectric turbine draft tube exit. The resolved three-dimensional velocity vectors show a highly complex and helical flow pattern developed near to and downstream of the exit. Velocity vectors were integrated across the exit and we computed an uneven percentage of flow (67%/33%) passing through the two draft tube barrels at a mid-range turbine discharge, consistent with physical model results. In addition to the three-dimensional velocity vectors, the individual one-dimensional velocities measured by each of the four ADCP beams can be separately used as calibration and validation datasets for numerical and physical models. This technique is demonstrated by comparing along-beam ADCP velocity measurements to data collected in a scaled physical model.

  15. Turbine entrainment at six hydroelectric projects located on the AuSable River, Michigan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matousek, J.A.; Metzger, S.G.; Wells, A.W. [Lawler, Matusky & Skelly Engineers, Pearl River, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Turbine entrainment monitoring was conducted by Lawler, Matusky & Skelly Engineers for Consumers Power Company as part of relicensing activities at six hydroelectric projects located on Michigan`s AuSable River. The number and species of fish passing through the Francis turbines of the projects were determined through continuous hydroacoustic monitoring, with the transducers located upstream of the turbines, and through biweekly diel collections using partial-coverage turbine discharge draft tube nets. Although the nets were intended to supply information on species composition, both techniques were ultimately used to estimate turbine entrainment. Comparisons of entrainment abundance estimates were made among projects (location, physical equipment, and operating conditions) and between data collection techniques (hydroacoustics and nets). Species composition and size, based on the partial-coverage draft tube net collections, were also examined. The locations of the projects (along the lower section of the river) permitted evaluation of entrainment data related to morphometric characteristics of the respective impoundments, stream conditions, and water quality parameters.

  16. MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT PHASE I: AUDIT OF CURRENT PRACTICE The Mushroom Waste Management Project (MWMP) was initiated by Environment Canada, the BC Ministry of solid and liquid wastes generated at mushroom producing facilities. Environmental guidelines

  17. Development of iron phosphate ceramic waste form to immobilize radioactive waste solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Jongkwon; Um, Wooyong; Choung, Sungwook

    2014-05-09

    The objective of this research was to develop an iron phosphate ceramic (IPC) waste form using converter slag obtained as a by-product of the steel industry as a source of iron instead of conventional iron oxide. Both synthetic off-gas scrubber solution containing technetium-99 (or Re as a surrogate) and LiCl-KCl eutectic salt, a final waste solution from pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuel, were used as radioactive waste streams. The IPC waste form was characterized for compressive strength, reduction capacity, chemical durability, and contaminant leachability. Compressive strengths of the IPC waste form prepared with different types of waste solutions were 16 MPa and 19 MPa for LiCl-KCl eutectic salt and the off-gas scrubber simulant, respectively, which meet the minimum compressive strength of 3.45 MPa (500 psi) for waste forms to be accepted into the radioactive waste repository. The reduction capacity of converter slag, a main dry ingredient used to prepare the IPC waste form, was 4,136 meq/kg by the Ce(IV) method, which is much higher than those of the conventional Fe oxides used for the IPC waste form and the blast furnace slag materials. Average leachability indexes of Tc, Li, and K for the IPC waste form were higher than 6.0, and the IPC waste form demonstrated stable durability even after 63-day leaching. In addition, the Toxicity Characteristic Leach Procedure measurements of converter slag and the IPC waste form with LiCl-KCl eutectic salt met the universal treatment standard of the leachability limit for metals regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This study confirms the possibility of development of the IPC waste form using converter slag, showing its immobilization capability for radionuclides in both LiCl-KCl eutectic salt and off-gas scrubber solutions with significant cost savings.

  18. Images of energy: Policy perspectives on the introduction of hydroelectricity in Italy, 1882-1914

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laszlo, A.R.

    1992-01-01

    This study considers the link between energy technologies and cultural attitudes. Contemporary energy policy makers lack the conceptual tools with which to evaluate culturally appropriate energy choices. A way to regain a contextual capability is needed; that is, the capacity to recognize and avert situations where technological advance is insufficiently harmonized with its embedding environment. This study explores how both policy makers and the general public form their [open quotes]images of energy.[close quotes] It does so in three parts, beginning with an examination of the concepts of [open quotes]technology,[close quotes] [open quotes]culture[close quotes] and [open quotes]cognitive map,[close quotes] and an explanation of their interrelationship. The second part presents two historical case-studies of the introduction of hydroelectricity in Italy from 1882-1914. It considers how a relatively unknown technology made its way into urban and rural life, who its primary surveyors were, and how it shaped and was shaped by the cognitive maps of those into whose lives it marched. The final part extends the investigation to contemporary socio-cultural dynamics. Through concepts derived from General System Theory, the process of technological integration is interpreted in light of events that shape the world today. The design of a model to be used by energy makers and educators alike in conceiving culturally attuned energy alternatives is proposed. Such a model would describe energy-related cognitive maps and could serve as the basis for informed decision-making on energy choice at all levels of society. The study concludes with suggestions for a research agenda to further explore individual and collective energy-related cognitive maps.

  19. Conventional Energy Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    & Casino The Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Energy Forum on "Conventional Energy (Oil, Gas, and Coal) Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development: Best Practices in...

  20. Comparing Evolvable Hardware to Conventional Classifiers for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glette, Kyrre

    Comparing Evolvable Hardware to Conventional Classifiers for Electromyographic Prosthetic Hand electromyographic (EMG) signals. Such signals consist of a transient phase and a steady state phase. While some

  1. Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluwihare, Lihini

    Mixed Waste Before generating mixed waste (i.e, mixture of biohazardous and chemical or radioactive waste), call Environment, Health & Safety: (858) 534-2753. * Disinfectants other than bleach mustBiohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Human

  2. Analysis of environmental issues related to small-scale hydroelectric development. VI. Dissolved oxygen concentrations below operating dams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, G.F.; Kumar, K.D.; Solomon, J.A.; Hildebrand, S.G.

    1982-01-01

    Results are presented of an effort aimed at determining whether or not water quality degradation, as exemplified by dissolved oxygen concentrations, is a potentially significant issue affecting small-scale hydropower development in the US. The approach was to pair operating hydroelectric sites of all sizes with dissolved oxygen measurements from nearby downstream US Geological Survey water quality stations (acquired from the WATSTORE data base). The USGS data were used to calculate probabilities of non-compliance (PNCs), i.e., the probabilities that dissolved oxygen concentrations in the discharge waters of operating hydroelectric dams will drop below 5 mg/l. PNCs were estimated for each site, season (summer vs remaining months), and capacity category (less than or equal to 30 MW vs >30 MW). Because of the low numbers of usable sites in many states, much of the subsequent analysis was conducted on a regional basis. During the winter months (November through June) all regions had low mean PNCs regardless of capacity. Most regions had higher mean PNCs in summer than in winter, and summer PNCs were greater for large-scale than for small-scale sites. Among regions, the highest mean summer PNCs were found in the Great Basin, the Southeast, and the Ohio Valley. To obtain a more comprehensive picture of the effects of season and capacity on potential dissolved oxygen problems, cumulative probability distributions of PNC were developed for selected regions. This analysis indicates that low dissolved oxygen concentrations in the tailwaters below operating hydroelectric projects are a problem largely confined to large-scale facilities.

  3. WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource! energy forum Case Studies from Estonia, Switzerland, Germany Bossart,· ABB Waste-to-Energy Plants Edmund Fleck,· ESWET Marcel van Berlo,· Afval Energie Bedrijf From Waste to Energy To Energy from Waste #12;9.00-9.30: Registration 9.30-9.40: Chairman Ella Stengler opens

  4. Conventional regression models Auto-generated units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCullagh, Peter

    Conventional regression models Auto-generated units Consequences of auto-generation Inference regression models Auto-generated units Consequences of auto-generation Inference and prediction Outline 1 Conventional regression models Gaussian models Binary regression model Attenuation of treatment effect Problems

  5. Conventional regression models Auto-generated units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCullagh, Peter

    Conventional regression models Auto-generated units Consequences of auto-generation Inference regression models Auto-generated units Consequences of auto-generation Inference and prediction Outline 1 Conventional regression models Gaussian models Binary regression model Properties of regression models Problems

  6. HAZARDOUS WASTE [Written Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    HAZARDOUS WASTE MANUAL [Written Program] Cornell University [10/7/13 #12;Hazardous Waste Program................................................... 8 3.0 MINIMIZING HAZARDOUS WASTE GENERATION.........................................................10 4.0 HAZARDOUS WASTE GENERATOR REQUIREMENTS.....................................................10

  7. Waste Management's LNG Truck Fleet: Final Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, K.; Norton, P.; Clark, N.

    2001-01-25

    Waste Management, Inc., began operating a fleet of heavy-duty LNG refuse trucks at its Washington, Pennsylvania, facility. The objective of the project was to provide transportation professionals with quantitative, unbiased information on the cost, maintenance, operational, and emissions characteristics of LNG as one alternative to conventional diesel for heavy-duty trucking applications.

  8. Waste Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricN A 035(92/02) nergFeet)DepartmentWasteWaste

  9. Electronic waste disassembly with industrial waste heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    and for e?ective use of industrial exhaust heat is describedto scale up the process to industrial production levels.Waste Disassembly with Industrial Waste Heat Mengjun

  10. Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluwihare, Lihini

    of biohazardous and chemical or radioactive waste), call Environment, Health & Safety: (858) 534Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Human Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 200 West Arbor Dr. San Diego, CA 92103 (858

  11. Indian Gaming 2012 Tradeshow and Convention

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Indian Gaming Association (NIGA) 2012 tradeshow and convention will take place April 1-4, 2012, in San Diego, California. The event features seminars and trainings and other activities...

  12. An expert system framework for nondestructive waste assay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, G.K.

    1996-10-01

    Management and disposition of transuranic (RU) waste forms necessitates determining entrained RU and associated radioactive material quantities as per National RU Waste Characterization Program requirements. Technical justification and demonstration of a given NDA method used to determine RU mass and uncertainty in accordance with program quality assurance is difficult for many waste forms. Difficulties are typically founded in waste NDA methods that employ standards compensation and/or employment of simplifying assumptions on waste form configurations. Capability to determine and justify RU mass and mass uncertainty can be enhanced through integration of waste container data/information using expert system and empirical data-driven techniques with conventional data acquisition and analysis. Presented is a preliminary expert system framework that integrates the waste form data base, alogrithmic techniques, statistical analyses, expert domain knowledge bases, and empirical artificial intelligence modules into a cohesive system. The framework design and bases in addition to module development activities are discussed.

  13. WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    large amounts of waste that must be managed as part of both immediate recovery and long-term recovery management plans that can address contaminated waste through the entire life cycle of the waste. Through Demonstration LLNL Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory MSW Municipal Solid Waste OSHA Occupational Safety

  14. Recharging U.S. Energy Policy: Advocating for a National Renewable Portfolio Standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunt, Robin J.

    2007-01-01

    wind, geother- mal, hydroelectric, wave/tidal, biomass orsolid waste, or new hydroelectric genera- tion capacitycapacity at an existing hydroelectric project." 24 Although

  15. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment of the United States Army Corps of Engineers Garrison Dam Hydroelectric Powerplant, Riverdale, North Dakota. Report for March-September 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, D.; Buschow, R.; Smith, J.

    1995-08-01

    The report describes the results of pollution prevention opportunity assessments conducted at a representative U.S. Army Corps of Engineers civil works dam and hydroelectric power plant. Recommended methods for reducing pollution resulting primarily from the operation of these facilities are addressed.

  16. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Hydrogen, Municipal Solid Waste, Combined Heat & Power, Landfill Gas, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Anaerobic Digestion, Fuel...

  17. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Geothermal Heat Pumps, Municipal Solid Waste, Combined Heat & Power, Landfill Gas, Tidal, Wave, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric...

  18. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Combined Heat & Power, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Other Distributed Generation Technologies...

  19. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Combined Heat & Power, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Other Distributed Generation Technologies Net...

  20. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Tidal, Wave, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small) Renewable Energy Systems Exemption...

  1. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Landfill Gas, Tidal, Wave, Ocean Thermal, Yes; specific technologies not identified, Hydroelectric...

  2. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Tidal, Wave, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small) Alternative Energy and Energy...

  3. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Combined Heat & Power, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small) Net Metering Eligibility: Eligibility: Commercial,...

  4. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Biomass, Hydroelectric, Geothermal Heat Pumps, Municipal Solid Waste, Combined Heat & Power, Landfill Gas, Tidal, Wave, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Anaerobic...

  5. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Combined Heat & Power, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small) Interconnection Standards Note: The North Carolina Utilities...

  6. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Tidal, Wave, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small) Renewable Energy Systems Exemption Recognized...

  7. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Combined Heat & Power, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Other Distributed Generation Technologies Net...

  8. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Combined Heat & Power, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Other Distributed Generation Technologies...

  9. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Combined Heat & Power, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Other Distributed Generation Technologies Alternative...

  10. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Combined Heat & Power, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Other Distributed Generation Technologies Renewable...

  11. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Combined Heat & Power, Landfill Gas, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Anaerobic Digestion, Other Distributed Generation...

  12. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Combined Heat & Power, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small) Interconnection Standards Note: The North Carolina...

  13. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Landfill Gas, Tidal, Wave, Ocean Thermal, Yes; specific technologies not identified, Hydroelectric (Small),...

  14. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Tidal, Wave, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small) Alternative Energy and Energy Conservation...

  15. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Electric, Solar Thermal Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Combined Heat & Power, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric...

  16. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Utility Savings Category: Solar Thermal Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Landfill Gas, Hydroelectric (Small), Anaerobic...

  17. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01

    cycle inventory for hydroelectric generation: a BrazilianChina currently has 15 hydroelectric projects of over 1 GWonly conventional large hydroelectric generation and does

  18. America's Bottom-Up Climate Change Mitigation Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01

    large conventional hydroelectric power, municipal solidconventional large hydroelectric power). To quantify theby states that large hydroelectric is not counted toward the

  19. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for the Noxon Rapids and Cabinet Gorge Hydroelectric Projects, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bissell, Gael

    1985-04-01

    Mitigation projects for wildlife species impacted by the Noxon Rapids and Cabinet Gorge hydroelectric projects are recommended. First priority projects encompass the development of long-term wildlife management plans for WWP lands adjacent to the two reservoirs. General objectives for all WWP lands include alternatives designed to protect or enhance existing wildlife habitat. It is also suggested that WWP evaluate the current status of beaver and river otter populations occupying the reservoirs and implement indicated management. Second priority projects include the protection/enhancement of wildlife habitat on state owned or privately owned lands. Long-term wildlife management agreements would be developed with Montana School Trust lands and may involve reimbursement of revenues lost to the state. Third priority projects include the enhancement of big game winter ranges located on Kootenai National Forest lands. 1 ref., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  20. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 1, Part 1, Generator dangerous waste report, dangerous waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, weight, and waste designation.

  1. Columbia metropolitan Convention Center Columbia, South Carolina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valtorta, Marco

    at the Columbia metropolitan Convention Center Columbia, South Carolina marCh 23-25, 2011 Bringing Center 101 linColn Street Bringing Open SOurce tO the SOutheaSt Columbia, South Carolina developerS, edu team member, Rails Bringing Open SOurce tO the SOutheaSt Columbia, South Carolina POSSCON 2010 kicked

  2. Islamic Finance Bulletin Conventional Stock Markets 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meju, Max

    in Oman crude prices are re- flected in the Oman stock markets returns as it rose by about 5 percent- lar increased from oil importers, and as #12;StockMarkets Table 2: Evolution of Islamic Stock MarketsIslamic Finance Bulletin April 2012 Conventional Stock Markets 2 Islamic Stock Markets 4 Bond

  3. Waste remediation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Halas, Nancy J.; Nordlander, Peter; Neumann, Oara

    2015-12-29

    A system including a steam generation system and a chamber. The steam generation system includes a complex and the steam generation system is configured to receive water, concentrate electromagnetic (EM) radiation received from an EM radiation source, apply the EM radiation to the complex, where the complex absorbs the EM radiation to generate heat, and transform, using the heat generated by the complex, the water to steam. The chamber is configured to receive the steam and an object, wherein the object is of medical waste, medical equipment, fabric, and fecal matter.

  4. The New York Convention and the American Federal System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drahozal, Christopher R.

    2012-01-01

    This article outlines three models of the implementation of arbitration conventions in a federal system to illustrate how the U.S. might have implemented its obligations under the New York Convention Convention, and finds two of the models...

  5. Polyethylene encapsulatin of nitrate salt wastes: Waste form stability, process scale-up, and economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1991-07-01

    A polyethylene encapsulation system for treatment of low-level radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes has been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Polyethylene has several advantages compared with conventional solidification/stabilization materials such as hydraulic cements. Waste can be encapsulated with greater efficiency and with better waste form performance than is possible with hydraulic cement. The properties of polyethylene relevant to its long-term durability in storage and disposal environments are reviewed. Response to specific potential failure mechanisms including biodegradation, radiation, chemical attack, flammability, environmental stress cracking, and photodegradation are examined. These data are supported by results from extensive waste form performance testing including compressive yield strength, water immersion, thermal cycling, leachability of radioactive and hazardous species, irradiation, biodegradation, and flammability. The bench-scale process has been successfully tested for application with a number of specific problem'' waste streams. Quality assurance and performance testing of the resulting waste form confirmed scale-up feasibility. Use of this system at Rocky Flats Plant can result in over 70% fewer drums processed and shipped for disposal, compared with optimal cement formulations. Based on the current Rocky Flats production of nitrate salt per year, polyethylene encapsulation can yield an estimated annual savings between $1.5 million and $2.7 million, compared with conventional hydraulic cement systems. 72 refs., 23 figs., 16 tabs.

  6. Radioactive Waste Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1984-02-06

    To establish policies and guidelines by which the Department of Energy (DOE) manages tis radioactive waste, waste byproducts, and radioactively contaminated surplus facilities.

  7. Waste Treatment Plant Overview

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the...

  8. Salt Waste Processing Initiatives

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Patricia Suggs Salt Processing Team Lead Assistant Manager for Waste Disposition Project Office of Environmental Management Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Initiatives 2...

  9. Hanford Tank Waste Retrieval,

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tank Waste Retrieval, Treatment, and Disposition Framework September 24, 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 Hanford Tank Waste Retrieval, Treatment, and...

  10. Transuranic Waste Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09

    The guide provides criteria for determining if a waste is to be managed in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter III, Transuranic Waste Requirements.

  11. Waste-to-Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    into renewable energy, thereby enabling a national network of distributed power and biofuel production sites. Image courtesy of Iona Capital Waste-to-Energy Cycle Waste...

  12. Low Temperature Heat Release Behavior of Conventional and Alternative...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low Temperature Heat Release Behavior of Conventional and Alternative Fuels in a Motored Engine Low Temperature Heat Release Behavior of Conventional and Alternative Fuels in a...

  13. Public Comment re NOI on Convention on Supplementary Compensation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    NOI on Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Public Comment re NOI on Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage ENERGYSOLUTIONS' Comment in...

  14. Meeting Notes re NOI for Convention on Supplementary Compensation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NOPR NEI Public Comment re NOI on Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation...

  15. Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost...

  16. Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Section 934 Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation, Section 934 LES comments in response to Notice of Inquiry on Convention on...

  17. Conventional Hydropower Technologies, Wind And Water Power Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Conventional Hydropower Technologies, Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP) (Fact Sheet) Conventional Hydropower Technologies, Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP) (Fact Sheet) The US...

  18. Quantum Noise in Conventional Optical Heterodyne Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dechao He; Boya Xie; Yu Xiao; Sheng Feng

    2014-10-31

    By invoking the quantum theory of optical coherence, we theoretically show that the quantum noise in conventional optical heterodyne devices, which were previously identified as usual phase-insensitive amplifiers with additional quantum noise, is similar to that in optical homodyne devices, as verified by experimental data. Albeit more study is demanded to understand this result, it is certain that neither the uncertainty principle nor Caves's theorem for quantum noise of linear amplifiers sets a limit to the quantum noise of heterodyne devices.

  19. The Application of Traits-Based Assessment Approaches to Estimate the Effects of Hydroelectric Turbine Passage on Fish Populations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, Glenn F; Schweizer, Peter E

    2012-04-01

    One of the most important environmental issues facing the hydropower industry is the adverse impact of hydroelectric projects on downstream fish passage. Fish that migrate long distances as part of their life cycle include not only important diadromous species (such as salmon, shads, and eels) but also strictly freshwater species. The hydropower reservoirs that downstream-moving fish encounter differ greatly from free-flowing rivers. Many of the environmental changes that occur in a reservoir (altered water temperature and transparency, decreased flow velocities, increased predation) can reduce survival. Upon reaching the dam, downstream-migrating fish may suffer increased mortality as they pass through the turbines, spillways and other bypasses, or turbulent tailraces. Downstream from the dam, insufficient environmental flow releases may slow downstream fish passage rates or decrease survival. There is a need to refine our understanding of the relative importance of causative factors that contribute to turbine passage mortality (e.g., strike, pressure changes, turbulence) so that turbine design efforts can focus on mitigating the most damaging components. Further, present knowledge of the effectiveness of turbine improvements is based on studies of only a few species (mainly salmon and American shad). These data may not be representative of turbine passage effects for the hundreds of other fish species that are susceptible to downstream passage at hydroelectric projects. For example, there are over 900 species of fish in the United States. In Brazil there are an estimated 3,000 freshwater fish species, of which 30% are believed to be migratory (Viana et al. 2011). Worldwide, there are some 14,000 freshwater fish species (Magurran 2009), of which significant numbers are susceptible to hydropower impacts. By comparison, in a compilation of fish entrainment and turbine survival studies from over 100 hydroelectric projects in the United States, Winchell et al. (2000) found useful turbine passage survival data for only 30 species. Tests of advanced hydropower turbines have been limited to seven species - Chinook and coho salmon, rainbow trout, alewife, eel, smallmouth bass, and white sturgeon. We are investigating possible approaches for extending experimental results from the few tested fish species to predict turbine passage survival of other, untested species (Cada and Richmond 2011). In this report, we define the causes of injury and mortality to fish tested in laboratory and field studies, based on fish body shape and size, internal and external morphology, and physiology. We have begun to group the large numbers of unstudied species into a small number of categories, e.g., based on phylogenetic relationships or ecological similarities (guilds), so that subsequent studies of a few representative species (potentially including species-specific Biological Index Testing) would yield useful information about the overall fish community. This initial effort focused on modifying approaches that are used in the environmental toxicology field to estimate the toxicity of substances to untested species. Such techniques as the development of species sensitivity distributions (SSDs) and Interspecies Correlation Estimation (ICE) models rely on a considerable amount of data to establish the species-toxicity relationships that can be extended to other organisms. There are far fewer studies of turbine passage stresses from which to derive the turbine passage equivalent of LC{sub 50} values. Whereas the SSD and ICE approaches are useful analogues to predicting turbine passage injury and mortality, too few data are available to support their application without some form of modification or simplification. In this report we explore the potential application of a newer, related technique, the Traits-Based Assessment (TBA), to the prediction of downstream passage mortality at hydropower projects.

  20. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 4, Waste Management Facility report, Radioactive mixed waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, handling method and containment vessel, waste number, waste designation and amount of waste.

  1. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation.

  2. Comparative evaluation of network flow programming and conventional reservoir system simulation models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yerramreddy, Anilkumar

    1993-01-01

    Rights Types Multiple-Reservoir Release Rules Hydroelectric Power Operations Negative Incremental Streamflow Options Salinity Constraints 59 61 64 65 65 66 66 66 68 71 76 76 77 80 81 84 89 90 91 VI COMPARISON OF ALTERNATIVE..., hydroelectric power generated, water supply diversions and diversion shortages, and(or water quality pa- rameter values. Water resources development agencies and others responsible for planning, construction, and management of reservoir projects have applied...

  3. Measures to implement the Chemical Weapons Convention

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanzman, E.; Kellman, B.

    1999-11-05

    This seminar is another excellent opportunity for those involved in preventing chemical weapons production and use to learn from each other about how the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) can become a foundation of arms control in Africa and around the world. The author is grateful to the staff of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) for inviting him to address this distinguished seminar. The views expressed in this paper are those of the authors alone, and do not represent the position of the government of the US nor or of any other institution. In 1993, as the process of CWC ratification was beginning, concerns arose that the complexity of integrating the treaty with national law would cause each nation to implement the Convention without regard to what other nations were doing, thereby causing inconsistencies among States Parties in how the Convention would be carried out. As a result the Manual for National Implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention was prepared and presented it to each national delegation at the December 1993 meeting of the Preparatory Commission in The Hague. During its preparation, the Manual was reviewed by the Committee of Legal Experts on National Implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention, a group of distinguished international jurists, law professors, legally-trained diplomats, government officials, and Parliamentarians from every region of the world, including Mica. In February 1998, the second edition of the Manual was published in order to update it in light of developments since the CWC entered into force on 29 April 1997. The second edition 1998 clarified the national implementation options to reflect post-entry-into-force thinking, added extensive references to national implementing measures that had been enacted by various States Parties, and included a prototype national implementing statute developed by the authors to provide a starting point for those whose national implementing measures were still under development. Last month, the Web Edition of the Manual was completed. It's internet address, or URL, is http://www.cwc.anl.gov/.

  4. HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT REFERENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfree, Erik

    HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT REFERENCE GUIDE Prepared by Environment, Health and Safety Office@caltech.edu http://safety.caltech.edu #12;Hazardous Waste Management Reference Guide Page 2 of 36 TABLE OF CONTENTS Satellite Accumulation Area 9 Waste Accumulation Facility 10 HAZARDOUS WASTE CONTAINER MANAGEMENT Labeling

  5. Legal obstacles and incentives to the third development of small-scale hydroelectric potential in the six New England states: executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None,

    1980-05-01

    This executive summary describes the relationship of Federal law and regulation to state law and regulation of small-scale hydroelectric facilities. It also highlights important features of the constitutional law, statutory law, case law, and regulations of each of the six New England states. The summary may serve as a concise overview of and introduction to the detailed reports prepared by the Energy Law Institute on the legal and regulatory systems of each of the six states. The dual regulatory system is a function of the federalist nature of our government. This dual system is examined from the standpoint of the appropriate legal doctrine, i.e., the law of pre-emption, and the application of this law to the case of hydroelectric development. The regulation of small dams are discussed and flow diagrams of the regulations are presented for each of the six states - Maine, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, Vermont, and Connecticut.

  6. Waste Package Lifting Calculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. Marr

    2000-05-11

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the structural response of the waste package during the horizontal and vertical lifting operations in order to support the waste package lifting feature design. The scope of this calculation includes the evaluation of the 21 PWR UCF (pressurized water reactor uncanistered fuel) waste package, naval waste package, 5 DHLW/DOE SNF (defense high-level waste/Department of Energy spent nuclear fuel)--short waste package, and 44 BWR (boiling water reactor) UCF waste package. Procedure AP-3.12Q, Revision 0, ICN 0, calculations, is used to develop and document this calculation.

  7. Understanding radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

  8. Radioactive Waste Management Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09

    This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07.

  9. Fish Passage Assessment of an Advanced Hydropower Turbine and Conventional Turbine Using Blade-strike Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Dauble, Dennis D.; Ploskey, Gene R.

    2011-01-04

    In the Columbia and Snake River basins, several species of Pacific salmon were listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 due to significant declines of fish population. Dam operators and design engineers are thus faced with the task of making those hydroelectric facilities more ecologically friendly through changes in hydro-turbine design and operation. Public Utility District No. 2 of Grant County, Washington, applied for re-licensing from the U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to replace the 10 turbines at Wanapum Dam with advanced hydropower turbines that were designed to increase power generation and improve fish passage conditions. We applied both deterministic and stochastic blade-strike models to the newly installed turbine and an existing turbine. Modeled probabilities were compared to the results of a large-scale live fish survival study and a sensor fish study under the same operational parameters. Overall, injury rates predicted by the deterministic model were higher than experimental rates of injury while those predicted by the stochastic model were in close agreement with experiment results. Fish orientation at the time of entry into the plane of the leading edges of the turbine runner blades was an important factor contributing to uncertainty in modeled results. The advanced design turbine had slightly higher modeled injury rates than the existing turbine design; however, there was no statistical evidence that suggested significant differences in blade-strike injuries between the two turbines and the hypothesis that direct fish survival rate through the advanced hydropower turbine is equal or better than that through the conventional turbine could not be rejected.

  10. Reducing the Impacts of Hydroelectric Dams on Juvenile Anadromous Fishes: Bioengineering Evaluations Using Acoustic Imaging in the Columbia River, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hedgepeth, J.; Khan, Fenton; Mueller, Robert P.; Nagy, William T.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Weiland, Mark A.

    2008-07-29

    Dams impact the survival of juvenile anadromous fishes by obstructing migration corridors, lowering water quality, delaying migrations, and entraining fish in turbine discharge. To reduce these impacts, structural and operational modifications to dams— such as voluntary spill discharge, turbine intake guidance screens, and surface flow outlets—are instituted. Over the last six years, we have used acoustic imaging technology to evaluate the effects of these modifications on fish behavior, passage rates, entrainment zones, and fish/flow relationships at hydroelectric projects on the Columbia River. The imaging technique has evolved from studies documenting simple movement patterns to automated tracking of images to merging and analysis with concurrent hydraulic data. This chapter chronicles this evolution and shows how the information gleaned from the scientific evaluations has been applied to improve passage conditions for juvenile salmonids. We present data from Bonneville and The Dalles dams that document fish behavior and entrainment zones at sluiceway outlets (14 to 142 m3/s), fish passage rates through a gap at a turbine intake screen, and the relationship between fish swimming effort and hydraulic conditions. Dam operators and fisheries managers have applied these data to support decisions on operational and structural changes to the dams for the benefit of anadromous fish populations in the Columbia River basin.

  11. Eco-efficient waste glass recycling: Integrated waste management and green product development through LCA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blengini, Gian Andrea, E-mail: blengini@polito.it [DISPEA - Department of Production Systems and Business Economics, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); CNR-IGAG, Institute of Environmental Geology and Geo-Engineering, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Busto, Mirko, E-mail: mirko.busto@polito.it [DISPEA - Department of Production Systems and Business Economics, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Fantoni, Moris, E-mail: moris.fantoni@polito.it [DITAG - Department of Land, Environment and Geo-Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Fino, Debora, E-mail: debora.fino@polito.it [DISMIC - Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new eco-efficient recycling route for post-consumer waste glass was implemented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrated waste management and industrial production are crucial to green products. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most of the waste glass rejects are sent back to the glass industry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recovered co-products give more environmental gains than does avoided landfill. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy intensive recycling must be limited to waste that cannot be closed-loop recycled. - Abstract: As part of the EU Life + NOVEDI project, a new eco-efficient recycling route has been implemented to maximise resources and energy recovery from post-consumer waste glass, through integrated waste management and industrial production. Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been used to identify engineering solutions to sustainability during the development of green building products. The new process and the related LCA are framed within a meaningful case of industrial symbiosis, where multiple waste streams are utilised in a multi-output industrial process. The input is a mix of rejected waste glass from conventional container glass recycling and waste special glass such as monitor glass, bulbs and glass fibres. The green building product is a recycled foam glass (RFG) to be used in high efficiency thermally insulating and lightweight concrete. The environmental gains have been contrasted against induced impacts and improvements have been proposed. Recovered co-products, such as glass fragments/powders, plastics and metals, correspond to environmental gains that are higher than those related to landfill avoidance, whereas the latter is cancelled due to increased transportation distances. In accordance to an eco-efficiency principle, it has been highlighted that recourse to highly energy intensive recycling should be limited to waste that cannot be closed-loop recycled.

  12. The Chemical Weapons Convention -- Legal issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-08-01

    The Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) offers a unique challenge to the US system of constitutional law. Its promise of eliminating what is the most purely genocidal type of weapon from the world`s arsenals as well as of destroying the facilities for producing these weapons, brings with it a set of novel legal issues. The reservations about the CWC expressed by US business people are rooted in concern about safeguarding confidential business information and protecting the constitutional right to privacy. The chief worry is that international verification inspectors will misuse their power to enter commercial property and that trade secrets or other private information will be compromised as a result. It has been charged that the Convention is probably unconstitutional. The author categorically disagrees with that view and is aware of no scholarly writing that supports it. The purpose of this presentation is to show that CWC verification activities can be implemented in the US consistently with the traditional constitutional regard for commercial and individual privacy. First, he very briefly reviews the types of verification inspections that the CWC permits, as well as some of its specific privacy protections. Second, he explains how the Fourth Amendment right to privacy works in the context of CWC verification inspections. Finally, he reviews how verification inspections can be integrated into these constitutional requirements in the SU through a federal implementing statute.

  13. Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waste Management Group

    2006-01-01

    LBNL/PUB-5352, Revision 6 Waste Management QualityAssurance Plan Waste Management Group Environment, HealthRev. 6 WM QA Plan Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan

  14. Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities July 24, 2014 9:00AM to 3:30PM EDT U.S....

  15. Electronic waste disassembly with industrial waste heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    equipment for automatic dismantling of electronic componentsthe technology acceptance for dismantling of waste printedR. Research on with dismantling of PCB mounted electronic

  16. Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    oxygen demand (COD) and availability of low-grade waste heat sources. The pulp and paper industry and other industries are also potential MHRC users. Project Description This...

  17. Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    - Allentown, PA A microbial reverse electrodialysis technology will be combined with waste heat recovery to convert effluents into electricity and chemical products, including...

  18. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 1, Part 2, Generator dangerous waste report, dangerous waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This report contains information on hazardous materials at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, weight, and waste designation.

  19. Radioactive Waste Management Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09

    This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. The purpose of the Manual is to catalog those procedural requirements and existing practices that ensure that all DOE elements and contractors continue to manage DOE's radioactive waste in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety, and the environment. Does not cancel other directives.

  20. Copenhagen Waste Management and Incineration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Copenhagen Waste Management and Incineration Florence, April 24 2009 Julie B. Svendsen 24 20092 Presentation · General introduction to Copenhagen Waste Management System · National incentives · Waste Management plan 2012 · Incineration plants #12;Florence, April 24 20093 Copenhagen Waste

  1. Waste Management and WasteWaste Management and Waste--toto--EnergyEnergy Status in SingaporeStatus in Singapore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    ;20031970 The Solid Waste Challenge Waste Explosion 1,200 t/d1,200 t/d 6,900 t/d6,900 t/d #12;Waste ManagementWaste Management and WasteWaste Management and Waste--toto--EnergyEnergy Status in Singapore #12;Singapore's Waste Management · In 2003, 6877 tonnes/day (2.51 M tonnes/year) of MSW collected

  2. Hazardous Waste Management (Delaware)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The act authorizes the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environment Control (DNREC) to regulate hazardous waste and create a program to manage sources of hazardous waste. The act...

  3. Hanford Tank Waste Residuals

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Hanford Tank Waste Residuals DOE HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 Chris Kemp, DOE ORP Bill Hewitt, YAHSGS LLC Hanford Tanks & Tank Waste * Single-Shell Tanks (SSTs) - 27...

  4. Nuclear Waste Partnership, LLC

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Nuclear Waste Partnership, LLC Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Report from the Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review March 17-27, 2015 U.S. Department of...

  5. Pet Waste Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechell, Justin; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-08-28

    About 1 million pounds of dog waste is deposited daily in North Texas alone. That's why proper disposal of pet waste can make a big difference in the environment. 5 photos, 2 pages...

  6. Comparing the Performance of SunDiesel and Conventional Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Performance of SunDiesel and Conventional Diesel in a Light-Duty Vehicle and Engines Comparing the Performance of SunDiesel and Conventional Diesel in a Light-Duty Vehicle and...

  7. The Basel Convention and e-waste: Translation of scientific uncertainty to protective policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogunseitan, OA

    2013-01-01

    shipped for repair, refurbishment, resale, or humanitarian-destined for repair or refurbishment along with proof of

  8. Solid waste handling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parazin, R.J.

    1995-05-31

    This study presents estimates of the solid radioactive waste quantities that will be generated in the Separations, Low-Level Waste Vitrification and High-Level Waste Vitrification facilities, collectively called the Tank Waste Remediation System Treatment Complex, over the life of these facilities. This study then considers previous estimates from other 200 Area generators and compares alternative methods of handling (segregation, packaging, assaying, shipping, etc.).

  9. Waste disposal package

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, M.J.

    1985-06-19

    This is a claim for a waste disposal package including an inner or primary canister for containing hazardous and/or radioactive wastes. The primary canister is encapsulated by an outer or secondary barrier formed of a porous ceramic material to control ingress of water to the canister and the release rate of wastes upon breach on the canister. 4 figs.

  10. Radioactive Waste Management Basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, B K

    2009-06-03

    The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

  11. Municipal waste processing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayberry, J.L.

    1988-04-13

    This invention relates to apparatus for processing municipal waste, and more particularly to vibrating mesh screen conveyor systems for removing grit, glass, and other noncombustible materials from dry municipal waste. Municipal waste must be properly processed and disposed of so that it does not create health risks to the community. Generally, municipal waste, which may be collected in garbage trucks, dumpsters, or the like, is deposited in processing areas such as landfills. Land and environmental controls imposed on landfill operators by governmental bodies have increased in recent years, however, making landfill disposal of solid waste materials more expensive. 6 figs.

  12. Radioactive Waste Management Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09

    This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07. Admin Chg 2, dated 6-8-11, supersedes DOE M 435.1-1 Chg 1.

  13. Standard Guide for Preparing Waste Management Plans for Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This guide addresses the development of waste management plans for potential waste streams resulting from decommissioning activities at nuclear facilities, including identifying, categorizing, and handling the waste from generation to final disposal. 1.2 This guide is applicable to potential waste streams anticipated from decommissioning activities of nuclear facilities whose operations were governed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or Agreement State license, under Department of Energy (DOE) Orders, or Department of Defense (DoD) regulations. 1.3 This guide provides a description of the key elements of waste management plans that if followed will successfully allow for the characterization, packaging, transportation, and off-site treatment or disposal, or both, of conventional, hazardous, and radioactive waste streams. 1.4 This guide does not address the on-site treatment, long term storage, or on-site disposal of these potential waste streams. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address ...

  14. Mixed waste: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moghissi, A.A.; Blauvelt, R.K.; Benda, G.A.; Rothermich, N.E.

    1993-12-31

    This volume contains the peer-reviewed and edited versions of papers submitted for presentation a the Second International Mixed Waste Symposium. Following the tradition of the First International Mixed Waste Symposium, these proceedings were prepared in advance of the meeting for distribution to participants. The symposium was organized by the Mixed Waste Committee of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The topics discussed at the symposium include: stabilization technologies, alternative treatment technologies, regulatory issues, vitrification technologies, characterization of wastes, thermal technologies, laboratory and analytical issues, waste storage and disposal, organic treatment technologies, waste minimization, packaging and transportation, treatment of mercury contaminated wastes and bioprocessing, and environmental restoration. Individual abstracts are catalogued separately for the data base.

  15. Falls Creek Hydroelectric Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavus Electric Company; Richard Levitt; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

    2007-06-12

    This project was for planning and construction of a 700kW hydropower project on the Fall River near Gustavus, Alaska.

  16. Transuranic (TRU) Waste | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Defined by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act as "waste containing more than 100 nanocuries of alpha-emitting...

  17. Solid Waste Management Plan. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-26

    The waste types discussed in this Solid Waste Management Plan are Municipal Solid Waste, Hazardous Waste, Low-Level Mixed Waste, Low-Level Radioactive Waste, and Transuranic Waste. The plan describes for each type of solid waste, the existing waste management facilities, the issues, and the assumptions used to develop the current management plan.

  18. Ferrocyanide tank waste stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, K.D.

    1993-01-01

    Ferrocyanide wastes were generated at the Hanford Site during the mid to late 1950s as a result of efforts to create more tank space for the storage of high-level nuclear waste. The ferrocyanide process was developed to remove [sup 137]CS from existing waste and newly generated waste that resulted from the recovery of valuable uranium in Hanford Site waste tanks. During the course of research associated with the ferrocyanide process, it was recognized that ferrocyanide materials, when mixed with sodium nitrate and/or sodium nitrite, were capable of violent exothermic reaction. This chemical reactivity became an issue in the 1980s, when safety issues associated with the storage of ferrocyanide wastes in Hanford Site tanks became prominent. These safety issues heightened in the late 1980s and led to the current scrutiny of the safety issues associated with these wastes, as well as current research and waste management programs. Testing to provide information on the nature of possible tank reactions is ongoing. This document supplements the information presented in Summary of Single-Shell Tank Waste Stability, WHC-EP-0347, March 1991 (Borsheim and Kirch 1991), which evaluated several issues. This supplement only considers information particular to ferrocyanide wastes.

  19. www.d-waste.com info@d-waste.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    management data available". According to David Newman, president of the International Solid Waste Association collection services, according to the first global survey of waste management. The Waste Atlas 2013 Report marketplace, about 47 grams of waste is produced-- with worldwide municipal solid waste generation totaling

  20. Waste Disposal Guide HOW TO PROPERLY DISPOSE OF WASTE MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaefer, Marcus

    of Containers p.8 o E. Disposal of Empty Containers p.8 o F. Storage of Waste Chemicals p.8,9 o G. Chemical Compatibility p.9 Radioactive Waste Disposal p.10 Bio Hazard Waste chemical and radioactive waste, and Biohazardous waste. This document contains university procedures

  1. 8-Waste treatment and disposal A. Responsibility for waste management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    8- Waste treatment and disposal A. Responsibility for waste management 1. Each worker is responsible for correctly bagging and labeling his/her own waste. 2. A BSL3 technician will be responsible for transporting and autoclaving the waste. Waste will be autoclaved once or twice per day, depending on use

  2. The Effect of CO2 Pricing on Conventional and Non- Conventional Oil Supply and Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Méjean, Aurélie; Hope, Chris

    demand modelling Meling (StatoilHydro) 1.6%/year No detailed demand modelling Total 1.4%/year No detailed demand modelling Exxon Mobil 1.4%/year Detailed demand modelling Energyfiles 1.8%/year Demand not modelled, exogenous rate Adapted from (UKERC... of unconventional oil and gas) “By 2015, growth in the production of easily accessible oil and gas will not match the projected rate of demand growth.” UKERC (2009b p33) ExxonMobil 2008 101 in 2030 (excl. non-conventional oil) No peak before 2030 UKERC...

  3. Underground waste barrier structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saha, Anuj J. (Hamburg, NY); Grant, David C. (Gibsonia, PA)

    1988-01-01

    Disclosed is an underground waste barrier structure that consists of waste material, a first container formed of activated carbonaceous material enclosing the waste material, a second container formed of zeolite enclosing the first container, and clay covering the second container. The underground waste barrier structure is constructed by forming a recessed area within the earth, lining the recessed area with a layer of clay, lining the clay with a layer of zeolite, lining the zeolite with a layer of activated carbonaceous material, placing the waste material within the lined recessed area, forming a ceiling over the waste material of a layer of activated carbonaceous material, a layer of zeolite, and a layer of clay, the layers in the ceiling cojoining with the respective layers forming the walls of the structure, and finally, covering the ceiling with earth.

  4. CARD No. 24 Waste Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CARD No. 24 Waste Characterization 24.A.1 BACKGROUND DOE must provide waste inventory information Report (TWBIR), Revisions 2 and 3, which provides waste characterization information specific to DOE solidified waste forms was included. Waste described in TWBIR Revision 3 was primarily characterized through

  5. Operational Waste Volume Projection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STRODE, J.N.

    2000-08-28

    Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of June. 2000.

  6. Operational Waste Volume Projection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STRODE, J.N.

    1999-08-24

    Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2018 are projected based on assumption as of July 1999. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement.

  7. Table 32. Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 Table 32. Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Cents per Gallon...

  8. Public comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation on...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Damage Contingent Cost Allocation; Section 934 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 Public comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation on Nuclear Damage...

  9. Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    issued proposed regulations under section 934 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. FR CSC NOPR More Documents & Publications Convention on Supplementary...

  10. The United States Ratifies The Convention On Supplementary Compensatio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of ratification for the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC) with the Director-General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The...

  11. DOE Notice of Inquiry on the Convention on Supplementary Compensation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Inquiry on the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC) Contingent Cost Allocation - March 2, 2011 Meeting with CIGNL DOE Notice of Inquiry on the...

  12. Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    is extended to October 27, 2010. Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation More Documents & Publications CSCExtension.PDF...

  13. DOE Notice of Inquiry on the Convention on Supplementary Compensation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the DOE Notice of Inquiry on the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC) Contingent Cost Allocation. 75 Fed. Reg. 43945 (Jul. 27, 2010). This summary of...

  14. Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah Michael Vanden Berg; Paul Anderson; Janae Wallace;...

  15. Characterizing Structural Controls of EGS Candidate and Conventional...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Structural Controls of EGS Candidate and Conventional Geothermal Reservoirs in the Great Basin: Developing Successful Exploration Strategies in Extended Terranes Characterizing...

  16. Table 32. Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 Table 32. Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) -...

  17. Current Status of the high enthalpy conventional geothermal fields...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Current Status of the high enthalpy conventional geothermal fields in Europe and the potential perspectives for their exploitation in terms of EGS Jump to: navigation, search...

  18. Waste Heat Recovery

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DRAFT - PRE-DECISIONAL - DRAFT 1 Waste Heat Recovery 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the TechnologySystem ......

  19. Norcal Waste Systems, Inc.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-12-01

    Fact sheet describes the LNG long-haul heavy-duty trucks at Norcal Waste Systems Inc.'s Sanitary Fill Company.

  20. Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Department of Environmental...

  1. Solid Waste Management (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Indiana Department of...

  2. HLW Glass Waste Loadings

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    HLW Glass Waste Loadings Ian L. Pegg Vitreous State Laboratory The Catholic University of America Washington, DC Overview Overview Vitrification - general background Joule...

  3. Waste Confidence Discussion

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Long-Term Waste Confidence Update Christine Pineda Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission National Transportation Stakeholders Forum...

  4. Vitrification of waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

    1999-01-01

    A method for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300.degree. C. to 800.degree. C. to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100.degree. C. to 1400.degree. C. at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

  5. Vitrification of waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wicks, G.G.

    1999-04-06

    A method is described for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300 C to 800 C to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100 C to 1400 C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

  6. WASTE PACKAGE TRANSPORTER DESIGN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.C. Weddle; R. Novotny; J. Cron

    1998-09-23

    The purpose of this Design Analysis is to develop preliminary design of the waste package transporter used for waste package (WP) transport and related functions in the subsurface repository. This analysis refines the conceptual design that was started in Phase I of the Viability Assessment. This analysis supports the development of a reliable emplacement concept and a retrieval concept for license application design. The scope of this analysis includes the following activities: (1) Assess features of the transporter design and evaluate alternative design solutions for mechanical components. (2) Develop mechanical equipment details for the transporter. (3) Prepare a preliminary structural evaluation for the transporter. (4) Identify and recommend the equipment design for waste package transport and related functions. (5) Investigate transport equipment interface tolerances. This analysis supports the development of the waste package transporter for the transport, emplacement, and retrieval of packaged radioactive waste forms in the subsurface repository. Once the waste containers are closed and accepted, the packaged radioactive waste forms are termed waste packages (WP). This terminology was finalized as this analysis neared completion; therefore, the term disposal container is used in several references (i.e., the System Description Document (SDD)) (Ref. 5.6). In this analysis and the applicable reference documents, the term ''disposal container'' is synonymous with ''waste package''.

  7. Secondary Waste Cast Stone Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2012-09-26

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Cast Stone – a cementitious waste form, has been selected for solidification of this secondary waste stream after treatment in the ETF. The secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. This secondary waste Cast Stone waste form qualification testing plan outlines the testing of the waste form and immobilization process to demonstrate that the Cast Stone waste form can comply with the disposal requirements. Specifications for the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form have not been established. For this testing plan, Cast Stone specifications are derived from specifications for the immobilized LAW glass in the WTP contract, the waste acceptance criteria for the IDF, and the waste acceptance criteria in the IDF Permit issued by the State of Washington. This testing plan outlines the testing needed to demonstrate that the waste form can comply with these waste form specifications and acceptance criteria. The testing program must also demonstrate that the immobilization process can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. This testing plan also outlines the testing needed to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support performance assessment analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form in the IDF

  8. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Nitrate Salt Bearing Waste Container...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    LLC. The Order, at paragraph 22, requires the Permittees to submit a WIPP Nitrate Salt Bearing Waste Container Isolation Plan for identified nitrate salt bearing waste...

  9. Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act provides for planning for the processing and disposal of municipal waste; requires counties to submit plans for municipal waste management systems within their boundaries; authorizes...

  10. Report: EM Tank Waste Subcommittee Full Report for Waste Treatment...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    meeting, enclosed please find the Environmental Management Advisory Board EM Tank Waste Subcommittee Report for Waste Treatment Plant; Report Number EMAB EM-TWS WTP-001,...

  11. Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    6 Technology Readiness Assessment for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW Waste Vitrification Facility L. Holton D. Alexander C. Babel H. Sutter J. Young August...

  12. Waste Loading Enhancements for Hanford Low-Activity Waste Glasses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WASTE LOADING ENHANCEMENTS FOR HANFORD LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE GLASSES Albert A. Kruger, Glass Scientist DOE-WTP Project Office Engineering Division US Department of Energy Richland,...

  13. Virginia Waste Management Act (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solid waste and hazardous waste are regulated under a number of programs at the Department of Environmental Quality. These programs are designed to encourage the reuse and recycling of solid waste...

  14. HAZARDOUS WASTE LABEL DEPAUL UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaefer, Marcus

    HAZARDOUS WASTE LABEL DEPAUL UNIVERSITY ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY 5-4170 Corrosive Non- Hazardous Ignitable Reactive Toxic Oxidizer Other ( explain ) Generator Building Dept. HAZARDOUS WASTE LABEL DEPAUL UNIVERSITY ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY 5-4170 HAZARDOUS WASTE LABEL DEPAUL UNIVERSITY

  15. Predicting Emerging Social Conventions in Online Social Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gummadi, Krishna P.

    of massive social movements [34]. They guide everyday behaviors of the general public [1] as well as thosePredicting Emerging Social Conventions in Online Social Networks Farshad Kooti MPI-SWS farshad@mpi-sws.org Meeyoung Cha KAIST meeyoungcha@kaist.edu ABSTRACT The way in which social conventions emerge in communities

  16. PROCEEDINGS, INDONESIAN PETROLEUM ASSOCIATION Annual Convention & Exhibition, October 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royal Holloway, University of London

    , Indonesia. Proceedings of the Indonesian Petroleum Association 27th Annual Convention, 487-493. #121 PROCEEDINGS, INDONESIAN PETROLEUM ASSOCIATION 27th Annual Convention & Exhibition, October 1999 NEOGENE HISTORY OF COLLISION IN THE HALMAHERA REGION, INDONESIA Robert Hall SE Asia Research Group

  17. Nematode Communities in Organically and Conventionally Managed Agricultural Soils1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    Nematode Communities in Organically and Conventionally Managed Agricultural Soils1 Deborah A. Neher organically and conventionally managed soils in the Piedmont region of North Carolina. Available nitrogen availability. Soils were sampled six times yearly in 1993 and 1994 to determine the best time of year to sample

  18. Waste Specification Records - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Specification Records About Us Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Program What's New Acceptance Criteria Acceptance Process Becoming a new Hanford Customer Annual Waste Forecast...

  19. Hazardous Waste Management (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The New Mexico Environment Department's Hazardous Waste Bureau is responsible for the management of hazardous waste in the state. The Bureau enforces the rules established by the Environmental...

  20. Solid Waste Management (North Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Solid Waste Program regulates safe management of solid waste through guidance, technical assistance, regulations, permitting, environmental monitoring, compliance evaluation and enforcement....

  1. Solid Waste Management (South Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute contains provisions for solid waste management systems, groundwater monitoring, liability for pollution, permitting, inspections, and provisions for waste reduction and recycling...

  2. Attachment C ? Waste Analysis Plan

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    PLAN 1 Los Alamos National Laboratory Hazardous Waste Permit December 2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF TABLES 2 WASTE ANALYSIS PLAN......

  3. Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waste Management Group

    2006-01-01

    Waste Management group organization chart. Revised to updatecurrent practices. New organization chart, roles, andManagement Group organization chart. EH&S Waste Management

  4. Radioactive waste disposal package

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lampe, Robert F. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1986-01-01

    A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

  5. Waste Description Pounds Reduced,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,320 $5,817 Installation of motion detector lighting in common areas of Buildings 490 and 463. "Bio Circle Cleaner" parts washer Substitution 640 Hazardous waste $10,000 $4,461 $10,000 Eliminates the need disposal system Recycling 528 Hazardous waste $12,000 $0 $12,000 Empty aerosol cans are recycled as scrap

  6. Hazardous Waste Management Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Pengcheng

    Hazardous Waste Management Training Persons (including faculty, staff and students) working with hazardous materials should receive annual training that addresses storage, use, and disposal of hazardous before handling hazardous waste. Departments are re- quired to keep records of training for as long

  7. Nuclear waste solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walker, Darrel D. (1684 Partridge Dr., Aiken, SC 29801); Ebra, Martha A. (129 Hasty Rd., Aiken, SC 29801)

    1987-01-01

    High efficiency removal of technetium values from a nuclear waste stream is achieved by addition to the waste stream of a precipitant contributing tetraphenylphosphonium cation, such that a substantial portion of the technetium values are precipitated as an insoluble pertechnetate salt.

  8. Radioactive waste storage issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunz, D.E.

    1994-08-15

    In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state`s boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected.

  9. Managing America's solid waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, J. A.

    1998-09-15

    This report presents an historical overview of the federal role in municipal solid waste management from 1965 to approximately 1995. Attention is focuses on the federal role in safeguarding public health, protecting the environment, and wisely using material and energy resources. It is hoped that this report will provide important background for future municipal solid waste research and development initiatives.

  10. Improving medical waste disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connor, L.

    1994-05-01

    This article describes the use of electron-beam irradiation, steam detoxification, and microwave disinfection systems rather than incineration to rid the waste stream of medical scraps. The topics of the article include biological waste stream sources and amounts, pyrolysis and oxidation, exhaust gas cleanup, superheated steam sterilization and detoxification.

  11. Vitrification of NORM wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, C.

    1994-05-01

    Vitrification of wastes is a relatively new application of none of man`s oldest manufacturing processes. During the past 25 years it has been developed and accepted internationally for immobilizing the most highly radioactive wastes from spent nuclear fuel. By the year 2005, there will be nine operating high-level radioactive vitrification plants. Many of the technical ``lessons learned`` from this international program can be applied to much less hazardous materials such as naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). With the deployment of low capital and operating cost systems, vitrification should become a broadly applied process for treating a large variety of wastes. In many situations, the wastes can be transformed into marketable products. This paper will present a general description of waste vitrification, summarize some of its key advantages, provide some test data for a small sample of one NORM, and suggest how this process may be applied to NORM.

  12. AVLIS production plant waste management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-11-15

    Following the executive summary, this document contains the following: (1) waste management facilities design objectives; (2) AVLIS production plant wastes; (3) waste management design criteria; (4) waste management plan description; and (5) waste management plan implementation. 17 figures, 18 tables.

  13. Waste Management & Research290 Waste Manage Res 2002: 20: 290301

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Waste Management & Research290 Waste Manage Res 2002: 20: 290­301 Printed in UK ­ all rights reserved Copyright © ISWA 2002 Waste Management & Research ISSN 0734­242X Introduction Chromated copper of sorting technologies for CCA treated wood waste Monika Blassino Helena Solo-Gabriele University of Miami

  14. The Management of the Radioactive Waste Generated by Cernavoda NPP, Romania, an Example of International Cooperation - 13449

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barariu, Gheorghe

    2013-07-01

    The design criteria and constraints for the development of the management strategy for radioactive waste generated from operating and decommissioning of CANDU Nuclear Units from Cernavoda NPP in Romania, present many specific aspects. The main characteristics of CANDU type waste are its high concentrations of tritium and radiocarbon. Also, the existing management strategy for radioactive waste at Cernavoda NPP provides no treatment or conditioning for radioactive waste disposal. These characteristics embodied a challenging effort, in order to select a proper strategy for radioactive waste management at present, when Romania is an EU member and a signatory country of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management. The helping of advanced countries in radioactive waste management, directly or into the frame of the international organizations, like IAEA, become solve the aforementioned challenges at adequate level. (authors)

  15. Radioactive waste material disposal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1995-10-24

    The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide. 3 figs.

  16. Radioactive waste material disposal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles W. (155 Newport Dr., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Beahm, Edward C. (106 Cooper Cir., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Parker, George W. (321 Dominion Cir., Knoxville, TN 37922)

    1995-01-01

    The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide.

  17. Specifying Waste Heat Boilers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganapathy, V.

    1992-01-01

    HEAT BOILERS V.Ganapathy.ABCO Industries Abilene,Texas ABSTRACT Waste heat boilers or Heat Recovery Steam 'Generators(HRSGs) as they are often called are used to recover energy from waste gas streams in chemical plants, refineries... stream_source_info ESL-IE-92-04-42.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 11937 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ESL-IE-92-04-42.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 SPECIFYING WASTE...

  18. Plasma destruction of North Carolina`s hazardous waste based on hazardous waste generated between the years of 1989 and 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, D.L.

    1994-12-31

    The purpose of this research is to analyze the applicability of the plasma waste destruction technology to North Carolina hazardous waste streams. This study outlines the current regulations, existing technologies, and innovative technologies being considered as hazardous waste treatment alternatives. From this foundation, the study proceeds to identify the superiority of the plasma waste destruction technology. Specific areas of discussion include: temperature capabilities, waste residence time requirements, destruction removal efficiencies, operational efficiencies, economic issues, safety, and maintenance. This study finds the plasma destruction technology to be fully effective and superior to conventional facilities. The technology completely destroys hydrocarbons and can reduce the volume of many other hazardous wastes on the order of one part per million. The required residence time of waste in a plasma facility for effective destruction is a fraction of a second, while the rotary kiln incinerator maintains an average residence time of approximately 5 seconds. Also mass and heat balance calculations are performed to quantify the effectiveness and efficiency of this technology. It is found that one day`s average amount of hazardous waste generated in the state of North Carolina can be destroyed in approximately thirty seconds using a standard one megawatt power source. Yet, before this technology is adopted as North Carolina`s primary hazardous waste destruction technology, further study is needed so that all issues considered in this research can be conducted in great detail.

  19. INTERSTATE WASTE TECHNOLOGIES THERMOSELECT TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    1 INTERSTATE WASTE TECHNOLOGIES THERMOSELECT TECHNOLOGY AN OVERVIEW Presented to the DELAWARE SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT TECHNICAL WORKING GROUP January 10, 2006 #12;2 INTERSTATE WASTE MANAGEMENT ALLIANCE and maintenance (30 years) ­ Will guarantee performance and Operation and Maintenance ­ Serves solid waste

  20. Methane generation from waste materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Samani, Zohrab A. (Las Cruces, NM); Hanson, Adrian T. (Las Cruces, NM); Macias-Corral, Maritza (Las Cruces, NM)

    2010-03-23

    An organic solid waste digester for producing methane from solid waste, the digester comprising a reactor vessel for holding solid waste, a sprinkler system for distributing water, bacteria, and nutrients over and through the solid waste, and a drainage system for capturing leachate that is then recirculated through the sprinkler system.

  1. Generating power with waste wood

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkins, R.S.

    1995-02-01

    Among the biomass renewables, waste wood has great potential with environmental and economic benefits highlighting its resume. The topics of this article include alternate waste wood fuel streams; combustion benefits; waste wood comparisons; waste wood ash; pilot scale tests; full-scale test data; permitting difficulties; and future needs.

  2. Contained recovery of oily waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jr., Lyle A. (Laramie, WY); Sudduth, Bruce C. (Laramie, WY)

    1989-01-01

    A method is provided for recovering oily waste from oily waste accumulations underground comprising sweeping the oily waste accumulation with hot water to recover said oily waste, wherein said area treated is isolated from surrounding groundwater hydraulically. The hot water may be reinjected after the hot-water displacement or may be treated to conform to any discharge requirements.

  3. Full-scale retrieval of simulated buried transuranic waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valentich, D.J. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1993-09-01

    This report describes the results of a field test conducted to determine the effectiveness of using conventional type construction equipment for the retrieval of buried transuranic (TRU) waste. A cold (nonhazardous and nonradioactive) test pit (1,100 yd{sup 3} volume) was constructed with boxes and drums filled with simulated waste materials, such as metal, plastic, wood, concrete, and sludge. Large objects, including truck beds, tanks, vaults, pipes, and beams, were also placed in the pit. These materials were intended to simulate the type of wastes found in TRU buried waste pits and trenches. A series of commercially available equipment items, such as excavators and tracked loaders outfitted with different end effectors, were used to remove the simulated waste. Work was performed from both the abovegrade and belowgrade positions. During the demonstration, a number of observations, measurements, and analyses were performed to determine which equipment was the most effective in removing the waste. The retrieval rates for the various excavation techniques were recorded. The inherent dust control capabilities of the excavation methods used were observed. The feasibility of teleoperating reading equipment was also addressed.

  4. Actors, coalitions and the framework convention on climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sewell, Granville C

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the political processes through which the Framework Convention on Climate Change was negotiated and the initial efforts of the United States, the Netherlands, and Japan to adopt national policies and ...

  5. Fact #880: July 6, 2015 Conventional Vehicle Energy Use: Where...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Go? Not all of the fuel that is put into a car's fuel tank is used to move the car down the road. In fact, only 14-30% of the energy put into a conventional car is used...

  6. Fact #648: November 8, 2010 Conventional and Alternative Fuel Prices

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Department of Energy's Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report is a quarterly report that tracks prices for conventional and alternative fuels in the U.S. The graph below shows the...

  7. Comparison of Conventional Diesel and Reactivity Controlled Compressio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in a Light-Duty Engine CFD modeling was used to compare conventional diesel and dual-fuel Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition combustion at US Tier 2 Bin 5 NOx...

  8. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    This appendix provides information on fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) technology as it has been applied to municipal waste combustion (MWC). A review of the literature was conducted to determine: (1) to what extent FBC technology has been applied to MWC, in terms of number and size of units was well as technology configuration; (2) the operating history of facilities employing FBC technology; and (3) the cost of these facilities as compared to conventional MSW installations. Where available in the literature, data on operating and performance characteristics are presented. Tabular comparisons of facility operating/cost data and emissions data have been complied and are presented. The literature review shows that FBC technology shows considerable promise in terms of providing improvements over conventional technology in areas such as NOx and acid gas control, and ash leachability. In addition, the most likely configuration to be applied to the first large scale FBC dedicated to municipal solid waste (MSW) will employ circulating bed (CFB) technology. Projected capital costs for the Robbins, Illinois 1600 ton per day CFB-based waste-to-energy facility are competitive with conventional systems, in the range of $125,000 per ton per day of MSW receiving capacity.

  9. A Rigging Convention for Isosurface-Based Characters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davalath, Megha Nataraj

    2011-08-08

    CONVENTION FOR ISOSURFACE-BASED CHARACTERS A Thesis by MEGHA NATARAJ DAVALATH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2011 Major Subject...: Visualization A RIGGING CONVENTION FOR ISOSURFACE-BASED CHARACTERS A Thesis by MEGHA NATARAJ DAVALATH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE...

  10. Solid Waste Management (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act aims to establish and maintain a cooperative state and local program of planning and technical and financial assistance for comprehensive solid waste management. No person shall construct,...

  11. Waste Steam Recovery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    An examination has been made of the recovery of waste steam by three techniques: direct heat exchange to process, mechanical compression, and thermocompression. Near atmospheric steam sources were considered, but the techniques developed are equally...

  12. Waste and Recycling

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McCarthy, Kathy

    2013-05-28

    Nuclear engineer Dr. Kathy McCarthy talks about nuclear energy, the challenge of nuclear waste and the research aimed at solutions. For more information about nuclear energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  13. Adoption of waste minimization technology to benefit electroplaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ching, E.M.K.; Li, C.P.H.; Yu, C.M.K. [Hong Kong Productivity Council, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    1996-12-31

    Because of increasingly stringent environmental legislation and enhanced environmental awareness, electroplaters in Hong Kong are paying more heed to protect the environment. To comply with the array of environmental controls, electroplaters can no longer rely solely on the end-of-pipe approach as a means for abating their pollution problems under the particular local industrial environment. The preferred approach is to adopt waste minimization measures that yield both economic and environmental benefits. This paper gives an overview of electroplating activities in Hong Kong, highlights their characteristics, and describes the pollution problems associated with conventional electroplating operations. The constraints of using pollution control measures to achieve regulatory compliance are also discussed. Examples and case studies are given on some low-cost waste minimization techniques readily available to electroplaters, including dragout minimization and water conservation techniques. Recommendations are given as to how electroplaters can adopt and exercise waste minimization techniques in their operations. 1 tab.

  14. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report. Volume 1, Part 2, Generator dangerous waste report dangerous waste: Calendar Year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, weight, waste description, and waste designation.

  15. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report. Volume 1, Part 1, Generator dangerous waste report dangerous waste: Calendar Year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, weight, waste description, and waste designation.

  16. Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities Project Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnema, Bruce Edward

    2001-09-01

    This feasibility study report presents a draft design of the Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility (VWISF), which is one of three subprojects of the Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities (IWVF) project. The primary goal of the IWVF project is to design and construct a treatment process system that will vitrify the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) to a final waste form. The project will consist of three subprojects that include the Waste Collection Tanks Facility, the Waste Vitrification Facility (WVF), and the VWISF. The Waste Collection Tanks Facility will provide for waste collection, feed mixing, and surge storage for SBW and newly generated liquid waste from ongoing operations at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The WVF will contain the vitrification process that will mix the waste with glass-forming chemicals or frit and turn the waste into glass. The VWISF will provide a shielded storage facility for the glass until the waste can be disposed at either the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as mixed transuranic waste or at the future national geological repository as high-level waste glass, pending the outcome of a Waste Incidental to Reprocessing determination, which is currently in progress. A secondary goal is to provide a facility that can be easily modified later to accommodate storage of the vitrified high-level waste calcine. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of the VWISF, which would be constructed in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local laws. This project supports the Department of Energy’s Environmental Management missions of safely storing and treating radioactive wastes as well as meeting Federal Facility Compliance commitments made to the State of Idaho.

  17. Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2015 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - October 2013 Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility...

  18. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2013 More Documents & Publications Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Analytical Laboratory...

  19. Hazardous waste sites and housing appreciation rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCluskey, Jill; Rausser, Gordon C.

    2000-01-01

    WORKING PAPER NO. 906 HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES AND HOUSINGEconomics January 2000 Hazardous Waste Sites and Housingand RF. Anderson, Hazardous waste sites: the credibility

  20. Savannah River Site Waste Disposition Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Terrel J. Spears Assistant Manager Waste Disposition Project DOE Savannah River Operations Office Savannah River Site Savannah River Site Waste Disposition Project Waste...

  1. EIS-0200: Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    00: Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste EIS-0200: Waste Management...

  2. Biochar: A Solution to Oakland's Green Waste?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villar, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    as an alternative waste management solution. Biochar is asequestration and alternative green waste management. For5 years, Alameda County Waste Management’s (WM) residential

  3. EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    & Transportation EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation DOE's Radioactive Waste Management Priorities: Continue to manage waste inventories in a safe and compliant...

  4. SECONDARY WASTE MANAGEMENT STRATEGY FOR EARLY LOW ACTIVITY WASTE TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CRAWFORD TW

    2008-07-17

    This study evaluates parameters relevant to River Protection Project secondary waste streams generated during Early Low Activity Waste operations and recommends a strategy for secondary waste management that considers groundwater impact, cost, and programmatic risk. The recommended strategy for managing River Protection Project secondary waste is focused on improvements in the Effiuent Treatment Facility. Baseline plans to build a Solidification Treatment Unit adjacent to Effluent Treatment Facility should be enhanced to improve solid waste performance and mitigate corrosion of tanks and piping supporting the Effiuent Treatment Facility evaporator. This approach provides a life-cycle benefit to solid waste performance and reduction of groundwater contaminants.

  5. This document details how to manage hazardous waste with multiple hazards. Waste Management Procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    This document details how to manage hazardous waste with multiple hazards. Waste Management Procedures · Always manage hazardous waste as the highest ranked waste in the hazardous waste hierarchy Waste Solids Place in solid radioactive waste box. Radioactive Waste Liquids Place in liquid radioactive

  6. Waste Treatment Plant - 12508

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harp, Benton; Olds, Erik

    2012-07-01

    The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will immobilize millions of gallons of Hanford's tank waste into solid glass using a proven technology called vitrification. The vitrification process will turn the waste into a stable glass form that is safe for long-term storage. Our discussion of the WTP will include a description of the ongoing design and construction of this large, complex, first-of-a-kind project. The concept for the operation of the WTP is to separate high-level and low-activity waste fractions, and immobilize those fractions in glass using vitrification. The WTP includes four major nuclear facilities and various support facilities. Waste from the Tank Farms is first pumped to the Pretreatment Facility at the WTP through an underground pipe-in-pipe system. When construction is complete, the Pretreatment Facility will be 12 stories high, 540 feet long and 215 feet wide, making it the largest of the four major nuclear facilities that compose the WTP. The total size of this facility will be more than 490,000 square feet. More than 8.2 million craft hours are required to construct this facility. Currently, the Pretreatment Facility is 51 percent complete. At the Pretreatment Facility the waste is pumped to the interior waste feed receipt vessels. Each of these four vessels is 55-feet tall and has a 375,000 gallon capacity, which makes them the largest vessels inside the Pretreatment Facility. These vessels contain a series of internal pulse-jet mixers to keep incoming waste properly mixed. The vessels are inside the black-cell areas, completely enclosed behind thick steel-laced, high strength concrete walls. The black cells are designed to be maintenance free with no moving parts. Once hot operations commence the black-cell area will be inaccessible. Surrounded by black cells, is the 'hot cell canyon'. The hot cell contains all the moving and replaceable components to remove solids and extract liquids. In this area, there is ultrafiltration equipment, cesium-ion exchange columns, evaporator boilers and recirculation pumps, and various mechanical process pumps for transferring process fluids. During the first phase of pretreatment, the waste will be concentrated using an evaporation process. Solids will be filtered out, and the remaining soluble, highly radioactive isotopes will be removed using an ion-exchange process. The high-level solids will be sent to the High-Level Waste (HLW) Vitrification Facility, and the low activity liquids will be sent to the Low-Activity Waste (LAW) Vitrification Facility for further processing. The high-level waste will be transferred via underground pipes to the HLW Facility from the Pretreatment Facility. The waste first arrives at the wet cell, which rests inside a black-cell area. The pretreated waste is transferred through shielded pipes into a series of melter preparation and feed vessels before reaching the melters. Liquids from various facility processes also return to the wet cell for interim storage before recycling back to the Pretreatment Facility. (authors)

  7. Mixed waste characterization reference document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    Waste characterization and monitoring are major activities in the management of waste from generation through storage and treatment to disposal. Adequate waste characterization is necessary to ensure safe storage, selection of appropriate and effective treatment, and adherence to disposal standards. For some wastes characterization objectives can be difficult and costly to achieve. The purpose of this document is to evaluate costs of characterizing one such waste type, mixed (hazardous and radioactive) waste. For the purpose of this document, waste characterization includes treatment system monitoring, where monitoring is a supplement or substitute for waste characterization. This document establishes a cost baseline for mixed waste characterization and treatment system monitoring requirements from which to evaluate alternatives. The cost baseline established as part of this work includes costs for a thermal treatment technology (i.e., a rotary kiln incinerator), a nonthermal treatment process (i.e., waste sorting, macronencapsulation, and catalytic wet oxidation), and no treatment (i.e., disposal of waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)). The analysis of improvement over the baseline includes assessment of promising areas for technology development in front-end waste characterization, process equipment, off gas controls, and monitoring. Based on this assessment, an ideal characterization and monitoring configuration is described that minimizes costs and optimizes resources required for waste characterization.

  8. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Biomass, Hydroelectric, Hydrogen, Geothermal Heat Pumps, Municipal Solid Waste, Combined Heat & Power, Landfill Gas, Solar Pool Heating, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small),...

  9. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Tidal, Wave, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small) Net Metering NOTE: In Feb 2014, the PUC proposed...

  10. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Tidal, Wave, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small) Net Metering In Delaware, net metering is available to any...

  11. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Tidal, Wave, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small) Net Metering In Delaware, net metering is available to any customer that generates...

  12. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Combined Heat & Power, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small) Energy Efficiency Standards for State Buildings...

  13. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Tidal, Wave, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small) NV Energy- RenewableGenerations Rebate...

  14. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Tidal, Wave, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small) Renewable Energy Systems Property Tax...

  15. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Landfill Gas, Tidal, Wave, Ocean Thermal, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Anaerobic Digestion, Fuel...

  16. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Tidal, Wave, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small) Energy Conversion and Thermal Efficiency...

  17. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Tidal, Wave, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small) Renewable Energy Systems Tax Credit...

  18. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Tidal, Wave, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small) Sustainable Energy Trust Fund The SETF is...

  19. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Tidal, Wave, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small) State Energy Loan Program The program...

  20. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Tidal, Wave, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small) Energy Trust of Oregon Of the funds...

  1. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Tidal, Wave, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small) Dollar and Energy Savings Loans Renewable...

  2. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Tidal, Wave, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small) Renewable Energy Property Tax Exemption...

  3. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Biomass, Hydroelectric, Geothermal Heat Pumps, Municipal Solid Waste, Combined Heat & Power, Landfill Gas, Tidal, Wave, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Anaerobic Digestion,...

  4. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Tidal, Wave, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small) Solar and Wind Energy Credit (Corporate)...

  5. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Geothermal Heat Pumps, Municipal Solid Waste, Combined Heat & Power, Landfill Gas, Tidal, Wave, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Anaerobic...

  6. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Combined Heat & Power, Fuel Cells using Non-Renewable Fuels, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Anaerobic...

  7. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Tidal, Wave, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small) Renewable Portfolio Standard NOTE: NYSERDA has...

  8. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Tidal, Wave, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small) Renewable Energy Systems Tax Credit (Personal)...

  9. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Tidal, Wave, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small) NV Energy- RenewableGenerations Rebate Program...

  10. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Tidal, Wave, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small) Energy Trust of Oregon Of the funds collected by...

  11. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Tidal, Wave, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small) Energy Conversion and Thermal Efficiency Sales...

  12. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Landfill Gas, Tidal, Wave, Ocean Thermal, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Anaerobic Digestion, Fuel Cells...

  13. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Tidal, Wave, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small) Connecticut Clean Energy Fund Connecticut's 1998...

  14. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Tidal, Wave, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small) Local Option- Property Tax Exemption for...

  15. Final environmental impact statement. Management of commercially generated radioactive waste. Volume 2. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    This EIS analyzes the significant environmental impacts that could occur if various technologies for management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes from commercial nuclear power reactors were to be developed and implemented. This EIS will serve as the environmental input for the decision on which technology, or technologies, will be emphasized in further research and development activities in the commercial waste management program. The action proposed in this EIS is to (1) adopt a national strategy to develop mined geologic repositories for disposal of commercially generated high-level and transuranic radioactive waste (while continuing to examine subseabed and very deep hole disposal as potential backup technologies) and (2) conduct a R and D program to develop such facilities and the necessary technology to ensure the safe long-term containment and isolation of these wastes. The Department has considered in this statement: development of conventionally mined deep geologic repositories for disposal of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors and/or radioactive fuel reprocessing wastes; balanced development of several alternative disposal methods; and no waste disposal action. This volume contains appendices of supplementary data on waste management systems, geologic disposal, radiological standards, radiation dose calculation models, related health effects, baseline ecology, socio-economic conditions, hazard indices, comparison of defense and commercial wastes, design considerations, and wastes from thorium-based fuel cycle alternatives. (DMC)

  16. Using wastes as resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prakasam, T.B.S.; Lue-Hing, C. )

    1992-09-01

    The collection, treatment, and disposal of domestic and industrial wastewater, garbage, and other wastes present considerable problems in urban and semiurban areas of developing countries. Major benefits of using integrated treatment and resource recovery systems include waste stabilization, recovering energy as biogas, producing food from algae and fish, irrigation, improved public health, and aquatic weed control and use. Information and research are needed, however, to assesss the appropriateness, benefits, and limitations of such technology on a large scale. System configuration depends on the types and quantities of wastes available for processing. There must be enough collectable waste for the system to be viable. Information should be gathered to asses whether there is a net public health benefit by implementing a waste treatment and resource recovery system. Benefits such as savings in medical expenses and increased worker productivity due to improved health may be difficult to quantify. The potential health risks created by implementing a resource recovery system should be studied. The most difficult issues to contend with are socioeconomic in nature. Often, the poor performance of a proven technology is attributed to a lack of proper understanding of its principles by the operators, lack of community interest, improper operator training, and poor management. Public education to motivate people to accept technologies that are beneficial to them is important.

  17. ZERO WASTE STANFORD WASTE REDUCTION, RECYCLING AND COMPOSTING GUIDELINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerdes, J. Christian

    ZERO WASTE STANFORD WASTE REDUCTION, RECYCLING AND COMPOSTING GUIDELINES PLASTICS, METALS & GLASS pleaseemptyandflatten COMPOSTABLES kitchenandyardwasteonly LANDFILL ONLY ifallelsefails All Plastic Containers Metal Material All Food Paper Plates & Napkins *including pizza & donut boxes Compostable & Biodegradable

  18. Tank Waste and Waste Processing | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    waste stored in underground tanks and approximately 4,000 cubic meters of solid waste derived from the liquids stored in bins. The current DOE estimated cost for retrieval,...

  19. Waste generator services implementation plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mousseau, J.; Magleby, M.; Litus, M.

    1998-04-01

    Recurring waste management noncompliance problems have spurred a fundamental site-wide process revision to characterize and disposition wastes at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The reengineered method, termed Waste Generator Services, will streamline the waste acceptance process and provide waste generators comprehensive waste management services through a single, accountable organization to manage and disposition wastes in a timely, cost-effective, and compliant manner. This report outlines the strategy for implementing Waste Generator Services across the INEEL. It documents the culmination of efforts worked by the LMITCO Environmental Management Compliance Reengineering project team since October 1997. These efforts have included defining problems associated with the INEEL waste management process; identifying commercial best management practices; completing a review of DOE Complex-wide waste management training requirements; and involving others through an Integrated Process Team approach to provide recommendations on process flow, funding/charging mechanisms, and WGS organization. The report defines the work that will be performed by Waste Generator Services, the organization and resources, the waste acceptance process flow, the funding approach, methods for measuring performance, and the implementation schedule and approach. Field deployment will occur first at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant in June 1998. Beginning in Fiscal Year 1999, Waste Generator Services will be deployed at the other major INEEL facilities in a phased approach, with implementation completed by March 1999.

  20. Steam Reforming of Low-Level Mixed Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    Under DOE Contract No. DE-AR21-95MC32091, Steam Reforming of Low-Level Mixed Waste, ThermoChem has successfully designed, fabricated and operated a nominal 90 pound per hour Process Development Unit (PDU) on various low-level mixed waste surrogates. The design construction, and testing of the PDU as well as performance and economic projections for a 500- lb/hr demonstration and commercial system are described. The overall system offers an environmentally safe, non-incinerating, cost-effective, and publicly acceptable method of processing LLMW. The steam-reforming technology was ranked the No. 1 non-incineration technology for destruction of hazardous organic wastes in a study commissioned by the Mixed Waste Focus Area published April 1997.1 The ThermoChem steam-reforming system has been developed over the last 13 years culminating in this successful test campaign on LLMW surrogates. Six surrogates were successfidly tested including a 750-hour test on material simulating a PCB- and Uranium- contaminated solid waste found at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The test results indicated essentially total (>99.9999oA) destruction of RCRA and TSCA hazardous halogenated organics, significant levels of volume reduction (> 400 to 1), and retention of radlonuclides in the volume-reduced solids. Cost studies have shown the steam-reforming system to be very cost competitive with more conventional and other emerging technologies.

  1. Recommendation 223: Recommendations on Additional Waste Disposal...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3: Recommendations on Additional Waste Disposal Capacity Recommendation 223: Recommendations on Additional Waste Disposal Capacity ORSSAB's recommendations encourage DOE to...

  2. Waste management units - Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    This report is a compilation of worksheets from the waste management units of Savannah River Plant. Information is presented on the following: Solid Waste Management Units having received hazardous waste or hazardous constituents with a known release to the environment; Solid Waste Management Units having received hazardous waste or hazardous constituents with no known release to the environment; Solid Waste Management Units having received no hazardous waste or hazardous constituents; Waste Management Units having received source; and special nuclear, or byproduct material only.

  3. Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Skutterudite TE modules were...

  4. Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators Thermoelectrics have unique advantages for...

  5. Waste Management Assistance Act (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section promotes the proper and safe storage, treatment, and disposal of solid, hazardous, and low-level radioactive wastes in Iowa, and calls on Iowans to assume responsibility for waste...

  6. Management of Solid Waste (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Solid Waste Management Division of the Department of Environmental Quality regulates solid waste disposal or any person who generates, collects, transports, processes, and/or disposes of solid...

  7. Copenhagen Waste Management and Incineration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ownership of treatment facilities · Incineration plants · Land fill · Disposal of hazardous waste · Source waste prevention · Focus areas · Changes in behaviour among consumers and producers · City schemes almost fully developed · Collection of hazardous substances, paper, cardboard, gardening and bulky

  8. Low-Level Waste Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09

    The guide provides criteria for determining which DOE radioactive wastes are to be managed as low-level waste in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter IV.

  9. High-Level Waste Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09

    The guide provides the criteria for determining which DOE radioactive wastes are to be managed as high-level waste in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1.

  10. Eating Disorders: Body Wasting Away

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shao, Shirley

    2015-01-01

    can begin with the waste of food, and end in the waste ofwaste in eating, regurgitating, and then flushing a box of Cheez-its down the toilet, or in tossing untouched food

  11. Process Waste Assessment - Paint Shop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, N.M.

    1993-06-01

    This Process Waste Assessment was conducted to evaluate hazardous wastes generated in the Paint Shop, Building 913, Room 130. Special attention is given to waste streams generated by the spray painting process because it requires a number of steps for preparing, priming, and painting an object. Also, the spray paint booth covers the largest area in R-130. The largest and most costly waste stream to dispose of is {open_quote}Paint Shop waste{close_quotes} -- a combination of paint cans, rags, sticks, filters, and paper containers. These items are compacted in 55-gallon drums and disposed of as solid hazardous waste. Recommendations are made for minimizing waste in the Paint Shop. Paint Shop personnel are very aware of the need to minimize hazardous wastes and are continuously looking for opportunities to do so.

  12. Zero Waste, Renewable Energy & Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Zero Waste, Renewable Energy & Environmental Stewardship - Connecting loose ends: Thermal Recycling Party, Berlin · Research Institute Karlsruhe, Germany · Oekoinstitut, Freiburg, Germany · BASF, Germany business, namely "zero waste" and "clean production." #12;Arguments given against WTE: People who think we

  13. Hydrothermal Processing of Wet Wastes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 3A—Conversion Technologies III: Energy from Our Waste—Will we Be Rich in Fuel or Knee Deep in Trash by 2025? Hydrothermal Processing of Wet Wastes James R. Oyler, President, Genifuel Corporation

  14. Ferrocyanide waste simulant characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeppson, D.W.; Wong, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    Ferrocyanide waste simulants were prepared and characterized to help assess safety concerns associated with the ferrocyanide sludges stored in underground single-shell waste tanks at the Hanford Site. Simulants were prepared to represent the variety of ferrocyanide sludges stored in the storage tanks. Physical properties, chemical compositions, and thermodynamic properties of the simulants were determined. The simulants, as produced, were shown to not sustain propagating reactions when subjected to a strong ignition source. Additional testing and evaluations are recommended to assess safety concerns associated with postulated ferrocyanide sludge dry-out and exposure to external ignition sources.

  15. Heat Recovery From Solid Waste 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Underwood, O. W.

    1981-01-01

    areas of evaluation, including the cost of fuel, cost of solid waste disposal, plant energy requirements, available technology, etc....

  16. Oregon Trust Agreement Planning Project : Potential Mitigations to the Impacts on Oregon Wildlife Resources Associated with Relevant Mainstem Columbia River and Willamette River Hydroelectric Projects.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1993-10-01

    A coalition of the Oregon wildlife agencies and tribes (the Oregon Wildlife Mitigation Coalition) have forged a cooperative effort to promote wildlife mitigation from losses to Oregon wildlife resources associated with the four mainstream Columbia River and the eight Willamette River Basin hydroelectric projects. This coalition formed a Joint Advisory Committee, made up of technical representatives from all of the tribes and agencies, to develop this report. The goal was to create a list of potential mitigation opportunities by priority, and to attempt to determine the costs of mitigating the wildlife losses. The information and analysis was completed for all projects in Oregon, but was gathered separately for the Lower Columbia and Willamette Basin projects. The coalition developed a procedure to gather information on potential mitigation projects and opportunities. All tribes, agencies and interested parties were contacted in an attempt to evaluate all proposed or potential mitigation. A database was developed and minimum criteria were established for opportunities to be considered. These criteria included the location of the mitigation site within a defined area, as well as other criteria established by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Costs were established for general habitats within the mitigation area, based on estimates from certified appraisers. An analysis of the cost effectiveness of various types of mitigation projects was completed. Estimates of operation and maintenance costs were also developed. The report outlines strategies for gathering mitigation potentials, evaluating them, determining their costs, and attempting to move towards their implementation.

  17. WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for reduction in mixed waste generation Pump Oil Substitution 51 Hazardous Waste / Industrial Waste $3,520 $6 with the subsequent clean up costs ($15,000). Hydraulic Oil Product Substitution 3,000 Industrial Waste $26,000 $0 $26WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED, REUSED, RECYCLED OR CONSERVED IN 2003 WASTE TYPE

  18. Hazardous Waste Management Overview The Five L's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    Hazardous Waste Management Overview The Five L's CoLLect CoLLect all hazardous chemical waste are unsure if your chemical waste is a Hazardous Waste, consult EH&S at hazmat@columbia.edu. DO NOT - Dispose of Hazardous Waste inappropriately or prior to determining its hazards. Hazardous Waste must never

  19. RECYCLING AND GENERAL WASTE MANAGEMENT OPERATIONAL PROCEDURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, Neal.A.

    RECYCLING AND GENERAL WASTE MANAGEMENT OPERATIONAL PROCEDURE Swansea University Estates Services.6.1/1 Recycling & General Waste Management Department: Estates & Facilities Management Site: Swansea University waste through waste hierarchy and managing the waste in-house for final disposal. To explain the waste

  20. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This paper provides highlights from the 1995 summer meeting of the Low Level radioactive Waste Forum. Topics included: new developments in state and compacts; federal waste management; DOE plans for Greater-Than-Class C waste management; mixed wastes; commercial mixed waste management; international export of rad wastes for disposal; scintillation cocktails; license termination; pending legislation; federal radiation protection standards.

  1. Quantifying the Uncertainty in Estimates of World Conventional Oil Resources 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tien, Chih-Ming

    2010-07-14

    Since Hubbert proposed the "peak oil" concept to forecast ultimate recovery of crude oil for the U.S. and the world, there have been countless debates over the timing of peak world conventional oil production rate and ultimate recovery. From review...

  2. Hardwood Markets and Marketing AHEC American Hardwood in Europe Convention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Convention Venice, Italy 20-22 October 2004 Hardwood chapter highlights · EU production and consumption of hardwood flooring rose once again in 2003 · Production, trade and consumption of sawn hardwood all grew in central and eastern Europe · CIS subregion production and consumption of sawn hardwoods are forecast

  3. Land Use Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Conventional Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turetsky, Merritt

    Land Use Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Conventional Oil Production and Oil Sands S O N I A Y E H received September 12, 2010. Accepted September 14, 2010. Debates surrounding the greenhouse gas (GHG emissions of California crude and in situ oil sands production (

  4. Nuclear Proliferation and the Deterrence of Conventional War: Justin Pollard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    Nuclear Proliferation and the Deterrence of Conventional War: A Proposal Justin Pollard April 2009) Introduction It seems counterintuitive to think that the spread of nuclear weapons could make the world a safer of ubiquitous nuclear armament is a more dangerous and unstable one. Certainly, a weapon of the nuclear

  5. A Foundation for Conventional and Temporal Query Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snodgrass, Richard T.

    substantially from built-in temporal support in the DBMS. To achieve this, temporal query representation DBMS architectures and ones where the temporal support is obtained via a layer on top of a conventional DBMS. This foundation captures duplicates and ordering for all queries, as well as coalescing

  6. I. PROBLEM ADDRESSED In recent years, global warming, depleting conventional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramakrishnan, Naren

    such as solar panels, wind turbines or diesel generators. Typically, and more so recently dueI. PROBLEM ADDRESSED In recent years, global warming, depleting conventional sources of energy physical and operational state, including environmental sensor data (e.g. temperature), operational state

  7. Appendix IV. Risks Associated with Conventional Uranium Milling Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as in situ leaching (ISL) mining operations, to provide a more complete picture of uranium production. While this report focuses on the impacts associated with conventional surface and underground uranium mines Radioactive Materials from Uranium Mining. Volume 1: Mining and Reclamation Background" by U.S. EPA (2006

  8. Producing usable fuel from municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohlsson, O.O.

    1995-03-01

    Refuse disposal is a matter of increasing concern for municipalities and state governments. As existing land-fills become filled to capacity, and new landfills become more costly to site, it has become critical to develop alternative disposal methods. Some of the refuse that is presently being landfilled has the potential to provide considerable quantities of energy and thereby replace conventional fossil fuels. Another environmental concern is the problem of the emissions associated with combustion of traditional fossil fuels. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 significantly restrict the level of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions permissible as effluent from combustion facilities. To address both of these concerns, Argonne National Laboratory, under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), has developed a means of producing fuel from municipal solid waste that can be co-fired with coal to supplement coal supplies and reduce problematic emissions.

  9. MARSHALL UNIVERSITY HAZARDOUS WASTE DISPOSAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanyal, Suman

    /16/2005 1 #12;Marshall University Hazardous Waste Program POLICY STATEMENT- Hazardous Materials Management of the Hazardous Waste Management Program is to ensure that proper handling and legal disposal of hazardous wastes Management Program will apply to the following: 1. Any liquid, semi-solid, solid or gaseous substance defined

  10. Mixed Waste Working Group report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-09

    The treatment of mixed waste remains one of this country`s most vexing environmental problems. Mixed waste is the combination of radioactive waste and hazardous waste, as defined by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The Department of Energy (DOE), as the country`s largest mixed waste generator, responsible for 95 percent of the Nation`s mixed waste volume, is now required to address a strict set of milestones under the Federal Facility Compliance Act of 1992. DOE`s earlier failure to adequately address the storage and treatment issues associated with mixed waste has led to a significant backlog of temporarily stored waste, significant quantities of buried waste, limited permanent disposal options, and inadequate treatment solutions. Between May and November of 1993, the Mixed Waste Working Group brought together stakeholders from around the Nation. Scientists, citizens, entrepreneurs, and bureaucrats convened in a series of forums to chart a course for accelerated testing of innovative mixed waste technologies. For the first time, a wide range of stakeholders were asked to examine new technologies that, if given the chance to be tested and evaluated, offer the prospect for better, safer, cheaper, and faster solutions to the mixed waste problem. In a matter of months, the Working Group has managed to bridge a gap between science and perception, engineer and citizen, and has developed a shared program for testing new technologies.

  11. Waste Management Coordinating Lead Authors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    10 Waste Management Coordinating Lead Authors: Jean Bogner (USA) Lead Authors: Mohammed Abdelrafie Ahmed, C. Diaz, A. Faaij, Q. Gao, S. Hashimoto, K. Mareckova, R. Pipatti, T. Zhang, Waste Management University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA. #12;586 Waste Management Chapter 10 Table

  12. Pharmaceutical Waste Management Under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linninger, Andreas A.

    Pharmaceutical Waste Management Under Uncertainty Andreas A. Linninger and Aninda Chakraborty of their benefits and costs constitutes a formidable task. Designing plant-wide waste management policies assuming this article addresses the problem of finding optimal waste management policies for entire manufacturing sites

  13. Radioactive Waste Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09

    The objective of this Order is to ensure that all Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive waste is managed in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety and the environment. Supersedes DOE O 5820.2A. Chg 1 dated 8-28-01. Certified 1-9-07.

  14. Final Report Waste Incineration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    methods have been evaluated, and with the information obtained, it seems that the price for treatment of the waste streams, or as fuel in an incineration facility generating heat and pos- sibly electricity for export that is economical and technical efficient. The aim of this project is to make a long

  15. Radioactive Waste Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09

    The objective of this Order is to ensure that all Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive waste is managed in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety and the environment. Cancels DOE O 5820.2A

  16. Focus Sheet | Hazardous Waste Checklist How to be ready for state hazardous waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcock, William

    storage cabinet. Avoid accumulating a lot of waste ­ keep areas clear. EPO ­ Hazardous Waste Checklist 07Focus Sheet | Hazardous Waste Checklist How to be ready for state hazardous waste inspectors. See a hazardous waste inspection. ons, rrosive. n hemicals? ical waste. Waste-like chemicals have als Are you

  17. Hanford Tank Waste - Near Source Treatment of Low Activity Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsey, William Gene

    2013-08-15

    Abstract only. Treatment and disposition of Hanford Site waste as currently planned consists of 100+ waste retrievals, waste delivery through up to 8+ miles of dedicated, in-ground piping, centralized mixing and blending operations- all leading to pre-treatment combination and separation processes followed by vitrification at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The sequential nature of Tank Farm and WTP operations requires nominally 15-20 years of continuous operations before all waste can be retrieved from many Single Shell Tanks (SSTs). Also, the infrastructure necessary to mobilize and deliver the waste requires significant investment beyond that required for the WTP. Treating waste as closely as possible to individual tanks or groups- as allowed by the waste characteristics- is being investigated to determine the potential to 1) defer, reduce, and/or eliminate infrastructure requirements, and 2) significantly mitigate project risk by reducing the potential and impact of single point failures. The inventory of Hanford waste slated for processing and disposition as LAW is currently managed as high-level waste (HLW), i.e., the separation of fission products and other radionuclides has not commenced. A significant inventory of this waste (over 20M gallons) is in the form of precipitated saltcake maintained in single shell tanks, many of which are identified as potential leaking tanks. Retrieval and transport (as a liquid) must be staged within the waste feed delivery capability established by site infrastructure and WTP. Near Source treatment, if employed, would provide for the separation and stabilization processing necessary for waste located in remote farms (wherein most of the leaking tanks reside) significantly earlier than currently projected. Near Source treatment is intended to address the currently accepted site risk and also provides means to mitigate future issues likely to be faced over the coming decades. This paper describes the potential near source treatment and waste disposition options as well as the impact these options could have on reducing infrastructure requirements, project cost and mission schedule.

  18. International low level waste disposal practices and facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nutt, W.M.

    2011-12-19

    The safe management of nuclear waste arising from nuclear activities is an issue of great importance for the protection of human health and the environment now and in the future. The primary goal of this report is to identify the current situation and practices being utilized across the globe to manage and store low and intermediate level radioactive waste. The countries included in this report were selected based on their nuclear power capabilities and involvement in the nuclear fuel cycle. This report highlights the nuclear waste management laws and regulations, current disposal practices, and future plans for facilities of the selected international nuclear countries. For each country presented, background information and the history of nuclear facilities are also summarized to frame the country's nuclear activities and set stage for the management practices employed. The production of nuclear energy, including all the steps in the nuclear fuel cycle, results in the generation of radioactive waste. However, radioactive waste may also be generated by other activities such as medical, laboratory, research institution, or industrial use of radioisotopes and sealed radiation sources, defense and weapons programs, and processing (mostly large scale) of mineral ores or other materials containing naturally occurring radionuclides. Radioactive waste also arises from intervention activities, which are necessary after accidents or to remediate areas affected by past practices. The radioactive waste generated arises in a wide range of physical, chemical, and radiological forms. It may be solid, liquid, or gaseous. Levels of activity concentration can vary from extremely high, such as levels associated with spent fuel and residues from fuel reprocessing, to very low, for instance those associated with radioisotope applications. Equally broad is the spectrum of half-lives of the radionuclides contained in the waste. These differences result in an equally wide variety of options for the management of radioactive waste. There is a variety of alternatives for processing waste and for short term or long term storage prior to disposal. Likewise, there are various alternatives currently in use across the globe for the safe disposal of waste, ranging from near surface to geological disposal, depending on the specific classification of the waste. At present, there appears to be a clear and unequivocal understanding that each country is ethically and legally responsible for its own wastes, in accordance with the provisions of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management. Therefore the default position is that all nuclear wastes will be disposed of in each of the 40 or so countries concerned with nuclear power generation or part of the fuel cycle. To illustrate the global distribution of radioactive waste now and in the near future, Table 1 provides the regional breakdown, based on the UN classification of the world in regions illustrated in Figure 1, of nuclear power reactors in operation and under construction worldwide. In summary, 31 countries operate 433 plants, with a total capacity of more than 365 gigawatts of electrical energy (GW[e]). A further 65 units, totaling nearly 63 GW(e), are under construction across 15 of these nations. In addition, 65 countries are expressing new interest in, considering, or actively planning for nuclear power to help address growing energy demands to fuel economic growth and development, climate change concerns, and volatile fossil fuel prices. Of these 65 new countries, 21 are in Asia and the Pacific region, 21 are from the Africa region, 12 are in Europe (mostly Eastern Europe), and 11 in Central and South America. However, 31 of these 65 are not currently planning to build reactors, and 17 of those 31 have grids of less than 5 GW, which is said to be too small to accommodate most of the reactor designs available. For the remaining 34 countries actively planning reactors, as of September 2010: 14 indicate a strong intention to precede w

  19. TRU waste characterization chamber gloveboxes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, D. S.

    1998-07-02

    Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) is participating in the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Transuranic Waste Program in support of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The Laboratory's support currently consists of intrusive characterization of a selected population of drums containing transuranic waste. This characterization is performed in a complex of alpha containment gloveboxes termed the Waste Characterization Gloveboxes. Made up of the Waste Characterization Chamber, Sample Preparation Glovebox, and the Equipment Repair Glovebox, they were designed as a small production characterization facility for support of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This paper presents salient features of these gloveboxes.

  20. Analysis of energy recovery potential using innovative technologies of waste gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lombardi, Lidia; Carnevale, Ennio; Corti, Andrea

    2012-04-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy recovery from waste by gasification was simulated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two processes: high temperature gasification and gasification associated to plasma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two types of feeding waste: Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) and pulper residues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different configurations for the energy cycles were considered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison with performances from conventional Waste-to-Energy process. - Abstract: In this paper, two alternative thermo-chemical processes for waste treatment were analysed: high temperature gasification and gasification associated to plasma process. The two processes were analysed from the thermodynamic point of view, trying to reconstruct two simplified models, using appropriate simulation tools and some support data from existing/planned plants, able to predict the energy recovery performances by process application. In order to carry out a comparative analysis, the same waste stream input was considered as input to the two models and the generated results were compared. The performances were compared with those that can be obtained from conventional combustion with energy recovery process by means of steam turbine cycle. Results are reported in terms of energy recovery performance indicators as overall energy efficiency, specific energy production per unit of mass of entering waste, primary energy source savings, specific carbon dioxide production.

  1. Is a Green Paradox Spectre Haunting International Climate Change Laws and Conventions?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Partain, Roy Andrew

    2015-01-01

    accumulated production from conventional crude oil, 371 butaccumulated production of conventional crude oil as z-bar ).crude oil before the model would switch to continuous production

  2. Synthesis of waste interception and allocation networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Halwagi, M.M.; Hamad, A.A.; Garrison, G.W.

    1996-11-01

    This article introduces the novel concept of synthesizing waste-interception networks (WINs) and incorporates it within a mass-integration framework for the global allocation of pollutants. The essence of this notion is to provide selective interception and rerouting of undesirable species at the heart of the process instead of dealing with the pollutants in the terminal waste streams. It also provides a unified framework for simultaneously tackling gaseous and liquid pollution. Several tools are developed to track the pollutant throughout the process and determine the optimal interception policies. The problem is formulated as an optimization program that seeks to determine the optimum locations for interception the pollutants, extent of separation, and separating agents to carry out the interception tasks. Furthermore, the WINs can be used within a mass-integration scheme for the global allocation of species throughout the plant. These new concepts and associated mathematical formulation are demonstrated using a case study on the removal of a chlorinated hydrocarbon. This approach has benefits over conventional recycle/reuse (such as MEN synthesis).

  3. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transuranic Waste Baseline inventory report. Volume 3. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    This report consists of information related to the waste forms at the WIPP facility from the waste originators. Data for retrievably stored, projected and total wastes are given.

  4. Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 360: Solid Waste Management Facilities (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations apply to all solid wastes with the exception of hazardous or radioactive waste. Proposed solid waste processing facilities are required to obtain permits prior to construction,...

  5. WASTE/BY-PRODUCT HYDROGEN DOE/DOD Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; 6 Waste/Byproduct HydrogenWaste/By product Hydrogen Waste H2 sources include: Waste biomass: biogas Waste/Byproduct Hydrogen Waste/By product Hydrogen Fuel FlexibilityFuel Flexibility Biogas: generated

  6. Treatment of halogen-containing waste and other waste materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Beahm, Edward C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Parker, George W. (Concord, TN)

    1997-01-01

    A process for treating a halogen-containing waste material. The process provides a bath of molten glass containing a sacrificial metal oxide capable of reacting with a halogen in the waste material. The sacrificial metal oxide is present in the molten glass in at least a stoichiometric amount with respect to the halogen in the waste material. The waste material is introduced into the bath of molten glass to cause a reaction between the halogen in the waste material and the sacrificial metal oxide to yield a metal halide. The metal halide is a gas at the temperature of the molten glass. The gaseous metal halide is separated from the molten glass and contacted with an aqueous scrubber solution of an alkali metal hydroxide to yield a metal hydroxide or metal oxide-containing precipitate and a soluble alkali metal halide. The precipitate is then separated from the aqueous scrubber solution. The molten glass containing the treated waste material is removed from the bath as a waste glass. The process of the invention can be used to treat all types of waste material including radioactive wastes. The process is particularly suited for separating halogens from halogen-containing wastes.

  7. Treatment of halogen-containing waste and other waste materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1997-03-18

    A process is described for treating a halogen-containing waste material. The process provides a bath of molten glass containing a sacrificial metal oxide capable of reacting with a halogen in the waste material. The sacrificial metal oxide is present in the molten glass in at least a stoichiometric amount with respect to the halogen in the waste material. The waste material is introduced into the bath of molten glass to cause a reaction between the halogen in the waste material and the sacrificial metal oxide to yield a metal halide. The metal halide is a gas at the temperature of the molten glass. The gaseous metal halide is separated from the molten glass and contacted with an aqueous scrubber solution of an alkali metal hydroxide to yield a metal hydroxide or metal oxide-containing precipitate and a soluble alkali metal halide. The precipitate is then separated from the aqueous scrubber solution. The molten glass containing the treated waste material is removed from the bath as a waste glass. The process of the invention can be used to treat all types of waste material including radioactive wastes. The process is particularly suited for separating halogens from halogen-containing wastes. 3 figs.

  8. EM Contributes to Joint Convention Meeting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatement |toDepartmentContributes to Joint Convention Meeting

  9. The EU Approach for Responsible and Safe Management of Spent Fuel and Radioactive Waste - 12118

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blohm-Hieber, Ute; Necheva, Christina [European Commission, Directorate-General for Energy, Luxembourg L-2920 (Luxembourg)

    2012-07-01

    In July 2011 legislation on responsible and safe management of spent fuel and radioactive waste was adopted in the European Union (EU). It aims at ensuring a high level of safety, avoiding undue burdens on future generations and enhancing transparency. EU Member States are responsible for the management of their spent fuel and/or radioactive waste. Each Member State remains free to define its fuel cycle policy. The spent fuel can be regarded either as a valuable resource that may be reprocessed or as radioactive waste that is destined for direct disposal. Whatever option is chosen, the disposal of high level waste, separated at reprocessing, or of spent fuel regarded as waste should be considered. The storage of radioactive waste, including long-term storage, is an interim solution, but not an alternative to disposal. To this end, each Member State has to establish, maintain and implement national policy, framework and programme for management of spent fuel and/or radioactive waste in the long term. Member States will invite international peer reviews to ensure that high safety standards are achieved. The EU approach is anchored in internationally endorsed principles and requirements of the IAEA safety standards and the Joint Convention and in this context makes them legally binding and enforceable in the EU. The EU approach of regulating the management of spent fuel and radioactive waste is anchored in the competence of the national regulatory authorities and in the internationally endorsed principles and requirements of the IAEA Safety Standards and the Joint Convention. Member States have to report to the Commission on the implementation of Directive 2011/70/Euratom for the first time by 23 August 2015, and every 3 years thereafter, taking advantage of the review and reporting under the Joint Convention. On the basis of the Member States' reports, the Commission will submit to the European Parliament and the Council a report on progress made and an inventory of radioactive waste and spent fuel present in the EU territory and the future prospects. Directive 2011/70/Euratom is a logical next step after the Council Directive 2009/71/Euratom on the nuclear safety of nuclear installations. The EU is the first major regional actor providing a binding legal framework on nuclear safety and on responsible and safe management of spent fuel and radioactive waste, and thus is a real model to progress spent fuel and waste management in a safe and responsible manner. (authors)

  10. Tritium waste package

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rossmassler, R.; Ciebiera, L.; Tulipano, F.J.; Vinson, S.; Walters, R.T.

    1995-11-07

    A containment and waste package system for processing and shipping tritium oxide waste received from a process gas includes an outer drum and an inner drum containing a disposable molecular sieve bed (DMSB) seated within the outer drum. The DMSB includes an inlet diffuser assembly, an outlet diffuser assembly, and a hydrogen catalytic recombiner. The DMSB absorbs tritium oxide from the process gas and converts it to a solid form so that the tritium is contained during shipment to a disposal site. The DMSB is filled with type 4A molecular sieve pellets capable of adsorbing up to 1000 curies of tritium. The recombiner contains a sufficient amount of catalyst to cause any hydrogen and oxygen present in the process gas to recombine to form water vapor, which is then adsorbed onto the DMSB. 1 fig.

  11. The Influence of Tag Presence on the Mortality of Juvenile Chinook Salmon Exposed to Simulated Hydroturbine Passage: Implications for Survival Estimates and Management of Hydroelectric Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Brown, Richard S.; Stephenson, John R.; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Gingerich, Andrew J.; Benjamin, Piper L.; Langeslay, Mike; Ahmann, Martin L.; Johnson, Robert L.; Skalski, John R.; Seaburg, Adam; Townsend, Richard L.

    2012-05-01

    Each year, millions of fish have telemetry tags (acoustic, radio, inductive) surgically implanted to assess their passage and survival through hydropower facilities. One route of passage of particular concern is through hydro turbines, in which fish may be exposed to a range of potential injuries, including barotraumas from rapid decompression. The change in pressure from acclimation to exposure (nadir) has been found to be an important factor in predicting the likelihood of mortality and injury for juvenile Chinook salmon undergoing rapid decompression associated with simulated turbine passage. The presence of telemetry tags has also been shown to influence the likelihood of injury and mortality for juvenile Chinook salmon. This research investigated the likelihood of mortality and injury for juvenile Chinook salmon carrying telemetry tags and exposed to a range of simulated turbine passage. Several factors were examined as predictors of mortal injury for fish undergoing rapid decompression, and the ratio of pressure change and tag burden were determined to be the most predictive factors. As the ratio of pressure change and tag burden increase, the likelihood of mortal injury also increases. The results of this study suggest that previous survival estimates of juvenile Chinook salmon passing through hydro turbines may have been biased due to the presence of telemetry tags, and this has direct implications to the management of hydroelectric facilities. Realistic examples indicate how the bias in turbine passage survival estimates could be 20% or higher, depending on the mass of the implanted tags and the ratio of acclimation to exposure pressures. Bias would increase as the tag burden and pressure ratio increase, and have direct implications on survival estimates. It is recommended that future survival studies use the smallest telemetry tags possible to minimize the potential bias that may be associated with carrying the tag.

  12. The effect of rapid and sustained decompression on barotrauma in juvenile brook lamprey and Pacific lamprey: implications for passage at hydroelectric facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colotelo, Alison HA; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Brown, Richard S.; Brauner, Colin J.; Mueller, Robert P.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Deng, Zhiqun; Ahmann, Martin L.; Trumbo, Bradly A.

    2012-10-01

    Fish passing downstream through hydroelectric facilities may pass through hydroturbines where they experience a rapid decrease in barometric pressure as they pass by turbine blades, which can lead to barotraumas including swim bladder rupture, exopthalmia, emboli, and hemorrhaging. In juvenile Chinook salmon, the main mechanism for injury is thought to be expansion of existing gases (particularly those present in the swim bladder) and the rupture of the swim bladder ultimately leading to exopthalmia, emboli and hemorrhaging. In fish that lack a swim bladder, such as lamprey, the rate and severity of barotraumas due to rapid decompression may be reduced however; this has yet to be extensively studied. Another mechanism for barotrauma can be gases coming out of solution and the rate of this occurrence may vary among species. In this study, juvenile brook and Pacific lamprey acclimated to 146.2 kPa (equivalent to a depth of 4.6 m) were subjected to rapid (<1 sec; brook lamprey only) or sustained decompression (17 minutes) to a very low pressure (13.8 kPa) using a protocol previously applied to juvenile Chinook salmon. No mortality or evidence of barotraumas, as indicated by the presence of hemorrhages, emboli or exopthalmia, were observed during rapid or sustained decompression, nor following recovery for up to 120 h following sustained decompression. In contrast, mortality or injury would be expected for 97.5% of juvenile Chinook salmon exposed to a similar rapid decompression to these very low pressures. Additionally, juvenile Chinook salmon experiencing sustained decompression died within 7 minutes, accompanied by emboli in the fins and gills and hemorrhaging in the tissues. Thus, juvenile lamprey may not be susceptible to barotraumas associated with hydroturbine passage to the same degree as juvenile salmonids, and management of these species should be tailored to their specific morphological and physiological characteristics.

  13. Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    exempt, small quantity hazardous waste, and industrial solid waste. It includes food waste, residential rubbish, commercial and industrial wastes, and construction and...

  14. Probative Investigation of the Thermal Stability of Wastes Involved...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the Thermal Stability of Wastes Involved in February 2014 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Drum Breach Event Probative Investigation of the Thermal Stability of Wastes...

  15. Method for processing aqueous wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pickett, J.B.; Martin, H.L.; Langton, C.A.; Harley, W.W.

    1993-12-28

    A method is presented for treating waste water such as that from an industrial processing facility comprising the separation of the waste water into a dilute waste stream and a concentrated waste stream. The concentrated waste stream is treated chemically to enhance precipitation and then allowed to separate into a sludge and a supernate. The supernate is skimmed or filtered from the sludge and blended with the dilute waste stream to form a second dilute waste stream. The sludge remaining is mixed with cementitious material, rinsed to dissolve soluble components, then pressed to remove excess water and dissolved solids before being allowed to cure. The dilute waste stream is also chemically treated to decompose carbonate complexes and metal ions and then mixed with cationic polymer to cause the precipitated solids to flocculate. Filtration of the flocculant removes sufficient solids to allow the waste water to be discharged to the surface of a stream. The filtered material is added to the sludge of the concentrated waste stream. The method is also applicable to the treatment and removal of soluble uranium from aqueous streams, such that the treated stream may be used as a potable water supply. 4 figures.

  16. Method for processing aqueous wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pickett, John B. (3922 Wood Valley Dr., Aiken, SC 29803); Martin, Hollis L. (Rt. 1, Box 188KB, McCormick, SC 29835); Langton, Christine A. (455 Sumter St. SE., Aiken, SC 29801); Harley, Willie W. (110 Fairchild St., Batesburg, SC 29006)

    1993-01-01

    A method for treating waste water such as that from an industrial processing facility comprising the separation of the waste water into a dilute waste stream and a concentrated waste stream. The concentrated waste stream is treated chemically to enhance precipitation and then allowed to separate into a sludge and a supernate. The supernate is skimmed or filtered from the sludge and blended with the dilute waste stream to form a second dilute waste stream. The sludge remaining is mixed with cementitious material, rinsed to dissolve soluble components, then pressed to remove excess water and dissolved solids before being allowed to cure. The dilute waste stream is also chemically treated to decompose carbonate complexes and metal ions and then mixed with cationic polymer to cause the precipitated solids to flocculate. Filtration of the flocculant removes sufficient solids to allow the waste water to be discharged to the surface of a stream. The filtered material is added to the sludge of the concentrated waste stream. The method is also applicable to the treatment and removal of soluble uranium from aqueous streams, such that the treated stream may be used as a potable water supply.

  17. Naval Waste Package Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.M. Lewis

    2004-03-15

    A design methodology for the waste packages and ancillary components, viz., the emplacement pallets and drip shields, has been developed to provide designs that satisfy the safety and operational requirements of the Yucca Mountain Project. This methodology is described in the ''Waste Package Design Methodology Report'' Mecham 2004 [DIRS 166168]. To demonstrate the practicability of this design methodology, four waste package design configurations have been selected to illustrate the application of the methodology. These four design configurations are the 21-pressurized water reactor (PWR) Absorber Plate waste package, the 44-boiling water reactor (BWR) waste package, the 5-defense high-level waste (DHLW)/United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) Co-disposal Short waste package, and the Naval Canistered SNF Long waste package. Also included in this demonstration is the emplacement pallet and continuous drip shield. The purpose of this report is to document how that design methodology has been applied to the waste package design configurations intended to accommodate naval canistered SNF. This demonstrates that the design methodology can be applied successfully to this waste package design configuration and support the License Application for construction of the repository.

  18. UC Irvine Construction Related Hazardous Waste Some construction related wastes are hazardous and require special handling. Examples of such wastes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    UC Irvine Construction Related Hazardous Waste Scope Some construction related wastes are hazardous the hazardous waste manifest. Process 1. When a construction project will generate hazardous wastes, the project and require special handling. Examples of such wastes include: · Asbestos Containing Materials · Mercury

  19. Radioactive waste processing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Robert E. (Lombard, IL); Ziegler, Anton A. (Darien, IL); Serino, David F. (Maplewood, MN); Basnar, Paul J. (Western Springs, IL)

    1987-01-01

    Apparatus for use in processing radioactive waste materials for shipment and storage in solid form in a container is disclosed. The container includes a top, and an opening in the top which is smaller than the outer circumference of the container. The apparatus includes an enclosure into which the container is placed, solution feed apparatus for adding a solution containing radioactive waste materials into the container through the container opening, and at least one rotatable blade for blending the solution with a fixing agent such as cement or the like as the solution is added into the container. The blade is constructed so that it can pass through the opening in the top of the container. The rotational axis of the blade is displaced from the center of the blade so that after the blade passes through the opening, the blade and container can be adjusted so that one edge of the blade is adjacent the cylindrical wall of the container, to insure thorough mixing. When the blade is inside the container, a substantially sealed chamber is formed to contain vapors created by the chemical action of the waste solution and fixant, and vapors emanating through the opening in the container.

  20. Compaction behavior of surrogate degraded emplaced WIPP waste.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broome, Scott Thomas; Bronowski, David R.; Kuthakun, Souvanny James; Pfeifle, Thomas W.; Herrick, Courtney Grant

    2014-03-01

    The present study results are focused on laboratory testing of surrogate waste materials. The surrogate wastes correspond to a conservative estimate of degraded Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) containers and TRU waste materials at the end of the 10,000 year regulatory period. Testing consists of hydrostatic, triaxial, and uniaxial strain tests performed on surrogate waste recipes that were previously developed by Hansen et al. (1997). These recipes can be divided into materials that simulate 50% and 100% degraded waste by weight. The percent degradation indicates the anticipated amount of iron corrosion, as well as the decomposition of cellulosics, plastics, and rubbers (CPR). Axial, lateral, and volumetric strain and axial, lateral, and pore stress measurements were made. Two unique testing techniques were developed during the course of the experimental program. The first involves the use of dilatometry to measure sample volumetric strain under a hydrostatic condition. Bulk moduli of the samples measured using this technique were consistent with those measured using more conventional methods. The second technique involved performing triaxial tests under lateral strain control. By limiting the lateral strain to zero by controlling the applied confining pressure while loading the specimen axially in compression, one can maintain a right-circular cylindrical geometry even under large deformations. This technique is preferred over standard triaxial testing methods which result in inhomogeneous deformation or (3z(Bbarreling(3y. (BManifestations of the inhomogeneous deformation included non-uniform stress states, as well as unrealistic Poissons ratios (> 0.5) or those that vary significantly along the length of the specimen. Zero lateral strain controlled tests yield a more uniform stress state, and admissible and uniform values of Poissons ratio.

  1. Steam reforming of low-level mixed waste. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-06-01

    ThermoChem has successfully designed, fabricated and operated a nominal 90 pound per hour Process Development Unit (PDU) on various low-level mixed waste surrogates. The design, construction, and testing of the PDU as well as performance and economic projections for a 300-lb/hr demonstration and commercial system are described. The overall system offers an environmentally safe, non-incinerating, cost-effective, and publicly acceptable method of processing LLMW. The steam-reforming technology was ranked the No. 1 non-incineration technology for destruction of hazardous organic wastes in a study commissioned by the Mixed Waste Focus Area and published in April 1997. The ThermoChem steam-reforming system has been developed over the last 13 years culminating in this successful test campaign on LLMW surrogates. Six surrogates were successfully tested including a 750-hour test on material simulating a PCB- and Uranium-contaminated solid waste found at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The test results indicated essentially total (> 99.9999%) destruction of RCRA and TSCA hazardous halogenated organics, significant levels of volume reduction (> 400 to 1), and retention of radionuclides in the volume-reduced solids. Economic evaluations have shown the steam-reforming system to be very cost competitive with more conventional and other emerging technologies.

  2. WASTE DESCRIPTION CONTACT PHONE RECYCLED OR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    eliminates potential environmental impact of storing waste bricks. Waste Oil Roland Baillargeon, ext.3261 Source Reduction 3,500 Hazardous Waste $6,000 $0 $20,000 350 gallons of waste oil contaminated contamination was identified and replaced with non-chlorinated substitute. Waste oil is now removed free

  3. Pharmaceutical waste may be a hazardous chemical waste, controlled substance or biomedical waste. Proper classification is necessary to be in compliance with the laws regulating each waste type.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Steven C.

    Pharmaceutical waste may be a hazardous chemical waste, controlled substance or biomedical waste. Hazardous Chemical Pharmaceutical Waste: A number of common pharmaceuticals are regulated as hazardous or more of the EPA characteristics of a hazardous chemical waste are also regulated as a hazardous

  4. University of Sussex Waste Management Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    University of Sussex Waste Management Policy May 2007 #12;1 University of Sussex Waste Management Policy May 2007 University of Sussex Waste Management Policy Contents 1. Introduction 2. Policy Statement;2 University of Sussex Waste Management Policy May 2007 Waste Management Policy 1. Introduction Due

  5. Hazardous Waste Management Overview The Five L's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    Hazardous Waste Management Overview The Five L's CoLLect CoLLect all hazardous chemical waste and submit a chemical waste pick-up request form for proper disposal. Periodically evaluate your chemical are unsure if your chemical waste is a Hazardous Waste, consult EH&S at hazmat@columbia.edu. DO

  6. Waste management units - Savannah River Site. Volume 1, Waste management unit worksheets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    This report is a compilation of worksheets from the waste management units of Savannah River Plant. Information is presented on the following: Solid Waste Management Units having received hazardous waste or hazardous constituents with a known release to the environment; Solid Waste Management Units having received hazardous waste or hazardous constituents with no known release to the environment; Solid Waste Management Units having received no hazardous waste or hazardous constituents; Waste Management Units having received source; and special nuclear, or byproduct material only.

  7. Energy Conservation and Waste Reduction in the Metal Fabrication Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirk, M. C. Jr.; Looby, G. P.

    1996-01-01

    , and solvent - is shipped off-site as hazardous waste to be incinerated. Paint overspray from conventional spray guns collects and dries on paint booth filters, which are landfilled. Solvent used for paint thinning and clean-up evaporates. Spent oil...,620 15,000 0.5 proportioning system Use an enclosed 90 2,210 1,750 0.8 spray gun washer Use air-=isted 9 1,300 1,300 1.0 airless paint spray guns Total ppos 31.130 18.050 0.6 Case Study: Manufacturer of Air-cooled Heat Exchangers. This plant...

  8. Plant response to FBC waste-coal slurry solid mixtures. [Quarterly] technical report, September 1--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darmody, R.G.; Dunker, R.E. [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States); Dreher, G.B.; Roy, W.R.; Steel, J.D. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1994-03-01

    The goal of this project is to test the feasibility of stabilizing coal slurry solids (CSS) wastes by directly seeding plants into the waste. This is not done conventionally because the waste can generate toxic amounts of sulfuric acid. Our approach is to neutralize the potential acidity by mixing fluidized bed combustion (FBC) waste into the slurry. If successful, this approach would both help dispose of FBC wastes while providing a more economical slurry stabilization technique. The project involves growing forage plants in CSS-FBC mixtures in the greenhouse. This is the first quarter of the project. We have designed the experiment, secured greenhouse space, purchased the seeds, collected and dried the FBC and CSS samples. The samples represent a typical range of properties. We retrieved two FBC and two CSS samples. One CSS sample appears to have a higher pyrite content than the other.

  9. Total energy cycle assessment of electric and conventional vehicles: an energy and environmental analysis. Volume 1: technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuenca, R.; Formento, J.; Gaines, L.; Marr, B.; Santini, D.; Wang, M.; Adelman, S.; Kline, D.; Mark, J.; Ohi, J.; Rau, N.; Freeman, S.; Humphreys, K.; Placet, M.

    1998-01-01

    This report compares the energy use, oil use and emissions of electric vehicles (EVs) with those of conventional, gasoline-powered vehicles (CVs) over the total life cycle of the vehicles. The various stages included in the vehicles` life cycles include vehicle manufacture, fuel production, and vehicle operation. Disposal is not included. An inventory of the air emissions associated with each stage of the life cycle is estimated. Water pollutants and solid wastes are reported for individual processes, but no comprehensive inventory is developed. Volume I contains the major results, a discussion of the conceptual framework of the study, and summaries of the vehicle, utility, fuel production, and manufacturing analyses. It also contains summaries of comments provided by external peer reviewers and brief responses to these comments.

  10. Generalized Ginzburg-Landau models for non-conventional superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Esposito; G. Salesi

    2009-06-20

    We review some recent extensions of the Ginzburg-Landau model able to describe several properties of non-conventional superconductors. In the first extension, s-wave superconductors endowed with two different critical temperatures are considered, their main thermodynamical and magnetic properties being calculated and discussed. Instead in the second extension we describe spin-triplet superconductivity (with a single critical temperature), studying in detail the main predicted physical properties. A thorough discussion of the peculiar predictions of our models and their physical consequences is as well performed.

  11. SECONDARY WASTE MANAGEMENT FOR HANFORD EARLY LOW ACTIVITY WASTE VITRIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    UNTERREINER BJ

    2008-07-18

    More than 200 million liters (53 million gallons) of highly radioactive and hazardous waste is stored at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The DOE's Hanford Site River Protection Project (RPP) mission includes tank waste retrieval, waste treatment, waste disposal, and tank farms closure activities. This mission will largely be accomplished by the construction and operation of three large treatment facilities at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP): (1) a Pretreatment (PT) facility intended to separate the tank waste into High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW); (2) a HLW vitrification facility intended to immobilize the HLW for disposal at a geologic repository in Yucca Mountain; and (3) a LAW vitrification facility intended to immobilize the LAW for shallow land burial at Hanford's Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The LAW facility is on target to be completed in 2014, five years prior to the completion of the rest of the WTP. In order to gain experience in the operation of the LAW vitrification facility, accelerate retrieval from single-shell tank (SST) farms, and hasten the completion of the LAW immobilization, it has been proposed to begin treatment of the low-activity waste five years before the conclusion of the WTP's construction. A challenge with this strategy is that the stream containing the LAW vitrification facility off-gas treatment condensates will not have the option of recycling back to pretreatment, and will instead be treated by the Hanford Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Here the off-gas condensates will be immobilized into a secondary waste form; ETF solid waste.

  12. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transuranic Waste Baseline inventory report. Volume 2. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    This document is the Baseline Inventory Report for the transuranic (alpha-bearing) wastes stored at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. Waste stream profiles including origin, applicable EPA codes, typical isotopic composition, typical waste densities, and typical rates of waste generation for each facility are presented for wastes stored at the WIPP.

  13. Treatment of mercury containing waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalb, Paul D. (Wading River, NY); Melamed, Dan (Gaithersburg, MD); Patel, Bhavesh R (Elmhurst, NY); Fuhrmann, Mark (Babylon, NY)

    2002-01-01

    A process is provided for the treatment of mercury containing waste in a single reaction vessel which includes a) stabilizing the waste with sulfur polymer cement under an inert atmosphere to form a resulting mixture and b) encapsulating the resulting mixture by heating the mixture to form a molten product and casting the molten product as a monolithic final waste form. Additional sulfur polymer cement can be added in the encapsulation step if needed, and a stabilizing additive can be added in the process to improve the leaching properties of the waste form.

  14. Progress Update: TRU Waste Shipping

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2012-06-14

    A progress update at the Savannah River Site. A continued effort on shipping TRU waste to WIPP in Carlsbad, New Mexico.

  15. Solid Waste Management Act (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act provides for the planning and regulation of solid waste storage, collection, transportation, processing, treatment, and disposal. It requires that municipalities submit plans for municipal...

  16. Process for preparing liquid wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oden, Laurance L. (Albany, OR); Turner, Paul C. (Albany, OR); O'Connor, William K. (Lebanon, OR); Hansen, Jeffrey S. (Corvallis, OR)

    1997-01-01

    A process for preparing radioactive and other hazardous liquid wastes for treatment by the method of vitrification or melting is provided for.

  17. Enhanced Tank Waste Strategy Update

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to maintain a safe, secure, and compliant posture in the EM complex Radioactive tank waste stabilization, treatment, and disposal Spent (used) nuclear fuel storage, receipt, and...

  18. Nuclear Waste Partnership Contract Modifications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Waste Partnership Contract DE-EM0001971 Modifications NWP Modification Index Description Modification 001 Modification 002 Modification 003 Modification 004 Modification 005...

  19. Reporting Fraud, Waste, and Abuse

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-09-15

    This Notice reminds all DOE employees of their duty to report allegations of fraud, waste, and abuse to the Office of Inspector General. No cancellation.

  20. Radioactive waste processing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, R.E.; Ziegler, A.A.; Serino, D.F.; Basnar, P.J.

    1985-08-30

    Apparatus for use in processing radioactive waste materials for shipment and storage in solid form in a container is disclosed. The container includes a top, and an opening in the top which is smaller than the outer circumference of the container. The apparatus includes an enclosure into which the container is placed, solution feed apparatus for adding a solution containing radioactive waste materials into the container through the container opening, and at least one rotatable blade for blending the solution with a fixing agent such as cement or the like as the solution is added into the container. The blade is constructed so that it can pass through the opening in the top of the container. The rotational axis of the blade is displaced from the center of the blade so that after the blade passes through the opening, the blade and container can be adjusted so that one edge of the blade is adjacent the cylindrical wall of the container, to insure thorough mixing. When the blade is inside the container, a substantially sealed chamber is formed to contain vapors created by the chemical action of the waste solution and fixant, and vapors emanating through the opening in the container. The chamber may be formed by placing a removable extension over the top of the container. The extension communicates with the apparatus so that such vapors are contained within the container, extension and solution feed apparatus. A portion of the chamber includes coolant which condenses the vapors. The resulting condensate is returned to the container by the force of gravity.

  1. Waste IncIneratIon and Waste PreventIon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    replace fossil energy sources such as coal or oil and prevent about 9.75 million tonnes of carbon dioxide in recent years would withdraw these from material recovery. Regarding this point, the UBA would emphasise-/Abfallgesetz) continues to hold: Waste prevention has priority over recovery and disposal. Nevertheless, the use of waste

  2. Waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), DOE/WIPP-069, was initially developed by a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Steering Committee to provide performance requirements to ensure public health and safety as well as the safe handling of transuranic (TRU) waste at the WIPP. This revision updates the criteria and requirements of previous revisions and deletes those which were applicable only to the test phase. The criteria and requirements in this document must be met by participating DOE TRU Waste Generator/Storage Sites (Sites) prior to shipping contact-handled (CH) and remote-handled (RH) TRU waste forms to the WIPP. The WIPP Project will comply with applicable federal and state regulations and requirements, including those in Titles 10, 40, and 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). The WAC, DOE/WIPP-069, serves as the primary directive for assuring the safe handling, transportation, and disposal of TRU wastes in the WIPP and for the certification of these wastes. The WAC identifies strict requirements that must be met by participating Sites before these TRU wastes may be shipped for disposal in the WIPP facility. These criteria and requirements will be reviewed and revised as appropriate, based on new technical or regulatory requirements. The WAC is a controlled document. Revised/changed pages will be supplied to all holders of controlled copies.

  3. Tank Waste Remediation System Tank Waste Analysis Plan. FY 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haller, C.S.; Dove, T.H.

    1994-11-01

    This documents lays the groundwork for preparing the implementing the TWRS tank waste analysis planning and reporting for Fiscal Year 1995. This Tank Waste Characterization Plan meets the requirements specified in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, better known as the Tri-Party Agreement.

  4. SYNERGIA Forum Integrated Municipal Solid Waste Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    2nd SYNERGIA Forum «Integrated Municipal Solid Waste Management: Recycling and Energy Change and Solid Waste Management" Anthony Mavropoulos President, Scientific Technical Committee, Chairman, SYNERGIA "Where Greece stands on the Ladder of Sustainable Waste Management " *Nikolaos

  5. Hazardous Waste Management Standards and Regulations (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act states the standards and regulations for the management of hazardous waste. No person shall construct, modify or operate a hazardous waste facility or otherwise dispose of hazardous waste...

  6. Columbia University Hazardous Waste Room Inspection Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    Storage Area Hazardous Waste Room Inspection Report Location: Bldg. Room: Date: Inspected ByColumbia University Hazardous Waste Room Inspection Report Flammable Storage Area Lack Pack always closed while holding hazardous wastes? Comment: 12. Are containers labeled? Date

  7. Environmental Management Waste and Recycling Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haase, Markus

    Environmental Management Waste and Recycling Policy October 2006 The University is committed to sustainable waste management through reducing our consumption of materials, encouraging re-use where possible information in all future waste management contracts For further information see www

  8. Biochar: A Solution to Oakland's Green Waste?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villar, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    maize stover, is the food waste which differs from stoverfor simplicity, since food waste accounts for only 1/3 ofof Oakland. This waste consists of food scraps as well as

  9. Coolside waste management research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Objective was to produce sufficient information on physical and chemical nature of Coolside waste (Coolside No.1, 3 at Edgewater power plant) to design and construct stable, environmentally safe landfills. Progress during this period was centered on analytical method development, elemental and mineralogical analysis of samples, and field facilities preparation to receive lysimeter fill. Sample preparation techniques for thick target PIXE/PIGE were investigated; good agreement between measured and actual values for standard fly ash were obtained for all elements except Fe, Ba, K (PIXE).

  10. Municipal waste processing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayberry, John L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1988-01-01

    Municipal waste materials are processed by crushing the materials so that pieces of noncombustible material are smaller than a selected size and pieces of combustible material are larger than the selected size. The crushed materials are placed on a vibrating mesh screen conveyor belt having openings which pass the smaller, noncombustible pieces of material, but do not pass the larger, combustible pieces of material. Pieces of material which become lodged in the openings of the conveyor belt may be removed by cylindrical deraggers or pressurized air. The crushed materials may be fed onto the conveyor belt by a vibrating feed plate which shakes the materials so that they tend to lie flat.

  11. Municipal waste processing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayberry, John L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1989-01-01

    Municipal waste materials are processed by crushing the materials so that pieces of noncombustible material are smaller than a selected size and pieces of combustible material are larger than the selected size. The crushed materials are placed on a vibrating mesh screen conveyor belt having openings which pass the smaller, noncombustible pieces of material, but do not pass the larger, combustible pieces of material. Consecutive conveyors may be connected by an intermediate vibratory plate. An air knife can be used to further separate materials based on weight.

  12. Tank Waste Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S. Coal StocksSuppliers Tag:Take ActionPermitB3/15 Tank Waste

  13. The Integrated Waste Tracking System - A Flexible Waste Management Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Robert Stephen

    2001-02-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has fully embraced a flexible, computer-based tool to help increase waste management efficiency and integrate multiple operational functions from waste generation through waste disposition while reducing cost. The Integrated Waste Tracking System (IWTS)provides comprehensive information management for containerized waste during generation,storage, treatment, transport, and disposal. The IWTS provides all information necessary for facilities to properly manage and demonstrate regulatory compliance. As a platformindependent, client-server and Web-based inventory and compliance system, the IWTS has proven to be a successful tracking, characterization, compliance, and reporting tool that meets the needs of both operations and management while providing a high level of management flexibility.

  14. Vitrification of hazardous and radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bickford, D.F.; Schumacher, R.

    1995-12-31

    Vitrification offers many attractive waste stabilization options. Versatility of waste compositions, as well as the inherent durability of a glass waste form, have made vitrification the treatment of choice for high-level radioactive wastes. Adapting the technology to other hazardous and radioactive waste streams will provide an environmentally acceptable solution to many of the waste challenges that face the public today. This document reviews various types and technologies involved in vitrification.

  15. Wanaket Wildlife Area Management Plan : Five-Year Plan for Protecting, Enhancing, and Mitigating Wildlife Habitat Losses for the McNary Hydroelectric Facility.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

    2001-09-01

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to continue to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat at the Wanaket Wildlife Area. The Wanaket Wildlife Area was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1993. This management plan will provide an update of the original management plan approved by BPA in 1995. Wanaket will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the McNary Hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Wanaket Wildlife Area, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Wanaket Wildlife Area management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Wanaket Wildlife Area will be managed over the next five years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management. Specific project objectives are related to protection and enhancement of wildlife habitats and are expressed in terms of habitat units (HU's). Habitat units were developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service's Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP), and are designed to track habitat gains and/or losses associated with mitigation and/or development projects. Habitat Units for a given species are a product of habitat quantity (expressed in acres) and habitat quality estimates. Habitat quality estimates are developed using Habitat Suitability Indices (HSI). These indices are based on quantifiable habitat features such as vegetation height, shrub cover, or other parameters, which are known to provide life history requisites for mitigation species. Habitat Suitability Indices range from 0 to 1, with an HSI of 1 providing optimum habitat conditions for the selected species. One acre of optimum habitat provides one Habitat Unit. The objective of continued management of the Wanaket Wildlife Mitigation Area, including protection and enhancement of upland and wetland/wetland associated cover types, is to provide and maintain 2,334 HU's of protection credit and generate 2,495 HU's of enhancement credit by the year 2004.

  16. Total energy cycle assessment of electric and conventional vehicles: an energy and environmental analysis. Volume 4: peer review comments on technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    This report compares the energy use, oil use and emissions of electric vehicles (EVs) with those of conventional, gasoline-powered vehicles (CVs) over the total life cycle of the vehicles. The various stages included in the vehicles` life cycles include vehicle manufacture, fuel production, and vehicle operation. Disposal is not included. An inventory of the air emissions associated with each stage of the life cycle is estimated. Water pollutants and solid wastes are reported for individual processes, but no comprehensive inventory is developed. Volume IV includes copies of all the external peer review comments on the report distributed for review in July 1997.

  17. Solid low-level radioactive waste radiation stability studies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Arnold Andre?

    1989-01-01

    MANAGEMENT . . . Historical background Characteristics of radioactive wastes Classification of radioactive wastes Disposal methodology and criteria Handling and storage of radioactive wastes SOLID RADIOACTIVE WASTES Historical background... Characteristics of the solidified wastes Storage and handling of solid radioactive wastes Shipment of solid radioactive wastes Solidification of waste solutions MATERIALS AND METHODS Ion-exchange methods. High integrity containers (HIC). . tv tx 15 15...

  18. Production and degradation of polyhydroxyalkanoates in waste environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    waste has been investigated in order to utilize abundant organic compounds in waste water. Since PHA

  19. Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - March 2013 March 2013 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction...

  20. Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - March 2012 March 2012 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project...

  1. Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    August 2011 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - August 2011 August 2011 Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality...

  2. Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    October 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - October 2012 October 2012 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant...

  3. Enterprise Assessments Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant -...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Enterprise Assessments Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - December 2014 Enterprise Assessments Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - December 2014 December, 2014 Review of the...

  4. Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    January 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - January 2013 January 2013 Review of the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant...

  5. Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    May 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - May 2013 May 2013 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction...

  6. Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    August 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - August 2012 August 2012 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant...

  7. Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) Reports and Records of Decision Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS)...

  8. Independent Oversight Assessment, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - January 2012 Independent Oversight Assessment, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - January 2012 January 2012 Assessment of the...

  9. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    - October 2013 October 2013 Observation of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter and Melter Off-gas Process System Hazards Analysis Activities...

  10. Integrated Solid Waste Management Act (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act affirms the state's support for alternative waste management practices, including waste reduction and resource recovery. Each county and municipality is required to file an integrated...

  11. Missouri Hazardous Waste Management Law (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Hazardous Waste Program, administered by the Hazardous Waste Management Commission in the Department of Natural Resources, regulates the processing, transportation, and disposal of hazardous...

  12. Solid Waste Management Policy and Programs (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These statutes encourage the State and local governments to develop waste management strategies to achieve the maximum possible reduction in waste generation, eliminate or reduce adverse...

  13. Solid Waste Management Act (West Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In addition to establishing a comprehensive program of controlling all phases of solid waste management and assigning responsibilities for solid waste management to the Secretary of Department of...

  14. UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA INFECTIOUS WASTE DISPOSAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgan, Stephen L.

    UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA INFECTIOUS WASTE DISPOSAL Introduction All biologically EHS: -South Carolina Infectious Waste Management Regulations R.61-105 #12;

  15. Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Operations Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations This document was used to determine facts and conditions...

  16. Advanced Membrane Systems: Recovering Wasteful and Hazardous...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Membrane Systems: Recovering Wasteful and Hazardous Fuel Vapors at the Gasoline Tank Advanced Membrane Systems: Recovering Wasteful and Hazardous Fuel Vapors at the...

  17. Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Federal Operational Readiness Review This report documents the results of an...

  18. Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Contractor Operational Readiness Review This report documents the results of an...

  19. Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Operations, EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations, EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 The documents...

  20. Overview of Integrated Waste Treatment Unit

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Environmental Management Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Overview Overview for the DOE High Level Waste Corporate Board March 5, 2009 safety performance cleanup closure...

  1. Tank Waste System Integrated Project Team

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to protect human health, the environment and national security are maintained. Tank Waste System Tank Waste System Integrated Project Team Integrated Project Team Steve...

  2. Independent Oversight Review, Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project - April 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project - April 2013 April 2013 Review of Radiation Protection...

  3. Enforcement Letter, Westinghouse Waste Isolation Division - October...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to Westinghouse Waste Isolation Division related to Quality Assurance and Occupational Radiation Protection Noncompliances at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant On October 3, 2000,...

  4. 1993 Solid Waste Reference Forecast Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valero, O.J.; Blackburn, C.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Kaae, P.S.; Armacost, L.L.; Garrett, S.M.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-08-01

    This report, which updates WHC-EP-0567, 1992 Solid Waste Reference Forecast Summary, (WHC 1992) forecasts the volumes of solid wastes to be generated or received at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site during the 30-year period from FY 1993 through FY 2022. The data used in this document were collected from Westinghouse Hanford Company forecasts as well as from surveys of waste generators at other US Department of Energy sites who are now shipping or plan to ship solid wastes to the Hanford Site for disposal. These wastes include low-level and low-level mixed waste, transuranic and transuranic mixed waste, and nonradioactive hazardous waste.

  5. Vitrification Melter Waste Incidental to Reprocessing Determination...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE Manual 435.1-1 Waste-Incidental-To-Reprocessing Determination for the West Valley Demonstration Project Vitrification Melter Vitrification Melter Waste Incidental to...

  6. Cummins Waste Heat Recovery | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Waste Heat Recovery Cummins Waste Heat Recovery Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit,...

  7. Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Overview and status of project to develop...

  8. Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions...

  9. Thermoelectric Generator Development for Automotive Waste Heat...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Thermoelectric Generator Development for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and...

  10. Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the waste inside those tanks. Both elements were ultimately placed in sturdy, stainless steel containers which were then put into Hanford's Waste Encapsulation Storage...

  11. Waste Treatment Facility Passes Federal Inspection, Completes...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Treatment Facility Passes Federal Inspection, Completes Final Milestone, Begins Startup Waste Treatment Facility Passes Federal Inspection, Completes Final Milestone, Begins...

  12. Vehicle Fuel Economy Improvement through Thermoelectric Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Economy Improvement through Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Vehicle Fuel Economy Improvement through Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions...

  13. Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Thermoelectric Materials and Generator Technology for Automotive Waste Heat at GM Advanced Thermoelectric Materials and Generator Technology for Automotive Waste Heat at...

  14. Reporting Fraud, Waste, and Abuse

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-12-15

    To notify all Department of Energy (DOE) employees, including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) employees, of their duty to report allegations of fraud, waste, and abuse to the appropriate authorities, including the DOE Office of Inspector General (OIG). Cancels: DOE N 221.12, Reporting Fraud, Waste, and Abuse, dated 10-19-06

  15. Generating Steam by Waste Incineration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, D. R.; Darrow, L. A.

    1981-01-01

    Combustible waste is a significant source of steam at the new John Deere Tractor Works assembly plant in Waterloo, Iowa. The incinerators, each rated to consume two tons of solid waste per hour, are expected to provide up to 100 percent of the full...

  16. Reduced waste generation, FY 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-02-01

    The United States Department of Energy is committed to the principles of minimizing the quantity and transuranic content of its transuranium (TRU) waste being generated at its nuclear facilities. The reasons are to reduce costs associated with waste handling and disposal, and also to reduce radiation exposure to workers and risk for radionuclide release to man and the environment. The purpose of this document is to provide the USDOE with a plan of research and development tasks for waste minimization, and is prepared so as to provide the maximum impact on volumes based on cost/benefit factors. The document is to be updated annually or as needed to reflect current and future tasks. The Reduced Waste Generation (RWG) tasks encompass a wide range of activities with the principal goals of (1) preventing the generation of waste and (2) converting TRU waste into low-level wastes (LLW) by sorting or decontamination. Concepts for reducing the volume such as in incineration and compaction are considered within the discipline of Reduced Waste Generation, but are considered as somewhat developed technology with only a need for implementation. 33 refs.

  17. Hydroelectric redevelopment maintains heritage values

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bulkovshteyn, L.; Chidiac, M.; Hall, W.

    1995-12-31

    The Seymour GS is an 80 year old generating station on the historic Trent-Severn Waterway in Ontario, Canada. The rehabilitation at Seymour was approved by Provincial and Federal authorities on condition that the original appearance of the building be maintained. The capacity of the Generating Station (GS) is being uprated from 3.15 MW to 5.7 MW, by replacing five vertical double runner Francis units with five horizontal Kaplan turbines. The replacement of vertical Francis units with horizontal Kaplan units, necessitated an extensive and innovative demolition approach for the substructure modification. The new turbines required a powerhouse base slab 3.5 m below the grade of the original slab. This required removal of the existing slabs and foundation rock along with most of the interior powerhouse walls. The type of modification and demolition were carefully chosen to accommodate a very tight schedule dictated by the requirement of the Federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO), where in-water work is restricted to certain months of the year.

  18. Hydroelectric energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas: EnergyHunterdonHutto,Fuel CellHydrodynamic

  19. Small Hydroelectric | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing Capacity forSilicium de ProvenceSolar JumpSloan, New York:Sluneta sroSmall

  20. Small Hydroelectric | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEurope GmbH JumpSlough Heat and Power Jump to:Small