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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste-to-energy msw" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Waste?to?Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Waste?to?Energy Roadmapping Workshop Waste?to?Energy Presentation by Jonathan Male, Director of the Bioenery Technolgies Office, Department of Energy

2

CCA-Treated wood disposed in landfills and life-cycle trade-offs with waste-to-energy and MSW landfill disposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CCA-Treated wood disposed in landfills and life-cycle trade-offs with waste-to-energy and MSW in waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities. In other countries, the predominant disposal option for wood, others have not, and the product continues to enter the waste stream from construction, demolition

Florida, University of

3

Waste-to-Energy Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Waste to Energy Roadmapping Workshop was held on November 5, 2014, in Arlington, Virginia. This workshop gathered waste-to-energy experts to identify the key technical barriers to the commercial deployment of liquid transportation fuels from wet waste feedstocks.

4

Waste-to-Energy Forum  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The tenth in a series of planned U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy-sponsored strategic energy development forums, this Tribal Leader Forum will focus on waste-to-energy...

5

Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop Agenda | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop Agenda Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop Agenda Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop Agenda, November 5-6, 2014, Arlington, Virginia....

6

THERMAL TREATMENT REVIEW . WTE I THERMAL TREATMENT Since the beginning of this century, global waste-to-energy capacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of new waste-to gasification process at an industrial scale The Waste-To-Energy Research and Technology waste-to-energy capacity has increased steadily at the rate of about four million tonnes of MSW per year solid waste (MSW). Three dominant ,technologies _ those developed by The only true A global perspective

Columbia University

7

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities July 24, 2014 9:00AM to 3:30PM EDT U.S....

8

Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop Agenda  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste-to-Energy Workshop Agenda November 5-6, 2014 DoubleTree Hotel Crystal City Arlington, VA 22202 Day 1: Wednesday, November 5, 2014 Time Activity 7:30 am Registration and...

9

Waste-to-Energy Technologies and Project Development | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste-to-Energy Technologies and Project Development Waste-to-Energy Technologies and Project Development Presentation at Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cells Webinar, July 13, 2011...

10

WASTE-TO-ENERGY ROADMAPPING WORKSHOP | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

WASTE-TO-ENERGY ROADMAPPING WORKSHOP WASTE-TO-ENERGY ROADMAPPING WORKSHOP The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) at the Department of Energy aims to identify and address key...

11

ISWA Study Tour WASTE-TO-ENERGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Waste Treatment and Energy Recovery" Fundamentals of drying, pyrolysis, gasification, and combustionISWA Study Tour WASTE-TO-ENERGY Programme, June 22-27, 2014 Czech Republic Austria Seminar;Practice Seminar on Sustainable Waste Management in Europe based on Prevention, Recycling, Recovery

12

Waste-to-Energy Workshop Agenda  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) at the Department of Energy aims to identify and address key technical barriers to the commercial deployment of liquid transportation fuels from waste feedstocks. As a part of this effort, BETO is organizing a Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping workshop. Workshop participants will join facilitated breakout sessions to discuss anaerobic digestion, hydrothermal liquefaction, and other processes that make productive use of wastewater residuals, biosolids, foodstuffs, and organic municipal solid waste. These discussions will be synthesized and used in developing a waste-to-energy technology roadmap.

13

The 2010 ERC Directory of Waste-to-Energy Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The 2010 ERC Directory of Waste-to-Energy Plants By Ted Michaels The 2010 ERC Directory of Waste-to-Energy Plants provides current information about the waste-to-energy sector in the United States. Since this Directory was last published in 2007, waste-to-energy capacity has increased for the first time in many

Columbia University

14

Waste to Energy: Biogas CHP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Southside Wastewater Treatment Plant Biogas Cogeneration Project November 9, 2011 2011 Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference ?Turning Waste Into Energy? What to Expect ? ? Southside Overview ? Wastewater Treatment Process... gallons per day ? Processes and disposes over 150 tons of solids/day from both of the City?s wastewater treatment plants What is Biogas? ? Biogas is the methane (CH4) produced as a by-product of the anaerobic digestion process at the Southside...

Wagner, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) Agency/Company /Organization: Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Waste to Energy Phase: Create a Vision Resource Type: Dataset, Publications, Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.wte.org/ Cost: Free The Energy Recovery Council is a national trade organization representing the waste-to-energy industry and communities that own waste-to-energy facilities. Overview The Energy Recovery Council is a national trade organization representing the waste-to-energy industry and communities that own waste-to-energy facilities. The website includes information on waste-to-energy basics

16

Waste-to-Energy Workshop | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste-to-Energy Workshop Waste-to-Energy Workshop November 5, 2014 9:00AM EST to November 6, 2014 12:00PM EST DoubleTree Hotel Crystal City 300 Army Navy Drive Arlington, VA 22202...

17

Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop November 5, 2014 9:00AM EST to November 6, 2014 12:00PM EST DoubleTree Hotel Crystal City 300 Army Navy...

18

Feasibility Study on Solid Waste to Energy Technological Aspects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feasibility Study on Solid Waste to Energy Technological Aspects Yuzhong Tan College of Engineering://www.funginstitute.berkeley.edu/sites/default/ les/SolidWasteToEnergy.pdf April 15, 2013 130 Blum Hall #5580 Berkeley, CA 94720-5580 | (510) 664 seeks to compare and evaluate each technology by reviewing waste to energy reports and seeking

Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

19

Waste-to-Energy Evaluation: U.S. Virgin Islands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This NREL technical report evaluates the environmental impact and fundamental economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) technology based on available data from commercially operating WTE facilities in the United States. In particular, it considers life-cycle impacts of WTE as compared to landfill disposal and various forms of electrical generation, as well as WTE impacts on source reduction or recycling programs. In addition, it evaluates the economics and potential environmental impact of WTE in the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) based on existing USVI waste stream characterization data, recycling challenges unique to the USVI, and the results of cost and environmental modeling of four municipal solid waste (MSW) management options, including landfill, refuse-derived fuel (RDF) production, recycling, and gassification plus RDF.

Davis, J.; Hasse, S.; Warren, A.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Global Waste to Energy Conversion Company GWECC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste to Energy Conversion Company GWECC Waste to Energy Conversion Company GWECC Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Waste to Energy Conversion Company (GWECC) Place Washington, DC Product GWECC is a global alternative energy company headquartered in Washington DC, USA. References Global Waste to Energy Conversion Company (GWECC)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Global Waste to Energy Conversion Company (GWECC) is a company located in Washington, DC . References ↑ "Global Waste to Energy Conversion Company (GWECC)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Global_Waste_to_Energy_Conversion_Company_GWECC&oldid=345924" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste-to-energy msw" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The ninth in a series of planned U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy-sponsored strategic energy development forums, this Tribal Leader Forum focused on waste-to-energy technology and project opportunities for Tribes.

22

Waste-to-Energy and Fuel Cell Technologies Overview  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation by Robert Remick, NREL, at the DOE-DOD Waste-to-Energy Using Fuel Cells Workshop held Jan. 13, 2011

23

Waste to Energy Developers WTED | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste-to-Energy Developers (WTED) Place: California Sector: Services Product: WTED is an engineering company that provides services in the areas of industrial processes, electric...

24

(www.wtert.gr) Waste-to-Energy Research &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ WTERT (www.wtert.gr) 1 Waste-to-Energy Research & Technology Council WTERT Greece ­ SYNERGIA Dr. Efstratios Kalogirou is the President of Waste-to-Energy Research & Technology Council (WTERT.S.A. (cooperating with Professor N. Themelis) , in the scientific fields: energy recovery from solid wastes, potable

25

Waste-To-Energy Feasibility Analysis: A Simulation Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste- To- Energy Feasibility Analysis: A Simulation Model Viet- An Duong College of Engineering://www.funginstitute.berkeley.edu/sites/default/ les/WasteToEnergy.pdf May 1, 2014 130 Blum Hall #5580 Berkeley, CA 94720-5580 | (510) 664-4337 | www of the main battles of our generation. Using waste to produce electricity can be a major source of energy

Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

26

SMALL SCALE WASTE-TO-ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES Claudine Ellyin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 SMALL SCALE WASTE-TO-ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES Claudine Ellyin Advisor: Prof. Nickolas J. Themelis for large Waste-to-Energy (WTE) facilities is combustion on a moving grate of "as-received" municipal solid, in particular, the Energos technology. The Energos technology was developed in Norway, in order to provide

27

Waste-to-Energy using Refuse-Derived Fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At a mass-burn incinerator, Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) is ... vehicles or waste collection vehicles into a deep pit. There is no processing of the waste. Waste is removed from the pit by overhead crane and fed i...

Floyd Hasselriis MME; Dr. Patrick F. Mahoney

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Waste-to-Energy using Refuse-Derived Fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At a mass-burn incinerator, Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) is ... vehicles or waste collection vehicles into a deep pit. There is no processing of the waste. Waste is removed from the pit by overhead crane and fed i...

Floyd Hasselriis MME; Dr. Patrick F. Mahoney

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference May 18-20, 2009, Chantilly, Virginia, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WASTE (MSW) GASIFICATION UNDER VARIOUS PRESSURES AND CO2 CONCENTRATION ATMOSPHERES Eilhann Kwon, Kelly J, New York, NY 10027 ABSTRACT The Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) gasification process is a promisingProceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference NAWTEC17 May 18-20, 2009

Columbia University

30

Kent County Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kent County Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility Kent County Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Kent County Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility Facility Kent County Waste to Energy Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Kent County, Michigan Coordinates 43.0097027°, -85.520024° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.0097027,"lon":-85.520024,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

31

Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cells Webinar  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Fuel Cell Technologies Office and the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) held a webinar on July 13, 2011, in Washington, DC, to discuss waste-to-energy for fuel...

32

Waste-to-Energy Projects at Army Installations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation by Franklin H. Holcomb, U.S. Army ERDC-CERL, at the DOE-DOD Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cells Workshop held Jan. 13, 2011

33

Waste-to-Energy Evaluation: U.S. Virgin Islands  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

This report evaluates the environmental impact and fundamental economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) technology based on available data from commercially operating WTE facilities in the United States.

34

Waste-to-Energy and Fuel Cell Technologies Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Waste-to-Energy and Fuel Cell Waste-to-Energy and Fuel Cell T h l i O i Innovation for Our Energy Future Technologies Overview Presented to: DOD-DOE Waste-to- Energy Workshop Energy Workshop Dr. Robert J. Remick J 13 2011 January 13, 2011 Capital Hilton Hotel Washington, DC NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Global Approach for Using Biogas Innovation for Our Energy Future Anaerobic Digestion of Organic Wastes is a Good Source of Methane. Organic waste + methanogenic bacteria → methane (CH 4 ) Issues: High levels of contamination Time varying output of gas quantity and quality Innovation for Our Energy Future Photo courtesy of Dos Rios Water Recycling Center, San Antonio, TX

35

The Conversion of Waste to Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Almost every industrial operation produces some combustible waste, but conversion of this to useful energy is often more difficult than with other energy recovery projects and requires careful attention to design, operating and maintaining...

John, T.; Cheek, L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Waste To Energy -Strategies and Payoffs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, expanding the steam through back pressure turbines to generate electricity. Some plants used to gen erate so much power through cogeneration and hydro that they became power companies also. The hard ware involved in this type of cogeneration system has... the wastes to make steam? The answer is that under some circumstances the cost of the electric generation equipment would be marginally unattrac tive, but for the majority of American industry, the design of new waste to steam facilities should include...

Gilbert, J. S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Waste-to-Energy Evaluation: U.S. Virgin Islands  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Waste-to-Energy Evaluation: Waste-to-Energy Evaluation: U.S. Virgin Islands Jerry Davis, Scott Haase, and Adam Warren Technical Report NREL/TP-7A20-52308 August 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Waste-to-Energy Evaluation: U.S. Virgin Islands Jerry Davis, Scott Haase, and Adam Warren Prepared under Task No(s). IDVI.0000 and IDVI.0032 Technical Report NREL/TP-7A20-52308 August 2011 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

38

WASTE-TO-ENERGY RESEARCH & TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL www.wtert.gr PRESS RELEASE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WASTE-TO-ENERGY RESEARCH & TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL www.wtert.gr 1 PRESS RELEASE INTERNATIONAL INTENSIVE COURSE " Waste to Energy as an Integral Part of Sustainable Waste Management Worldwide: The case of Baku event focus on state of the art technologies for sustainable waste management, entitled "Waste to Energy

39

Waste-to-Energy Evaluation: U.S. Virgin Islands  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Waste-to-Energy Evaluation: U.S. Virgin Islands Jerry Davis, Scott Haase, and Adam Warren Technical Report NREL/TP-7A20-52308 August 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Waste-to-Energy Evaluation: U.S. Virgin Islands Jerry Davis, Scott Haase, and Adam Warren Prepared under Task No(s). IDVI.0000 and IDVI.0032 Technical Report NREL/TP-7A20-52308 August 2011 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

40

Waste to Energy Power Production at DOE and DOD Sites  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Waste to Energy Power Production Waste to Energy Power Production at DOE and DOD Sites January 13, 2011 Overview - Federal Agency Innovations DOE: S avannah River S ite * Biomass Heat and Power US AF: Hill Air Force Base * Landfill Gas to Energy Generation Ameresco independent DOES avannah River S ite DOES avannah River S ite (DOE-S R) * Georgia / S outh Carolina border * 300+ sq miles extending into 3 counties * Began operations in 1950s Challenges faced by DOE-S R * Aging Infrastructure Ameresco independent * Coal and fuel oil power plants * Increased / new clean air requirements * New energy efficiency / sustainability requirements Business Case Analysis S ite need for both steam and power Repair, renovate, or replace Mandates and desire for renewable energy solution Appropriated funds not available

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste-to-energy msw" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cells Workshop  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cells Workshop Capital Hilton Hotel, Washington DC January 13th, 2011 8:30 am to 5:00 pm Agenda 8:30 am Welcome, introductions and meeting logistics Pete Devlin, Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overall Purpose * To identify DOD-DOE waste-to-energy and fuel cells opportunities * To identify challenges and determine actions to address them * To determine specific ways fuel cell and related technologies can help meet Executive Order 13514 requirements * To identify the next steps for collaboration Background Materials Provided * DOD-DOE MOU - http://www.energy.gov/news/documents/Enhance-Energy-Security-MOU.pdf * Executive Order 13514 - http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/2009/pdf/E9-24518.pdf

42

Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop: Attendee Networking Tool  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

For the Waste-to-Energy Workshop, this tool offers a concise listing of participants' background, areas of expertise, areas of need, and business contact information. Users can sort the information by clicking on the arrows in the header rows. Users can also filter by keywords by typing them into the search field in order to find individuals with skill sets complementary to their own.

43

The crucial role of Waste-to-Energy technologies in enhanced landfill mining: a technology review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The novel concepts Enhanced Waste Management (EWM) and Enhanced Landfill Mining (ELFM) intend to place landfilling of waste in a sustainable context. The state of the technology is an important factor in determining the most suitable moment to valorize either as materials (Waste-to-Product, WtP) or as energy (Waste-to-Energy, WtE) certain landfill waste streams. The present paper reviews thermochemical technologies (incineration, gasification, pyrolysis, plasma technologies, combinations) for energetic valorization of calorific waste streams, with focus on municipal solid waste (MSW), possibly processed into refuse derived fuel (RDF). The potential and suitability of these thermochemical technologies for ELFM applications are discussed. From this review it is clear that process and waste have to be closely matched, and that some thermochemical processes succeed in recovering both materials and energy from waste. Plasma gasification/vitrification is a viable candidate for combined energy and material valorization, its technical feasibility for MSW/RDF applications (including excavated waste) has been proven on installations ranging from pilot to full scale. The continued advances that are being made in process control and process efficiency are expected to improve the commercial viability of these advanced thermochemical conversion technologies in the near future.

A. Bosmans; I. Vanderreydt; D. Geysen; L. Helsen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Ris DTU 09-06-08 Waste-to-energy technologies in TIMES models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Risø DTU 09-06-08 1 Waste-to-energy technologies in TIMES models Poul Erik Grohnheit, Kenneth DTU 09-06-08 2 Waste-to-energy technologies in TIMES models · European law 1999 Directive and current (focusing on Denmark) Long tradition for waste incineration for district heating · How to model waste-to-energy

45

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Overview: 2011 Waste-to-Energy Using...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Overview: 2011 Waste-to-Energy Using Fuel Cells Workshop DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Overview: 2011 Waste-to-Energy Using Fuel Cells Workshop Presentation...

46

Waste-to-Energy Cogeneration Project, Centennial Park  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste-to-Energy Cogeneration Project at Centennial Park has allowed methane from the closed Centennial landfill to export excess power into the the local utilitys electric grid for resale. This project is part of a greater brownfield reclamation project to the benefit of the residents of Munster and the general public. Installation of a gas-to-electric generator and waste-heat conversion unit take methane byproduct and convert it into electricity at the rate of about 103,500 Mwh/year for resale to the local utility. The sale of the electricity will be used to reduce operating budgets by covering the expenses for streetlights and utility bills. The benefits of such a project are not simply financial. Munsters Waste-to Energy Cogeneration Project at Centennial Park will reduce the communitys carbon footprint in an amount equivalent to removing 1,100 cars from our roads, conserving enough electricity to power 720 homes, planting 1,200 acres of trees, or recycling 2,000 tons of waste instead of sending it to a landfill.

Johnson, Clay; Mandon, Jim; DeGiulio, Thomas; Baker, Ryan

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

47

Engineering/design of a co-generation waste-to-energy facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Five hundred fifteen thousand tons of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) is being generated every day in America. At present 68% of this trash is dumped into landfill operations. As the amount of garbage is increasing daily, the amount of land reserved for landfills is diminishing rapidly. With the sentiment of the public that you produce it, you keep it, the import-export of waste between the counties and states for the landfills, no longer appears to be feasible, especially when combined with expensive disposal costs. One method of reducing the quantity of waste sent to landfills is through the use of waste-to-energy facilities - the technology of resource recovery - the technology of today INCINERATION. All cogeneration projects are not alike. This paper examines several aspects of the electrical system of a particular municipal solid waste-to-energy project at Charleston, S.C. which includes plant auxiliary loads as well as a utility interconnection through a step-up transformer.

Bajaj, K.S.; Virgilio, R.J. (Foster Wheeler USA Corp., Clinton, NJ (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Waste to energy status in India: A short review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract India is one of the most rapidly developing countries in the world. It is witnessing growing industrialization and thus development. Such rapid development needs energy to progress, which further makes India an energy hungry nation. Currently India depends mainly upon fossil fuels and thus has to pay a huge bill at the end of every contractual period. These bills can be shortened and the expenditures brought down by using and exploiting non-conventional sources of energy. India holds a huge potential for such non-conventional sources of energy. The rapid development of India is not just pressing hard upon its resources but forcing expenditures on the same. There are also some neglected side effects of this development process like, generation of waste. A population of 1.2 billion is generating 0.5kg per person every day. This, sums up to a huge pile of waste, which is mostly landfilled in the most unhygienic manner possible. Such unmanaged waste not only eats up resources but demands expenditure as well. This can lead to the downfall of an economy and degradation of the nation. Thus, the paper presents waste to energy as a solution to both the problems stated above, using which not only can we reduce the amount of waste, but also produce energy from the same, thus achieving our goal of waste management as well as energy security. The paper presents the current status, major achievements and future aspects of waste to energy in India which will help decision makers, planners and bodies involved in the management of municipal solid waste understand the current status challenges and barriers of MSWM in India for further better planning and management.

Khanjan Ajaybhai Kalyani; Krishan K. Pandey

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Waste-to-energy: Decision making and the decisions made  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the early 1980s, it was projected that waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities would manage as much as half of all municipal solid waste by the turn of the century. However, during the latter part of the 1980s, the cancellation rate for WTE facilities grew to the point that the portion of the waste stream WTE will handle in the long-term future is less certain. This study, conducted as part of a larger study, identifies factors that influence municipalities, decisions regarding WTE. This study takes a broad perspective about decision-making within communities, emphasizing the context within which decisions were made and the decision-making process. It does not seek to judge the correctness of the decisions.

Schexnayder, S.M. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)); Wolfe, A.K. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Waste-to-energy: Decision making and the decisions made  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the early 1980s, it was projected that waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities would manage as much as half of all municipal solid waste by the turn of the century. However, during the latter part of the 1980s, the cancellation rate for WTE facilities grew to the point that the portion of the waste stream WTE will handle in the long-term future is less certain. This study, conducted as part of a larger study, identifies factors that influence municipalities, decisions regarding WTE. This study takes a broad perspective about decision-making within communities, emphasizing the context within which decisions were made and the decision-making process. It does not seek to judge the correctness of the decisions.

Schexnayder, S.M. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States); Wolfe, A.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

High efficiency waste to energy facility -- Pilot plant design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste To Energy facilities are commonly acceptable to the environment and give benefits in two main areas: one is a hygienic waste disposal and another is waste heat energy recovery to save fossil fuel consumption. Recovered energy is used for electricity supply, and it is required to increase the efficiency of refuse to electric energy conversion, and to spread the plant construction throughout the country of Japan, by the government. The national project started in 1992, and pilot plant design details were established in 1995. The objective of the project is to get 30% of energy conversion efficiency through the measure by raising the steam temperature and pressure to 500 C and 9.8 MPa respectively. The pilot plant is operating under the design conditions, which verify the success of applied technologies. This paper describes key technologies which were used to design the refuse burning boiler, which generates the highest steam temperature and pressure steam.

Orita, Norihiko; Kawahara, Yuuzou; Takahashi, Kazuyoshi; Yamauchi, Toru; Hosoda, Takuo

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF A WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT FOR MONTEVIDEO; AND WASTE TO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF A WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT FOR MONTEVIDEO; AND WASTE TO ENERGY IN SMALL OF COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY #12;2 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This thesis consists of two parts. The first is a cost of implementation. Part 1: Cost-Benefit Analysis of a WTE Plant for Montevideo In May-September 2011, the Earth

53

Waste-to-energy in the United States: Socioeconomic factors and the decision-making process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Municipal solid waste (MSW) combustion with energy recovery, commonly called waste-to-energy (WTE), was adopted by many US communities during the 1980s to manage their growing quantities of MSW. Although less than one percent of all US MSW was burned to retrieve its heat energy in 1970, WTE grew to account for 16 percent of MSW in 1990, and many experts forecasted that WTE would be used to manage as much as half of all garbage by the turn of the century. However, the growth of WTE has been reduced in recent years by project cancellations. This study takes an in-depth look at the socioeconomic factors that have played a role in the decisions of communities that have considered WTE as a component of their solid waste management strategies. More specifically, a three-pronged approach is adopted to investigate (1) the relationships between a municipality`s decision to consider and accept/reject WTE and key socioeconomic parameters, (2) the potential impacts of recent changes in financial markets on the viability of WTE, and (3) the WTE decision-making process and the socioeconomic parameters that are most important in the municipality`s decision. The first two objectives are met by the collection and analysis of aggregate data on all US WTE initiatives during the 1982 to 1990 time frame. The latter objective is met by way of four in-depth case studies -- two directed at communities that have accepted WTE and two that have cancelled WTE projects.

Curlee, T.R.; Schexnayder, S.M.; Vogt, D.P.; Wolfe, A.K.; Kelsay, M.P.; Feldman, D.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Boiler tube failures in municipal waste-to-energy plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste-to-energy plants experienced increased boiler tube failures when the design changed from waste-heat boilers to radiant furnace waterwalls using superheat. Fireside attack by chlorine and sulfur compounds in refuse combustion products caused many forced outages in early European plants operating at high steam temperatures and pressures. Despite conservative steam conditions in the first US plants, failures occurred. As steam temperatures increased, corrosion problems multiplied. The problems have been alleviated by covering the waterwalls with either refractory or weld overlays of nickel-based alloys and using high nickel-chromium alloys for superheater tubes. Changes in furnace design to provide uniform combustion and avoid reducing conditions in the waterwall zone and to lower the gas temperature in the superheater also have helped minimize corrosion.

Krause, H.H.; Wright, I.G. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

T:\\013.ffentlichkeitsarbeit\\05.Vortrge\\32.NAWTEC 11 Florida 2003\\A_Ways to Improve the Efficiency of Waste to Energy Plants.doc Ways to Improve the Efficiency of Waste to Energy Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Waste to Energy Plants.doc Ways to Improve the Efficiency of Waste to Energy Plants for the Production@mvr-hh.de Abstract Up to now the emissions of waste-to-energy plants have been of major concern for the operators about CO2 reductions the efficiency of today's Waste to Energy (WTE) plants should be improved, even

Columbia University

56

Waste-to-Energy 25 Years Later: Technology with a Past, Present  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solution Quite a Ride: UpsQuite a Ride: Ups MacArthur Resource Recovery Facility Islip, New York #12; Waste-to-energy Falls, New York #12; European Union: waste-to- energy preferable to landfills European Union directives and Consulting Federation of New York Solid Waste Associations Solid Waste/Recycling Conference Federation of New

Columbia University

57

Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Wast-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Agency/Company /Organization: Wast-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Sector: Energy, Land, Climate Focus Area: Biomass, - Waste to Energy, Greenhouse Gas Phase: Create a Vision Resource Type: Dataset, Maps, Presentation, Publications, Guide/manual, Training materials, Case studies/examples User Interface: Website Website: www.seas.columbia.edu/earth/wtert Cost: Free The Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) brings together engineers, scientists and managers from universities and industry. The mission of WTERT is to identify and advance the best available

58

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Overview: 2011 Waste-to-Energy Using Fuel Cells Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation by Sunita Satyapal, DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Program, at the Waste-to-Energy Using Fuel Cells Workshop help January 13, 2011.

59

CEWEP -Confederation of European Waste-to-Energy Plants Boulevard Clovis 12A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CEWEP - Confederation of European Waste-to- Energy Plants Boulevard Clovis 12A B-1000 Brussels Tel. : +32 (0)2 770 63 11 Fax : +32 (0)2 770 68 14 info@cewep.eu www.cewep.eu 1 Waste-to-Energy: towards recovery CEWEP welcomes that `energy recovery' should cover the use of waste for generating energy through

Columbia University

60

Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) (Redirected from Wast-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT)) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Wast-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Agency/Company /Organization: Wast-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Sector: Energy, Land, Climate Focus Area: Biomass, - Waste to Energy, Greenhouse Gas Phase: Create a Vision Resource Type: Dataset, Maps, Presentation, Publications, Guide/manual, Training materials, Case studies/examples User Interface: Website

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste-to-energy msw" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Waste Not, Want Not: Analyzing the Economic and Environmental Viability of Waste-to-Energy (WTE) Technology for Site-Specific Optimization of Renewable Energy Options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste-to-energy (WTE) technology burns municipal solid waste (MSW) in an environmentally safe combustion system to generate electricity, provide district heat, and reduce the need for landfill disposal. While this technology has gained acceptance in Europe, it has yet to be commonly recognized as an option in the United States. Section 1 of this report provides an overview of WTE as a renewable energy technology and describes a high-level model developed to assess the feasibility of WTE at a site. Section 2 reviews results from previous life cycle assessment (LCA) studies of WTE, and then uses an LCA inventory tool to perform a screening-level analysis of cost, net energy production, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and conventional air pollution impacts of WTE for residual MSW in Boulder, Colorado. Section 3 of this report describes the federal regulations that govern the permitting, monitoring, and operating practices of MSW combustors and provides emissions limits for WTE projects.

Funk, K.; Milford, J.; Simpkins, T.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Off-design performance of integrated waste-to-energy, combined cycle plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper focuses on the off-design operation of plants where a waste-to-energy (WTE) system fed with municipal solid waste (MSW) is integrated with a natural gas-fired combined cycle (CC). Integration is accomplished by sharing the steam cycle: saturated steam generated in a MSW grate combustor is exported to the heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) of the combined cycle, where it is superheated and then fed to a steam turbine serving both the CC and the WTE plant. Most likely, the WTE section and the natural gas-fired CC section are subject to different operation and maintenance schedules, so that the integrated plant operates in conditions different from those giving full power output. In this paper we discuss and give performance estimates for the two situations that delimit the range of operating conditions: (a) WTE plant at full power and gas turbine down; (b) WTE plant down and gas turbine at full power. This is done for two integrated plants having the same WTE section, i.e. grate combustors with an overall MSW combustion power of 180MWLHV, coupled with Combined Cycles based on two different heavy-duty gas turbines: a medium-size, 70MW class turbine and a large-size, 250MW class turbine. For each situation we discuss the control strategy and the actions that can help to achieve safe and reliable off-design operation. Heat and mass balances and performances at off-design conditions are estimated by accounting for the constraints imposed by the available heat transfer areas in boilers, heaters and condenser, as well as the characteristic curve of the steam turbine. When the gas turbine is down the net electric efficiency of the WTE section is very close to the one of the stand-alone WTE plant; instead, when the WTE section is down, the efficiency of the CC is much below the one of a stand alone CC. These performances appear most congenial to what is likely to be the operational strategy of these plants, i.e. paramount priority to waste treatment and CC dispatched according to the requirements of the national grid.

Stefano Consonni; Paolo Silva

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

EA-0952: The Louisiana State University Waste-to Energy Incinerator, Baton  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2: The Louisiana State University Waste-to Energy 2: The Louisiana State University Waste-to Energy Incinerator, Baton Rouge, Louisiana EA-0952: The Louisiana State University Waste-to Energy Incinerator, Baton Rouge, Louisiana SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for incinerating combustible, non-recyclable office wastes from Louisiana State University (LSU) administrative/academic areas and combustible, non-renderable biological and potentially infectious wastes from the School of Veterinary Medicine and Student Health Center, both part of the LSU campus complex in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD October 24, 1994 EA-0952: Finding of No Significant Impact The Louisiana State University Waste-to Energy Incinerator

64

MacArthur Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MacArthur Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility MacArthur Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name MacArthur Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility Facility MacArthur Waste to Energy Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Suffolk County, New York Coordinates 40.9848784°, -72.6151169° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.9848784,"lon":-72.6151169,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

65

1 Copyright 2009 by ASME Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Copyright © 2009 by ASME Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference

66

Proceedings of NAWTEC16 16th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

require pre-processing of the MSW, combust the resulting syngas to generate steam, and produce a vitrified used globally for energy recovery from municipal solid wastes is combustion of "as received" MSW combustion of solid wastes. In China, there have been some mass-burn new plants and also over forty

Columbia University

67

Copyright 2009 by ASME Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Copyright © 2009 by ASME Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference on the strengths of past research at Columbia and North Carolina State on recycling, composting, waste- to-energy of each technology has the potential 1 Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy

Columbia University

68

National Master Plan for Development of Waste-to-Energy in India 1 The National Master Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 National Master Plan for Development of Waste-to-Energy in India 1 The National Master Plan a National Master Plan (NMP) for waste-to-energy as one of the activities under UNDP/GEF assisted project. The NMP provides a framework for waste-to-energy programme for the country besides a means of processing

Columbia University

69

Covanta Announces Contracts for Lee County, Florida Waste-to-Energy Facility Wednesday February 8, 3:51 pm ET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Covanta Announces Contracts for Lee County, Florida Waste-to-Energy Facility Expansion Wednesday the construction of a 636 TPD (ton per day) capacity expansion to Lee County's 1,200 TPD waste-to-energy facility includes recycling, composting, waste-to- energy and landfilling. Covanta's service agreement, which

Columbia University

70

Waste to Energy Power Production at DOE and DOD Sites | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

at DOE and DOD Sites Presentation by Joe Price, Ameresco, DOE-DOD Waste to Energy using Fuel Cells Workshop held Jan. 13, 2011 wasteprice.pdf More Documents & Publications...

71

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

1: Availability of Feedstock and Technology Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume 1: Availability of Feedstock and Technology Municipal solid waste (MSW) is...

72

Integrated municipal solid waste scenario model using advanced pretreatment and waste to energy processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper an Integrated Municipal Solid Waste scenario model (IMSW-SM) with a potential practical application in the waste management sector is analyzed. The model takes into account quantification and characterization of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) streams from different sources, selective collection (SC), advanced mechanical sorting, material recovery and advanced thermal treatment. The paper provides a unique chain of advanced waste pretreatment stages of fully commingled waste streams, leading to an original set of suggestions and future contributions to a sustainable IMSWS, taking into account real data and EU principles. The selection of the input data was made on MSW management real case studies from two European regions. Four scenarios were developed varying mainly SC strategies and thermal treatment options. The results offer useful directions for decision makers in order to calibrate modern strategies in different realities.

Gabriela Ionescu; Elena Cristina Rada; Marco Ragazzi; Cosmin M?rculescu; Adrian Badea; Tiberiu Apostol

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Proceedings of NAWTEC16 16th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and over-burdened dumps. Improper disposal of solid wastes over several decades and open burning of garbageProceedings of NAWTEC16 16th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference May 19-21, 2008 is facing a solid waste management crisis. The infrastructure has been unable to keep pace with economic

Columbia University

74

Waste to energy facilities. (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning technical, economic, and environmental evaluations of facilities that convert waste to energy. Solid waste and municipal waste conversion facilities are highlighted. Feasibility studies, technical design, emissions studies, and markets for the resulting energy are discussed. Heat and electrical generation facilities are emphasized. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Waste to energy facilities. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning technical, economic, and environmental evaluations of facilities that convert waste to energy. Solid waste and municipal waste conversion facilities are highlighted. Feasibility studies, technical design, emissions studies, and markets for the resulting energy are discussed. Heat and electrical generation facilities are emphasized. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Waste to energy facilities. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning technical, economic, and environmental evaluations of facilities that convert waste to energy. Solid waste and municipal waste conversion facilities are highlighted. Feasibility studies, technical design, emissions studies, and markets for the resulting energy are discussed. Heat and electrical generation facilities are emphasized. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

EA-1862: Oneida Seven Generation Corporation Waste-To-Energy System,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

62: Oneida Seven Generation Corporation Waste-To-Energy 62: Oneida Seven Generation Corporation Waste-To-Energy System, Ashwaubenon, Wisconsin EA-1862: Oneida Seven Generation Corporation Waste-To-Energy System, Ashwaubenon, Wisconsin Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal by Oneida's Energy Recovery Project to construct and operate a solid waste-to-electricity power plant on vacant property within the Bayport Industrial Center in the City of Green Bay, Brown County, Wisconsin. This energy recovery process would involve bringing municipal solid waste into the plant for sizing (shredding), sorting (removing recyclable material), and conveying into one of three pyrolytic gasification systems. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download

78

Haiti: Feasibility of Waste-to-Energy Options at the Trutier Waste Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides further analysis of the feasibility of a waste-to-energy (WTE) facility in the area near Port-au-Prince, Haiti. NREL's previous analysis and reports identified anaerobic digestion (AD) as the optimal WTE technology at the facility. Building on the prior analyses, this report evaluates the conceptual financial and technical viability of implementing a combined waste management and electrical power production strategy by constructing a WTE facility at the existing Trutier waste site north of Port-au-Prince.

Conrad, M. D.; Hunsberger, R.; Ness, J. E.; Harris, T.; Raibley, T.; Ursillo, P.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Waste-to-Energy Biomass Digester with Decreased Water Consumption...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Applications and Industries Disposal of solid animal waste and generation of biogas Suitable for large-scale animal feeding operations that dry-scrape manure Especially...

80

Incineration versus gasification: A comparison in waste to energy plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste thermodestruction has obvious advantages; nevertheless, it encounters problems not very easy to solve, such as those related to gas cleaning and to restricting standards for emission control. One important aspect is the possibility of heat recovery with production of valuable energy such as electric energy. A new technology, at least as far as its application to waste disposal (mainly municipal waste) is concerned, is represented by gasification. It becomes interesting to establish a comparison between this new technology and the traditional one. This comparison does not appear, however, to be very simple, since for gasification only few documented experiments can be found, and these are often difficult to relate to a common evaluation factor. The present paper describes the state of the art of the traditional technology in the thermodestruction field to define a comparison basis. Then, a general discussion is given for the gasification technology, emphasizing different possible solutions to allow for a quantitative evaluation. At last the various aspects of the problem (related to plant, environment, energy, economics, etc.) are specifically compared for the purpose of finding elements which allow for a quantitative evaluation or for emphasizing parameters useful for a final choice.

Ghezzi, U.; Pasini, S.; Ferri, L.D.A. [Politecnico di Milano (Italy). Dipt. di Energetica

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste-to-energy msw" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Municipal solid waste combustion: Waste-to-energy technologies, regulations, and modern facilities in USEPA Region V  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Table of Contents: Incinerator operations (Waste preprocessing, combustion, emissions characterization and emission control, process monitoring, heat recovery, and residual ash management); Waste-to-energy regulations (Permitting requirements and operating regulations on both state and Federal levels); Case studies of EPA Region V waste-to-energy facilities (Polk County, Minnesota; Jackson County, Michigan; La Crosse, Wisconsin; Kent County, Michigan; Elk River, Minnesota; Indianapolis, Indiana); Evaluation; and Conclusions.

Sullivan, P.M.; Hallenbeck, W.H.; Brenniman, G.R.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Waste to energy facilities. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning technical, economic, and environmental evaluations of facilities that convert waste to energy. Solid waste and municipal waste conversion facilities are highlighted. Feasibility studies, technical design, emissions studies, and markets for the resulting energy are discussed. Heat and electrical generation facilities are emphasized. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Waste to energy facilities. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning technical, economic, and environmental evaluations of facilities that convert waste to energy. Solid waste and municipal waste conversion facilities are highlighted. Feasibility studies, technical design, emissions studies, and markets for the resulting energy are discussed. Heat and electrical generation facilities are emphasized. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

CEWEP -Confederation of European Waste-to-Energy Plants Boulevard Clovis 12A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recovered Fuel) as a fuel in both cement kilns and power plants, dedicated Biomass Energy Plants (BEP; BEP ­ Biomass Energy Plants; LFG ­ Landfill Gas; WtE ­ Waste-to-Energy 1 Excluding agricultural is considered biomass, thus a renewable energy source. Summary of the overall development of Renewable Energy

85

WASTE-TO-ENERGY RECONSIDERED IN SWEDEN By Waldemar Ingdahl (04/23/2003);  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WASTE-TO-ENERGY RECONSIDERED IN SWEDEN By Waldemar Ingdahl (04/23/2003); as reported in Swedish newspapers;Tech Central Station Sweden has for a long time been a bastion of "green" ideology, and the EU and the rest of the world has monitored Sweden's environmental policies closely for new ideas and inspiration

Columbia University

86

Bay County, Florida waste-to-energy facility air emission tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bay County Resource Management Center is located 10 miles Northeast of Panama City, Florida. Panama City is a resort community approximately 100 miles east of Pensacola, Florida, on the northwest coast of Florida's panhandle. The average population of this area is approximately 115,000. The average quantity of municipal solid (MSW) waste generated in Bay County during most of the year is 300 tons per day. However, during the summer months when the population increases to more than 150,000 the community must handle in excess of 350 tons of MSW per day. The County decided to design the facility to ultimately burn 510 tons of MSW to allow additional waste to be processed as the population and quantity of waste increases. Until other sources of MSW are procured, the facility is supplementing the 350 tpd of MSW with about 160 tpd of wood waste.The facility began initial start-up, equipment check-out, and instrument calibration in February 1987. Plant shakedown and systems operational checks were made from February through May. This paper discusses emission testing which was conducted from late April through early June. The emission compliance tests were completed on June 4-5, 1987. The facility acceptance test and emission compliance test were completed five months ahead of the original project schedule.

Beachler, D.S.; Pompelia, D.M.; Weldon, J. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

The role of waste-to-energy in integrated waste management: A life cycle assessment perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) management has become a major issue in terms of environmental impacts. It has become the focus of local, state and federal regulations, which generally tend to promote the reduce/re-use/recycle/incinerate/landfill environmental hierarchy. At the same time, the Waste Industry capital requirements have increased in order of magnitude since the beginning of the 80`s. The driving forces of further capital requirements for the Waste Management Industry will be the impact of public policies set today and goals set by politicians. Therefore, it appears extremely important for the Waste Industry to correctly analyze and forecast the real environmental and financial costs of waste management practices in order to: discuss with the local, state and federal agencies on more rational grounds; forecast the right investments in new technologies (recycling networks and plants, incinerators with heat recovery, modern landfill). The aim of this paper is to provide an example of a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) project in the waste management field that raised surprising issues on otherwise unchallenged waste management practices.

Besnainou, J. [Ecobalance, Rockville, MD (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

88

WTE (waste-to-energy) developers: What are they Who are they  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent case histories illustrate the diversity of development approaches available to communities. Developers discuss their relationships with communities, what to look for when deciding to build a waste-to-energy plant, and what the future holds for WTE. The following cities are used for illustration: Savannah, Georgia; Panama City, Florida; Fergus Falls, Minnesota; Millbury, Massachusetts; Newport, Minnesota; and Bristol, Connecticut. The paper briefly discusses community support and development in the future.

Kilgore, M.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Experience with FLS-GSA dry scrubbing technology for waste-to-energy applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper describes the gas suspension absorber (GSA) dry scrubbing technology developed by FLS miljo a/s, Denmark. The GSA is a new generation of semi-dry technology utilizing a circulating fast fluidized bed as absorber for acid gases (SO{sub 2}, HCI, HF) dioxins and heavy metals. The authors give a detailed description of the GSA which differs from conventional spray-dryer absorber systems in that it provides an extreme high dust concentration in the absorber. The high specific surface area of the dust combined with the quenching action of the atomized lime slurry provides excellent conditions for heat and mass transfer as well as secondary nucleation sites for the condensation/adsorption of dioxins and heavy metals. Attention is focused on the GSA as a retrofit technology for waste-to-energy plants. As retrofit the GSA is advantageous due to the compact design, small footprint and the ability to use the existing electrostatic precipitator (ESP) for particulate control. The grain loading leaving the GSA system and entering the ESP, is controlled by the efficiency of the GSA cyclone, and for this reasons the grain loading entering the ESP is less than or equal to the grain loading leaving the incinerator. The retrofit with a GSA system will furthermore reduce the actual flue gas volume to the ESP, which means an increased specific collection area. In addition the increased moisture content in the flue gas improves the collection efficiency. The authors compare this retrofit option to conventional spray-dryer absorption technology. They describe the operating experience with the GSA technology for waste-to-energy plants. Operating experience and performance test results for acid gases, dioxins and heavy metals, especially mercury, from several European waste-to-energy are reported.

Olsen, P.B.; Stuard, C.; Hsu, F.E.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Life cycle assessment of thermal Waste-to-Energy technologies: Review and recommendations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been used extensively within the recent decade to evaluate the environmental performance of thermal Waste-to-Energy (WtE) technologies: incineration, co-combustion, pyrolysis and gasification. A critical review was carried out involving 250 individual case-studies published in 136 peer-reviewed journal articles within 1995 and 2013. The studies were evaluated with respect to critical aspects such as: (i) goal and scope definitions (e.g. functional units, system boundaries, temporal and geographic scopes), (ii) detailed technology parameters (e.g. related to waste composition, technology, gas cleaning, energy recovery, residue management, and inventory data), and (iii) modeling principles (e.g. energy/mass calculation principles, energy substitution, inclusion of capital goods and uncertainty evaluation). Very few of the published studies provided full and transparent descriptions of all these aspects, in many cases preventing an evaluation of the validity of results, and limiting applicability of data and results in other contexts. The review clearly suggests that the quality of LCA studies of WtE technologies and systems including energy recovery can be significantly improved. Based on the review, a detailed overview of assumptions and modeling choices in existing literature is provided in conjunction with practical recommendations for state-of-the-art LCA of Waste-to-Energy.

Thomas Fruergaard Astrup; Davide Tonini; Roberto Turconi; Alessio Boldrin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Waste-to-Energy: Hawaii and Guam Energy Improvement Technology Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the U.S. Navy have worked together to demonstrate new or leading-edge commercial energy technologies whose deployment will support the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) in meeting its energy efficiency and renewable energy goals while enhancing installation energy security. This is consistent with the 2010 Quadrennial Defense Review report1 that encourages the use of 'military installations as a test bed to demonstrate and create a market for innovative energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies coming out of the private sector and DOD and Department of Energy laboratories,' as well as the July 2010 memorandum of understanding between DOD and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that documents the intent to 'maximize DOD access to DOE technical expertise and assistance through cooperation in the deployment and pilot testing of emerging energy technologies.' As part of this joint initiative, a promising waste-to-energy (WTE) technology was selected for demonstration at the Hickam Commissary aboard the Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam (JBPHH), Hawaii. The WTE technology chosen is called high-energy densification waste-to-energy conversion (HEDWEC). HEDWEC technology is the result of significant U.S. Army investment in the development of WTE technology for forward operating bases.

Davis, J.; Gelman, R.; Tomberlin, G.; Bain, R.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Boiler tube failures in municipal waste-to-energy plants: Case histories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste-to-energy plants experienced boiler tube failures when the design changed from waste-heat boilers to radiant furnace waterwalls with superheat, adopted from coal-firing technology. The fireside attack by chlorine and sulfur compounds in the refuse combustion products caused many forced outages in early European plants with high steam temperatures and pressures. In spite of conservative steam conditions in the first US plants, some failures occurred. As steam temperatures increased in later US plants, corrosion problems multiplied. Over the years these problems have been alleviated by covering the waterwalls with either refractories or weld overlays of nickel-base alloys and using high nickel-chromium alloys for superheater tubes. Various changes in furnace design to provide uniform combustion and avoid reducing conditions in the waterwall zone and to lower the gas temperature in the superheater also have helped to minimize corrosion.

Krause, H.H.; Wright, I.G. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Process aspects in combustion and gasification Waste-to-Energy (WtE) units  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The utilisation of energy in waste, Waste to Energy (WtE), has become increasingly important. Waste is a wide concept, and to focus, the feedstock dealt with here is mostly municipal solid waste. It is found that combustion in grate-fired furnaces is by far the most common mode of fuel conversion compared to fluidized beds and rotary furnaces. Combinations of pyrolysis in rotary furnace or gasification in fluidized or fixed bed with high-temperature combustion are applied particularly in Japan in systems whose purpose is to melt ashes and destroy dioxins. Recently, also in Japan more emphasis is put on WtE. In countries with high heat demand, WtE in the form of heat and power can be quite efficient even in simple grate-fired systems, whereas in warm regions only electricity is generated, and for this product the efficiency of boilers (the steam data) is limited by corrosion from the flue gas. However, combination of cleaned gas from gasification with combustion provides a means to enhance the efficiency of electricity production considerably. Finally, the impact of sorting on the properties of the waste to be fed to boilers or gasifiers is discussed. The description intends to be general, but examples are mostly taken from Europe.

Bo Leckner

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Case Study- The Challenge: Improving the Performance of a Waste-To-Energy Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This case study examines how the City of Long Beach, California, was able to improve the operational efficiency of its Southeast Resource Recovery Facility (SERRF), a recycling and solid waste-to-energy plant. To replace inlet damper control and reduce energy consumption, variable frequency drives (VFDs) were installed on the induced draft fans of three boiler systems. As a result of the retrofit, facility energy consumption was reduced by more than 34 percent (3,661,200 kWh per year), and the facility saved more than $329,500 annually. Taking into consideration a $400,000 California Energy Commission grant, the simple net payback for this project was just under 10 months.

95

Thermoeconomic optimization of sensible heat thermal storage for cogenerated waste-to-energy recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper investigates the feasibility of employing thermal storage for cogenerated waste-to-energy recovery such as using mass-burning water-wall incinerators and topping steam turbines. Sensible thermal storage is considered in rectangular cross-sectioned channels through which is passed unused process steam at 1,307 kPa/250 C (175 psig/482 F) during the storage period and feedwater at 1,307 kPa/102 C (175 psig/216 F) during the recovery period. In determining the optimum storage configuration, it is found that the economic feasibility is a function of mass and specific heat of the material and surface area of the channel as well as cost of material and fabrication. Economic considerations included typical cash flows of capital charges, energy revenues, operation and maintenance, and income taxes. Cast concrete is determined to be a potentially attractive storage medium.

Abdul-Razzak, H.A. [Texas A and M Univ., Kingsville, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; Porter, R.W. [Illinois Inst. of Tech., chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Energy implications of mechanical and mechanicalbiological treatment compared to direct waste-to-energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Compared systems achieve primary energy savings between 34 and 140 MJ{sub primary}/100 MJ{sub input} {sub waste.} Savings magnitude is foremost determined by chosen primary energy and materials production. Energy consumption and process losses can be upset by increased technology efficiency. Material recovery accounts for significant shares of primary energy savings. Direct waste-to-energy is highly efficient if cogeneration (CHP) is possible. - Abstract: Primary energy savings potential is used to compare five residual municipal solid waste treatment systems, including configurations with mechanical (MT) and mechanicalbiological (MBT) pre-treatment, which produce waste-derived fuels (RDF and SRF), biogas and/or recover additional materials for recycling, alongside a system based on conventional mass burn waste-to-energy and ash treatment. To examine the magnitude of potential savings we consider two energy efficiency levels (state-of-the-art and best available technology), the inclusion/exclusion of heat recovery (CHP vs. PP) and three different background end-use energy production systems (coal condensing electricity and natural gas heat, Nordic electricity mix and natural gas heat, and coal CHP energy quality allocation). The systems achieved net primary energy savings in a range between 34 and 140 MJ{sub primary}/100 MJ{sub input} {sub waste}, in the different scenario settings. The energy footprint of transportation needs, pre-treatment and reprocessing of recyclable materials was 39.5%, 118% and 18% respectively, relative to total energy savings. Mass combustion WtE achieved the highest savings in scenarios with CHP production, nonetheless, MBT-based systems had similarly high performance if SRF streams were co-combusted with coal. When RDF and SRF was only used in dedicated WtE plants, MBT-based systems totalled lower savings due to inherent system losses and additional energy costs. In scenarios without heat recovery, the biodrying MBS-based system achieved the highest savings, on the condition of SRF co-combustion. As a sensitivity scenario, alternative utilisation of SRF in cement kilns was modelled. It supported similar or higher net savings for all pre-treatment systems compared to mass combustion WtE, except when WtE CHP was possible in the first two background energy scenarios. Recovery of plastics for recycling before energy recovery increased net energy savings in most scenario variations, over those of full stream combustion. Sensitivity to assumptions regarding virgin plastic substitution was tested and was found to mostly favour plastic recovery.

Cimpan, Ciprian, E-mail: cic@kbm.sdu.dk; Wenzel, Henrik

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

97

Waste-to-energy plants face costly emissions-control upgrades  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One treatment method of municipal solid waste, incineration, has fallen in and out of public favor. In the 1970s, emerging consciousness of the threat to groundwater posed by leaking landfills made incineration an attractive option. Prompted by disrupted energy supplies and steeply rising prices, more than 100 municipalities began to generate electricity from the heat produced by burning trash. In the 1990s, the pendulum of public enthusiasm has swung away from incineration. Energy prices have declined dramatically, and safety and siting concerns complicate new projects. A recent Supreme Court decision ruled that municipal incinerator ash must be tested as hazardous waste and disposed accordingly if levels of such pollutants as cadmium and lead exceed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act limits. So-called flow control regulations, which allowed municipalities to apportion garbage disposal to ensure steady supplies to incinerators, also have been struck down. EPA is tackling the issue of air emissions from waste-to-energy and non-energy-producing municipal waste combustors. Emissions guidelines for MWCs and new-source performance standards for new units, proposed Sept. 20 under Sec. 129 of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, are the culmination of a stalled and litigated initiative dating back to the CAA Amendments of 1977.

McIlvaine, R.W.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Daily Gazette, Schenectady NY Letters to the Editor for Thursday, July 10, 2008 Nothing to fear, and much to gain, from waste-to-energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and much to gain, from waste-to-energy Schenectady is one of those misguided cities that sends its municipal solid wastes to distant landfills, costing much money, wasting valuable energy and increasing global warming and pollution of our environment. Waste-to-energy (WTE) is safe. I advised the Israel

Columbia University

99

An integrated analytical framework for quantifying the LCOE of waste-to-energy facilities for a range of greenhouse gas emissions policy and technical factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study presents a novel integrated method for considering the economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities with priced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions based upon technical and economic characteristics of the WTE facility, MSW stream, landfill alternative, and GHG emissions policy. The study demonstrates use of the formulation for six different policy scenarios and explores sensitivity of the results to ranges of certain technical parameters as found in existing literature. The study shows that details of the GHG emissions regulations have large impact on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of WTE and that GHG regulations can either increase or decrease the LCOE of WTE depending on policy choices regarding biogenic fractions from combusted waste and emissions from landfills. Important policy considerations are the fraction of the carbon emissions that are priced (i.e. all emissions versus only non-biogenic emissions), whether emissions credits are allowed due to reducing fugitive landfill gas emissions, whether biogenic carbon sequestration in landfills is credited against landfill emissions, and the effectiveness of the landfill gas recovery system where waste would otherwise have been buried. The default landfill gas recovery system effectiveness assumed by much of the industry yields GHG offsets that are very close to the direct non-biogenic GHG emissions from a WTE facility, meaning that small changes in the recovery effectiveness cause relatively larger changes in the emissions factor of the WTE facility. Finally, the economics of WTE are dependent on the MSW stream composition, with paper and wood being advantageous, metal and glass being disadvantageous, and plastics, food, and yard waste being either advantageous or disadvantageous depending upon the avoided tipping fee and the GHG emissions price.

Townsend, Aaron K., E-mail: aarontownsend@utexas.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Webber, Michael E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Energy implications of mechanical and mechanicalbiological treatment compared to direct waste-to-energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Primary energy savings potential is used to compare five residual municipal solid waste treatment systems, including configurations with mechanical (MT) and mechanicalbiological (MBT) pre-treatment, which produce waste-derived fuels (RDF and SRF), biogas and/or recover additional materials for recycling, alongside a system based on conventional mass burn waste-to-energy and ash treatment. To examine the magnitude of potential savings we consider two energy efficiency levels (state-of-the-art and best available technology), the inclusion/exclusion of heat recovery (CHP vs. PP) and three different background end-use energy production systems (coal condensing electricity and natural gas heat, Nordic electricity mix and natural gas heat, and coal CHP energy quality allocation). The systems achieved net primary energy savings in a range between 34 and 140MJprimary/100MJinput waste, in the different scenario settings. The energy footprint of transportation needs, pre-treatment and reprocessing of recyclable materials was 39.5%, 118% and 18% respectively, relative to total energy savings. Mass combustion WtE achieved the highest savings in scenarios with CHP production, nonetheless, MBT-based systems had similarly high performance if SRF streams were co-combusted with coal. When RDF and SRF was only used in dedicated WtE plants, MBT-based systems totalled lower savings due to inherent system losses and additional energy costs. In scenarios without heat recovery, the biodrying MBS-based system achieved the highest savings, on the condition of SRF co-combustion. As a sensitivity scenario, alternative utilisation of SRF in cement kilns was modelled. It supported similar or higher net savings for all pre-treatment systems compared to mass combustion WtE, except when WtE CHP was possible in the first two background energy scenarios. Recovery of plastics for recycling before energy recovery increased net energy savings in most scenario variations, over those of full stream combustion. Sensitivity to assumptions regarding virgin plastic substitution was tested and was found to mostly favour plastic recovery.

Ciprian Cimpan; Henrik Wenzel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste-to-energy msw" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Field Test of High Temperature Corrosion Sensors in a Waste to Energy Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field trial of electrochemical corrosion rate sensors was conducted over a five month period to monitor fireside corrosion in a waste to energy (WTE) plant. The unique 3-electrode air-cooled corrosion sensors, each including a thermocouple to monitor sensor temperature, were installed in four different ports at approximately the same level of the WTE boiler. A total of twelve sensors were tested, six with electrodes using the carbon steel boiler tube material, and six using the nickel-chromium weld overlay alloy for the electrodes. Corrosion rates and temperatures of the sensors were monitored continuously through the trial. Measurements of sensor thickness loss were used to calibrate the electrochemical corrosion rates. Air cooling of the sensors was found to be necessary in order to bring the sensors to the temperature of the boiler tubes, to better match the corrosion rate of the tubes, and to increase survivability of the sensors and thermocouples. Varying the temperature of the sensors simulated corrosion rates of boiler tubes with steam temperatures above and below that in the actual WTE plant. Temperatures of two of the sensors were successfully held at various controlled temperatures close to the steam temperature for a three hour test period. Corrosion rates of the two materials tested were similar although of different magnitude. An expression relating the corrosion rate of the boiler tube material to the corrosion rate of weld overlay was determined for a 7 day period in the middle of the field trial. Results from the field trial suggest that corrosion rate sensors controlled to the outer waterwall temperature can successfully monitor fireside corrosion in WTE plants and be used as a process control variable by plant operators.

Matthes, S.A.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Williamson, K.M.

2008-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

102

Waste to Energy Energy Recovery of Green Bin Waste: Incineration/Biogas Comparison  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study presents how to determine marginal incinerator energy efficiencies. This concept should be applied in ... depend on the technical level, the surrounding energy system, and the waste type/heating value ...

Lasse Tobiasen; Kristian Kahle

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Waste to energy: The case of the Bolzano solid urban waste incineration plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the most demanding problems of waste management was that of finding the means and the technology for converting, neutralizing and disposing of the refuse, without disturbing the delicate ecological equilibrium of the soil, water and air. Today, this problem is handled with the latest refuse incineration and Snamprogetti's combustion residue purification technologies, which in addition to substantial energy returns, also provide sufficient assurance of efficiency as well as health and environmental safety. In the present state of the art, these technologies make it possible to cut down on the use of dumps and landfills. In fact, such technologies permit to obtain an extremely small volume of inert residues, as well as very low dust and hydrochloric acid levels, and an infinitesimal concentration of micropollutants in the atmospheric emissions. Experience has shown that non-polluting incineration of unrecoverable wastes is feasible and the electricity obtained from the combustion heat is more than enough to run the plant and can be sold making the operation advantageous in economic terms. On the basis of this philosophy Snamprogetti designed and built an incineration at Bolzano on 1994, which was expanded in 1996 with a second line, for a total operating potential of 400 t/d of wastes. The plant included a heat recovery line with a steam boiler and a turbogenerator for the production of electricity. The steam turbine driving the generator could operate partly in the condensation mode, and partly in the bleeding mode to produce both electricity and steam. Implementation of the integrated program made provision for employment of the bled off steam to produce superheated water to feed the city's district heating network. A detailed assessment of the characteristics of the plant and its environmental efficiency is presented.

Nicolai, H.G.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Robbins project - start-up and commercial operation at a leading-edge recycling, waste-to-energy plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On January 22, 1997, the Robbins Resource Recovery Facility began commercial operation in Robbins, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago, after a very successful start-up program. The first installation of its kind in the United States, the Robbins facility converts municipal solid waste (MSW) into refuse-derived fuel (RDF) that is fired in two circulating fluidized-bed boilers. Steam from the boilers powers a turbine generator that can produce enough electricity to service more than 50,000 homes. The Robbins facility processes a minimum of 1600 tons of MSW per day. Some 75 percent of the MSW is converted into RDF. In addition to compostable material, the balance yields reusable aluminum, ferrous materials, and glass. Even ash produced by the circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) boilers can be used to manufacture cement. The Robbins facility is operated by Foster Wheeler Illinois, Inc., a member of the Foster Wheeler Power Systems Group. The plant was engineered by Foster Wheeler USA Corporation and built by Foster Wheeler Constructors, Inc. Foster Wheeler Energy International, Inc. provided the circulating fluidized-bed boilers.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

105

Waste-to-energy facilities. January 1985-October 1991 (Citations from the NTIS Data Base). Rept. for Jan 85-Oct 91  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning technical, economic, and environmental evaluations of facilities that convert waste to energy. Solid waste and municipal waste conversion facilities are highlighted. Feasibility studies, technical design, emissions studies, and markets for the resulting energy are discussed. Heat and electrical generation facilities are emphasized. (Contains 187 citations with title list and subject index.)

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Role of Thermochemical Conversion in Livestock Waste-to-Energy Treatments:? Obstacles and Opportunities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dry wastes like poultry litter and feedlot manures can be processed directly via pyrolysis and air/steam gasification technology. ... The net energy (ETotal) from gasifying swine waste is estimated as the summation of Erxn, EWs, and the energy value of product gas (EGas). ... The land disposal of waste from the poultry industry and subsequent environmental implications has stimulated interest into cleaner and more useful disposal options. ...

Keri Cantrell; Kyoung Ro; Devinder Mahajan; Mouzhgun Anjom; Patrick G. Hunt

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

E-Print Network 3.0 - american ref-fuel waste-to-energy Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 50 Leaching of Dioxins from Municipal Waste Combustor Residues Summary: 12, 12th North American...

108

E-Print Network 3.0 - american waste-to-energy conference Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 20 Leaching of Dioxins from Municipal Waste Combustor Residues Summary: 12, 12th North American...

109

Cow2Joules: Distributed Conversion of Organic Waste to Energy Resources Background to the project THEY are undertaking at ESF DLJohnson, Feb. 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cow2Joules: Distributed Conversion of Organic Waste to Energy Resources Background to the project of anaerobic digestion (AD) techniques for the conversion of biomass-related organic waste materials to useful energy products. This approach to industrial ecology, or sustainability, is well advanced in Europe where

Chatterjee, Avik P.

110

The Current and Future Marketplace for Waste-To-Energy Cogeneration Facilities in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

control systems. The more sophisticated control systems provide plant operators with ~tate-of-the-art monitoring and control capabilities. It also appears that fluidized bed incineration tech nology will find wider ap"lication within the waste...

Jacobs, S.

111

Ris-R-Report Energy Systems Analysis of Waste to Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as upgraded biogas and petrol made from syngas. Biogas and thermal gasification technologies are interesting alternatives to waste incineration and it is recommended to support the use of biogas based on manure Centre Denmark, DONG Energy, Danish Energy Authority, DAKA, Lemvig Biogas Plant and Plan

112

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume 1: Availability of Feedstock and Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Municipal solid waste (MSW) is a domestic energy resource with the potential to provide a significant amount of energy to meet US liquid fuel requirements. MSW is defined as household waste, commercial solid waste, nonhazardous sludge, conditionally exempt, small quantity hazardous waste, and industrial solid waste. It includes food waste, residential rubbish, commercial and industrial wastes, and construction and demolition debris. It has an average higher heating value (HHV) of approximately 5100 btu/lb (as arrived basis).

113

Generation!and!Disposition!of!Municipal!Solid!Waste! (MSW)!in!the!United!States!A!National!Survey!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

! 1! ! Generation!and!Disposition!of!Municipal!Solid!Waste! (MSW on Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Generation and Disposition in the U.S., in collaboration with Ms. Nora Goldstein was not carried out in 2012 and in 2013 EEC and BioCycle agreed that the 2013 Survey of Waste Generation

Columbia University

114

Generation!and!Disposition!of!Municipal!Solid!Waste! (MSW)!in!the!United!States!A!National!Survey!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

! 1! ! Generation!and!Disposition!of!Municipal!Solid!Waste! (MSW Waste (MSW) Generation and Disposition in the U.S., in collaboration with Ms. Nora Goldstein of Bio in 2012 and in 2013 EEC and BioCycle agreed that the 2013 Survey of Waste Generation and Disposition

115

Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference May 18-20, 2009, Chantilly, Virginia, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the U.S. did not recover the heat of combustion generated via MSW incineration, until the mid seventies

Columbia University

116

Seasonal characterization of municipal solid waste (MSW) in the city of Chihuahua, Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Management of municipal solid waste (MSW) has become a significant environmental problem, especially in fast-growing cities. The amount of waste generated increases each year and this makes it difficult to create solutions which due to the increase in waste generation year after year and having to identify a solution that will have minimum impact on the environment. To determine the most sustainable waste management strategy for Chihuahua, it is first necessary to identify the nature and composition of the citys urban waste. The MSW composition varied considerably depending on many factors, the time of year is one of them. Therefore, as part of our attempt to implement an integral waste management system in the city of Chihuahua, we conducted a study of the characteristics of MSW composition for the different seasons. This paper analyzes and compares the findings of the study of the characterization and the generation of solid waste from households at three different socio-economic levels in the city over three periods (April and August, 2006 and January, 2007). The average weight of waste generated in Chihuahua, taking into account all three seasons, was 0.592kgcapita?1day?1. Our results show that the lowest income groups generated the least amount of waste. We also found that less waste was generated during the winter season. The breakdown for the composition of the waste shows that organic waste accounts for the largest proportion (45%), followed by paper (17%) and others (16%).

Guadalupe Gmez; Montserrat Meneses; Lourdes Ballinas; Francesc Castells

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Seasonal characterization of municipal solid waste (MSW) in the city of Chihuahua, Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Management of municipal solid waste (MSW) has become a significant environmental problem, especially in fast-growing cities. The amount of waste generated increases each year and this makes it difficult to create solutions which due to the increase in waste generation year after year and having to identify a solution that will have minimum impact on the environment. To determine the most sustainable waste management strategy for Chihuahua, it is first necessary to identify the nature and composition of the city's urban waste. The MSW composition varied considerably depending on many factors, the time of year is one of them. Therefore, as part of our attempt to implement an integral waste management system in the city of Chihuahua, we conducted a study of the characteristics of MSW composition for the different seasons. This paper analyzes and compares the findings of the study of the characterization and the generation of solid waste from households at three different socio-economic levels in the city over three periods (April and August, 2006 and January, 2007). The average weight of waste generated in Chihuahua, taking into account all three seasons, was 0.592 kg capita{sup -1} day{sup -1}. Our results show that the lowest income groups generated the least amount of waste. We also found that less waste was generated during the winter season. The breakdown for the composition of the waste shows that organic waste accounts for the largest proportion (45%), followed by paper (17%) and others (16%)

Gomez, Guadalupe [Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua, 31310 (Mexico); Meneses, Montserrat [Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Ballinas, Lourdes [Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua, 31310 (Mexico); Castells, Francesc [Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, 43007 Tarragona (Spain)], E-mail: francesc.castells@urv.cat

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

Report of the DOD-DOE Workshop on Converting Waste to Energy Using Fuel Cells: Workshop Summary and Action Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report discusses the results of a January 13, 2011, workshop that focused on utilizing biowaste as an energy feedstock and converting this feedstock into heat and/or power using fuel cells. DOD and DOE are collaborating under a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to pursue technology-driven solutions that reduce petroleum use, among other objectives. One of the solutions being explored under the MOU is leveraging waste as feedstock for fuel cell applications in fixed and deployed military operations.

119

2014 ENERGY AND ECONOMIC VALUE OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE (MSW), INCLUDING NON-RECYCLED PLASTICS (NRP),  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-to-energy (WTE) plants, 0.27 million tons (0.7%) were used as alternative fuel in cement production, and 32 Earth Engineering Center (EEC) Report to the American Chemistry Council (ACC) which was based on U.S. 2008 data and quantified the energy and economic value of municipal solid wastes (MSW) and non

Columbia University

120

Greenhouse gas emissions from MSW incineration in China: Impacts of waste characteristics and energy recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Determination of the amount of greenhouse gas (GHG) emitted during municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) is complex because both contributions and savings of GHGs exist in the process. To identify the critical factors influencing GHG emissions from MSWI in China, a GHG accounting model was established and applied to six Chinese cities located in different regions. The results showed that MSWI in most of the cities was the source of GHGs, with emissions of 25-207 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw. Within all process stages, the emission of fossil CO{sub 2} from the combustion of MSW was the main contributor (111-254 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw), while the substitution of electricity reduced the GHG emissions by 150-247 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw. By affecting the fossil carbon content and the lower heating value of the waste, the contents of plastic and food waste in the MSW were the critical factors influencing GHG emissions of MSWI. Decreasing food waste content in MSW by half will significantly reduce the GHG emissions from MSWI, and such a reduction will convert MSWI in Urumqi and Tianjin from GHG sources to GHG sinks. Comparison of the GHG emissions in the six Chinese cities with those in European countries revealed that higher energy recovery efficiency in Europe induced much greater reductions in GHG emissions. Recovering the excess heat after generation of electricity would be a good measure to convert MSWI in all the six cities evaluated herein into sinks of GHGs.

Yang Na [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhang Hua, E-mail: zhanghua_tj@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Chen Miao; Shao Liming [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); He Pinjing, E-mail: xhpjk@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste-to-energy msw" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

An overview of renewable energy utilization from municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration in Taiwan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

summarized in the paper. Finally, we present the regulatory system including Air Pollution Control Act . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 495 4. Air pollution control regulations on MSW-to-energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 497 4.1. MSW incinerator air pollutants emission standards

Columbia University

122

Processing and properties of a solid energy fuel from municipal solid waste (MSW) and recycled plastics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Diversion of waste streams such as plastics, woods, papers and other solid trash from municipal landfills and extraction of useful materials from landfills is an area of increasing interest especially in densely populated areas. One promising technology for recycling municipal solid waste (MSW) is to burn the high-energy-content components in standard coal power plant. This research aims to reform wastes into briquettes that are compatible with typical coal combustion processes. In order to comply with the standards of coal-fired power plants, the feedstock must be mechanically robust, free of hazardous contaminants, and moisture resistant, while retaining high fuel value. This study aims to investigate the effects of processing conditions and added recyclable plastics on the properties of MSW solid fuels. A well-sorted waste stream high in paper and fiber content was combined with controlled levels of recyclable plastics PE, PP, PET and PS and formed into briquettes using a compression molding technique. The effect of added plastics and moisture content on binding attraction and energy efficiency were investigated. The stability of the briquettes to moisture exposure, the fuel composition by proximate analysis, briquette mechanical strength, and burning efficiency were evaluated. It was found that high processing temperature ensures better properties of the product addition of milled mixed plastic waste leads to better encapsulation as well as to greater calorific value. Also some moisture removal (but not complete) improves the compacting process and results in higher heating value. Analysis of the post-processing water uptake and compressive strength showed a correlation between density and stability to both mechanical stress and humid environment. Proximate analysis indicated heating values comparable to coal. The results showed that mechanical and moisture uptake stability were improved when the moisture and air contents were optimized. Moreover, the briquette sample composition was similar to biomass fuels but had significant advantages due to addition of waste plastics that have high energy content compared to other waste types. Addition of PP and HDPE presented better benefits than addition of PET due to lower softening temperature and lower oxygen content. It should be noted that while harmful emissions such as dioxins, furans and mercury can result from burning plastics, WTE facilities have been able to control these emissions to meet US EPA standards. This research provides a drop-in coal replacement that reduces demand on landfill space and replaces a significant fraction of fossil-derived fuel with a renewable alternative.

JeongIn Gug; David Cacciola; Margaret J. Sobkowicz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Reconsidering Municipal Solid Waste as a Renewable Energy Feedstock For many years, opposition to the use of municipal solid waste (MSW) as an energy resource has been nearly universal among  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reconsidering Municipal Solid Waste as a Renewable Energy Feedstock July 2009 For many years, opposition to the use of municipal solid waste (MSW) as an energy resource has been nearly universal among of technologies can be used to create energy from MSW: · Landfill Gas Capture -- Waste in landfills naturally

Columbia University

124

German Company Offers to Transform Sofia Waste to Energy The German company AlphaKat has filed a bid at Sofia municipality to construct an  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is produced from 1.2kg waste and the expenses for 1 liter of diesel from an installation with power 2000 into diesel would cost EUR 65 M. Under their project Sofia would need two installations of that type. The company also claims that the diesel that will be produced from the waste would be of high quality

Columbia University

125

Waste to energy by industrially integrated supercritical water gasification Effects of alkali salts in residual by-products from the pulp and paper industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Supercritical water gasification (SCWG) is a method by which biomass can be converted intoa hydrogen-rich gas product. Wet industrial waste streams, which contain both organic and inorganic material, are well suited for treatment by SCWG. In this study, the gasification of two streams of biomass resulting from the pulp and paper industry, black liquor and paper sludge, has been investigated. The purpose is to convert these to useful products, both gaseous and solids, which can be used either in the papermaking process or in external applications. Simple compounds, such as glucose, have been fully gasified in SCWG, but gasification of more complex compounds, such as biomass and waste, have not reached as high conversions. The investigated paper sludge was not easily gasified. Improving gasification results with catalysts is an option and the use of alkali salts for this purpose was studied. The relationship between alkali concentration, temperature, and gasification yields was studied with the addition of KOH, K2CO3, NaOH and black liquor to the paper sludge. Addition of black liquor to the paper sludge resulted in similarly enhancing effects as when the alkali salts were added, which made it possible to raise the dry matter content and gasification yield without expensive additives.

I. Rnnlund; L. Myren; K. Lundqvist; J. Ahlbeck; T. Westerlund

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Waste-to-Energy Road Mapping Workshop  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Hydrothermal Liquefaction Heat, Char, Bio-oil, Syngas ANAEROBIC DIGESTION AND BIOGAS 7 * Biological, naturally occurring ANAEROBIC DIGESTION PROCESS 8 Anaerobic Digestion...

127

Waste-to-Energy Design Proposal for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

beneficially for construction purposes. Due to significant emission of pollutants from past incineration and Environmental Engineering, Columbia University Engineers: Zak Accuardi, Micah Babbitt, Rex Chen, Esther Lee, Tim and Themelis Client: John Quadrozzi, Gowanus Industrial Park, Red Hook, Brooklyn Draft: Final Submitted: 5

Columbia University

128

Municipal solid waste disposal in Portugal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal has been one of the most important environmental problems for all of the Portuguese regions. The basic principles of MSW management in Portugal are: (1) prevention or reduction, (2) reuse, (3) recovery (e.g., recycling, incineration with heat recovery), and (4) polluter-pay principle. A brief history of legislative trends in waste management is provided herein as background for current waste management and recycling activities. The paper also presents and discusses the municipal solid waste management in Portugal and is based primarily on a national inquiry carried out in 2003 and directed to the MSW management entities. Additionally, the MSW responsibility and management structure in Portugal is presented, together with the present situation of production, collection, recycling, treatment and elimination of MSW. Results showed that 96% of MSW was collected mixed (4% was separately collected) and that 68% was disposed of in landfill, 21% was incinerated at waste-to-energy plants, 8% was treated at organic waste recovery plants and 3% was delivered to sorting. The average generation rate of MSW was 1.32 kg/capita/day.

Magrinho, Alexandre [Mechanical Engineering Department, Escola Superior de Tecnologia de Setubal, Campus IPS, Estefanilha, Setubal (Portugal); Didelet, Filipe [Mechanical Engineering Department, Escola Superior de Tecnologia de Setubal, Campus IPS, Estefanilha, Setubal (Portugal); Semiao, Viriato [Mechanical Engineering Department, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: ViriatoSemiao@ist.utl.pt

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Fuel-Slurry Integrated Gasifier/Gas Turbine (FSIG/GT) Alternative for Power Generation Applied to Municipal Solid Waste (MSW)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The gas is cleaned to bring the particle content and size as well alkaline concentration within the acceptable limits for injections into standard gas turbines. ... The proper disposal and use of Municipal Solid Wastes (MSW) for power generation remains among the most pressing problems of medium to large cities. ... Bubble sizes and raising velocities through the gasifier bed (Configuration A). ...

Marcio L. de Souza-Santos; Kevin B. Ceribeli

2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

130

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume 2: A Techno-economic Evaluation of the Production of Mixed Alcohols  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Biomass is a renewable energy resource that can be converted into liquid fuel suitable for transportation applications and thus help meet the Energy Independence and Security Act renewable energy goals (U.S. Congress 2007). However, biomass is not always available in sufficient quantity at a price compatible with fuels production. Municipal solid waste (MSW) on the other hand is readily available in large quantities in some communities and is considered a partially renewable feedstock. Furthermore, MSW may be available for little or no cost.

131

Performance of a municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerator predicted with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to investigate by the means of numerical simulation the performance of the MSW incinerator with of Vercelli (Italy). FLUENT, a finite-volumes commercial code for Fluid Dynamics has been used to predict the 3-D reacting flows (gaseous phase) within the incinerator geometry, in order to estimate if the three conditions settled by the Italian law (P.D. 915 / 82) are respected: (a) Flue gas temperature at the input of the secondary combustion chamber must exceed 950 C. (b) Oxygen concentration in the same section must exceed 6 %. (c) Residence time for the flue gas in the secondary combustion chamber must exceed 2 seconds. The model of the incinerator has been created using the software pre-processing facilities (wall, input, outlet and live cells), together with the set-up of boundary conditions. There are also imposed the combustion constants (stoichiometry, heat of combustion, air excess). The solving procedure transforms at the level of each live cell the partial derivative equations in algebraic equations, computing the velocities field, the temperatures, gases concentration, etc. These predicted values were compared with the design properties, and the conclusion was that the conditions (a), (b), (c), are respected in normal operation. The powerful graphic interface helps the user to visualize the magnitude of the computed parameters. These results may be successfully used for the design and operation improvements for MSW incinerators. This fact will substantially increase the efficiency, reduce pollutant emissions and optimize the plant overall performance.

Anglesio, P.; Negreanu, G.P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Impact of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Quality on the Behavior of Alkali Metals and Trace Elements during Combustion: A Thermodynamic Equilibrium Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Light, thermal- and bacterial-resistant, and inexpensive leathers, especially in the footwear industry, are obtained by the Cr tanning method. ... The selected waste items are representing the major combustible fractions found in MSW, i.e. paper, plastic, textile, and biogenic materials (both food and biomass), but also the other waste fraction (a mixed and poorly defined fraction). ... Pedersen et al.(6) studies six different waste fractions separately under different operational conditions in a full-scale incinerator: NaCl (road salt), household batteries, automotive shredder waste (rubber and plastics), Cu?Cr?As (CCA)-impregnated wood, PVC, and shoes (leather mainly). ...

Michae?l Becidan; Lars Srum; Daniel Lindberg

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

133

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume 2: A Techno-economic Evaluation of the Production of Mixed Alcohols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biomass is a renewable energy resource that can be converted into liquid fuel suitable for transportation applications and thus help meet the Energy Independence and Security Act renewable energy goals (U.S. Congress 2007). However, biomass is not always available in sufficient quantity at a price compatible with fuels production. Municipal solid waste (MSW) on the other hand is readily available in large quantities in some communities and is considered a partially renewable feedstock. Furthermore, MSW may be available for little or no cost. This report provides a techno-economic analysis of the production of mixed alcohols from MSW and compares it to the costs for a wood based plant. In this analysis, MSW is processed into refuse derived fuel (RDF) and then gasified in a plant co-located with a landfill. The resulting syngas is then catalytically converted to mixed alcohols. At a scale of 2000 metric tons per day of RDF, and using current technology, the minimum ethanol selling price at a 10% rate of return is approximately $1.85/gallon ethanol (early 2008 $). However, favorable economics are dependent upon the toxicity characteristics of the waste streams and that a market exists for the by-product scrap metal recovered from the RDF process.

Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua; Valkenburt, Corinne

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Waste Growth Challenges Local Democracy. The Politics of Waste between Europe and the Mediterranean: a Focus on Italy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The new incinerator (or waste-to-energy plant) in the Alpinedecreasing. Indeed waste-to- energy plants and recyclingDerived Fuel) and sent to a waste-to- energy plants, are now

Mengozzi, Alessandro

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Waste-to-Energy Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency in South Korea, fueled by industrial waste (mainly fabric, wood, plastic, packaging materials

136

MSW Biogenic | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MSW Biogenic MSW Biogenic Dataset Summary Description Provides annual consumption (in quadrillion Btu) of renewable energy by energy use sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electricity) and by energy source (e.g. solar, biofuel) for 2004 through 2008. Original sources for data are cited on spreadsheet. Also available from: www.eia.gov/cneaf/solar.renewables/page/trends/table1_2.xls Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords annual energy consumption biodiesel Biofuels biomass energy use by sector ethanol geothermal Hydroelectric Conventional Landfill Gas MSW Biogenic Other Biomass renewable energy Solar Thermal/PV Waste wind Wood and Derived Fuels Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon RE Consumption by Energy Use Sector, Excel file (xls, 32.8 KiB)

137

Modeling and comparative assessment of municipal solid waste gasification for energy production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Study developed a methodology for the evaluation of gasification for MSW treatment. Study was conducted comparatively for USA, UAE, and Thailand. Study applies a thermodynamic model (Gibbs free energy minimization) using the Gasify software. The energy efficiency of the process and the compatibility with different waste streams was studied. - Abstract: Gasification is the thermochemical conversion of organic feedstocks mainly into combustible syngas (CO and H{sub 2}) along with other constituents. It has been widely used to convert coal into gaseous energy carriers but only has been recently looked at as a process for producing energy from biomass. This study explores the potential of gasification for energy production and treatment of municipal solid waste (MSW). It relies on adapting the theory governing the chemistry and kinetics of the gasification process to the use of MSW as a feedstock to the process. It also relies on an equilibrium kinetics and thermodynamics solver tool (Gasify) in the process of modeling gasification of MSW. The effect of process temperature variation on gasifying MSW was explored and the results were compared to incineration as an alternative to gasification of MSW. Also, the assessment was performed comparatively for gasification of MSW in the United Arab Emirates, USA, and Thailand, presenting a spectrum of socioeconomic settings with varying MSW compositions in order to explore the effect of MSW composition variance on the products of gasification. All in all, this study provides an insight into the potential of gasification for the treatment of MSW and as a waste to energy alternative to incineration.

Arafat, Hassan A., E-mail: harafat@masdar.ac.ae; Jijakli, Kenan

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

ISWA commitments on waste and climate ISWA General Secretariat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of renewable energy. Incineration and other thermal processes for waste-to-energy, landfill gas recovery

139

January 2007 (text up-dated January 2008) Don't waste waste it is a resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.g. composting and anaerobic digestion), and Waste-to-Energy. Modern Waste to Energy technology deserves to dispel the myths surrounding Waste to Energy by attempting to present factual answers to the concerns management priorities and practices. Waste-to-Energy goes hand in hand with Recycling In order to achieve

Columbia University

140

Biomass and Waste-to-Energy | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

studies provided a detailed basis for understanding the current state of various conversion technologies for producing fuel ethanol. The studies also helped identify technical...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste-to-energy msw" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Waste to Energy and Absorption Chiller: A Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

All measured performance characteristics corresponded well to manufacturer's specifications or were within the expected range for this type of incinerator. The simplified economic analysis showed a payback of period 4.5 years. An optimized payback...

Wolpert, J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Waste to Energy Power Production at DOE and DOD Sites  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of its kind in the US AF DOD Utah * First Project Under DOEBiomass Alternative Methane Fuel ES PCProgram * Numerous awards and recognitions S olar Photovoltaic S ystem S olar...

143

Waste-to-Energy: Hawaii and Guam Energy Improvement Technology...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ESTCP Environmental Security Technology Certification Program FY fiscal year GEM Green Energy Machine H 2 S hydrogen sulfide HECO Hawaii Electric Company HEDWEC...

144

Waste to Energy Power Production at DOE and DOD Sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agency Innovations DOE: Savannah River Site · BiomassHeat and Power USAF: Hill Air Force Base · Landfill;Hill AFBRenewable Energy Initiatives Landfill Gasto Energy Electrical Generation (LFGTE) · First- LFGTE Air Force Base isadjacent to the DavisCounty Landfill Hi

145

Global MSW Generation in 2007 estimated at two billion tons Global Waste Management Market Assessment 2007, Key Note Publications Ltd ,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-gas emissions, water pollution, air pollution and noise/visual impact (of recycling/waste disposal facilities including construction/demolition, mining, quarrying, manufacturing and municipal waste. Much of the focus

Columbia University

146

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource! energy forum Case Studies from Estonia, Switzerland, Germany Bossart,· ABB Waste-to-Energy Plants Edmund Fleck,· ESWET Marcel van Berlo,· Afval Energie Bedrijf From Waste to Energy To Energy from Waste #12;9.00-9.30: Registration 9.30-9.40: Chairman Ella Stengler opens

Columbia University

147

Chemical pollution and toxicity of water samples from stream receiving leachate from controlled municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The present study was aimed to determine the impact of municipal waste landfill on the pollution level of surface waters, and to investigate whether the choice and number of physical and chemical parameters monitored are sufficient for determining the actual risk related to bioavailability and mobility of contaminants. In 20072012, water samples were collected from the stream flowing through the site at two sampling locations, i.e. before the stream?s entry to the landfill, and at the stream outlet from the landfill. The impact of leachate on the quality of stream water was observed in all samples. In 20072010, high values of TOC and conductivity in samples collected down the stream from the landfill were observed; the toxicity of these samples was much greater than that of samples collected up the stream from the landfill. In 20102012, a significant decrease of conductivity and TOC was observed, which may be related to the modernization of the landfill. Three tests were used to evaluate the toxicity of sampled water. As a novelty the application of Phytotoxkit F for determining water toxicity should be considered. Microtox showed the lowest sensitivity of evaluating the toxicity of water samples, while Phytotoxkit F showed the highest. High mortality rates of Thamnocephalus platyurus in Thamnotoxkit F test can be caused by high conductivity, high concentration of TOC or the presence of compounds which are not accounted for in the water quality monitoring program.

A. Melnyk; K. Kukli?ska; L. Wolska; J. Namie?nik

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

REACTION AND COMBUSTION INDICATORS IN MSW LANDFILLS Jeffrey W. Martin1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REACTION AND COMBUSTION INDICATORS IN MSW LANDFILLS Jeffrey W. Martin1 ,P.G., R.S., Timothy D, Ohio. ABSTRACT Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills may contain aluminum from residential, particularly aluminum production wastes, may react exothermically with liquid within a landfill and cause

149

Waste Growth Challenges Local Democracy. The Politics of Waste between Europe and the Mediterranean: a Focus on Italy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

activities, such as waste burning versus waste dumping.and the Geographies of Waste Governance: A Burning Issue forEurope: Burning oriented Incineration (waste-to-energy)

Mengozzi, Alessandro

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Advanced combustion zone retrofitting Lidkoeping BFB establishes a state-of-the-art design for waste firing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The oil crisis in 1973 gave an impetus to the development of the fluidized bed combustion technology for power and heat generation with local, often low quality, fuels. Kvaerner delivered the first Bubbling Fluidized Bed (BFB) for Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) firing in 1979 and the first waste fired Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) in 1984. Since this introduction Kvaerner has delivered 13 fluidized beds based on MSW out of a total of over 60 BFB and CFB delivers (in the range 5--165 MW{sub ht}). The ever more stringent demands on emissions performance, efficiency and availability have induced a continuous series of design enhancements culminating in the state-of-the-art BFB boilers at Lidkoeping BFB (in operation since 1985 on shredded MSW) was induced by new emission standards and need for increased output. The modified design was based on learning experience from Kvaerner Waste To Energy (WTE) BFB installations and an extensive R and D program. The design has fulfilled all expectations and established a third generation design for MSW fueled BFB-boilers. The green field installation at BCH Energy will commence operation in 1995. Design features include the Advanced Combustion Zone with an air swept fuel inlet spout, an asymmetrical overfire air (OFA) system installed in a double arch arrangement and directional bottom air nozzles. Also included are an integrated ash classifier, an improved back pass surface arrangement and a SNCR-system based on NH{sub 3}.

Tellgren, E.; Hagman, U.; Victoren, A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

151

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This appendix provides information on fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) technology as it has been applied to municipal waste combustion (MWC). A review of the literature was conducted to determine: (1) to what extent FBC technology has been applied to MWC, in terms of number and size of units was well as technology configuration; (2) the operating history of facilities employing FBC technology; and (3) the cost of these facilities as compared to conventional MSW installations. Where available in the literature, data on operating and performance characteristics are presented. Tabular comparisons of facility operating/cost data and emissions data have been complied and are presented. The literature review shows that FBC technology shows considerable promise in terms of providing improvements over conventional technology in areas such as NOx and acid gas control, and ash leachability. In addition, the most likely configuration to be applied to the first large scale FBC dedicated to municipal solid waste (MSW) will employ circulating bed (CFB) technology. Projected capital costs for the Robbins, Illinois 1600 ton per day CFB-based waste-to-energy facility are competitive with conventional systems, in the range of $125,000 per ton per day of MSW receiving capacity.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

E-Print Network 3.0 - analytical waste solutions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Waste, CO2, and Biofuels... ', followed by Dr. Kalogirou , who presented the : Waste to Energy Solution for Green Metropolitan Cities... Waste Management: Recycling and Waste to...

153

Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This page provides a brief overview of municipal solid waste energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply waste to energy within the Federal sector.

154

Clean liquid fuels from MSW  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need for a cost effective and cleaner method of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) disposal hardly needs emphasizing. With funding through the US EPA and US DOE-METC, EnerTech demonstrated its SlurryCarb{trademark} process for producing homogeneous, pumpable fuels from Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) with continuous pilot plant facilities, and characterized flue gas and ash emissions from combustion of the carbonized RDF slurry fuel. Pilot scale slurry carbonization experiments with RDF produced a homogeneous pumpable slurry fuel with a Higher Heating Value up to approximately 6,600 Btu/lb at 51.7 wt% total solids. The viscosity of this carbonized RDF slurry fuel was approximately 500 cP {at} 100 Hz decreasing, and ambient temperature. Also, pilot scale slurry carbonization experiments extracted up to approximately 94% of the feed RDF chlorine content as chloride salts. Atmospheric combustion of the carbonized RDF slurry fuel produced a carbon burnout exceeding 99.9%, with excess air as low as 15%. CO emissions averaged below 16 ppm (corrected to 7% O{sub 2}), while HCl and SO{sub 2} emissions were below 17 and 40 ppm, respectively, without acid gas scrubbing. NO{sub x} emissions depended on combustion temperature and averaged between 82--211 ppm, without selective noncatalytic or catalytic reduction. In addition, mercury emissions were measured at 0.003 mg/dscm. Combustion ash was non-hazardous, with low leaching characteristics, based on a TCLP analysis.

Klosky, M. [EnerTech Environmental, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

155

Modeling and simulation of landfill gas production from pretreated MSW landfill simulator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The cumulative landfill gas (LFG) production and its rate ... simulated for pretreated municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill using four models namely first order exponential ... . Considering the behavior of the p...

Rasool Bux Mahar; Abdul Razaque Sahito

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Transforming trash: reuse as a waste management and climate change mitigation strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the nexus between the waste and energy systems is crucial toof biological matter. wastes into energy and compost. Non-used to convert waste to energy. Where conventional

Vergara, Sintana Eugenia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Waste/By-Product Hydrogen  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation by Ruth Cox, Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association, at the DOE-DOD Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cells Workshop held Jan. 13, 2011

158

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 3, Appendix A: Mass burn technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This appendix on Mass Burn Technologies is the first in a series designed to identify, describe and assess the suitability of several currently or potentially available generic technologies for the management of municipal solid waste (MSW). These appendices, which cover eight core thermoconversion, bioconversion and recycling technologies, reflect public domain information gathered from many sources. Representative sources include: professional journal articles, conference proceedings, selected municipality solid waste management plans and subscription technology data bases. The information presented is intended to serve as background information that will facilitate the preparation of the technoeconomic and life cycle mass, energy and environmental analyses that are being developed for each of the technologies. Mass burn has been and continues to be the predominant technology in Europe for the management of MSW. In the United States, the majority of the existing waste-to-energy projects utilize this technology and nearly 90 percent of all currently planned facilities have selected mass burn systems. Mass burning generally refers to the direct feeding and combustion of municipal solid waste in a furnace without any significant waste preprocessing. The only materials typically removed from the waste stream prior to combustion are large bulky objects and potentially hazardous or undesirable wastes. The technology has evolved over the last 100 or so years from simple incineration to the most highly developed and commercially proven process available for both reducing the volume of MSW and for recovering energy in the forms of steam and electricity. In general, mass burn plants are considered to operate reliably with high availability.

none,

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

A hybrid procedure for MSW generation forecasting at multiple time scales in Xiamen City, China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: ? We propose a hybrid model that combines seasonal SARIMA model and grey system theory. ? The model is robust at multiple time scales with the anticipated accuracy. ? At month-scale, the SARIMA model shows good representation for monthly MSW generation. ? At medium-term time scale, grey relational analysis could yield the MSW generation. ? At long-term time scale, GM (1, 1) provides a basic scenario of MSW generation. - Abstract: Accurate forecasting of municipal solid waste (MSW) generation is crucial and fundamental for the planning, operation and optimization of any MSW management system. Comprehensive information on waste generation for month-scale, medium-term and long-term time scales is especially needed, considering the necessity of MSW management upgrade facing many developing countries. Several existing models are available but of little use in forecasting MSW generation at multiple time scales. The goal of this study is to propose a hybrid model that combines the seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) model and grey system theory to forecast MSW generation at multiple time scales without needing to consider other variables such as demographics and socioeconomic factors. To demonstrate its applicability, a case study of Xiamen City, China was performed. Results show that the model is robust enough to fit and forecast seasonal and annual dynamics of MSW generation at month-scale, medium- and long-term time scales with the desired accuracy. In the month-scale, MSW generation in Xiamen City will peak at 132.2 thousand tonnes in July 2015 1.5 times the volume in July 2010. In the medium term, annual MSW generation will increase to 1518.1 thousand tonnes by 2015 at an average growth rate of 10%. In the long term, a large volume of MSW will be output annually and will increase to 2486.3 thousand tonnes by 2020 2.5 times the value for 2010. The hybrid model proposed in this paper can enable decision makers to develop integrated policies and measures for waste management over the long term.

Xu, Lilai, E-mail: llxu@iue.ac.cn [Key Lab of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1799 Jimei Road, Xiamen 361021 (China); Xiamen Key Lab of Urban Metabolism, Xiamen 361021 (China); Gao, Peiqing, E-mail: peiqing15@yahoo.com.cn [Xiamen City Appearance and Environmental Sanitation Management Office, 51 Hexiangxi Road, Xiamen 361004 (China); Cui, Shenghui, E-mail: shcui@iue.ac.cn [Key Lab of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1799 Jimei Road, Xiamen 361021 (China); Xiamen Key Lab of Urban Metabolism, Xiamen 361021 (China); Liu, Chun, E-mail: xmhwlc@yahoo.com.cn [Xiamen City Appearance and Environmental Sanitation Management Office, 51 Hexiangxi Road, Xiamen 361004 (China)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced mixed waste Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

unskapssammanstllning om dioxiner"(Waste-to-energy, an inventory and review about... dioxins) Continuous efforts are being made to further improve waste incineration as a means...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste-to-energy msw" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerating waste removal Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SOLID WASTE IN CALIFORNIA: NEEDS AND CHALLENGES Alexander E. Helou... , such as gasification, pyrolysis, waste-to-energy (WTE), and advanced thermal ... Source: Columbia...

162

Circulating fluidized-bed boiler makes inroads for waste recycling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) boilers have ben used for years in Scandinavia to burn refuse-derived fuel (RDF). Now, Foster Wheeler Power Systems, Inc., (Clinton, N.J.) is bringing the technology to the US. Touted as the world`s largest waste-to-energy plant to use CFB technology, the Robbins (III.) Resource Recovery Facility will have the capacity to process 1,600 tons/d of municipal solid waste (MSW) when it begins operation in early 1997. The facility will have two materials-separation and RDF-processing trains, each with dual trommel screens, magnetic and eddy current separators, and shredders. About 25% of the incoming MSW will be sorted and removed for recycling, while 75% of it will be turned into fuel, with a heat value of roughly 6,170 btu/lb. Once burned in the twin CFB boilers the resulting steam will be routed through a single turbine generator to produce 50,000 mW of electric power.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Combined Municipal Solid Waste and biomass system optimization for district energy applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Combined energy conversion of MSW and agricultural residue biomass is examined. The model optimizes the financial yield of the investment. Several system specifications are optimally defined by the optimization model. The application to a case study in Greece shows positive financial yield. The investment is mostly sensitive on the interest rate, the investment cost and the heating oil price. - Abstract: Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) disposal has been a controversial issue in many countries over the past years, due to disagreement among the various stakeholders on the waste management policies and technologies to be adopted. One of the ways of treating/disposing MSW is energy recovery, as waste is considered to contain a considerable amount of bio-waste and therefore can lead to renewable energy production. The overall efficiency can be very high in the cases of co-generation or tri-generation. In this paper a model is presented, aiming to support decision makers in issues relating to Municipal Solid Waste energy recovery. The idea of using more fuel sources, including MSW and agricultural residue biomass that may exist in a rural area, is explored. The model aims at optimizing the system specifications, such as the capacity of the base-load Waste-to-Energy facility, the capacity of the peak-load biomass boiler and the location of the facility. Furthermore, it defines the quantity of each potential fuel source that should be used annually, in order to maximize the financial yield of the investment. The results of an energy tri-generation case study application at a rural area of Greece, using mixed MSW and biomass, indicate positive financial yield of investment. In addition, a sensitivity analysis is performed on the effect of the most important parameters of the model on the optimum solution, pinpointing the parameters of interest rate, investment cost and heating oil price, as those requiring the attention of the decision makers. Finally, the sensitivity analysis is enhanced by a stochastic analysis to determine the effect of the volatility of parameters on the robustness of the model and the solution obtained.

Rentizelas, Athanasios A., E-mail: arent@central.ntua.gr; Tolis, Athanasios I., E-mail: atol@central.ntua.gr; Tatsiopoulos, Ilias P., E-mail: itat@central.ntua.gr

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

Microsoft Word - Oneida Waste to Energy Project DOE Final EA 1862  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ONEIDA SEVEN GENERATIONS ONEIDA SEVEN GENERATIONS CORPORATION: ENERGY RECOVERY PROJECT, GREEN BAY, WISCONSIN U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office NOVEMBER 2011 DOE/EA-1862 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE ONEIDA SEVEN GENERATIONS CORPORATION: ENERGY RECOVERY PROJECT, GREEN BAY, WISCONSIN U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office NOVEMBER 2011 DOE/EA-1862 DOE/EA-1862 iii November 2011 COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy TITLE: Environmental Assessment for Oneida Seven Generations Corporation: Energy Recovery Project, Green Bay, Wisconsin (DOE/EA-1862) CONTACT: For more information on this Environmental Assessment (EA), please contact:

165

Waste-to-Energy and Fuel Cell T h l i O i  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. #12;Global Approach for Using Biogas Innovation for Our Energy Future #12;Anaerobic Digestion by Generator Type (based on 40-million SCF* of biogas per year**)( g p y ) Generator Type Megawatthours not come in an infinite range of sizes. Innovation for Our Energy Future #12;Contaminants in Biogas

166

EA-1860: Richland Renewable Energy Waste-to-Energy Project, Richland, Wisconsin  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is preparing a draft Environmental Assessment to analyze the potential environmental impacts of the proposed construction and operation of a new wastewater treatment facility and the alternative of not implementing this project.

167

Microsoft PowerPoint - Tribal Leader Forum Waste to Energy Introductio...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Fe 2 O 3 , and Al 2 O 3 Potential re-use Concrete, bricks, artificial reefs Air Modern air pollution control technology removes most contaminants Scrubbers, baghouse, ESP, etc....

168

renewable energy from waste 1730 RHODE ISLAND AVENUE, NW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

renewable energy from waste 1730 RHODE ISLAND AVENUE, NW SUITE 700 WASHINGTON, DC 20036 WWW Energy and Security Act of 2009 that was released as a discussion draft on March 31. While waste-to-energy gas reductions and renewable energy provided by waste-to-energy and if it implemented policies

Columbia University

169

The renewable energy contribution from waste across Europe.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas MSW or Mixed residual waste LFG Biogas -> Electr. (and Heat) 100 Solid Recovered Fuel Sorted Digestion Source separated biomass fraction or Sorted bio-fraction of MSW AD Biogas -> Electr. & Heat 100

170

Fuel Cell Power Plants Renewable and Waste Fuels | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Plants Renewable and Waste Fuels Fuel Cell Power Plants Renewable and Waste Fuels Presentation by Frank Wolak, Fuel Cell Energy, at the Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cells Workshop...

171

Process and technological aspects of municipal solid waste gasification. A review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Critical assessment of the main commercially available MSW gasifiers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Detailed discussion of the basic features of gasification process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Description of configurations of gasification-based waste-to-energy units. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmental performance analysis, on the basis of independent sources data. - Abstract: The paper proposes a critical assessment of municipal solid waste gasification today, starting from basic aspects of the process (process types and steps, operating and performance parameters) and arriving to a comparative analysis of the reactors (fixed bed, fluidized bed, entrained bed, vertical shaft, moving grate furnace, rotary kiln, plasma reactor) as well as of the possible plant configurations (heat gasifier and power gasifier) and the environmental performances of the main commercially available gasifiers for municipal solid wastes. The analysis indicates that gasification is a technically viable option for the solid waste conversion, including residual waste from separate collection of municipal solid waste. It is able to meet existing emission limits and can have a remarkable effect on reduction of landfill disposal option.

Arena, Umberto, E-mail: umberto.arena@unina2.it [Department of Environmental Sciences, Second University of Naples, Via A. Vivaldi, 43, 81100 Caserta (Italy)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminium dross waste Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Copyright 2008 by ASME Proceedings of NAWTEC16 16th Annual North American Waste... analysis of the mass streams and the properties of residual Municipal Solid Waste (MSW)....

173

Pyrolysis of Municipal Solid Waste for Syngas Production by Microwave Irradiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present study, we discuss the application of microwave-irradiated pyrolysis of municipal solid waste (MSW) for total recovery of useful gases and energy. The MSW pyrolysis under microwave irradiation hi...

Vidyadhar V. Gedam; Iyyaswami Regupathi

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

An overview of the sustainability of solid waste management at military installations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of chemical use), waste reduction, and energy savings by theA Changing Climate for Energy from Waste? Final Report forHowever, new waste-to-energy plants and composting have

Borglin, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative recycled waste Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

waste Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: alternative recycled waste Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 11th North American Waste to Energy...

176

Haraldrud Municipal Solid Waste Combustion Plant in Oslo.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis has studied Haraldrud MSW combustion process. Haraldrud is a realcombustion plant burning waste for citizens of Oslo. A thoroughly description ofthe combustion process (more)

Gudim, Simen Johan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Comparing the greenhouse gas emissions from three alternative waste combustion concepts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant GHG reductions are possible by efficient WtE technologies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CHP and high power-to-heat ratio provide significant GHG savings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N{sub 2}O and coal mine type are important in LCA GHG emissions of FBC co-combustion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Substituting coal and fuel oil by waste is beneficial in electricity and heat production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Substituting natural gas by waste may not be reasonable in CHP generation. - Abstract: Three alternative condensing mode power and combined heat and power (CHP) waste-to-energy concepts were compared in terms of their impacts on the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from a heat and power generation system. The concepts included (i) grate, (ii) bubbling fluidised bed (BFB) and (iii) circulating fluidised bed (CFB) combustion of waste. The BFB and CFB take advantage of advanced combustion technology which enabled them to reach electric efficiency up to 35% and 41% in condensing mode, respectively, whereas 28% (based on the lower heating value) was applied for the grate fired unit. A simple energy system model was applied in calculating the GHG emissions in different scenarios where coal or natural gas was substituted in power generation and mix of fuel oil and natural gas in heat generation by waste combustion. Landfilling and waste transportation were not considered in the model. GHG emissions were reduced significantly in all of the considered scenarios where the waste combustion concepts substituted coal based power generation. With the exception of condensing mode grate incinerator the different waste combustion scenarios resulted approximately in 1 Mton of fossil CO{sub 2}-eq. emission reduction per 1 Mton of municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerated. When natural gas based power generation was substituted by electricity from the waste combustion significant GHG emission reductions were not achieved.

Vainikka, Pasi, E-mail: pasi.vainikka@vtt.fi [VTT, Koivurannantie 1, FIN 40101 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Tsupari, Eemeli; Sipilae, Kai [VTT, Koivurannantie 1, FIN 40101 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Hupa, Mikko [Aabo Akademi Process Chemistry Centre, Piispankatu 8, FIN 20500 Turku (Finland)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

Oxygen-enriched coincineration of MSW and sewage sludge: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Federal regulations banning ocean dumping of sewage sludge coupled with stricter regulations on the disposal of sewage sludge in landfills have forced municipalities, especially those in the northeast United States, to consider alternate methods for disposal of this solid waste. Coincineration of municipal solid waste (MSW) and sludge has proven to be economically attractive for both Europe and Japan, but has not yet proven to be a viable sludge disposal technology in the United States because of a history of operational problems in existing facilities. The most prevalent problem in coincinerating MSW and a dewatered sewage sludge (15 to 25% solids) is incomplete sludge combustion. Incomplete sludge combustion is primarily a function of sludge particle size, occurring when the surface of the sludge particle dries and hardens, while the inner mass is unaffected. This phenomenon is commonly referred to in the industry as the {open_quotes}hamburger effect.{close_quotes} In an effort to promote technology development in this area, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. teamed with the US Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate a new process being developed for the disposal of a dewatered sewage sludge, {open_quotes}Oxygen-Enriched Coincineration of MSW and Sewage Sludge.{close_quotes} This report provides a comprehensive summary of the pilot demonstration test program for oxygen-enriched coincineration of MSW and sewage sludge. This report describes the pilot test facility, instrumentation, and methods of data collection and data analyses; describes how the tests were executed; and discusses the test results. Recommendations for the future development of this technology in the current marketplace are also provided.

none,

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Copyright 2009 by ASME Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

composition and high temperature corrosion in boiler that limit steam temperature and pressure and thus unit volume of combustion chamber; heat transfer rate per unit area of boiler surfaces; % excess air thermal efficiency; cost of APC (air pollution control) system because of the need to remove volatile

Columbia University

180

An overview of the sustainability of solid waste management at military installations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arc Gasification. Sustainability of Solid Waste Management.and gasification technologies for energy efficient and environmentally sound MSW disposal." Wastewaste to energy (Provence 2008). Plasma Arc Gasification

Borglin, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste-to-energy msw" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Capacity-to-Act in India's Solid Waste Management and Waste-to-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, for example, Oppili, P., "Waste Burning, A Health Hazard at Pallikaranai," The Hindu, Sept. 9, 2003; "MPPCB1 Capacity-to-Act in India's Solid Waste Management and Waste-to- Energy Industries Perinaz Bhada and disposal of garbage, or municipal solid waste, compounded by increasing consumption levels. Another serious

Columbia University

182

The Municipal Solid Waste Landfill as a Source of Montreal Protocol-restricted Halocarbons in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Municipal Solid Waste Landfill as a Source of Montreal Protocol-restricted Halocarbons of Geophysics #12;2 #12;The Municipal Solid Waste Landfill as a Source of Montreal Protocol municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. With several hundred MSW landfills in both the US and UK, estimating

183

'Incineration: A burning issue or a load of rubbish? Examining public attitudes to municipal solid waste incineration.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The author set out to investigate public attitudes to municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration. The area chosen for the study was Carlow town, a regional (more)

Dillon, Rachel

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Wet welding qualification trials at 35 MSW  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wet welding is gaining increased attention and attraction for application on marine buildings and offshore structures all over the world because of its versatility, flexibility and mobility in combination with low investment costs. In a common research and development project between PETROBRAS/CENPES, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and GKSS Research Centre, Geesthacht, Germany wet welding qualification trials have been performed in different water depths up to 35 msw. The tests have been performed with newly developed electrodes in two different wet welding procedures. The experiments have been carried out on SS- as well as on 5F-specimens acc. ANSI/AWS D 3.6-89. Results will be presented in respect to the performance of the two welding procedures especially with regard to the avoidance of hydrogen induced cold cracking and high hardness values.

Dos Santos, V.R.; Teixeira, C.J. [Petrobras/CENPES, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Szelagowski, P.J.F. [GKSS Research Center, Geesthacht (Germany)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

Characterization of Landfill Gas Composition at the Fresh Kills Municipal Solid-Waste Landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Characterization of Landfill Gas Composition at the Fresh Kills Municipal Solid-Waste Landfill ... The most common disposal method in the United States for municipal solid waste (MSW) is burial in landfills. ... Under the New Source Performance Standards and Emission Guidelines for MSW landfills, MSW operators are required to determine the nonmethane organic gas generation rate of their landfill through modeling and/or measurements. ...

Bart Eklund; Eric P. Anderson; Barry L. Walker; Don B. Burrows

1998-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

186

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy Conversion, and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A project to develop a microbial heat recovery cell (MHRC) system prototype using wastewater effluent samples from candidate facilities to produce either electric power or hydrogen

187

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This appendix contains the alphabetically indexed bibliography for the complete group of reports on municipal waste management alternatives. The references are listed for each of the following topics: mass burn technologies, RDF technologies, fluidized-bed combustion, pyrolysis and gasification of MSW, materials recovery- recycling technologies, sanitary landfills, composting, and anaerobic digestion of MSW.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This appendix contains the numerically indexed bibliography for the complete group of reports on municipal solid waste management alternatives. The list references information on the following topics: mass burn technologies, RDF technologies, fluidized bed combustion, pyrolysis and gasification of MSW, materials recovery- recycling technologies, sanitary landfills, composting and anaerobic digestion of MSW.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

A legislator`s guide to municipal solid waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this guide is to allow individual state legislators to gain a better understanding of municipal solid waste (MSW) management issues in general, and examine the applicability of these concerns to their state. This guide incorporates a discussion of MSW management issues and a comprehensive overview of the components of an integrated solid waste management system. Major MSW topics discussed include current management issues affecting states, federal activities, and state laws and local activities. Solid waste characteristics and management approaches are also detailed.

Starkey, D.; Hill, K.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Synthesis, Volume 2: A Techno-economic Evaluation of the Production of Mixed Alcohols Biomass is a renewable energy resource that can be converted into liquid fuel suitable for...

191

1828 L Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20036  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reducing mining operations WTE Provides Clean Energy ­ WTE technology has significantly advanced of municipal solid waste (MSW), also called Waste to Energy (WTE). Proven Technology - WTE is a proven-recycling MSW. WTE technology is used extensively in Europe and other developed nations in Asia such as Russia

Columbia University

192

Energy from waste via coal/waste co-firing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper reviews the feasibility of waste-to-energy plants using the cocombustion of coal with refuse-derived fuels. The paper discusses the types of wastes available: municipal solid wastes, plastics, tires, biomass, and specialized industrial wastes, such as waste oils, post-consumer carpet, auto shredder residues, and petroleum coke. The five most common combustion systems used in co-firing are briefly described. They are the stoker boiler, suspension-fired boilers, cyclone furnaces, fluidized bed boilers, and cement kilns. The paper also discusses the economic incentives for generating electricity from waste.

Winslow, J.; Ekmann, J.; Smouse, S. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center; Ramezan, M. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Harding, S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

193

andradionuclide mixed wastes: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Steam -> Electr. & Heat Av 50 Range 47-80 Landfill Gas MSW or Mixed residual waste LFG Biogas -> Electr. (and Heat) 100 Solid Recovered Fuel Sorted Biomass Energy Plants...

194

Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:28am Addthis Black and white photo of a bulldozer pushing a large mound of trash in a landfill. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's high-solids digester converts wastes to biogas and compost for energy production. This page provides a brief overview of municipal solid waste energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply waste to energy within the Federal sector. Overview Municipal solid waste, also known as waste to energy, generates electricity by burning solid waste as fuel. This generates renewable electricity while also incinerating landfill and other municipal waste products such as trash, yard clippings and debris, furniture, food scraps, and other

195

Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:28am Addthis Black and white photo of a bulldozer pushing a large mound of trash in a landfill. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's high-solids digester converts wastes to biogas and compost for energy production. This page provides a brief overview of municipal solid waste energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply waste to energy within the Federal sector. Overview Municipal solid waste, also known as waste to energy, generates electricity by burning solid waste as fuel. This generates renewable electricity while also incinerating landfill and other municipal waste products such as trash, yard clippings and debris, furniture, food scraps, and other

196

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 12, Numerically indexed bibliography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This appendix contains the numerically indexed bibliography for the complete group of reports on municipal solid waste management alternatives. The list references information on the following topics: mass burn technologies, RDF technologies, fluidized bed combustion, pyrolysis and gasification of MSW, materials recovery- recycling technologies, sanitary landfills, composting and anaerobic digestion of MSW.

none,

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 11, Alphabetically indexed bibliography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This appendix contains the alphabetically indexed bibliography for the complete group of reports on municipal waste management alternatives. The references are listed for each of the following topics: mass burn technologies, RDF technologies, fluidized-bed combustion, pyrolysis and gasification of MSW, materials recovery- recycling technologies, sanitary landfills, composting, and anaerobic digestion of MSW.

none,

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Resource recovery potential from secondary components of segregated municipal solid wastes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(MSW) such as fruit and vegetable wastes (FVW), leaf litter, paddy straw, cane bagasse, cane trash for decentralized biogas plants to be operated in the vicinity. We characterized the fermen- tation potential of six of the above MSW fractions for their suitability to be converted to biogas and anaerobic compost using

Columbia University

199

Waste Gasification by Thermal Plasma: A Review Frdric Fabry*, Christophe Rehmet, Vandad Rohani, Laurent Fulcheri  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

12 Waste Gasification by Thermal Plasma: A Review Frédéric Fabry*, Christophe Rehmet, Vandad Rohani proposes an overview of waste-to-energy conversion by gasification processes based on thermal plasma, of various waste gasification processes based on thermal plasma (DC or AC plasma torches) at lab scale versus

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

200

Waste utilization as an energy source: Municipal wastes. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the utilization of municipal wastes as an energy source. Articles discuss energy derived from incineration/combustion, refuse-derived fuels, co-firing municipal waste and standard fuels, landfill gas production, sewage combustion, and other waste-to-energy technologies. Citations address economics and efficiencies of various schemes to utilize municipal waste products as energy sources. (Contains a minimum of 130 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste-to-energy msw" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

E-Print Network 3.0 - activity waste vitrification Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conference May 1-3, 2006, Tampa, Florida USA Summary: -98. Izumikawa C., 1996, "Metal recovery from fly ash generated from vitrification process for MSW ash," Waste... 14th...

202

"Potential for Combined Heat and Power and District Heating and Cooling from Waste-to-Energy Facilities in the U.S. Learning from the Danish Experience"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is used for the generation of electricity. The advantages of district heating using WTE plants are heating and cooling system in Indianapolis. However, there are few U.S. hot water district heating systems,800 district heating and cooling systems, providing 320 million MWh of thermal energy. Currently, 28 of the 88

Shepard, Kenneth

203

Municipal Solid WasteMunicipal Solid Waste Landfills In CitiesLandfills In Cities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Municipal Solid WasteMunicipal Solid Waste Landfills In CitiesLandfills In Cities ArunArun PurandarePurandare Eco Designs India Pvt. Ltd.Eco Designs India Pvt. Ltd. #12;What is a Landfill? A sanitary landfill refers to an engineered facility for the disposal of MSW designed and operated

Columbia University

204

The WTERT Awards recognize outstanding contributions to advancing sustainable waste management worldwide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the sustainable waste management "ladder" than the U.S., at a GDP per capita Brunner (Austria) 2008: Covanta Energy (USA); Inventor Artie Cole (USA) 2010: City, composting and waste-to- energy, 200-2014. ROK has achieved a higher standing

205

Municipal solid waste degradation and landfill gas resources characteristics in self-recirculating sequencing batch bioreactor landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on the degradation characteristics of municipal solid waste (MSW) in China, the traditional anaerobic sequencing batch bioreactor landfill (ASBRL) was optimized, and an improved anaerobic sequencing batch b...

Xiao-zhi Zhou ???; Shu-xun Sang ???; Li-wen Cao ???

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Municipal solid waste effective stress analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mechanical behavior of municipal solid waste (MSW) has attracted the attention of many researchers in the field of geo-environmental engineering in recent years and several aspects of waste mechanical response under loading have been elucidated. However, the mechanical response of MSW materials under undrained conditions has not been described in detail to date. The knowledge of this aspect of the MSW mechanical response is very important in cases involving MSW with high water contents, seismic ground motion and in regions where landfills are built with poor operation conditions. This paper presents the results obtained from 26 large triaxial tests performed both in drained and undrained conditions. The results were analyzed taking into account the waste particles compressibility and the deformation anisotropy of the waste samples. The waste particles compressibility was used to modify the Terzaghi effective stress equation, using the Skempton (1961) proposition. It is shown that the use of the modified effective stress equation led to much more compatible shear strength values when comparing Consolidated-Drained (CD) and Consolidated-Undrained (CU), results, explaining the high shear strength values obtained in CU triaxial tests, even when the pore pressure is almost equal to the confining stress.

Shariatmadari, Nader, E-mail: shariatmadari@iust.ac.i [Dept. of Civil Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, 16846-13114 Teharn (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Machado, Sandro Lemos, E-mail: smachado@ufba.b [Dept. of Materials Science and Technology, Federal University of Bahia, 02 Aristides Novis St., 40210-630 Salvador-BA (Brazil); Noorzad, Ali, E-mail: noorzad@pwut.ac.i [Faculty of Water Engineering, Power and Water University of Technology, Tehranpars, 1719-16765 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimpour-Fard, Mehran, E-mail: karimpour_mehran@iust.ac.i [Dept. of Civil Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, 16846-13114 Teharn (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

WTE Guidebook, EEC/IDB, July 2013 1 FOR THE APPLICATION OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to produce a synthetic gas ("gasification"), or heat petrochemical wastes in the absence of oxygen to produceWTE Guidebook, EEC/IDB, July 2013 1 GUIDEBOOK FOR THE APPLICATION OF WASTE TO ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES of an increasing amount of municipal solid waste (MSW) that is surpassing the existing capacity of sanitary

208

THERMODYNAMIC STUDY OF HEAVY METALS BEHAVIOUR DURING MUNICIPAL WASTE INCINERATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, heat and mass transfer, drying, pyrolysis, combustion of pyrolysis gases, combustion and gasificationTHERMODYNAMIC STUDY OF HEAVY METALS BEHAVIOUR DURING MUNICIPAL WASTE INCINERATION Y. ME´ NARD, A Me´tallurgie (LSG2M) Nancy, France T he incineration of municipal solid waste (MSW) contributes

Boyer, Edmond

209

Aluminum Reactions and Problems in Municipal Solid Waste Landfills  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aluminum Reactions and Problems in Municipal Solid Waste Landfills G. Vincent Calder, Ph.D.1 ; and Timothy D. Stark, Ph.D., P.E., F.ASCE2 Abstract: Aluminum enters municipal solid waste MSW landfills from problematic for landfill operations by generating undesirable heat, liquid leachate, and gases

210

Process modeling of hydrogen production from municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ASPEN PLUS commercial simulation software has been used to develop a process model for a conceptual process to convert municipal solid waste (MSW) to hydrogen. The process consists of hydrothermal treatment of the MSW in water to create a slurry suitable as feedstock for an oxygen blown Texaco gasifier. A method of reducing the complicated MSW feed material to a manageable set of components is outlined along with a framework for modeling the stoichiometric changes associated with the hydrothermal treatment process. Model results indicate that 0.672 kmol/s of hydrogen can be produced from the processing of 30 kg/s (2600 tonne/day) of raw MSW. A number of variations on the basic processing parameters are explored and indicate that there is a clear incentive to reduce the inert fraction in the processed slurry feed and that cofeeding a low value heavy oil may be economically attractive.

Thorsness, C.B.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Evaluation of landfill gas production and emissions in a MSW large-scale Experimental Cell in Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Landfill gas (LFG) emissions from municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills are an important environmental concern in Brazil due to the existence of several uncontrolled disposal sites. A program of laboratory and field tests was conducted to investigate gas generation in and emission from an Experimental Cell with a 36,659-ton capacity in Recife/PE Brazil. This investigation involved waste characterisation, gas production and emission monitoring, and geotechnical and biological evaluations and was performed using three types of final cover layers. The results obtained in this study showed that waste decomposes 45 times faster in a tropical wet climate than predicted by traditional first-order models using default parameters. This fact must be included when considering the techniques and economics of projects developed in tropical climate countries. The design of the final cover layer and its geotechnical and biological behaviour proved to have an important role in minimising gas emissions to the atmosphere. Capillary and methanotrophic final cover layers presented lower CH4 flux rates than the conventional layer.

Felipe Juc Maciel; Jos Fernando Thom Juc

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Conversion of municipal solid waste to hydrogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

LLNL and Texaco are cooperatively developing a physical and chemical treatment method for the conversion of municipal solid waste (MSW) to hydrogen via the steps of hydrothermal pretreatment, gasification and purification. LLNL`s focus has been on hydrothermal pretreatment of MSW in order to prepare a slurry of suitable viscosity and heating value to allow efficient and economical gasification and hydrogen production. The project has evolved along 3 parallel paths: laboratory scale experiments, pilot scale processing, and process modeling. Initial laboratory-scale MSW treatment results (e.g., viscosity, slurry solids content) over a range of temperatures and times with newspaper and plastics will be presented. Viscosity measurements have been correlated with results obtained at MRL. A hydrothermal treatment pilot facility has been rented from Texaco and is being reconfigured at LLNL; the status of that facility and plans for initial runs will be described. Several different operational scenarios have been modeled. Steady state processes have been modeled with ASPEN PLUS; consideration of steam injection in a batch mode was handled using continuous process modules. A transient model derived from a general purpose packed bed model is being developed which can examine the aspects of steam heating inside the hydrothermal reactor vessel. These models have been applied to pilot and commercial scale scenarios as a function of MSW input parameters and have been used to outline initial overall economic trends. Part of the modeling, an overview of the MSW gasification process and the modeling of the MSW as a process material, was completed by a DOE SERS (Science and Engineering Research Semester) student. The ultimate programmatic goal is the technical demonstration of the gasification of MSW to hydrogen at the laboratory and pilot scale and the economic analysis of the commercial feasibility of such a process.

Richardson, J.H.; Rogers, R.S.; Thorsness, C.B. [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Reducing Waste and Harvesting Energy This Halloween | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reducing Waste and Harvesting Energy This Halloween Reducing Waste and Harvesting Energy This Halloween Reducing Waste and Harvesting Energy This Halloween October 30, 2013 - 9:57am Addthis This graphic shows how seasonal waste can be used to generate power. | Graphic by BCS for the Energy Department This graphic shows how seasonal waste can be used to generate power. | Graphic by BCS for the Energy Department Paul Grabowski Demonstration and Deployment, Bioenergy Technologies Office This Halloween, think of turning seasonal municipal solid waste (MSW) to energy as a very important "trick" that can have a positive environmental impact. Usually, these seasonal items including hay, pumpkins, candy, and leaves, are thrown away and sent to landfills. From there, the MSW decomposes and eventually turns into methane-a harmful

214

Application of Geographical Information System (GIS) in optimisation of waste collection for Alandur Municipality in South Chennai, India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The population outburst in urban areas had resulted in a substantial increase in the generation of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) and challenged with waste management. Issam et al. (2007) pointed out that most of the cities which is burning the waste in open dumps lacks in proper health and safety requirements. Alandur which is under Alandur Municipal Corporation (AMC) generate nearly 80 MT MSW every day. Due to improper institutional mechanism for collection and conveyance of waste, an engineered design for storage, collection and conveyance using GIS incorporating route optimisation had been discussed in this paper.

T.E. Kanchanabhan; Srinivasan Selvaraj; V. Lenin Kalyana Sundaram; J. Abbas Mohaideen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

The potential of GHG emission savings for programmatic CDM by municipal solid waste composting in the Western Province - Sri Lanka  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Western Province (WP) of Sri Lanka, as the most populated province in the country is burdened with a high level of municipal solid waste generation. Out of the 48 administrative local authorities within the WP, only 16 local authorities are practicing municipal solid waste composting. All other local authorities are practicing the most common method of MSW disposal; open dumping. The study was aimed at finding the potential of green house gas emission savings by municipal solid waste composting according to Programmatic Clean Development Mechanism in 32 local authorities of the WP which are not currently practicing MSW composting in order to quantify the certified emission reduction. The daily collection rate of municipal solid waste in the entire WP is around 2,000 tons per day. Biodegradable portion dominates the bulk of municipal solid waste in WP as about 76.30%. There is potential of claiming 231 certified emission reductions annually with regard to MSW composting within the WP.

V.K.D.H. Kariyakarawana; N.J.G.J. Bandara; S. Leelarathne

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Mercury emissions from municipal solid waste combustors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines emissions of mercury (Hg) from municipal solid waste (MSW) combustion in the United States (US). It is projected that total annual nationwide MSW combustor emissions of mercury could decrease from about 97 tonnes (1989 baseline uncontrolled emissions) to less than about 4 tonnes in the year 2000. This represents approximately a 95 percent reduction in the amount of mercury emitted from combusted MSW compared to the 1989 mercury emissions baseline. The likelihood that routinely achievable mercury emissions removal efficiencies of about 80 percent or more can be assured; it is estimated that MSW combustors in the US could prove to be a comparatively minor source of mercury emissions after about 1995. This forecast assumes that diligent measures to control mercury emissions, such as via use of supplemental control technologies (e.g., carbon adsorption), are generally employed at that time. However, no present consensus was found that such emissions control measures can be implemented industry-wide in the US within this time frame. Although the availability of technology is apparently not a limiting factor, practical implementation of necessary control technology may be limited by administrative constraints and other considerations (e.g., planning, budgeting, regulatory compliance requirements, etc.). These projections assume that: (a) about 80 percent mercury emissions reduction control efficiency is achieved with air pollution control equipment likely to be employed by that time; (b) most cylinder-shaped mercury-zinc (CSMZ) batteries used in hospital applications can be prevented from being disposed into the MSW stream or are replaced with alternative batteries that do not contain mercury; and (c) either the amount of mercury used in fluorescent lamps is decreased to an industry-wide average of about 27 milligrams of mercury per lamp or extensive diversion from the MSW stream of fluorescent lamps that contain mercury is accomplished.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Municipal solid waste characteristics and management in Allahabad, India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by political, legal, socio-cultural, environmental and economic factors, as well as available resources on a suitable management plan (Shimura et al., 2001). More than 90% of MSW in India is directly disposedMunicipal solid waste characteristics and management in Allahabad, India Mufeed Sharholy a , Kafeel

Columbia University

218

Resource recovery waste heat boiler upgrade  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The waste heat boilers installed in a 360 TPD waste to energy plant were identified as the bottle neck for an effort to increase plant capacity. These boilers were successfully modified to accommodate the increase of plant capacity to 408 TPD, improve steam cycle performance and reduce boiler tube failures. The project demonstrated how engineering and operation can work together to identify problems and develop solutions that satisfy engineering, operation, and financial objectives. Plant checking and testing, design review and specification development, installation and operation results are presented.

Kuten, P.; McClanahan, D.E. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Gehring, P.R.; Toto, M.L. [SRRI, Springfield, MA (United States); Davis, J.J. [Deltak, Minon, MN (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Neutrino-electron scattering and the choice between different MSW solutions of the solar neutrino problem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider the scattering of solar neutrinos by electrons as a means for distinguishing between MSW solutions of the solar neutrino problem. In terms of the ratio R between the observed cross-section and that for pure electron-type neutrinos, we find that some correlation between the value R and the appropriate solution. 9 refs., 3 figs.

Rosen, S.P.; Gelb, J.M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

The estimation of N{sub 2}O emissions from municipal solid waste incineration facilities: The Korea case  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The greenhouse gases (GHGs) generated in municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration are carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}), and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O). In South Korea case, the total of GHGs from the waste incineration facilities has been increasing at an annual rate 10%. In these view, waste incineration facilities should consider to reduce GHG emissions. This study is designed to estimate the N{sub 2}O emission factors from MSW incineration plants, and calculate the N{sub 2}O emissions based on these factors. The three MSW incinerators examined in this study were either stoker or both stoker and rotary kiln facilities. The N{sub 2}O concentrations from the MSW incinerators were measured using gas chromatography-electron capture detection (GC-ECD) equipment. The average of the N{sub 2}O emission factors for the M01 plant, M02 plant, and M03 plant are 71, 75, and 153 g-N{sub 2}O/ton-waste, respectively. These results showed a significant difference from the default values of the intergovernmental panel on climate change (IPCC), while approaching those values derived in Japan and Germany. Furthermore, comparing the results of this study to the Korea Energy Economics Institute (KEEI) (2007) data on waste incineration, N{sub 2}O emissions from MSW incineration comprised 19% of the total N{sub 2}O emissions.

Park, Sangwon; Choi, Jun-Ho [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, 262 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jinwon, E-mail: jwpark@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, 262 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste-to-energy msw" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A direct steam heat option for hydrothermal treatment of municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A conceptual process for producing a gasifiable slurry from raw municipal solid waste (MSW) using direct steam heating is outlined. The process is based on the hydrothermal decomposition of the organic matter in the MSW, which requires the MSW to be heated to 300-350{degrees}C in the presence of water. A process model is developed and it is shown, based on preliminary estimates of the hydrothermal reaction stoichiometry, that a process using multiple pressure vessels, which allows recovery of waste heat, results in a process capable of producing a product slurry having a 40 wt % solids content with no waste water emissions. Results for a variety of process options and process parameters are presented. It is shown that the addition of auxiliary feedstock to the gasifier, along with the MSW derived slurry, results in more efficient gasification. It is estimated that 2.6 kmol/s of hydrogen can be produced from 30 kg/s (2600 tonne/day) of MSW and 16 kg/s of heavy oil. Without the additional feedstock, heavy oil in this case, only 0.49 kmol/s of hydrogen would be produced.

Thorsness, C.B.

1995-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

222

Hydrogen production by gasification of municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As fossil fuel reserves run lower and lower, and as their continued widespread use leads toward numerous environmental problems, the need for clean and sustainable energy alternatives becomes ever clearer. Hydrogen fuel holds promise as such as energy source, as it burns cleanly and can be extracted from a number of renewable materials such as municipal solid waste (MSW), which can be considered largely renewable because of its high content of paper and biomass-derived products. A computer model is being developed using ASPEN Plus flow sheeting software to simulate a process which produces hydrogen gas from MSW; the model will later be used in studying the economics of this process and is based on an actual Texaco coal gasification plant design. This paper gives an overview of the complete MSW gasification process, and describes in detail the way in which MSW is modeled by the computer as a process material. In addition, details of the gasifier unit model are described; in this unit modified MSW reacts under pressure with oxygen and steam to form a mixture of gases which include hydrogen.

Rogers, R. III

1994-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

223

Emissions inventories for MSW landfills under Title V  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the past, many states were either not concerned with, or unaware that, municipal solid waste landfills (MSWLFs) were potential sources of regulated air pollutants. This philosophy is rapidly changing, in part due to US EPA policy documents concerning (and defining) fugitive and non-fugitive emissions from MSWLFs, the attention given to the newly released New Source Performance Standards and a recent lawsuit that gained national notoriety involving landfill air emissions and air permitting applicability issues. Most states now recognize that MSWLFs are sources of regulated air pollutants and are subject to permitting requirements (and pollutant emission fees) as other industries; i.e., state-level minor- and major-source operating permit programs, and the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments Title V Operating Permits Program (Title V).

Vogt, W.G. [SCS Engineers, Reston, VA (United States); Peyser, T.R. [SCS Engineers, Birmingham, AL (United States); Hamilton, S.M. [SCS Engineers, Tampa, FL (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Eco-efficiency for greenhouse gas emissions mitigation of municipal solid waste management: A case study of Tianjin, China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The issue of municipal solid waste (MSW) management has been highlighted in China due to the continually increasing MSW volumes being generated and the limited capacity of waste treatment facilities. This article presents a quantitative eco-efficiency (E/E) analysis on MSW management in terms of greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation. A methodology for E/E analysis has been proposed, with an emphasis on the consistent integration of life cycle assessment (LCA) and life cycle costing (LCC). The environmental and economic impacts derived from LCA and LCC have been normalized and defined as a quantitative E/E indicator. The proposed method was applied in a case study of Tianjin, China. The study assessed the current MSW management system, as well as a set of alternative scenarios, to investigate trade-offs between economy and GHG emissions mitigation. Additionally, contribution analysis was conducted on both LCA and LCC to identify key issues driving environmental and economic impacts. The results show that the current Tianjin's MSW management system emits the highest GHG and costs the least, whereas the situation reverses in the integrated scenario. The key issues identified by the contribution analysis show no linear relationship between the global warming impact and the cost impact in MSW management system. The landfill gas utilization scenario is indicated as a potential optimum scenario by the proposed E/E analysis, given the characteristics of MSW, technology levels, and chosen methodologies. The E/E analysis provides an attractive direction towards sustainable waste management, though some questions with respect to uncertainty need to be discussed further.

Zhao Wei, E-mail: zhaowei.tju@gmail.com [College of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Liaoning University of Technology, 121000 Jinzhou (China); Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300RA Leiden (Netherlands); Huppes, Gjalt, E-mail: huppes@cml.leidenuniv.nl [Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300RA Leiden (Netherlands); Voet, Ester van der, E-mail: Voet@cml.leidenuniv.nl [Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300RA Leiden (Netherlands)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Building waste management core indicators through Spatial Material Flow Analysis: Net recovery and transport intensity indexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sustainability and proximity principles have a key role in waste management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Core indicators are needed in order to quantify and evaluate them. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A systematic, step-by-step approach is developed in this study for their development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transport may play a significant role in terms of environmental and economic costs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Policy action is required in order to advance in the consecution of these principles. - Abstract: In this paper, the material and spatial characterization of the flows within a municipal solid waste (MSW) management system are combined through a Network-Based Spatial Material Flow Analysis. Using this information, two core indicators are developed for the bio-waste fraction, the Net Recovery Index (NRI) and the Transport Intensity Index (TII), which are aimed at assessing progress towards policy-related sustainable MSW management strategies and objectives. The NRI approaches the capacity of a MSW management system for converting waste into resources through a systematic metabolic approach, whereas the TII addresses efficiency in terms of the transport requirements to manage a specific waste flow throughout the entire MSW management life cycle. Therefore, both indicators could be useful in assessing key MSW management policy strategies, such as the consecution of higher recycling levels (sustainability principle) or the minimization of transport by locating treatment facilities closer to generation sources (proximity principle). To apply this methodological approach, the bio-waste management system of the region of Catalonia (Spain) has been chosen as a case study. Results show the adequacy of both indicators for identifying those points within the system with higher capacity to compromise its environmental, economic and social performance and therefore establishing clear targets for policy prioritization. Moreover, this methodological approach permits scenario building, which could be useful in assessing the outcomes of hypothetical scenarios, thus proving its adequacy for strategic planning.

Font Vivanco, David, E-mail: font@cml.leidenuniv.nl [Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA), Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Puig Ventosa, Ignasi [ENT Environment and Management, Carrer Sant Joan 39, First Floor, 08800 Vilanova i la Geltru, Barcelona (Spain); Gabarrell Durany, Xavier [Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA), Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators Agency/Company /Organization: International Solid Waste Association (ISWA), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) Sector: Energy, Land, Water Focus Area: Renewable Energy, - Waste to Energy Phase: Evaluate Options Topics: Adaptation, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type: Guide/manual, Training materials Website: www.trp-training.info/ Cost: Paid Language: English References: Training Resource Pack[1] "The new TRP+ provides a structured package of notes, technical summaries, visual aids and other training material concerning the (hazardous) waste

227

Aqueous alteration of municipal solid waste ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Municipal solid waste (MSW) ash is composed largely of amorphous oxides and approximately 20% minerals including halite, magnetite, hematite, quartz, gypsum, calcite, and rutile. It is also enriched in toxic trace metals by up to three orders of magnitude over average soil. The thermodynamic stabilities and rates of dissolution of the minerals and glasses in MSW ash will determine whether the ash is an environmental problem. The authors have used batch reactors at 20, 40, and 60 C over time periods up to 60 days to simulate longer reaction times for ash under cooler landfill conditions. Soluble salts are most quickly dissolved, giving solutions dominated by Ca[sup 2+], Na[sup +], K[sup +], SO[sub 2][sup 2[minus

Kirby, C.S.; Rimstidt, J.D. (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Effects of biodrying process on municipal solid waste properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, the effect of biodrying process on municipal solid waste (MSW) properties was studied. The results obtained indicated that after 14d, biodrying reduced the water content of waste, allowing the production of biodried waste with a net heating value (NHV) of 16,7792,074kJkg?1 wet weight, i.e. 41% higher than that of untreated waste. The low moisture content of the biodried material reduced, also, the potential impacts of the waste, i.e. potential self-ignition and potential odors production. Low waste impacts suggest to landfill the biodried material obtaining energy via biogas production by waste re-moistening, i.e. bioreactor. Nevertheless, results of this work indicate that biodrying process because of the partial degradation of the organic fraction contained in the waste (losses of 290gkg?1 VS), reduced of about 28% the total producible biogas.

F. Tambone; B. Scaglia; S. Scotti; F. Adani

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Multiple regression analysis for the estimation of energy content of municipal solid waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A regression equation is proposed to predict the Higher Heating Value (HHV) of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) from the waste data of 86 cities of 35 countries. A mathematical model is developed, by using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS-10.0), to correlate the energy content of waste with the variables derived from its physical composition. Performance of the proposed multiple regression model is superior to available models. For validation, the proposed model is applied to the waste data of Jaipur City (India), nine cities of EEC countries and also to the MSW of USA. Energy content values obtained by proposed regression model and Modified Dulong's Equation (MDE) are closer to the measured mean energy content values for EEC countries compared to the values obtained by Khan's method. Objective of the paper is to propose a simple model, which can replace the lengthy MDE and which has universal applicability for the predication of HHVs.

G.D. Agrawal; A.P.S. Rathore; A.B. Gupta

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Assessing the Power Generation Solution by Thermal-chemical Conversion of Meat Processing Industry Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The paper presents a waste to energy conversion solution using a pyro-air-gasification process applied to biodegradable residues from meat processing industry integrated with small scale thermodynamic cycle for power generation. The solution of air- gasification at atmospheric pressure is based on experimental research and engineering computation developed during the study. The input data, such as: waste chemical composition, low/high heating value and proximate analysis, correspond to real waste products, sampled directly from the industrial processing line. Separate drying as first stage pre-treatment and integrated partial drying inside the reactor was used. The syngas low heating value of about 4.3MJ/Nm3 is insured by its combustible fraction (H2 12.2%, CO 19.2%, CH4 1.6%). According to syngas composition the thermodynamic cycle was chosen Otto gas engine. For a given waste feed-in flow considered in our computation of about 110kg/h the power output obtained is about 50 kWel. The global energy efficiency of the unit is about 15%. The results offer answers to energy recovery waste disposal for residues with characteristics that are not suitable for classic incineration or limit the energy efficiency of the process making it non-economical (the average humidity of the raw waste is about 42% in mass). The research focused on waste to energy conversion process energy efficiency, waste neutralization and power generation.

Cosmin Marculescu; Florin Alexe

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Occurrence of Zinc and Lead in Aerosols and Deposits in the Fluidized-Bed Combustion of Recovered Waste Wood. Part 1: Samples from Boilers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1.1 Recovered Waste Wood (RWW) as a Fuel ... In recent years, concerns about the environment, depletion of fossil fuel resources, and economic considerations have increased interest in the use of biomass and waste-derived fuels for power production. ... Lundholm et al. found K2ZnCl4 as one of the main components of the aerosol particles in grate combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW). ...

Sonja Enestam; Christoffer Boman; Jere Niemi; Dan Bostrm; Rainer Backman; Kari Mkel; Mikko Hupa

2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

232

Energy aspects of solid waste management: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Eighteenth Annual Illinois Energy Conference entitled ``Energy Aspects of Solid Waste Management`` was held in Chicago, Illinois on October 29--30, 1990. The conference program was developed by a planning committee that drew upon Illinois energy and environmental specialists from the major sectors including energy industries, environmental organizations, research universities, utility companies, federal, state and local government agencies, and public interest groups. Within this framework, the committee identified a number of key topic areas surrounding solid waste management in Illinois which were the focus of the conference. These issues included: review of the main components of the solid waste cycle in the Midwest and what the relative impact of waste reduction, recycling, incineration and land disposal might be on Illinois` and the Midwest`s solid waste management program. Investigation of special programs in the Midwest dealing with sewage sludge, combustion residuals and medical/infectious wastes. Review of the status of existing landfills in Illinois and the Midwest and an examination of the current plans for siting of new land disposal systems. Review of the status of incinerators and waste-to-energy systems in Illinois and the Midwest, as well as an update on activities to maximize methane production from landfills in the Midwest.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

233

Short mechanical biological treatment of municipal solid waste allows landfill impact reduction saving waste energy content  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of full scale MBT process (28 d) in removing inhibition condition for successive biogas (ABP) production in landfill and in reducing total waste impact. For this purpose the organic fraction of MSW was treated in a full-scale MBT plant and successively incubated vs. untreated waste, in simulated landfills for one year. Results showed that untreated landfilled-waste gave a total ABP reduction that was null. On the contrary MBT process reduced ABP of 44%, but successive incubation for one year in landfill gave a total ABP reduction of 86%. This ABP reduction corresponded to a MBT process of 22weeks length, according to the predictive regression developed for ABP reduction vs. MBT-time. Therefore short MBT allowed reducing landfill impact, preserving energy content (ABP) to be produced successively by bioreactor technology since pre-treatment avoided process inhibition because of partial waste biostabilization.

Barbara Scaglia; Silvia Salati; Alessandra Di Gregorio; Alberto Carrera; Fulvia Tambone; Fabrizio Adani

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Waste disposal technology transfer matching requirement clusters for waste disposal facilities in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We outline the differences of Chinese MSW characteristics from Western MSW. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model the requirements of four clusters of plant owner/operators in China. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine the best technology fit for these requirements via a matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Variance in waste input affects result more than training and costs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For China technology adaptation and localisation could become push, not pull factors. - Abstract: Even though technology transfer has been part of development aid programmes for many decades, it has more often than not failed to come to fruition. One reason is the absence of simple guidelines or decision making tools that help operators or plant owners to decide on the most suitable technology to adopt. Practical suggestions for choosing the most suitable technology to combat a specific problem are hard to get and technology drawbacks are not sufficiently highlighted. Western counterparts in technology transfer or development projects often underestimate or don't sufficiently account for the high investment costs for the imported incineration plant; the differing nature of Chinese MSW; the need for trained manpower; and the need to treat flue gas, bunker leakage water, and ash, all of which contain highly toxic elements. This article sets out requirements for municipal solid waste disposal plant owner/operators in China as well as giving an attribute assessment for the prevalent waste disposal plant types in order to assist individual decision makers in their evaluation process for what plant type might be most suitable in a given situation. There is no 'best' plant for all needs and purposes, and requirement constellations rely on generalisations meaning they cannot be blindly applied, but an alignment of a type of plant to a type of owner or operator can realistically be achieved. To this end, a four-step approach is suggested and a technology matrix is set out to ease the choice of technology to transfer and avoid past errors. The four steps are (1) Identification of plant owner/operator requirement clusters; (2) Determination of different municipal solid waste (MSW) treatment plant attributes; (3) Development of a matrix matching requirement clusters to plant attributes; (4) Application of Quality Function Deployment Method to aid in technology localisation. The technology transfer matrices thus derived show significant performance differences between the various technologies available. It is hoped that the resulting research can build a bridge between technology transfer research and waste disposal research in order to enhance the exchange of more sustainable solutions in future.

Dorn, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.dorn@uni-rostock.de [University of Rostock, Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Department Waste Management, Justus-v.-Liebig-Weg 6, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Nelles, Michael, E-mail: michael.nelles@uni-rostock.de [University of Rostock, Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Department Waste Management, Justus-v.-Liebig-Weg 6, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Flamme, Sabine, E-mail: flamme@fh-muenster.de [University of Applied Sciences Muenster, Corrensstrasse 25, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Jinming, Cai [Hefei University of Technology, 193 Tunxi Road, 230009 Hefei (China)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

A Research Needs Assessment for waste plastics recycling: Volume 1, Executive summary. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This first volume provides a summary of the entire project. The study utilized the talents of a large number of participants, including a significant number of peer reviewers from industrial companies, government agencies, and research institutes. in addition, an extensive analysis of relevant literature was carried out. In considering the attractiveness of recycling technologies that are alternatives to waste-to-energy combustion units, a systems approach was utilized. Collection of waste streams containing plastics, sortation, and reclamation of plastics and plastic mixtures, reprocessing or chemical conversion of the reclaimed polymers, and the applicability of the products to specific market segments have been analyzed in the study.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Long-term behavior of municipal solid waste landfills  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method is presented to predict the long-term behavior of element concentrations (non-metals and metals) in the leachate of a municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill. It is based on water flux and concentration measurements in leachates over one year, analysis of drilled cores from MSW landfills and leaching experiments with these samples. A mathematical model is developed to predict the further evolution of annual flux-weighted mean element concentrations in leachates after the intensive reactor phase, i.e. after the gas production has dropped to a very low level. The results show that the organic components are the most important substances to control until the leachate is compatible with the environment. This state of low emissions, the so-called final storage quality, will take many centuries to be achieved in a moderate climate.

H. Belevi; P. Baccini

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Integrated solid waste management of Minneapolis, Minnesota  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The subject document reports the results of an in-depth investigation of the fiscal year 1992 cost of the City of Minneapolis, Minnesota (Hennepin County) integrated municipal solid waste management (IMSWM) system, the energy consumed to operate the system, and the environmental performance requirements for each of the system`s waste-processing and disposal facilities. Actual data from records kept by participants is reported in this document. Every effort was made to minimize the use of assumptions, and no attempt is made to interpret the data reported. Analytical approaches are documented so that interested analysts may perform manipulation or further analysis of the data. As such, the report is a reference document for municipal solid waste (MSW) management professionals who are interested in the actual costs and energy consumption for a one-year period, of an operating IMSWM system.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Radioactive Waste Radioactive Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Radioactive Waste at UF Bldg 831 392-8400 #12;Radioactive Waste · Program is designed to;Radioactive Waste · Program requires · Generator support · Proper segregation · Packaging · labeling #12;Radioactive Waste · What is radioactive waste? · Anything that · Contains · or is contaminated

Slatton, Clint

239

LMA MSW solution of the solar neutrino problem and first KamLAND results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The first KamLAND results are in a very good agreement with the predictions made on the basis of the solar neutrino data and the LMA realization of the MSW mechanism. We perform a combined analysis of the KamLAND (rate, spectrum) and the solar neutrino data with a free boron neutrino flux f_B. The best fit values of neutrino parameters are Delta m^2 = 7.3e-5 eV^2, tg^2 theta = 0.41 and f_B = 1.05 with the 1 sigma intervals: Delta m^2 = (6.2 - 8.4)e-5 eV^2, tg^2 theta = 0.33 - 0.54. We find the 3 sigma upper bounds: Delta m^2 4e-5 eV^2. At 99% C.L. the KamLAND spectral result splits the LMA region into two parts with the preferred one at Delta m^2 solar neutrino and KamLAND results are considered.

P. C. de Holanda; A. Yu. Smirnov

2002-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

240

Integrated solid waste management of Seattle, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The subject document reports the results of an in-depth investigation of the fiscal year 1992 cost of the City of Seattle, Washington, integrated municipal solid waste management (IMSWM) system, the energy consumed to operate the system, and the environmental performance requirements for each of the system`s waste-processing and disposal facilities. Actual data from records kept by participants is reported in this document. Every effort was made to minimize the use of assumptions, and no attempt is made to interpret the data reported. Analytical approaches are documented so that interested analysts may perform manipulation or further analysis of the data. As such, the report is a reference document for MSW management professionals who are interested in the actual costs and energy consumption for a one-year period, of an operating IMSWM systems.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste-to-energy msw" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Advanced thermal processing alternatives for solid waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1990`s have seen a resurgence of interest in the development of new thermal processing alternatives for municipal solid waste (MSW). Sparked by increasingly stringent environmental regulations, much of this creative energy has been applied to technologies for the gasification of MSW: converting the solid, hard to handle material into a clean, medium to high-Btu fuel gas. Other developers have focussed on full combustion technology but with a {open_quotes}twist{close_quotes} that lowers emissions or reduces cost. A comprehensive study of these new technologies was recently completed under the sponsorship of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy. The study characterized the state-of-the-art among emerging MSW thermal processing technologies that have reached the point of `incipient commercialization.` More than 45 technologies now under development were screened to develop a short list of seven processes that have passed through the idea stage, laboratory and benchscale testing, and have been prototyped at an MSW feed rate of at least several tons per hour. In-depth review of these seven included inspections of operating pilot or prototype units and a detailed analysis of technical, environmental and economic feasibility issues. No attempt was made to select `the best` technology since best can only be defined in the context of the constraints, aspirations and circumstances of a specific, local situation. The basic flowsheet, heat and material balances and available environmental data were summarized to help the reader grasp the underlying technical concepts and their embodiment in hardware. Remaining development needs, as seen by the study team are presented. Economic analysis shows the general balance of capital and operating costs.

Niessen, W.R. [Camp Dresser & McKee Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Proposal of an environmental performance index to assess solid waste treatment technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proposal of a new concept in waste management: Cleaner Treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Development of an index to assess quantitatively waste treatment technologies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Delphi Method was carried out so as to define environmental indicators. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmental performance evaluation of waste-to-energy plants. - Abstract: Although the concern with sustainable development and environment protection has considerably grown in the last years it is noted that the majority of decision making models and tools are still either excessively tied to economic aspects or geared to the production process. Moreover, existing models focus on the priority steps of solid waste management, beyond waste energy recovery and disposal. So, in order to help the lack of models and tools aiming at the waste treatment and final disposal, a new concept is proposed: the Cleaner Treatment, which is based on the Cleaner Production principles. This paper focuses on the development and validation of the Cleaner Treatment Index (CTI), to assess environmental performance of waste treatment technologies based on the Cleaner Treatment concept. The index is formed by aggregation (summation or product) of several indicators that consists in operational parameters. The weights of the indicator were established by Delphi Method and Brazilian Environmental Laws. In addition, sensitivity analyses were carried out comparing both aggregation methods. Finally, index validation was carried out by applying the CTI to 10 waste-to-energy plants data. From sensitivity analysis and validation results it is possible to infer that summation model is the most suitable aggregation method. For summation method, CTI results were superior to 0.5 (in a scale from 0 to 1) for most facilities evaluated. So, this study demonstrates that CTI is a simple and robust tool to assess and compare the environmental performance of different treatment plants being an excellent quantitative tool to support Cleaner Treatment implementation.

Goulart Coelho, Hosmanny Mauro, E-mail: hosmanny@hotmail.com [Federal University of Minas Gerais, School of Engineering, Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering, Bloco 2, Sala 4628, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627 Pampulha, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, CEP 30.270-901 (Brazil); Lange, Lisete Celina [Federal University of Minas Gerais, School of Engineering, Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering, Bloco 2, Sala 4628, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627 Pampulha, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, CEP 30.270-901 (Brazil); Coelho, Lineker Max Goulart [Ecole des Ponts ParisTech 6 et 8 avenue Blaise-Pascal, Cite Descartes Champs-sur-Marne, 77455, Marne-la-Vallee (France)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

Town of Hague landfill reclamation study: Research ways to increase waste heating value and reduce waste volume. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monitored composing was studied as a method for reducing the quantity of waste requiring disposed from a landfill reclamation project. After each of two re-screening steps, composted {open_quotes}soil{close_quotes} from a single long windrow of varying depths and moisture content was subjected to analytical testing to determine its suitability to remain as backfill in a reclaimed landfill site. The remaining uncomposted waste was combusted at a waste-to-energy facility to determine if Btu values were improved. Results indicate that a full-scale composting operation could result in a net decrease of approximately 11 percent in disposal costs. The Btu value of the reclaimed waste was calculated to be 4,500 to 5,000 Btu/lb. The feasibility of composting reclaimed waste at other landfill reclamation projects will depend upon site-specific technical and economic factors, including size and nature of the organic fraction of the waste mass, local processing costs, and the cost of waste disposal alternatives.

Salerni, E. [SSB Environmental Inc., Albany, NY (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Mercury emissions from municipal solid waste combustors. An assessment of the current situation in the United States and forecast of future emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines emissions of mercury (Hg) from municipal solid waste (MSW) combustion in the United States (US). It is projected that total annual nationwide MSW combustor emissions of mercury could decrease from about 97 tonnes (1989 baseline uncontrolled emissions) to less than about 4 tonnes in the year 2000. This represents approximately a 95 percent reduction in the amount of mercury emitted from combusted MSW compared to the 1989 mercury emissions baseline. The likelihood that routinely achievable mercury emissions removal efficiencies of about 80 percent or more can be assured; it is estimated that MSW combustors in the US could prove to be a comparatively minor source of mercury emissions after about 1995. This forecast assumes that diligent measures to control mercury emissions, such as via use of supplemental control technologies (e.g., carbon adsorption), are generally employed at that time. However, no present consensus was found that such emissions control measures can be implemented industry-wide in the US within this time frame. Although the availability of technology is apparently not a limiting factor, practical implementation of necessary control technology may be limited by administrative constraints and other considerations (e.g., planning, budgeting, regulatory compliance requirements, etc.). These projections assume that: (a) about 80 percent mercury emissions reduction control efficiency is achieved with air pollution control equipment likely to be employed by that time; (b) most cylinder-shaped mercury-zinc (CSMZ) batteries used in hospital applications can be prevented from being disposed into the MSW stream or are replaced with alternative batteries that do not contain mercury; and (c) either the amount of mercury used in fluorescent lamps is decreased to an industry-wide average of about 27 milligrams of mercury per lamp or extensive diversion from the MSW stream of fluorescent lamps that contain mercury is accomplished.

none,

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Resouce recovery option in solid-waste management: a review guide for public officials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purposes of this document are to: serve as a guide for public-works directors and others interested in implementing resource-recovery systems; and (2) provide background material that can be used in presenting information on resource-recovery systems to city managers, mayors, legislative bodies, and citizen advisory groups. It raises some issues of which local communities must be aware before developing resource-recovery systems. Additionally, the document: (1) focuses on possible institutional problems that may arise in planning waste-to-energy systems and presents some solutions and alternatives, and (2) serve public-works officials as a reference for other publications on resource-recovery systems. It will aid public-works officials in the decision-making process concerning the implementation of waste-to-energy systems. Members of the public works profession who are fully aware of all the implementation procedures involved with resource-recovery systems can best decide if this is a feasible solid-waste-management option for their community.

Nemeth, D M

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Fluid-bed combustion of solid wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For over ten years combustion Power Company has been conducting experimental programs and developing fluid bed systems for agencies of the federal government and for private industry and institutions. Many of these activities have involved systems for the combustion of solid waste materials. Discussed here will be three categories of programs, development of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) fired fluid beds, development of wood waste fired fluid beds, and industrial installations. Research and development work on wood wastes has led to the design and construction of two large industrial fluid bed combustors. In one of these, a fluid bed is used for the generation of steam with a fuel that was previously suited only for landfill. Rocks and inerts are continuously removed from this combustor using a patented system. The second FBC is designed to use a variety of fuels as the source of energy to dry hog fuel for use in a high performance power boiler. Here the FBC burns green hog fuel, log yard debris, fly ash (char) from the boiler, and dried wood fines to produce a hot gas system for the wood dryer. A significant advantage of the fluidized bed reactor over conventional incinerators is its ability to reduce noxious gas emission and, finally, the fluidized bed is unique in its ability to efficiently consume low quality fuels. The relatively high inerts and moisture content of solid wastes pose no serious problem and require no associated additional devices for their removal.

Vander Molen, R.H.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Waste2Tricity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tricity Tricity Jump to: navigation, search Name Waste2Tricity Place London, United Kingdom Zip EC1V 9EE Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product W2T is seeking to developer a waste to energy plant combining plasma gasification and hydrogen fuel cells to achieve highly efficient conversion of municipal solid waste to electricity. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

248

Landfill Methane Project Development Handbook | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Methane Project Development Handbook Landfill Methane Project Development Handbook Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Landfill Methane Project Development Handbook Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Landfill Gas Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Get Feedback Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.epa.gov/lmop/publications-tools/handbook.html Cost: Free References: Project Development Handbook[1] The handbook describes the process of implementing a waste-to-energy landfill gas project. Overview "Approximately 250 million tons of solid waste was generated in the United States in 2008 with 54 percent deposited in municipal solid waste (MSW)

249

Municipal solid waste energy conversion study on Guam and American Samoa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the Pacific Islands of Guam and Tutuila in American Samoa, conversion of municipal solid waste to useable energy forms - principally electricity but possibly steam - may hold promise for reducing economic dependence on imported petroleum. A secondary benefit may be derived from reduction of solid waste landfill requirements. At the preliminary planning stage, waste-to-energy facilities producing electricity appear technically and environmentally feasible. Economically, the projects appear marginal but could be viable under specific conditions related to capital costs, revenue from garbage collection and revenue from the sale of the energy generated. Grant funding for the projects would considerably enhance the economic viability of the proposed facilities. The projects appear sufficiently viable to proceed to the detailed planning stage. Such projects are not viable for the islands now emerging from the US Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands.

Not Available

1984-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

Modeling On-Grate MSW Incineration with Experimental Validation in a Batch Incinerator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This knowledge cannot be readily obtained from direct experimental studies on industrial-scale incinerators; in contrast, mathematical modeling and numerical simulation appear to be an attractive approach for quantitative insight into the mechanisms and variables of waste-bed incineration. ... This approach was successfully employed for grate(6) or rotary kiln(7) plants. ... Gasification of carbon (char or coke) by steam is a well-known process for producing syngas. ...

Abhishek Asthana; Yannick Me?nard; Philippe Sessiecq; Fabrice Patisson

2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

251

REPORT OF THE PANAMA WTE CONFERENCE Panama City , 11th June 2011 co-organized by the Greek  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

worldwide like in New York, Miami, Shanghai, etc. #12;2 Concerning SYNERGIA: The Waste to Energy Research, a successful Waste To Energy Conference was held in Panama City (Republic of Panama) with wide participation entitled "Waste to Energy Solution for Municipal Solid Waste worldwide and potential for Waste to Energy

252

A comparative assessment of waste incinerators in the UK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: We evaluate operational municipal solid waste incinerators in the UK. The supply chain of four case study plants are examined and compared in detail. Technical, financial and operational data has been gathered for the four plants. We suggest the best business practices for waste incinerators. Appropriate strategy choices are the major difficulties for waste to energy plants. - Abstract: The uptake in Europe of Energy from Waste (EfW) incinerator plants has increased rapidly in recent years. In the UK, 25 municipal waste incinerators with energy recovery are now in operation; however, their waste supply chains and business practices vary significantly. With over a hundred more plant developments being considered it is important to establish best business practices for ensuring efficient environmental and operational performance. By reviewing the 25 plants we identify four suitable case study plants to compare technologies (moving grate, fluidised bed and rotary kiln), plant economics and operations. Using data collected from annual reports and through interviews and site visits we provide recommendations for improving the supply chain for waste incinerators and highlight the current issues and challenges faced by the industry. We find that plants using moving grate have a high availability of 8792%. However, compared to the fluidised bed and rotary kiln, quantities of bottom ash and emissions of hydrogen chloride and carbon monoxide are high. The uptake of integrated recycling practices, combined heat and power, and post incineration non-ferrous metal collections needs to be increased among EfW incinerators in the UK. We conclude that one of the major difficulties encountered by waste facilities is the appropriate selection of technology, capacity, site, waste suppliers and heat consumers. This study will be of particular value to EfW plant developers, government authorities and researchers working within the sector of waste management.

Nixon, J.D., E-mail: j.nixon@kingston.ac.uk [Sustainable Environment Research Group, School of Engineering and Applied Science, Aston University, Aston Triangle, Birmingham B4 7ET (United Kingdom); Wright, D.G.; Dey, P.K. [Aston Business School, Aston University, Aston Triangle, Birmingham B4 7ET (United Kingdom); Ghosh, S.K. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Centre for Quality Management System, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Davies, P.A. [Sustainable Environment Research Group, School of Engineering and Applied Science, Aston University, Aston Triangle, Birmingham B4 7ET (United Kingdom)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Plasmatron gasification of biomass lignocellulosic waste materials derived from municipal solid waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The aim of this work is to study the feasibility and operational performance of plasmatron (plasma torch) gasification of municipal solid waste mixed with raw wood (MSW/RW) derived from the pretreatment of Steam Mechanical Heat Treatment (SMHT), as the target material (MRM). A 10kW plasmatron reactor is used for gasification of the MRM. The production of syngas (CO and H2) is the major component, and almost 90% of the gaseous products appear in 2min of reaction time, with relatively high reaction rates. The syngas yield is between 88.59 and 91.84vol%, and the recovery mass ratio of syngas from MRM is 45.19 down to 27.18wt% with and without steam with the energy yields of 59.07111.89%. The concentrations of gaseous products from the continuous feeding of 200g/h are stable and higher than the average concentrations of the batch feeding of 10g. The residue from the plasmatron gasification with steam is between 0 and 4.52wt%, with the inorganic components converted into non-leachable vitrified lava, which is non-hazardous. The steam methane reforming reaction, hydrogasification reaction and Boudouard reaction all contribute to the increase in the syngas yield. It is proved that MSW can be completely converted into bioenergy using SMHT, followed by plasmatron gasification.

Je-Lueng Shie; Li-Xun Chen; Kae-Long Lin; Ching-Yuan Chang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Simulation of Syngas Production from Municipal Solid Waste Gasification in a Bubbling Fluidized Bed Using Aspen Plus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simulation of Syngas Production from Municipal Solid Waste Gasification in a Bubbling Fluidized Bed Using Aspen Plus ... When the reaction kinetics is not known, a rigorous reactor and multiphase equilibrium based on the minimization of the total Gibbs free energy of the product mixture (an RGibbs block) is preferred to predict the equilibrium composition of the produced syngas. ... Catalytic steam gasification of municipal solid waste (MSW) to produce hydrogen-rich gas or syngas (H2 + CO) with calcined dolomite as a catalyst in a bench-scale downstream fixed bed reactor was investigated. ...

Miaomiao Niu; Yaji Huang; Baosheng Jin; Xinye Wang

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

255

Combustion of municipal solid wastes with oil shale in a circulating fluidized bed. Quarterly report, quarter ending 31 December 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The test plan is designed to demonstrate that oil shale co-combusted with municipal solid waste (MSW) can reduce gaseous pollutants (SO{sub 2}, CO) to acceptable levels (90%+ reduction) and produce a cementitious ash which will, at a minimum, be acceptable in normal land fills. The small-scale combustion testing will be accomplished in a 6-in. circulating fluid bed combustor (CFBC) at Hazen Research Laboratories. This work will be patterned after the study the authors conducted in 1988 when coal and oil shale were co-combusted in a program sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute. The specific purpose of the test program will be to: determine the required ratio of oil shale to MSW by determining the ratio of absorbent to pollutant (A/P); determine the effect of temperature and resident time in the reactor; and determine if kinetic model developed for coal/oil shale mixture is applicable.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Life Cycle Assessment of Energy and Energy Carriers from Waste Matter A Review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The development of economic growth, population, and rapid urbanization is increasing the pace of energy consumption and waste production. These trends, if left unchecked, will lead to massive environmental degradation. Waste-to-energy (WtE) conversion is one way of alleviating the twin problems of fossil fuel use and solid waste disposal, and their related problems (climate change, pollution etc). Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a useful tool for assessing the environmental performances of WtE systems. Over fifty LCA studies on various WtE systems are reviewed, comprising different waste sources, energy products, and including countries from six continents. A variety of waste types, such as agricultural residues, used cooking oil, manure, municipal solid waste, and waste wood were studied. The review found that a large majority of WtE has lower greenhouse gas emissions when compared to fossil fuels. However, some WtE studies showed an increase in environmental impacts such as acidification and eutrophication, compared to fossil fuel extraction and use. This is due to the use of chemicals (fertilizers, pesticides) in agriculture and the allocation of these impacts to the use of the agricultural waste for energy conversion. Other problems with LCA are also highlighted, including allocation issues, definition of reference systems and functional units.

Augustine Quek; Rajasekhar Balasubramanian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Formation of deposits on the surfaces of superheaters and economisers of MSW incinerator plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Composition of deposits depends on the temperature profile and boiler geometry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mineralogy of deposits defines critical and uncritical zones in the boiler. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Critical zones in boilers can be characterised by a classification systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Specific measures to enhance energy efficiency can be defined. - Abstract: Mineralogical and chemical investigations of deposits from superheaters and economisers from a MSWI plant in Mannheim, Germany, lead to a classification system which provides information about the most critical parameters leading to fouling and corrosion. With the help of this classification system parameters like the geometry of boilers and the waste input can be changed in order to prolong run times between revisions and enhance energy efficiency of MSWI plants.

Reichelt, J. [IBR, Obergrombacher Strasse 29, D-76646 Bruchsal (Germany); Pfrang-Stotz, G., E-mail: Gudrun.Pfrang-Stotz@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), ITC, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Bergfeldt, B.; Seifert, H. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), ITC, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Knapp, P. [MVV O and M GmbH, Muellheizkraftwerk Mannheim, Otto-Hahn-Strasse 1, D-68169 Mannheim (Germany)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

Nuclear Waste: Knowledge Waste?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...4). Although disposal of HLW remains...for long-term disposal is through deep...successful waste-disposal program has eluded...geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Authorized...Administration withdrew funding for Yucca Mountain...

Eugene A. Rosa; Seth P. Tuler; Baruch Fischhoff; Thomas Webler; Sharon M. Friedman; Richard E. Sclove; Kristin Shrader-Frechette; Mary R. English; Roger E. Kasperson; Robert L. Goble; Thomas M. Leschine; William Freudenburg; Caron Chess; Charles Perrow; Kai Erikson; James F. Short

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

259

Co-gasification of municipal solid waste and material recovery in a large-scale gasification and melting system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study evaluates the effects of co-gasification of MSW with MSW bottom ash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No significant difference between MSW treatment with and without MSW bottom ash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCDD/DFs yields are significantly low because of the high carbon conversion ratio. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Slag quality is significantly stable and slag contains few hazardous heavy metals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The final landfill amount is reduced and materials are recovered by DMS process. - Abstract: This study evaluates the effects of co-gasification of municipal solid waste with and without the municipal solid waste bottom ash using two large-scale commercial operation plants. From the viewpoint of operation data, there is no significant difference between municipal solid waste treatment with and without the bottom ash. The carbon conversion ratios are as high as 91.7% and 95.3%, respectively and this leads to significantly low PCDD/DFs yields via complete syngas combustion. The gross power generation efficiencies are 18.9% with the bottom ash and 23.0% without municipal solid waste bottom ash, respectively. The effects of the equivalence ratio are also evaluated. With the equivalence ratio increasing, carbon monoxide concentration is decreased, and carbon dioxide and the syngas temperature (top gas temperature) are increased. The carbon conversion ratio is also increased. These tendencies are seen in both modes. Co-gasification using the gasification and melting system (Direct Melting System) has a possibility to recover materials effectively. More than 90% of chlorine is distributed in fly ash. Low-boiling-point heavy metals, such as lead and zinc, are distributed in fly ash at rates of 95.2% and 92.0%, respectively. Most of high-boiling-point heavy metals, such as iron and copper, are distributed in metal. It is also clarified that slag is stable and contains few harmful heavy metals such as lead. Compared with the conventional waste management framework, 85% of the final landfill amount reduction is achieved by co-gasification of municipal solid waste with bottom ash and incombustible residues. These results indicate that the combined production of slag with co-gasification of municipal solid waste with the bottom ash constitutes an ideal approach to environmental conservation and resource recycling.

Tanigaki, Nobuhiro, E-mail: tanigaki.nobuhiro@nsc-eng.co.jp [Nippon Steel Engineering Co., Ltd. (Head Office), Osaki Center Building 1-5-1, Osaki, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-8604 (Japan); Manako, Kazutaka [Nippon Steel Engineering Co., Ltd., 46-59, Nakabaru, Tobata-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 804-8505 (Japan); Osada, Morihiro [Nippon Steel Engineering Co., Ltd. (Head Office), Osaki Center Building 1-5-1, Osaki, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-8604 (Japan)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 7, Appendix E -- Material recovery/material recycling technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The enthusiasm for and commitment to recycling of municipal solid wastes is based on several intuitive benefits: Conservation of landfill capacity; Conservation of non-renewable natural resources and energy sources; Minimization of the perceived potential environmental impacts of MSW combustion and landfilling; Minimization of disposal costs, both directly and through material resale credits. In this discussion, ``recycling`` refers to materials recovered from the waste stream. It excludes scrap materials that are recovered and reused during industrial manufacturing processes and prompt industrial scrap. Materials recycling is an integral part of several solid waste management options. For example, in the preparation of refuse-derived fuel (RDF), ferrous metals are typically removed from the waste stream both before and after shredding. Similarly, composting facilities, often include processes for recovering inert recyclable materials such as ferrous and nonferrous metals, glass, Plastics, and paper. While these two technologies have as their primary objectives the production of RDF and compost, respectively, the demonstrated recovery of recyclables emphasizes the inherent compatibility of recycling with these MSW management strategies. This appendix discusses several technology options with regard to separating recyclables at the source of generation, the methods available for collecting and transporting these materials to a MRF, the market requirements for post-consumer recycled materials, and the process unit operations. Mixed waste MRFs associated with mass bum plants are also presented.

none,

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste-to-energy msw" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Data Summary of Municipal Solid Waste Management Alternatives. Volume VIII: Appendix F - Landfills  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While the preceding appendices have focused on the thermochemical approaches to managing municipal solid waste (MSW), this appendix and those that follow on composting and anaerobic digestion address more of the bioconversion process technologies. Landfilling is the historical baseline MSW management option central to every community's solid waste management plan. It generally encompasses shredfills, balefills, landfill gas recovery, and landfill mining. While landfilling is virtually universal in use, it continues to undergo intense scrutiny by the public and regulators alike. Most recently, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued its final rule on criteria for designing, operating, monitoring, and closing municipal solid waste landfills. While the Federal government has established nationwide standards and will assist the States in planning and developing their own practices, the States and local governments will carry out the actual planning and direct implementation. The States will also be authorized to devise programs to deal with their specific conditions and needs. While the main body of this appendix and corresponding research was originally prepared in July of 1991, references to the new RCRA Subtitle D, Part 258 EPA regulations have been included in this resubmission (908). By virtue of timing, this appendix is, necessarily, a transition'' document, combining basic landfill design and operation information as well as reference to new regulatory requirements. Given the speed with which landfill practices are and will be changing, the reader is encouraged to refer to Part 258 for additional details. As States set additional requirements and schedules and owners and operators of MSW landfills seek to comply, additional guidance and technical information, including case studies, will likely become available in the literature.

None

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 8, Appendix F, Landfills  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While the preceding appendices have focused on the thermochemical approaches to managing municipal solid waste (MSW), this appendix and those that follow on composting and anaerobic digestion address more of the bioconversion process technologies. Landfilling is the historical baseline MSW management option central to every community`s solid waste management plan. It generally encompasses shredfills, balefills, landfill gas recovery, and landfill mining. While landfilling is virtually universal in use, it continues to undergo intense scrutiny by the public and regulators alike. Most recently, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued its final rule on criteria for designing, operating, monitoring, and closing municipal solid waste landfills. While the Federal government has established nationwide standards and will assist the States in planning and developing their own practices, the States and local governments will carry out the actual planning and direct implementation. The States will also be authorized to devise programs to deal with their specific conditions and needs. While the main body of this appendix and corresponding research was originally prepared in July of 1991, references to the new RCRA Subtitle D, Part 258 EPA regulations have been included in this resubmission (908). By virtue of timing, this appendix is, necessarily, a ``transition`` document, combining basic landfill design and operation information as well as reference to new regulatory requirements. Given the speed with which landfill practices are and will be changing, the reader is encouraged to refer to Part 258 for additional details. As States set additional requirements and schedules and owners and operators of MSW landfills seek to comply, additional guidance and technical information, including case studies, will likely become available in the literature.

none,

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Solar Neutrino Rates, Spectrum, and its Moments : an MSW Analysis in the Light of Super-Kamiokande Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We re-examine MSW solutions of the solar neutrino problem in a two flavor scenario taking (a) the results on total rates and the electron energy spectrum from the 1117-day SuperKamiokande (SK) data and (b) those on total rates from the Chlorine and Gallium experiments. We find that the SMA solution gives the best fit to the total rates data from the different experiments. One new feature of our analysis is the use of the moments of the SK electron spectrum in a $\\chi^2$ analysis. The best-fit to the moments is broadly in agreement with that obtained from a direct fit to the spectrum data and prefers a $\\Delta m^2$ comparable to the SMA fit to the rates but the required mixing angle is larger. In the combined rate and spectrum analysis, apart from varying the normalization of the $^8$B flux as a free parameter and determining its best-fit value we also obtain the best-fit parameters when correlations between the rates and the spectrum data are included and the normalization of the $^8$B flux held fixed at its SSM value. We observe that the correlations between the rates and spectrum data are important and the goodness of fit worsens when these are included. In either case, the best-fit lies in the LMA region.

Srubabati Goswami; Debasish Majumdar; Amitava Raychaudhuri

2001-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

264

Energy recovery from waste incineration: Assessing the importance of district heating networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Municipal solid waste incineration contributes with 20% of the heat supplied to the more than 400 district heating networks in Denmark. In evaluation of the environmental consequences of this heat production, the typical approach has been to assume that other (fossil) fuels could be saved on a 1:1 basis (e.g. 1 GJ of waste heat delivered substitutes for 1 GJ of coal-based heat). This paper investigates consequences of waste-based heat substitution in two specific Danish district heating networks and the energy-associated interactions between the plants connected to these networks. Despite almost equal electricity and heat efficiencies at the waste incinerators connected to the two district heating networks, the energy and CO{sub 2} accounts showed significantly different results: waste incineration in one network caused a CO{sub 2} saving of 48 kg CO{sub 2}/GJ energy input while in the other network a load of 43 kg CO{sub 2}/GJ. This was caused mainly by differences in operation mode and fuel types of the other heat producing plants attached to the networks. The paper clearly indicates that simple evaluations of waste-to-energy efficiencies at the incinerator are insufficient for assessing the consequences of heat substitution in district heating network systems. The paper also shows that using national averages for heat substitution will not provide a correct answer: local conditions need to be addressed thoroughly otherwise we may fail to assess correctly the heat recovery from waste incineration.

Fruergaard, T.; Christensen, T.H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Astrup, T., E-mail: tha@env.dtu.d [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

265

Processing and utilizing high heat value, low ash alternative fuels from urban solid waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The history of technologies in the US that recover energy from urban solid waste is relatively short. Most of the technology as we know it evolved over the past 25 years. This evolution led to the development of about 100 modern mass burn and RDF type waste-to-energy plants and numerous small modular combustion systems, which collectively are handling about 20%, or about 40 million tons per year, of the nations municipal solid waste. Technologies also evolved during this period to co-fire urban waste materials with other fuels or selectively burn specific waste streams as primary fuels. A growing number of second or third generation urban waste fuels projects are being developed. This presentation discusses new direction in the power generating industry aimed at recovery and utilization of clean, high heat value, low ash alternative fuels from municipal and industrial solid waste. It reviews a spectrum of alternative fuels for feasible recovery and reuse, with new opportunities emerging for urban fuels processors providing fuels in the 6,000--15,000 BTU/LB range for off premises use.

Smith, M.L. [M.L. Smith Environmental and Associates, Tinley Park, IL (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Economics of co-firing waste materials in an advanced pressurized fluidized-bed combustor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study was undertaken to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of co-firing a PFBC with coal and municipal and industrial wastes. Focus was placed on the production of electricity and the efficient disposal of wastes for application in central power station and distributed locations. Issues concerning waste material preparation and feed, PFBC operation, plant emissions, and regulations are addressed. The results and conclusions developed are generally applicable to current and advanced PFBC design concepts. Wastes considered for co-firing include municipal solid waste (MSW), tire derived fuel (TDF), sewage sludge and industrial de-inking sludge. Conceptual designs of three power plants rated at 250 MWe, 150 MWe and 4 MWe were developed. The 4 MWe facility was chosen to represent a distributed power source for a remote location and designated to co-fire coal with MSW, TDF and sewage sludge while producing electricity for a small town. Heat and material balances were completed for each plant and costs determined including capital costs, operating costs and cost of electricity. With the PFBCs operation at high temperature and pressure, efforts were centered on defining feeding systems capable of operating at these conditions. Since PFBCs have not been tested co-firing wastes, other critical performance factors were addressed and recommendations were provided for resolving potential technical issues. Air emissions and solid wastes were characterized to assess the environmental performance comparing them to state and federal regulations. This paper describes the results of this investigation, presents conclusions on the key issues, and provides recommendations for further evaluation.

Bonk, D.L.; McDaniel, H.M. [Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States). Morgantown Energy Technology Center; DeLallo, M.R. Jr.; Zaharchuk, R. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Reading, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

267

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization |...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Summary Notes from 28 May 2008 Generic Technical Issue...

268

Nuclear Waste: Knowledge Waste?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...06520, USA. Nuclear power is re-emerging...proclaiming a nuclear renaissance...example, plant safety...liabilities, terrorism at plants and in transport...high-level nuclear wastes (HLW...factor in risk perceptions...supporting nuclear power in the abstract...

Eugene A. Rosa; Seth P. Tuler; Baruch Fischhoff; Thomas Webler; Sharon M. Friedman; Richard E. Sclove; Kristin Shrader-Frechette; Mary R. English; Roger E. Kasperson; Robert L. Goble; Thomas M. Leschine; William Freudenburg; Caron Chess; Charles Perrow; Kai Erikson; James F. Short

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

269

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waste (i.e, mixture of biohazardous and chemical or radioactive waste), call Environment, Health2/2009 Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 200 West Arbor Dr. San Diego, CA 92103 (619

Tsien, Roger Y.

270

Analysis of energy recovery potential using innovative technologies of waste gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy recovery from waste by gasification was simulated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two processes: high temperature gasification and gasification associated to plasma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two types of feeding waste: Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) and pulper residues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different configurations for the energy cycles were considered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison with performances from conventional Waste-to-Energy process. - Abstract: In this paper, two alternative thermo-chemical processes for waste treatment were analysed: high temperature gasification and gasification associated to plasma process. The two processes were analysed from the thermodynamic point of view, trying to reconstruct two simplified models, using appropriate simulation tools and some support data from existing/planned plants, able to predict the energy recovery performances by process application. In order to carry out a comparative analysis, the same waste stream input was considered as input to the two models and the generated results were compared. The performances were compared with those that can be obtained from conventional combustion with energy recovery process by means of steam turbine cycle. Results are reported in terms of energy recovery performance indicators as overall energy efficiency, specific energy production per unit of mass of entering waste, primary energy source savings, specific carbon dioxide production.

Lombardi, Lidia, E-mail: lidia.lombardi@unifit.it [Dipartimento di Energetica, University of Florence, via Santa Marta 3, 50139 Florence (Italy); Carnevale, Ennio [Dipartimento di Energetica, University of Florence, via Santa Marta 3, 50139 Florence (Italy); Corti, Andrea [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell'Informazione, University of Siena, via Roma 56, 56100 Siena (Italy)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

Recovery of solid fuel from municipal solid waste by hydrothermal treatment using subcritical water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrothermal treatment using subcritical water was studied to recover solid fuel from MSW. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer More than 75% of carbon in MSW was recovered as char. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heating value of char was comparable to that of brown coal and lignite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polyvinyl chloride was decomposed at 295 Degree-Sign C and 8 MPa and was removed by washing. - Abstract: Hydrothermal treatments using subcritical water (HTSW) such as that at 234 Degree-Sign C and 3 MPa (LT condition) and 295 Degree-Sign C and 8 MPa (HT condition) were investigated to recover solid fuel from municipal solid waste (MSW). Printing paper, dog food (DF), wooden chopsticks, and mixed plastic film and sheets of polyethylene, polypropylene, and polystyrene were prepared as model MSW components, in which polyvinylchloride (PVC) powder and sodium chloride were used to simulate Cl sources. While more than 75% of carbon in paper, DF, and wood was recovered as char under both LT and HT conditions, plastics did not degrade under either LT or HT conditions. The heating value (HV) of obtained char was 13,886-27,544 kJ/kg and was comparable to that of brown coal and lignite. Higher formation of fixed carbon and greater oxygen dissociation during HTSW were thought to improve the HV of char. Cl atoms added as PVC powder and sodium chloride to raw material remained in char after HTSW. However, most Cl originating from PVC was found to converse into soluble Cl compounds during HTSW under the HT condition and could be removed by washing. From these results, the merit of HTSW as a method of recovering solid fuel from MSW is considered to produce char with minimal carbon loss without a drying process prior to HTSW. In addition, Cl originating from PVC decomposes into soluble Cl compound under the HT condition. The combination of HTSW under the HT condition and char washing might improve the quality of char as alternative fuel.

Hwang, In-Hee, E-mail: hwang@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Solid Waste Disposal Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060 8628 (Japan); Aoyama, Hiroya; Matsuto, Toshihiko; Nakagishi, Tatsuhiro; Matsuo, Takayuki [Laboratory of Solid Waste Disposal Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060 8628 (Japan)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

Campus Toolkit What goes around comes around  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to as gasification, pyrolysis, waste to energy, biomass burners and Zero Waste to landfill. This has been touted

273

Integrated solid waste management of Springfield, Massachusetts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The subject document reports the results of an in-depth investigation of the fiscal year 1993 cost of the city of Springfield, Massachusetts, integrated municipal solid waste management (IMSWM) system, the energy consumed to operate the system, and the environmental performance requirements for each of the system`s waste-processing and disposal facilities. The document reports actual data from records kept by participants. Every effort was made to minimize the use of assumptions, and no attempt is made to interpret the data reported. Analytical approaches are documented so that interested analysts may perform manipulation or further analysis of the data. As such, the report is a reference document for Municipal Solid Waste management professionals who are interested in the actual costs and energy consumption, for a 1-year period, of an operating IMSWM system. The report is organized into two main parts. The first part is the executive summary and case study portion of the report. The executive summary provides a basic description of the study area and selected economic and energy information. Within the case study are detailed descriptions of each component operating during the study period; the quantities of solid waste collected, processed, and marketed within the study boundaries; the cost of managing MSW in Springfield; an energy usage analysis; a review of federal, state, and local environmental requirement compliance; a reference section; and a glossary of terms. The second part of the report focuses on a more detailed discourse on the above topics. In addition, the methodology used to determine the economic costs and energy consumption of the system components is found in the second portion of this report. The methodology created for this project will be helpful for those professionals who wish to break out the costs of their own integrated systems.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) impacts of a novel process for converting food waste to ethanol and co-products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Waste-to-ethanol conversion is a promising technology to provide renewable transportation fuel while mitigating feedstock risks and land use conflicts. It also has the potential to reduce environmental impacts from waste management such as greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that contribute to climate change. This paper analyzes the life cycle GHG emissions associated with a novel process for the conversion of food processing waste into ethanol (EtOH) and the co-products of compost and animal feed. Data are based on a pilot plant co-fermenting retail food waste with a sugary industrial wastewater, using a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process at room temperature with a grinding pretreatment. The process produced 295L EtOH/dry t feedstock. Lifecycle GHG emissions associated with the ethanol production process were 1458gCO2e/L EtOH. When the impact of avoided landfill emissions from diverting food waste to use as feedstock are considered, the process results in net negative GHG emissions and approximately 500% improvement relative to corn ethanol or gasoline production. This finding illustrates how feedstock and alternative waste disposal options have important implications in life cycle GHG results for waste-to-energy pathways.

Jacqueline Ebner; Callie Babbitt; Martin Winer; Brian Hilton; Anahita Williamson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Best Practices for Siting Solar Photovoltaics on Municipal Solid Waste Landfills. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Agency and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory developed this best practices document to address common technical challenges for siting solar photovoltaics (PV) on municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. The purpose of this document is to promote the use of MSW landfills for solar energy systems. Closed landfills and portions of active landfills with closed cells represent thousands of acres of property that may be suitable for siting solar photovoltaics (PV). These closed landfills may be suitable for near-term construction, making these sites strong candidate to take advantage of the 30% Federal Business Energy Investment Tax Credit. It was prepared in response to the increasing interest in siting renewable energy on landfills from solar developers; landfill owners; and federal, state, and local governments. It contains examples of solar PV projects on landfills and technical considerations and best practices that were gathered from examining the implementation of several of these projects.

Kiatreungwattana, K.; Mosey, G.; Jones-Johnson, S.; Dufficy, C.; Bourg, J.; Conroy, A.; Keenan, M.; Michaud, W.; Brown, K.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

* 96 total credits in A&S courses are required for the degree. ** BA/MSW students may count 6 credits from SCWK7721 and SCWK7723 toward the required 96 A&S credits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with Children+ OR Financial Management & Resource Development++ 3 CR SCWK8800 Basic Skills in Macro Practice 3/MSW PROGRAM Curriculum Plan Freshman Year [30 A&S credits*] Course # Semester 1 Course Semester 2 15 Behavior in the Social Environment ** 3 CR SCWK7701 Social Welfare System 3 CR SCWK7723 Diversity and Cross-Cultural

Huang, Jianyu

277

2007 WTE Conference San Juan, Puerto Rico, March 14, 2007 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AGENCY, REGION 2 2007 WASTE-TO-ENERGY CONFERENCE Waste-to-Energy: An Integrated Waste Management Option tremendous challenges and requires creative approaches. The use of waste as energy, coupled with increased 14, 2007 2 this in mind that we have put together today's conference titled, Waste-to-Energy

Columbia University

278

The composition, heating value and renewable share of the energy content of mixed municipal solid waste in Finland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract For the estimation of greenhouse gas emissions from waste incineration it is essential to know the share of the renewable energy content of the combusted waste. The composition and heating value information is generally available, but the renewable energy share or heating values of different fractions of waste have rarely been determined. In this study, data from Finnish studies concerning the composition and energy content of mixed MSW were collected, new experimental data on the compositions, heating values and renewable share of energy were presented and the results were compared to the estimations concluded from earlier international studies. In the town of Lappeenranta in south-eastern Finland, the share of renewable energy ranged between 25% and 34% in the energy content tests implemented for two sample trucks. The heating values of the waste and fractions of plastic waste were high in the samples compared to the earlier studies in Finland. These high values were caused by good source separation and led to a low share of renewable energy content in the waste. The results showed that in mixed municipal solid waste the renewable share of the energy content can be significantly lower than the general assumptions (5060%) when the source separation of organic waste, paper and cardboard is carried out successfully. The number of samples was however small for making extensive conclusions on the results concerning the heating values and renewable share of energy and additional research is needed for this purpose.

M. Horttanainen; N. Teirasvuo; V. Kapustina; M. Hupponen; M. Luoranen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Potential for Materials and Energy RecoveryPotential for Materials and Energy Recovery the Municipal Solid Wastes (the Municipal Solid Wastes (MSWMSW) of Beograd) of Beograd  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential for Materials and Energy RecoveryPotential for Materials and Energy Recovery fromfrom;26.2World total 1.30.255.2Developing world 0.380.550.7 EU, Japan, Canada, Australia 0.331.10.3U.S.A. Tons MSW generated, billions Tons MSW per capita Population, billion Global generation of MSW Estimated SCG

Columbia University

280

Performance analysis of co-firing waste materials in an advanced pressurized fluidized-bed combustor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The co-firing of waste materials with coal in utility scale power plants has emerged as an effective approach to produce energy and manage municipal wastes. Leading this approach is the atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor (AFBC). It has demonstrated its commercial acceptance in the utility market as a reliable source of power by burning a variety of waste and alternative fuels. The application of pressurized fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC) technology, although relatively new, can provide significant enhancements to the efficient production of electricity while maintaining the waste management benefits of AFBC. A study was undertaken to investigate the technical and economical feasibility of co-firing a PFBC with coal and municipal and industrial wastes. Focus was placed on the production of electricity and the efficient disposal of wastes for application in central power station and distributed locations. Issues concerning waste material preparation and feed, PFBC operation, plant emissions, and regulations are addressed. The results and conclusions developed are generally applicable to current and advanced PFBC design concepts. Wastes considered for co-firing include municipal solid waste (MSW), sewage sludge, and industrial de-inking sludge. Conceptual designs of two power plants rated at 250 MWe and 150 MWe were developed. Heat and material balances were completed for each plant along with environmental issues. With the PFBC`s operation at high temperature and pressure, efforts were centered on defining feeding systems capable of operating at these conditions. Air emissions and solid wastes were characterized to assess the environmental performance comparing them to state and Federal regulations. This paper describes the results of this investigation, presents conclusions on the key issues, and provides recommendations for further evaluation.

Bonk, D.L.; McDaniel, H.M. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); DeLallo, M.R. Jr.; Zaharchuk, R. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Reading, PA (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste-to-energy msw" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Waste Hoist  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Primary Hoist: 45-ton Rope-Guide Friction Hoist Completely enclosed (for contamination control), the waste hoist at WIPP is a modern friction hoist with rope guides. With a 45-ton...

282

Nuclear Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear waste is radioactive material no longer considered valuable...238U, 235U, and 226Ra (where the latter decays to 222Rn gas by emitting an alpha particle) or formed through fission of fissile radioisotopes ...

Rob P. Rechard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

UV&P 2014 999_2014_Sofia_WTERT Presentation Neubacher 2014-03-06  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficiency: up to 90 % (co-generation of electricity and district heat) Steam production: 2 x 50 t / h (32 acceptance of Waste-to-Energy in Vienna For Waste-to-Energy with district heating Against incineration Source- equivalent [kg/ton waste] Reduction in household heating from Waste-to-Energy Plant (district heating

284

Maria Elena Diaz Barriga Rodriguez me.diazb@gmail.com / md2936@caa.columbia.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: "Guidebook for the Application of Waste to Energy Technologies in Latin (Argentina, Chile, and Mexico) to exemplify the first part of the guide. - Pre-feasibility study of a Waste to Energy plant in Uruguay. A division of the government

285

Waste Disposal (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article lays an outline of waste disposal regulations, permits and fees, hazardous waste management and underground storage tank requirements.

286

International Symposium on Plasma Chemistry (ISPC 21) Sunday 4 August Friday 9 August 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Waste-to-Energy gasification processes based on thermal plasma. However, very few studies have been

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

287

E-Print Network 3.0 - antimony sbfrom municipal Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

municipal... solid waste in a municipal waste combustor (MWC). In an attempt to "turn the tide", officials from Polk Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and...

288

A Guidebook for Low-Carbon Development at the Local Level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emissions, waste production and energy use. To qualify, theenergy generation, waste to energy, wind and solar energy,efficiency, energy generation, transportation, waste and

Zhou, Nan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

HANWEI ZHANG 19 Riley Ct. Skillman, NJ 08558  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3, Pages 277-298 [6]. Klein, A., Zhang, H. & Themelis, N. J. (2003). A Waste-To-Energy Power Plant.zhang@gmail.com Research Interests Thermal conversion of municipal solid waste to energy; Numerical Analysis of High (2007). Process Simulation of a large Mass Burn Waste-To-Energy boiler by the combination of CFD

290

-Viewsoninfertilit~treatmentsclashat hearins 'page 4 > I The lIIursday, MIII'Gh15,W07  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EnvironmentalistS,..y()w to fight waste-to-energy 'to the death' EPAlaudsRR.trash planas large waste-to-energy projects, is "visionary:' Environmental Protection Agency Regional Director Alan j into energy. however. activists blasted the federal agency for promoting waste-to-energy and vowed

Columbia University

291

"Maximum recycling of Material and Energy, Minimum of Landfilling"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in "Recycling". "Waste-to-Energy" is now defined as Recycling, when energy efficiency is > 0,65 Prevention Reuse Recycling and Waste-to Energy? #12;6 European Policies on Landfill Ban The EU Landfill Directive The amount Ban decided upon in 2000, in force in 2005. A very strong effect, with a strong increase of Waste-to-Energy

Columbia University

292

Environmental sustainability comparison of a hypothetical pneumatic waste collection system and a door-to-door system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We compare the environmental sustainability of two MSW collection systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We evaluate pneumatic and door-to-door collection systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The greenhouse gas emissions of pneumatic collection are around three times higher. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer System components are decisive but assumptions on electricity use are also important. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pneumatic collection could provide other benefits over door-to-door system. - Abstract: Waste collection is one of the life cycle phases that influence the environmental sustainability of waste management. Pneumatic waste collection systems represent a new way of arranging waste collection in densely populated urban areas. However, limited information is available on the environmental impacts of this system. In this study, we compare the environmental sustainability of conventional door-to-door waste collection with its hypothetical pneumatic alternative. Furthermore, we analyse whether the size of the hypothetical pneumatic system, or the number of waste fractions included, have an impact on the results. Environmental loads are calculated for a hypothetical pneumatic waste collection system modelled on an existing dense urban area in Helsinki, Finland, and the results are compared to those of the prevailing, container-based, door-to-door waste collection system. The evaluation method used is the life-cycle inventory (LCI). In this study, we report the atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG), SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. The results indicate that replacing the prevailing system with stationary pneumatic waste collection in an existing urban infrastructure would increase total air emissions. Locally, in the waste collection area, emissions would nonetheless diminish, as collection traffic decreases. While the electricity consumption of the hypothetical pneumatic system and the origin of electricity have a significant bearing on the results, emissions due to manufacturing the system's components prove decisive.

Punkkinen, Henna, E-mail: henna.punkkinen@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Biologinkuja 7, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Merta, Elina, E-mail: elina.merta@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Biologinkuja 7, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Teerioja, Nea, E-mail: nea.teerioja@helsinki.fi [University of Helsinki, Department of Economics and Management, Latokartanonkaari 9, P.O. Box 27, FI-00014 HY (Finland); Moliis, Katja, E-mail: katja.moliis@helsinki.fi [University of Helsinki, Department of Economics and Management, Latokartanonkaari 9, P.O. Box 27, FI-00014 HY (Finland); Kuvaja, Eveliina, E-mail: eveliina.kuvaja@helsinki.fi [University of Helsinki, Department of Economics and Management, Latokartanonkaari 9, P.O. Box 27, FI-00014 HY (Finland)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

293

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility Full Document and Summary Versions...

294

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE January 2010 Prepared for the Interagency left intentionally blank.] #12;Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy PNNL-SA-69994 under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Waste Disposal Workshops: Anthrax-Contaminated Waste AM Lesperance JF Upton SL

295

Waste Processing | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Processing Waste Processing Workers process and repackage waste at the Transuranic Waste Processing Centers Cask Processing Enclosure. Workers process and repackage waste at...

296

Waste Hoist  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Primary Hoist: 45-ton Rope-Guide Friction Hoist Largest friction hoist in the world when it was built in 1985 Completely enclosed (for contamination control), the waste hoist at WIPP is a modern friction hoist with rope guides (uses a balanced counterweight and tail ropes). With a 45-ton capacity, it was the largest friction hoist in the world when it was built in 1986. Hoist deck footprint: 2.87m wide x 4.67m long Hoist deck height: 2.87m wide x 7.46m high Access height to the waste hoist deck is limited by a high-bay door at 4.14m high Nominal configuration is 2-cage (over/under), with bottom (equipment) cage interior height of 4.52m The photo, at left, shows the 4.14m high-bay doors at the top collar of the waste hoist shaft. The perpendicular cross section of the opening is 3.5m x 4.14m, but the bottom cage cross section is 2.87m x 4.5m (and 4.67m into the plane of the photo).

297

Evolution of WTE utilization - a global look. Asian perspective - waste incineration and it`s value in Japan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Incineration carries significant weight in waste disposal in general. Seventy-five percent of the total quantity of municipal solid waste is incinerated. In the year 1994, there were a total of 1,854 incineration plants in Japan. Waste heat from MSW incineration is utilized for power generation at most large-scale incineration plants. In 1994, a total of 3,376 industrial waste incineration plants existed in Japan. They have been contributing much toward waste volume reduction, improvement of the quality of landfill materials through conversion of organic substances into inorganic substances which are more beneficial for landfill purposes, and conservation of resources by energy recovery. But air pollution by exhaust substances - especially dioxin - from incineration plants pose a problem. This may place a big hurdle before future incineration plant projects. Small batch-type incineration furnaces are slowly dying out. Some municipalities will jointly construct a large incineration plant among themselves while others will consider introducing RDF producing plant, which is getting popular. More efforts will be made to melt and solify the incineration residue, reduce the environmental load imposed by pollutants in the exhaust gas from now on.

Tanaka, Masaru [National Institute of Public Health, Tokyo (Japan)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

ELLEFSON, M.D.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Radioactive Waste Management (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section regulates the transportation and disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Minnesota, and establishes a Nuclear Waste Council to monitor the federal high-level radioactive waste...

300

Radioactive Waste Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish policies and guidelines by which the Department of Energy (DOE) manages tis radioactive waste, waste byproducts, and radioactively contaminated surplus facilities.

1984-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste-to-energy msw" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Transuranic Waste Requirements  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The guide provides criteria for determining if a waste is to be managed in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter III, Transuranic Waste Requirements.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

302

Nuclear Waste Disposal: Amounts of Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The term nuclear waste...embraces all residues from the use of radioactive materials, including uses in medicine and industry. The most highly radioactive of these are the spent fuel or reprocessed wastes from co...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

WasteTraining Booklet Waste & Recycling Impacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WasteTraining Booklet #12;Waste & Recycling Impacts Environment: The majority of our municipal jobs while recycling 10,000 tons of waste creates 36 jobs. Environment: Recycling conserves resources. It takes 95% less energy to make aluminum from recycled aluminum than from virgin materials, 60% less

Saldin, Dilano

304

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

305

Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Hood, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) follow-on renewable energy (RE) assessment of Fort Hood. Fort Hood receives many solicitations from renewable energy vendors who are interested in doing projects on site. Based on specific requests from Fort Hood staff so they can better understand these proposals, and the results of PNNL's 2008 RE assessment of Fort Hood, the following resources were examined in this assessment: (1) Municipal solid waste (MSW) for waste-to-energy (WTE); (2) Wind; (3) Landfill gas; (4) Solar photovoltaics (PV); and (5) Shale gas. This report also examines the regulatory issues, development options, and environmental impacts for the promising RE resources, and includes a review of the RE market in Texas.

Solana, Amy E.; Warwick, William M.; Orrell, Alice C.; Russo, Bryan J.; Parker, Kyle R.; Weimar, Mark R.; Horner, Jacob A.; Manning, Anathea

2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

306

Recycling of sodium waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recycling of sodium waste ... Methods for handling and recycling a dangerous and costly chemical. ...

Bettina Hubler-Blank; Michael Witt; Herbert W. Roesky

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source special nuclear and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this document. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge. This document has been revised to meet the interim status waste analysis plan requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173 303-300(5). When the final status permit is issued, permit conditions will be incorporated and this document will be revised accordingly.

ELLEFSON, M.D.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

308

Infectious waste feed system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An infectious waste feed system for comminuting infectious waste and feeding the comminuted waste to a combustor automatically without the need for human intervention. The system includes a receptacle for accepting waste materials. Preferably, the receptacle includes a first and second compartment and a means for sealing the first and second compartments from the atmosphere. A shredder is disposed to comminute waste materials accepted in the receptacle to a predetermined size. A trough is disposed to receive the comminuted waste materials from the shredder. A feeding means is disposed within the trough and is movable in a first and second direction for feeding the comminuted waste materials to a combustor.

Coulthard, E. James (York, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

An integrated appraisal of energy recovery options in the United Kingdom using solid recovered fuel derived from municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports an integrated appraisal of options for utilising solid recovered fuels (SRF) (derived from municipal solid waste, MSW) in energy intensive industries within the United Kingdom (UK). Four potential co-combustion scenarios have been identified following discussions with industry stakeholders. These scenarios have been evaluated using (a) an existing energy and mass flow framework model, (b) a semi-quantitative risk analysis, (c) an environmental assessment and (d) a financial assessment. A summary of results from these evaluations for the four different scenarios is presented. For the given ranges of assumptions; SRF co-combustion with coal in cement kilns was found to be the optimal scenario followed by co-combustion of SRF in coal-fired power plants. The biogenic fraction in SRF (ca. 70%) reduces greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions significantly ({approx}2500 g CO{sub 2} eqvt./kg DS SRF in co-fired cement kilns and {approx}1500 g CO{sub 2} eqvt./kg DS SRF in co-fired power plants). Potential reductions in electricity or heat production occurred through using a lower calorific value (CV) fuel. This could be compensated for by savings in fuel costs (from SRF having a gate fee) and grants aimed at reducing GHG emission to encourage the use of fuels with high biomass fractions. Total revenues generated from coal-fired power plants appear to be the highest ( Pounds 95/t SRF) from the four scenarios. However overall, cement kilns appear to be the best option due to the low technological risks, environmental emissions and fuel cost. Additionally, cement kiln operators have good experience of handling waste derived fuels. The scenarios involving co-combustion of SRF with MSW and biomass were less favourable due to higher environmental risks and technical issues.

Garg, A.; Smith, R. [Sustainable Systems Department, School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Hill, D. [DPH Environment and Energy Ltd., c/o Sustainable Systems Department, School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Longhurst, P.J.; Pollard, S.J.T. [Sustainable Systems Department, School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Simms, N.J. [Sustainable Systems Department, School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom)], E-mail: n.j.simms@cranfield.ac.uk

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

Leaching behavior and possible resource recovery from air pollution control residues of fluidized bed combustion of municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ash residues are generated at several points during combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW), i.e., in cyclones, electrostatic precipitators and fabric filters. Such residues are of a complex physical and chemical nature and are often enriched in soluble salts and heavy metals such as Pb, Cd and Zn. Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) of MSW is a relatively new technique and very little information is available about the leaching behavior of its residues. In this study, the total elemental composition, mineralogy and leaching behavior of cyclone and bag-house filter ashes from a bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) boiler fired with municipal solid waste have been investigated. In addition, the possibilities of recovery heavy metals from these ashes were studied. The long-term leaching behavior of the ash constituents was evaluated using a two-step batch leaching test known as the CEN-test, whereas short and medium term leaching behavior was evaluated using a Column test. The extraction of elements from cyclone and filter ashes with various acidic solutions was also investigated. The leaching behavior of acid washed ashes was evaluated using the CEN test. The cyclone ash was mainly composed of aluminosilicate minerals, whereas the filter ash consisted of chlorides and hydroxides of alkali and alkaline earth metals. The concentration of heavy metals such as Zn, Cu, Cd and Pb was higher in the filter ash than in the cyclone ash. The leached amounts of sulfates and Pb from the cyclone ash decreased with leaching test contact time, indicating the formation of secondary mineral phases. Large amounts of chlorides, sulfates, Ca, Cu and Pb were leached from the filter ash. Acid extraction removed large amounts ({gt}50%) of Zn, Pb and Cu from the filter ash and approximately 56% of the total amount of Zn present in the cyclone ash. An efficient removal of heavy metal species from these types of ashes can probably be achieved by application of a recycling or multi-step process.

Abbas, Z.; Andersson, B.A.; Steenari, B.M.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

312

Two stage fluid bed-plasma gasification process for solid waste valorisation: Technical review and preliminary thermodynamic modelling of sulphur emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate sulphur during MSW gasification within a fluid bed-plasma process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We review the literature on the feed, sulphur and process principles therein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The need for research in this area was identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We perform thermodynamic modelling of the fluid bed stage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Initial findings indicate the prominence of solid phase sulphur. - Abstract: Gasification of solid waste for energy has significant potential given an abundant feed supply and strong policy drivers. Nonetheless, significant ambiguities in the knowledge base are apparent. Consequently this study investigates sulphur mechanisms within a novel two stage fluid bed-plasma gasification process. This paper includes a detailed review of gasification and plasma fundamentals in relation to the specific process, along with insight on MSW based feedstock properties and sulphur pollutant therein. As a first step to understanding sulphur partitioning and speciation within the process, thermodynamic modelling of the fluid bed stage has been performed. Preliminary findings, supported by plant experience, indicate the prominence of solid phase sulphur species (as opposed to H{sub 2}S) - Na and K based species in particular. Work is underway to further investigate and validate this.

Morrin, Shane, E-mail: shane.morrin@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering, University College London, London, WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Advanced Plasma Power, South Marston Business park, Swindon, SN3 4DE (United Kingdom); Lettieri, Paola, E-mail: p.lettieri@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering, University College London, London, WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Chapman, Chris, E-mail: chris.chapman@app-uk.com [Advanced Plasma Power, South Marston Business park, Swindon, SN3 4DE (United Kingdom); Mazzei, Luca, E-mail: l.mazzei@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering, University College London, London, WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic thermophiles final Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for treating this waste stream since it results in two valuable final products, biogas and ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council...

314

E-Print Network 3.0 - automotive shredded residues Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Shredded municipal refuse Refuse derived oil (Garrett process 3 ) Natural gas Waste gasifier product: air Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology...

315

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute coal dust Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Engineering 27 Proceedings of NAWTEC18 18th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference Summary: -to-particle conversions. In coal and waste combustion systems,...

316

Past Meetings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

wet waste feedstocks. For more information, see the Waste to Energy Roadmapping Workshop Web page. Process Integration and Carbon Efficiency Workshop The Process Integration and...

317

Shanghai JEC Environmental Consultant Co Ltd SHJEC | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

provider of technical consulting services in municipal waste disposal and waste-to-energy projects, and a CDM project PDD consultant. Coordinates: 31.247709, 121.472618...

318

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerial plant parts Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

bulky waste. In large part, the location of the new ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 85...

319

EVALUATION OF POSSIBLE GASIFIER-ENGINE APPLICATIONS WITH MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE (A CASE STUDY OF KAMPALA).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Gasification of biomass for electricity power generation has been a proven technology in a number of countries in the world. MSW consists of biomass, (more)

BERNARD, KIVUMBI

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

OpenEI - MSW Biogenic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy Renewable Energy Consumption by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/51 Provides annual consumption (in quadrillion Btu) of renewable energy by energy use sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electricity) and by energy source (e.g. solar, biofuel) for 2004 through 2008. Original sources for data are cited on spreadsheet. Also available from: www.eia.gov/cneaf/solar.renewables/page/trends/table1_2.xls License

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste-to-energy msw" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. - Allentown, PA A microbial reverse electrodialysis...

322

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

(ex: organic Rankine cycle) High installed KW capital Low temperature waste heat (<100C) is not practicable Further efficiency loss in electrolytic conversion to...

323

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. The purpose of the Manual is to catalog those procedural requirements and existing practices that ensure that all DOE elements and contractors continue to manage DOE's radioactive waste in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety, and the environment. Does not cancel other directives.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

324

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is collected by the RSO. 2. Dry radioactive waste must be segregated by isotope. 3. Liquid radioactive waste must be separated by isotope. 4. Liquid frequently and change them if contaminated. 5. Use radioactive waste container to collect the waste. 6. Check

Jia, Songtao

325

Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from tank waste. * Decreases the volume of water to create room in double-shell tanks, allowing them to accept waste from noncompliant single- shell tanks. * Treats up to 1...

326

Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

trucks for scale. The DSTs have limited capacity and are aging. Maintaining these tanks is important to ensure that waste is ready to supply the Waste Treatment Plant. The...

327

Hazardous Waste Management (Oklahoma)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article states regulations for the disposal of hazardous waste. It also provides information about permit requirements for the transport, treatment and storage of such waste. It also mentions...

328

Nuclear waste solids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Glass and polycrystalline materials for high-level radioactive waste immobilization are discussed. Borosilicate glass has been selected as the waste form for defence high-level radwaste in the US. Since releas...

L. L. Hench; D. E. Clark; A. B. Harker

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Waste disposal package  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This is a claim for a waste disposal package including an inner or primary canister for containing hazardous and/or radioactive wastes. The primary canister is encapsulated by an outer or secondary barrier formed of a porous ceramic material to control ingress of water to the canister and the release rate of wastes upon breach on the canister. 4 figs.

Smith, M.J.

1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

330

Identifying Mixed Chemical and Radioactive Waste Mixed waste is: any waste material containing both radioactive materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identifying Mixed Chemical and Radioactive Waste Mixed waste is: any waste material containing both as noted on the list, you do not have a mixed waste and it may be managed as a normal radioactive waste radioactive waste after initially dating the container, the hold for decay time is extended, but you cannot

Straight, Aaron

331

Acute and Genetic Toxicity of Municipal Landfill Leachate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills have been found to contain many of the same hazardous constituents as found in hazardous waste landfills. Because of the large number of MSW landfills, these sites pose a serious environmental threat...

Brown, K.W.; Schrab, G.E.; Donnelly, K.C.

332

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07. Admin Chg 2, dated 6-8-11, cancels DOE M 435.1-1 Chg 1.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

333

Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda More Documents &...

334

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security More Documents &...

335

On mobilization of lead and arsenic in groundwater in response to CO2 leakage from deep geological storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation and mitigation of landfill gas impacts on cadmiummunicipal solid waste (MSW) landfill gas on the release of

Zheng, L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Tank Waste and Waste Processing | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing The Defense Waste Processing Facility set a record by producing 267 canisters filled with glassified waste in a year. New bubbler technology and other enhancements will increase canister production in the future. The Defense Waste Processing Facility set a record by producing 267 canisters filled with glassified waste in a year. New bubbler technology and other enhancements will increase canister production in the future. A Savannah River Remediation employee uses a manipulator located inside a shielded enclosure at the Defense Waste Processing Facility where the melter is pouring molten glass inside a canister. A Savannah River Remediation employee uses a manipulator located inside a

337

Energy recovery from municipal solid waste and sewage sludge using multi-solid fluidized bed combustion technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was initiated to investigate the recovery of energy from municipal solid waste (MSW) and domestic sewage sludge (DSS) simultaneously by using Battelle's multi-solid fluidized-bed combustion (MS-FBC) technology. The concept was to recover energy as high and low pressure steam, simultaneously. High pressure steam would be generated from flue gas using a conventional tubular boiler. Low pressure steam would be generated by direct contact drying of DSS (as 4% solids) with hot sand in a fluidized bed that is an integral part of the MS-FBC process. It was proposed that high pressure steam could be used for district heating or electricity generation. The low pressure steam could be used for close proximity building heat. Alternatively, low pressure steam could be used to heat wastewater in a sewage treatment plant to enhance sedimentation and biological activity that would provide a captive market for this part of the recovered energy. The direct contact drying or tubeless steam generation eliminates fouling problems that are common during heat exchange with DSS. The MS-FBC process was originally developed for coal and was chosen for this investigation because its combustion rate is about three times that of conventional fluidized beds and it was projected to have the flexibility needed for accomplishing tubeless steam generation. The results of the investigation show that the MS-FBC process concept for the co-utilization of MSW and DSS is technically feasible and that the thermal efficiency of the process is 76 to 82% based on experiments conducted in a 70 to 85 lb/h pilot plant and calculations on three conceptual cases.

Not Available

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

electrolytic cell, designed to integrate waste heat recovery (i.e a microbial heat recovery cell or MHRC), can operate as a fuel cell and convert effluent streams into...

339

New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the issues of conducting debris treatment in the New Waste Calcine Facility (NWCF) decontamination area and the methods currently being used to decontaminate material at the NWCF.

K. E. Archibald

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Solid Waste Management Plan. Revision 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The waste types discussed in this Solid Waste Management Plan are Municipal Solid Waste, Hazardous Waste, Low-Level Mixed Waste, Low-Level Radioactive Waste, and Transuranic Waste. The plan describes for each type of solid waste, the existing waste management facilities, the issues, and the assumptions used to develop the current management plan.

NONE

1995-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste-to-energy msw" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Waste Confidence Discussion | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Confidence Discussion Waste Confidence Discussion Long-Term Waste Confidence Update. Waste Confidence Discussion More Documents & Publications Status Update: Extended Storage...

342

EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation DOE's Radioactive Waste Management Priorities: Continue to manage waste...

343

Transuranic (TRU) Waste | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Defined by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act as "waste containing more than 100 nanocuries of alpha-emitting...

344

Ferrocyanide tank waste stability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ferrocyanide wastes were generated at the Hanford Site during the mid to late 1950s as a result of efforts to create more tank space for the storage of high-level nuclear waste. The ferrocyanide process was developed to remove [sup 137]CS from existing waste and newly generated waste that resulted from the recovery of valuable uranium in Hanford Site waste tanks. During the course of research associated with the ferrocyanide process, it was recognized that ferrocyanide materials, when mixed with sodium nitrate and/or sodium nitrite, were capable of violent exothermic reaction. This chemical reactivity became an issue in the 1980s, when safety issues associated with the storage of ferrocyanide wastes in Hanford Site tanks became prominent. These safety issues heightened in the late 1980s and led to the current scrutiny of the safety issues associated with these wastes, as well as current research and waste management programs. Testing to provide information on the nature of possible tank reactions is ongoing. This document supplements the information presented in Summary of Single-Shell Tank Waste Stability, WHC-EP-0347, March 1991 (Borsheim and Kirch 1991), which evaluated several issues. This supplement only considers information particular to ferrocyanide wastes.

Fowler, K.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

6 - Nuclear Waste Regulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The most influential national and international bodies providing recommendations on radiation protection are described, including the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Protection philosophies and the ICRP general principles of radiation protection are discussed. Radioactive material regulations and sources of radiation are explained. Criteria of exemption from regulatory control are discussed with examples of exemption levels for naturally occurring and radioactive waste radionuclides. Clearance of both moderate and bulk amounts of materials from regulatory control is also explained, including examples of EU and the UK regulations. Dose limits recommended by the ICRP are given, as well as the main principles of control of radiation hazards. Nuclear waste classification schemes are outlined, including the IAEA classification scheme. A brief explanation of nuclear waste classes including exempt waste, very short-lived waste, very low-level waste, low-level waste, intermediate-level waste and high-level waste is given. Examples of waste classification schemes are given, including that of the UK.

M.I. Ojovan; W.E. Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Hanford Tank Waste Information Enclosure 1 Hanford Tank Waste Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hanford Tank Waste Information Enclosure 1 1 Hanford Tank Waste Information 1.0 Summary This information demonstrates the wastes in the twelve Hanford Site tanks meet the definition of transuranic (TRU. The wastes in these twelve (12) tanks are not high-level waste (HLW), and contain more than 100 nanocuries

347

Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste Read more overleaf Introduction Energy from waste provides us with an opportunity for a waste solution and a local source of energy rolled,itcan onlyaddressaportionofthewastestream andisnotsufficientonitsown. Energy obtained from the combustion of residual waste (Energy from

348

Stabilization of compactible waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of series of experiments performed to determine the feasibility of stabilizing compacted or compactible waste with polymers. The need for this work arose from problems encountered at disposal sites attributed to the instability of this waste in disposal. These studies are part of an experimental program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) investigating methods for the improved solidification/stabilization of DOE low-level wastes. The approach taken in this study was to perform a series of survey type experiments using various polymerization systems to find the most economical and practical method for further in-depth studies. Compactible dry bulk waste was stabilized with two different monomer systems: styrene-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and polyester-styrene, in laboratory-scale experiments. Stabilization was accomplished by wetting or soaking compactible waste (before or after compaction) with monomers, which were subsequently polymerized. Three stabilization methods are described. One involves the in-situ treatment of compacted waste with monomers in which a vacuum technique is used to introduce the binder into the waste. The second method involves the alternate placement and compaction of waste and binder into a disposal container. In the third method, the waste is treated before compaction by wetting the waste with the binder using a spraying technique. A series of samples stabilized at various binder-to-waste ratios were evaluated through water immersion and compression testing. Full-scale studies were conducted by stabilizing two 55-gallon drums of real compacted waste. The results of this preliminary study indicate that the integrity of compacted waste forms can be readily improved to ensure their long-term durability in disposal environments. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Waste Inspection Tomography (WIT)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste Inspection Tomography (WIT) provides mobile semi-trailer mounted nondestructive examination (NDE) and assay (NDA) for nuclear waste drum characterization. WIT uses various computed tomography (CT) methods for both NDE and NDA of nuclear waste drums. Low level waste (LLW), transuranic (TRU), and mixed radioactive waste can be inspected and characterized without opening the drums. With externally transmitted x-ray NDE techniques, WIT has the ability to identify high density waste materials like heavy metals, define drum contents in two- and three-dimensional space, quantify free liquid volumes through density and x-ray attenuation coefficient discrimination, and measure drum wall thickness. With waste emitting gamma-ray NDA techniques, WIT can locate gamma emitting radioactive sources in two- and three-dimensional space, identify gamma emitting isotopic species, identify the external activity levels of emitting gamma-ray sources, correct for waste matrix attenuation, provide internal activity approximations, and provide the data needed for waste classification as LLW or TRU. The mobile feature of WIT allows inspection technologies to be brought to the nuclear waste drum storage site without the need to relocate drums for safe, rapid, and cost-effective characterization of regulated nuclear waste. The combination of these WIT characterization modalities provides the inspector with an unprecedented ability to non-invasively characterize the regulated contents of waste drums as large as 110 gallons, weighing up to 1,600 pounds. Any objects that fit within these size and weight restrictions can also be inspected on WIT, such as smaller waste bags and drums that are five and thirty-five gallons.

Bernardi, R.T.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Environmental impacts of residual Municipal Solid Waste incineration: A comparison of 110 French incinerators using a life cycle approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: 110 French incinerators are compared with LCA based on plant-specific data. Environmental impacts vary as a function of plants energy recovery and NO{sub x} emissions. E.g. climate change impact ranges from ?58 to 408 kg CO{sub 2}-eq/tonne of residual MSW. Implications for LCA of waste management in a decision-making process are detailed. - Abstract: Incineration is the main option for residual Municipal Solid Waste treatment in France. This study compares the environmental performances of 110 French incinerators (i.e. 85% of the total number of plants currently in activity in France) in a Life Cycle Assessment perspective, considering 5 non-toxic impact categories: climate change, photochemical oxidant formation, particulate matter formation, terrestrial acidification and marine eutrophication. Mean, median and lower/upper impact potentials are determined considering the incineration of 1 tonne of French residual Municipal Solid Waste. The results highlight the relatively large variability of the impact potentials as a function of the plant technical performances. In particular, the climate change impact potential of the incineration of 1 tonne of waste ranges from a benefit of ?58 kg CO{sub 2}-eq to a relatively large burden of 408 kg CO{sub 2}-eq, with 294 kg CO{sub 2}-eq as the average impact. Two main plant-specific parameters drive the impact potentials regarding the 5 non-toxic impact categories under study: the energy recovery and delivery rate and the NO{sub x} process-specific emissions. The variability of the impact potentials as a function of incinerator characteristics therefore calls for the use of site-specific data when required by the LCA goal and scope definition phase, in particular when the study focuses on a specific incinerator or on a local waste management plan, and when these data are available.

Beylot, Antoine, E-mail: a.beylot@brgm.fr; Villeneuve, Jacques

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

18 18 19 T he WIPP's first waste receipt, 11 years later than originally planned, was a monumental step forward in the safe management of nuclear waste. Far from ending, however, the WIPP story has really just begun. For the next 35 years, the DOE will face many challenges as it manages a complex shipment schedule from transuranic waste sites across the United States and continues to ensure that the repository complies with all regulatory requirements. The DOE will work to maintain the highest level of safety in waste handling and trans- portation. Coordination with sites Disposal operations require coordination with sites that will ship transuranic waste to the WIPP and include periodic certification of waste characterization and handling practices at those facilities. During the WIPP's

352

SRS - Programs - Waste Solidification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Waste Solidification Waste Solidification The two primary facilities operated within the Waste Solidification program are Saltstone and the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Each DWPF canister is 10 feet tall and 2 feet in diameter, and typically takes a little over a day to fill. Each DWPF canister is 10 feet tall and 2 feet in diameter, and typically takes a little over a day to fill. The largest radioactive waste glassification plant in the world, DWPF converts the high-level liquid nuclear waste currently stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) into a solid glass form suitable for long-term storage and disposal. Scientists have long considered this glassification process, called "vitrification," as the preferred option for immobilizing high-level radioactive liquids into a more stable, manageable form until a federal

353

High level nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE Division of Waste Products through a lead office at Savannah River is developing a program to immobilize all US high-level nuclear waste for terminal disposal. DOE high-level wastes include those at the Hanford Plant, the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, and the Savannah River Plant. Commercial high-level wastes, for which DOE is also developing immobilization technology, include those at the Nuclear Fuel Services Plant and any future commercial fuels reprocessing plants. The first immobilization plant is to be the Defense Waste Processing Facility at Savannah River, scheduled for 1983 project submission to Congress and 1989 operation. Waste forms are still being selected for this plant. Borosilicate glass is currently the reference form, but alternate candidates include concretes, calcines, other glasses, ceramics, and matrix forms.

Crandall, J L

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Underground waste barrier structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is an underground waste barrier structure that consists of waste material, a first container formed of activated carbonaceous material enclosing the waste material, a second container formed of zeolite enclosing the first container, and clay covering the second container. The underground waste barrier structure is constructed by forming a recessed area within the earth, lining the recessed area with a layer of clay, lining the clay with a layer of zeolite, lining the zeolite with a layer of activated carbonaceous material, placing the waste material within the lined recessed area, forming a ceiling over the waste material of a layer of activated carbonaceous material, a layer of zeolite, and a layer of clay, the layers in the ceiling cojoining with the respective layers forming the walls of the structure, and finally, covering the ceiling with earth.

Saha, Anuj J. (Hamburg, NY); Grant, David C. (Gibsonia, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Synthesizing Optimal Waste Blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vitrification of tank wastes to form glass is a technique that will be used for the disposal of high-level waste at Hanford. ... Durability restrictions ensure that the resultant glass meets the quantitative criteria for disposal/long-term storage in a repository. ... If glasses are formulated to minimize the volume of glass that would be produced, then the cost of processing the waste and storing the resultant glass would be greatly reduced. ...

Venkatesh Narayan; Urmila M. Diwekar; Mark Hoza

1996-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

356

Waste Confidence Discussion  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Long-Term Long-Term Waste Confidence Update Christine Pineda Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission National Transportation Stakeholders Forum May 2012 ♦ Knoxville, Tennessee Long-Term Update Draft Report, "Background and Preliminary Assumptions for an Environmental Impact Statement- Long-Term Waste Confidence Update" Elements of the Long-Term Update - Draft environmental impact statement - Draft Waste Confidence Decision - Proposed Waste Confidence Rule based on the EIS and Decision, if applicable 2 Overview of Draft Report Background and assumptions report is first step in process. Basic topics in the report are:

357

Norcal Waste Systems, Inc.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fact sheet describes the LNG long-haul heavy-duty trucks at Norcal Waste Systems Inc.'s Sanitary Fill Company.

Not Available

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Section 24: Waste Characterization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy (DOE). 1995b. Transuranic Waste Baseline Inventory Report (Revision 2, December). DOECAO-95-1121. ERMS 531643. Carlsbad Area Office, Carlsbad, NM. PDF Author U.S....

359

Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

training, security) * Closure plan Tank-Related Permit Units New * 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) * 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs) Existing * 242-A Evaporator * Waste Treatment...

360

Waste Heat Recovery  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

DRAFT - PRE-DECISIONAL - DRAFT 1 Waste Heat Recovery 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the TechnologySystem ......

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste-to-energy msw" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Electronic Waste Transformation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electronic Waste Transformation ... Instead, entrepreneurial individuals and small businesses recover valuable metals such as copper from obsolete equipment through activities such as burning. ...

CHERYL HOGUE

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Waste minimization assessment procedure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Perry Nuclear Power Plant began developing a waste minimization plan early in 1991. In March of 1991 the plan was documented following a similar format to that described in the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual. Initial implementation involved obtaining management's commitment to support a waste minimization effort. The primary assessment goal was to identify all hazardous waste streams and to evaluate those streams for minimization opportunities. As implementation of the plan proceeded, non-hazardous waste streams routinely generated in large volumes were also evaluated for minimization opportunities. The next step included collection of process and facility data which would be useful in helping the facility accomplish its assessment goals. This paper describes the resources that were used and which were most valuable in identifying both the hazardous and non-hazardous waste streams that existed on site. For each material identified as a waste stream, additional information regarding the materials use, manufacturer, EPA hazardous waste number and DOT hazard class was also gathered. Once waste streams were evaluated for potential source reduction, recycling, re-use, re-sale, or burning for heat recovery, with disposal as the last viable alternative.

Kellythorne, L.L. (Centerior Energy, Cleveland, OH (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300 C to 800 C to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100 C to 1400 C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, G.G.

1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

364

Avoidable waste management costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the activity based costing method used to acquire variable (volume dependent or avoidable) waste management cost data for routine operations at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Waste volumes from environmental restoration, facility stabilization activities, and legacy waste were specifically excluded from this effort. A core team consisting of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, and Oak Ridge Reservation developed and piloted the methodology, which can be used to determine avoidable waste management costs. The method developed to gather information was based on activity based costing, which is a common industrial engineering technique. Sites submitted separate flow diagrams that showed the progression of work from activity to activity for each waste type or treatability group. Each activity on a flow diagram was described in a narrative, which detailed the scope of the activity. Labor and material costs based on a unit quantity of waste being processed were then summed to generate a total cost for that flow diagram. Cross-complex values were calculated by determining a weighted average for each waste type or treatability group based on the volume generated. This study will provide DOE and contractors with a better understanding of waste management processes and their associated costs. Other potential benefits include providing cost data for sites to perform consistent cost/benefit analysis of waste minimization and pollution prevention (WMIN/PP) options identified during pollution prevention opportunity assessments and providing a means for prioritizing and allocating limited resources for WMIN/PP.

Hsu, K.; Burns, M.; Priebe, S.; Robinson, P.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

September 19, 2014 - No second release at WIPP September 12, 2014 - Waste hoist transformer replacement September 09, 2014 - Additional areas cleared in WIPP underground...

366

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300.degree. C. to 800.degree. C. to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100.degree. C. to 1400.degree. C. at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Waste Loading Enhancements for Hanford Low-Activity Waste Glasses  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

WASTE LOADING ENHANCEMENTS FOR HANFORD LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE GLASSES Albert A. Kruger, Glass Scientist DOE-WTP Project Office Engineering Division US Department of Energy Richland,...

368

Tank Waste Committee Page 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of a PA is to examine the final waste disposition at Hanford, such as waste in the tanks at C-Farm. Vince said the quest is to model waste movement over 10,000 years,...

369

WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DESCRIPTION DETAILS * Radioactive Waste Source Reduction 1,500 Radioactive Waste $6,000 $2,500 $6,000 Waste Yard Sorting Table surveying to sort clean waste from radioactive waste Radioactive Emissions Emission lives. Radioactive Waste generated through wet chemistry Waste Minimization 30 Mixed waste / Liquid

370

Chapter 19 - Nuclear Waste Fund  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nuclear Waste Fund 19-1 Nuclear Waste Fund 19-1 CHAPTER 19 NUCLEAR WASTE FUND 1. INTRODUCTION. a. Purpose. This chapter establishes the financial, accounting, and budget policies and procedures for civilian and defense nuclear waste activities, as authorized in Public Law 97-425, the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended, referred to hereafter as the Act. b. Applicability. This chapter applies to all Departmental elements, including the National Nuclear Security Administration, and activities that are funded by the Nuclear Waste Fund (NWF) or the Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal appropriation. c. Background. The Act established the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) and assigned it responsibility for the management

371

Solid Waste Rules (New Hampshire)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The solid waste statute applies to construction and demolition debris, appliances, recyclables, and the facilities that collect, process, and dispose of solid waste. DES oversees the management of...

372

Solid Waste Management (North Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Solid Waste Program regulates safe management of solid waste through guidance, technical assistance, regulations, permitting, environmental monitoring, compliance evaluation and enforcement....

373

Waste Management | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Management Waste Management Oak Ridge has an onsite CERCLA disposal facility, the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility, that reduces cleanup and transportation costs....

374

Municipal Waste Combustion (New Mexico)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This rule establishes requirements for emissions from, and design and operation of, municipal waste combustion units. "Municipal waste"means all materials and substances discarded from residential...

375

Waste Disposal | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Disposal Waste Disposal Trucks transport debris from Oak Ridges cleanup sites to the onsite CERCLA disposal area, the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility....

376

22 - Radioactive waste disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter discusses the disposal of radioactive wastes that arise from a great variety of sources, including the nuclear fuel cycle, beneficial uses of isotopes, and radiation by institutions. Spent fuel contains uranium, plutonium, and highly radioactive fission products. The spent fuel is accumulating, awaiting the development of a high-level waste repository. It is anticipated that a multi-barrier system involving packaging and geologic media will provide protection of the public over the centuries. The favored method of disposal is in a mined cavity deep underground. In some countries, reprocessing the fuel assemblies permits recycling of materials and disposal of smaller volumes of solidified waste. Transportation of wastes is done by casks and containers designed to withstand severe accidents. Low-level wastes come from research and medical procedures and from a variety of activation and fission sources at a reactor site. They generally can be given near-surface burial. Isotopes of special interest are cobalt-60 and cesium-137. Transuranic wastes are being disposed of in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Decommissioning of reactors in the future will contribute a great deal of low-level radioactive waste.

Raymond L. Murray

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Radioactive waste disposal package  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

Lampe, Robert F. (Bethel Park, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Nuclear waste solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

High efficiency removal of technetium values from a nuclear waste stream is achieved by addition to the waste stream of a precipitant contributing tetraphenylphosphonium cation, such that a substantial portion of the technetium values are precipitated as an insoluble pertechnetate salt.

Walker, Darrel D. (1684 Partridge Dr., Aiken, SC 29801); Ebra, Martha A. (129 Hasty Rd., Aiken, SC 29801)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Radioactive waste storage issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state`s boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected.

Kunz, D.E.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

T h e W a s t e I s o l a t i o n P i l o t P l a n t DOE 1980. Final Environmental Impact Statement, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. DOE/EIS-0026, Washington, DC, Office of Environmental Management, U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1981. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP): Record of Decision. Federal Register, Vol. 46, No. 18, p. 9162, (46 Federal Register 9162), January 28, 1981. U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1990. Final Supplement Environmental Impact Statement, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. DOE/EIS-0026-FS, Washington, DC, Office of Environmental Management, U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1990. Record of Decision: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Federal Register, Vol. 55, No. 121, 25689-25692, U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1994. Comparative Study of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Transportation Alternatives.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste-to-energy msw" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Salt Waste Processing Initiatives  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Patricia Suggs Patricia Suggs Salt Processing Team Lead Assistant Manager for Waste Disposition Project Office of Environmental Management Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Initiatives 2 Overview * Current SRS Liquid Waste System status * Opportunity to accelerate salt processing - transformational technologies - Rotary Microfiltration (RMF) and Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) - Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (ARP/MCU) extension with next generation extractant - Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) performance enhancement - Saltstone enhancements * Life-cycle impacts and benefits 3 SRS Liquid Waste Total Volume >37 Million Gallons (Mgal) Total Curies 183 MCi (51% ) 175 MCi (49% ) >358 Million Curies (MCi) Sludge 34.3 Mgal (92% ) 3.0 Mgal (8%)

382

HLW Glass Waste Loadings  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

HLW HLW Glass Waste Loadings Ian L. Pegg Vitreous State Laboratory The Catholic University of America Washington, DC Overview Overview  Vitrification - general background  Joule heated ceramic melter (JHCM) technology  Factors affecting waste loadings  Waste loading requirements and projections  WTP DWPF  DWPF  Yucca Mountain License Application requirements on waste loading  Summary Vitrification  Immobilization of waste by conversion into a glass  Internationally accepted treatment for HLW  Why glass?  Amorphous material - able to incorporate a wide spectrum of elements over wide ranges of composition; resistant to radiation damage  Long-term durability - natural analogs Relatively simple process - amenable to nuclearization at large  Relatively simple process - amenable to nuclearization at large scale  There

383

Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Timothy D. Stark, F.ASCE1 landfills may contain aluminum from residential and commercial solid waste, industrial waste, and aluminum, may react with liquid in a landfill and cause uncontrolled temperature increases, significant changes

384

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 360: Solid Waste Management Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0: Solid Waste Management 0: Solid Waste Management Facilities (New York) Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 360: Solid Waste Management Facilities (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations apply to all solid wastes with the exception of hazardous or radioactive waste. Proposed solid waste processing facilities are required to obtain permits prior to construction, and the regulations provide details about permitting, construction, registration, and operation requirements. The regulations contain specific guidance for land

385

TRU Waste Sampling Program: Volume I. Waste characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume I of the TRU Waste Sampling Program report presents the waste characterization information obtained from sampling and characterizing various aged transuranic waste retrieved from storage at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The data contained in this report include the results of gas sampling and gas generation, radiographic examinations, waste visual examination results, and waste compliance with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant-Waste Acceptance Criteria (WIPP-WAC). A separate report, Volume II, contains data from the gas generation studies.

Clements, T.L. Jr.; Kudera, D.E.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Hanford Tank Waste Residuals  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hanford Hanford Tank Waste Residuals DOE HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 Chris Kemp, DOE ORP Bill Hewitt, YAHSGS LLC Hanford Tanks & Tank Waste * Single-Shell Tanks (SSTs) - ~27 million gallons of waste* - 149 SSTs located in 12 SST Farms - Grouped into 7 Waste Management Areas (WMAs) for RCRA closure purposes: 200 West Area S/SX T TX/TY U 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) - ~26 million gallons of waste* - 28 DSTs located in 6 DST Farms (1 West/5 East) * 17 Misc Underground Storage Tanks (MUST) * 43 Inactive MUST (IMUST) 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Volumes fluctuate as SST retrievals and 242-A Evaporator runs occur. Major Regulatory Drivers * Radioactive Tank Waste Materials - Atomic Energy Act - DOE M 435.1-1, Ch II, HLW - Other DOE Orders * Hazardous/Dangerous Tank Wastes - Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (TPA) - Retrieval/Closure under State's implementation

387

Waste inspection tomography (WIT)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The WIT program will provide an inspection system that offers the nuclear waste evaluator a unique combination of tools for regulatory-driven characterization of low-level waste (LLW), transuranic waste (TRU), and mixed waste drums. WIT provides nondestructive, noninvasive, and environmentally safe inspections using X-ray and gamma ray technologies, with reasonable cost and throughput. Two emission imaging techniques will be employed for characterizing materials in waste containers. The first of these is gamma emission tomography, commonly called single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Rather than using an external radiation source, SPECT uses the emission of radioactive materials within the object of interest for imaging. In this case, emission from actual nuclear waste within a container will provide a three-dimensional image of the radioactive substances in the container. The second emission technique will use high-purity germanium detectors for gamma ray spectroscopy. This technique, called nondestructive assay (NDA), can identify the emitting isotopic species and strength. Work in emission tomography and assay of nuclear waste has been undertaken at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory using a technique called Passive Tomography. Results from a process development unit are presented.

Bernardi, R.T.; Han, K.S.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

388

Experimental research on emission and removal of dioxins in flue gas from a co-combustion of MSW and coal incinerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the experimental study of dioxins removal from flue gas from a co-combustion municipal solid waste and coal incinerator by means of a fluidized absorption tower and a fabric filter. A test rig has been set up. The flow rate of flue gas of the test rig is 150-2000 m{sup 3}/h. The system was composed of a humidification and cooling system, an absorption tower, a demister, a slurry make-up tank, a desilter, a fabric filter and a measurement system. The total height of the absorption tower was 6.5 m, and the diameter of the reactor pool was 1.2 m. When the absorbent was 1% limestone slurry, the recirculation ratio was 3, the jet rate was 5-15 m/s and the submerged depth of the bubbling pipe under the slurry was 0.14 m, the removal efficiency for dioxins was 99.35%. The concentration of dioxins in the treated flue gas was 0.1573 x 10{sup -13} kg/Nm{sup 3} and the concentration of oxygen was 11%. This concentration is comparable to the emission standards of other developed countries.

Zhong Zhaoping [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)]. E-mail: zzhong@seu.edu.cn; Jin Baosheng [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Huang Yaji [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Zhou Hongcang [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Lan Jixiang [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide. 3 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

390

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide.

Forsberg, Charles W. (155 Newport Dr., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Beahm, Edward C. (106 Cooper Cir., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Parker, George W. (321 Dominion Cir., Knoxville, TN 37922)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Hazardous Waste Disposal Sites (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These sections contain information on fees and monitoring relevant to operators of hazardous waste disposal sites.

392

Generating power with waste wood  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Among the biomass renewables, waste wood has great potential with environmental and economic benefits highlighting its resume. The topics of this article include alternate waste wood fuel streams; combustion benefits; waste wood comparisons; waste wood ash; pilot scale tests; full-scale test data; permitting difficulties; and future needs.

Atkins, R.S.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Methane generation from waste materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An organic solid waste digester for producing methane from solid waste, the digester comprising a reactor vessel for holding solid waste, a sprinkler system for distributing water, bacteria, and nutrients over and through the solid waste, and a drainage system for capturing leachate that is then recirculated through the sprinkler system.

Samani, Zohrab A. (Las Cruces, NM); Hanson, Adrian T. (Las Cruces, NM); Macias-Corral, Maritza (Las Cruces, NM)

2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

394

Certification Plan, low-level waste Hazardous Waste Handling Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan also incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end-product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; an executive summary of the Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP) for the HWHF and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification. This plan provides guidance from the HWHF to waste generators, waste handlers, and the Waste Certification Specialist to enable them to conduct their activities and carry out their responsibilities in a manner that complies with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Waste generators have the primary responsibility for the proper characterization of LLW. The Waste Certification Specialist verifies and certifies that LBL LLW is characterized, handled, and shipped in accordance with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Certification is the governing process in which LBL personnel conduct their waste generating and waste handling activities in such a manner that the Waste Certification Specialist can verify that the requirements of WHC-WAC are met.

Albert, R.

1992-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

395

Vista International Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Efficiency, Wind energy Product: Technology holding company, developing products in waste-to-energy gasification, low speed wind generators, alternative fuels, and...

396

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced recycle filter Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 18 Green Team Starting Kit Step 1: Prepare for the first meeting Summary: , coffee machines,...

397

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkali burn traumatic Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 26 APPLICATION FORM Directions for Rank Ordering Rotation Preferences Summary:...

398

Mexico-Climate Technology Initiative Private Financing Advisory...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

closure with over US412 million of investment raised. These projects include biogas, biomass, waste to energy, clean transport, wind, solar, small hydro and energy...

399

Building a World of Difference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Waste?to?Energy Roadmapping Workshop Building a World of Difference Presentation by Patricia Scanlan, Director of Residuals Treatment Technologies, Black & Veatch

400

E-Print Network 3.0 - active organosulfur compounds1woa Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

-added products (e.g., activated carbon and carbon black). In their process, char upgrading is implemented Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste-to-energy msw" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

E-Print Network 3.0 - addition study denmark Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 26 UPGRADING OF WASTE-TO-ENERGY PLANT IN BRESCIA, ITALY Summary: treatment options outlined...

402

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis toluca basin Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in Toluca (population 0.82 million), the ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 5 Amer J of...

403

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid degradable plastics Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Of this amount only 7% is recovered for recycling , mostly in the form of polyethylene Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council...

404

Solargy Systems Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zip: 33309 Sector: Biomass, Solar Product: Solargy Systems designs and manufactures PV cells and develops waste to energy and biomass plants. References: Solargy Systems...

405

A Guidebook for Low-Carbon Development at the Local Level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

economical energy resources and fuel-efficient technologies such as conservation, methane recovery for energy generation, waste to energy, wind and solar

Zhou, Nan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

A Plan with a time-line Draft 3.2, July 21, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are average outputs, not ca- pacities.) Wind: 30 GW; tide: 8 GW; waste-to-energy: 2.5 GW; "clean coal

MacKay, David J.C.

407

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative materials wascon Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 2 Wastewater Renovation in Buried and Recirculating Sand Filters A.J. Gold,* B.E....

408

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced flue gas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 5 INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY FOR THE CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION AT WASTE-TO-ENERGY Summary: -Beam process is applied to flue gas compositions...

409

Federal Sector Renewable Energy Project Implementation: ""What's Working and Why  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation by Robert Westby, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, at the Waste-to-Energy Using Fuel Cells Workshop held Jan. 13, 2011.

410

E-Print Network 3.0 - acai pulp euterpe Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 47 Press release For Immediate Release Seattle, USA. May 21, 2008 Summary: and...

411

E-Print Network 3.0 - automatic fire detection Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

off, the fire is normally so large... , Chantilly, VA, USA NAWTEC17-2338 SUPPLEMENTAL PIT ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council...

412

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminous cement Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and expanded shale (lightweight) aggregate Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 63 By-Products...

413

Aire Valley Environmental | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name: Aire Valley Environmental Place: United Kingdom Product: Leeds-based waste-to-energy project developer. References: Aire Valley Environmental1 This article...

414

BATNEEC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search Name: BATNEEC Place: United Kingdom Product: Formed to develop the waste to energy plant at Dargavel, Scotland. References: BATNEEC1 This article is a...

415

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid combustion rate Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

air flows are established to provide local and overall... content, and the combustion gas heat loss rate. ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology...

416

Energy Resource Library | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Tribal Case Studies Energy Biomass and Waste-to-Energy Energy Efficiency Fossil Energy Geothermal Energy Renewable Energy Technologies Overview Solar Energy Water Energy Wind...

417

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternate fuels combustibles Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 2 Inroduction Introduction Summary: , as alternative fuels. However, the currently...

418

E-Print Network 3.0 - achieve high bed Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

validation of our reacting bed modelling code (FLIC) has... predictions. Our new gasification concept offers the prospect of ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy...

419

E-Print Network 3.0 - air case study Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

classifiers 1-3 . However, these studies ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 3 Poster Design &...

420

E-Print Network 3.0 - air analysis Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

covered three different air classifiers, ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 3 Improved...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste-to-energy msw" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Methane Emissions  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

credit for renewable energy, including waste-to-energy and landfill gas combustion. Wastewater treatment, including both domestic wastewater (about two-thirds) and industrial...

422

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum slag dross Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

mast significant aspect of the IWPF feed mixtures Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 72 Zhang, L....

423

E-Print Network 3.0 - albina raanskiene rytis Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SCIENCE PUBLISHERS LTD. 10. Albina, D.O., Theory Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 70 STORING ARB...

424

Gills Onions Advanced Energy Recovery System  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation by Dave Reardon, HDR Engineering, Inc., at the Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cell Workshop on Jan. 13, 2011

425

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash fossil energy Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sources from Waste-to-Energy (WTE) plants. The advantages... -effective Determination of "Green" Energy and ... Source: Szmolyan, Peter - Institut fr Analysis und Scientific...

426

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric presure arc Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the drying process takes place too. Here an ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 4 JOURNAL DE...

427

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinomycete salinispora arenicola Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

viable and non-viable, were determined with an Andersen six Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 56...

428

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid inertness studies Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of bacteria utilizing these short-chain organic ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 2...

429

Publisher: AGRONOMY; Journal: VZJ:Vadose Zone Journal; Copyright: Will notify... Volume: Will notify...; Issue: Will notify...; Manuscript: V12-0056; DOI: 10.2136/vzj201; PII  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wastes and sewage sludge; MSW, municipal solid waste compost; SCM, stochastic­convective model; TDR, time of urban wastes by application to cultivated land. Waste composting creates a relatively low-cost product, a biowaste compost (BIO), a municipal solid waste compost (MSW), and a co-compost of green waste and sewage

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

430

Tank Waste Strategy Update  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tank Waste Subcommittee www.em.doe.gov safety performance cleanup closure E M Environmental Management 1 Tank Waste Subcommittee Ken Picha Office of Environmental Management December 5, 2011 Background Tank Waste Subcommittee (TWS)originally chartered, in response to Secretary's request to perform a technical review of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) in May 2010. Three tasks: o Verification of closure of WTP External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issues. o WTP Technical Design Review o WTP potential improvements Report completed and briefed to DOE in September 2010 www.em.doe.gov safety performance cleanup closure E M Environmental Management 2 Report completed and briefed to DOE in September 2010 Follow-on scope for TWS identified immediately after briefing to DOE and

431

Waste Treatment Plant Overview  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, was the largest of three defense production sites in the U.S. Over the span of 40 years, it was used to produce 64 metric tons of plutonium, helping end World War II and playing a major role in military defense efforts during the Cold War. As a result, 56 million gallons of radioactive and chemical wastes are now stored in 177 underground tanks on the Hanford Site. To address this challenge, the U.S. Department of Energy contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the "Vit Plant," will use vitrification to immobilize most of Hanford's dangerous tank waste.

432

Waste Steam Recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An examination has been made of the recovery of waste steam by three techniques: direct heat exchange to process, mechanical compression, and thermocompression. Near atmospheric steam sources were considered, but the techniques developed are equally...

Kleinfeld, J. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Waste and Recycling  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Nuclear engineer Dr. Kathy McCarthy talks about nuclear energy, the challenge of nuclear waste and the research aimed at solutions. For more information about nuclear energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

McCarthy, Kathy

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

434

Citrus Waste Biomass Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Renewable Spirits is developing an innovative pilot plant bio-refinery to establish the commercial viability of ehtanol production utilizing a processing waste from citrus juice production. A novel process based on enzymatic hydrolysis of citrus processing waste and fermentation of resulting sugars to ethanol by yeasts was successfully developed in collaboration with a CRADA partner, USDA/ARS Citrus and Subtropical Products Laboratory. The process was also successfully scaled up from laboratory scale to 10,000 gal fermentor level.

Karel Grohman; Scott Stevenson

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

435

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment Plant -...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Waste Treatment Plant - February 2011 Independent Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment Plant - February 2011 February 2011 Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Construction Quality...

436

Rhenium solubility in borosilicate nuclear waste glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glasses Developed for Nuclear Waste Immobilization," 91[12],solubility in borosilicate nuclear waste glass Ashutoshfor the researchers in nuclear waste community around the

McCloy, John S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record, Waste Treatment...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Observation of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant High Level Waste Facility Radioactive Liquid Waste Disposal System Hazards Analysis Activities (EA-WTP-HLW-2014-08-18(a))...

438

Municipal Solid Waste | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Municipal Solid Waste Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleMunicipalSolidWaste&oldid...

439

Waste Processing Annual Technology Development Report 2007 |...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Processing Annual Technology Development Report 2007 Waste Processing Annual Technology Development Report 2007 Waste Processing Annual Technology Development Report 2007...

440

Pollution Prevention, Waste Reduction, and Recycling | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Pollution Prevention, Waste Reduction, and Recycling Pollution Prevention, Waste Reduction, and Recycling The Pollution Prevention, Waste Reduction and Recycling Program was...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste-to-energy msw" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Operators prepare drums of contact-handled transuranic waste for loading into transportation containers Operators prepare...

442

Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on February 13, 2013. EZFeed Policy Place Pennsylvania Name Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) Policy Category Other Policy Policy Type Environmental Regulations Affected Technologies Biomass/Biogas, Coal with CCS, Concentrating Solar Power, Energy Storage, Fuel Cells, Geothermal Electric, Hydroelectric, Hydroelectric (Small), Natural Gas, Nuclear, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind energy Active Policy Yes Implementing Sector State/Province Program Administrator Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection

443

Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations

444

SECONDARY WASTE MANAGEMENT STRATEGY FOR EARLY LOW ACTIVITY WASTE TREATMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study evaluates parameters relevant to River Protection Project secondary waste streams generated during Early Low Activity Waste operations and recommends a strategy for secondary waste management that considers groundwater impact, cost, and programmatic risk. The recommended strategy for managing River Protection Project secondary waste is focused on improvements in the Effiuent Treatment Facility. Baseline plans to build a Solidification Treatment Unit adjacent to Effluent Treatment Facility should be enhanced to improve solid waste performance and mitigate corrosion of tanks and piping supporting the Effiuent Treatment Facility evaporator. This approach provides a life-cycle benefit to solid waste performance and reduction of groundwater contaminants.

CRAWFORD TW

2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

445

Solid Waste and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) Solid Waste and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter of the law that establishes the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency establishes the rules and regulations regarding solid waste. The chapter establishes specific regulations for biomass facilities, which includes permitting, siting, operation, safety guidelines, and closing requirements. Siting regulations include setbacks from waste handling areas for state facilities (1000 feet from jails, schools), requirements for not siting

446

LANL reaches waste shipment milestone  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LANL reaches waste shipment milestone LANL reaches waste shipment milestone LANL reaches waste shipment milestone The Lab surpassed 100,000 plutonium-equivalent curies of TRU waste shipped to WIPP, about one-third of the Lab's total. May 31, 2011 A shipment of transuranic waste on its way to the WIPP repository A shipment of transuranic waste on its way to the WIPP repository. Contact Fred deSousa Communicatons Office (505) 665-3430 Email LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, May 31, 2011 - Los Alamos National Laboratory has reached an important milestone in its campaign to ship transuranic (TRU) waste from Cold War-era nuclear operations to the U.S. Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. This month, the Lab surpassed 100,000 plutonium-equivalent curies of TRU waste shipped to WIPP, about one-third of the Lab's total.

447

The largest radioactive waste glassification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

largest radioactive waste glassification largest radioactive waste glassification plant in the nation, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) converts the liquid nuclear waste currently stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) into a solid glass form suitable for long-term storage and disposal. Scientists have long considered this glassification process, called "vitrification," as the preferred option for treating liquid nuclear waste. By immobilizing the radioactivity in glass, the DWPF reduces the risks associated with the continued storage of liquid nuclear waste at SRS and prepares the waste for final disposal in a federal repository. About 38 million gallons of liquid nuclear wastes are now stored in 49 underground carbon-steel tanks at SRS. This waste has about 300 million curies of radioactivity, of which the vast majority

448

Waste Treatment Plant - 12508  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will immobilize millions of gallons of Hanford's tank waste into solid glass using a proven technology called vitrification. The vitrification process will turn the waste into a stable glass form that is safe for long-term storage. Our discussion of the WTP will include a description of the ongoing design and construction of this large, complex, first-of-a-kind project. The concept for the operation of the WTP is to separate high-level and low-activity waste fractions, and immobilize those fractions in glass using vitrification. The WTP includes four major nuclear facilities and various support facilities. Waste from the Tank Farms is first pumped to the Pretreatment Facility at the WTP through an underground pipe-in-pipe system. When construction is complete, the Pretreatment Facility will be 12 stories high, 540 feet long and 215 feet wide, making it the largest of the four major nuclear facilities that compose the WTP. The total size of this facility will be more than 490,000 square feet. More than 8.2 million craft hours are required to construct this facility. Currently, the Pretreatment Facility is 51 percent complete. At the Pretreatment Facility the waste is pumped to the interior waste feed receipt vessels. Each of these four vessels is 55-feet tall and has a 375,000 gallon capacity, which makes them the largest vessels inside the Pretreatment Facility. These vessels contain a series of internal pulse-jet mixers to keep incoming waste properly mixed. The vessels are inside the black-cell areas, completely enclosed behind thick steel-laced, high strength concrete walls. The black cells are designed to be maintenance free with no moving parts. Once hot operations commence the black-cell area will be inaccessible. Surrounded by black cells, is the 'hot cell canyon'. The hot cell contains all the moving and replaceable components to remove solids and extract liquids. In this area, there is ultrafiltration equipment, cesium-ion exchange columns, evaporator boilers and recirculation pumps, and various mechanical process pumps for transferring process fluids. During the first phase of pretreatment, the waste will be concentrated using an evaporation process. Solids will be filtered out, and the remaining soluble, highly radioactive isotopes will be removed using an ion-exchange process. The high-level solids will be sent to the High-Level Waste (HLW) Vitrification Facility, and the low activity liquids will be sent to the Low-Activity Waste (LAW) Vitrification Facility for further processing. The high-level waste will be transferred via underground pipes to the HLW Facility from the Pretreatment Facility. The waste first arrives at the wet cell, which rests inside a black-cell area. The pretreated waste is transferred through shielded pipes into a series of melter preparation and feed vessels before reaching the melters. Liquids from various facility processes also return to the wet cell for interim storage before recycling back to the Pretreatment Facility. (authors)

Harp, Benton; Olds, Erik [US DOE (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Mixed waste characterization reference document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste characterization and monitoring are major activities in the management of waste from generation through storage and treatment to disposal. Adequate waste characterization is necessary to ensure safe storage, selection of appropriate and effective treatment, and adherence to disposal standards. For some wastes characterization objectives can be difficult and costly to achieve. The purpose of this document is to evaluate costs of characterizing one such waste type, mixed (hazardous and radioactive) waste. For the purpose of this document, waste characterization includes treatment system monitoring, where monitoring is a supplement or substitute for waste characterization. This document establishes a cost baseline for mixed waste characterization and treatment system monitoring requirements from which to evaluate alternatives. The cost baseline established as part of this work includes costs for a thermal treatment technology (i.e., a rotary kiln incinerator), a nonthermal treatment process (i.e., waste sorting, macronencapsulation, and catalytic wet oxidation), and no treatment (i.e., disposal of waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)). The analysis of improvement over the baseline includes assessment of promising areas for technology development in front-end waste characterization, process equipment, off gas controls, and monitoring. Based on this assessment, an ideal characterization and monitoring configuration is described that minimizes costs and optimizes resources required for waste characterization.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Treatment Building throughput study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hazardous waste/mixed waste HW/MW Treatment Building (TB) is the specified treatment location for solid hazardous waste/mixed waste at SRS. This report provides throughput information on the facility based on known and projected waste generation rates. The HW/MW TB will have an annual waste input for the first four years of approximately 38,000 ft{sup 3} and have an annual treated waste output of approximately 50,000 ft{sup 3}. After the first four years of operation it will have an annual waste input of approximately 16,000 ft{sup 3} and an annual waste output of approximately 18,000 ft. There are several waste streams that cannot be accurately predicted (e.g. environmental restoration, decommissioning, and decontamination). The equipment and process area sizing for the initial four years should allow excess processing capability for these poorly defined waste streams. A treatment process description and process flow of the waste is included to aid in understanding the computations of the throughput. A description of the treated wastes is also included.

England, J.L.; Kanzleiter, J.P.

1991-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

451

Waste generator services implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recurring waste management noncompliance problems have spurred a fundamental site-wide process revision to characterize and disposition wastes at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The reengineered method, termed Waste Generator Services, will streamline the waste acceptance process and provide waste generators comprehensive waste management services through a single, accountable organization to manage and disposition wastes in a timely, cost-effective, and compliant manner. This report outlines the strategy for implementing Waste Generator Services across the INEEL. It documents the culmination of efforts worked by the LMITCO Environmental Management Compliance Reengineering project team since October 1997. These efforts have included defining problems associated with the INEEL waste management process; identifying commercial best management practices; completing a review of DOE Complex-wide waste management training requirements; and involving others through an Integrated Process Team approach to provide recommendations on process flow, funding/charging mechanisms, and WGS organization. The report defines the work that will be performed by Waste Generator Services, the organization and resources, the waste acceptance process flow, the funding approach, methods for measuring performance, and the implementation schedule and approach. Field deployment will occur first at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant in June 1998. Beginning in Fiscal Year 1999, Waste Generator Services will be deployed at the other major INEEL facilities in a phased approach, with implementation completed by March 1999.

Mousseau, J.; Magleby, M.; Litus, M.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Transuranic Waste Tabletop  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste (Hazard Class 7 Radioactive) Moderator's Version of Tabletop Prepared for the Department of Energy Office of Transportation and Emergency Management 02B00215-07D.p65 This page intentionally left blank table of contents Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) planning tools planning tools planning tools planning tools T T T T Tr r r r ransur ansur ansur ansur ansuranic (TRU) W anic (TRU) W anic (TRU) W anic (TRU) W anic (TRU) Waste aste aste aste aste (Hazar (Hazar (Hazar (Hazar (Hazard Class 7 Radio d Class 7 Radio d Class 7 Radio d Class 7 Radio d Class 7 Radioactiv activ activ activ active) e) e) e) e) Moder Moder Moder Moder Moderat at at at ator' or' or' or' or's V s V s V s V s Version of T ersion of T ersion of T ersion of T ersion of Tablet ablet ablet ablet abletop

453

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 2 3 T he journey to the WIPP began nearly 60 years before the first barrels of transuranic waste arrived at the repository. The United States produced the world's first sig- nificant quantities of transuranic material during the Manhattan Project of World War II in the early 1940s. The government idled its plutonium- producing reactors and warhead manu- facturing plants at the end of the Cold War and scheduled most of them for dismantlement. However, the DOE will generate more transuranic waste as it cleans up these former nuclear weapons facilities. The WIPP is a cor- nerstone of the effort to clean up these facilities by providing a safe repository to isolate transuranic waste in disposal rooms mined out of ancient salt beds, located 2,150 feet below ground. The need for the WIPP

454

FROM WASTE TO WORTH: THE ROLE OF WASTE DIVERSION IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Canadian Energy-From-Waste Coalition (CEFWC) 1 There is considerable merit to the ideas outlined commitment to foster a green and sustainable economy. The Canadian Energy-From-Waste Coalition (CEFWC sign that the system is failing. #12;Canadian Energy-From-Waste Coalition (CEFWC) 2 Like you, the CEFWC

Columbia University

455

Waste IncIneratIon and Waste PreventIon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

disposing of waste, it also makes consider- able amounts of energy available in the form of electricity emissions annu- ally. About 50 percent of the energy contained in residual municipal waste comes from- sions from the fossil waste fraction and the fos- sil energy purchased from external sources

456

Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Skutterudite TE modules were...

457

Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators Thermoelectrics have unique advantages for...

458

High-Level Waste Requirements  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The guide provides the criteria for determining which DOE radioactive wastes are to be managed as high-level waste in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

459

Pathology waste includes: Transgenic animals.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resistant, have tight fitting covers, be clean, and in good repair. · Pathology waste must be transferred via the Internet: · Visit www.ehs.uci.edu/programs/enviro/. · Fill out the "Biomedical Waste

George, Steven C.

460

Waste Management Coordinating Lead Authors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-use and recycling ..............602 10.4.6 Wastewater and sludge treatment.....................602 10.4.7 Waste ............................................591 10.2.2 Wastewater generation ....................................592 10.2.3 Development trends for waste and ......................... wastewater ......................................................593

Columbia University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste-to-energy msw" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Leaching of Nuclear Waste Glasses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Resistance to aqueous corrosion is the most important requirement of glasses designed to immobilize high level radioactive wastes. Obtaining a highly durable nuclear waste glass is complicated by the requirement ...

L. L. Hench

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

The Discovery of Nuclear Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When did man discover nuclear waste? To answer this question, we first have to ask if nuclear waste really is something that could be called ... Prize in physics. In early writings within nuclear energy research ...

Gran Sundqvist

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Nuclear Waste Disposal Plan Drafted  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear Waste Disposal Plan Drafted ... Of all the issues haunting nuclear power plants, that of disposing of the radioactive wastes and spent nuclear fuel they generate has been the most vexing. ...

1984-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

464

Hydrothermal Processing of Wet Wastes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 3AConversion Technologies III: Energy from Our WasteWill we Be Rich in Fuel or Knee Deep in Trash by 2025? Hydrothermal Processing of Wet Wastes James R. Oyler, President, Genifuel Corporation

465

Zero Waste, Renewable Energy & Environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Dioxins & Furans · The `State of Waste' in the US · WTE Technologies · Thermal Recycling ­ Turnkey dangerous wastes in the form of gases and ash, often creating entirely new hazards, like dioxins and furans

Columbia University

466

Delaware Solid Waste Authority (Delaware)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Delaware Solid Waste Authority (DSWA) runs three landfills, all of which recover methane and generate electricity with a total capacity of 24 MWs. The DSWA Solid Waste Plan includes goals,...

467

Explosive Waste Treatment Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

106 106 Environment a 1 Assessment for th.e Explosive Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory MASTER November 1995 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Washington, DOC. 20585 Portions of this document maly be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. Table of Contents 1 . 0 2.0 3 . 0 4.0 5 . 0 6.0 7 . 0 8 . 0 Document Summary .............................................................. 1 Purpose and Need for Agency Action ............................................. 3 Description of the Proposed Action and Alternatives ............................ 4 3.1.1 Location ............................................................. 4

468

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant AFFIDAVIT FOR SURVIVING RELATIVE STATE _______________ ) ) ss: __________________ COUNTY OF _____________ ) That I, ________________________, am the _________________________ (Indicate relationship) of ___________________________, who is deceased and make the attached request pursuant to 10 CFR, Section 1008. That the information contained on the attached request is true and correct to the best of my knowledge and belief, and I am signing this authorization subject to the penalties provided in 18 U.S.C. 1001. ____________________________ SIGNATURE NOTARIZATION: SUBSCRIBED and SWORN to before me this ______day of __________, 20_____

469

Converter waste disposal study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The importance of waste management and disposal issues to the converting and print industries is demonstrated by the high response rate to a survey of US and Canadian converters and printers. The 30-item questionnaire measured the impact of reuse, recycling, source reduction, incineration, and landfilling on incoming raw-material packaging, process scrap, and waste inks, coatings, and adhesives. The results indicate that significant amounts of incoming packaging materials are reused in-house or through supplier take-back programs. However, there is very little reuse of excess raw materials and process scrap, suggesting the need for greater source reduction within these facilities as the regulatory climate becomes increasingly restrictive.

Schultz, R.B. (RBS Technologies, Inc., Skokie, IL (United States))

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Integrated Plant for the Municipal Solid Waste of Madrid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as steam- boiler water treatment, compressed-air, control and instrumentation, etc. The incinerator of the project was to recover the energy content of RDF generated by the recycling plant of the city of Madrid and Composting Plant The MSW is brought by the collecting trucks which unload in the storage area with a two

Columbia University

471

WORLDWIDE FOCUS ON NUCLEAR WASTE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

WORLDWIDE FOCUS ON NUCLEAR WASTE ... Volume grows and years pile up, but world lacks consensus on disposing of nuclear waste ... WHAT TO DO WITH SPENT nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste is a problem shared by much of the world. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

472

RETHINKING WASTE, RECYCLING, AND HOUSEKEEPING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RETHINKING WASTE, RECYCLING, AND HOUSEKEEPING EFFICIENCY.EFFICIENCY. A l GA leaner Green #12 t R li Management Recycling Staff The Office of Waste Reduction & Recycling started in The Office of Waste Reduction & Recycling started in 1990, we have 14 full time staff positions. ·We collect over 40

Howitt, Ivan

473

Mixed Waste Working Group report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The treatment of mixed waste remains one of this country`s most vexing environmental problems. Mixed waste is the combination of radioactive waste and hazardous waste, as defined by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The Department of Energy (DOE), as the country`s largest mixed waste generator, responsible for 95 percent of the Nation`s mixed waste volume, is now required to address a strict set of milestones under the Federal Facility Compliance Act of 1992. DOE`s earlier failure to adequately address the storage and treatment issues associated with mixed waste has led to a significant backlog of temporarily stored waste, significant quantities of buried waste, limited permanent disposal options, and inadequate treatment solutions. Between May and November of 1993, the Mixed Waste Working Group brought together stakeholders from around the Nation. Scientists, citizens, entrepreneurs, and bureaucrats convened in a series of forums to chart a course for accelerated testing of innovative mixed waste technologies. For the first time, a wide range of stakeholders were asked to examine new technologies that, if given the chance to be tested and evaluated, offer the prospect for better, safer, cheaper, and faster solutions to the mixed waste problem. In a matter of months, the Working Group has managed to bridge a gap between science and perception, engineer and citizen, and has developed a shared program for testing new technologies.

Not Available

1993-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

474

Disposal of Nuclear Wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...generated between now and A.D. 2000 is about 0.04 km3 (0.01...high-level wastes do not be-come a public hazard. The AEC adopts this...pre-sented at the 66th national meeting of the American Institute of...ARH-SA-41 (Atlantic Richfield Hanford Co., Richland, Washington...

Arthur S. Kubo; David J. Rose

1973-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

475

Radioactive Waste Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The objective of this Order is to ensure that all Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive waste is managed in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety and the environment. Cancels DOE O 5820.2A

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

476

D11 WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITIES FOR TRANSURANIC WASTE  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

10 CFR Ch. X (1-1-12 Edition) Pt. 1022 D11 WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITIES FOR TRANSURANIC WASTE Siting, construction or expansion, and op- eration of disposal facilities for transuranic (TRU) waste and TRU mixed waste (TRU waste also containing hazardous waste as designated in 40 CFR part 261). D12 INCINERATORS Siting, construction, and operation of in- cinerators, other than research and develop- ment incinerators or incinerators for non- hazardous solid waste (as designated in 40 CFR 261.4(b)). PART 1022-COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND EN- VIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIRE- MENTS Subpart A-General Sec. 1022.1 Background. 1022.2 Purpose and scope. 1022.3 Policy. 1022.4 Definitions. 1022.5 Applicability. 1022.6 Public inquiries. Subpart B-Procedures for Floodplain and

477

Solid Waste Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities (Rhode  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities (Rhode Island) Solid Waste Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Management Facilities which compost putrescible waste and/or leaf and yard waste are subject to these regulations. The regulations establish permitting, registration, and operational requirements for composting facilities. Operational requirements for putrescible waste facilities include siting, distance, and buffer requirements, as well as standards for avoiding harm to endangered species and contamination of air and water sources. Specific

478

WIPP TRANSURANIC WASTE How has the WIPP TRU Waste Inventory Changed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of tank waste from the Hanford site that is currently managed as high-level waste. None of this waste has that these Hanford tank wastes will be treated and will eventually be able to meet the WIPP waste acceptance criteria on the Hanford Tank Waste and K-Basin Sludges that were included in the waste inventory for recertifica- tion

479

Hanford Tank Waste - Near Source Treatment of Low Activity Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Treatment and disposition of Hanford Site waste as currently planned consists of I 00+ waste retrievals, waste delivery through up to 8+ miles of dedicated, in-ground piping, centralized mixing and blending operations- all leading to pre-treatment combination and separation processes followed by vitrification at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The sequential nature of Tank Farm and WTP operations requires nominally 15-20 years of continuous operations before all waste can be retrieved from many Single Shell Tanks (SSTs). Also, the infrastructure necessary to mobilize and deliver the waste requires significant investment beyond that required for the WTP. Treating waste as closely as possible to individual tanks or groups- as allowed by the waste characteristics- is being investigated to determine the potential to 1) defer, reduce, and/or eliminate infrastructure requirements, and 2) significantly mitigate project risk by reducing the potential and impact of single point failures. The inventory of Hanford waste slated for processing and disposition as LAW is currently managed as high-level waste (HLW), i.e., the separation of fission products and other radionuclides has not commenced. A significant inventory ofthis waste (over 20M gallons) is in the form of precipitated saltcake maintained in single shell tanks, many of which are identified as potential leaking tanks. Retrieval and transport (as a liquid) must be staged within the waste feed delivery capability established by site infrastructure and WTP. Near Source treatment, if employed, would provide for the separation and stabilization processing necessary for waste located in remote farms (wherein most ofthe leaking tanks reside) significantly earlier than currently projected. Near Source treatment is intended to address the currently accepted site risk and also provides means to mitigate future issues likely to be faced over the coming decades. This paper describes the potential near source treatment and waste disposition options as well as the impact these options could have on reducing infrastructure requirements, project cost and mission schedule.

Ramsey, William Gene

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

480

Waste acceptance and waste loading for vitrified Oak Ridge tank waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Science and Technology of the DOE has funded a joint project between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) to evaluate vitrification and grouting for the immobilization of sludge from ORNL tank farms. The radioactive waste is from the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT), the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST), the Bethel Valley Evaporator Service Tanks (BVEST), and the Old Hydrofractgure Tanks (OHF). Glass formulation development for sludge from these tanks is discussed in an accompanying article for this conference (Andrews and Workman). The sludges contain transuranic radionuclides at levels which will make the glass waste form (at reasonable waste loadings) TRU. Therefore, one of the objectives for this project was to ensure that the vitrified waste form could be disposed of at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). In order to accomplish this, the waste form must meet the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). An alternate pathway is to send the glass waste forms for disposal at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). A sludge waste loading in the feed of 6 wt percent will lead to a waste form which is non-TRU and could potentially be disposed of at NTS. The waste forms would then have to meet the requirements of the NTS WAC. This paper presents SRTC`s efforts at demonstrating that the glass waste form produced as a result of vitrification of ORNL sludge will meet all the criteria of the WIPP WAC or NTS WAC.

Harbour, J.R.; Andrews, M.K.

1997-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste-to-energy msw" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Environmental waste disposal contracts awarded  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental contracts awarded locally Environmental contracts awarded locally Environmental waste disposal contracts awarded locally Three small businesses with offices in Northern New Mexico awarded nuclear waste clean-up contracts. April 3, 2012 Worker moves drums of transuranic (TRU) waste at a staging area A worker stages drums of transuranic waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Technical Area 54. the Lap ships such drums to the U.S. Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Southern New Mexico. The Lab annually averages about 120 shipments of TRU waste to WIPP. Contact Small Business Office (505) 667-4419 Email "They will be valuable partners in the Lab's ability to dispose of the waste safely and efficiently." Small businesses selected for environmental work at LANL

482

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - Reports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reports Reports Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Review Report 2013 Review of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Work Planning and Control Activities, April 2013 Review Report 2012 Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, November 2012 Activity Reports 2011 Orientation Visit to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, September 2011 Review Reports 2007 Independent Oversight Inspection of Emergency Management at the Carlsbad Field Office and Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 2007 Review Reports 2002 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health and Emergency Management at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - Summary Report, August 2002 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Management at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - Volume I, August 2002

483

Waste Management | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Management Management Waste Management Nuclear Materials Disposition In fulfilling its mission, EM frequently manages and completes disposition of surplus nuclear materials and spent nuclear fuel. These are not waste. They are nuclear materials no longer needed for national security or other purposes, including spent nuclear fuel, special nuclear materials (as defined by the Atomic Energy Act) and other Nuclear Materials. Read more Tank Waste and Waste Processing The Department has approximately 88 million gallons of liquid waste stored in underground tanks and approximately 4,000 cubic meters of solid waste derived from the liquids stored in bins. The current DOE estimated cost for retrieval, treatment and disposal of this waste exceeds $50 billion to be spent over several decades.

484

Process Waste Assessment, Mechanics Shop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Process Waste Assessment was conducted to evaluate hazardous wastes generated in the Mechanics Shop. The Mechanics Shop maintains and repairs motorized vehicles and equipment on the SNL/California site, to include motorized carts, backhoes, street sweepers, trash truck, portable emergency generators, trencher, portable crane, and man lifts. The major hazardous waste streams routinely generated by the Mechanics Shop are used oil, spent off filters, oily rags, and spent batteries. The used off and spent off filters make up a significant portion of the overall hazardous waste stream. Waste oil and spent batteries are sent off-site for recycling. The rags and spent on filters are not recycled. They are disposed of as hazardous waste. Mechanics Shop personnel continuously look for opportunities to minimize hazardous wastes.

Phillips, N.M.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Waste Management | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cleanup » Waste Management Cleanup » Waste Management Waste Management November 12, 2013 U.S. Department of Energy to Host Press Call on Radioactive Waste Shipment and Disposal On Tuesday, November 12, 2013, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will host a press call to discuss Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project (CEUSP) shipment and disposal plans in Nevada. September 24, 2013 Hanford Tank Waste Retrieval, Treatment and Disposition Framework Completing the Office of River Protection (ORP) mission of stabilizing 56 million gallons of chemical and radioactive waste stored in Hanford's 177 tanks is one of the Energy Department's highest priorities. This Framework document outlines a phased approach for beginning tank waste treatment while continuing to resolve technical issues with the Pretreatment and

486

WASTE/BY-PRODUCT HYDROGEN DOE/DOD Workshop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; 6 Waste/Byproduct HydrogenWaste/By product Hydrogen Waste H2 sources include: Waste biomass: biogas Waste/Byproduct Hydrogen Waste/By product Hydrogen Fuel FlexibilityFuel Flexibility Biogas: generated

487

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transuranic Waste Baseline inventory report. Volume 3. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report consists of information related to the waste forms at the WIPP facility from the waste originators. Data for retrievably stored, projected and total wastes are given.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

The Laconia, New Hampshire Bottom, Ashi Paving Project. Volume 1: Environmental testing report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bottom ash is the principal waste stream fro m the combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW). It is comprised of grate ash (97%), the slag material discharged at the end of the grate system and grate sffting (3%), the material that melts or falls through the grate structure. This project was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of using municipal solid waste grate ash as an aggregate substitute in the construction of a pavement binder course for a portion of Rt. 3 in Laconia, New Hampshire. The research was conducted over a two year period during 1993 and 1994. This study is the culmination of an earlier two year characterization study between 1990 and 1992 that documented the physical and environmental characteristics of the bottom ash as it was produced at the Concord, N.H. waste-to-energy (WTE) facility and used in an asphaltic binder course. Together, these two studies provide a complete evaluation of the potential for using grate ash or bottom ash in asphalt binder course or as recycled asphalt pavement (RAP) in base courses in pavements.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

The Laconia, New Hampshire bottom ash paving project: Volume 3, Physical Performance Testing Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bottom ash is the principal waste stream from the combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW). It is comprised of grate ash (97%), the slag material discharged at the end of the grate system, and grate sifting (3%), the material that melts or falls through the grate structure. This project was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of using municipal solid waste grate ash as an aggregate substitute in the construction of a pavement binder course for a portion of Rt. 3 in Laconia, New Hampshire. The research was conducted over a two year period during 1993 and 1994. This study is the culmination of an earlier two year characterization study between 1990 and 1992 that documented the physical and environmental characteristics of the bottom ash as it was produced at the Concord, N.H. waste-to-energy (@) facility and used in an asphaltic binder course. Together, these two studies provide a complete evaluation of the potential for using grate ash or bottom ash in asphalt binder course or as recycled asphalt pavement (RAP) in base courses in pavements.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Treatment of halogen-containing waste and other waste materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for treating a halogen-containing waste material. The process provides a bath of molten glass containing a sacrificial metal oxide capable of reacting with a halogen in the waste material. The sacrificial metal oxide is present in the molten glass in at least a stoichiometric amount with respect to the halogen in the waste material. The waste material is introduced into the bath of molten glass to cause a reaction between the halogen in the waste material and the sacrificial metal oxide to yield a metal halide. The metal halide is a gas at the temperature of the molten glass. The gaseous metal halide is separated from the molten glass and contacted with an aqueous scrubber solution of an alkali metal hydroxide to yield a metal hydroxide or metal oxide-containing precipitate and a soluble alkali metal halide. The precipitate is then separated from the aqueous scrubber solution. The molten glass containing the treated waste material is removed from the bath as a waste glass. The process of the invention can be used to treat all types of waste material including radioactive wastes. The process is particularly suited for separating halogens from halogen-containing wastes. 3 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

491

Treatment of halogen-containing waste and other waste materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for treating a halogen-containing waste material. The process provides a bath of molten glass containing a sacrificial metal oxide capable of reacting with a halogen in the waste material. The sacrificial metal oxide is present in the molten glass in at least a stoichiometric amount with respect to the halogen in the waste material. The waste material is introduced into the bath of molten glass to cause a reaction between the halogen in the waste material and the sacrificial metal oxide to yield a metal halide. The metal halide is a gas at the temperature of the molten glass. The gaseous metal halide is separated from the molten glass and contacted with an aqueous scrubber solution of an alkali metal hydroxide to yield a metal hydroxide or metal oxide-containing precipitate and a soluble alkali metal halide. The precipitate is then separated from the aqueous scrubber solution. The molten glass containing the treated waste material is removed from the bath as a waste glass. The process of the invention can be used to treat all types of waste material including radioactive wastes. The process is particularly suited for separating halogens from halogen-containing wastes.

Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Beahm, Edward C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Parker, George W. (Concord, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Managing America's Defense Nuclear Waste | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Managing America's Defense Nuclear Waste Managing America's Defense Nuclear Waste Managing America's Defense Nuclear Waste More Documents & Publications National Defense...

493

Experimental and Analytical Studies on Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste heat Pyroelectric energy3 Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Harvesting Using Heat4 Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Harvesting Using Relaxor

Lee, Felix

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Nuclear waste management. Semiannual progress report, October 1983-March 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress in the following studies on radioactive waste management is reported: defense waste technology; Nuclear Waste Materials Characterization Center; waste isolation; and supporting studies. 58 figures, 22 tables.

McElroy, J.L.; Powell, J.A.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

To learn more about AT&T Network Sourcing Solutions, visit www.att.com/network-sourcing or have us contact you.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Management owns and operates 17 waste-to-energy facilities, five independent power production plants and 115 1,200 recycling facilities, transfer stations, landfills and waste-to-energy plants, 22 call centers and implement a full-service solution. An AT&T Virtual Private Network increased network capacity

Fisher, Kathleen

496

IWSA WEEKLY UPDATE January 30, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, including waste-to-energy, in New York's Hudson Valley. After her swearing in this week, Gillibrand the ten waste-to-energy facilities in New York. #12;A reminder: IWSA has moved. Our new location is: 1730 and Environment Coalition, a new caucus designed to push for policies that promote renewable energy and domestic

Columbia University

497

International Energy Symposium October 31, 2013 (Organized by John Foden of CEFWC and Prof. Marco Castaldi, EEC-CCNY)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, recycling and thermal waste to energy. Benefit of waste to energy in New York would be 11 million miles power sourced in the northern waterways. Other minimal sources are wind, bio and solar. Need cost1 International Energy Symposium October 31, 2013 (Organized by John Foden of CEFWC and Prof. Marco

498

Municipal Solid Waste:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Methodology for Allocating Municipal Solid Waste Methodology for Allocating Municipal Solid Waste to Biogenic and Non-Biogenic Energy May 2007 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contact This report was prepared by staff of the Renewable Information Team, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels.

499

Tritium waste package  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A containment and waste package system for processing and shipping tritium xide waste received from a process gas includes an outer drum and an inner drum containing a disposable molecular sieve bed (DMSB) seated within outer drum. The DMSB includes an inlet diffuser assembly, an outlet diffuser assembly, and a hydrogen catalytic recombiner. The DMSB absorbs tritium oxide from the process gas and converts it to a solid form so that the tritium is contained during shipment to a disposal site. The DMSB is filled with type 4A molecular sieve pellets capable of adsorbing up to 1000 curies of tritium. The recombiner contains a sufficient amount of catalyst to cause any hydrogen add oxygen present in the process gas to recombine to form water vapor, which is then adsorbed onto the DMSB.

Rossmassler, Rich (Cranbury, NJ); Ciebiera, Lloyd (Titusville, NJ); Tulipano, Francis J. (Teaneck, NJ); Vinson, Sylvester (Ewing, NJ); Walters, R. Thomas (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Waste | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste Waste Dataset Summary Description The Planning Database Project provides the UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) with regular data to track progress towards achieving EU targets for electricity generation from renewable energy (RE) sources. Extracts from the database are available each month. Information collected in the database includes: name, location and installed capacity of RE projects over 0.1MW; environmental designations; planning status; and construction status. Included here is the October 2010 Progress Datasheet, and an extract from December, 15, 2010 (i.e. Source UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Date Released December 15th, 2010 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords biomass co-firing installed capacity