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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities July 24, 2014 9:00AM to 3:30PM EDT U.S....

2

Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste Read more overleaf Introduction Energy from waste provides us with an opportunity for a waste solution and a local source of energy rolled,itcan onlyaddressaportionofthewastestream andisnotsufficientonitsown. Energy obtained from the combustion of residual waste (Energy from

3

Waste to Energy Time Activities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEMINAR Waste to Energy Time Activities 9:30-9:40 Brief introduction of participants 9:40-10:10 Presentation of Dr. Kalogirou, "Waste to Energy: An Integral Part of Worldwide Sustainable Waste Management" 10. Sofia Bethanis, "Production of synthetic aggregates for use in structural concrete from waste to energy

4

Waste Management and WasteWaste Management and Waste--toto--EnergyEnergy Status in SingaporeStatus in Singapore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste Management and WasteWaste Management and Waste--toto--EnergyEnergy Status in Singapore #12;Singapore's Waste Management · In 2003, 6877 tonnes/day (2.51 M tonnes/year) of MSW collected plants · 8% (non-incinerable waste) and incineration ash goes to the offshore Semakau Landfill · To reach

Columbia University

5

Waste Management | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cleanup Waste Management Waste Management July 15, 2014 Energy Expos Students work in groups to create hands-on exhibits about the energy sources that power the nation, ways to...

6

Hydraulic waste energy recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water distribution systems are typically a municipality's largest consumer of energy and greatest expense. The water distribution network has varying pressure requirements due to the age of the pipeline and topographical differences. Certain circumstances require installation of pressure reducing devices in the pipeline to lower the water pressure in the system. The consequence of this action is that the hydraulic energy supplied by the high lift or booster pumps is wasted in the process of reducing the pressure. A possible solution to capture the waste hydraulic energy is to install an in-line electricity generating turbine. Energy recovery using in-line turbine systems is an emerging technology. Due to the lack of technical and other relevant information on in-line turbine system installations, questions of constructability and legal issues over the power service contract have yet to be answered. This study seeks to resolve these questions and document the findings so that other communities may utilize this information. 10 figs.

Lederer, C.C.; Thomas, A.H.; McGuire, J.L. (Detroit Buildings and Safety Engineering Dept., MI (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geo-thermal energy, ocean thermal energy, wasted heat ingeothermal energy, ocean thermal energy, wasted heat inthermal energy, geo/ocean-thermal energy, wasted heat in

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Experimental and Analytical Studies on Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste heat Pyroelectric energy3 Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Harvesting Using Heat4 Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Harvesting Using Relaxor

Lee, Felix

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Waste-to-Energy Forum  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The tenth in a series of planned U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy-sponsored strategic energy development forums, this Tribal Leader Forum will focus on waste-to-energy...

10

AUSTRIA SHOWCASE WASTE-to-ENERGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 AUSTRIA SHOWCASE WASTE-to-ENERGY in AUSTRIA AECC Aberdeen Exhibition & Conference Center management in EU countries · Separated collection: Recycling and Waste-to-Energy · Development of emission standards for waste incineration · Examples for Waste-to-Energy projects in Austria · Waste-to-Energy

11

Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop Agenda | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop Agenda Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop Agenda Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop Agenda, November 5-6, 2014, Arlington, Virginia....

12

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Recycling of Wasted Energy : ThermalOF THE DISSERTATION Recycling of Wasted Energy : Thermal to

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Experimental and Analytical Studies on Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Harvesting Using Heat4 Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Harvesting Using RelaxorWaste heat Pyroelectric energy

Lee, Felix

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities |  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of EnergyofProject is onModelingFederal EnergyWaste Heat WasteDepartment of

15

WASTE-TO-ENERGY ROADMAPPING WORKSHOP | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

WASTE-TO-ENERGY ROADMAPPING WORKSHOP WASTE-TO-ENERGY ROADMAPPING WORKSHOP The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) at the Department of Energy aims to identify and address key...

16

California Energy Commission GUIDANCE ON WASTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California Energy Commission GUIDANCE GUIDANCE ON WASTE MANAGEMENT PLANS FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY) obtain waste management plans for each proposed project receiving funding under the Energy Efficiency of waste. The Energy Commission is providing the following guidance to assist recipients of EECBG Program

17

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Waste Treatment Baseline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership program (GNEP) is designed to demonstrate a proliferation-resistant and sustainable integrated nuclear fuel cycle that can be commercialized and used internationally. Alternative stabilization concepts for byproducts and waste streams generated by fuel recycling processes were evaluated and a baseline of waste forms was recommended for the safe disposition of waste streams. Waste forms are recommended based on the demonstrated or expected commercial practicability and technical maturity of the processes needed to make the waste forms, and performance of the waste form materials when disposed. Significant issues remain in developing technologies to process some of the wastes into the recommended waste forms, and a detailed analysis of technology readiness and availability may lead to the choice of a different waste form than what is recommended herein. Evolving regulations could also affect the selection of waste forms.

Dirk Gombert; William Ebert; James Marra; Robert Jubin; John Vienna

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Zero Waste, Renewable Energy & Environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Dioxins & Furans · The `State of Waste' in the US · WTE Technologies · Thermal Recycling ­ Turnkey dangerous wastes in the form of gases and ash, often creating entirely new hazards, like dioxins and furans

Columbia University

19

Waste to Energy: Biogas CHP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Southside Wastewater Treatment Plant Biogas Cogeneration Project November 9, 2011 2011 Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference ?Turning Waste Into Energy? What to Expect ? ? Southside Overview ? Wastewater Treatment Process... gallons per day ? Processes and disposes over 150 tons of solids/day from both of the City?s wastewater treatment plants What is Biogas? ? Biogas is the methane (CH4) produced as a by-product of the anaerobic digestion process at the Southside...

Wagner, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Energy from Waste November 4, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generation of renewable electrical power and/or steam U.S. EPA has stated that Energy from Waste is one Waste Combustion (MWC) Power plant that combusts MSW and other non-hazardous wastes as fuel/Covanta JV Own / operate 4 EfW facilities 5 #12;6 A typical Contains enough energy to power a 50 watt light

Columbia University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

ISWA Study Tour WASTE-TO-ENERGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Waste Treatment and Energy Recovery" Fundamentals of drying, pyrolysis, gasification, and combustionISWA Study Tour WASTE-TO-ENERGY Programme, June 22-27, 2014 Czech Republic Austria Seminar;Practice Seminar on Sustainable Waste Management in Europe based on Prevention, Recycling, Recovery

22

Energy and solid/hazardous waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the past and potential future solid and hazardous waste impacts from energy development, and summarizes the major environmental, legislation applicable to solid and hazardous waste generation and disposal. A glossary of terms and acronyms used to describe and measure solid waste impacts of energy development is included. (PSB)

None

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Transuranic (TRU) Waste | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Defined by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act as "waste containing more than 100 nanocuries of alpha-emitting...

24

EnergyEfficiency Energy:Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EnergyEfficiency­ Energy:Waste Copyright © 2012 by Taylor & Francis. All rights reserved equivalence; the c is the speed of light in a vacuum); thus, mass and energy are interrelated. Mass and energy cars and trains, and boats and planes. It bakes food and keeps it frozen for storage. Energy lights our

Kostic, Milivoje M.

25

COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF A WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT FOR MONTEVIDEO; AND WASTE TO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF A WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT FOR MONTEVIDEO; AND WASTE TO ENERGY IN SMALL-benefit analysis by the author of a waste to energy (WTE) plant in Montevideo, Uruguay; the second part are that it is the most proven waste- to-energy technology in the world, has demonstrated high plant availability (>90

26

Waste Minimization: A Hidden Energy Savings?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WASTE MINIMIZATION: A HIDDEN ENERGY SAVINGS? R. 1. GOOD Principal Engineer, Environmental Protection and Energy Union Carbide Chemicals & Plastics Company, Inc. Seadrift, Texas ABSTRACT Several changes in the last few years have forced a re...-examination of waste generation within the petro chemical industry. In today's political/regulatory arena, industrial waste, both hazardous and non hazardous, has become an extreme potential liability in handling, storing, and disposal. Traditional methods...

Good, R. L.; Hunt, K. E.

27

Waste-to-Energy Workshop Agenda  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) at the Department of Energy aims to identify and address key technical barriers to the commercial deployment of liquid transportation fuels from waste feedstocks. As a part of this effort, BETO is organizing a Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping workshop. Workshop participants will join facilitated breakout sessions to discuss anaerobic digestion, hydrothermal liquefaction, and other processes that make productive use of wastewater residuals, biosolids, foodstuffs, and organic municipal solid waste. These discussions will be synthesized and used in developing a waste-to-energy technology roadmap.

28

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solar radiation, and the geothermal energy. [16] Fig. 1.1.thermal energy, geothermal energy, wasted heat from athermal energy, geothermal energy, ocean thermal energy,

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biological thermal energy, geothermal energy, wasted heatpower plants, solar thermal energy, geothermal energy, oceansolar radiation, and the geothermal energy. [16] Fig. 1.1.

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Flexible Distributed Energy and Water from Waste for the Food...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Flexible Distributed Energy and Water from Waste for the Food and Beverage Industry - Fact Sheet, 2014 Flexible Distributed Energy and Water from Waste for the Food and Beverage...

31

Combined Heat and Power, Waste Heat, and District Energy | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Combined Heat and Power, Waste Heat, and District Energy Combined Heat and Power, Waste Heat, and District Energy Presentation-given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership...

32

Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop November 5, 2014 9:00AM EST to November 6, 2014 12:00PM EST DoubleTree Hotel Crystal City 300 Army Navy...

33

Tank Waste and Waste Processing | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

breakthrough immobilization technologies. Currently projects are focusing on: In-tank sludge washing at Hanford Enhanced waste processing at Idaho, Hanford, and Savannah River...

34

Energy Recovery from Municipal Solid WasteEnergy Recovery from Municipal Solid Waste WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT AT VIJAYAWADAWASTE TO ENERGY PLANT AT VIJAYAWADA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Recovery from Municipal Solid WasteEnergy Recovery from Municipal Solid Waste WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT AT VIJAYAWADAWASTE TO ENERGY PLANT AT VIJAYAWADA #12;UNIQUE PROCESSUNIQUE PROCESS DEVELOPED PRIMARY SIZE REDUCTION Stones / Inert Soil Enricher COARSE FLUFF SORTING Large stone, Tyres etc. HOT AIR

Columbia University

35

Energy aspects of solid waste management: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Eighteenth Annual Illinois Energy Conference entitled ``Energy Aspects of Solid Waste Management`` was held in Chicago, Illinois on October 29--30, 1990. The conference program was developed by a planning committee that drew upon Illinois energy and environmental specialists from the major sectors including energy industries, environmental organizations, research universities, utility companies, federal, state and local government agencies, and public interest groups. Within this framework, the committee identified a number of key topic areas surrounding solid waste management in Illinois which were the focus of the conference. These issues included: review of the main components of the solid waste cycle in the Midwest and what the relative impact of waste reduction, recycling, incineration and land disposal might be on Illinois` and the Midwest`s solid waste management program. Investigation of special programs in the Midwest dealing with sewage sludge, combustion residuals and medical/infectious wastes. Review of the status of existing landfills in Illinois and the Midwest and an examination of the current plans for siting of new land disposal systems. Review of the status of incinerators and waste-to-energy systems in Illinois and the Midwest, as well as an update on activities to maximize methane production from landfills in the Midwest.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

36

Fossil energy waste management. Technology status report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the current status and recent accomplishments of the Fossil Energy Waste Management (FE WM) projects sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The primary goal of the Waste Management Program is to identify and develop optimal strategies to manage solid by-products from advanced coal technologies for the purpose of ensuring the competitiveness of advanced coal technologies as a future energy source. The projects in the Fossil Energy Waste Management Program are divided into three types of activities: Waste Characterization, Disposal Technologies, and Utilization Technologies. This technology status report includes a discussion on barriers to increased use of coal by-products. Also, the major technical and nontechnical challenges currently being addressed by the FE WM program are discussed. A bibliography of 96 citations and a list of project contacts is included if the reader is interested in obtaining additional information about the FE WM program.

Bossart, S.J.; Newman, D.A.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

MHRC System Concept ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy Conversion, and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with...

38

The 2010 ERC Directory of Waste-to-Energy Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The 2010 ERC Directory of Waste-to-Energy Plants By Ted Michaels The 2010 ERC Directory of Waste-to-Energy Plants provides current information about the waste-to-energy sector in the United States. Since this Directory was last published in 2007, waste-to-energy capacity has increased for the first time in many

Columbia University

39

Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop Agenda  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste-to-Energy Workshop Agenda November 5-6, 2014 DoubleTree Hotel Crystal City Arlington, VA 22202 Day 1: Wednesday, November 5, 2014 Time Activity 7:30 am Registration and...

40

Tank Waste and Waste Processing | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR8, 2013 FINAL MEETING SUMMARY7,Tank Waste and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Radioactive Waste Radioactive Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Radioactive Waste at UF Bldg 831 392-8400 #12;Radioactive Waste · Program is designed to;Radioactive Waste · Program requires · Generator support · Proper segregation · Packaging · labeling #12;Radioactive Waste · What is radioactive waste? · Anything that · Contains · or is contaminated

Slatton, Clint

42

Assessment of Tire Technologies and Practices for Potential Waste and Energy Use Reductions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Practices for Potential Waste and Energy Use ReductionsPractices for Potential Waste and Energy Use Reductions Maythe study involving research on waste and energy saving tire

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Regnier, Justin; Burke, Andy; Melaina, Marc W; Bremson, Joel; Keteltas, Michael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

renewable energy from waste 1730 RHODE ISLAND AVENUE, NW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

renewable energy from waste 1730 RHODE ISLAND AVENUE, NW SUITE 700 WASHINGTON, DC 20036 WWW Energy and Security Act of 2009 that was released as a discussion draft on March 31. While waste-to-energy gas reductions and renewable energy provided by waste-to-energy and if it implemented policies

Columbia University

44

Identifying Energy Waste through Dense Power Sensing and Utilization Monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identifying Energy Waste through Dense Power Sensing and Utilization Monitoring Maria Kazandjieva the efficiency of such a computing system requires detailed data of both en- ergy consumption and energy waste to differentiate energy used well from energy waste. This is an important difference from pre- vious work [8, 14

Stanford University

45

Hydraulic waste energy recovery, Phase 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The energy required for booster station operation is supplied by the electrical utility company and has an associated cost. Energy removed by pressure reducing valves in the system is lost or wasted. The objective of this project is to capture the wasted hydraulic energy with in-line turbines. In this application, the in-line turbines act as pressure reducing valves while removing energy from the water distribution system and converting it to electrical energy. The North Service Center pumping station was selected for the pilot program due to the availability of a wide range in pressure drop and flow, which are necessary for hydraulic energy recovery. The research performed during this project resulted in documentation of technical, economic, installation, and operational information necessary for local government officials to make an informed judgement as it relates to in-line turbine generation.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Feasibility Study on Solid Waste to Energy Technological Aspects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feasibility Study on Solid Waste to Energy Technological Aspects Yuzhong Tan College of Engineering://www.funginstitute.berkeley.edu/sites/default/ les/SolidWasteToEnergy.pdf April 15, 2013 130 Blum Hall #5580 Berkeley, CA 94720-5580 | (510) 664 seeks to compare and evaluate each technology by reviewing waste to energy reports and seeking

Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

47

Camargo Waste to Energy Power Plant Hamed Zamenian1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Camargo Waste to Energy Power Plant Hamed Zamenian1 , Eminou Nasser 1 , Matt Ray2 , Tom Iseley3 1 and Technology, IUPUI The Camargo Waste to Energy Power plant project is being proposed to dispose of Municipal are discarded in landfills. The Camargo Waste to Energy (WTE) power station is an opportunity to continue

Zhou, Yaoqi

48

(www.wtert.gr) Waste-to-Energy Research &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ WTERT (www.wtert.gr) 1 Waste-to-Energy Research & Technology Council WTERT Greece ­ SYNERGIA Dr. Efstratios Kalogirou is the President of Waste-to-Energy Research & Technology Council (WTERT.S.A. (cooperating with Professor N. Themelis) , in the scientific fields: energy recovery from solid wastes, potable

49

Waste-To-Energy Feasibility Analysis: A Simulation Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste- To- Energy Feasibility Analysis: A Simulation Model Viet- An Duong College of Engineering://www.funginstitute.berkeley.edu/sites/default/ les/WasteToEnergy.pdf May 1, 2014 130 Blum Hall #5580 Berkeley, CA 94720-5580 | (510) 664-4337 | www of the main battles of our generation. Using waste to produce electricity can be a major source of energy

Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

50

Energy from Waste: A good practice guide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

including central and local Government, the public and professional waste managers. Since the publication of a more sustainable approach to waste management, involving public participation, greater levels new to municipal waste management, and drawing on good practice from the UK and overseas, I am sure

Columbia University

51

CEWEP -Confederation of European Waste-to-Energy Plants Boulevard Clovis 12A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CEWEP - Confederation of European Waste-to- Energy Plants Boulevard Clovis 12A B-1000 Brussels Tel energy from waste Waste-to-Energy A cost effective and reliable sustainable energy source Waste for additional renewable energy which can be exploited from municipal solid waste (MSW) and comparable waste

52

Energy utilization: municipal waste incineration. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An assessment is made of the technical and economical feasibility of converting municipal waste into useful and useable energy. The concept presented involves retrofitting an existing municipal incinerator with the systems and equipment necessary to produce process steam and electric power. The concept is economically attractive since the cost of necessary waste heat recovery equipment is usually a comparatively small percentage of the cost of the original incinerator installation. Technical data obtained from presently operating incinerators designed specifically for generating energy, documents the technical feasibility and stipulates certain design constraints. The investigation includes a cost summary; description of process and facilities; conceptual design; economic analysis; derivation of costs; itemized estimated costs; design and construction schedule; and some drawings.

LaBeck, M.F.

1981-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

53

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Climate protection in light of the· Waste Framework Directive. The "energy package", e.g. the RenewablesWASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource! energy forum Case Studies from Estonia, Switzerland, Germany Bossart,· ABB Waste-to-Energy Plants Edmund Fleck,· ESWET Marcel van Berlo,· Afval Energie Bedrijf From

Columbia University

54

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012NuclearBradley Nickell02-03 AUDITMotionWhenStatus andWaste

55

Transuranic Waste Tabletop | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012 Greenbuy3 Archive Transportation Fact ofATEnergyWaste

56

CHP, Waste Heat & District Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Applications 25 Oct 11 Today's Electric Grid What is CHP * ASHRAE Handbook: "Combined heat and power (CHP). Simultaneous production of electrical or mechanical energy and...

57

Waste Management | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomenthe House Committee onsupports high impact projectsMatt8 Image: Nuclear Materials

58

Waste Management | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomenthe House Committee onsupports high impact projectsMatt8 Image: Nuclear

59

Waste Processing | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomenthe House Committee onsupports high impact projectsMatt8 Image: NuclearWorkers

60

Solid Waste as an Energy Source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. PROCESS The solLd waste energy conversion system bullt by Kelley Company consists of a combustion unit and an energy recovery boLler. The combustion unit uses a two stage process; the refuse is fLrst converted to gases by a pyrolysis process... wlll be conslderably lower than the temperature that woulq be achleved If stoichiometrlc air to fuel ratlo was malntained. The resulting temperatures In the pyrolysis chamber ranges from 1200 0 to 1500 o P. The low a lr lnput, as compared wlth...

Erlandsson, K. I.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Waste Disposal | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface.Laboratory30,WP-073.99 4.22

62

Energy Secretary Bodman Statement on Hanford Solid Waste Settlement...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Mike Waldron, 202586-4940 Addthis Related Articles Agreement on New Commitments for Hanford Tank Waste Cleanup Sent to Federal Judge Energy Secretary Chu, EPA Administrator...

63

Wilders Grove Solid Waste Services Center | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Grove Solid Waste Services Center Project objective: Provide demonstration of Geothermal Heat Pumps viability on energy usage for future Service Centers planned by the City of...

64

Flexible Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for the Food ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Water from Waste for the Food and Beverage Industry - Fact Sheet, 2014 2011 CHPIndustrial Distributed Energy R&D Portfolio Review - Summary Report Biogas Opportunities Roadmap...

65

Waste utilization as an energy source: Municipal wastes. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the utilization of municipal wastes as an energy source. Articles discuss energy derived from incineration/combustion, refuse-derived fuels, co-firing municipal waste and standard fuels, landfill gas production, sewage combustion, and other waste-to-energy technologies. Citations address economics and efficiencies of various schemes to utilize municipal waste products as energy sources. (Contains a minimum of 130 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Waste Heat Energy Harvesting Using Olsen Cycle on PZN-5.5PT Single Crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy converter for waste heat energy harvesting using co-L. Pyroelectric waste heat energy harvesting using heatNo.3, pp.035015, 2012. WASTE HEAT ENERGY HARVESTING USING

McKinley, Ian Meeker; Kandilian, Razmig; Pilon, Laurent

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Waste Heat Energy Harvesting Using Olsen Cycle on PZN-5.5PT Single Crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy converter for waste heat energy harvesting using co-Pilon, L. Pyroelectric waste heat energy harvesting usingNo.3, pp.035015, 2012. WASTE HEAT ENERGY HARVESTING USING

McKinley, Ian Meeker; Kandilian, Razmig; Pilon, Laurent

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Haiti: Feasibility of Waste-to-Energy Options at the Trutier Waste Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides further analysis of the feasibility of a waste-to-energy (WTE) facility in the area near Port-au-Prince, Haiti. NREL's previous analysis and reports identified anaerobic digestion (AD) as the optimal WTE technology at the facility. Building on the prior analyses, this report evaluates the conceptual financial and technical viability of implementing a combined waste management and electrical power production strategy by constructing a WTE facility at the existing Trutier waste site north of Port-au-Prince.

Conrad, M. D.; Hunsberger, R.; Ness, J. E.; Harris, T.; Raibley, T.; Ursillo, P.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Waste To Energy -Strategies and Payoffs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, expanding the steam through back pressure turbines to generate electricity. Some plants used to gen erate so much power through cogeneration and hydro that they became power companies also. The hard ware involved in this type of cogeneration system has... the wastes to make steam? The answer is that under some circumstances the cost of the electric generation equipment would be marginally unattrac tive, but for the majority of American industry, the design of new waste to steam facilities should include...

Gilbert, J. S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Radioactive Waste Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish policies and guidelines by which the Department of Energy (DOE) manages tis radioactive waste, waste byproducts, and radioactively contaminated surplus facilities.

1984-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

71

WASTE-TO-ENERGY RESEARCH & TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL www.wtert.gr PRESS RELEASE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WASTE-TO-ENERGY RESEARCH & TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL www.wtert.gr 1 PRESS RELEASE INTERNATIONAL INTENSIVE COURSE " Waste to Energy as an Integral Part of Sustainable Waste Management Worldwide: The case of Baku event focus on state of the art technologies for sustainable waste management, entitled "Waste to Energy

72

Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) is to provide an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive-waste storage facility or disposal repository. Achieving the objective of modeling the performance of a disposal scenario requires describing processes involved in waste form degradation and radionuclide release at the subcontinuum scale, beginning with mechanistic descriptions of chemical reactions and chemical kinetics at the atomic scale, and upscaling into effective, validated constitutive models for input to high-fidelity continuum scale codes for coupled multiphysics simulations of release and transport. Verification and validation (V&V) is required throughout the system to establish evidence-based metrics for the level of confidence in M&S codes and capabilities, including at the subcontiunuum scale and the constitutive models they inform or generate. This Report outlines the nature of the V&V challenge at the subcontinuum scale, an approach to incorporate V&V concepts into subcontinuum scale modeling and simulation (M&S), and a plan to incrementally incorporate effective V&V into subcontinuum scale M&S destined for use in the NEAMS Waste IPSC work flow to meet requirements of quantitative confidence in the constitutive models informed by subcontinuum scale phenomena.

Schultz, Peter Andrew

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Energy Management by Recycling of Vehicle Waste Oil in Pakistan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract: Pakistan has been suffering from an energy crisis for about half a decade now. The power crisis is proving to be unbearable, so importing huge amount of hydrocarbons from abroad to meet its energy needs. This study therefore focuses on the analysis of energy and environmental benefits for vehicle waste lubricant oil pertaining to its reuse by means of: (i) regain the heating value of used oils in a combustion process and (ii) recycling of waste oil to make fresh oil products. The waste oil samples were tested by ICP method and the test results were compared with standard requirements. It was found that the matter could effectively be solved by means of waste oil management practices together with collection centers, transports and processors by encouraging and financial help for the recycling industry. The importance and worth of this work concludes minor levels of hazardous elements when regained the heating value from the waste lubricating oil.

Hassan Ali Durrani

74

Waste Management Improvement Initiatives at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited - 13091  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL) Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) has been in operation for over 60 years. Radioactive, mixed, hazardous and non-hazardous wastes have been and continue to be generated at CRL as a result of research and development, radioisotope production, reactor operation and facility decommissioning activities. AECL has implemented several improvement initiatives at CRL to simplify the interface between waste generators and waste receivers: - Introduction of trained Waste Officers representing their facilities or activities at CRL; - Establishment of a Waste Management Customer Support Service as a Single-Point of Contact to provide guidance to waste generators for all waste management processes; and - Implementation of a streamlined approach for waste identification with emphasis on early identification of waste types and potential disposition paths. As a result of implementing these improvement initiatives, improvements in waste management and waste transfer efficiencies have been realized at CRL. These included: 1) waste generators contacting the Customer Support Service for information or guidance instead of various waste receivers; 2) more clear and consistent guidance provided to waste generators for waste management through the Customer Support Service; 3) more consistent and correct waste information provided to waste receivers through Waste Officers, resulting in reduced time and resources required for waste management (i.e., overall cost); 4) improved waste minimization and segregation approaches, as identified by in-house Waste Officers; and 5) enhanced communication between waste generators and waste management groups. (authors)

Chan, Nicholas; Adams, Lynne; Wong, Pierre [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)] [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Energy Policy 33 (2005) 16911702 Paradise recovered: energy production and waste management in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Policy 33 (2005) 1691­1702 Paradise recovered: energy production and waste management the conclusions of a previous study by the authors regarding the competitiveness of waste-to-energy (WTE in the earlier study and the island is currently seeking to modernize its energy production and waste management

Columbia University

76

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top Five EEREDepartment ofEnergyEnergyBetterMake Fuels andBiodiesel

77

www.d-waste.com info@d-waste.com  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the International Solid Waste Association, GIZ/SWEEP-Net, the Waste to Energy Research Council (WTERT) and the Solidwww.d-waste.com info@d-waste.com Acharnon 141 10446 ATHENS GREECE T: +30 2155302449 F: +30 2155302447 For Release November 13, 2013 Waste Atlas shows how the world handles its refuse D-Waste

78

Energy Conservation and Waste Reduction in the Metal Fabrication Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reductions of energy use and waste generation can help manufacturers to be more profitable and more environmentally acceptable. Industrial Assessment Centers located at universities throughout the United States, funded by the U.S. Department...

Kirk, M. C. Jr.; Looby, G. P.

79

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waste (i.e, mixture of biohazardous and chemical or radioactive waste), call Environment, Health2/2009 Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 200 West Arbor Dr. San Diego, CA 92103 (619

Tsien, Roger Y.

80

The Conversion of Waste to Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology Conference Houston, TX, April 13-16, 1980 and 10% combustibles (hydrogen and hydro carbons) is incinerated at 1400?F. ~ecause of the quantity of inerts, supplemental natural gas firing with a grid burner is required to maintain the required... thermocouples. A Wobbe index analyzer compensates fuel gas flow measure ment for changes in composition. A three element feedwater control system maintai~s water level. Modular, controlled air solid waste incinerators/heat recovery systems are now...

John, T.; Cheek, L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

WasteTraining Booklet Waste & Recycling Impacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WasteTraining Booklet #12;Waste & Recycling Impacts Environment: The majority of our municipal jobs while recycling 10,000 tons of waste creates 36 jobs. Environment: Recycling conserves resources. It takes 95% less energy to make aluminum from recycled aluminum than from virgin materials, 60% less

Saldin, Dilano

82

Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of EnergyofProject is onModelingFederal EnergyWaste Heat Waste Heat - -Waste

83

Energy implications of the thermal recovery of biodegradable municipal waste materials in the United Kingdom  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: > Energy balances were calculated for the thermal treatment of biodegradable wastes. > For wood and RDF, combustion in dedicated facilities was the best option. > For paper, garden and food wastes and mixed waste incineration was the best option. > For low moisture paper, gasification provided the optimum solution. - Abstract: Waste management policies and legislation in many developed countries call for a reduction in the quantity of biodegradable waste landfilled. Anaerobic digestion, combustion and gasification are options for managing biodegradable waste while generating renewable energy. However, very little research has been carried to establish the overall energy balance of the collection, preparation and energy recovery processes for different types of wastes. Without this information, it is impossible to determine the optimum method for managing a particular waste to recover renewable energy. In this study, energy balances were carried out for the thermal processing of food waste, garden waste, wood, waste paper and the non-recyclable fraction of municipal waste. For all of these wastes, combustion in dedicated facilities or incineration with the municipal waste stream was the most energy-advantageous option. However, we identified a lack of reliable information on the energy consumed in collecting individual wastes and preparing the wastes for thermal processing. There was also little reliable information on the performance and efficiency of anaerobic digestion and gasification facilities for waste.

Burnley, Stephen, E-mail: s.j.burnley@open.ac.uk [Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Phillips, Rhiannon, E-mail: rhiannon.jones@environment-agency.gov.uk [Strategy Unit, Welsh Assembly Government, Ty Cambria, 29 Newport Road, Cardiff CF24 0TP (United Kingdom); Coleman, Terry, E-mail: terry.coleman@erm.com [Environmental Resources Management Ltd, Eaton House, Wallbrook Court, North Hinksey Lane, Oxford OX2 0QS (United Kingdom); Rampling, Terence, E-mail: twa.rampling@hotmail.com [7 Thurlow Close, Old Town Stevenage, Herts SG1 4SD (United Kingdom)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

84

Waste-to-Energy | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of| Department of EnergyDepartmentDepartmentofTechnologiesusing Fuel

85

Municipal solid waste combustion: Waste-to-energy technologies, regulations, and modern facilities in USEPA Region V  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Table of Contents: Incinerator operations (Waste preprocessing, combustion, emissions characterization and emission control, process monitoring, heat recovery, and residual ash management); Waste-to-energy regulations (Permitting requirements and operating regulations on both state and Federal levels); Case studies of EPA Region V waste-to-energy facilities (Polk County, Minnesota; Jackson County, Michigan; La Crosse, Wisconsin; Kent County, Michigan; Elk River, Minnesota; Indianapolis, Indiana); Evaluation; and Conclusions.

Sullivan, P.M.; Hallenbeck, W.H.; Brenniman, G.R.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Zero Waste Plc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 South Place:ReferenceEditWisconsin:YBR SolarZe-gen Jump to:ZebotecWaste Plc

87

Radioactive mixed waste disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various types of waste have been generated during the 50-year history of the Hanford Site. Regulatory changes in the last 20 years have provided the emphasis for better management of these wastes. Interpretations of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA), and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) have led to the definition of radioactive mixed wastes (RMW). The radioactive and hazardous properties of these wastes have resulted in the initiation of special projects for the management of these wastes. Other solid wastes at the Hanford Site include low-level wastes, transuranic (TRU), and nonradioactive hazardous wastes. This paper describes a system for the treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of solid radioactive waste.

Jasen, W.G.; Erpenbeck, E.G.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Waste-to-Energy 25 Years Later: Technology with a Past, Present  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solution Quite a Ride: UpsQuite a Ride: Ups MacArthur Resource Recovery Facility Islip, New York #12; Waste-to-energy Falls, New York #12; European Union: waste-to- energy preferable to landfills European Union directives and Consulting Federation of New York Solid Waste Associations Solid Waste/Recycling Conference Federation of New

Columbia University

89

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 534) and identity of liquid waste Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 534

Tsien, Roger Y.

90

High efficiency waste to energy facility -- Pilot plant design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste To Energy facilities are commonly acceptable to the environment and give benefits in two main areas: one is a hygienic waste disposal and another is waste heat energy recovery to save fossil fuel consumption. Recovered energy is used for electricity supply, and it is required to increase the efficiency of refuse to electric energy conversion, and to spread the plant construction throughout the country of Japan, by the government. The national project started in 1992, and pilot plant design details were established in 1995. The objective of the project is to get 30% of energy conversion efficiency through the measure by raising the steam temperature and pressure to 500 C and 9.8 MPa respectively. The pilot plant is operating under the design conditions, which verify the success of applied technologies. This paper describes key technologies which were used to design the refuse burning boiler, which generates the highest steam temperature and pressure steam.

Orita, Norihiko; Kawahara, Yuuzou; Takahashi, Kazuyoshi; Yamauchi, Toru; Hosoda, Takuo

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Energy implications of integrated solid waste management systems. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study develops estimates of energy use and recovery from managing municipal solid waste (MSW) under various collection, processing, and disposal scenarios. We estimate use and recovery -- or energy balance -- resulting from MSW management activities such as waste collection, transport, processing, and disposal, as well as indirect use and recovery linked to secondary materials manufacturing using recycled materials. In our analysis, secondary materials manufacturing displaces virgin materials manufacturing for 13 representative products. Energy implications are expressed as coefficients that measure the net energy saving (or use) of displacing products made from virgin versus recycled materials. Using data developed for the 1992 New York City Master Plan as a starting point, we apply our method to an analysis of various collection systems and 30 types of facilities to illustrate bow energy balances shift as management systems are modified. In sum, all four scenarios show a positive energy balance indicating the energy and advantage of integrated systems versus reliance on one or few technology options. That is, energy produced or saved exceeds the energy used to operate the solid waste system. The largest energy use impacts are attributable to processing, including materials separation and composting. Collection and transportation energy are relatively minor contributors. The largest two contributors to net energy savings are waste combustion and energy saved by processing recycled versus virgin materials. An accompanying spatial analysis methodology allocates energy use and recovery to New York City, New York State outside the city, the U.S., and outside the U.S. Our analytical approach is embodied in a spreadsheet model that can be used by energy and solid waste analysts to estimate impacts of management scenarios at the state and substate level.

Little, R.E.; McClain, G.; Becker, M.; Ligon, P.; Shapiro, K.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Hazardous Waste Program (Alabama)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This rule states criteria for identifying the characteristics of hazardous waste and for listing hazardous waste, lists of hazardous wastes, standards for the management of hazardous waste and...

93

Dow's Energy/WRAP Contest- A 12-Yr Energy and Waste Reduction Success Story  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOW'S ENERGY/WRAP CONTEST A 12-YR ENERGY AND WASTE REDUCTION SUCCESS STORY Kenneth E. Nelson, Manager, Energy Conservation, Dow U.S.A. ABSTRACT Keeping employees interested in saving energy and reducing waste is a constant challenge. Ideally... conservation program in 1981. It took the form of an annual Contest. In 1983, the Contest scope was expanded to included yield improvement, and in 1987, Dow's WRAP (Waste Reduction Always Pays) program was added. The Contest has been enormously successful...

Nelson, K. E.

94

Waste Energy Analysis Recovery for a Typical Food Processing Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An energy analysis made for the Joan of Arc Food Processing Plant in St. Francisville, Louisiana indicated that a significant quantity of waste heat energy was being released to the atmosphere in the forms of low quality steam and hot flue gases...

Miller, P. H.; Mann, L., Jr.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Recovery of Energy and Chrome from Leather Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compounds can result in a saving of some 25 million dollars per year for the industry. The paper presents a pyrolysis method for handling leather tanning wastes to recover energy and chromium compounds for use in the tanning process. Energy and cost savings...

Muralidhara, H. S.; Maggin, B.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Water and Energy Wasted During Residential Shower Events: Findings from a Pilot Field Study of Hot Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

study to determine waste of water and energy in residential30 percent. The average waste of energy in the hot water ispaper examines the waste of water and energy associated with

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Pilot Phase of a Field Study to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in Residential Hot-Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

understanding the waste of energy and water in residentialStudy to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in ResidentialStudy to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in Residential

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

CEWEP -Confederation of European Waste-to-Energy Plants Boulevard Clovis 12A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CEWEP - Confederation of European Waste-to- Energy Plants Boulevard Clovis 12A B-1000 Brussels Tel. : +32 (0)2 770 63 11 Fax : +32 (0)2 770 68 14 info@cewep.eu www.cewep.eu 1 Waste-to-Energy: towards recovery CEWEP welcomes that `energy recovery' should cover the use of waste for generating energy through

Columbia University

99

U.S. Department of Energy to Host Press Call on Radioactive Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Department of Energy to Host Press Call on Radioactive Waste Shipment and Disposal U.S. Department of Energy to Host Press Call on Radioactive Waste Shipment and Disposal November...

100

Proceedings of NAWTEC16 16th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of NAWTEC16 16th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference May 19-21, 2008 Proceedings of NAWTEC16 16th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference May 19-21, 2008, Philadelphia

Columbia University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Overview: 2011 Waste-to-Energy Using...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Overview: 2011 Waste-to-Energy Using Fuel Cells Workshop DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Overview: 2011 Waste-to-Energy Using Fuel Cells Workshop Presentation...

102

Waste incineration and the community -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

strategy followed by the operator of Amsterdam's waste-to- energy plant has convinced the public and other growing amounts of waste In 1992, the City of Amsterdam created Afval Energie Bedrijf (AEB), a waste-to-energy as much energy and materials as possible from municipal waste while protecting the environment. It seeks

Columbia University

103

Mixed Waste Focus Area: Department of Energy complex needs report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) at the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a new approach in August of 1993 to environmental research and technology development. A key feature of this new approach included establishment of the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (MWFA). The mission of the MWFA is to identify, develop, and implement needed technologies such that the major environmental management problems related to meeting DOE`s commitments for treatment of mixed wastes under the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCA), and in accordance with the Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), can be addressed, while cost-effectively expending the funding resources. To define the deficiencies or needs of the EM customers, the MWFA analyzed Proposed Site Treatment Plans (PSTPs), as well as other applicable documents, and conducted site visits throughout the summer of 1995. Representatives from the Office of Waste Management (EM-30), the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and the Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60) at each site visited were requested to consult with the Focus Area to collaboratively define their technology needs. This report documents the needs, deficiencies, technology gaps, and opportunities for expedited treatment activities that were identified during the site visit process. The defined deficiencies and needs are categorized by waste type, namely Wastewaters, Combustible Organics, Sludges/Soils, Debris/Solids, and Unique Wastes, and will be prioritized based on the relative affect the deficiency has on the DOE Complex.

Roach, J.A.

1995-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

104

Energy from Waste: Preparing Today for Tomorrow's Energy Needs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

--has been a pioneer in the research and development of resource recovery systems. Work in the areas of pyrolysis, froth flotation for glass recovery and eddy current separation for aluminum recovery has been sponsored for many years. Occidental in 1977...-8. 9. J. W. Regan, J. F. Mullen, R. D. Nickerson, "Suspension Firing of Solid Waste Fuels," American Power Conference, 1969. 10. L. J. Westin, "Spreader Stoker Steam Generators Combined with Industrial Waste Incineration," ASME Grates...

Krueger, R. P.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Recovery | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of EnergyofProject is onModelingFederal EnergyWaste Heat Waste Heat - - to to -

106

Waste-to-Energy Evaluation: U.S. Virgin Islands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This NREL technical report evaluates the environmental impact and fundamental economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) technology based on available data from commercially operating WTE facilities in the United States. In particular, it considers life-cycle impacts of WTE as compared to landfill disposal and various forms of electrical generation, as well as WTE impacts on source reduction or recycling programs. In addition, it evaluates the economics and potential environmental impact of WTE in the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) based on existing USVI waste stream characterization data, recycling challenges unique to the USVI, and the results of cost and environmental modeling of four municipal solid waste (MSW) management options, including landfill, refuse-derived fuel (RDF) production, recycling, and gassification plus RDF.

Davis, J.; Hasse, S.; Warren, A.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Waste-to-energy: Decision making and the decisions made  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the early 1980s, it was projected that waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities would manage as much as half of all municipal solid waste by the turn of the century. However, during the latter part of the 1980s, the cancellation rate for WTE facilities grew to the point that the portion of the waste stream WTE will handle in the long-term future is less certain. This study, conducted as part of a larger study, identifies factors that influence municipalities, decisions regarding WTE. This study takes a broad perspective about decision-making within communities, emphasizing the context within which decisions were made and the decision-making process. It does not seek to judge the correctness of the decisions.

Schexnayder, S.M. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)); Wolfe, A.K. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Waste-to-energy: Decision making and the decisions made  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the early 1980s, it was projected that waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities would manage as much as half of all municipal solid waste by the turn of the century. However, during the latter part of the 1980s, the cancellation rate for WTE facilities grew to the point that the portion of the waste stream WTE will handle in the long-term future is less certain. This study, conducted as part of a larger study, identifies factors that influence municipalities, decisions regarding WTE. This study takes a broad perspective about decision-making within communities, emphasizing the context within which decisions were made and the decision-making process. It does not seek to judge the correctness of the decisions.

Schexnayder, S.M. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States); Wolfe, A.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Waste to Energy Power Production at DOE and DOD Sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste to Energy Power Production at DOE and DOD Sites January 13, 2011 #12;Overview ­ Federal renewable ESPC Largest biomassoperation in Federal government #12;BiomassAvailability in U.S. Ameresco logo Agency Innovations DOE: Savannah River Site · BiomassHeat and Power USAF: Hill Air Force Base · Landfill

110

SMALL SCALE WASTE-TO-ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES Claudine Ellyin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in operation. The investigation included both existing grate combustion plants and novel processes. The Energos grate gasification and combustion technology is currently in operation at six plants in Norway1 SMALL SCALE WASTE-TO-ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES Claudine Ellyin Advisor: Prof. Nickolas J. Themelis

111

Hydraulic waste energy recovery, Phase 2. A technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The energy required for booster station operation is supplied by the electrical utility company and has an associated cost. Energy removed by pressure reducing valves in the system is lost or wasted. The objective of this project is to capture the wasted hydraulic energy with in-line turbines. In this application, the in-line turbines act as pressure reducing valves while removing energy from the water distribution system and converting it to electrical energy. The North Service Center pumping station was selected for the pilot program due to the availability of a wide range in pressure drop and flow, which are necessary for hydraulic energy recovery. The research performed during this project resulted in documentation of technical, economic, installation, and operational information necessary for local government officials to make an informed judgement as it relates to in-line turbine generation.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of solid and liquid wastes generated at mushroom producing facilities. Environmental guidelines#12;MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT PHASE I: AUDIT OF CURRENT PRACTICE The Mushroom Waste Management Project (MWMP) was initiated by Environment Canada, the BC Ministry

113

THE INSIDE-OUT APPROACH FOR IDENTIFYING INDUSTRIAL ENERGY AND WASTE REDUCTION OPPORTUNITIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE INSIDE-OUT APPROACH FOR IDENTIFYING INDUSTRIAL ENERGY AND WASTE REDUCTION OPPORTUNITIES Kelly Traditional approaches for reducing energy and waste in industrial processes typically focus on improving and more apparent to us. In our experience, this approach for reducing energy use and waste generation

Kissock, Kelly

114

Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Correspondence with the Department of Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

85 Appendix E Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Correspondence with the Department of Energy #12;#12;Appendix E 87 Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Correspondence with the Department of Energy I n of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The letters typically provide

115

Press Release Von Roll Inova to build the UK's largest energy-from-waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and regenerative heat recovery is used to boost the plant's overall energy efficiency. The majority of the wastePress Release Von Roll Inova to build the UK's largest energy-from-waste plant Zürich, September, 1 Roll Inova will build the UK's largest energy-from-waste facility. The contract is worth approximately

Columbia University

116

PowerNet: Energy Use & Energy Waste powernet.stanford.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PowerNet: Energy Use & Energy Waste powernet.stanford.edu 345,281 kWh $ 36,255 Device Type Measured lights, etc. Current Energy Use of Computing Systems Monday: Holiday What About Waste? Network Traffic on Core Switches Label Switch Type Active Ports (gigabit each) Data trace (# days) a HP 5412zl 120 150 b

Levis, Philip

117

UPGRADING OF WASTE-TO-ENERGY PLANT IN BRESCIA, ITALY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and district heating, gas supply, waste collection, treatment and disposal, and wastewa- ter treatment. Brescia was one of the first cities to have a well-established district heating net- work. Today, the waste

Columbia University

118

The role of waste-to-energy in integrated waste management: A life cycle assessment perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) management has become a major issue in terms of environmental impacts. It has become the focus of local, state and federal regulations, which generally tend to promote the reduce/re-use/recycle/incinerate/landfill environmental hierarchy. At the same time, the Waste Industry capital requirements have increased in order of magnitude since the beginning of the 80`s. The driving forces of further capital requirements for the Waste Management Industry will be the impact of public policies set today and goals set by politicians. Therefore, it appears extremely important for the Waste Industry to correctly analyze and forecast the real environmental and financial costs of waste management practices in order to: discuss with the local, state and federal agencies on more rational grounds; forecast the right investments in new technologies (recycling networks and plants, incinerators with heat recovery, modern landfill). The aim of this paper is to provide an example of a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) project in the waste management field that raised surprising issues on otherwise unchallenged waste management practices.

Besnainou, J. [Ecobalance, Rockville, MD (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

119

Waste-to-Energy Cogeneration Project, Centennial Park  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste-to-Energy Cogeneration Project at Centennial Park has allowed methane from the closed Centennial landfill to export excess power into the the local utilitys electric grid for resale. This project is part of a greater brownfield reclamation project to the benefit of the residents of Munster and the general public. Installation of a gas-to-electric generator and waste-heat conversion unit take methane byproduct and convert it into electricity at the rate of about 103,500 Mwh/year for resale to the local utility. The sale of the electricity will be used to reduce operating budgets by covering the expenses for streetlights and utility bills. The benefits of such a project are not simply financial. Munsters Waste-to Energy Cogeneration Project at Centennial Park will reduce the communitys carbon footprint in an amount equivalent to removing 1,100 cars from our roads, conserving enough electricity to power 720 homes, planting 1,200 acres of trees, or recycling 2,000 tons of waste instead of sending it to a landfill.

Johnson, Clay; Mandon, Jim; DeGiulio, Thomas; Baker, Ryan

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

120

Waste Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface.Laboratory30,WP-073.99 4.22PrimaryWaste

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Nanjing Green Waste Recovery Engineering Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3Informationof Energy Calculator29 JumpNamaNanjing Green Waste

122

Waste to energy: The case of the Bolzano solid urban waste incineration plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the most demanding problems of waste management was that of finding the means and the technology for converting, neutralizing and disposing of the refuse, without disturbing the delicate ecological equilibrium of the soil, water and air. Today, this problem is handled with the latest refuse incineration and Snamprogetti's combustion residue purification technologies, which in addition to substantial energy returns, also provide sufficient assurance of efficiency as well as health and environmental safety. In the present state of the art, these technologies make it possible to cut down on the use of dumps and landfills. In fact, such technologies permit to obtain an extremely small volume of inert residues, as well as very low dust and hydrochloric acid levels, and an infinitesimal concentration of micropollutants in the atmospheric emissions. Experience has shown that non-polluting incineration of unrecoverable wastes is feasible and the electricity obtained from the combustion heat is more than enough to run the plant and can be sold making the operation advantageous in economic terms. On the basis of this philosophy Snamprogetti designed and built an incineration at Bolzano on 1994, which was expanded in 1996 with a second line, for a total operating potential of 400 t/d of wastes. The plant included a heat recovery line with a steam boiler and a turbogenerator for the production of electricity. The steam turbine driving the generator could operate partly in the condensation mode, and partly in the bleeding mode to produce both electricity and steam. Implementation of the integrated program made provision for employment of the bled off steam to produce superheated water to feed the city's district heating network. A detailed assessment of the characteristics of the plant and its environmental efficiency is presented.

Nicolai, H.G.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Current MSW Management and Waste-to-Energy Status in the Republic of Korea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(WTE) in Korea and the potential for improvement. Despite growth of per capita GDP of nearly 501 Current MSW Management and Waste-to-Energy Status in the Republic of Korea By Yoonjung Seo of the generally accepted hierarchy of waste management. The study also investigated the status of waste-to-energy

Columbia University

124

Ris DTU 09-06-08 Waste-to-energy technologies in TIMES models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(focusing on Denmark) Long tradition for waste incineration for district heating How to model waste that supply base-load district heating. #12;Ris DTU 09-06-08 13 Modelling new Waste for Energy Technologies station for households and businesses. Some electricity is generated, but most energy is used for district

125

Waste to energy facilities. (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning technical, economic, and environmental evaluations of facilities that convert waste to energy. Solid waste and municipal waste conversion facilities are highlighted. Feasibility studies, technical design, emissions studies, and markets for the resulting energy are discussed. Heat and electrical generation facilities are emphasized. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Waste to energy facilities. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning technical, economic, and environmental evaluations of facilities that convert waste to energy. Solid waste and municipal waste conversion facilities are highlighted. Feasibility studies, technical design, emissions studies, and markets for the resulting energy are discussed. Heat and electrical generation facilities are emphasized. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Waste to energy facilities. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning technical, economic, and environmental evaluations of facilities that convert waste to energy. Solid waste and municipal waste conversion facilities are highlighted. Feasibility studies, technical design, emissions studies, and markets for the resulting energy are discussed. Heat and electrical generation facilities are emphasized. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

T:\\013.ffentlichkeitsarbeit\\05.Vortrge\\32.NAWTEC 11 Florida 2003\\A_Ways to Improve the Efficiency of Waste to Energy Plants.doc Ways to Improve the Efficiency of Waste to Energy Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Waste to Energy Plants.doc Ways to Improve the Efficiency of Waste to Energy Plants for the Production@mvr-hh.de Abstract Up to now the emissions of waste-to-energy plants have been of major concern for the operators about CO2 reductions the efficiency of today's Waste to Energy (WTE) plants should be improved, even

Columbia University

129

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Activites | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation | Department of EnergyDepartmentEnergy WRPSWasteActivites Waste

130

Waste Management in Dsseldorf Combination of separate collection,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste Management in Düsseldorf Combination of separate collection, recycling and waste-to-energy Biowaste Garden waste Light packaging Paper Glass Wood from bulky waste Bulky waste Rest / mixed waste Bio- Garden- Paper Glass Light Metals Wood Bulky Rest waste waste Card- Pack. waste board Saved CO2

Columbia University

131

Future waste treatment and energy systems examples of joint scenarios  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Approach for use of scenarios dealing with both waste management and energy issues. Overall scenarios for the common project and sub-scenarios in parts of the project. Combining different types of scenarios to the tools of different disciplines. Use of explorative external scenarios based on marginals for consequential LCA. - Abstract: Development and use of scenarios for large interdisciplinary projects is a complicated task. This article provides practical examples of how it has been carried out in two projects addressing waste management and energy issues respectively. Based on experiences from the two projects, recommendations are made for an approach concerning development of scenarios in projects dealing with both waste management and energy issues. Recommendations are given to develop and use overall scenarios for the project and leave room for sub-scenarios in parts of the project. Combining different types of scenarios is recommended, too, in order to adapt to the methods and tools of different disciplines, such as developing predictive scenarios with general equilibrium tools and analysing explorative scenarios with energy system analysis tools. Furthermore, as marginals identified in differing future background systems determine the outcomes of consequential life cycle assessments (LCAs), it is considered advisable to develop and use explorative external scenarios based on possible marginals as a framework for consequential LCAs. This approach is illustrated using an on-going Danish research project.

Mnster, M., E-mail: maem@dtu.dk [System Analysis Division, DTU Management Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Finnveden, G. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and the Built Environment, Department of Planning and Environment, Division of Environmental Strategies Research fms, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Wenzel, H. [Institute of Chemical Engineering, Biotechnology and Environmental Technology, University of Southern Denmark, Niels Bohrs All 1, 5230 Odense M (Denmark)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

132

Wasted Wind  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

why turbulent airflows are causing power losses and turbine failures in America's wind farms-and what to do about it April 1, 2014 Wasted Wind This aerial photo of Denmark's Horns...

133

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Nitrate Salt Bearing Waste Container  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Energy (DOE) and Nuclear Waste Partnership LLC (NWP), collectively referred to as the Permittees Isolation Plan (Plan) for identified nitrate salt bearing waste disposed in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant detailed proposal for the expedited closure of underground Hazardous Waste Disposal Unit (HWDU) Panel 6, so

Napp, Nils

134

EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy CooperationRequirementsDraft Environmental ImpactEM Active Sitesof Energy WasteOnEM

135

London Waste and Recycling Board | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(Monaster AndLittletown, Arizona:Lockland, Ohio:London Waste and

136

Incineration versus gasification: A comparison in waste to energy plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste thermodestruction has obvious advantages; nevertheless, it encounters problems not very easy to solve, such as those related to gas cleaning and to restricting standards for emission control. One important aspect is the possibility of heat recovery with production of valuable energy such as electric energy. A new technology, at least as far as its application to waste disposal (mainly municipal waste) is concerned, is represented by gasification. It becomes interesting to establish a comparison between this new technology and the traditional one. This comparison does not appear, however, to be very simple, since for gasification only few documented experiments can be found, and these are often difficult to relate to a common evaluation factor. The present paper describes the state of the art of the traditional technology in the thermodestruction field to define a comparison basis. Then, a general discussion is given for the gasification technology, emphasizing different possible solutions to allow for a quantitative evaluation. At last the various aspects of the problem (related to plant, environment, energy, economics, etc.) are specifically compared for the purpose of finding elements which allow for a quantitative evaluation or for emphasizing parameters useful for a final choice.

Ghezzi, U.; Pasini, S.; Ferri, L.D.A. [Politecnico di Milano (Italy). Dipt. di Energetica

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

137

Anaerobic Co-digestion of Brown Water and Food Waste for Energy Recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waste. Keywords Anaerobic digestion; food waste; brown water; biogas; co-digestion INTRODUCTION-cal/m3 , biogas has been widely used in heating digesters and gas engines (Wang et al., 2007LIM J.W. Anaerobic Co-digestion of Brown Water and Food Waste for Energy Recovery Jun Wei LIM

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

138

Waste Heat Energy Harvesting Using Olsen Cycle on PZN-5.5PT Single Crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010. Thermal energy harvesting through pyroelectricity.Pilon, L. , 2010. Harvesting nanoscale thermal radiationfor waste heat energy harvesting using co-polymer P(VDF-

McKinley, Ian Meeker; Kandilian, Razmig; Pilon, Laurent

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Characteristics of transuranic waste at Department of Energy sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports data and information on TRU waste from all DOE generating and storage sites. The geographical location of the sites is shown graphically. There are four major sections in this document. The first three cover the TRU waste groups known as Newly Generated, Stored, and Buried Wastes. Subsections are included under Newly Generated and Stored on contact-handled and remote-handled waste. These classifications of waste are defined, and the current or expected totals of each are given. Figure 1.3 shows the total amount of Buried and Stored TRU waste. Preparation of this document began in 1981, and most of the data are as of December 31, 1980. In a few cases data were reported to December 31, 1981, and these have been noted. The projections in the Newly Generated section were made, for the most part, at the end of 1981.

Jensen, R.T.; Wilkinson, F.J. III

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Waste Treatment Plant and Tank Farm Program | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012NuclearBradley Nickell02-03 AUDITMotionWhenStatusinWaste

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Waste and Materials Disposition Information | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomenthe House Committee onsupports high impact projectsMatt8 Image:Waste and Materials

142

Boiler tube failures in municipal waste-to-energy plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste-to-energy plants experienced increased boiler tube failures when the design changed from waste-heat boilers to radiant furnace waterwalls using superheat. Fireside attack by chlorine and sulfur compounds in refuse combustion products caused many forced outages in early European plants operating at high steam temperatures and pressures. Despite conservative steam conditions in the first US plants, failures occurred. As steam temperatures increased, corrosion problems multiplied. The problems have been alleviated by covering the waterwalls with either refractory or weld overlays of nickel-based alloys and using high nickel-chromium alloys for superheater tubes. Changes in furnace design to provide uniform combustion and avoid reducing conditions in the waterwall zone and to lower the gas temperature in the superheater also have helped minimize corrosion.

Krause, H.H.; Wright, I.G. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Waste Confidence Discussion | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation | Department of EnergyDepartmentEnergy WRPS EarnsWashington,Confidence

144

Quantifying Wasted Write Energy in the Memory Hierarchy Charles Shelor, Jim Buchanan, and Krishna Kavi Ron Cytron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying Wasted Write Energy in the Memory Hierarchy Charles Shelor, Jim Buchanan, and Krishna. Wasted writes consume energy, consume execution time as memory bandwidth and consume component lifetime of potential energy savings that can be obtained from eliminating wasted writes. If all of the wasted writes

Kavi, Krishna

145

10/12/2009 www.wtert.gr 1 Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10/12/2009 www.wtert.gr 1 Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council SYNERGIA Dr. Efstratios MANAGEMENT IN GREECE & POTENTIAL FOR WASTE - TO - ENERGY ISWA Beacon Conference - Strategic Waste Management Planning in SEE, Middle East and Mediterranean Region #12;10/12/2009 www.wtert.gr 2 The Waste-to-Energy

Columbia University

146

The Energy Impact of Industrial Recycling and Waste Exchange  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of regulations and the most interest. There is a chain of regulation that extends from those who generate hazardous waste to those who transport, store, treat, and dispose of it. However, facilities that recycle or reuse hazardous wastes are excluded from...~e listed as available in waste-exchange catalogs. The haza~dous natu~e of these wastes is ext~emely impo~tant in dete~mining the benefits of exchanging them, because the costs of ~egulated disposal, sto~age, and t~eatment may be avoided by ~ecycling (4...

Phillips, W. C.

147

Anaerobic digestion of organic solid waste for energy production.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study was carried out in order to evaluate the performance of anaerobic reactors treating OFMSW (organic fraction of municipal solid waste), especially in terms (more)

Nayono, Satoto Endar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Nuclear Waste Policy Act | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced ScorecardReactor Technology Subcommittee of NEACSummary NucleariNuclear

149

Energy Supply- Production of Fuel from Agricultural and Animal Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Society for Energy and Environmental Research (SEER) was funded in March 2004 by the Department of Energy, under grant DE-FG-36-04GO14268, to produce a study, and oversee construction and implementation, for the thermo-chemical production of fuel from agricultural and animal waste. The grant focuses on the Changing World Technologies (CWT) of West Hempstead, NY, thermal conversion process (TCP), which converts animal residues and industrial food processing biproducts into fuels, and as an additional product, fertilizers. A commercial plant was designed and built by CWT, partially using grant funds, in Carthage, Missouri, to process animal residues from a nearby turkey processing plant. The DOE sponsored program consisted of four tasks. These were: Task 1 Optimization of the CWT Plant in Carthage - This task focused on advancing and optimizing the process plant operated by CWT that converts organic waste to fuel and energy. Task 2 Characterize and Validate Fuels Produced by CWT - This task focused on testing of bio-derived hydrocarbon fuels from the Carthage plant in power generating equipment to determine the regulatory compliance of emissions and overall performance of the fuel. Task 3 Characterize Mixed Waste Streams - This task focused on studies performed at Princeton University to better characterize mixed waste incoming streams from animal and vegetable residues. Task 4 Fundamental Research in Waste Processing Technologies - This task focused on studies performed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on the chemical reformation reaction of agricultural biomass compounds in a hydrothermal medium. Many of the challenges to optimize, improve and perfect the technology, equipment and processes in order to provide an economically viable means of creating sustainable energy were identified in the DOE Stage Gate Review, whose summary report was issued on July 30, 2004. This summary report appears herein as Appendix 1, and the findings of the report formed the basis for much of the subsequent work under the grant. An explanation of the process is presented as well as the completed work on the four tasks.

Gabriel Miller

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

150

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012NuclearBradley Nickell02-03 AUDITMotionWhenStatus

151

Waste to Energy Technology | GE Global Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout Printable VersionProtective

152

Waste-to-Energy Workshop | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of Dept.| DepartmentVolvo TrucksofPostWaste

153

RW - Radioactive Waste - Energy Conservation Plan  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015 | DepartmentLoans |QuerylNuclear PowerUnconsciously

154

Salt Waste Contractor Reaches Contract Milestone | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September2-SCORECARD-01-24-13 Page 1 of 1 DepartmentSalt Waste

155

Nuclear Waste Fund Activities Management Team | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartment of Energy Advanced1, 2014NuclearCommission,ScienceWaste Fund

156

GreenWaste Recovery Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio: EnergyGrasslandsGreen2V Jump to: navigation,GreenRayGreenWaste

157

Energy recovery from solid waste fuels using advanced gasification technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the mid-1980s, TPS Termiska Processer AB has been working on the development of an atmospheric-pressure gasification process. A major aim at the start of this work was the generation of fuel gas from indigenous fuels to Sweden (i.e. biomass). As the economic climate changed and awareness of the damage to the environment caused by the use of fossil fuels in power generation equipment increased, the aim of the development work at TPS was changed to applying the process to heat and power generation from feedstocks such as biomass and solid wastes. Compared with modern waste incineration with heat recovery, the gasification process will permit an increase in electricity output of up to 50%. The gasification process being developed is based on an atmospheric-pressure circulating fluidized bed gasifier coupled to a tar-cracking vessel. The gas produced from this process is then cooled and cleaned in conventional equipment. The energy-rich gas produced is clean enough to be fired in a gas boiler without requiring extensive flue gas cleaning, as is normally required in conventional waste incineration plants. Producing clean fuel gas in this manner, which facilitates the use of efficient gas-fired boilers, means that overall plant electrical efficiencies of close to 30% can be achieved. TPS has performed a considerable amount of pilot plant testing on waste fuels in their gasification/gas cleaning pilot plant in Sweden. Two gasifiers of TPS design have been in operation in Greve-in-Chianti, italy since 1992. This plant processes 200 tonnes of RDF (refuse-derived fuel) per day.

Morris, M.; Waldheim, L. [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)] [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

158

Waste processing air cleaning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste processing and preparing waste to support waste processing relies heavily on ventilation. Ventilation is used at the Hanford Site on the waste storage tanks to provide confinement, cooling, and removal of flammable gases.

Kriskovich, J.R.

1998-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

159

Howard Waste Recycling Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:GreerHi GtelHomer, Alaska:Horace,Geothermal|227. It is classified

160

Capturing Waste Gas: Saves Energy, Lower Costs  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top FiveDepartment of EnergyLANDSCAPEDepartment ofDepartment of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Portsmouth Waste Disposal | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006PhotovoltaicSeptember 22, 2014 In replySite Portsmouth

162

Paducah Waste Disposal | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 TheSteven Ashby Dr. Steven Para9Environmental

163

Municipal Solid Waste | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico: EnergyMithun Jump to:MoeInformationMultnomah County,

164

Wastes Hazardous or Solid | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 South Place: Salt LakeWashtenaw County, Michigan: Energy Resources

165

World Waste Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 South Place:ReferenceEditWisconsin: EnergyEdison, NJ

166

Transuranic Waste Screener - Energy Innovation Portal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2Topo II:LIGHT-DUTYTransportation

167

Transuranic (TRU) Waste | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of EnergyThe SunMelissa HowellTechnologies »Transportation

168

Idaho Solid Waste Webpage | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:GreerHiCalifornia:ISI Solar JumpObtain EPAForm 204) |GrantWebpage Jump

169

THERMAL TREATMENT REVIEW . WTE I THERMAL TREATMENT Since the beginning of this century, global waste-to-energy capacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of new waste-to gasification process at an industrial scale The Waste-To-Energy Research and Technology waste-to-energy capacity has increased steadily at the rate of about four million tonnes of MSW per year solid waste (MSW). Three dominant ,technologies _ those developed by The only true A global perspective

Columbia University

170

Waste Disposal (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article lays an outline of waste disposal regulations, permits and fees, hazardous waste management and underground storage tank requirements.

171

Proceedings of the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fifth of a series of waste minimization (WMIN)/reduction workshops (Waste Reduction Workshop V) was held at the Little Tree Inn in Idaho Falls, Idaho, on July 24--26, 1990. The workshops are held under the auspices of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). The purpose of this workshop was to provide a forum for sharing site activities in WMIN/reduction planning. Topics covered were management commitment, organizational structure, goal setting, reporting requirements, data bases and tracking systems, pollution prevention, awareness and incentives, information exchange, process waste assessment (PWA) implementation, and recycling internal and external. The workshops assist DOE waste-generating sites in implementing WMIN/reduction programs, plans, and activities, thus providing for optimal waste reduction within the DOE complex. All wastes are considered within this discipline: liquid, solid, and airborne, within the categories of high-level waste (HLW), transuranic waste (TRU), low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste, and mixed waste.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

FROM WASTE TO WORTH: THE ROLE OF WASTE DIVERSION IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Canadian Energy-From-Waste Coalition (CEFWC) 1 There is considerable merit to the ideas outlined commitment to foster a green and sustainable economy. The Canadian Energy-From-Waste Coalition (CEFWC sign that the system is failing. #12;Canadian Energy-From-Waste Coalition (CEFWC) 2 Like you, the CEFWC

Columbia University

173

Waste IncIneratIon and Waste PreventIon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

disposing of waste, it also makes consider- able amounts of energy available in the form of electricity emissions annu- ally. About 50 percent of the energy contained in residual municipal waste comes from- sions from the fossil waste fraction and the fos- sil energy purchased from external sources

174

Heat Recovery From Solid Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

areas of evaluation, including the cost of fuel, cost of solid waste disposal, plant energy requirements, available technology, etc....

Underwood, O. W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

E-Print Network 3.0 - american ref-fuel waste-to-energy Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 50 Leaching of Dioxins from Municipal Waste Combustor Residues Summary: 12, 12th North American...

176

E-Print Network 3.0 - american waste-to-energy conference Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 20 Leaching of Dioxins from Municipal Waste Combustor Residues Summary: 12, 12th North American...

177

Engine Waste Heat Recovery Concept Demonstration | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCof Energy 12, 2004DepartmentWaste Heat Recovery Concept

178

Waste and Recycling  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Nuclear engineer Dr. Kathy McCarthy talks about nuclear energy, the challenge of nuclear waste and the research aimed at solutions. For more information about nuclear energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

McCarthy, Kathy

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

179

Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This page provides a brief overview of municipal solid waste energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply waste to energy within the Federal sector.

180

Avoidable waste management costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the activity based costing method used to acquire variable (volume dependent or avoidable) waste management cost data for routine operations at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Waste volumes from environmental restoration, facility stabilization activities, and legacy waste were specifically excluded from this effort. A core team consisting of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, and Oak Ridge Reservation developed and piloted the methodology, which can be used to determine avoidable waste management costs. The method developed to gather information was based on activity based costing, which is a common industrial engineering technique. Sites submitted separate flow diagrams that showed the progression of work from activity to activity for each waste type or treatability group. Each activity on a flow diagram was described in a narrative, which detailed the scope of the activity. Labor and material costs based on a unit quantity of waste being processed were then summed to generate a total cost for that flow diagram. Cross-complex values were calculated by determining a weighted average for each waste type or treatability group based on the volume generated. This study will provide DOE and contractors with a better understanding of waste management processes and their associated costs. Other potential benefits include providing cost data for sites to perform consistent cost/benefit analysis of waste minimization and pollution prevention (WMIN/PP) options identified during pollution prevention opportunity assessments and providing a means for prioritizing and allocating limited resources for WMIN/PP.

Hsu, K.; Burns, M.; Priebe, S.; Robinson, P.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Waste to energy facilities. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning technical, economic, and environmental evaluations of facilities that convert waste to energy. Solid waste and municipal waste conversion facilities are highlighted. Feasibility studies, technical design, emissions studies, and markets for the resulting energy are discussed. Heat and electrical generation facilities are emphasized. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Waste to energy facilities. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning technical, economic, and environmental evaluations of facilities that convert waste to energy. Solid waste and municipal waste conversion facilities are highlighted. Feasibility studies, technical design, emissions studies, and markets for the resulting energy are discussed. Heat and electrical generation facilities are emphasized. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Immediate Deployment of Waste Energy Recovery Technologies at Multi Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Verso Paper Corp. implemented a portfolio of 13 commercially available proven industrial technologies each exceeding 30% minimum threshold efficiency and at least 25% efficiency increase. These sub-projects are a direct result of a grant received from the Department of Energy (DOE) through its FOA 0000044 (Deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Systems, District Energy Systems, Waste Energy Recovery Systems, and Efficient Industrial Equipment), which was funded by the American Recovery Act. These were installed at 3 sites in 2 states and are helping to reduce Verso costs, making the facilities more competitive. This created approximately 100 construction jobs (FTE's) and reduced impacted Verso facilities' expense budgets. These sub-projects were deployed at Verso paper mills located in Jay, Maine, Bucksport, Maine, and Sartell, Minnesota. The paper mills are the economic engines of the rural communities in which these mills are located. Reinvestment in waste energy recovery capital improvements is providing a stimulus to help maintain domestic jobs and to competitively position the US pulp and paper industry with rising energy costs. Energy efficiency improvements are also providing a positive environmental impact by reducing greenhouse gas emissions, the quantity of wastewater treated and discharged, and fossil fuel demand. As a result of these projects, when fully operating, Verso realized a total of approximately 1.5 TBtu/Year reduction in overall energy consumption, which is 119% of the project objectives. Note that three paper machines have since been permanently curtailed. However even with these shutdowns, the company still met its energy objectives. Note also that the Sartell mill's paper machine is down due to a recent fire which damaged the mill's electrical infrastructure (the company has not decided on the mill's future).

Dennis Castonguay

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

184

Proceedings of NAWTEC16 16th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Proceedings of NAWTEC16 16th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference May 19-21, 2008 of commercial tubing in Waste-to-Energy (WTE) boilers, a corrosion test was made by altering the HCl composition analysis of corrosion products by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive

Columbia University

185

Presentation 2.6: Wood waste for energy: lessons learnt from tropical regions Paul Vantomme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of forest products with more value adding, and promoting the use of wood waste to increase energy efficiency tropical timber trade · almost 80% of the world's tropical forests ITTO ­ Wood Waste for Energy Working and forest industries GhanaDevelopment of energy alternatives for the efficient utilization of wood

186

Waste Heat Recovery System: Lightweight Thermal Energy Recovery (LIGHTER) System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: GM is using shape memory alloys that require as little as a 10C temperature difference to convert low-grade waste heat into mechanical energy. When a stretched wire made of shape memory alloy is heated, it shrinks back to its pre-stretched length. When the wire cools back down, it becomes more pliable and can revert to its original stretched shape. This expansion and contraction can be used directly as mechanical energy output or used to drive an electric generator. Shape memory alloy heat engines have been around for decades, but the few devices that engineers have built were too complex, required fluid baths, and had insufficient cycle life for practical use. GM is working to create a prototype that is practical for commercial applications and capable of operating with either air- or fluid-based heat sources. GMs shape memory alloy based heat engine is also designed for use in a variety of non-vehicle applications. For example, it can be used to harvest non-vehicle heat sources, such as domestic and industrial waste heat and natural geothermal heat, and in HVAC systems and generators.

None

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by US Department of Energy waste management operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms evaluated. A personal-computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for the calculation of human health risk impacts. The WM PEIS addresses management of five waste streams in the DOE complex: low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste (HW), high-level waste (HLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (TRUW). Currently projected waste generation rates, storage inventories, and treatment process throughputs have been calculated for each of the waste streams. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated, and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. Key assumptions in the development of the source terms are identified. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also discuss specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Policastro, A.; Freeman, W.; Jackson, R.; Mishima, J.; Turner, S.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Hydrothermal Processing of Wet Wastes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 3AConversion Technologies III: Energy from Our WasteWill we Be Rich in Fuel or Knee Deep in Trash by 2025? Hydrothermal Processing of Wet Wastes James R. Oyler, President, Genifuel Corporation

189

Low-Value Waste Gases as an Energy Source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste gases with potentially useful fuel value are generated at any number of points in refineries, chemical plants and other industrial and commercial sites. The higher quality streams have been utilized successfully in fuel systems for years...

Waibel, R. T.

190

The renewable energy contribution from waste across Europe.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas MSW or Mixed residual waste LFG Biogas -> Electr. (and Heat) 100 Solid Recovered Fuel Sorted Digestion Source separated biomass fraction or Sorted bio-fraction of MSW AD Biogas -> Electr. & Heat 100

191

Low Temperature Waste Energy Recovery at Chemical Plants and Refineries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

candidates of waste heat recovery technologies that might have an application in these industries. Four technologies that met the criteria of the Advisory Committee included: organic rankine cycle (ORC), absorption refrigeration and chilling, Kalina cycle...

Ferland, K.; papar, R.; Quinn, J.; Kumar, S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities Project Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This feasibility study report presents a draft design of the Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility (VWISF), which is one of three subprojects of the Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities (IWVF) project. The primary goal of the IWVF project is to design and construct a treatment process system that will vitrify the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) to a final waste form. The project will consist of three subprojects that include the Waste Collection Tanks Facility, the Waste Vitrification Facility (WVF), and the VWISF. The Waste Collection Tanks Facility will provide for waste collection, feed mixing, and surge storage for SBW and newly generated liquid waste from ongoing operations at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The WVF will contain the vitrification process that will mix the waste with glass-forming chemicals or frit and turn the waste into glass. The VWISF will provide a shielded storage facility for the glass until the waste can be disposed at either the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as mixed transuranic waste or at the future national geological repository as high-level waste glass, pending the outcome of a Waste Incidental to Reprocessing determination, which is currently in progress. A secondary goal is to provide a facility that can be easily modified later to accommodate storage of the vitrified high-level waste calcine. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of the VWISF, which would be constructed in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local laws. This project supports the Department of Energys Environmental Management missions of safely storing and treating radioactive wastes as well as meeting Federal Facility Compliance commitments made to the State of Idaho.

Bonnema, Bruce Edward

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Waste-to-Energy: Hawaii and Guam Energy Improvement Technology Demonstration Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and Materials Disposition Information Waste

194

Technological options for management of hazardous wastes from US Department of Energy facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides comprehensive information on the technological options for management of hazardous wastes generated at facilities owned or operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE). These facilities annually generate a large quantity of wastes that could be deemed hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Included in these wastes are liquids or solids containing polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, heavy metals, waste oils, spent solvents, acids, bases, carcinogens, and numerous other pollutants. Some of these wastes consist of nonnuclear hazardous chemicals; others are mixed wastes containing radioactive materials and hazardous chemicals. Nearly 20 unit processes and disposal methods are presented in this report. They were selected on the basis of their proven utility in waste management and potential applicability at DOE sites. These technological options fall into five categories: physical processes, chemical processes, waste exchange, fixation, and ultimate disposal. The options can be employed for either resource recovery, waste detoxification, volume reduction, or perpetual storage. Detailed descriptions of each technological option are presented, including information on process performance, cost, energy and environmental considerations, waste management of applications, and potential applications at DOE sites. 131 references, 25 figures, 23 tables.

Chiu, S.; Newsom, D.; Barisas, S.; Humphrey, J.; Fradkin, L.; Surles, T.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Campus Energy, Water, and Waste Reduction Policy Page 1 of 7 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University No. 5505 Rev.: 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Campus Energy, Water, and Waste Reduction Policy Page 1 of 7 Virginia Polytechnic Institute __________________________________________________________________________________ Subject: Campus Energy, Water, and Waste Reduction Policy the highest standards in energy/water usage and waste reduction with consideration of the impact

Virginia Tech

196

Commercial treatability study capabilities for application to the US Department of Energy`s anticipated mixed waste streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA), which represents a national effort to develop and coordinate treatment solutions for mixed waste among all DOE facilities. The hazardous waste component of mixed waste is regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), while the radioactive component is regulated under the Atomic Energy Act, as implemented by the DOE, making mixed waste one of the most complex types of waste for the DOE to manage. The MWFA has the mission to support technologies that meet the needs of the DOE`s waste management efforts to characterize, treat, and dispose of mixed waste being generated and stored throughout the DOE complex. The technologies to be supported must meet all regulatory requirements, provide cost and risk improvements over available technologies, and be acceptable to the public. The most notable features of the DOE`s mixed-waste streams are the wide diversity of waste matrices, volumes, radioactivity levels, and RCRA-regulated hazardous contaminants. Table 1-1 is constructed from data from the proposed site treatment plans developed by each DOE site and submitted to DOE Headquarters. The table shows the number of mixed-waste streams and their corresponding volumes. This table illustrates that the DOE has a relatively small number of large-volume mixed-waste streams and a large number of small-volume mixed-waste streams. There are 1,033 mixed-waste streams with volumes less than 1 cubic meter; 1,112 mixed-waste streams with volumes between 1 and 1,000 cubic meters; and only 61 mixed-waste streams with volumes exceeding 1,000 cubic meters.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

EA-1862: Oneida Seven Generation Corporation Waste-To-Energy System, Ashwaubenon, Wisconsin  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Oneidas Energy Recovery Project would construct and operate a solid waste-to-electricity power plant on vacant property within the Bayport Industrial Center in the City of Green Bay, Brown County, Wisconsin. This energy recovery process would involve bringing municipal solid waste into the plant for sizing (shredding), sorting (removing recyclable material), and conveying into one of three pyrolytic gasification systems.

198

RENEWABLE ENERGY FROM SWINE WASTE Bingjun He, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RENEWABLE ENERGY FROM SWINE WASTE Bingjun He, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 1 Yuanhui Zhang, Ted waste and to produce renewable energy from swine manure. Experimental results showed that operating, gasification, and liquefaction. Among the TCC processes, direct liquefaction is the most widely studied biomass

He, Brian

199

Covanta Begins Operating Nation's First Energy-from-Waste Unit under the EPA's New Source Performance Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Covanta Begins Operating Nation's First Energy-from-Waste Unit under the EPA's New Source in the development and operation of large scale Energy-from-Waste and renewable energy projects, today announced it has begun operating the first energy-from-waste unit built under the U.S. Environmental Protection

Columbia University

200

Waste Management & Research172 Waste Manage Res 2003: 21: 172177  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Keywords: Waste incineration, PVC (polyvinylchloride), energy recovery, material recycling, HCLWaste Management & Research172 Waste Manage Res 2003: 21: 172­177 Printed in UK ­ all rights reserved Copyright © ISWA 2003 Waste Management & Research ISSN 0734­242X In many market segments

Columbia University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 1, Part 1, Generator dangerous waste report, dangerous waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, weight, and waste designation.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

202

Waste Toolkit A-Z Light bulbs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste Toolkit A-Z Light bulbs Can I recycle light bulbs? It depends what type of bulbs you have of in the normal University waste bins (landfill waste). Energy saving bulbs and fluorescent tubes are classified light bulbs? Standard filament bulbs Put in the waste bin (landfill waste) as these are not classified

Melham, Tom

203

Microsoft PowerPoint - EM SSAB Chairs Webinar - Marcinowski Waste...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Chair's Meeting Waste Disposition Strategies Update www.energy.govEM 1 Waste Disposition Strategies Update Frank Marcinowski Deputy Assistant Secretary for Waste Management Office...

204

Low-level waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the US Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides technical support information for use in analyzing environmental impacts associated with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) low-level radioactive waste (LLW) management alternatives in the Waste-Management (WM) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). Waste loads treated and disposed of for each of the LLW alternatives considered in the DOE WM PEIS are presented. Waste loads are presented for DOE Waste Management (WM) wastes, which are generated from routine operations. Radioactivity concentrations and waste quantities for treatment and disposal under the different LLW alternatives are described for WM waste. 76 refs., 14 figs., 42 tabs.

Goyette, M.L.; Dolak, D.A.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

SC Beta Graded Cavity Design for a Proposed 350 MHZ Linac for Waste Transmutation and Energy Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SC Beta Graded Cavity Design for a Proposed 350 MHZ Linac for Waste Transmutation and Energy Production

Barni, D; Pagani, C; Pierini, P; Visona, S; Gemme, G; Parodi, R

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Recovery Act: Waste Energy Project at AK Steel Corporation Middletown  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2008, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products) began development of a project to beneficially utilize waste blast furnace topgas generated in the course of the iron-making process at AK Steel Corporations Middletown, Ohio works. In early 2010, Air Products was awarded DOE Assistance Agreement DE-EE002736 to further develop and build the combined-cycle power generation facility. In June 2012, Air Products and AK Steel Corporation terminated work when it was determined that the project would not be economically viable at that time nor in the foreseeable future. The project would have achieved the FOA-0000044 Statement of Project Objectives by demonstrating, at a commercial scale, the technology to capture, treat, and convert blast furnace topgas into electric power and thermal energy.

Joyce, Jeffrey

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

207

Material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems: The potential for energy recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: > The amount of waste available for energy recovery is significantly higher than the Unsorted Residual Waste (URW). > Its energy potential is always higher than the complement to 100% of the Source Separation Level (SSL). > Increasing SSL has marginal effects on the potential for energy recovery. > Variations in the composition of the waste fed to WtE plants affect only marginally their performances. > A large WtE plant with a treatment capacity some times higher than a small plant achieves electric efficiency appreciably higher. - Abstract: This article is part of a set of six coordinated papers reporting the main findings of a research project carried out by five Italian universities on 'Material and energy recovery in Integrated Waste Management Systems (IWMS)'. An overview of the project and a summary of the most relevant results can be found in the introductory article of the series. This paper describes the work related to the evaluation of mass and energy balances, which has consisted of three major efforts (i) development of a model for quantifying the energy content and the elemental compositions of the waste streams appearing in a IWMS; (ii) upgrade of an earlier model to predict the performances of Waste-to-Energy (WtE) plants; (iii) evaluation of mass and energy balances of all the scenarios and the recovery paths considered in the project. Results show that not only the amount of material available for energy recovery is significantly higher than the Unsorted Residual Waste (URW) left after Separate Collection (SC), because selection and recycling generate significant amounts of residues, but its heating value is higher than that of the original, gross waste. Therefore, the energy potential of what is left after recycling is always higher than the complement to 100% of the Source Separation Level (SSL). Also, increasing SSL has marginal effects on the potential for energy recovery: nearly doubling SSL (from 35% to 65%) reduces the energy potential only by one fourth. Consequently, even at high SSL energy recovery is a fundamental step of a sustainable waste management system. Variations of SSL do bring about variations of the composition, heating value and moisture content of the material fed to WtE plants, but these variations (i) are smaller than one can expect; (ii) have marginal effects on the performances of the WtE plant. These considerations suggest that the mere value of SSL is not a good indicator of the quality of the waste management system, nor of its energy and environmental outcome. Given the well-known dependence of the efficiency of steam power plants with their power output, the efficiency of energy recovery crucially depends on the size of the IWMS served by the WtE plant. A fivefold increase of the amount of gross waste handled in the IWMS (from 150,000 to 750,000 tons per year of gross waste) allows increasing the electric efficiencies of the WtE plant by about 6-7 percentage points (from 21-23% to 28.5% circa).

Consonni, Stefano [Department of Energy, Politecnico di Milano, Via Lambruschini 4, 20156 Milan (Italy); LEAP - Laboratorio Energia Ambiente Piacenza, Via Bixio 27, 29100 Piacenza (Italy); Vigano, Federico, E-mail: federico.vigano@polimi.it [Department of Energy, Politecnico di Milano, Via Lambruschini 4, 20156 Milan (Italy); LEAP -Laboratorio Energia Ambiente Piacenza, Via Bixio 27, 29100 Piacenza (Italy)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

ELLEFSON, M.D.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Copyright 2009 by ASME Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Copyright © 2009 by ASME Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference on the strengths of past research at Columbia and North Carolina State on recycling, composting, waste- to-energy of each technology has the potential 1 Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy

Columbia University

210

National Master Plan for Development of Waste-to-Energy in India 1 The National Master Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 National Master Plan for Development of Waste-to-Energy in India 1 The National Master Plan a National Master Plan (NMP) for waste-to-energy as one of the activities under UNDP/GEF assisted project. The NMP provides a framework for waste-to-energy programme for the country besides a means of processing

Columbia University

211

Covanta Announces Contracts for Lee County, Florida Waste-to-Energy Facility Wednesday February 8, 3:51 pm ET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Covanta Announces Contracts for Lee County, Florida Waste-to-Energy Facility Expansion Wednesday the construction of a 636 TPD (ton per day) capacity expansion to Lee County's 1,200 TPD waste-to-energy facility includes recycling, composting, waste-to- energy and landfilling. Covanta's service agreement, which

Columbia University

212

Radioactive Waste Management (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section regulates the transportation and disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Minnesota, and establishes a Nuclear Waste Council to monitor the federal high-level radioactive waste...

213

E-Print Network 3.0 - analytical waste solutions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Waste, CO2, and Biofuels... ', followed by Dr. Kalogirou , who presented the : Waste to Energy Solution for Green Metropolitan Cities... Waste Management: Recycling and Waste to...

214

Waste in a land of plenty -Solid waste generation and management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of recycling and waste-to- energy, according to the latest in an annual series of national surveys on municipal waste numbers using tonnages only, with any percentages - for recycling, landfilling, waste-to-energyWaste in a land of plenty - Solid waste generation and management in the US The US generates

Columbia University

215

Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation gives regulatory authority to the Department of Environmental Management to monitor commercial sites for hazardous wastes; fees on waste received at such sites; hearings and...

216

Waste Treatment Plant Overview  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the...

217

Salt Waste Processing Initiatives  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

1 Patricia Suggs Salt Processing Team Lead Assistant Manager for Waste Disposition Project Office of Environmental Management Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Initiatives...

218

Solid Waste (New Mexico)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The New Mexico Environment Department's Solid Waste Bureau manages solid waste in the state. The Bureau implements and enforces the rules established by the Environmental Improvement Board.

219

Nuclear Waste Reduction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Waste Reduction Pyroprocessing is a promising technology for recycling used nuclear fuel and improving the associated waste management options. The process...

220

Transuranic Waste Requirements  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The guide provides criteria for determining if a waste is to be managed in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter III, Transuranic Waste Requirements.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Ris-R-Report Energy Systems Analysis of Waste to Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as upgraded biogas and petrol made from syngas. Biogas and thermal gasification technologies are interesting alternatives to waste incineration and it is recommended to support the use of biogas based on manure Centre Denmark, DONG Energy, Danish Energy Authority, DAKA, Lemvig Biogas Plant and Plan

222

Energy efficiency of substance and energy recovery of selected waste fractions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to reduce the ecological impact of resource exploitation, the EU calls for sustainable options to increase the efficiency and productivity of the utilization of natural resources. This target can only be achieved by considering resource recovery from waste comprehensively. However, waste management measures have to be investigated critically and all aspects of substance-related recycling and energy recovery have to be carefully balanced. This article compares recovery methods for selected waste fractions with regard to their energy efficiency. Whether material recycling or energy recovery is the most energy efficient solution, is a question of particular relevance with regard to the following waste fractions: paper and cardboard, plastics and biowaste and also indirectly metals. For the described material categories material recycling has advantages compared to energy recovery. In accordance with the improved energy efficiency of substance opposed to energy recovery, substance-related recycling causes lower emissions of green house gases. For the fractions paper and cardboard, plastics, biowaste and metals it becomes apparent, that intensification of the separate collection systems in combination with a more intensive use of sorting technologies can increase the extent of material recycling. Collection and sorting systems must be coordinated. The objective of the overall system must be to achieve an optimum of the highest possible recovery rates in combination with a high quality of recyclables. The energy efficiency of substance related recycling of biowaste can be increased by intensifying the use of anaerobic technologies. In order to increase the energy efficiency of the overall system, the energy efficiencies of energy recovery plants must be increased so that the waste unsuitable for substance recycling is recycled or treated with the highest possible energy yield.

Fricke, Klaus, E-mail: klaus.fricke@tu-bs.de [Technical University of Braunschweig, Leichtweiss-Institute, Department of Waste and Resource Management, Beethovenstrasse 51a, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Bahr, Tobias, E-mail: t.bahr@tu-bs.de [Technical University of Braunschweig, Leichtweiss-Institute, Department of Waste and Resource Management, Beethovenstrasse 51a, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Bidlingmaier, Werner, E-mail: werner.bidlingmaier@uni-weimar.de [Bauhaus-Universitaet Weimar, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Waste Management, Coudraystrasse 7, 99423 Weimar (Germany); Springer, Christian, E-mail: christian.springer@uni-weimar.de [Bauhaus-Universitaet Weimar, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Waste Management, Coudraystrasse 7, 99423 Weimar (Germany)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

223

Radioactive and chemotoxic wastes: Only radioactive wastes?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive waste arising from Italian Nuclear Power Plants and Research Centers, classified as 1st and 2nd Category wastes, are managed only as radioactive wastes following the Technical Guide No. 26 issued by the Italian Regulatory Body: ENEA DISP on 1987. A very important Regulatory Regime revision for Italian Nuclear Activities started at the end of 1991. This paper considers the need to develop a new strategy dedicated to mixed waste in line with current international trends.

Eletti, G.F.; Tocci, M. [ENEA DISP, Rome (Italy)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Solid Waste and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This chapter of the law that establishes the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency establishes the rules and regulations regarding solid waste.

225

1993 Solid Waste Reference Forecast Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report, which updates WHC-EP-0567, 1992 Solid Waste Reference Forecast Summary, (WHC 1992) forecasts the volumes of solid wastes to be generated or received at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site during the 30-year period from FY 1993 through FY 2022. The data used in this document were collected from Westinghouse Hanford Company forecasts as well as from surveys of waste generators at other US Department of Energy sites who are now shipping or plan to ship solid wastes to the Hanford Site for disposal. These wastes include low-level and low-level mixed waste, transuranic and transuranic mixed waste, and nonradioactive hazardous waste.

Valero, O.J.; Blackburn, C.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Kaae, P.S.; Armacost, L.L.; Garrett, S.M.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Waste-to-Energy Projects at ArmyWaste to Energy Projects at Army Installations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Now!)p ( gy ) 2009 RDECOM WTE Technology Assessment Selected Army WTE Projects ERDC F l C ll D ERDC natural gas and steam by Oct 2016 [EISA 2007] Electricity use for federal government from renewable, NDAA 2007] Total consumption from renewable sources · At least 50% of required annual renewable energy

227

Mixed waste landfill cell construction at energy solutions LLC: a regulator's perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A small percentage of the property that EnergySolutions' (formerly Envirocare) operates at Clive, Utah is permitted by the State of Utah as a treatment, storage and disposal facility for mixed waste. Mixed Waste is defined as a hazardous waste (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 261.3) that also has a radioactive component. Typically, the waste EnergySolutions receives at its mixed waste facility is contaminated with heavy metals and organic compounds while also contaminated with radioactivity. For EnergySolutions, the largest generator of mixed waste is the United States Department of Energy. However, EnergySolutions also accepts a wide variety of mixed waste from other generators. For many wastes, EnergySolutions goes through the process of characterization and acceptance (if appropriate) of the waste, treating the waste (if necessary), confirmation that the waste meets Land Disposal Restriction, and disposal of the waste in its mixed waste landfill cell (MWLC). EnergySolutions originally received its State-issued Part B (RCRA) permit in 1990. The Permit allows a mixed waste landfill cell footprint that covers roughly 10 hectares and includes 20 individual 'sumps'. EnergySolutions chose to build small segments of the landfill cell as waste receipts dictated. Nearly 16 years later, EnergySolutions has just completed its Phase V construction project. 18 of the 20 sumps in the original design have been constructed. The last two sumps are anticipated to be its Phase VI construction project. Further expansion of its mixed waste disposal landfill capacity beyond the current design would require a permit modification request and approval by the Executive Secretary of the Utah Solid and Hazardous Waste Control Board. Construction of the landfill cell is governed by the Construction Quality Assurance/Quality Control manual of its State-issued Permit. The construction of each sump is made up of (from the bottom up): a foundation; three feet of engineered clay; primary and secondary geo-synthetics (60 mil HDPE, geo-fabric and geo-textile); a two foot soil protective cover; tertiary geo-synthetics (80 mil HDPE, geo-fabric and geo-textile); and a final two foot soil protective cover. The Utah Department of Environmental Quality Division of Solid and Hazardous Waste (UDEQ/DSHW) oversees the construction process and reviews the documentation after the construction is complete. If all aspects of the construction process are met, the Executive Secretary of the Utah Solid and Hazardous Waste Control Board approves the landfill cell for disposal. It is the role of the regulator to ensure to the stakeholders that the landfill cell has been constructed in accordance with the State-issued permit and that the cell is protective of human health and the environment. A final determination may require conflict resolution between the agency and the facility. (authors)

Lukes, G.C.; Willoughby, O.H. [Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Div. of Solid and Hazardous Waste (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 4, Waste Management Facility report, Radioactive mixed waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, handling method and containment vessel, waste number, waste designation and amount of waste.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

229

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

230

Energy implications of mechanical and mechanicalbiological treatment compared to direct waste-to-energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Compared systems achieve primary energy savings between 34 and 140 MJ{sub primary}/100 MJ{sub input} {sub waste.} Savings magnitude is foremost determined by chosen primary energy and materials production. Energy consumption and process losses can be upset by increased technology efficiency. Material recovery accounts for significant shares of primary energy savings. Direct waste-to-energy is highly efficient if cogeneration (CHP) is possible. - Abstract: Primary energy savings potential is used to compare five residual municipal solid waste treatment systems, including configurations with mechanical (MT) and mechanicalbiological (MBT) pre-treatment, which produce waste-derived fuels (RDF and SRF), biogas and/or recover additional materials for recycling, alongside a system based on conventional mass burn waste-to-energy and ash treatment. To examine the magnitude of potential savings we consider two energy efficiency levels (state-of-the-art and best available technology), the inclusion/exclusion of heat recovery (CHP vs. PP) and three different background end-use energy production systems (coal condensing electricity and natural gas heat, Nordic electricity mix and natural gas heat, and coal CHP energy quality allocation). The systems achieved net primary energy savings in a range between 34 and 140 MJ{sub primary}/100 MJ{sub input} {sub waste}, in the different scenario settings. The energy footprint of transportation needs, pre-treatment and reprocessing of recyclable materials was 39.5%, 118% and 18% respectively, relative to total energy savings. Mass combustion WtE achieved the highest savings in scenarios with CHP production, nonetheless, MBT-based systems had similarly high performance if SRF streams were co-combusted with coal. When RDF and SRF was only used in dedicated WtE plants, MBT-based systems totalled lower savings due to inherent system losses and additional energy costs. In scenarios without heat recovery, the biodrying MBS-based system achieved the highest savings, on the condition of SRF co-combustion. As a sensitivity scenario, alternative utilisation of SRF in cement kilns was modelled. It supported similar or higher net savings for all pre-treatment systems compared to mass combustion WtE, except when WtE CHP was possible in the first two background energy scenarios. Recovery of plastics for recycling before energy recovery increased net energy savings in most scenario variations, over those of full stream combustion. Sensitivity to assumptions regarding virgin plastic substitution was tested and was found to mostly favour plastic recovery.

Cimpan, Ciprian, E-mail: cic@kbm.sdu.dk; Wenzel, Henrik

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Project plans for transuranic waste at small quantity sites in the Department of Energy comples-10522  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory, Carlsbad Office (LANL-CO), has been tasked to write Project Plans for all of the Small Quantity Sites (SQS) with defense related Transuranic (TRU) waste in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Transuranic Work-Off Plans were precursors to the Project Plans. LANL-CO prepared a Work-Off Plan for each small quantity site. The Work-Off Plan that identified issues, drivers, schedules, and inventory. Eight sites have been chosen to deinventory their legacy TRU waste; Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, General Electric-Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory-Area 300, Nevada Test Site, Nuclear Radiation Development, Sandia National Laboratory, and the Separations Process Research Unit. Each plan was written for contact and/or remote handled waste if present at the site. These project plans will assist the small quantity sites to ship legacy TRU waste offsite and de-inventory the site of legacy TRU waste. The DOE is working very diligently to reduce the nuclear foot print in the United States. Each of the eight SQSs will be de-inventoried of legacy TRU waste during a campaign that ends September 2011. The small quantity sites have a fraction of the waste that large quantity sites possess. During this campaign, the small quantity sites will package all of the legacy TRU waste and ship to Idaho or directly to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. The sites will then be removed from the Transuranic Waste Inventory if they are de-inventoried of all waste. Each Project Plan includes the respective site inventory report, schedules, resources, drivers and any issues. These project plans have been written by the difficult waste team and will be approved by each site. Team members have been assigned to each site to write site specific project plans. Once the project plans have been written, the difficult team members will visit the sites to ensure nothing has been overlooked and to verify the inventory. After each site has approved their project plan, the site will begin writing procedures and packaging/repackaging their waste. In some cases the sites have already begun the process. The waste will be shipped after all of the waste has been characterized and approved.

Mctaggart, Jerri Lynne [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lott, Sheila [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gadbury, Casey [DOE

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Waste-to-Energy Biomass Digester with Decreased Water Consumption - Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and Materials Disposition Information Waste andInnovation

233

Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cells Webinar | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of Dept.| DepartmentVolvo TrucksofPostWasteWebinar Waste-to-Energy

234

Water-related environmental control requirements at municipal solid waste-to-energy conversion facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water use and waste water production, water pollution control technology requirements, and water-related limitations to their design and commercialization are identified at municipal solid waste-to-energy conversion systems. In Part I, a summary of conclusions and recommendations provides concise statements of findings relative to water management and waste water treatment of each of four municipal solid waste-to-energy conversion categories investigated. These include: mass burning, with direct production of steam for use as a supplemental energy source; mechanical processing to produce a refuse-derived fuel (RDF) for co-firing in gas, coal or oil-fired power plants; pyrolysis for production of a burnable oil or gas; and biological conversion of organic wastes to methane. Part II contains a brief description of each waste-to-energy facility visited during the subject survey showing points of water use and wastewater production. One or more facilities of each type were selected for sampling of waste waters and follow-up tests to determine requirements for water-related environmental controls. A comprehensive summary of the results are presented. (MCW)

Young, J C; Johnson, L D

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Energy recovery from waste incineration: Assessing the importance of district heating networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Municipal solid waste incineration contributes with 20% of the heat supplied to the more than 400 district heating networks in Denmark. In evaluation of the environmental consequences of this heat production, the typical approach has been to assume that other (fossil) fuels could be saved on a 1:1 basis (e.g. 1 GJ of waste heat delivered substitutes for 1 GJ of coal-based heat). This paper investigates consequences of waste-based heat substitution in two specific Danish district heating networks and the energy-associated interactions between the plants connected to these networks. Despite almost equal electricity and heat efficiencies at the waste incinerators connected to the two district heating networks, the energy and CO{sub 2} accounts showed significantly different results: waste incineration in one network caused a CO{sub 2} saving of 48 kg CO{sub 2}/GJ energy input while in the other network a load of 43 kg CO{sub 2}/GJ. This was caused mainly by differences in operation mode and fuel types of the other heat producing plants attached to the networks. The paper clearly indicates that simple evaluations of waste-to-energy efficiencies at the incinerator are insufficient for assessing the consequences of heat substitution in district heating network systems. The paper also shows that using national averages for heat substitution will not provide a correct answer: local conditions need to be addressed thoroughly otherwise we may fail to assess correctly the heat recovery from waste incineration.

Fruergaard, T.; Christensen, T.H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Astrup, T., E-mail: tha@env.dtu.d [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source special nuclear and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this document. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge. This document has been revised to meet the interim status waste analysis plan requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173 303-300(5). When the final status permit is issued, permit conditions will be incorporated and this document will be revised accordingly.

ELLEFSON, M.D.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

237

A Los Alamos concept for accelerator transmutation of waste and energy production (ATW)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains the diagrams presented at the ATW (Accelerator Transmutation of Waste and Energy Production) External Review, December 10-12, 1990, held at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Included are the charge to the committee and the presentations for the committee`s review. Topics of the presentations included an overview of the concept, LINAC technology, near-term application -- high-level defense wastes (intense thermal neutron source, chemistry and materials), advanced application of the ATW concept -- fission energy without a high-level waste stream (overview, advanced technology, and advanced chemistry), and a summary of the research issues.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

238

Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Timothy D. Stark, F.ASCE1 landfills may contain aluminum from residential and commercial solid waste, industrial waste, and aluminum pro- duction wastes. Some aluminum-bearing waste materials, particularly aluminum production wastes

239

Risk assessment for the on-site transportation of radioactive wastes for the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the risk assessment performed for the on-site transportation of radioactive wastes in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). Risks for the routine shipment of wastes and the impacts from potential accidental releases are analyzed for operations at the Hanford Site (Hanford) near Richland, Washington. Like other large DOE sites, hanford conducts waste management operations for all wastes types; consequently, the impacts calculated for Hanford are expected to be greater than those for smaller sites. The risk assessment conducted for on-site transportation is intended to provide an estimate of the magnitude of the potential risk for comparison with off-site transportation risks assessed for the WM PEIS.

Biwer, B.M.; Monette, F.A.; Chen, S.Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Understanding radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

Murray, R.L.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering Spring 2013 Solar Innovations -HVAC and Waste Stream Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PENNSTATE Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering Spring 2013 Solar Innovations - HVAC and Waste Stream Analysis Overview There are two problems that were voiced by Solar Innovations, HVAC system

Demirel, Melik C.

242

Waste Prevention-- What Can We Learn From the Success of Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enlightened Self Interest- A Parallel Path to Follow. The goals of stockholders, employees and the nations in which we live are clearly aligned in energy conservation and waste prevention. Call it social responsibility, call it enlightened self...

Steinmeyer, D.

243

Evaluation of Industrial Energy Options for Cogeneration, Waste Heat Recovery and Alternative Fuel Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes the energy options available to Missouri industrial firms in the areas of cogeneration, waste heat recovery, and coal and alternative fuel utilization. The project, being performed by Synergic Resources Corporation...

Hencey, S.; Hinkle, B.; Limaye, D. R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Flexible Distributed Energy and Water from Waste for the Food and Beverage Industry  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Waste-to-value is a promising and comprehensive wastewater processing solution being pursued by GE that recovers valuable energy and purified water from the abundant wastewater generated and...

245

Proceedings of NAWTEC16 16th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of NAWTEC16 16th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference May 19-21, 2008 city population, Mumbai ranks first, while Tokyo comes in eighth at over 8 million. [8] Proceedings

Columbia University

246

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

247

Visit of Professor Avraam Karagiannidis to the Toulon Waste-to-Energy plant Toulon-France, December 11, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

organizes recycling in the greater Toulon area. The Toulon WTE facility is being used also as an argument to promote prevention, reuse and recycling of municipal solid wastes! All recycling and waste collectionVisit of Professor Avraam Karagiannidis to the Toulon Waste-to-Energy plant Toulon-France, December

Columbia University

248

DOE Issues RFP for Waste Treatment Services | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Deliciouscritical_materials_workshop_presentations.pdf MoreProgram |DOE Exercises OptionDOESynchrophasorRFP for Waste

249

Municipal Waste Combustion (New Mexico) | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |EnergyonSupport0.pdf5 OPAM SEMIANNUAL REPORTMAMayCrossColoradoMotionMunicipal Waste

250

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

density, making direct thermal energy storage methods, e.g.reduced. Conventional thermal energy harvesting and storageharvesting, storage, and utilization of thermal energy has

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct energy conversion ..developed. Typically, direct energy conversion is achievedTechnologies 1.2.1. Direct energy conversion In a direct

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electrode surfaces, and electric energy is stored as surfacetemperature end and electric energy is generated, thermalbeing the generated electric energy and the consumed thermal

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the portion of thermal energy that can be converted toof high-performance thermal energy harvesting systems, butreferred to as the thermal energy from low- temperature heat

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Daily Gazette, Schenectady NY Letters to the Editor for Thursday, July 10, 2008 Nothing to fear, and much to gain, from waste-to-energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and much to gain, from waste-to-energy Schenectady is one of those misguided cities that sends its municipal solid wastes to distant landfills, costing much money, wasting valuable energy and increasing global warming and pollution of our environment. Waste-to-energy (WTE) is safe. I advised the Israel

Columbia University

255

Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act (HWMA) describes a comprehensive, Statewide program to manage hazardous wastes through regulating hazardous waste generation, transportation, storage,...

256

Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Revision 6 Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan Waste6 WM QA Plan Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan LBNL/4 Management Quality Assurance

Waste Management Group

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Hazardous Waste Act (New Mexico)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"Hazardous waste" means any solid waste or combination of solid wastes that because of their quantity, concentration or physical, chemical or infectious characteristics may: cause or significantly...

258

WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuel oil and Turkey Based Biofuel Energy Rocovery 12,000 Industrial Waste $30,000 $500 $29,500 1500WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED, REUSED, RECYCLED OR CONSERVED IN 2006 WASTE TYPE DESCRIPTION DETAILS * Aerosol Can Disposal System Recycling 528 66 pounds of hazardous waste per unit $7

259

Bubblers Speed Nuclear Waste Processing at SRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site, American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding has supported installation of bubbler technology and related enhancements in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The improvements will accelerate the processing of radioactive waste into a safe, stable form for storage and permit expedited closure of underground waste tanks holding 37 million gallons of liquid nuclear waste.

None

2010-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

260

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD 2300 Clarendon Boulevard, Suite 1300 Arlington is intended to update Congress and the Secretary of Energy on the U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board-level radioactive waste (HLW) is evolving. The letter is issued in accordance with provisions of the Nuclear Waste

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Bubblers Speed Nuclear Waste Processing at SRS  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

At the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site, American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding has supported installation of bubbler technology and related enhancements in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The improvements will accelerate the processing of radioactive waste into a safe, stable form for storage and permit expedited closure of underground waste tanks holding 37 million gallons of liquid nuclear waste.

None

2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

262

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT WASTE PROCESSING ANNUAL TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Waste Processing identifies and reduces engineering and technical risks and uncertainties of the waste processing programs and projects of the Department of Energy's Environmental Management (EM) mission through the timely development of solutions to technical issues. The risks, and actions taken to mitigate those risks, are determined through technology readiness assessments, program reviews, technology information exchanges, external technical reviews, technical assistance, and targeted technology development and deployment. The Office of Waste Processing works with other DOE Headquarters offices and project and field organizations to proactively evaluate technical needs, identify multi-site solutions, and improve the technology and engineering associated with project and contract management. Participants in this program are empowered with the authority, resources, and training to implement their defined priorities, roles, and responsibilities. The Office of Waste Processing Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) supports the goals and objectives of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - Office of Environmental Management Engineering and Technology Roadmap by providing direction for technology enhancement, development, and demonstration that will lead to a reduction of technical risks and uncertainties in EM waste processing activities. The MYPP summarizes the program areas and the scope of activities within each program area proposed for the next five years to improve safety and reduce costs and environmental impacts associated with waste processing; authorized budget levels will impact how much of the scope of activities can be executed, on a year-to-year basis. Waste Processing Program activities within the Roadmap and the MYPP are described in these seven program areas: (1) Improved Waste Storage Technology; (2) Reliable and Efficient Waste Retrieval Technologies; (3) Enhanced Tank Closure Processes; (4) Next-Generation Pretreatment Solutions; (5) Enhanced Stabilization Technologies; (6) Spent Nuclear Fuel; and (7) Challenging Materials. This report provides updates on 35 technology development tasks conducted during calendar year 2008 in the Roadmap and MYPP program areas.

Bush, S.

2009-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

263

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Other LGH sources include solar thermal energy, geo-thermalThe heat source can be solar thermal energy, biologicalsources include the coolants in coal and nuclear power plants, solar thermal energy,

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

US Department of Energy interim mixed waste inventory report: Waste streams, treatment capacities and technologies: Volume 4, Site specific---Ohio through South Carolina  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this report to provide an inventory of its mixed wastes and treatment capacities and technologies in response to Section 105(a) of the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAct) of 1992 (Pub. L. No. 102-386). As required by the FFCAct-1992, this report provides site-specific information on DOE`s mixed waste streams and a general review of available and planned treatment facilities for mixed wastes at the following five Ohio facilities: Battelle Columbus Laboratories; Fernald Environmental Management Project; Mound Plant; Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant; and RMI, Titanium Company.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

total energy received by todays solar panels and is beings best solar panels can convert only ~16% of solar energy to

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Hybrid Solar Lighting Provides Energy Savings and Reduces Waste Heat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Artificial lighting is the largest component of electricity use in commercial U.S. buildings. Hybrid solar lighting (HSL) provides an exciting new means of reducing energy consumption while also delivering significant ancillary benefits associated with natural lighting in buildings. As more than half of all federal facilities are in the Sunbelt region (defined as having an average direct solar radiation of greater than 4 kWh/m2/day) and as more than half of all square footage available in federal buildings is also in the Sunbelt, HSL is an excellent technology fit for federal facilities. The HSL technology uses a rooftop, 4-ft-wide dish and secondary mirror that track the sun throughout the day (Fig. 1). The collector system focuses the sunlight onto 127 optical fibers. The fibers serve as flexible light pipes and are connected to hybrid light fixtures that have special diffusion rods that spread out the light in all directions. One collector powers about eight hybrid light fixtures-which can illuminate about 1,000 square feet. The system tracks at 0.1 accuracy, required by the two-mirror geometry to keep the focused beam on the fiber bundle. When sunlight is plentiful, the optical fibers in the luminaires provide all or most of the light needed in an area. During times of little or no sunlight, a sensor controls the intensity of the artificial lamps to maintain a desired illumination level. Unlike conventional electric lamps, the natural light produces little to no waste heat and is cool to the touch. This is because the system's solar collector removes the infrared light-the part of the spectrum that generates a lot of the heat in conventional bulbs-from the sunlight.

Lapsa, Melissa Voss [ORNL; Maxey, L Curt [ORNL; Earl, Dennis Duncan [ORNL; Beshears, David L [ORNL; Ward, Christina D [ORNL; Parks, James Edgar [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Transforming trash: reuse as a waste management and climate change mitigation strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the nexus between the waste and energy systems is crucial toof biological matter. wastes into energy and compost. Non-used to convert waste to energy. Where conventional

Vergara, Sintana Eugenia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. - Allentown, PA A microbial reverse electrodialysis...

269

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demonstration LLNL Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory MSW Municipal Solid Waste OSHA Occupational Safety and Health Administration PPE Personal Protective Equipment POTW Publicly Owned Treatment Works RCRA Resource

270

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. The purpose of the Manual is to catalog those procedural requirements and existing practices that ensure that all DOE elements and contractors continue to manage DOE's radioactive waste in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety, and the environment. Does not cancel other directives.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

271

List of Municipal Solid Waste Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place:KeystoneSolarList of GeothermalMethanol Incentives383Waste

272

Naval Waste Package Design Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A design methodology for the waste packages and ancillary components, viz., the emplacement pallets and drip shields, has been developed to provide designs that satisfy the safety and operational requirements of the Yucca Mountain Project. This methodology is described in the ''Waste Package Design Methodology Report'' Mecham 2004 [DIRS 166168]. To demonstrate the practicability of this design methodology, four waste package design configurations have been selected to illustrate the application of the methodology. These four design configurations are the 21-pressurized water reactor (PWR) Absorber Plate waste package, the 44-boiling water reactor (BWR) waste package, the 5-defense high-level waste (DHLW)/United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) Co-disposal Short waste package, and the Naval Canistered SNF Long waste package. Also included in this demonstration is the emplacement pallet and continuous drip shield. The purpose of this report is to document how that design methodology has been applied to the waste package design configurations intended to accommodate naval canistered SNF. This demonstrates that the design methodology can be applied successfully to this waste package design configuration and support the License Application for construction of the repository.

M.M. Lewis

2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

Hot Issue and Burning Options in Waste Management: A Social Cost Benefit Analysis of Waste-to-Energy in the UK.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Miranda and Hale, 1997). 20 4.3 External Costs and Benefits WtE plants emit some pollutants, which include sulphur dioxide, lead, and dioxins which are linked with damage to health and the environment if they occur in high enough concentrations... Hot Issue and Burning Options in Waste Management: A Social Cost Benefit Analysis of Waste-to-Energy in the UK Tooraj Jamasb* Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge Hande Kiamil Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge...

Jamasb, Tooraj; Kiamil, H; Nepal, R

274

Radioactive Waste Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The objective of this Order is to ensure that all Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive waste is managed in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety and the environment. Cancels DOE O 5820.2A

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

275

Radioactive Waste Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The objective of this Order is to ensure that all Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive waste is managed in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety and the environment. Cancels DOE O 5820.2A. Chg 1 dated 8-28-01. Certified 1-9-07.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

276

Waste-to-Energy: Hawaii and Guam Energy Improvement Technology Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the U.S. Navy have worked together to demonstrate new or leading-edge commercial energy technologies whose deployment will support the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) in meeting its energy efficiency and renewable energy goals while enhancing installation energy security. This is consistent with the 2010 Quadrennial Defense Review report1 that encourages the use of 'military installations as a test bed to demonstrate and create a market for innovative energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies coming out of the private sector and DOD and Department of Energy laboratories,' as well as the July 2010 memorandum of understanding between DOD and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that documents the intent to 'maximize DOD access to DOE technical expertise and assistance through cooperation in the deployment and pilot testing of emerging energy technologies.' As part of this joint initiative, a promising waste-to-energy (WTE) technology was selected for demonstration at the Hickam Commissary aboard the Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam (JBPHH), Hawaii. The WTE technology chosen is called high-energy densification waste-to-energy conversion (HEDWEC). HEDWEC technology is the result of significant U.S. Army investment in the development of WTE technology for forward operating bases.

Davis, J.; Gelman, R.; Tomberlin, G.; Bain, R.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Waste characterization at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most industries generate limited types of solid wastes of a result of their manufacturing processes. The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), a research and development facility, generates a large variety of solid wastes, some exotic. Over 50,000 distinct waste streams are currently generated in the 43 square mile area defining LANL. These wastes include refuse, medical, infectious, hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes. LANL is subject to federal and State oversight on matters concerning management of solid wastes. In order to assure regulatory agencies such as the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that the Laboratory is properly managing and disposing all solid wastes. LANL has undertaken an extensive waste characterization program to identify sources and ultimate disposition of all solid wastes. Given the number of solid waste streams expected, LANL has taken a two-pronged approach to characterizing wastes: (a) physical identification of all sources of solid wastes including interviews with waste generators; and (b) characterization of wastes from the point of generation. The former approach consists of canvassing all structures within the LANL complex, interviewing waste generators, and identifying sources of waste generation. Data gathered by these interviews are compiled in a database in order to identify the types and rates of waste generation and correct mismanagement of wastes identified during the interviews. The latter approach consists of characterizing all solid wastes which are controlled administratively or subject to stricter controls than municipal solid wastes (i.e., infectious, hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes). This characterization forms the basis by which LANL will manage solid waste in accordance to NMED/EPA regulations and US Department of Energy Orders. 8 refs., 3 figs.

Corpion, J.C.; Grieggs, A.R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Solid Waste Management Written Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solid Waste Management Program Written Program Cornell University 8/28/2012 #12;Solid Waste.................................................................... 4 4.2.1 Compost Solid Waste Treatment Facility.................................................................... 4 4.2.2 Pathological Solid Waste Treatment Facility

Pawlowski, Wojtek

279

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is collected by the RSO. 2. Dry radioactive waste must be segregated by isotope. 3. Liquid radioactive waste must be separated by isotope. 4. Liquid frequently and change them if contaminated. 5. Use radioactive waste container to collect the waste. 6. Check

Jia, Songtao

280

NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document establishes the U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal. Mixed waste generated within the State of Nevada by NNSA/NSO activities is accepted for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site for storage or disposal.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, NEVADA SITE OFFICE

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems: A life-cycle costing approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: > The study aims at assessing economic performance of alternative scenarios of MSW. > The approach is the life-cycle costing (LCC). > Waste technologies must be considered as complementary into an integrated strategy. - Abstract: A critical assumption of studies assessing comparatively waste management options concerns the constant average cost for selective collection regardless the source separation level (SSL) reached, and the neglect of the mass constraint. The present study compares alternative waste management scenarios through the development of a desktop model that tries to remove the above assumption. Several alternative scenarios based on different combinations of energy and materials recovery are applied to two imaginary areas modelled in order to represent a typical Northern Italian setting. External costs and benefits implied by scenarios are also considered. Scenarios are compared on the base of the full cost for treating the total waste generated in the area. The model investigates the factors that influence the relative convenience of alternative scenarios.

Massarutto, Antonio [University of Udine, Udine (Italy); IEFE, Bocconi University, Milan (Italy); Carli, Alessandro de, E-mail: alessandro.decarli@unibocconi.it [IEFE, Bocconi University, Milan (Italy); Graffi, Matteo [University of Udine, Udine (Italy); IEFE, Bocconi University, Milan (Italy)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

Kent County Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 Throttled (botOpen6 ClimateKamas,KelseyMichigan: Energy Resources Jump

283

Waste-to-Energy Workshop | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of| Department of EnergyDepartmentDepartmentofTechnologies and

284

Waste-to-Energy Technologies and Project Development | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012NuclearBradley Nickell02-03Waste-to-Energy Technologies and

285

Reduce Waste and Save Energy this Holiday Season | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeEnvironment,Institutes and Launches theResidentialRecoveryWaste and Save Energy this

286

Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Hazardous Waste Program is carried out by the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality which administers its' program under the Hazardous Waste management Act (Arkansas Code Annotated 8-7...

287

Hazardous Waste Management (Delaware)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The act authorizes the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environment Control (DNREC) to regulate hazardous waste and create a program to manage sources of hazardous waste. The act...

288

Hazardous Waste Management (Oklahoma)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article states regulations for the disposal of hazardous waste. It also provides information about permit requirements for the transport, treatment and storage of such waste. It also mentions...

289

Pet Waste Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

About 1 million pounds of dog waste is deposited daily in North Texas alone. That's why proper disposal of pet waste can make a big difference in the environment. 5 photos, 2 pages...

Mechell, Justin; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

290

Municipal solid waste management: A bibliography of US Department of Energy contractor report through 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Energy contractors continue to conduct research targeting the productive and responsible use of the more than 516,000 metric tons (567,000 tons) of municipal solid waste (MSW) that is generated each day in the United States. It is becoming more and more prudent to improve current methods of MSW management and to continue to search for additional cost-effective, energy-efficient means to manage our MSW resource. This bibliography provides information about technical reports on energy from municipal waste that were prepared under grants or contracts from the US DOE. The reports listed focus on energy from municipal waste technologies and energy conservation in wastewater treatment.

None

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Waste Growth Challenges Local Democracy. The Politics of Waste between Europe and the Mediterranean: a Focus on Italy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The new incinerator (or waste-to-energy plant) in the Alpinedecreasing. Indeed waste-to- energy plants and recyclingDerived Fuel) and sent to a waste-to- energy plants, are now

Mengozzi, Alessandro

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Mixed waste characterization, treatment & disposal focus area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (referred to as the Mixed Waste Focus Area or MWFA) is to provide treatment systems capable of treating DOE`s mixed waste in partnership with users, and with continual participation of stakeholders, tribal governments, and regulators. The MWFA deals with the problem of eliminating mixed waste from current and future storage in the DOE complex. Mixed waste is waste that contains both hazardous chemical components, subject to the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and radioactive components, subject to the requirements of the Atomic Energy Act. The radioactive components include transuranic (TRU) and low-level waste (LLW). TRU waste primarily comes from the reprocessing of spent fuel and the use of plutonium in the fabrication of nuclear weapons. LLW includes radioactive waste other than uranium mill tailings, TRU, and high-level waste, including spent fuel.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Waste disposal package  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This is a claim for a waste disposal package including an inner or primary canister for containing hazardous and/or radioactive wastes. The primary canister is encapsulated by an outer or secondary barrier formed of a porous ceramic material to control ingress of water to the canister and the release rate of wastes upon breach on the canister. 4 figs.

Smith, M.J.

1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

294

Rethinking the Waste Hierarchy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

principles of EU waste policies. The environmental damage caused by waste depends on which type of manage, Environmental Assessment Institute For further information please contact: Environmental Assessment Institute.imv.dk #12;Environmental Assessment Institute Rethinking the Waste Hierarchy March 2005 Recommendations

295

Pumpkin Power: Turning Food Waste into Energy | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' Research | DepartmentDepartment ofThermoChemJanuaryPumping-Self

296

Reducing Waste and Harvesting Energy This Halloween | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' Research | DepartmentDepartmentHatch,DepartmentDeliveryMay 1,HereWrap yourAs''This

297

Global Waste to Energy Conversion Company GWECC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to: navigation,GigaCreteInformation| OpenEnergy

298

Assessment of TEES reg sign applications for Wet Industrial Wastes: Energy benefit and economic analysis report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fundamental work is catalyzed biomass pyrolysis/gasification led to the Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg sign}) concept, a means of converting moist biomass feedstocks to high-value fuel gases such as methane. A low-temperature (350{degrees}C), pressurized (3100 psig) reaction environment and a nickel catalyst are used to reduce volumes of very high-moisture wastes such as food processing byproducts while producing useful quantities of energy. A study was conducted to assess the economic viability of a range of potential applications of the process. Cases examined included feedstocks of cheese whey, grape pomace, spent grain, and an organic chemical waste stream. The analysis indicated that only the organic chemical waste process is economically attractive in the existing energy/economic environment. However, food processing cases will become attractive as alternative disposal practices are curtailed and energy prices rise.

Elliott, D.C.; Scheer, T.H.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Sodium Bearing Waste - Waste Incidental to Reprocessing Determination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management, Section I.1.C, requires that all radioactive waste subject to Department of Energy Order 435.1 be managed as high-level radioactive waste, transuranic waste, or low-level radioactive waste. Determining the radiological classification of the sodium-bearing waste currently in the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Tank Farm Facility inventory is important to its proper treatment and disposition. This report presents the technical basis for making the determination that the sodium-bearing waste is waste incidental to spent fuel reprocessing and should be managed as mixed transuranic waste. This report focuses on the radiological characteristics of the sodiumbearing waste. The report does not address characterization of the nonradiological, hazardous constituents of the waste in accordance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requirements.

Jacobson, Victor Levon

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Reporting Fraud, Waste, and Abuse  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To notify all Department of Energy (DOE) employees, including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) employees, of their duty to report allegations of fraud, waste, and abuse to the appropriate authorities, including the DOE Office of Inspector General (OIG). Cancels: DOE N 221.12, Reporting Fraud, Waste, and Abuse, dated 10-19-06

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Waste Management Coordinating Lead Authors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-to-energy ..............................................601 10.4.4 Biological treatment including composting, anaerobic digestion, and MBT (Mechanical Biological Treatment) ........................................601 10.4.5 Waste reduction, re-use and recycling ..............602 10.4.6 Wastewater and sludge treatment.....................602 10.4.7 Waste

Columbia University

302

Conversion Technology and the San Jose Zero Waste Initiative  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Innovation in San Jose * Partnering with Bulk Handling Systems * Zero Waste Energy Zero Waste Energy Development Integrated ADComposting Project Site AD Project Site Digester...

303

Waste Not, Want Not: Analyzing the Economic and Environmental Viability of Waste-to-Energy (WTE) Technology for Site-Specific Optimization of Renewable Energy Options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste-to-energy (WTE) technology burns municipal solid waste (MSW) in an environmentally safe combustion system to generate electricity, provide district heat, and reduce the need for landfill disposal. While this technology has gained acceptance in Europe, it has yet to be commonly recognized as an option in the United States. Section 1 of this report provides an overview of WTE as a renewable energy technology and describes a high-level model developed to assess the feasibility of WTE at a site. Section 2 reviews results from previous life cycle assessment (LCA) studies of WTE, and then uses an LCA inventory tool to perform a screening-level analysis of cost, net energy production, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and conventional air pollution impacts of WTE for residual MSW in Boulder, Colorado. Section 3 of this report describes the federal regulations that govern the permitting, monitoring, and operating practices of MSW combustors and provides emissions limits for WTE projects.

Funk, K.; Milford, J.; Simpkins, T.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Vitrification of high sulfate wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) through the Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) is investigating the application of vitrification technology to mixed wastes within the DOE system This work involves identifying waste streams, laboratory testing to identify glass formulations and characterize the vitrified product, and demonstration testing with the actual waste in a pilot-scale system. Part of this program is investigating process limits for various waste components, specifically those components that typically create problems for the application of vitrification, such as sulfate, chloride, and phosphate. This work describes results from vitrification testing for a high-sulfate waste, the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basin waste at Hanford. A low melting phosphate glass formulation has been developed for a waste stream high in sodium and sulfate. At melt temperatures in the range of 1,000 C to 1,200 C, sulfate in the waste is decomposed to gaseous oxides and driven off during melting, while the remainder of the oxides stay in the melt. Decomposition of the sulfates eliminates the processing problems typically encountered in vitrification of sulfate-containing wastes, resulting in separation of the sulfate from the remainder of the waste and allowing the sulfate to be collected in the off-gas system and treated as a secondary waste stream. Both the vitreous product and intentionally devitrified samples are durable when compared to reference glasses by TCLP and DI water leach tests. Simple, short tests to evaluate the compatibility of the glasses with potential melter materials found minimal corrosion with most materials.

Merrill, R.A.; Whittington, K.F.; Peters, R.D.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Waste-Lithium-Liquid (WLL) Flow Battery for Stationary Energy Storage Applications Youngsik Kim* and Nina MahootcheianAsl  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste-Lithium-Liquid (WLL) Flow Battery for Stationary Energy Storage Applications Youngsik Kim in a Waste-Lithium-Liquid (WLL) flow battery that can be used in a stationary energy storage application. Li* and Nina MahootcheianAsl Richard Lugar Center for Renewable Energy, Department of Mechanical Engineering

Zhou, Yaoqi

306

Identifying Mixed Chemical and Radioactive Waste Mixed waste is: any waste material containing both radioactive materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identifying Mixed Chemical and Radioactive Waste Mixed waste is: any waste material containing both as noted on the list, you do not have a mixed waste and it may be managed as a normal radioactive waste radioactive waste after initially dating the container, the hold for decay time is extended, but you cannot

Straight, Aaron

307

Municipal waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to apparatus for processing municipal waste, and more particularly to vibrating mesh screen conveyor systems for removing grit, glass, and other noncombustible materials from dry municipal waste. Municipal waste must be properly processed and disposed of so that it does not create health risks to the community. Generally, municipal waste, which may be collected in garbage trucks, dumpsters, or the like, is deposited in processing areas such as landfills. Land and environmental controls imposed on landfill operators by governmental bodies have increased in recent years, however, making landfill disposal of solid waste materials more expensive. 6 figs.

Mayberry, J.L.

1988-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

308

Radioactive Waste Management Basis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

Perkins, B K

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

309

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07. Admin Chg 2, dated 6-8-11, cancels DOE M 435.1-1 Chg 1.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

310

Design and management for resource recovery. Volume 1. Energy from waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 16 chapters in this volume represent a large fraction of the technical presentations made at the July 1979 Engineerng Foundation Conference, Municipal solid waste as a resource: the problem and the promise. This conference was held at a time when commercial interest in recovering resources from solid waste entered a growth phase and when the economics of energy recovery from waste improved dramatically. The purpose of the meeting, in Henniker, NH, was to deal openly with some of the past problems and look to the future to see if in fact the nagging early difficulties could be overcome. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 16 chapters, all of which were selected for Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA); 2 will appear in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA).

Frankiewicz, T.C. (ed.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Municipal solid waste energy conversion study on Guam and American Samoa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the Pacific Islands of Guam and Tutuila in American Samoa, conversion of municipal solid waste to useable energy forms - principally electricity but possibly steam - may hold promise for reducing economic dependence on imported petroleum. A secondary benefit may be derived from reduction of solid waste landfill requirements. At the preliminary planning stage, waste-to-energy facilities producing electricity appear technically and environmentally feasible. Economically, the projects appear marginal but could be viable under specific conditions related to capital costs, revenue from garbage collection and revenue from the sale of the energy generated. Grant funding for the projects would considerably enhance the economic viability of the proposed facilities. The projects appear sufficiently viable to proceed to the detailed planning stage. Such projects are not viable for the islands now emerging from the US Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands.

Not Available

1984-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

312

Mixed waste: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains the peer-reviewed and edited versions of papers submitted for presentation a the Second International Mixed Waste Symposium. Following the tradition of the First International Mixed Waste Symposium, these proceedings were prepared in advance of the meeting for distribution to participants. The symposium was organized by the Mixed Waste Committee of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The topics discussed at the symposium include: stabilization technologies, alternative treatment technologies, regulatory issues, vitrification technologies, characterization of wastes, thermal technologies, laboratory and analytical issues, waste storage and disposal, organic treatment technologies, waste minimization, packaging and transportation, treatment of mercury contaminated wastes and bioprocessing, and environmental restoration. Individual abstracts are catalogued separately for the data base.

Moghissi, A.A.; Blauvelt, R.K.; Benda, G.A.; Rothermich, N.E. [eds.] [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Safety and Health

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

313

Material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems: Project overview and main results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: > The source separation level (SSL) of waste management system does not qualify adequately the system. > Separately collecting organic waste gives less advantages than packaging materials. > Recycling packaging materials (metals, glass, plastics, paper) is always attractive. > Composting and anaerobic digestion of organic waste gives questionable outcomes. > The critical threshold of optimal recycling seems to be a SSL of 50%. - Abstract: This paper describes the context, the basic assumptions and the main findings of a joint research project aimed at identifying the optimal breakdown between material recovery and energy recovery from municipal solid waste (MSW) in the framework of integrated waste management systems (IWMS). The project was carried out from 2007 to 2009 by five research groups at Politecnico di Milano, the Universities of Bologna and Trento, and the Bocconi University (Milan), with funding from the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research (MIUR). Since the optimization of IWMSs by analytical methods is practically impossible, the search for the most attractive strategy was carried out by comparing a number of relevant recovery paths from the point of view of mass and energy flows, technological features, environmental impact and economics. The main focus has been on mature processes applicable to MSW in Italy and Europe. Results show that, contrary to a rather widespread opinion, increasing the source separation level (SSL) has a very marginal effects on energy efficiency. What does generate very significant variations in energy efficiency is scale, i.e. the size of the waste-to-energy (WTE) plant. The mere value of SSL is inadequate to qualify the recovery system. The energy and environmental outcome of recovery depends not only on 'how much' source separation is carried out, but rather on 'how' a given SSL is reached.

Consonni, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.consonni@polimi.it [Department of Energy, Politecnico di Milano, Via Lambruschini 4, 20156 Milan (Italy); Giugliano, Michele [DIIAR, Environmental Section, Politecnico di Milano, P.za L. Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milan (Italy); Massarutto, Antonio [Dse, Universita degli Studi di Udine and IEFE, Via Tomadini 30/a, 33100 Udine (Italy); Ragazzi, Marco [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Trento, Via Mesiano 77, 38123 Trento (Italy); Saccani, Cesare [DIEM, University of Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 2, 40136 Bologna (Italy)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

314

Solid waste disposal options: an optimum disposal model for the management of municipal solid waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Solid Waste Disposal Act and shifted the emphasis from disposal practices to recycling, resource recovery, and energy conversion of wastes. ' The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) provided for the disposal of solid waste in such a... was constructed in 1930 in New York City. " But waste- to-energy technology development was hindered by poor reliability, poor efficiency, and low cost effectiveness. " The Resource Recovery Act of 1970 and RCRA of 1976, shifted the em- phasis in solid waste...

Haney, Brenda Ann

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System. Waste management 1993 symposium papers and viewgraphs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State has the most diverse and largest amount of highly radioactive waste of any site in the US. High-level radioactive waste has been stored in large underground tanks since 1944. A Tank Waste Remediation System Program has been established within the DOE to safely manage and immobilize these wastes in anticipation of permanent disposal in a geologic repository. The Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System Waste Management 1993 Symposium Papers and Viewgraphs covered the following topics: Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System Overview; Tank Waste Retrieval Issues and Options for their Resolution; Tank Waste Pretreatment - Issues, Alternatives and Strategies for Resolution; Low-Level Waste Disposal - Grout Issue and Alternative Waste Form Technology; A Strategy for Resolving High-Priority Hanford Site Radioactive Waste Storage Tank Safety Issues; Tank Waste Chemistry - A New Understanding of Waste Aging; Recent Results from Characterization of Ferrocyanide Wastes at the Hanford Site; Resolving the Safety Issue for Radioactive Waste Tanks with High Organic Content; Technology to Support Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System Objectives.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Bad wine makes for good energy Waste from improper fermentation can transform into electricity, hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MSNBC.com Bad wine makes for good energy Waste from improper fermentation can transform, a group of scientists from India recently developed a microbial fuel cell that uses wine to produce energy of wine could drop your electrical and gas bills. Using widely available microbes, scientists

317

2014 ENERGY AND ECONOMIC VALUE OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE (MSW), INCLUDING NON-RECYCLED PLASTICS (NRP),  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-to-energy (WTE) plants, 0.27 million tons (0.7%) were used as alternative fuel in cement production, and 32 Earth Engineering Center (EEC) Report to the American Chemistry Council (ACC) which was based on U.S. 2008 data and quantified the energy and economic value of municipal solid wastes (MSW) and non

Columbia University

318

Municipal solid waste management: A bibliography of US Department of Energy contractor reports through 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

US Department of Energy contractors continue to conduct research targeting the productive and responsible use of the more than 536,000 tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) that is generated each day in the United States. It is becoming more and more prudent to improve current methods of MSW management and to continue to search for additional cost-effective, energy-efficient means to manage our MSW resource. This bibliography is an updated version of Municipal Waste to Energy: An Annotated Bibliography of US Department of Energy Contractor Reports, by Caroline Brooks, published in 1987. Like its predecessor, this bibliography provides information about technical reports on energy from municipal waste that were prepared under grants or contracts from the US Department of Energy. The reports listed focus on energy from municipal waste technologies and energy conservation in wastewater treatment. The bibliography contains three indexes -- an author index, a subject index, and a title index. The reports are listed alphabetically in the subject areas and may appear under more than one subject. All of the reports cited in the original MSW bibliography are also included in this update. The number of copies of each report originally published varied according to anticipated public demand. However, all reports are available in either microfiche or hard copy form and may be ordered from the National Technical Information Service (NTIS), US Department of Commerce, Springfield, VA 22161. Explicit information on ordering reports is included in Appendix A.

Shepherd, P.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) : FY10 development and integration.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the progress in fiscal year 2010 in developing the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with robust verification, validation, and software quality requirements. Waste IPSC activities in fiscal year 2010 focused on specifying a challenge problem to demonstrate proof of concept, developing a verification and validation plan, and performing an initial gap analyses to identify candidate codes and tools to support the development and integration of the Waste IPSC. The current Waste IPSC strategy is to acquire and integrate the necessary Waste IPSC capabilities wherever feasible, and develop only those capabilities that cannot be acquired or suitably integrated, verified, or validated. This year-end progress report documents the FY10 status of acquisition, development, and integration of thermal-hydrologic-chemical-mechanical (THCM) code capabilities, frameworks, and enabling tools and infrastructure.

Criscenti, Louise Jacqueline; Sassani, David Carl; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Bouchard, Julie F.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Wang, Yifeng; Schultz, Peter Andrew

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Energy or compost from green waste? - A CO{sub 2} - Based assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Green waste is increasingly extracted from the material recycling chain and, as a result of the financial subsidy arising from the German renewable energy law for the generation of energy from renewable raw materials; it is fed into the energy recovery process in biomass power stations. A reduction in climate relevant gases is also linked to the material recovery of green waste - in particular when using composts gained from the process as a new raw material in different types of potting compost and plant culture media as a replacement for peat. Unlike energy recovery, material valorisation is not currently subsidised. Through the analysis of material and energy valorisation methods for green waste, with particular emphasis on primary resource consumption and CO{sub 2}-balance, it could be determined that the use of green waste for energy generation and its recovery for material and peat replacement purposes can be considered to be on a par. Based on energy recovery or material oriented scenarios, it can be further deduced that no method on its own will achieve the desired outcome and that a combination of recycling processes is more likely to lead to a significant decrease of greenhouse gas emissions.

Kranert, Martin, E-mail: martin.kranert@iswa.uni-stuttgart.d [Universitaet Stuttgart, Institute for Sanitary Engineering, Water Quality and Solid Waste Management, Bandtaele 2, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Gottschall, Ralf; Bruns, Christian [Humus and Erden Kontor GmbH, Karlsbrunnenstrasse 11, D-37249 Neu-Eichenberg (Germany); Hafner, Gerold [Universitaet Stuttgart, Institute for Sanitary Engineering, Water Quality and Solid Waste Management, Bandtaele 2, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) verification and validation plan. version 1.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) is to provide an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive-waste storage facility or disposal repository. To meet this objective, NEAMS Waste IPSC M&S capabilities will be applied to challenging spatial domains, temporal domains, multiphysics couplings, and multiscale couplings. A strategic verification and validation (V&V) goal is to establish evidence-based metrics for the level of confidence in M&S codes and capabilities. Because it is economically impractical to apply the maximum V&V rigor to each and every M&S capability, M&S capabilities will be ranked for their impact on the performance assessments of various components of the repository systems. Those M&S capabilities with greater impact will require a greater level of confidence and a correspondingly greater investment in V&V. This report includes five major components: (1) a background summary of the NEAMS Waste IPSC to emphasize M&S challenges; (2) the conceptual foundation for verification, validation, and confidence assessment of NEAMS Waste IPSC M&S capabilities; (3) specifications for the planned verification, validation, and confidence-assessment practices; (4) specifications for the planned evidence information management system; and (5) a path forward for the incremental implementation of this V&V plan.

Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Urbina, Angel; Bouchard, Julie F.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Knupp, Patrick Michael; Wang, Yifeng; Schultz, Peter Andrew; Howard, Robert (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); McCornack, Marjorie Turner

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Twelfth annual US DOE low-level waste management conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The papers in this document comprise the proceedings of the Department of Energy's Twelfth Annual Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Conference, which was held in Chicago, Illinois, on August 28 and 29, 1990. General subjects addressed during the conference included: mixed waste, low-level radioactive waste tracking and transportation, public involvement, performance assessment, waste stabilization, financial assurance, waste minimization, licensing and environmental documentation, below-regulatory-concern waste, low-level radioactive waste temporary storage, current challenges, and challenges beyond 1990.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), DOE/WIPP-069, was initially developed by a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Steering Committee to provide performance requirements to ensure public health and safety as well as the safe handling of transuranic (TRU) waste at the WIPP. This revision updates the criteria and requirements of previous revisions and deletes those which were applicable only to the test phase. The criteria and requirements in this document must be met by participating DOE TRU Waste Generator/Storage Sites (Sites) prior to shipping contact-handled (CH) and remote-handled (RH) TRU waste forms to the WIPP. The WIPP Project will comply with applicable federal and state regulations and requirements, including those in Titles 10, 40, and 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). The WAC, DOE/WIPP-069, serves as the primary directive for assuring the safe handling, transportation, and disposal of TRU wastes in the WIPP and for the certification of these wastes. The WAC identifies strict requirements that must be met by participating Sites before these TRU wastes may be shipped for disposal in the WIPP facility. These criteria and requirements will be reviewed and revised as appropriate, based on new technical or regulatory requirements. The WAC is a controlled document. Revised/changed pages will be supplied to all holders of controlled copies.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Industrial Low Temperature Waste Heat Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, some common and emerging techniques to better utilize energy in the chemical process industries are discussed. Temperature levels of waste heat available are pointed out. Emerging practices for further economical utilization of waste...

Altin, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Waste Heat Boilers for Incineration Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Incineration is a widely used process for disposing of solid, liquid and gaseous wastes generated in various types of industries. In addition to destroying pollutants, energy may also be recovered from the waste gas streams in the form of steam...

Ganapathy, V.

326

Solid Waste Resource Recovery Financing Act (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The State of Texas encourages the processing of solid waste for the purpose of extracting, converting to energy, or otherwise separating and preparing solid waste for reuse. This Act provides for...

327

A Cumulative Energy Demand indicator (CED), life cycle based, for industrial waste management decision making  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: We developed a methodology useful to environmentally compare industrial waste management options. The methodology uses a Net Energy Demand indicator which is life cycle based. The method was simplified to be widely used, thus avoiding cost driven decisions. This methodology is useful for governments to promote the best environmental options. This methodology can be widely used by other countries or regions around the world. - Abstract: Life cycle thinking is a good approach to be used for environmental decision-support, although the complexity of the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) studies sometimes prevents their wide use. The purpose of this paper is to show how LCA methodology can be simplified to be more useful for certain applications. In order to improve waste management in Catalonia (Spain), a Cumulative Energy Demand indicator (LCA-based) has been used to obtain four mathematical models to help the government in the decision of preventing or allowing a specific waste from going out of the borders. The conceptual equations and all the subsequent developments and assumptions made to obtain the simplified models are presented. One of the four models is discussed in detail, presenting the final simplified equation to be subsequently used by the government in decision making. The resulting model has been found to be scientifically robust, simple to implement and, above all, fulfilling its purpose: the limitation of waste transport out of Catalonia unless the waste recovery operations are significantly better and justify this transport.

Puig, Rita, E-mail: rita.puig@eei.upc.edu [Escola dEnginyeria dIgualada (EEI), Universitat Politcnica de Catalunya (UPC), Plaa del Rei, 15, 08700 Igualada (Spain); Fullana-i-Palmer, Pere [UNESCO Chair in Life Cycle and Climate Change, Escola Superior de Comer Internacional, Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), c/Passeig Pujades, 1, 08003 Barcelona (Spain); Baquero, Grau; Riba, Jordi-Roger [Escola dEnginyeria dIgualada (EEI), Universitat Politcnica de Catalunya (UPC), Plaa del Rei, 15, 08700 Igualada (Spain); Bala, Alba [UNESCO Chair in Life Cycle and Climate Change, Escola Superior de Comer Internacional, Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), c/Passeig Pujades, 1, 08003 Barcelona (Spain)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

Engineering/design of a co-generation waste-to-energy facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Five hundred fifteen thousand tons of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) is being generated every day in America. At present 68% of this trash is dumped into landfill operations. As the amount of garbage is increasing daily, the amount of land reserved for landfills is diminishing rapidly. With the sentiment of the public that you produce it, you keep it, the import-export of waste between the counties and states for the landfills, no longer appears to be feasible, especially when combined with expensive disposal costs. One method of reducing the quantity of waste sent to landfills is through the use of waste-to-energy facilities - the technology of resource recovery - the technology of today INCINERATION. All cogeneration projects are not alike. This paper examines several aspects of the electrical system of a particular municipal solid waste-to-energy project at Charleston, S.C. which includes plant auxiliary loads as well as a utility interconnection through a step-up transformer.

Bajaj, K.S.; Virgilio, R.J. (Foster Wheeler USA Corp., Clinton, NJ (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Waste and Climate Change ISWA WHITE PAPER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waste prevention, recycling and reuse, biological treatment with land use of products, energy recoveryWaste and Climate Change ISWA WHITE PAPER #12;Preface 3 Re-evaluating waste: ISWA key messages 4 ISWA Commitments 6 Introduction 7 Technologies 8 Material recovery 14 Organic recovery 16 Energy

330

Harnessing waste heat and reducing wasted lighting : three mechanical structures for efficient energy systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents three mechanical structures designed for efficient energy systems. In [3], Cooley presents a modification of a fluorescent lamp which allows it to detect nearby occupants and dim itself automatically. ...

Stronger, Brad A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

electrolytic cell, designed to integrate waste heat recovery (i.e a microbial heat recovery cell or MHRC), can operate as a fuel cell and convert effluent streams into...

332

New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the issues of conducting debris treatment in the New Waste Calcine Facility (NWCF) decontamination area and the methods currently being used to decontaminate material at the NWCF.

K. E. Archibald

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Solid Waste Management Plan. Revision 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The waste types discussed in this Solid Waste Management Plan are Municipal Solid Waste, Hazardous Waste, Low-Level Mixed Waste, Low-Level Radioactive Waste, and Transuranic Waste. The plan describes for each type of solid waste, the existing waste management facilities, the issues, and the assumptions used to develop the current management plan.

NONE

1995-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

334

Ferrocyanide tank waste stability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ferrocyanide wastes were generated at the Hanford Site during the mid to late 1950s as a result of efforts to create more tank space for the storage of high-level nuclear waste. The ferrocyanide process was developed to remove [sup 137]CS from existing waste and newly generated waste that resulted from the recovery of valuable uranium in Hanford Site waste tanks. During the course of research associated with the ferrocyanide process, it was recognized that ferrocyanide materials, when mixed with sodium nitrate and/or sodium nitrite, were capable of violent exothermic reaction. This chemical reactivity became an issue in the 1980s, when safety issues associated with the storage of ferrocyanide wastes in Hanford Site tanks became prominent. These safety issues heightened in the late 1980s and led to the current scrutiny of the safety issues associated with these wastes, as well as current research and waste management programs. Testing to provide information on the nature of possible tank reactions is ongoing. This document supplements the information presented in Summary of Single-Shell Tank Waste Stability, WHC-EP-0347, March 1991 (Borsheim and Kirch 1991), which evaluated several issues. This supplement only considers information particular to ferrocyanide wastes.

Fowler, K.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Hanford Tank Waste Information Enclosure 1 Hanford Tank Waste Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hanford Tank Waste Information Enclosure 1 1 Hanford Tank Waste Information 1.0 Summary This information demonstrates the wastes in the twelve Hanford Site tanks meet the definition of transuranic (TRU. The wastes in these twelve (12) tanks are not high-level waste (HLW), and contain more than 100 nanocuries

336

Stabilization of compactible waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of series of experiments performed to determine the feasibility of stabilizing compacted or compactible waste with polymers. The need for this work arose from problems encountered at disposal sites attributed to the instability of this waste in disposal. These studies are part of an experimental program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) investigating methods for the improved solidification/stabilization of DOE low-level wastes. The approach taken in this study was to perform a series of survey type experiments using various polymerization systems to find the most economical and practical method for further in-depth studies. Compactible dry bulk waste was stabilized with two different monomer systems: styrene-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and polyester-styrene, in laboratory-scale experiments. Stabilization was accomplished by wetting or soaking compactible waste (before or after compaction) with monomers, which were subsequently polymerized. Three stabilization methods are described. One involves the in-situ treatment of compacted waste with monomers in which a vacuum technique is used to introduce the binder into the waste. The second method involves the alternate placement and compaction of waste and binder into a disposal container. In the third method, the waste is treated before compaction by wetting the waste with the binder using a spraying technique. A series of samples stabilized at various binder-to-waste ratios were evaluated through water immersion and compression testing. Full-scale studies were conducted by stabilizing two 55-gallon drums of real compacted waste. The results of this preliminary study indicate that the integrity of compacted waste forms can be readily improved to ensure their long-term durability in disposal environments. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal.

U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a generator of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the Hanford Site must ensure that its TRU waste meets the requirements of US. Department of Energy (DOE) 0 435.1, ''Radioactive Waste Management,'' and the Contact-Handled (CH) Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP-WAC). WIPP-WAC requirements are derived from the WIPP Technical Safety Requirements, WIPP Safety Analysis Report, TRUPACT-II SARP, WIPP Land Withdrawal Act, WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 191/194 Compliance Certification Decision. The WIPP-WAC establishes the specific physical, chemical, radiological, and packaging criteria for acceptance of defense TRU waste shipments at WIPP. The WPP-WAC also requires that participating DOE TRU waste generator/treatment/storage sites produce site-specific documents, including a certification plan, that describe their program for managing TRU waste and TRU waste shipments before transferring waste to WIPP. Waste characterization activities provide much of the data upon which certification decisions are based. Waste characterization requirements for TRU waste and TRU mixed waste that contains constituents regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) are established in the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Waste Analysis Plan (WAP). The Hanford Site Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) (HNF-2599) implements the applicable requirements in the WAP and includes the qualitative and quantitative criteria for making hazardous waste determinations. The Hanford Site must also ensure that its TRU waste destined for disposal at WPP meets requirements for transport in the Transuranic Package Transporter-11 (TRUPACT-11). The US. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) establishes the TRUPACT-11 requirements in the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package (TRUPACT-11 SARP). In addition, a TRU waste is eligible for disposal at WIPP only if it has been generated in whole or in part by one or more of the activities listed in Section 10101(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. DOE sites must determine that each waste stream to be disposed of at WIPP is ''defense'' TRU waste. (See also the definition of ''defense'' TRU waste.). Only CH TRU wastes meeting the requirements of the QAPjP, WIPP-WAP, WPP-WAC, and other requirements documents described above will be accepted for transportation and disposal at WIPP.

GREAGER, T.M.

2000-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

339

Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a generator of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the Hanford Site must ensure that its TRU waste meets the requirements of US. Department of Energy (DOE) 0 435.1, ''Radioactive Waste Management,'' and the Contact-Handled (CH) Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP-WAC). WIPP-WAC requirements are derived from the WIPP Technical Safety Requirements, WIPP Safety Analysis Report, TRUPACT-II SARP, WIPP Land Withdrawal Act, WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 191/194 Compliance Certification Decision. The WIPP-WAC establishes the specific physical, chemical, radiological, and packaging criteria for acceptance of defense TRU waste shipments at WIPP. The WPP-WAC also requires that participating DOE TRU waste generator/treatment/storage sites produce site-specific documents, including a certification plan, that describe their program for managing TRU waste and TRU waste shipments before transferring waste to WIPP. Waste characterization activities provide much of the data upon which certification decisions are based. Waste characterization requirements for TRU waste and TRU mixed waste that contains constituents regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) are established in the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Waste Analysis Plan (WAP). The Hanford Site Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) (HNF-2599) implements the applicable requirements in the WAP and includes the qualitative and quantitative criteria for making hazardous waste determinations. The Hanford Site must also ensure that its TRU waste destined for disposal at WPP meets requirements for transport in the Transuranic Package Transporter-11 (TRUPACT-11). The US. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) establishes the TRUPACT-11 requirements in the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package (TRUPACT-11 SARP). In addition, a TRU waste is eligible for disposal at WIPP only if it has been generated in whole or in part by one or more of the activities listed in Section 10101(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. DOE sites must determine that each waste stream to be disposed of at WIPP is ''defense'' TRU waste. (See also the definition of ''defense'' TRU waste.). Only CH TRU wastes meeting the requirements of the QAPjP, WIPP-WAP, WPP-WAC, and other requirements documents described above will be accepted for transportation and disposal at WIPP.

GREAGER, T.M.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Optimizing High Level Waste Disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

If society is ever to reap the potential benefits of nuclear energy, technologists must close the fuel-cycle completely. A closed cycle equates to a continued supply of fuel and safe reactors, but also reliable and comprehensive closure of waste issues. High level waste (HLW) disposal in borosilicate glass (BSG) is based on 1970s era evaluations. This host matrix is very adaptable to sequestering a wide variety of radionuclides found in raffinates from spent fuel reprocessing. However, it is now known that the current system is far from optimal for disposal of the diverse HLW streams, and proven alternatives are available to reduce costs by billions of dollars. The basis for HLW disposal should be reassessed to consider extensive waste form and process technology research and development efforts, which have been conducted by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), international agencies and the private sector. Matching the waste form to the waste chemistry and using currently available technology could increase the waste content in waste forms to 50% or more and double processing rates. Optimization of the HLW disposal system would accelerate HLW disposition and increase repository capacity. This does not necessarily require developing new waste forms, the emphasis should be on qualifying existing matrices to demonstrate protection equal to or better than the baseline glass performance. Also, this proposed effort does not necessarily require developing new technology concepts. The emphasis is on demonstrating existing technology that is clearly better (reliability, productivity, cost) than current technology, and justifying its use in future facilities or retrofitted facilities. Higher waste processing and disposal efficiency can be realized by performing the engineering analyses and trade-studies necessary to select the most efficient methods for processing the full spectrum of wastes across the nuclear complex. This paper will describe technologies being evaluated at Idaho National Laboratory and the facilities weve designed to evaluate options and support optimization.

Dirk Gombert

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Information related to low-level mixed waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was prepared to support the analysis of risks and costs associated with the proposed treatment of low-level mixed waste (LLMW) under management of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The various waste management alternatives for treatment of LLMW have been defined in the DOE`s Office of Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement. This technical memorandum estimates the waste material throughput expected at each proposed LLMW treatment facility and analyzes potential radiological and chemical releases at each DOE site resulting from treatment of these wastes. Models have been developed to generate site-dependent radiological profiles and waste-stream-dependent chemical profiles for these wastes. Current site-dependent inventories and estimates for future generation of LLMW have been obtained from DOE`s 1994 Mixed Waste Inventory Report (MWIR-2). Using treatment procedures developed by the Mixed Waste Treatment Project, the MWIR-2 database was analyzed to provide waste throughput and emission estimates for each of the different waste types assessed in this report. Uncertainties in the estimates at each site are discussed for waste material throughputs and radiological and chemical releases.

Wilkins, B.D.; Dolak, D.A.; Wang, Y.Y.; Meshkov, N.K.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Reporting Fraud, Waste, and Abuse  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To notify all Department of Energy (DOE) employees, including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) employees, of their duty to report allegations of fraud, waste, and abuse to the appropriate authorities, including the DOE Office of Inspector General (OIG).

2001-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

343

Reporting Fraud, Waste, and Abuse  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To notify all Department of Energy (DOE) employees, including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) employees, of their duty to report allegations of fraud, waste, and abuse to the appropriate authorities, including the DOE Office of Inspector General (OIG).

2003-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

344

Reporting Fraud, Waste and Abuse  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To notify all Department of Energy (DOE) employees, including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) employees, of their duty to report allegations of fraud, waste, and abuse to the appropriate authorities, including the DOE Office of Inspector General (OIG).

2000-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

345

Reporting Fraud, Waste and Abuse  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To notify all Department of Energy employees, including National Nuclear Security Administration employees, of their duty to report allegations of fraud, waste, and abuse to the appropriate authorities, including the DOE Office of Inspector General. No cancellation.

2006-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

346

Reporting Fraud, Waste, and Abuse  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To notify all Department of Energy employees, including National Nuclear Security Administration employees, of their duty to report allegations of fraud, waste, and abuse to the appropriate authorities, including the DOE Office of Inspector General.

2005-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

347

Recover heat from waste incineration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using these guidelines, engineers can address critical design problems associated with burning process-waste streams and select cost-effective waste-heat boilers. Incinerating contaminant streams is a win-win situation: (1) complete destruction of pollutant(s) is attained and (2) valuable thermal energy is recovered as steam and returned to process, thus conserving energy. However, recovering thermal energy from incinerated flue-gas streams contains some caveats. This treatment method creates a large high-temperature flue gas from which valuable thermal energy is recovered as saturated or superheated steam. Unfortunately, because a process-waste stream is used as feed, this stream will have variations in contaminant and component concentrations which influence the load on the boiler. Also, burning contaminants may create acid gases which will accelerate corrosion problems for the boiler at elevated temperatures. The following guidelines and checklist clarify the do`s and don`ts when designing waste-heat boilers.

Ganapathy, V. [ABCO Industries, Abilene, TX (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Underground waste barrier structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is an underground waste barrier structure that consists of waste material, a first container formed of activated carbonaceous material enclosing the waste material, a second container formed of zeolite enclosing the first container, and clay covering the second container. The underground waste barrier structure is constructed by forming a recessed area within the earth, lining the recessed area with a layer of clay, lining the clay with a layer of zeolite, lining the zeolite with a layer of activated carbonaceous material, placing the waste material within the lined recessed area, forming a ceiling over the waste material of a layer of activated carbonaceous material, a layer of zeolite, and a layer of clay, the layers in the ceiling cojoining with the respective layers forming the walls of the structure, and finally, covering the ceiling with earth.

Saha, Anuj J. (Hamburg, NY); Grant, David C. (Gibsonia, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Guidelines for mixed waste minimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, there is no commercial mixed waste disposal available in the United States. Storage and treatment for commercial mixed waste is limited. Host States and compacts region officials are encouraging their mixed waste generators to minimize their mixed wastes because of management limitations. This document provides a guide to mixed waste minimization.

Owens, C.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Use of Thermal Energy Storage to Enhance the Recovery and Utilization of Industrial Waste Heat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recovery and reuse of industrial waste heat may be limited if an energy source cannot be fully utilized in an otherwise available out of phase or unequal capacity end-use process. This paper summarizes the results of a technical and economic...

McChesney, H. R.; Bass, R. W.; Landerman, A. M.; Obee, T. N.; Sgamboti, C. T.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

WASTE-TO-ENERGY RECONSIDERED IN SWEDEN By Waldemar Ingdahl (04/23/2003);  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WASTE-TO-ENERGY RECONSIDERED IN SWEDEN By Waldemar Ingdahl (04/23/2003); as reported in Swedish newspapers;Tech Central Station Sweden has for a long time been a bastion of "green" ideology, and the EU and the rest of the world has monitored Sweden's environmental policies closely for new ideas and inspiration

Columbia University

352

Author's personal copy Pyroelectric waste heat energy harvesting using heat conduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-product of power, refrigeration, or heat pump cycles according to the second law of thermodynamics [1]. In 2009 pump, cryogenic refrigeration, and air liquefaction applications [3]. Organic Rankine cycles useAuthor's personal copy Pyroelectric waste heat energy harvesting using heat conduction Felix Y. Lee

Pilon, Laurent

353

Thermal Energy Storage/Waste Heat Recovery Applications in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and the Portland Cement Association have studied the potential benefits of using waste heat recovery methods and thermal energy storage systems in the cement manufacturing process. This work was performed under DOE Contract No. EC-77-C-01-50S4. The study has been...

Beshore, D. G.; Jaeger, F. A.; Gartner, E. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Waste-to-energy plants face costly emissions-control upgrades  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One treatment method of municipal solid waste, incineration, has fallen in and out of public favor. In the 1970s, emerging consciousness of the threat to groundwater posed by leaking landfills made incineration an attractive option. Prompted by disrupted energy supplies and steeply rising prices, more than 100 municipalities began to generate electricity from the heat produced by burning trash. In the 1990s, the pendulum of public enthusiasm has swung away from incineration. Energy prices have declined dramatically, and safety and siting concerns complicate new projects. A recent Supreme Court decision ruled that municipal incinerator ash must be tested as hazardous waste and disposed accordingly if levels of such pollutants as cadmium and lead exceed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act limits. So-called flow control regulations, which allowed municipalities to apportion garbage disposal to ensure steady supplies to incinerators, also have been struck down. EPA is tackling the issue of air emissions from waste-to-energy and non-energy-producing municipal waste combustors. Emissions guidelines for MWCs and new-source performance standards for new units, proposed Sept. 20 under Sec. 129 of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, are the culmination of a stalled and litigated initiative dating back to the CAA Amendments of 1977.

McIlvaine, R.W.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Operational Waste Volume Projection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of June. 2000.

STRODE, J.N.

2000-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

356

Operational waste volume projection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of June 1996.

Koreski, G.M.

1996-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

357

Accident analysis for the low-level mixed waste ``No-Flame`` option in the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper outlines the various steps pursued in performing a generic safety assessment of the various technologies considered for the low-level mixed waste (LLMW) ``No-Flame`` option in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The treatment technologies for the ``No-Flame`` option differ from previous LLMW technologies analyzed in the WM PEIS in that the incineration and thermal desorption technologies are replaced by sludge washing, soil washing, debris washing, and organic destruction. A set of dominant waste treatment processes and accident scenarios were selected for analysis by means of a screening process. A subset of results (release source terms) from this analysis is presented.

Folga, S.; Kohout, E.; Mueller, C.J.; Nabelssi, B.; Wilkins, B. [Argonne National Lab., Argonne, IL (United States); Mishima, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Final Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Characterization QA Project Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan required each US Department of Energy (DOE) site that characterizes transuranic waste to be sent the Waste Isolation Pilot Plan that addresses applicable requirements specified in the QAPP.

GREAGER, T.M.

1999-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

359

DOE/WIPP-12-3487 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND RECOVERY ACT AND SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL ACTDraft DOE/WIPP-12-3487 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Biennial Environmental Compliance Report United States Department of Energy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Carlsbad Field Office Carlsbad, New Mexico

360

Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Department of Environmental...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Waste Heat Recovery  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

DRAFT - PRE-DECISIONAL - DRAFT 1 Waste Heat Recovery 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the TechnologySystem ......

362

Norcal Waste Systems, Inc.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fact sheet describes the LNG long-haul heavy-duty trucks at Norcal Waste Systems Inc.'s Sanitary Fill Company.

Not Available

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Solid Waste Management (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Solid waste facilities operating in Connecticut must abide by these regulations, which describe requirements and procedures for issuing construction and operating permits; environmental...

364

Solid Waste Policies (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute establishes the support of the state for alternative waste management practices that reduce the reliance upon land disposal and incorporate resource recovery. Cities and counties are...

365

Solid Waste Management (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Indiana Department of...

366

Solid Waste Permits (Louisiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality administers the rules and regulations governing the storage, collection, processing, recovery, and reuse of solid waste protect the air,...

367

Solid Waste Management (Michigan)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act encourages the Department of Environmental Quality and Health Department representatives to develop and encourage methods for disposing solid waste that are environmentally sound, that...

368

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300.degree. C. to 800.degree. C. to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100.degree. C. to 1400.degree. C. at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300 C to 800 C to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100 C to 1400 C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, G.G.

1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

370

Waste minimization assessment procedure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Perry Nuclear Power Plant began developing a waste minimization plan early in 1991. In March of 1991 the plan was documented following a similar format to that described in the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual. Initial implementation involved obtaining management's commitment to support a waste minimization effort. The primary assessment goal was to identify all hazardous waste streams and to evaluate those streams for minimization opportunities. As implementation of the plan proceeded, non-hazardous waste streams routinely generated in large volumes were also evaluated for minimization opportunities. The next step included collection of process and facility data which would be useful in helping the facility accomplish its assessment goals. This paper describes the resources that were used and which were most valuable in identifying both the hazardous and non-hazardous waste streams that existed on site. For each material identified as a waste stream, additional information regarding the materials use, manufacturer, EPA hazardous waste number and DOT hazard class was also gathered. Once waste streams were evaluated for potential source reduction, recycling, re-use, re-sale, or burning for heat recovery, with disposal as the last viable alternative.

Kellythorne, L.L. (Centerior Energy, Cleveland, OH (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Information basis for developing comprehensive waste management system-US-Japan joint nuclear energy action plan waste management working group phase I report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The activity of Phase I of the Waste Management Working Group under the United States - Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan started in 2007. The US-Japan JNEAP is a bilateral collaborative framework to support the global implementation of safe, secure, and sustainable, nuclear fuel cycles (referred to in this document as fuel cycles). The Waste Management Working Group was established by strong interest of both parties, which arise from the recognition that development and optimization of waste management and disposal system(s) are central issues of the present and future nuclear fuel cycles. This report summarizes the activity of the Waste Management Working Group that focused on consolidation of the existing technical basis between the U.S. and Japan and the joint development of a plan for future collaborative activities. Firstly, the political/regulatory frameworks related to nuclear fuel cycles in both countries were reviewed. The various advanced fuel cycle scenarios that have been considered in both countries were then surveyed and summarized. The working group established the working reference scenario for the future cooperative activity that corresponds to a fuel cycle scenario being considered both in Japan and the U.S. This working scenario involves transitioning from a once-through fuel cycle utilizing light water reactors to a one-pass uranium-plutonium fuel recycle in light water reactors to a combination of light water reactors and fast reactors with plutonium, uranium, and minor actinide recycle, ultimately concluding with multiple recycle passes primarily using fast reactors. Considering the scenario, current and future expected waste streams, treatment and inventory were discussed, and the relevant information was summarized. Second, the waste management/disposal system optimization was discussed. Repository system concepts were reviewed, repository design concepts for the various classifications of nuclear waste were summarized, and the factors to consider in repository design and optimization were then discussed. Japan is considering various alternatives and options for the geologic disposal facility and the framework for future analysis of repository concepts was discussed. Regarding the advanced waste and storage form development, waste form technologies developed in both countries were surveyed and compared. Potential collaboration areas and activities were next identified. Disposal system optimization processes and techniques were reviewed, and factors to consider in future repository design optimization activities were also discussed. Then the potential collaboration areas and activities related to the optimization problem were extracted.

Nutt, M.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

372

Integrated assessment of a new Waste-to-Energy facility in Central Greece in the context of regional perspectives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main aim of this study is the integrated assessment of a proposed Waste-to-Energy facility that could contribute in the Municipal Solid Waste Management system of the Region of Central Greece. In the context of this paper alternative transfer schemes for supplying the candidate facility were assessed considering local conditions and economical criteria. A mixed-integer linear programming model was applied for the determination of optimum locations of Transfer Stations for an efficient supplying chain between the waste producers and the Waste-to-Energy facility. Moreover different Regional Waste Management Scenarios were assessed against multiple criteria, via the Multi Criteria Decision Making method ELECTRE III. The chosen criteria were total cost, Biodegradable Municipal Waste diversion from landfill, energy recovery and Greenhouse Gas emissions and the analysis demonstrated that a Waste Management Scenario based on a Waste-to-Energy plant with an adjacent landfill for disposal of the residues would be the best performing option for the Region, depending however on the priorities of the decision makers. In addition the study demonstrated that efficient planning is necessary and the case of three sanitary landfills operating in parallel with the WtE plant in the study area should be avoided. Moreover alternative cases of energy recovery of the candidate Waste-to-Energy facility were evaluated against the requirements of the new European Commission Directive on waste in order for the facility to be recognized as recovery operation. The latter issue is of high significance and the decision makers in European Union countries should take it into account from now on, in order to plan and implement facilities that recover energy efficiently. Finally a sensitivity check was performed in order to evaluate the effects of increased recycling rate, on the calorific value of treated Municipal Solid Waste and the gate fee of the candidate plant and found that increased recycling efforts would not diminish the potential for incineration with energy recovery from waste and neither would have adverse impacts on the gate fee of the Waste-to-Energy plant. In general, the study highlighted the need for efficient planning in solid waste management, by taking into account multiple criteria and parameters and utilizing relevant tools and methodologies into this context.

Perkoulidis, G. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Papageorgiou, A., E-mail: giou6@yahoo.g [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Karagiannidis, A. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Kalogirou, S. [Waste to Energy Research and Technology Council (Greece)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

Waste Hoist  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface.Laboratory30,WP-073.99 4.22Primary Hoist:

374

Waste Hoist  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface.Laboratory30,WP-073.99 4.22Primary Hoist:

375

Secondary Waste Cast Stone Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Cast Stone a cementitious waste form, has been selected for solidification of this secondary waste stream after treatment in the ETF. The secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. This secondary waste Cast Stone waste form qualification testing plan outlines the testing of the waste form and immobilization process to demonstrate that the Cast Stone waste form can comply with the disposal requirements. Specifications for the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form have not been established. For this testing plan, Cast Stone specifications are derived from specifications for the immobilized LAW glass in the WTP contract, the waste acceptance criteria for the IDF, and the waste acceptance criteria in the IDF Permit issued by the State of Washington. This testing plan outlines the testing needed to demonstrate that the waste form can comply with these waste form specifications and acceptance criteria. The testing program must also demonstrate that the immobilization process can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. This testing plan also outlines the testing needed to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support performance assessment analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form in the IDF

Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

376

Olefin Recovery from Chemical Industry Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop a membrane process to separate olefins from paraffins in waste gas streams as an alternative to flaring or distillation. Flaring these streams wastes their chemical feedstock value; distillation is energy and capital cost intensive, particularly for small waste streams.

A.R. Da Costa; R. Daniels; A. Jariwala; Z. He; A. Morisato; I. Pinnau; J.G. Wijmans

2003-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

377

United States Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

United States Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Experience Gained From Programs to Manage High-Level Radioactive Waste and Spent Nuclear Fuel in the United States and Other Countries A Report to Congress and the Secretary of Energy April 2011 #12;#12;U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Experience Gained From

378

Appendix A Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

39 Appendices Appendices #12;Appendix A Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Members: Curricula to the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board. President Clinton appointed Dr. Cohon chairman on January 17, 1997, and Asia and on energy facility siting, including nuclear waste ship- ping and storage. In addition to his

379

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JEC187V3 UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD 2300 Clarendon Boulevard, Suite 1300 of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Dear Secretary O'Leary: At the Nuclear Waste UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD 2300 Clarendon Boulevard, Suite 1300 Arlington, VA

380

Appendix A Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

59 Appendices Appendices #12;Appendix A Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Members: Curricula Cohon to serve on the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board. President Clinton appointed Dr. Cohon, and Asia and on energy-facility siting, including nuclear waste shipping and storage. In addition to his

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Department of Energy's (DOE) work related to the packaging and transport of such waste. Consistent with its and waste package performance. In light of continuing technical challenges, the Board believes that the DOEcon144vf UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD 2300 Clarendon Boulevard, Suite 1300

382

Identify the Problem: Reduce Waste By  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aims to reduce waste by banning plastic bags in light of the California state law AB 2449 which Primary energy Plastic uses 23% less Paper uses 80% less Solid waste Plastic contributes 76% less AbioticIdentify the Problem: Reduce Waste By Banning Plastic Bag Use Define Goal: Is the ban the most

Iglesia, Enrique

383

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

6 Technology Readiness Assessment for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW Waste Vitrification Facility L. Holton D. Alexander C. Babel H. Sutter J. Young August...

384

Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This act provides for planning for the processing and disposal of municipal waste; requires counties to submit plans for municipal waste management systems within their boundaries; authorizes...

385

Material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems. An evaluation based on life cycle assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports the environmental results, integrated with those arising from mass and energy balances, of a research project on the comparative analysis of strategies for material and energy recovery from waste, funded by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research. The project, involving the cooperation of five University research groups, was devoted to the optimisation of material and energy recovery activities within integrated municipal solid waste (MSW) management systems. Four scenarios of separate collection (overall value of 35%, 50% without the collection of food waste, 50% including the collection of food waste, 65%) were defined for the implementation of energetic, environmental and economic balances. Two sizes of integrated MSW management system (IWMS) were considered: a metropolitan area, with a gross MSW production of 750,000 t/year and an average province, with a gross MSW production of 150,000 t/year. The environmental analysis was conducted using Life Cycle Assessment methodology (LCA), for both material and energy recovery activities. In order to avoid allocation we have used the technique of the expansion of the system boundaries. This means taking into consideration the impact on the environment related to the waste management activities in comparison with the avoided impacts related to the saving of raw materials and primary energy. Under the hypotheses of the study, both for the large and for the small IWMS, the energetic and environmental benefits are higher than the energetic and environmental impacts for all the scenarios analysed in terms of all the indicators considered: the scenario with 50% separate collection in a drop-off scheme excluding food waste shows the most promising perspectives, mainly arising from the highest collection (and recycling) of all the packaging materials, which is the activity giving the biggest energetic and environmental benefits. Main conclusions of the study in the general field of the assessment of the environmental performance of any integrated waste management scheme address the importance of properly defining, beyond the design value assumed for the separate collection as a whole, also the yields of each material recovered; particular significance is finally related to the amount of residues deriving from material recovery activities, resulting on average in the order of 20% of the collected materials.

Giugliano, Michele; Cernuschi, Stefano [Politecnico di Milano - DIIAR, Environmental Section, P.zza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Grosso, Mario, E-mail: mario.grosso@polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano - DIIAR, Environmental Section, P.zza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Rigamonti, Lucia [Politecnico di Milano - DIIAR, Environmental Section, P.zza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

Hazardous Waste Management (North Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These rules identify and list hazardous waste and set standards for the generators and operators of such waste as well as owners or operators of waste facilities. They also stats standards for...

387

Virginia Waste Management Act (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Solid waste and hazardous waste are regulated under a number of programs at the Department of Environmental Quality. These programs are designed to encourage the reuse and recycling of solid waste...

388

Solid Waste Disposal Act (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality is responsible for the regulation and management of municipal solid waste and hazardous waste. A fee is applied to all solid waste disposed in the...

389

Solid Waste Act (New Mexico)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The main purpose of the Solid Waste Act is to authorize and direct the establishment of a comprehensive solid waste management program. The act states details about specific waste management...

390

Georgia Waste Control Law (Georgia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Waste Control Law makes it unlawful to dump waste in any lakes, streams or surfaces waters of the State or on any private property without consent of the property owner. Waste is very broadly...

391

Salt Waste Processing Initiatives  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September2-SCORECARD-01-24-13 Page 1 of 1 DepartmentSalt Waste1

392

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout Printable VersionProtective Actions Actions to30/15Waste

393

Environmental evaluation of municipal waste prevention  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: > Influence of prevention on waste management systems, excluding avoided production, is relatively minor. > Influence of prevention on overall supply chain, including avoided production is very significant. > Higher relative benefits of prevention are observed in waste management systems relying mainly on landfills. - Abstract: Waste prevention has been addressed in the literature in terms of the social and behavioural aspects, but very little quantitative assessment exists of the environmental benefits. Our study evaluates the environmental consequences of waste prevention on waste management systems and on the wider society, using life-cycle thinking. The partial prevention of unsolicited mail, beverage packaging and food waste is tested for a 'High-tech' waste management system relying on high energy and material recovery and for a 'Low-tech' waste management system with less recycling and relying on landfilling. Prevention of 13% of the waste mass entering the waste management system generates a reduction of loads and savings in the waste management system for the different impacts categories; 45% net reduction for nutrient enrichment and 12% reduction for global warming potential. When expanding our system and including avoided production incurred by the prevention measures, large savings are observed (15-fold improvement for nutrient enrichment and 2-fold for global warming potential). Prevention of food waste has the highest environmental impact saving. Prevention generates relatively higher overall relative benefit for 'Low-tech' systems depending on landfilling. The paper provides clear evidence of the environmental benefits of waste prevention and has specific relevance in climate change mitigation.

Gentil, Emmanuel C.; Gallo, Daniele [Department of Environmental Engineering, Building 115, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H., E-mail: thho@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Building 115, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste for disposal. The NNSSWAC includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NNSS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex for disposal. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project at (702) 295-7063 or fax to (702) 295-1153.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Waste Management Facilities Cost Information Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Management Facility Cost Information (WMFCI) Report, commissioned by the US Department of Energy (DOE), develops planning life-cycle cost (PLCC) estimates for treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. This report contains PLCC estimates versus capacity for 26 different facility cost modules. A procedure to guide DOE and its contractor personnel in the use of estimating data is also provided. Estimates in the report apply to five distinctive waste streams: low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, alpha contaminated low-level waste, alpha contaminated low-level mixed waste, and transuranic waste. The report addresses five different treatment types: incineration, metal/melting and recovery, shredder/compaction, solidification, and vitrification. Data in this report allows the user to develop PLCC estimates for various waste management options.

Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Waste Management Program management plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the prime contractor to the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID), Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO) provides comprehensive waste management services to all contractors at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) through the Waste Management (WM) Program. This Program Management Plan (PMP) provides an overview of the Waste Management Program objectives, organization and management practices, and scope of work. This document will be reviewed at least annually and updated as needed to address revisions to the Waste Management`s objectives, organization and management practices, and scope of work. Waste Management Program is managed by LMITCO Waste Operations Directorate. The Waste Management Program manages transuranic, low-level, mixed low-level, hazardous, special-case, and industrial wastes generated at or transported to the INEEL.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DESCRIPTION DETAILS * Radioactive Waste Source Reduction 1,500 Radioactive Waste $6,000 $2,500 $6,000 Waste Yard Sorting Table surveying to sort clean waste from radioactive waste Radioactive Emissions Emission lives. Radioactive Waste generated through wet chemistry Waste Minimization 30 Mixed waste / Liquid

398

Solid Waste Paul Woodson, East Central University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of groundwater contamination, air pollution, and odor. Solid wastes may be displeasing to the public either, industrial and medical wastes, food wastes, mineral waste, and nonhazardous wastes. In addition/reservoirs, special wastes, such as medical wastes, low level radioactive wastes, construction/demolition debris

399

Animal Waste Technology Fund (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A bill passed in 2012 transferred responsibility for animal waste management technology projects to the Maryland Department of Agriculture. The Department will maintain the Animal Waste Technology...

400

Nebraska Hazardous Waste Regulations (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Environmental Quality, contain provisions pertaining to hazardous waste management, waste standards, permitting requirements, and land disposal...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL IN GRANITE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL IN GRANITE Paul A. WitherspoonRADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL IN GRANITE Paul A. Wither spoona repository site in granite are to evaluate the suitability

Witherspoon, P.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Solid Waste Management Act (Oklahoma)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act establishes rules for the permitting, posting of security, construction, operation, closure, maintenance and remediation of solid waste disposal sites; disposal of solid waste in ways that...

403

Solid Waste Management (South Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute contains provisions for solid waste management systems, groundwater monitoring, liability for pollution, permitting, inspections, and provisions for waste reduction and recycling...

404

Hazardous Waste Management (New Mexico)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The New Mexico Environment Department's Hazardous Waste Bureau is responsible for the management of hazardous waste in the state. The Bureau enforces the rules established by the Environmental...

405

Solid Waste Rules (New Hampshire)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The solid waste statute applies to construction and demolition debris, appliances, recyclables, and the facilities that collect, process, and dispose of solid waste. DES oversees the management of...

406

Solid Waste Management (North Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Solid Waste Program regulates safe management of solid waste through guidance, technical assistance, regulations, permitting, environmental monitoring, compliance evaluation and enforcement....

407

Radioactive waste disposal package  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

Lampe, Robert F. (Bethel Park, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Hazardous Waste Management Training  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hazardous Waste Management Training Persons (including faculty, staff and students) working with hazardous materials should receive annual training that addresses storage, use, and disposal of hazardous before handling hazardous waste. Departments are re- quired to keep records of training for as long

Dai, Pengcheng

409

Nuclear waste solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

High efficiency removal of technetium values from a nuclear waste stream is achieved by addition to the waste stream of a precipitant contributing tetraphenylphosphonium cation, such that a substantial portion of the technetium values are precipitated as an insoluble pertechnetate salt.

Walker, Darrel D. (1684 Partridge Dr., Aiken, SC 29801); Ebra, Martha A. (129 Hasty Rd., Aiken, SC 29801)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Waste classification sampling plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this sampling is to explain the method used to collect and analyze data necessary to verify and/or determine the radionuclide content of the B-Cell decontamination and decommissioning waste stream so that the correct waste classification for the waste stream can be made, and to collect samples for studies of decontamination methods that could be used to remove fixed contamination present on the waste. The scope of this plan is to establish the technical basis for collecting samples and compiling quantitative data on the radioactive constituents present in waste generated during deactivation activities in B-Cell. Sampling and radioisotopic analysis will be performed on the fixed layers of contamination present on structural material and internal surfaces of process piping and tanks. In addition, dose rate measurements on existing waste material will be performed to determine the fraction of dose rate attributable to both removable and fixed contamination. Samples will also be collected to support studies of decontamination methods that are effective in removing the fixed contamination present on the waste. Sampling performed under this plan will meet criteria established in BNF-2596, Data Quality Objectives for the B-Cell Waste Stream Classification Sampling, J. M. Barnett, May 1998.

Landsman, S.D.

1998-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

411

Challenge problem and milestones for : Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the specification of a challenge problem and associated challenge milestones for the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) supporting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The NEAMS challenge problems are designed to demonstrate proof of concept and progress towards IPSC goals. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with robust verification, validation, and software quality requirements. To demonstrate proof of concept and progress towards these goals and requirements, a Waste IPSC challenge problem is specified that includes coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical-mechanical (THCM) processes that describe (1) the degradation of a borosilicate glass waste form and the corresponding mobilization of radionuclides (i.e., the processes that produce the radionuclide source term), (2) the associated near-field physical and chemical environment for waste emplacement within a salt formation, and (3) radionuclide transport in the near field (i.e., through the engineered components - waste form, waste package, and backfill - and the immediately adjacent salt). The initial details of a set of challenge milestones that collectively comprise the full challenge problem are also specified.

Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Wang, Yifeng; Howard, Robert; McNeish, Jerry A.; Schultz, Peter Andrew; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Secondary Waste Form Down-Selection Data PackageFluidized Bed Steam Reforming Waste Form  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site in southeast Washington State has 56 million gallons of radioactive and chemically hazardous wastes stored in 177 underground tanks (ORP 2010). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP), through its contractors, is constructing the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to convert the radioactive and hazardous wastes into stable glass waste forms for disposal. Within the WTP, the pretreatment facility will receive the retrieved waste from the tank farms and separate it into two treated process streams. These waste streams will be vitrified, and the resulting waste canisters will be sent to offsite (high-level waste [HLW]) and onsite (immobilized low-activity waste [ILAW]) repositories. As part of the pretreatment and ILAW processing, liquid secondary wastes will be generated that will be transferred to the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) on the Hanford Site for further treatment. These liquid secondary wastes will be converted to stable solid waste forms that will be disposed of in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). To support the selection of a waste form for the liquid secondary wastes from WTP, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) has initiated secondary waste form testing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In anticipation of a down-selection process for a waste form for the Solidification Treatment Unit to be added to the ETF, PNNL is developing data packages to support that down-selection. The objective of the data packages is to identify, evaluate, and summarize the existing information on the four waste forms being considered for stabilizing and solidifying the liquid secondary wastes. At the Hanford Site, the FBSR process is being evaluated as a supplemental technology for treating and immobilizing Hanford LAW radioactive tank waste and for treating secondary wastes from the WTP pretreatment and LAW vitrification processes.

Qafoku, Nikolla; Westsik, Joseph H.; Strachan, Denis M.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Pires, Richard P.

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

413

CCA-Treated wood disposed in landfills and life-cycle trade-offs with waste-to-energy and MSW landfill disposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CCA-Treated wood disposed in landfills and life-cycle trade-offs with waste-to-energy and MSW in waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities. In other countries, the predominant disposal option for wood, others have not, and the product continues to enter the waste stream from construction, demolition

Florida, University of

414

Waste-to-energy facilities. January 1985-October 1991 (Citations from the NTIS Data Base). Rept. for Jan 85-Oct 91  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning technical, economic, and environmental evaluations of facilities that convert waste to energy. Solid waste and municipal waste conversion facilities are highlighted. Feasibility studies, technical design, emissions studies, and markets for the resulting energy are discussed. Heat and electrical generation facilities are emphasized. (Contains 187 citations with title list and subject index.)

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF) will provide permanent Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage, treatment, and disposal for hazardous and mixed waste generated at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) that cannot be disposed of in existing or planned SRS facilities. Final design is complete for Phase I of the project, the Disposal Vaults. The Vaults will provide RCRA permitted, above-grade disposal capacity for treated hazardous and mixed waste generated at the SRS. The RCRA Part B Permit application was submitted upon approval of the Permit application, the first Disposal Vault is scheduled to be operational in mid 1994. The technical baseline has been established for Phase II, the Treatment Building, and preliminary design work has been performed. The Treatment Building will provide RCRA permitted treatment processes to handle a variety of hazardous and mixed waste generated at SRS in preparation for disposal. The processes will treat wastes for disposal in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). A RCRA Part B Permit application has not yet been submitted to SCDHEC for this phase of the project. The Treatment Building is currently scheduled to be operational in late 1996.

Bailey, L.L.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

416

Air pollution control technology for municipal solid waste-to-energy conversion facilities: capabilities and research needs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three major categories of waste-to-energy conversion processes in full-scale operation or advanced demonstration stages in the US are co-combustion, mass incineration, and pyrolysis. These methods are described and some information on US conversion facilities is tabulated. Conclusions and recommendations dealing with the operation, performance, and research needs for these facilities are given. Section II identifies research needs concerning air pollution aspects of the waste-to-energy processes and reviews significant operating and research findings for the co-combustion, mass incinceration, and pyrolysis waste-to-energy systems.

Lynch, J F; Young, J C

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Combined Municipal Solid Waste and biomass system optimization for district energy applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Combined energy conversion of MSW and agricultural residue biomass is examined. The model optimizes the financial yield of the investment. Several system specifications are optimally defined by the optimization model. The application to a case study in Greece shows positive financial yield. The investment is mostly sensitive on the interest rate, the investment cost and the heating oil price. - Abstract: Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) disposal has been a controversial issue in many countries over the past years, due to disagreement among the various stakeholders on the waste management policies and technologies to be adopted. One of the ways of treating/disposing MSW is energy recovery, as waste is considered to contain a considerable amount of bio-waste and therefore can lead to renewable energy production. The overall efficiency can be very high in the cases of co-generation or tri-generation. In this paper a model is presented, aiming to support decision makers in issues relating to Municipal Solid Waste energy recovery. The idea of using more fuel sources, including MSW and agricultural residue biomass that may exist in a rural area, is explored. The model aims at optimizing the system specifications, such as the capacity of the base-load Waste-to-Energy facility, the capacity of the peak-load biomass boiler and the location of the facility. Furthermore, it defines the quantity of each potential fuel source that should be used annually, in order to maximize the financial yield of the investment. The results of an energy tri-generation case study application at a rural area of Greece, using mixed MSW and biomass, indicate positive financial yield of investment. In addition, a sensitivity analysis is performed on the effect of the most important parameters of the model on the optimum solution, pinpointing the parameters of interest rate, investment cost and heating oil price, as those requiring the attention of the decision makers. Finally, the sensitivity analysis is enhanced by a stochastic analysis to determine the effect of the volatility of parameters on the robustness of the model and the solution obtained.

Rentizelas, Athanasios A., E-mail: arent@central.ntua.gr; Tolis, Athanasios I., E-mail: atol@central.ntua.gr; Tatsiopoulos, Ilias P., E-mail: itat@central.ntua.gr

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

418

Energy Saving Method of Manufacturing Ceramic Products from Fiber Glass Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. fiber glass industry disposes of more than 260,000 tons of industrial fiber glass waste in landfills annually. New technology is needed to reprocess this industrial waste into useful products. A low-cost energy-saving method of manufacturing ceramic tile from fiber glass waste was developed. The technology is based on sintering fiber glass waste at 700-900 degrees C to produce products which traditionally require firing temperatures of >1200 degrees C, or glass-melting temperatures >1500 degrees C. The process also eliminates other energy intensive processing steps, including mining and transportation of raw materials, spray-drying to produce granulated powder, drying pressed tile, and glazing. The technology completely transforms fiber glass waste into a dense ceramic product, so that all future environmental problems in the handling and disposal of the fibers is eliminated. The processing steps were developed and optimized to produce glossy and matte surface finishes for wall and floor tile applications. High-quality prototype tile samples were processed for demonstration and tile standards testing. A Market Assessment confirmed the market potential for tile products produced by the technology. Manufacturing equipment trials were successfully conducted for each step of the process. An industrial demonstration plant was designed, including equipment and operating cost analysis. A fiber glass manufacturer was selected as an industrial partner to commercialize the technology. A technology development and licensing agreement was completed with the industrial partner. Haun labs will continue working to transfer the technology and assist the industrial partner with commercialization beyond the DOE project.

Michael J. Haun

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

Supplemental analysis of accident sequences and source terms for waste treatment and storage operations and related facilities for the US Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents supplemental information for the document Analysis of Accident Sequences and Source Terms at Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities for Waste Generated by US Department of Energy Waste Management Operations. Additional technical support information is supplied concerning treatment of transuranic waste by incineration and considering the Alternative Organic Treatment option for low-level mixed waste. The latest respirable airborne release fraction values published by the US Department of Energy for use in accident analysis have been used and are included as Appendix D, where respirable airborne release fraction is defined as the fraction of material exposed to accident stresses that could become airborne as a result of the accident. A set of dominant waste treatment processes and accident scenarios was selected for a screening-process analysis. A subset of results (release source terms) from this analysis is presented.

Folga, S.; Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Kohout, E.; Mishima, J.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky9, 2010 The meetingand Eric EdlundWaste Treatment and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Combined Waste Form Cost Trade Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new generation of aqueous nuclear fuel reprocessing, now in development under the auspices of the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), separates fuel into several fractions, thereby partitioning the wastes into groups of common chemistry. This technology advance enables development of waste management strategies that were not conceivable with simple PUREX reprocessing. Conventional wisdom suggests minimizing high level waste (HLW) volume is desirable, but logical extrapolation of this concept suggests that at some point the cost of reducing volume further will reach a point of diminishing return and may cease to be cost-effective. This report summarizes an evaluation considering three groupings of wastes in terms of cost-benefit for the reprocessing system. Internationally, the typical waste form for HLW from the PUREX process is borosilicate glass containing waste elements as oxides. Unfortunately several fission products (primarily Mo and the noble metals Ru, Rh, Pd) have limited solubility in glass, yielding relatively low waste loading, producing more glass, and greater disposal costs. Advanced separations allow matching the waste form to waste stream chemistry, allowing the disposal system to achieve more optimum waste loading with improved performance. Metals can be segregated from oxides and each can be stabilized in forms to minimize the HLW volume for repository disposal. Thus, a more efficient waste management system making the most effective use of advanced waste forms and disposal design for each waste is enabled by advanced separations and how the waste streams are combined. This trade-study was designed to juxtapose a combined waste form baseline waste treatment scheme with two options and to evaluate the cost-benefit using available data from the conceptual design studies supported by DOE-NE.

Dirk Gombert; Steve Piet; Timothy Trickel; Joe Carter; John Vienna; Bill Ebert; Gretchen Matthern

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Robotics for mixed waste operations, demonstration description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD) is developing technology to aid in the cleanup of DOE sites. Included in the OTD program are the Robotics Technology Development Program and the Mixed Waste Integrated Program. These two programs are working together to provide technology for the cleanup of mixed waste, which is waste that has both radioactive and hazardous constituents. There are over 240,000 cubic meters of mixed low level waste accumulated at DOE sites and the cleanup is expected to generate about 900,000 cubic meters of mixed low level waste over the next five years. This waste must be monitored during storage and then treated and disposed of in a cost effective manner acceptable to regulators and the states involved. The Robotics Technology Development Program is developing robotics technology to make these tasks safer, better, faster and cheaper through the Mixed Waste Operations team. This technology will also apply to treatment of transuranic waste. The demonstration at the Savannah River Site on November 2-4, 1993, showed the progress of this technology by DOE, universities and industry over the previous year. Robotics technology for the handling, characterization and treatment of mixed waste as well robotics technology for monitoring of stored waste was demonstrated. It was shown that robotics technology can make future waste storage and waste treatment facilities better, faster, safer and cheaper.

Ward, C.R.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Hanford site transuranic waste certification plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a generator of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the Hanford Site must ensure that its TRU waste meets the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A, ''Radioactive Waste Management, and the Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant' (DOE 1996d) (WIPP WAC). The WIPP WAC establishes the specific physical, chemical, radiological, and packaging criteria for acceptance of defense TRU waste shipments at WIPP. The WIPP WAC also requires that participating DOE TRU waste generator/treatment/storage sites produce site-specific documents, including a certification plan, that describe their management of TRU waste and TRU waste shipments before transferring waste to WIPP. The Hanford Site must also ensure that its TRU waste destined for disposal at WIPP meets requirements for transport in the Transuranic Package Transporter41 (TRUPACT-11). The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) establishes the TRUPACT-I1 requirements in the ''Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package'' (NRC 1997) (TRUPACT-I1 SARP).

GREAGER, T.M.

1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

424

Electrochemical/Pyrometallurgical Waste Stream Processing and Waste Form Fabrication  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes treatment and waste form options being evaluated for waste streams resulting from the electrochemical/pyrometallurgical (pyro ) processing of used oxide nuclear fuel. The technologies that are described are South Korean (Republic of Korea ROK) and United States of America (US) centric in the approach to treating pyroprocessing wastes and are based on the decade long collaborations between US and ROK researchers. Some of the general and advanced technologies described in this report will be demonstrated during the Integrated Recycle Test (IRT) to be conducted as a part of the Joint Fuel Cycle Study (JFCS) collaboration between US Department of Energy (DOE) and ROK national laboratories. The JFCS means to specifically address and evaluated the technological, economic, and safe guard issues associated with the treatment of used nuclear fuel by pyroprocessing. The IRT will involve the processing of commercial, used oxide fuel to recover uranium and transuranics. The recovered transuranics will then be fabricated into metallic fuel and irradiated to transmutate, or burn the transuranic elements to shorter lived radionuclides. In addition, the various process streams will be evaluated and tested for fission product removal, electrolytic salt recycle, minimization of actinide loss to waste streams and waste form fabrication and characterization. This report specifically addresses the production and testing of those waste forms to demonstrate their compatibility with treatment options and suitability for disposal.

Steven Frank; Hwan Seo Park; Yung Zun Cho; William Ebert; Brian Riley

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF) will provide permanent Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage, treatment, and disposal for hazardous and mixed waste generated at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) that cannot be disposed of in existing or planned SRS facilities. Final design is complete for Phase I of the project, the Disposal Vaults. The Vaults will provide RCRA permitted, above-grade disposal capacity for treated hazardous and mixed waste generated at the SRS. The RCRA Part B Permit application was submitted upon approval of the Permit application, the first Disposal Vault is scheduled to be operational in mid 1994. The technical baseline has been established for Phase II, the Treatment Building, and preliminary design work has been performed. The Treatment Building will provide RCRA permitted treatment processes to handle a variety of hazardous and mixed waste generated at SRS in preparation for disposal. The processes will treat wastes for disposal in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). A RCRA Part B Permit application has not yet been submitted to SCDHEC for this phase of the project. The Treatment Building is currently scheduled to be operational in late 1996.

Bailey, L.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

TRU Waste Sampling Program: Volume I. Waste characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume I of the TRU Waste Sampling Program report presents the waste characterization information obtained from sampling and characterizing various aged transuranic waste retrieved from storage at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The data contained in this report include the results of gas sampling and gas generation, radiographic examinations, waste visual examination results, and waste compliance with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant-Waste Acceptance Criteria (WIPP-WAC). A separate report, Volume II, contains data from the gas generation studies.

Clements, T.L. Jr.; Kudera, D.E.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Joint Assessment of Renewable Energy and Water Desalination Research Center (REWDC) Program Capabilities and Facilities In Radioactive Waste Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of this visit was to perform a joint assessment of the Renewable Energy and Water Desalination Center's (REWDC) program in radioactive waste management. The visit represented the fourth technical and scientific interaction with Libya under the DOE/NNSA Sister Laboratory Arrangement. Specific topics addressed during the visit focused on Action Sheet P-05-5, ''Radioactive Waste Management''. The Team, comprised of Mo Bissani (Team Lead), Robert Fischer, Scott Kidd, and Jim Merrigan, consulted with REWDC management and staff. The team collected information, discussed particulars of the technical collaboration and toured the Tajura facility. The tour included the waste treatment facility, waste storage/disposal facility, research reactor facility, hot cells and analytical labs. The assessment team conducted the first phase of Task A for Action Sheet 5, which involved a joint assessment of the Radioactive Waste Management Program. The assessment included review of the facilities dedicated to the management of radioactive waste at the Tourja site, the waste management practices, proposed projects for the facility and potential impacts on waste generation and management.

Bissani, M; Fischer, R; Kidd, S; Merrigan, J

2006-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

428

Department of Energy plan for recovery and utilization of nuclear byproducts from defense wastes. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear wastes from the defense production cycle contain many uniquely useful, intrinsically valuable, and strategically important materials. These materials have a wide range of known and potential applications in food technology, agriculture, energy, public health, medicine, industrial technology, and national security. Furthermore, their removal from the nuclear waste stream can facilitate waste management and yield economic, safety, and environmental advantages in the management and disposal of the residual nuclear wastes that have no redemptive value. This document is the program plan for implementing the recovery and beneficial use of these valuable materials. An Executive Summary of this document, DOE/DP-0013, Vol. 1, January 1983, is available. Program policy, goals and strategy are stated in Section 2. Implementation tasks, schedule and funding are detailed in Section 3. The remaining five sections and the appendixes provide necessary background information to support these two sections. Section 4 reviews some of the unique properties of the individual byproduct materials and describes both demonstrated and potential applications. The amounts of byproduct materials that are available now for research and demonstration purposes, and the amounts that could be recovered in the future for expanded applications are detailed in Section 5. Section 6 describes the effects byproduct recovery and utilization have on the management and final disposal of nuclear wastes. The institutional issues that affect the recovery, processing and utilization of nuclear byproducts are discussed in Section 7. Finally, Section 8 presents a generalized mathematical process by which applications can be evaluated and prioritized (rank-ordered) to provide planning data for program management.

Not Available

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING MINERALIZATION FOR HIGH ORGANIC AND NITRATE WASTE STREAMS FOR THE GLOBAL NUCLEAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste streams that may be generated by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) Advanced Energy Initiative may contain significant quantities of organics (0-53 wt%) and/or nitrates (0-56 wt%). Decomposition of high nitrate streams requires reducing conditions, e.g. organic additives such as sugar or coal, to reduce the NO{sub x} in the off-gas to N{sub 2} to meet the Clean Air Act (CAA) standards during processing. Thus, organics will be present during waste form stabilization regardless of which GNEP processes are chosen, e.g. organics in the feed or organics for nitrate destruction. High organic containing wastes cannot be stabilized with the existing HLW Best Developed Available Technology (BDAT) which is HLW vitrification (HLVIT) unless the organics are removed by preprocessing. Alternative waste stabilization processes such as Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) operate at moderate temperatures (650-750 C) compared to vitrification (1150-1300 C). FBSR converts organics to CAA compliant gases, creates no secondary liquid waste streams, and creates a stable mineral waste form that is as durable as glass. For application to the high Cs-137 and Sr-90 containing GNEP waste streams a single phase mineralized Cs-mica phase was made by co-reacting illite clay and GNEP simulated waste. The Cs-mica accommodates up to 30% wt% Cs{sub 2}O and all the GNEP waste species, Ba, Sr, Rb including the Cs-137 transmutation to Ba-137. For reference, the cesium mineral pollucite (CsAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}), currently being studied for GNEP applications, can only be fabricated at {ge} 1000 C. Pollucite mineralization creates secondary aqueous waste streams and NO{sub x}. Pollucite is not tolerant of high concentrations of Ba, Sr or Rb and forces the divalent species into different mineral host phases. The pollucite can accommodate up to 33% wt% Cs{sub 2}O.

Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M

2008-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

430

Refinery Waste Heat Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Plant (WHAARP) Recovers LPG's and Gasoline, Saves Energy, and Reduces Air Pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A first-of-its-kind Waste Heat Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Plant (WHAARP) was installed by Planetec Utility Services Co., Inc. in partnership with Energy Concepts Co. at Ultramar Diamond Shamrock's 30,000 barrel per day refinery in Denver...

Brant, B.; Brueske, S.; Erickson, D.; Papar, R.

431

Waste to Energy Power Production at DOE and DOD Sites | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of| Department of EnergyDepartmentDepartmentof EnergyEnergy Waste

432

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide. 3 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

433

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide.

Forsberg, Charles W. (155 Newport Dr., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Beahm, Edward C. (106 Cooper Cir., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Parker, George W. (321 Dominion Cir., Knoxville, TN 37922)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

RD & D priorities for energy production and resource conservation from municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report identifies research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) needs and priorities associated with municipal solid waste (MSW) management technologies that conserve or produce energy or resources. The changing character of MSW waste management and the public`s heightened awareness of its real and perceived benefits and costs creates opportunities for RD&D in MSW technologies. Increased recycling, for example, creates new opportunities for energy, chemicals, and materials recovery. New technologies to control and monitor emissions from MSW combustion facilities are available for further improvement or application. Furthermore, emerging waste-to-energy technologies may offer environmental, economic, and other advantages. Given these developments, DOE identified a need to assess the RD&D needs and pdodties and carefully target RD&D efforts to help solve the carbon`s waste management problem and further the National Energy Strategy. This report presents such an assessment. It identifies and Documents RD&D needs and priorities in the broad area of MSW resource . recovery, focusing on efforts to make MSW management technologies commercially viable or to improve their commercial deployment over a 5 to l0 year period. Panels of technical experts identifies 279 RD&D needs in 12 technology areas, ranking about one-fifth of these needs as priorities. A ``Peer Review Group`` identified mass-burn combustion, ``systems studies,`` landfill gas, and ash utilization and disposal as high priority areas for RD&D based on cost and the impacts of further RD&D. The results of this assessment are intended to provide guidance to DOE concerning possible future RD&D projects.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

IDAPA 58.01.06 - Solid Waste Management Rules and Standards | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:GreerHiCalifornia: EnergytheInformation Solid Waste Management

436

The Organic Rankine Cycle System, Its Application to Extract Energy From Low Temperature Waste Heat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a Rankine Cycle to extract The theoretical Rankine Cycle efficiency (~R) is energy from low temperature waste heat. By 1968, a defined as: 3.8 megawatt unit using R-11 refrigerant was placed in commercial operation in Japan (2) and currently ?ZR.... Figure 2 compares the theo The basic Organic Rankine Cycle may be described retical Rankine efficiency for several hydrocarbons, using the Pressure-Enthalpy Diagram of a typical fluorocarbons and water within the evaporating working fluid (R-11). (See...

Sawyer, R. H.; Ichikawa, S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

LCA of local strategies for energy recovery from waste in England, applied to a large municipal flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An intense waste management (WM) planning activity is currently undergoing in England to build the infrastructure necessary to treat residual wastes, increase recycling levels and the recovery of energy from waste. From the analyses of local WM strategic and planning documents we have identified the emerging of three different energy recovery strategies: established combustion of residual waste; pre-treatment of residual waste and energy recovery from Solid Recovered Fuel in a dedicated plant, usually assumed to be a gasifier; pre-treatment of residual waste and reliance on the market to accept the 'fuel from waste' so produced. Each energy recovery strategy will result in a different solution in terms of the technology selected; moreover, on the basis of the favoured solution, the total number, scale and location of thermal treatment plants built in England will dramatically change. To support the evaluation and comparison of these three WM strategy in terms of global environmental impacts, energy recovery possibilities and performance with respect to changing 'fuel from waste' market conditions, the LCA comparison of eight alternative WM scenarios for a real case study dealing with a large flow of municipal wastes was performed with the modelling tool WRATE. The large flow of waste modelled allowed to formulate and assess realistic alternative WM scenarios and to design infrastructural systems which are likely to correspond to those submitted for approval to the local authorities. The results show that all alternative scenarios contribute to saving abiotic resources and reducing global warming potential. Particularly relevant to the current English debate, the performance of a scenario was shown to depend not from the thermal treatment technology but from a combination of parameters, among which most relevant are the efficiency of energy recovery processes (both electricity and heat) and the calorific value of residual waste and pre-treated material. The contribution and relative importance of recycling and treatment/recovery processes change with the impact category. The lack of reprocessing plants in the area of the case study has shown the relevance of transport distances for recyclate material in reducing the efficiency of a WM system. Highly relevant to the current English WM infrastructural debate, these results for the first time highlight the risk of a significant reduction in the energy that could be recovered by local WM strategies relying only on the market to dispose of the 'fuel from waste' in a non dedicated plant in the case that the SRF had to be sent to landfill for lack of treatment capacity.

Tunesi, Simonetta, E-mail: s.tunesi@ucl.ac.uk [Environment Institute, University College London, Pearson Building, Gower Street, WC1E 6BT London (United Kingdom)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

438

Hazardous Waste Disposal Sites (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These sections contain information on fees and monitoring relevant to operators of hazardous waste disposal sites.

439

Copenhagen Waste Management and Incineration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Copenhagen Waste Management and Incineration Florence, April 24 2009 Julie B. Svendsen incentives · Waste Management plan 2012 · Incineration plants #12;Florence, April 24 20093 Copenhagen Waste ownership of treatment facilities · Incineration plants · Land fill · Disposal of hazardous waste · Source

440

Generating power with waste wood  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Among the biomass renewables, waste wood has great potential with environmental and economic benefits highlighting its resume. The topics of this article include alternate waste wood fuel streams; combustion benefits; waste wood comparisons; waste wood ash; pilot scale tests; full-scale test data; permitting difficulties; and future needs.

Atkins, R.S.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Methane generation from waste materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An organic solid waste digester for producing methane from solid waste, the digester comprising a reactor vessel for holding solid waste, a sprinkler system for distributing water, bacteria, and nutrients over and through the solid waste, and a drainage system for capturing leachate that is then recirculated through the sprinkler system.

Samani, Zohrab A. (Las Cruces, NM); Hanson, Adrian T. (Las Cruces, NM); Macias-Corral, Maritza (Las Cruces, NM)

2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

442

Annual Transportation Report for Radioactive Waste Shipments...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

ANNUAL TRANSPORTATION REPORT FY 2008 Radioactive Waste Shipments to and from the Nevada Test Site (NTS) February 2009 United States Department of Energy National Nuclear Security...

443

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment Plant -...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

with the Department of Energy (DOE) WTP staff. One focus area for this visit was piping and pipe support installations. Independent Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment...

444

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

2013 May 2013 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight...

445

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

2013 March 2013 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight...

446

Certification Plan, low-level waste Hazardous Waste Handling Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan also incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end-product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; an executive summary of the Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP) for the HWHF and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification. This plan provides guidance from the HWHF to waste generators, waste handlers, and the Waste Certification Specialist to enable them to conduct their activities and carry out their responsibilities in a manner that complies with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Waste generators have the primary responsibility for the proper characterization of LLW. The Waste Certification Specialist verifies and certifies that LBL LLW is characterized, handled, and shipped in accordance with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Certification is the governing process in which LBL personnel conduct their waste generating and waste handling activities in such a manner that the Waste Certification Specialist can verify that the requirements of WHC-WAC are met.

Albert, R.

1992-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

447

"Zombie" Servers and Inefficiency Drive Energy Waste at Data Centers1 U.S. server facilities are riddled with underused machines, report says.2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

progress in this area, some using upgraded systems that can generate power from waste heat or use outside"Zombie" Servers and Inefficiency Drive Energy Waste at Data Centers1 U.S. server facilities waste documented in a report about U.S. data centers released Tuesday by the Natural8 Resources Defense

South Bohemia, University of

448

Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference May 18-20, 2009, Chantilly, Virginia, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WASTE (MSW) GASIFICATION UNDER VARIOUS PRESSURES AND CO2 CONCENTRATION ATMOSPHERES Eilhann Kwon, Kelly J, New York, NY 10027 ABSTRACT The Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) gasification process is a promisingProceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference NAWTEC17 May 18-20, 2009

Columbia University

449

National Institutes of Health: Mixed waste minimization and treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Appalachian States Low-Level Radioactive Waste Commission requested the US Department of Energy`s National Low-Level Waste Management Program (NLLWMP) to assist the biomedical community in becoming more knowledgeable about its mixed waste streams, to help minimize the mixed waste stream generated by the biomedical community, and to identify applicable treatment technologies for these mixed waste streams. As the first step in the waste minimization process, liquid low-level radioactive mixed waste (LLMW) streams generated at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) were characterized and combined into similar process categories. This report identifies possible waste minimization and treatment approaches for the LLMW generated by the biomedical community identified in DOE/LLW-208. In development of the report, on site meetings were conducted with NIH personnel responsible for generating each category of waste identified as lacking disposal options. Based on the meetings and general waste minimization guidelines, potential waste minimization options were identified.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Life-cycle-assessment of the historical development of air pollution control and energy recovery in waste incineration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Incineration of municipal solid waste is a debated waste management technology. In some countries it is the main waste management option whereas in other countries it has been disregarded. The main discussion point on waste incineration is the release of air emissions from the combustion of the waste, but also the energy recovery efficiency has a large importance. The historical development of air pollution control in waste incineration was studied through life-cycle-assessment modelling of eight different air pollution control technologies. The results showed a drastic reduction in the release of air emissions and consequently a significant reduction in the potential environmental impacts of waste incineration. Improvements of a factor 0.85-174 were obtained in the different impact potentials as technology developed from no emission control at all, to the best available emission control technologies of today (2010). The importance of efficient energy recovery was studied through seven different combinations of heat and electricity recovery, which were modelled to substitute energy produced from either coal or natural gas. The best air pollution control technology was used at the incinerator. It was found that when substituting coal based energy production total net savings were obtained in both the standard and toxic impact categories. However, if the substituted energy production was based on natural gas, only the most efficient recovery options yielded net savings with respect to the standard impacts. With regards to the toxic impact categories, emissions from the waste incineration process were always larger than those from the avoided energy production based on natural gas. The results shows that the potential environmental impacts from air emissions have decreased drastically during the last 35 years and that these impacts can be partly or fully offset by recovering energy which otherwise should have been produced from fossil fuels like coal or natural gas.

Damgaard, Anders, E-mail: and@env.dtu.d [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Riber, Christian [Ramboll, Consulting Engineers, Teknikerbyen 31, DK-2830 Virum (Denmark); Fruergaard, Thilde [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Hulgaard, Tore [Ramboll, Consulting Engineers, Teknikerbyen 31, DK-2830 Virum (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

451

Radioactive Waste Management BasisSept 2001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Radioactive Waste Management Basis (RWMB) documents radioactive waste management practices adopted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) pursuant to Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. The purpose of this RWMB is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

Goodwin, S S

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

452

Hazardous Waste Management (Michigan)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A person shall not generate, dispose, store, treat, or transport hazardous waste in this state without complying with the requirements of this article. The department, in the conduct of its duties...

453

Solid Waste Management (Kansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This act aims to establish and maintain a cooperative state and local program of planning and technical and financial assistance for comprehensive solid waste management. No person shall construct,...

454

UMC Construction Waste (4493)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

collect all Construction waste identified in 2006 and excess through plant sales, recycle through plant scrap metal recycle program, dispose in Y-12 on-site landfill, or ship to...

455

Experimental and Analytical Studies on Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-e?ciency direct conversion of heat to electrical energyJ. Yu and M. Ikura, Direct conversion of low-grade heat tois concerned with direct conversion of thermal energy into

Lee, Felix

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Opportunity Analysis for Recovering Energy from Industrial Waste Heat and Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

United States industry consumed 32.5 Quads (34,300 PJ) of energy during 2003, which was 33.1% of total U.S. energy consumption (EIA 2003 Annual Energy Review). The U.S. industrial complex yields valuable goods and products. Through its manufacturing processes as well as its abundant energy consumption, it supports a multi-trillion dollar contribution to the gross domestic product and provides millions of jobs in the U.S. each year. Industry also yields waste products directly through its manufacturing processes and indirectly through its energy consumption. These waste products come in two forms, chemical and thermal. Both forms of waste have residual energy values that are not routinely recovered. Recovering and reusing these waste products may represent a significant opportunity to improve the energy efficiency of the U.S. industrial complex. This report was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Industrial Technologies Program (DOE-ITP). It analyzes the opportunity to recover chemical emissions and thermal emissions from U.S. industry. It also analyzes the barriers and pathways to more effectively capitalize on these opportunities. A primary part of this analysis was to characterize the quantity and energy value of the emissions. For example, in 2001, the industrial sector emitted 19% of the U.S. greenhouse gases (GHG) through its industrial processes and emitted 11% of GHG through electricity purchased from off-site utilities. Therefore, industry (not including agriculture) was directly and indirectly responsible for emitting 30% of the U.S. GHG. These emissions were mainly comprised of carbon dioxide (CO2), but also contained a wide-variety of CH4 (methane), CO (carbon monoxide), H2 (hydrogen), NMVOC (non-methane volatile organic compound), and other chemicals. As part of this study, we conducted a survey of publicly available literature to determine the amount of energy embedded in the emissions and to identify technology opportunities to capture and reuse this energy. As shown in Table E-1, non-CO2 GHG emissions from U.S. industry were identified as having 2180 peta joules (PJ) or 2 Quads (quadrillion Btu) of residual chemical fuel value. Since landfills are not traditionally considered industrial organizations, the industry component of these emissions had a value of 1480 PJ or 1.4 Quads. This represents approximately 4.3% of the total energy used in the United States Industry.

Viswanathan, Vish V.; Davies, Richard W.; Holbery, Jim D.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Assessment of municipal solid waste for energy production in the western United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Municipal solid waste (MSW) represents both a significant problem and an abundant resource for the production of energy. The residential, institutional, and industrial sectors of this country generate about 250 million tons of MSW each year. In this report, the authors have compiled data on the status of MSW in the 13-state western region, including economic and environmental issues. The report is designed to assist the members of the Western Regional Biomass Energy Program Ad Hoc Resource Committee in determining the potential for using MSW to produce energy in the region. 51 refs., 7 figs., 18 tabs.

Goodman, B.J.; Texeira, R.H.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Citrus Waste Biomass Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Renewable Spirits is developing an innovative pilot plant bio-refinery to establish the commercial viability of ehtanol production utilizing a processing waste from citrus juice production. A novel process based on enzymatic hydrolysis of citrus processing waste and fermentation of resulting sugars to ethanol by yeasts was successfully developed in collaboration with a CRADA partner, USDA/ARS Citrus and Subtropical Products Laboratory. The process was also successfully scaled up from laboratory scale to 10,000 gal fermentor level.

Karel Grohman; Scott Stevenson

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

459

The Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management: Project performance study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) of the US Department of Energy commissioned Independent Project Analysis, Inc. (IPA) to perform this Project Performance Study to provide a quantitative analysis determining how well EM develops and executes environmental remediation and waste management projects. The approach consisted of collecting detailed data on a sample of 65 completed and ongoing EM projects conducted since 1984. These data were then compared with key project characteristics and outcomes from 233 environmental remediation projects (excluding EM) in IPA`s Environmental Remediation Database and 951 projects In IPA`s Capital Projects Database. The study establishes the standing of the EM system relative to other organizations, and suggests areas and opportunities for improvement.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Development of a local carbon dioxide emissions inventory based on energy demand and waste production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper describes the study that led to the development of a carbon dioxide emissions matrix for the Oeiras municipality, one of the largest Portuguese municipalities, located in the metropolitan area of Lisbon. This matrix takes into account the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions due to an increase of electricity demand in buildings as well as solid and liquid wastes treatment from the domestic and services sectors. Using emission factors that were calculated from the relationship between the electricity produced and amount of treated wastes, the GHC emissions in the Oeiras municipality were estimated for a time series of 6 yr (1998 - 2003). The obtained results showed that the electricity sector accounts for approximately 75% of the municipal emissions in 2003. This study was developed to obtain tools to base options and actions to be undertaken by local authorities such as energy planning and also public information. 11 refs., 12 tabs.

Joao Gomes; Joana Nascimento; Helena Rodrigues [Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal)

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Boiler tube failures in municipal waste-to-energy plants: Case histories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste-to-energy plants experienced boiler tube failures when the design changed from waste-heat boilers to radiant furnace waterwalls with superheat, adopted from coal-firing technology. The fireside attack by chlorine and sulfur compounds in the refuse combustion products caused many forced outages in early European plants with high steam temperatures and pressures. In spite of conservative steam conditions in the first US plants, some failures occurred. As steam temperatures increased in later US plants, corrosion problems multiplied. Over the years these problems have been alleviated by covering the waterwalls with either refractories or weld overlays of nickel-base alloys and using high nickel-chromium alloys for superheater tubes. Various changes in furnace design to provide uniform combustion and avoid reducing conditions in the waterwall zone and to lower the gas temperature in the superheater also have helped to minimize corrosion.

Krause, H.H.; Wright, I.G. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Pollution Prevention, Waste Reduction, and Recycling | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15, 2010Energy6Department of EnergyEnergy

463

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation | Department of EnergyDepartmentEnergy WRPSWasteActivitesTransportation

464

THERMAL IMPACT OF WASTE EMPLACEMENT AND SURFACE COOLING ASSOCIATED WITH GEOLOGIC DISPOSAL OF NUCLEAR WASTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waste repository design AERE-R--9343 Atomic Energy Researchof the thermal s t r e s s field. AERE R-8999, Atomic Energy

Wang, J.S.Y.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Processing constraints on high-level nuclear waste glasses for Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work presented in this paper is a part of a major technology program supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in preparation for the planned operation of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP). Because composition of Hanford waste varies greatly, processability is a major concern for successful vitrification. This paper briefly surveys general aspects of waste glass processability and then discusses their ramifications for specific examples of Hanford waste streams.

Hrma, P. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

466

State & Federal Initiatives Energy and Waste- The Landmark Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island Energy Savings Performance Contract  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STATE & FEDERAL INITIATIVES ENERGY AND WASTE THE LANDMARK STATUE OF LIBERTY AND ELLIS ISLAND ENERGY SAVINGS PERFORMANCE CONTRACT Michael D. Leach, P.E., C.E.M. Chairman and CEO CESlWay International, Inc. ABSTRACT The Statue... of Liberty and Ellis Island National Monument are perhaps the most visible Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPC) performed in the U.S. to date simply because of the international notoriety of the facilities themselves. While the technologies...

Leach, M. D.

467

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report. Volume 1, Part 2, Generator dangerous waste report dangerous waste: Calendar Year 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, weight, waste description, and waste designation.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

468

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report. Volume 1, Part 1, Generator dangerous waste report dangerous waste: Calendar Year 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, weight, waste description, and waste designation.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

469

Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept DOE non-radioactive classified waste, DOE non-radioactive hazardous classified waste, DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW), DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW), and U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste for permanent disposal. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and will be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project (WMP) at (702) 295-7063, and your call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

NSTec Environmental Management

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

470

Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept the following: ? DOE hazardous and non-hazardous non-radioactive classified waste ? DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW) ? DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW) ? U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste The LLW and MLLW listed above may also be classified waste. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and shall be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. Classified waste may be sent to the NNSS as classified matter. Section 3.1.18 provides the requirements that must be met for permanent burial of classified matter. The NNSA/NFO and support contractors are available to assist the generator in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NFO Environmental Management Operations (EMO) at (702) 295-7063, and the call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

none,

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Emissions from US waste collection vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: ? Life-cycle emissions for alternative fuel technologies. ? Fuel consumption of alternative fuels for waste collection vehicles. ? Actual driving cycle of waste collection vehicles. ? Diesel-fueled waste collection vehicle emissions. - Abstract: This research is an in-depth environmental analysis of potential alternative fuel technologies for waste collection vehicles. Life-cycle emissions, cost, fuel and energy consumption were evaluated for a wide range of fossil and bio-fuel technologies. Emission factors were calculated for a typical waste collection driving cycle as well as constant speed. In brief, natural gas waste collection vehicles (compressed and liquid) fueled with North-American natural gas had 610% higher well-to-wheel (WTW) greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions relative to diesel-fueled vehicles; however the pump-to-wheel (PTW) GHG emissions of natural gas waste collection vehicles averaged 6% less than diesel-fueled vehicles. Landfill gas had about 80% lower WTW GHG emissions relative to diesel. Biodiesel waste collection vehicles had between 12% and 75% lower WTW GHG emissions relative to diesel depending on the fuel source and the blend. In 2011, natural gas waste collection vehicles had the lowest fuel cost per collection vehicle kilometer travel. Finally, the actual driving cycle of waste collection vehicles consists of repetitive stops and starts during waste collection; this generates more emissions than constant speed driving.

Maimoun, Mousa A., E-mail: mousamaimoun@gmail.com [Department of Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Reinhart, Debra R. [Department of Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Gammoh, Fatina T. [Quality Department, Airport International Group, Amman (Jordan); McCauley Bush, Pamela [Department of Industrial Engineering and Management Systems, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

472

EA-0952: The Louisiana State University Waste-to Energy Incinerator, Baton Rouge, Louisiana  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for incinerating combustible, non-recyclable office wastes from Louisiana State University (LSU) administrative/academic areas and...

473

Flexible Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for the Food ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

2014 2011 CHPIndustrial Distributed Energy R&D Portfolio Review - Summary Report Biogas Opportunities Roadmap Advanced Manufacturing Home Key Activities Research &...

474

Integrated Waste Treatment Facility Fact Sheet | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA,Fermi NationalBusiness PlanPostingOctoberof Energy U.S.A

475

GNEP Element:Minimize Nuclear Waste | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | Department of Energy FreeportEnergy Issues Related toDevelopMinimize

476

Retrieval Of Final Stored Radioactive Waste Resumes | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015Department ofRequirementsEnergyJ u l yEnergyRetailOf

477

Capturing Waste Gas: Saves Energy, Lower Costs - Case Study, 2013 |  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2 (AprilBiden2 CategoricalApproach for Energy 07-21-2014

478

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WASTE PROCESSING ANNUAL TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Environmental Management's (EM) Roadmap, U.S. Department of Energy--Office of Environmental Management Engineering & Technology Roadmap (Roadmap), defines the Department's intent to reduce the technical risk and uncertainty in its cleanup programs. The unique nature of many of the remaining facilities will require a strong and responsive engineering and technology program to improve worker and public safety, and reduce costs and environmental impacts while completing the cleanup program. The technical risks and uncertainties associated with cleanup program were identified through: (1) project risk assessments, (2) programmatic external technical reviews and technology readiness assessments, and (3) direct site input. In order to address these needs, the technical risks and uncertainties were compiled and divided into the program areas of: Waste Processing, Groundwater and Soil Remediation, and Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D). Strategic initiatives were then developed within each program area to address the technical risks and uncertainties in that program area. These strategic initiatives were subsequently incorporated into the Roadmap, where they form the strategic framework of the EM Engineering & Technology Program. The EM-21 Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) supports the goals and objectives of the Roadmap by providing direction for technology enhancement, development, and demonstrations that will lead to a reduction of technical uncertainties in EM waste processing activities. The current MYPP summarizes the strategic initiatives and the scope of the activities within each initiative that are proposed for the next five years (FY2008-2012) to improve safety and reduce costs and environmental impacts associated with waste processing; authorized budget levels will impact how much of the scope of activities can be executed, on a year-to-year basis. As a result of the importance of reducing technical risk and uncertainty in the EM Waste Processing programs, EM-21 has focused considerable effort on identifying the key areas of risk in the Waste Processing programs. The resulting summary of technical risks and needs was captured in the Roadmap. The Roadmap identifies key Waste Processing initiative areas where technology development work should be focused. These areas are listed below, along with the Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) designation given to each initiative area. The WBS designations will be used throughout this document.

Bush, S

2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

479

Waste Form Development for the Solidification of PDCF/MOX Liquid Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the Savannah River Site, part of the Department of Energy's nuclear materials complex located in South Carolina, cementation has been selected as the solidification method for high-alpha and low-activity waste streams generated in the planned plutonium disposition facilities. A Waste Solidification Building (WSB) that will be used to treat and solidify three radioactive liquid waste streams generated by the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility) and the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility is in the preliminary design stage. The WSB is expected to treat a transuranic (TRU) waste stream composed primarily of americium and two low-level waste (LLW) streams. The acidic wastes will be concentrated in the WSB evaporator and neutralized in a cement head tank prior to solidification. A series of TRU mixes were prepared to produce waste forms exhibiting a range of processing and cured properties. The LLW mixes were prepared using the premix from the preferred TRU waste form. All of the waste forms tested passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure. After processing in the WSB, current plans are to dispose of the solidified TRU waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico and the solidified LLW waste at an approved low-level waste disposal facility.

COZZI, ALEX

2004-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

480

Mixed Waste Management Options: 1995 Update. National Low-Level Waste Management Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the original mixed Waste Management Options (DOE/LLW-134) issued in December 1991, the question was posed, ``Can mixed waste be managed out of existence?`` That study found that most, but not all, of the Nation`s mixed waste can theoretically be managed out of existence. Four years later, the Nation is still faced with a lack of disposal options for commercially generated mixed waste. However, since publication of the original Mixed Waste Management Options report in 1991, limited disposal capacity and new technologies to treat mixed waste have become available. A more detailed estimate of the Nation`s mixed waste also became available when the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published their comprehensive assessment, titled National Profile on Commercially Generated Low-Level Radioactive Mixed Waste (National Profile). These advancements in our knowledge about mixed waste inventories and generation, coupled with greater treatment and disposal options, lead to a more applied question posed for this updated report: ``Which mixed waste has no treatment option?`` Beyond estimating the volume of mixed waste requiring jointly regulated disposal, this report also provides a general background on the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). It also presents a methodical approach for generators to use when deciding how to manage their mixed waste. The volume of mixed waste that may require land disposal in a jointly regulated facility each year was estimated through the application of this methodology.

Kirner, N.; Kelly, J.; Faison, G.; Johnson, D. [Foster Wheeler Environmental Corp. (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste waste energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | Department of Energy Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P.Fuel

482

H-Tank Farm Waste Determination | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | Department of EnergyGeothermalGoingGuidelines forof

483

Using Waste Heat for External Processes | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment of EnergyProgram2-26The ConfederatedSolarusing ventEfficiencydescribes the

484

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Attracts World Interest | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment of Energy While dryWashington's CentraliaWashingtonSystemsLights,

485

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Recovery Plan | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment of Energy While dryWashington's

486

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Update | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment of Energy While dryWashington'sResults | Department of

487

Vehicle Technologies Office: Waste Heat Recovery | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012Nuclear GuideReport |(GATE)Department of

488

DOE Completes TRU Waste Cleanup at Bettis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTSof Energy DOE Challenge HomeEnergy The U.S. Department ofhas

489

Energy Department and Catholic University Improve Safety of Nuclear Waste |  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy CooperationRequirementsDraftEmerson: ENERGYBiofuelsDepartment of

490

EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power SystemsResources DOE ZeroThreeEnergyDepartment0: DOE512:Shines with Five DOE

491

California Waste Discharge Requirements Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBoston Areais3: CrystallineOpen EnergyCaliforniaEnergyRequirements

492

Delayed neutron energy spectrum measurements of actinide waste isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was irradiated using the Texas A&M Nuclear Science Center Reactor (NSCR). Three proton recoil detectors, operating individually, in conjunction with MCNP calculated response functions, were used to measure the delayed neutron energy spectra of each isotope...

Comfort, Christopher M.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

493

Hawaii DOH Hazardous Waste Section Webpage | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:Greer CountyCorridor | Open EnergySection Webpage Jump to: navigation,

494

Hawaii DOH Solid Waste Section Webpage | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:Greer CountyCorridor | Open EnergySection Webpage Jump to:

495

Hawaii Permit Application for Solid Waste Management Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:Greer CountyCorridor | OpenOpen EnergyOpenOceanic

496

Waste/By-Product Hydrogen | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of| Department of EnergyDepartmentDepartmentofTechnologiesusing

497

Solid Waste Management Program (South Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

South Dakota's Solid Waste Management Program offers loans and grants for solid waste disposal, recycling, and waste tire projects. Funds are available for private or public projects, and...

498

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - December 2012 December 2012 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process...

499

Modeling and comparative assessment of municipal solid waste gasification for energy production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Study developed a methodology for the evaluation of gasification for MSW treatment. Study was conducted comparatively for USA, UAE, and Thailand. Study applies a thermodynamic model (Gibbs free energy minimization) using the Gasify software. The energy efficiency of the process and the compatibility with different waste streams was studied. - Abstract: Gasification is the thermochemical conversion of organic feedstocks mainly into combustible syngas (CO and H{sub 2}) along with other constituents. It has been widely used to convert coal into gaseous energy carriers but only has been recently looked at as a process for producing energy from biomass. This study explores the potential of gasification for energy production and treatment of municipal solid waste (MSW). It relies on adapting the theory governing the chemistry and kinetics of the gasification process to the use of MSW as a feedstock to the process. It also relies on an equilibrium kinetics and thermodynamics solver tool (Gasify) in the process of modeling gasification of MSW. The effect of process temperature variation on gasifying MSW was explored and the results were compared to incineration as an alternative to gasification of MSW. Also, the assessment was performed comparatively for gasification of MSW in the United Arab Emirates, USA, and Thailand, presenting a spectrum of socioeconomic settings with varying MSW compositions in order to explore the effect of MSW composition variance on the products of gasification. All in all, this study provides an insight into the potential of gasification for the treatment of MSW and as a waste to energy alternative to incineration.

Arafat, Hassan A., E-mail: harafat@masdar.ac.ae; Jijakli, Kenan

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

500

Advanced Energy and Water Recovery Technology from Low Grade Waste Heat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project has developed a nanoporous membrane based water vapor separation technology that can be used for recovering energy and water from low-temperature industrial waste gas streams with high moisture contents. This kind of exhaust stream is widely present in many industrial processes including the forest products and paper industry, food industry, chemical industry, cement industry, metal industry, and petroleum industry. The technology can recover not only the sensible heat but also high-purity water along with its considerable latent heat. Waste heats from such streams are considered very difficult to recover by conventional technology because of poor heat transfer performance of heat-exchanger type equipment at low temperature and moisture-related corrosion issues. During the one-year Concept Definition stage of the project, the goal was to prove the concept and technology in the laboratory and identify any issues that need to be addressed in future development of this technology. In this project, computational modeling and simulation have been conducted to investigate the performance of a nanoporous material based technology, transport membrane condenser (TMC), for waste heat and water recovery from low grade industrial flue gases. A series of theoretical and computational analyses have provided insight and support in advanced TMC design and experiments. Experimental study revealed condensation and convection through the porous membrane bundle was greatly improved over an impermeable tube bundle, because of the membrane capillary condensation mechanism and the continuous evacuation of the condensate film or droplets through the membrane pores. Convection Nusselt number in flue gas side for the porous membrane tube bundle is 50% to 80% higher than those for the impermeable stainless steel tube bundle. The condensation rates for the porous membrane tube bundle also increase 60% to 80%. Parametric study for the porous membrane tube bundle heat transfer performance was also done, which shows this heat transfer enhancement approach works well in a wide parameters range for typical flue gas conditions. Better understanding of condensing heat transfer mechanism for porous membrane heat transfer surfaces, shows higher condensation and heat transfer rates than non-permeable tubes, due to existence of the porous membrane walls. Laboratory testing has documented increased TMC performance with increased exhaust gas moisture content levels, which has exponentially increased potential markets for the product. The TMC technology can uniquely enhance waste heat recovery in tandem with water vapor recovery for many other industrial processes such as drying, wet and dry scrubber exhaust gases, dewatering, and water chilling. A new metallic substrate membrane tube development and molded TMC part fabrication method, provides an economical way to expand this technology for scaled up applications with less than 3 year payback expectation. A detailed market study shows a broad application area for this advanced waste heat and water recovery technology. A commercialization partner has been lined up to expand this technology to this big market. This research work led to new findings on the TMC working mechanism to improve its performance, better scale up design approaches, and economical part fabrication methods. Field evaluation work needs to be done to verify the TMC real world performance, and get acceptance from the industry, and pave the way for our commercial partner to put it into a much larger waste heat and waste water recovery market. This project is addressing the priority areas specified for DOE Industrial Technologies Program's (ITP's): Energy Intensive Processes (EIP) Portfolio - Waste Heat Minimization and Recovery platform.

Dexin Wang

2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z