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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste tires agricultural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Waste tire recycling by pyrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project examines the City of New Orleans' waste tire problem. Louisiana State law, as of January 1, 1991, prohibits the knowing disposal of whole waste tires in landfills. Presently, the numerous waste tire stockpiles in New Orleans range in size from tens to hundreds of tires. New Orleans' waste tire problem will continue to increase until legal disposal facilities are made accessible and a waste tire tracking and regulatory system with enforcement provisions is in place. Tires purchased outside of the city of New Orleans may be discarded within the city's limits; therefore, as a practical matter this study analyzes the impact stemming from the entire New Orleans metropolitan area. Pyrolysis mass recovery (PMR), a tire reclamation process which produces gas, oil, carbon black and steel, is the primary focus of this report. The technical, legal and environmental aspects of various alternative technologies are examined. The feasibility of locating a hypothetical PMR operation within the city of New Orleans is analyzed based on the current economic, regulatory, and environmental climate in Louisiana. A thorough analysis of active, abandoned, and proposed Pyrolysis operations (both national and international) was conducted as part of this project. Siting a PMR plant in New Orleans at the present time is technically feasible and could solve the city's waste tire problem. Pending state legislation could improve the city's ability to guarantee a long term supply of waste tires to any large scale tire reclamation or recycling operation, but the local market for PMR end products is undefined.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Waste tire recycling by pyrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project examines the City of New Orleans` waste tire problem. Louisiana State law, as of January 1, 1991, prohibits the knowing disposal of whole waste tires in landfills. Presently, the numerous waste tire stockpiles in New Orleans range in size from tens to hundreds of tires. New Orleans` waste tire problem will continue to increase until legal disposal facilities are made accessible and a waste tire tracking and regulatory system with enforcement provisions is in place. Tires purchased outside of the city of New Orleans may be discarded within the city`s limits; therefore, as a practical matter this study analyzes the impact stemming from the entire New Orleans metropolitan area. Pyrolysis mass recovery (PMR), a tire reclamation process which produces gas, oil, carbon black and steel, is the primary focus of this report. The technical, legal and environmental aspects of various alternative technologies are examined. The feasibility of locating a hypothetical PMR operation within the city of New Orleans is analyzed based on the current economic, regulatory, and environmental climate in Louisiana. A thorough analysis of active, abandoned, and proposed Pyrolysis operations (both national and international) was conducted as part of this project. Siting a PMR plant in New Orleans at the present time is technically feasible and could solve the city`s waste tire problem. Pending state legislation could improve the city`s ability to guarantee a long term supply of waste tires to any large scale tire reclamation or recycling operation, but the local market for PMR end products is undefined.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Autothermal pyrolysis of waste tires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main objective of this research was to study the operating parameters of autothermal pyrolysis of scrap tires in a laboratory-scale fluidized bed reactor with a 100-cm bed height (10 cm I.D.) and a 100-cm freeboard (25 cm I.D.). Scrap tires were pyrolyzed in a limited oxygen supply, so that the heat for pyrolysis of the scrap tires was provided by combustion of some portion of the scrap tires. The operating parameters evaluated included the effect on the pyrolysis oil products and their relative proportions of (1) the air factor (0.07-0.035); (2) the pyrolysis temperature (370-570{degree}C); and (3) the catalyst added (zeolite and calcium carbonate). The results show that: (1) the composition of the liquid hydrocarbon obtained is affected significantly by the air factor; (2) the higher operating temperature caused a higher yield of gasoline and diesel; (3) the yield of gasoline increased due to the catalyst zeolite added, and the yield of diesel increased due to the addition of the catalyst calcium carbonate; (4) the principal constituents of gasoline included dipentene and diprene. 30 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

Wey, M.Y.; Liou, B.H. [National Chung-Hsing Univ., Taichung (Taiwan, Province of China); Wu, S.Y.; Zhang, C.H. [Feng-Chia Univ., Taichung (Taiwan, Province of China)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Assessment of Tire Technologies and Practices for Potential Waste and Energy Use Reductions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Practices for Potential Waste and Energy Use ReductionsPractices for Potential Waste and Energy Use Reductions Maythe study involving research on waste and energy saving tire

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Regnier, Justin; Burke, Andy; Melaina, Marc W; Bremson, Joel; Keteltas, Michael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Epoxy composites based on inexpensive tire waste filler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tire waste (TW) was recycled as raw material for the preparation of DGEBA-type epoxy composite materials. The effects of filler amount and epoxy type on the mechanical properties of the composites were investigated. Tensile strength and Youngís modulus of the composites with NPEL were generally higher than composites with NPEF. The appropriate mass level for TW in both type composites was found to be 20 wt%. The equilibrium water sorption of NPEL/TW and NPEF/TW composites for 14-day immersion was determined as 0.10 % and 0.21 %, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used for characterization of the composites.

Ahmetli, Gulnare, E-mail: ahmetli@selcuk.edu.tr; Gungor, Ahmet, E-mail: ahmetli@selcuk.edu.tr; Kocaman, Suheyla, E-mail: ahmetli@selcuk.edu.tr [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Selcuk University, 42031 Konya (Turkey)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

Chemi-microbial processing of waste tire rubber: A project overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PNL is developing a method to use thiophillic microorganisms to devulcanize (biodesulfurize) the surface of ground rubber particles, which will improve the bonding and adhesion of the ground tire rubber into the virgin tire rubber matrix. The Chemi-microbial processing approach, introduced in this paper, is targeted at alleviating the waste tire problem in an environmentally conscious manner; it may also be applied to improve asphaltic materials and rubber and polymeric wastes to facilite their recycling. This paper outlines the logic and technical methods that will be used.

Romine, R.A.; Snowden-Swan, L.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Utilization of waste tires employing novel surface-modification technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. is developing unique technology for the recycle of scrap tires. The approach involves surface-modification of ground tire rubber particles to facilitate their incorporation into novel composites. This form of recycling represents the highest value-added and greatest energy conservation potential of all tire recycle technologies. Furthermore, it is environmentally innocuous. Research and development of this unique technology is partially funded through a cost-shared contract with the US Department of Energy. 4 figs.

Bauman, B.D. (Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Co-processing of agricultural and biomass waste with coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major thrust of our research program is the use of waste materials as co-liquefaction agents for the first-stage conversion of coal to liquid fuels. By fulfilling one or more of the roles of an expensive solvent in the direct coal liquefaction (DCL) process, the waste material is disposed off ex-landfill, and may improve the overall economics of DCL. Work in our group has concentrated on co-liquefaction with waste rubber tires, some results from which are presented elsewhere in these Preprints. In this paper, we report on preliminary results with agricultural and biomass-type waste as co-liquefaction agents.

Stiller, A.H.; Dadyburjor, D.B.; Wann, Ji-Perng [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

9

Utilization of surface-treated rubber particles from waste tires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During a 12-month program, the author successfully demonstrated commercial applications for surface-treated rubber particles in two major markets: footwear (shoe soles and components) and urethane-foam carpet underlay (padding). In these markets, he has clearly demonstrated the ease of using R-4080 and R-4030 surface-treated rubber particles in existing manufacturing plants and processes and have shown that the material meets or exceeds existing standards for performance, quality, and cost-effectiveness. To produce R-4080 and R-4030, vulcanized rubber, whole-tire material is finely ground to particles of nominal 80 and mesh size respectively. Surface treatment is achieved by reacting these rubber particles with chlorine gas. In this report, the author describes the actual test and evaluations of the participant companies, and identifies other potential end uses.

Smith, F.G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Systems Div.]|[Environmental Technologies Alternatives, Inc., Lima, OH (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Tailored Recovery of Carbons from Waste Tires for Enhanced Performance as Anodes in Lithium-ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Morphologically tailored pyrolysis-recovered carbon black is utilized in lithium-ion batteries as a potential solution for adding value to waste tire-rubber-derived materials. Micronized tire rubber was digested in a hot oleum bath to yield a sulfonated rubber slurry that was then filtered, washed, and compressed into a solid cake. Carbon was recovered from the modified rubber cake by pyrolysis in a nitrogen atmosphere. The chemical pretreatment of rubber produced a carbon monolith with higher yield than that from the control (a fluffy tire-rubber-derived carbon black). The carbon monolith showed a very small volume fraction of pores of widths 3 4 nm, reduced specific surface area, and an ordered assembly of graphitic domains. Electrochemical studies on the recovered-carbon-based anode revealed an improved Li-ion battery performance with higher reversible capacity than that of commercial carbon materials. Anodes made with a sulfonated tire-rubber-derived carbon and a control tire-rubber-derived carbon, respectively, exhibited an initial coulombic efficiency of 80% and 45%, respectively. The reversible capacity of the cell with the sulfonated carbon as anode was 400 mAh/g after 100 cycles, with nearly 100% coulombic efficiency. Our success in producing higher performance carbon material from waste tire rubber for potential use in energy storage applications adds a new avenue to tire rubber recycling.

Naskar, Amit K [ORNL; Bi, [ORNL; Saha, Dipendu [ORNL; Chi, Miaofang [ORNL; Bridges, Craig A [ORNL; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Feasibility study for a demonstration plant for liquefaction and coprocessing of waste plastics and tires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of a feasibility study for a demonstration plant for the liquefaction of waste polymers and the coprocessing of waste polymers with coal are presented. The study was carried out by a committee of participants from five universities, the US DOE Federal Energy Technology Center, and Burns & Roe Corporation. The study included an assessment of current recycling practices, a review of pertinent research, and a survey of feedstock availability. A conceptual design for a demonstration plant was developed and a preliminary economic analysis for various feedstock mixes was carried out. The base case for feedstock scenarios was chosen to be 200 tons per day of waste plastic and 100 tons per day of waste tires. For this base case, the return on investment (ROI) was found to range from 8% to 16% as tipping fees for waste plastic and tires increased over a range comparable to that existing in the US. A number of additional feedstock scenarios that were both more and less profitable were also considered and are briefly discussed.

Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Shelley, M. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States)] [and others

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Feasibility study for thermal treatment of solid tire wastes in Bangladesh by using pyrolysis technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study on the basis of lab data and available resources in Bangladesh, feasibility study has been carried out for pyrolysis process converting solid tire wastes into pyrolysis oils, solid char and gases. The process considered for detailed analysis was fixed-bed fire-tube heating pyrolysis reactor system. The comparative techno-economic assessment was carried out in US$ for three different sizes plants: medium commercial scale (144 tons/day), small commercial scale (36 tons/day), pilot scale (3.6 tons/day). The assessment showed that medium commercial scale plant was economically feasible, with the lowest unit production cost than small commercial and pilot scale plants for the production of crude pyrolysis oil that could be used as boiler fuel oil and for the production of upgraded liquid-products.

Islam, M.R., E-mail: mrislam1985@yahoo.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Rajshahi University of Engineering and Technology, Rajshahi 6204 (Bangladesh); Joardder, M.U.H.; Hasan, S.M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Rajshahi University of Engineering and Technology, Rajshahi 6204 (Bangladesh); Takai, K.; Haniu, H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University Corporation Kitami Institute of Technology, 165 Koen-cho, Kitami City, Hokkaido 090-8507 (Japan)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Utilization of Agricultural WasteUtilization of Agricultural Waste for Composite Panelsfor Composite Panels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utilization of Agricultural WasteUtilization of Agricultural Waste for Composite Panelsfor Composite Panels Chung Y. HseChung Y. Hse Principal Wood ScientistPrincipal Wood Scientist USDA Forest State UniversityLouisiana State University 66thth Pacific Rim BioPacific Rim Bio--Based Composites

14

Solid waste reclamation and recycling: Tires. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the development, management, economic analysis, and environmental impacts of reclamation and recycling of scrap tires. The design and evaluation of recycling processes are examined. Recycled products for use in construction materials, embankment fills, fuel supplements, and material substitutions are covered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Solid waste reclamation and recycling: Tires. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the development, management, economic analysis, and environmental impacts of reclamation and recycling of scrap tires. The design and evaluation of recycling processes are examined. Recycled products for use in construction materials, embankment fills, fuel supplements, and material substitutions are covered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Report on Abatement Activities Related to Agriculture and Waste Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Guidelines for Producers 9 2.3 Best Agricultural Waste Management Plans (BAWMPs) 9 3.0 AGRICULTURAL PRACTICES COMPLAINT RESPONSE SYSTEM 8 2.1 Agricultural Waste Control Regulation and Code 9 2.2 Environmental ASSESSMENT INITIATIVE 10 3.1 Watershed Farm Practices Study 10 3.2 Ongoing Farm Practices Evaluation 12 3

17

Broadening the markets for scrap tire rubber  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Only a couple years ago was the first time that the U.S. first recycled more scrap tires than it discarded. More experienced processors using improved technology and resourceful manufacturers continue to discover more uses of old tires. Soon, they`ll chip away at the 800 million tires stockpiled around the country, not just work to keep up with the waste tires generated each year. After years ago, asphalt roads and highways looked like the answer. This report profiles the utilization of scrap tires.

Hilts, M.E. [ed.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Scrap tire derived fuel: Markets and issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More than 250 million scrap tires are generated annually in the United States and their proper management continues to be a solid waste management concern. Sound markets for scrap tires are growing and are consuming an ever increasing percentage of annual generation, with market capacity reaching more than 75% of annual generation in 1996. Of the three major markets - fuel, civil engineering applications, and ground rubber markets - the use of tires as a fuel is by far the largest market. The major fuel users include cement kilns, pulp and paper mills, electrical generation facilities, and some industrial facilities. Current issues that may impact the tire fuel market include continued public concern over the use of tires as fuels, the new EPA PM 2.5 standard, possible additional Clean Air emissions standards, access to adequate supplies of scrap tires, quality of processed tire derived fuel, and the possibility of creating a commodity market through the development of ASTM TDF standards.

Serumgard, J. [Scrap Tire Management Council, Washington, DC (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Scrap tire pyrolysis: Experiment and modelling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pyrolysis of waste, usually organic solids like tires, plastics or composite materials, is an alternative thermal waste treatment technology. Three main physical and chemical mechanisms - i.e.: chemical kinetics, internal heat transfer and external heat transfer - have to be considered when modelling the degradation of solid waste particles. Because of the lack of physical properties for wastes most of the models described in the literature use basic data obtained on the pyrolysis of coal, wood and biomass. In this work, the authors report basic information on the thermal degradation of tire samples at small scale: Thermogravimetric analyser (TGA) and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), as well as direct and indirect measurements of thermal and physical properties (thermal conductivity of the tire and of the char, porosity, density, specific heat). Pyrolysis experiments on tire samples are performed in an imaging furnace. The experimental results are compared to theoretical values deduced from models that take into account physical property measurements.

Napoli, A.; Soudais, Y.; Lecomte, D. [Ecole des Mines d`Albi - Carmaux, Albi (France); Castillo, S. [Universite Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

E-Print Network 3.0 - agriculture process waste Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Agricultural and food processing plants can turn waste into power can turn... . Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), waste streams from food and beverage processing plants,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste tires agricultural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural wastes Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

capable of converting wastes into fuels to other agriculturally based or other biomass feedstocks... ACTION TEAM PROGRESS REPORT Recovering the Value of Waste for Environmental...

22

Technical specifications for mechanical recycling of agricultural plastic waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: ē Technical specifications for agricultural plastic wastes (APWs) recycling proposed. ē Specifications are the base for best economical and environmental APW valorisation. ē Analysis of APW reveals inherent characteristics and constraints of APW streams. ē Thorough survey on mechanical recycling processes and industry as it applies to APW. ē Specifications for APW recycling tested, adjusted and verified through pilot trials. - Abstract: Technical specifications appropriate for the recycling of agricultural plastic wastes (APWs), widely accepted by the recycling industry were developed. The specifications establish quality standards to be met by the agricultural plastics producers, users and the agricultural plastic waste management chain. They constitute the base for the best economical and environmental valorisation of the APW. The analysis of the APW streams conducted across Europe in the framework of the European project ďLabelAgriWasteĒ revealed the inherent characteristics of the APW streams and the inherent constraints (technical or economical) of the APW. The APW stream properties related to its recycling potential and measured during pilot trials are presented and a subsequent universally accepted simplified and expanded list of APW recycling technical specifications is proposed and justified. The list includes two sets of specifications, applied to two different quality categories of recyclable APW: one for pellet production process (ďQuality IĒ) and another one for plastic profile production process (ďQuality IIĒ). Parameters that are taken into consideration in the specifications include the APW physical characteristics, contamination, composition and degradation. The proposed specifications are focused on polyethylene based APW that represents the vast majority of the APW stream. However, the specifications can be adjusted to cover also APW of different materials (e.g. PP or PVC) that are found in very small quantities in protected cultivations in Europe. The adoption of the proposed specifications could transform this waste stream into a labelled commodity traded freely in the market and will constitute the base for the best economical and environmental valorisation of the APW.

Briassoulis, D., E-mail: briassou@aua.gr; Hiskakis, M.; Babou, E.

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

23

Tapping the tire pile  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

What happens to car tires after they`ve exhausted their life on the road? Whether they are handed over to a tire dealer or tossed into the trash, many tires get a second life, reincarnated into products like doormats, park benches, and playground equipment. But the biggest single market for scrap tires is fuel; fuel that supplements the feedstock of paper mills, cement kilns, and even electric utility boilers. As well as offering a higher heating value than coal, tires can lower utilities` fuel costs and reduce polutant like nitrogen oxides and ash. But it`s the rare utility boiler that is amenable to burning tires successfully. 5 refs., 9 figs.

Lamarre, L.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Scrap tire recycling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the automobile tire technology has grown and met the need for safer and more durable tires, stronger reinforcement and more chemically resistant rubber compounds have made recycling tires more difficult. In an effort to resolve this problem, techniques and equipment were developed to grind tires into small pieces, and new markets were sought to utilize the crumb rubber product streams from ground tires. Industrial combustion processes were modified to accept scrap tires as fuel. These efforts have been beneficial, steadily increasing the percentage of scrap tires recycled to about 10% in 1985, and reaching 72% in 1995. By the end of 1997, fully 100% of tires generated in the U.S. are expected to be recycled.

Lula, J.W.; Bohnert, G.W.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Improving scrap tire processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The market for tire-derived materials is growing rapidly, with the largest market being tire-derived fuels. There is therefore a growing demand for higher quality products. This paper describes the processing and removal of steel from scrap tires.

Astafan, C.G. [Columbus McKinnon Corp., Sarasota, FL (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

LARGE SCALE DIRECT SHEAR TESTING WITH TIRE BALES By: Christopher J. LaRocque1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 , Advisor Abstract: There are growing environmental interests in the utilization of recycled tire for newly constructed roads. Tire bales are manufactured by compressing approximately 100 waste auto, The University of Texas at Austin #12;Materials and Methods: Figure 2 shows a tire bale similar to those being

Zornberg, Jorge G.

27

Energy Supply- Production of Fuel from Agricultural and Animal Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Society for Energy and Environmental Research (SEER) was funded in March 2004 by the Department of Energy, under grant DE-FG-36-04GO14268, to produce a study, and oversee construction and implementation, for the thermo-chemical production of fuel from agricultural and animal waste. The grant focuses on the Changing World Technologies (CWT) of West Hempstead, NY, thermal conversion process (TCP), which converts animal residues and industrial food processing biproducts into fuels, and as an additional product, fertilizers. A commercial plant was designed and built by CWT, partially using grant funds, in Carthage, Missouri, to process animal residues from a nearby turkey processing plant. The DOE sponsored program consisted of four tasks. These were: Task 1 Optimization of the CWT Plant in Carthage - This task focused on advancing and optimizing the process plant operated by CWT that converts organic waste to fuel and energy. Task 2 Characterize and Validate Fuels Produced by CWT - This task focused on testing of bio-derived hydrocarbon fuels from the Carthage plant in power generating equipment to determine the regulatory compliance of emissions and overall performance of the fuel. Task 3 Characterize Mixed Waste Streams - This task focused on studies performed at Princeton University to better characterize mixed waste incoming streams from animal and vegetable residues. Task 4 Fundamental Research in Waste Processing Technologies - This task focused on studies performed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on the chemical reformation reaction of agricultural biomass compounds in a hydrothermal medium. Many of the challenges to optimize, improve and perfect the technology, equipment and processes in order to provide an economically viable means of creating sustainable energy were identified in the DOE Stage Gate Review, whose summary report was issued on July 30, 2004. This summary report appears herein as Appendix 1, and the findings of the report formed the basis for much of the subsequent work under the grant. An explanation of the process is presented as well as the completed work on the four tasks.

Gabriel Miller

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

28

Shredded tires and rubber-sand as lightweight backfill  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The growing interest in utilizing waste materials in civil engineering applications has opened the possibility of constructing reinforced soil structures with unconventional backfills. Scrap tires are a high-profile waste material for which several uses have been studied, including the use of shredded tires as backfill. A triaxial testing program was conducted to investigate the stress-strain relationship and strength of tire chips and a mixture of sand and tire chips. The test results and additional information from the literature were used in the numerical modeling of wall backfills, both unreinforced and reinforced with geosynthetics. The numerical modeling results suggest tire shreds, particularly when mixed with sand, may be effectively used as a backfill.

Lee, J.H.; Salgado, R.; Lovell, C.W. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Civil Engineering] [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Civil Engineering; Bernal, A. [GeoHidra, Caracas (Venezuela)] [GeoHidra, Caracas (Venezuela)

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Overland flow transport of pathogens from agricultural land receiving faecal wastes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and nature of faecal waste applications to land in the UK is briefly reviewed, with data presented on both livestock slurry and manure, and human sewage sludge. Particular emphasis is placed on factors influencingOverland flow transport of pathogens from agricultural land receiving faecal wastes S.F. Tyrrel1

Quinton, John

30

Solid Waste Management Program (South Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

South Dakota's Solid Waste Management Program offers loans and grants for solid waste disposal, recycling, and waste tire projects. Funds are available for private or public projects, and...

31

Latest in tire burning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On September 26, Cris Lombardi and I presented a paper at the ARIPPA. The economic and environmental advantages available to CFB operators through the firing of tire-derived fuel (TDF) are discussed. The bottom line savings to the operation can be significant. It is believed that a regional scrap tire processing facility, capable of making properly-sized fuel, can be supported in Pennsylvania. An effort to develop such an operation is described. The technology for shredding and sizing TDF is well-proven. The proper equipment has been identified and reliable sources of scrap tires have been located. What is needed is to establish a certain minimum annual TDF usage so that fuel user permit modification activity can begin. Data are presented on the production and use of TDF.

Betzig, H.M.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

32

An assessment of biofuel use and burning of agricultural waste in the developing world Rosemarie Yevich  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Latin America, respectively. Agricultural waste supplies about 33% of total biofuel use, providing 39%, 29%, and 13% of biofuel use in Asia, Latin America, and Africa, and 41% and 51% of the biofuel use.9Pg C (as CO2) from burning of biofuels and field residues together is small, but non-negligible when

Jacob, Daniel J.

33

An assessment of biofuel use and burning of agricultural waste in the developing world  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Asia, and 21% and 13% in Africa and Latin America, respectively. Agricultural waste supplies about 33% of total biofuel use, providing 39%, 29%, and 13% of biofuel use in Asia, Latin America, and Africa, and 41 and industry. The emission of 0.9 Pg C (as CO2) from burning of biofuels and field residues together is small

Jacob, Daniel J.

34

Co-processing of agriculture and biomass waste with coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biomass and bio-processed waste are potential candidates for co-liquefaction with coal. Specific materials used here include sawdust and poultry manure. Liquefaction experiments were run on each of these materials, separately and with coal, using tetralin as solvent at 350{degrees}C and 1000 psi(cold) hydrogen pressure for 1h. Total conversion was monitored, as well as conversion to asphaltenes, oils and gases. All the biomass samples are converted to oils and gases under the reaction conditions. Poultry manure seems to convert coal more completely, and to produce more oils and gases, than conventional liquefaction.

Stiller, A.H.; Dadyburjor, D.B.; Wann, J.P. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Puncturing the scrap tire problem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recovery of scrap tires is making major headway in the 1990s. In 1994, an estimated 55 percent of all scrap tires generated were diverted from landfills, compared to 11 percent five years ago. Within three to five years, the Scrap Tire Management Council (STMC), an industry group, predicts that there will be markets for 100 percent of the estimated 250 million plus scrap tires generated in the U.S. annually. At that point, it should be possible to start making a serious dent in the estimated 800 to 850 million scrap tires stockpiled around the country. About 4.5 million scrap tires get transformed into ground rubber products. Despite that relatively small number, this category holds significant promise. It also is the area with perhaps the most entrepreneurial activity. The reason is clear when the value added from increasingly intensive processing of tires is examined. When scrap rubber is ground for use in asphalt, new tires or a host of other products - the value goes up tremendously. A quarter inch minus grind generally sells for 14 to 22 cents/lb., or $280 to $440/ton. With smallerpieces, the value continues to climb. An `80 mesh,` or rubber that passes through a screen with 80 holes/linear inch, sells for30 to 45 cents/ lb. ($600 to $900/ton), which is higher than prices for aluminum cans two years ago.

Steuteville, R.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Engi 8717 -9601, In Class Assignment, 9 March 2010 A) human waste and agricultural run-off  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engi 8717 - 9601, In Class Assignment, 9 March 2010 A) human waste and agricultural run-off B) reduced fertilizer use (or no fertilizer use), ii) wetlands need to be reintroduced into the catchments

Coles, Cynthia

37

Mechanical properties of radial truck tires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

determination of static properties of tire load vs. tire deflection and tire load vs. tire footprint area for radial and wide base radial truck tires is described and results are discussed. Determination of transmissibility for a conventional radial and a... (right) 12 13 15 Figure 7: Sidewall bulge measurement 16 Figure 8: Load vs. deflection; 385/65R22. 5 wide base tire tested at 90 psi inflation pressure 20 Figure 9: Load vs. deflection; 385/65R22. 5 wide base tire tested at 100 psi inflation...

Wasti, Mansoor-ul-Hassan

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Emissions from burning tire-derived fuel (TDF): Comparison of batch combustion of tire chips and continuous combustion of tire crumb mixed with coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This laboratory study investigated the emissions of waste automobile tire-derived fuel (TDF). This fuel was burned in two different modes, either segmented in small pieces (tire chunks) or in pulverized form (tire crumb). Tire chunks were burned in fixed beds in batch mode in a horizontal furnace. Tire crumb was burned in a continous flow mode, dispersed in air, either alone or mixed with pulverized coal, in a verical furnace. The gas flow was laminar, the gas temperature was 1000{degrees}C in all cases, and the residence times of the combustion products in the furnaces were similar. Chunks of waste tires had dimensions in the range of 3-9 {mu}m, tire crumb was size-classified to be 180-212 {mu}m and the high volatile bituminous coal, used herein, was 63-75. The fuel mass loading in the furnaces was varied. The following emissions were monitored at the exit of the furnaces: CO, CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and particulates. Results showed that combustion of TDF in fixed beds resulted in large yields (emissions per mass of fuel burned) of CO, soot and PAHs. Such yields increased with the size of the bed. CO, soot and PAHs yields from batch combustion of fixed beds of coal were lower by more than an order of magnitude than those from fixed beds of TDF. Continuous pulverized fuel combustion of TDF (tire crumb) resulted in dramatically lower yields of CO, soot and PAHs than those from batch combustion, especially when TDF was mixed with pulverized coal. To the contrary, switching the mode of combustion of coal (from fixed beds to pulverized fuel) did not result in large differences in the aforementioned emissions. CO{sub 2}, and, especially, NO{sub x} yields from batch combustion of TDF were lower than those from coal. Emissions of NO{sub x} were somewhat lower from batch combustion than from pulverized fuel combustion of TDF and coal.

Levendis, Y.A.; Atal, A. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Carlson, J.B. [Army Natick R, Natick, MA (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Unconventional fuel: Tire derived fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Material recovery of scrap tires for their fuel value has moved from a pioneering concept in the early 1980`s to a proven and continuous use in the United States` pulp and paper, utility, industrial, and cement industry. Pulp and paper`s use of tire derived fuel (TDF) is currently consuming tires at the rate of 35 million passenger tire equivalents (PTEs) per year. Twenty mills are known to be burning TDF on a continuous basis. The utility industry is currently consuming tires at the rate of 48 million PTEs per year. Thirteen utilities are known to be burning TDF on a continuous basis. The cement industry is currently consuming tires at the rate of 28 million PTEs per year. Twenty two cement plants are known to be burning TDF on a continuous basis. Other industrial boilers are currently consuming tires at the rate of 6.5 million PTEs per year. Four industrial boilers are known to be burning TDF on a continuous basis. In total, 59 facilities are currently burning over 117 million PTEs per year. Although 93% of these facilities were not engineered to burn TDF, it has become clear that TDF has found acceptance as a supplemental fuel when blending with conventional fuels in existing combustion devices designed for normal operating conditions. The issues of TDF as a supplemental fuel and its proper specifications are critical to the successful development of this fuel alternative. This paper will focus primarily on TDF`s use in a boiler type unit.

Hope, M.W. [Waste Recovery, Inc., Portland, OR (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Rubber friction and tire dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a simple rubber friction law, which can be used, e.g., in models of tire (and vehicle) dynamics. The friction law is tested by comparing numerical results to the full rubber friction theory (B.N.J. Persson, J. Phys.: Condensed Matter 18, 7789 (2006)). Good agreement is found between the two theories. We describe a two-dimensional (2D) tire model which combines the rubber friction model with a simple mass-spring description of the tire body. The tire model is very flexible and can be used to calculate accurate mu-slip (and the self-aligning torque) curves for braking and cornering or combined motion (e.g., braking during cornering). We present numerical results which illustrate the theory. Simulations of Anti-Blocking System (ABS) braking are performed using two simple control algorithms.

B. N. J. Persson

2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste tires agricultural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Coal-tire co-liquefaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Co-liquefaction of ground coal and tire rubber was studied at 400{degrees}C both with and without catalyst. Two different tire samples were used. In the non-catalytic runs, the conversion of coal increased with the addition of tire and the increase was dependent on tire/coal ratio and hydrogen pressure. Using a ferric sulfide-based catalyst, the coal conversion increased with an increase in the catalyst loading. However, the increase was more pronounced at loadings of around 0.5 wt%. The addition of tire to coal in the catalytic runs was not particularly beneficial, especially, when the tire/coal ratio was above 1.

Sharma, R.K.; Dadyburjor, D.B.; Zondlo, J.W.; Liu, Zhenyu; Stiller, A.H. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

42

Assessment of damage to geomembrane liners by shredded scrap tires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a field and laboratory study performed to assess damage to the geomembrane liner caused by using shredded scrap tires as a leachate drainage layer material in landfills. The field testing was performed to assess the damage that occurred to the geomembrane liner during construction and included nine tests conducted with different combinations of tire chip size and thickness, both with a geotextile and without a geotextile overlying the geomembrane, and under different loading conditions. The laboratory testing was performed to characterize the shredded tires, particularly their size distribution, hydraulic conductivity, compressibility, and chemical resistance. The laboratory testing also included performing simulation testing to determine the extent of damage that occurs to the geomembrane liner by the shredded tires under long-term waste-loading conditions. the damage that occurred to the geomembrane liners in both field tests and simulated laboratory tests was determined by visual observations as well as by conducting multi-axial tension tests, wide strip tension tests, and water vapor transmission tests on the exhumed geomembrane samples. Based on these results, a 0.46-m thick layer of secondary shred tire chips, with an average size of 7.6 cm, placed over a 543-g/m{sup 2} geotextile installed over a geomembrane liner using low-ground-pressure (<58 kPa) equipment was determined to provide adequate protection in the geomembrane liner during construction. The degree of protection offered under long-term loading conditions depends on the normal stress and the random orientation of the shredded tire chips at the geomembrane interface.

Reddy, K.R.; Saichek, R.E. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Civil and Materials Engineering

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Tire recovery: Baltimore firm seeks solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several U.S. companies are recycling tires on a large scale. The tires usually are shredded and sold as a fuel supplement, as an additive to new rubber products, or as a component of road surfaces. Examples of successful tire recycling operations reveal the diverse processing and marketing strategies employed by six companies. The experiences of one hauler in Baltimore, MD, concerning scrap tire transport, shredding, and marketing are summarized.

Greenhut, S.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Bioconversion of waste biomass to useful products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is provided for converting waste biomass to useful products by gasifying the biomass to produce synthesis gas and converting the synthesis gas substrate to one or more useful products. The present invention is directed to the conversion of biomass wastes including municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, plastic, tires, agricultural residues and the like, as well as coal, to useful products such as hydrogen, ethanol and acetic acid. The overall process includes the steps of gasifying the waste biomass to produce raw synthesis gas, cooling the synthesis gas, converting the synthesis gas to the desired product or products using anaerobic bioconversion, and then recovering the product or products. In accordance with a particular embodiment of the present invention, waste biomass is converted to synthesis gas containing carbon monoxide and, then, the carbon monoxide is converted to hydrogen by an anaerobic microorganism ERIH2, bacillus smithii ATCC No. 55404.

Grady, James L. (Fayetteville, AR); Chen, Guang Jiong (Fayetteville, AR)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Bioconversion of waste biomass to useful products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is provided for converting waste biomass to useful products by gasifying the biomass to produce synthesis gas and converting the synthesis gas substrate to one or more useful products. The present invention is directed to the conversion of biomass wastes including municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, plastic, tires, agricultural residues and the like, as well as coal, to useful products such as hydrogen, ethanol and acetic acid. The overall process includes the steps of gasifying the waste biomass to produce raw synthesis gas, cooling the synthesis gas, converting the synthesis gas to the desired product or products using anaerobic bioconversion, and then recovering the product or products. In accordance with a particular embodiment of the present invention, waste biomass is converted to synthesis gas containing carbon monoxide and, then, the carbon monoxide is converted to hydrogen by an anaerobic microorganism ERIH2, Bacillus smithii ATCC No. 55404. 82 figs.

Grady, J.L.; Chen, G.J.

1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

46

WAVE TRANSMISSION AND MOORING-FORCE CHARACTERISTICS OF PIPE-TIRE FLOATING BREAKWATERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Department, Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co. , Akron,to truck tires), arrangement Goodyear layer conveyor- Afor Goodyear or Wave-Maze floating tire breakwaters tires

Harms, Volker W.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

X-ray characterization of tire derived particles resulting from different solvents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, 200 million scrap tires are being annually stockpiled, landfilled, or illegally dumped, with ca. 50 million scrap tires being recycled in a variety of ways. The current disposal methods are causing numerous short-term environmental problems. Whole tires occupy large amounts of space and may {open_quotes}float{close_quotes} or rise to the top of landfills, causing puncturing of the landfill cover. In an attempt to prevent floating, many landfills require that the scrap tires be shredded, a process which is energy intensive and wasteful. Scrap tire stock piles produce large health risks by providing a place for rodents and mosquitos to breed -- aiding in the spread of diseases. Large stockpile fires have also broken out in major cities in Florida, Texas, Virginia, and Washington. These fires are long lasting and produce unwanted smoke into the environment. For many reasons, the recycling of scrap tires is desirable. This paper describes the processing of scrap tires by several liquids and acids.

Cummings, R.C.; Smithhart, C.B.; Quin, J.; Wertz, D.L. [Univ. of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

48

Agricultural  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the BuildingInnovation 2011Oversupply ManagementAgricultural Sign In

49

Agricultural  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the BuildingInnovation 2011Oversupply ManagementAgricultural Sign

50

Design of highway embankments using tire chips  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes research undertaken to develop design procedures for using shredded scrap tires as a lightweight fill material in highway construction. The benefits of using scrap tires are particularly enhanced if they can be used to replace virgin construction materials made from nonrenewable resources. This paper addresses the use of tire chips as a highway embankment material. Design parameters for embankments constructed using discarded shredded tires are presented based on laboratory model studies, numerical analyses, and field performance of test fills. The conclusions of this report support the use of tire chips as an environmentally acceptable lightweight fill in highway applications if properly confined. Recommendations for design procedures and construction specifications for the use of tire chips in highway fills are provided.

Bosscher, P.J.; Edil, T.B. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Kuraoka, S. [National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). Inst. for Research in Construction

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Extracting inorganics from scrap tires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scrap tires contain several inorganic moieties in abundances >0.5% which are impregnated into their carbonaceous matrix. These inorganic species are known to produce acid rain, toxic aerosols, and boiler scale and could produce unwanted catalytic effects as well. It is our position that the potential of recycling scrap tires would be considerably enhanced if the inorganics in question - S, Ca, and Zn - were removed prior to attempts to upgrade the carbonaceous matrix. Using non-mechanical methods, we are attempting to cleave the adherence between the co-polymer matrix and to extract the inorganics. The efficiency of our methods is being measured by wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometry and by other methods.

Cummings, R.; Wertz, D.L. [Univ. of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

52

Evaluation of tire pressure, tire construction, axle configuration, and axle load on flexible pavement performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EVALUATION OF TIRE PRESSURE, TIRE CONSTRUCTION, AXLE CONFIGURATION, AND AXLE LOAD ON FLEXIBLE PAVEMENT PERFORMANCE A Thesis by AHMAD NAJEEB JAMY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1991 Major Subject: Civil Engineering EVALUATION OF TIRE PRESSURE, TIRE CONSTRUCTION, AXLE CONFIGURATION, AND AXLE LOAD ON FLEXIBLE PAVEMENT PERFORMANCE. A Thesis by AHMAD NAJEEB JAMY Approved...

Jamy, Ahmad Najeeb

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Improving Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Through Tire Design, Materials...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Through Tire Design, Materials, and Reduced Weight Improving Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Through Tire Design, Materials, and Reduced Weight 2012 DOE Hydrogen...

54

Goodyear Tire Plant Gains Traction on Energy Savings After Completing...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Tire Plant saved approximately 93,000 MMBtu and 875,000 annually after increasing steam system energy efficiency in their Union City, Tennessee, plant. Goodyear Tire Plant...

55

Scrap tire utilization via surface modification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. is developing a novel approach to reusing scrap tire rubber, which will be described in this presentation. In addition to consuming scrap tires, this technology represents a new approach to material engineering. Furthermore, this method of rubber recycle is most efficient in terms of energy recovery. 4 figs.

Bauman, B.D. (Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Dynamics and Stability of Rolling Viscoelastic Tires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current steady state rolling tire calculations often do not include treads because treads destroy the rotational symmetry of the tire. We describe two methodologies to compute time periodic solutions of a two-dimensional viscoelastic tire with treads: solving a minimization problem and solving a system of equations. We also expand on work by Oden and Lin on free spinning rolling elastic tires in which they disovered a hierachy of N-peak steady state standing wave solutions. In addition to discovering a two-dimensional hierarchy of standing wave solutions that includes their N-peak hiearchy, we consider the eects of viscoelasticity on the standing wave solutions. Finally, a commonplace model of viscoelasticity used in our numerical experiments led to non-physical elastic energy growth for large tire speeds. We show that a viscoelastic model of Govindjee and Reese remedies the problem.

Potter, Trevor

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

57

Kicking the Tires | Jefferson Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfraredJeffersonJonathan PershingrelocatesKaye D.KentheKicking the Tires

58

Tire Remanufacturing and Energy Savings Avid Boustani1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

components that contribute to energy losses in a vehicle. The tread of a tire encompasses only 10 to 20 per (electric utilities), civil engineering purposes, etc. Another promising market for scrap tires is tireTire Remanufacturing and Energy Savings Avid Boustani1 , Sahni Sahni1 , Timothy Gutowski, Steven

Gutowski, Timothy

59

Scrap tire management in the mid south region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Scrap Tire Management Council (STMC) is a North American tire manufacturer-sponsored advocacy organization, created to identify and promote environmentally and economically sound markets for scrap tires. This presentation gives a national overview of the scrap tire situation, and focuses on the Tennessee and Mid-south region. National generation rates and markets for scrap tires are discussed, and markets for scrap tires are described. The major markets identified are fuel, rubber products, and civil engineering applications. Three technologies that may have an impact on scrap tire recycling are discussed: pyrolysis, gasification, and devulcanization.

Blumenthal, M. [Scrap Tire Management Council, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Experimental investigation of the quality characteristics of agricultural plastic wastes regarding their recycling and energy recovery potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Definition of parameters characterising agricultural plastic waste (APW) quality. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analysis of samples to determine APW quality for recycling or energy recovery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Majority of APW samples from various countries have very good quality for recycling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upper limit of 50% w/w soil contamination in APW acceptable for energy recovery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chlorine and heavy metals content in APW below the lowest limit for energy recovery. - Abstract: A holistic environmentally sound waste management scheme that transforms agricultural plastic waste (APW) streams into labelled guaranteed quality commodities freely traded in open market has been developed by the European research project LabelAgriWaste. The APW quality is defined by the APW material requirements, translated to technical specifications, for recycling or energy recovery. The present work investigates the characteristics of the APW quality and the key factors affecting it from the introduction of the virgin product to the market to the APW stream reaching the disposer. Samples of APW from different countries were traced from their application to the field through their storage phase and transportation to the final destination. The test results showed that the majority of APW retained their mechanical properties after their use preserving a 'very good quality' for recycling in terms of degradation. The degree of soil contamination concerning the APW recycling and energy recovery potential fluctuates depending on the agricultural plastic category and application. The chlorine and heavy metal content of the tested APW materials was much lower than the maximum acceptable limits for their potential use in cement industries.

Briassoulis, D., E-mail: briassou@aua.gr [Agricultural University of Athens, Agricultural Engineering Department, 75 Iera Odos Str., 11855 Athens (Greece); Hiskakis, M.; Babou, E. [Agricultural University of Athens, Agricultural Engineering Department, 75 Iera Odos Str., 11855 Athens (Greece); Antiohos, S.K., E-mail: santiohos@titan.gr [Titan Cement Company S.A., Group R and D and Quality Department, Kamari Plant, P.O. Box 18, 19200 Elefsina (Greece); Papadi, C., E-mail: c.papadi@polyeco.gr [Polyeco S.A., 16 km National Road Athens-Korinthos, Aspropyrgos 19300 (Greece)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste tires agricultural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Goodyearís Self-Regulating Tires Save Fuel, Improve Safety, Win Awards  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Tire manufacturer Goodyear has received multiple accolades for its self-regulating tire system, which monitors and automatically adjusts tire pressure.

62

Using Biosurfactants Produced from Agriculture Process Waste Streams to Improve Oil Recovery in Fractured Carbonate Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the progress of our research during the first 30 months (10/01/2004 to 03/31/2007) of the original three-year project cycle. The project was terminated early due to DOE budget cuts. This was a joint project between the Tertiary Oil Recovery Project (TORP) at the University of Kansas and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective was to evaluate the use of low-cost biosurfactants produced from agriculture process waste streams to improve oil recovery in fractured carbonate reservoirs through wettability mediation. Biosurfactant for this project was produced using Bacillus subtilis 21332 and purified potato starch as the growth medium. The INL team produced the biosurfactant and characterized it as surfactin. INL supplied surfactin as required for the tests at KU as well as providing other microbiological services. Interfacial tension (IFT) between Soltrol 130 and both potential benchmark chemical surfactants and crude surfactin was measured over a range of concentrations. The performance of the crude surfactin preparation in reducing IFT was greater than any of the synthetic compounds throughout the concentration range studied but at low concentrations, sodium laureth sulfate (SLS) was closest to the surfactin, and was used as the benchmark in subsequent studies. Core characterization was carried out using both traditional flooding techniques to find porosity and permeability; and NMR/MRI to image cores and identify pore architecture and degree of heterogeneity. A cleaning regime was identified and developed to remove organic materials from cores and crushed carbonate rock. This allowed cores to be fully characterized and returned to a reproducible wettability state when coupled with a crude-oil aging regime. Rapid wettability assessments for crushed matrix material were developed, and used to inform slower Amott wettability tests. Initial static absorption experiments exposed limitations in the use of HPLC and TOC to determine surfactant concentrations. To reliably quantify both benchmark surfactants and surfactin, a surfactant ion-selective electrode was used as an indicator in the potentiometric titration of the anionic surfactants with Hyamine 1622. The wettability change mediated by dilute solutions of a commercial preparation of SLS (STEOL CS-330) and surfactin was assessed using two-phase separation, and water flotation techniques; and surfactant loss due to retention and adsorption on the rock was determined. Qualitative tests indicated that on a molar basis, surfactin is more effective than STEOL CS-330 in altering wettability of crushed Lansing-Kansas City carbonates from oil-wet to water-wet state. Adsorption isotherms of STEOL CS-330 and surfactin on crushed Lansing-Kansas City outcrop and reservoir material showed that surfactin has higher specific adsorption on these oomoldic carbonates. Amott wettability studies confirmed that cleaned cores are mixed-wet, and that the aging procedure renders them oil-wet. Tests of aged cores with no initial water saturation resulted in very little spontaneous oil production, suggesting that water-wet pathways into the matrix are required for wettability change to occur. Further investigation of spontaneous imbibition and forced imbibition of water and surfactant solutions into LKC cores under a variety of conditions--cleaned vs. crude oil-aged; oil saturated vs. initial water saturation; flooded with surfactant vs. not flooded--indicated that in water-wet or intermediate wet cores, sodium laureth sulfate is more effective at enhancing spontaneous imbibition through wettability change. However, in more oil-wet systems, surfactin at the same concentration performs significantly better.

Stephen Johnson; Mehdi Salehi; Karl Eisert; Sandra Fox

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

63

wisconsin's vanishing waters tech transfer success stories reducing food waste College of Agricultural & Life Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wisconsin's vanishing waters · tech transfer success stories · reducing food waste College to grow potatoes that serves as a model for other crops and leading cutting-edge research on biofuels

Balser, Teri C.

64

Technical Report 2014-15 Lugre Tire Model for HMMWV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. An example of an all-terrain tire that can be used on HMMWV is depicted in figure 1. Figure 1. A Goodyear tire 37/12.50R17LT (http://www.goodyear.com/). Tires can be modelled in a number of ways in computerTechnical Report 2014-15 Lugre Tire Model for HMMWV Aki Mikkola October 21, 2014 #12;2 Abstract

Negrut, Dan

65

Passive tire pressure sensor and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A surface acoustic wave device includes a micro-machined pressure transducer for monitoring tire pressure. The device is configured having a micro-machined cavity that is sealed with a flexible conductive membrane. When an external tire pressure equivalent to the cavity pressure is detected, the membrane makes contact with ridges on the backside of the surface acoustic wave device. The ridges are electrically connected to conductive fingers of the device. When the detected pressure is correct, selected fingers on the device will be grounded producing patterned acoustic reflections to an impulse RF signal. When the external tire pressure is less than the cavity reference pressure, a reduced reflected signal to the receiver results. The sensor may further be constructed so as to identify itself by a unique reflected identification pulse series.

Pfeifer, Kent Bryant (Los Lunas, NM); Williams, Robert Leslie (Albuquerque, NM); Waldschmidt, Robert Lee (Calgary, CA); Morgan, Catherine Hook (Ann Arbor, MI)

2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

66

Passive tire pressure sensor and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A surface acoustic wave device includes a micro-machined pressure transducer for monitoring tire pressure. The device is configured having a micro-machined cavity that is sealed with a flexible conductive membrane. When an external tire pressure equivalent to the cavity pressure is detected, the membrane makes contact with ridges on the backside of the surface acoustic wave device. The ridges are electrically connected to conductive fingers of the device. When the detected pressure is correct, selected fingers on the device will be grounded producing patterned acoustic reflections to an impulse RF signal. When the external tire pressure is less than the cavity reference pressure, a reduced reflected signal to the receiver results. The sensor may further be constructed so as to identify itself by a unique reflected identification pulse series.

Pfeifer, Kent Bryant; Williams, Robert Leslie; Waldschmidt, Robert Lee; Morgan, Catherine Hook

2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

67

A statistical analysis of tire tread wear  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. o ~ 4 14 Tire ~uxement Teat QQXPmemt a o e ~ ~ a ~t CencMt9ome. Xmeyect Rem Sohedmles, , ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ a a e e a o ~ ~ ~ e o W a ~ XS lS lv Tzeatmeat ef the Rata. . . ~. . . . , . . . XS X X X ~ ANAEeYSXS OP ~ MM ~ e ~ e e e ~ ~ e ~ e ~ ~ SS... o e' 'e 'o e ' e 'e o e e ~ e Beanbag ef the Test ef Bean Siffexeneea an4 Kate~inn 'o o o ~ e o ~ e e o. e ~ R~B658atl~o e ~ ~ ~ o e e e e ~ ~ e o 45 41 4S 1. Tire Wear in Relation to Period, Position, Tire & Treatment I, encl Tclsg8xntnre...

Sperberg, Ronald Leigh

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Tire Development for Effective Transportation and Utilization of Used Tires, CRADA 01-N044, Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scrap tires represent a significant disposal and recycling challenge for the United States. Over 280 million tires are generated on an annual basis, and several states have large stockpiles or abandoned tire piles that are slated for remediation. While most states have programs to address the accumulation and generation of scrap tires, most of these states struggle with creating and sustaining recycling or beneficial end use markets. One of the major issues with market development has been the costs associated with transporting and processing the tires into material for recycling or disposal. According to a report by the Rubber Manufactures Association tire-derived fuel (TDF) represents the largest market for scrap tires, and approximately 115 million tires were consumed in 2001 as TDF (U.S. Scrap Tire Markets, 2001, December 2002, www.rma.org/scraptires). This market is supported primarily by cement kilns, followed by various industries including companies that operate utility and industrial boilers. However the use of TDF has not increased and the amount of TDF used by boiler operators has declined. The work completed through this cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) has shown the potential of a mobile tire shredding unit to economically produce TDF and to provide an alterative low cost fuel to suitable coal-fired power systems. This novel system addresses the economic barriers by processing the tires at the retailer, thereby eliminating the costs associated with hauling whole tires. The equipment incorporated into the design allow for small 1-inch chunks of TDF to be produced in a timely fashion. The TDF can then be co-fired with coal in suitable combustion systems, such as a fluidized bed. Proper use of TDF has been shown to boost efficiency and reduce emissions from power generation systems, which is beneficial to coal utilization in existing power plants. Since the original scope of work outlined in the CRADA could not be completed because of lack of progress by the CRADA members, the agreement was not extended beyond February 2004. The work completed included the detailed design of the mobile unit, a general economic analysis of the operating the system, and outreach activities.

Susan M. Maley

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

69

Tire Pressures and Sustainability: The Economic and Environmental Effects of Under-Inflated and Over-Inflated Tires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tire Pressures and Sustainability: The Economic and Environmental Effects of Under-Inflated and Over-Inflated Tires at Williams College Sam Baldwin GEOS 206 Professor Dethier 18 May 2010 #12;Baldwin sustainable automobile practices. As gas prices were rising in 2006, for example, tire manufacturer

Aalberts, Daniel P.

70

Scrap tires: Black gold or fool`s gold?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three years ago, a US EPA report estimated there were between 2 and 3 billion tires stockpiled in the US. Currently, according to the Scrap Tire Management Council (STMC, Washington, DC), the number of stockpiled tires totals 850 million. However, this reduction is not due to federal or state legislation; simply, the number was overestimated. Whatever the actual number, scrap tire mounds have been large enough to prompt 34 states to developed scrap tire funding programs aimed at eliminating the stockpiling of the some 250 million tires generated per year, while gradually eliminating the tires already stockpiled. However, of the 34 states, only Illinois, Oregon, Florida, Wisconsin, and Minnesota, are aggressively tackling the problem. In each of these five cases, state officials claim, the only viable way to reduce large quantities of tires quickly is through energy reuse, and, like any other disposal method, it costs money. To compensate for the costs of elimination, states are developing funding for scrap tire reduction programs by placing fees on tire disposal, tire purchase, or vehicle title transfer and registration.

Glaz, S.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Fact #763: January 21, 2013 Eighty-four Percent of Scrapped Tires...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tire Uses, 2009 Market Tons (Thousands) Tire-derived Fuel 2,084.8 Ground Rubber 1,354.2 Civil Engineering 284.9 Reclamation Projects 130.0 Exported 102.1 Baled TiresMarketable...

72

Goodyear's Self-Regulating Tires Save Fuel, Improve Safety, Win...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

on the environment. Addthis Related Articles This graphic shows how Goodyear's new Air Maintenance Technology -- also called the self-regulating tire -- works. | Graphic...

73

Final Scientific Report - "Improved Fuel Efficiency from Nanocomposite Tire Tread"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rolling resistance, a measure of the energy lost as a tire rotates while moving, is a significant source of power and fuel loss. Recently, low rolling resistant tires have been formulated by adding silica to tire tread. These "Green Tires" (so named from the environmental advantages of lower emissions and improved fuel economy) have seen some commercial success in Europe, where high fuel prices and performance drive tire selection. Unfortunately, the higher costs of the silica and a more complicated manufacturing process have prevented significant commercialization - and the resulting fuel savings - in the U.S. In this project, TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) prepared an inexpensive alternative to silica that leads to tire components with lower rolling resistance. These new tire composite materials were processed with traditional rubber processing equipment. We prepared specially designed nanoparticle additives, based on a high purity, inorganic mineral whose surface can be easily modified for compatibility with tire tread formulations. Our nanocomposites decreased energy losses to hysteresis, the loss of energy from the compression and relaxation of an elastic material, by nearly 20% compared to a blank SBR sample. We also demonstrated better performance than a leading silica product, with easier production of our final rubber nanocomposite.

Dr. Andrew Myers

2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

74

Scrap tire reuse through surface-modification technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. is developing a novel approach for reusing scrap tire rubber. The process involves the combination of scrap tire rubber particles with other materials to form higher value and higher performance composites. The process begins by grinding scrap tire to a fine particle size, and removing steel and fabric. The key to this approach is a proprietary surface-modification step which is critical for enhancing the compatibility with and bonding to other continuous phase matrix materials. Of all approaches for scrap tire rubber reuse, this approach offers the potential to recover (or save) the greatest amount of energy. Furthermore, this is the only approach which is clearly economically viable with current pricing and without a scrap tire tax. The process is environmentally innocuous, and capital requirements for large scale processing plants are projected to be modest. 7 figs.

Bauman, B.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Oklahoma Agriculture Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oklahoma Agriculture Agriculture #12;Oklahoma Agriculture 2011Oklahoma Agriculture 2011 Oklahoma agriculture affects each of us every day, young and old, whether we live in largely rural regions or the state's Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources promotes sustainable land use and embraces the land

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

76

Discussion of and reply to ``Processing of scrap tires: Technology and market applications``  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Publication of this paper by Michael H. Blumenthal provides an excellent overview of scrap tire market opportunities, processing options, and some legislative background. The authors present some comments and areas that need addition coverage or clarification. These include the following: durability of new tires made from recycled rubber; cost data; tire derived fuel; landfilling of tires; composition of tires; processing equipment; and processing problems. This article also contains Mr. Blumenthal`s reply to the comments and questions.

Cosulich, J. [Los Angeles County Sanitation District, Whittier, CA (United States); Smisko, J. [County Sanitation Districts of Los Angeles County, Commerce, CA (United States); Niessen, W.R. [Camp Dresser and McKee, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States); Blumenthal, M.H. [Scrap Tire Management Council, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Application of pyrolized carbon black from scrap tires in asphalt pavement design and construction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

According to EPA reports (1991) of the over 242 million waste generated each year in the United State, 5% are exported, 6% recycled, 11% incinerated, and 78% are landfilled, stockpiled, or illegally dumped. A variety of uses for these tires are being studied. Among these is pyrolysis which produces 5 5% of oil, 25% of carbon black, 9% of steel, 5% of fiber and 6% of gas. Pyrolized carbon black contains 9 % of ash, 4% of sulfur, 12% of butadine copolymer and 75% of carbon black. The objective of this research is to investigate the viability of using PCB as an additive in hot mix asphalt. The use of PCB in asphalt pavement is expected not only to improve the performance of conventional asphalt, but also to provide a means for the mass disposal of waste fires.

Park, T.; Coree, B.J. [Indiana Department of Transportation, West Lafayette, IN (United States). Division of Research; Lovell, C.W. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Civil Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

78

Animal Waste Technology Fund (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A bill passed in 2012 transferred responsibility for animal waste management technology projects to the Maryland Department of Agriculture. The Department will maintain the Animal Waste Technology...

79

Development of asphalts and pavements using recycled tire rubber. Phase 1, Technical feasibility. Technical progress report, September 1, 1994--August 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

About 285 million tires are discarded every year; less than 100 million are currently being recycled, with the rest being placed in landfills and other waste sites. A solution to reduce the littering of the environment is to use ground tire rubber in road construction. Currently, about 27 million tons of asphalt are used each year in road construction and maintenance of the country`s 2 million miles of roads. If all of the waste tire rubber could be combined with asphalt in road construction, it would displace less than 6% of the total asphalt used each year, yet could save about 60 trillion Btus annually. Purpose of this project is to provide data needed to optimize the performance of rubber-asphalt concretes. The first phase is to develop asphalts and recycling agents tailored for compatibility with ground tire rubber. Chapter 2 presents results on Laboratory Testing and Evaluation: fractionate asphalt material, reblending for aromatic asphalts, verifying optimal curing parameters, aging of blends, and measuring ductilities of asphalt-rubber binders. Chapter 3 focuses on Evaluating Mixture Characteristics (modified binders). Chapter 4 covers Adhesion Test Development (water susceptibility is also covered). The final chapter focuses on the Performance/Economic Update and Commercialization Plan.

Bullin, J.A.; Davison, R.R.; Glover, C.J. [and others

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Charles County- Agricultural Preservation Districts- Renewable Generation Allowed  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Charles County provides that producing energy "from solar, wind, biomass, and farm waste and residue crops" is a permitted agricultural use in areas zoned as Agricultural Preservation Districts.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste tires agricultural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Development of asphalts and pavements using recycled tire rubber. Phase 1: technical feasibility. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the technical progress made on the development of asphalts and pavements using recycled tire rubber.

Bullin, J.A.; Davison, R.R.; Glover, C.J. [and others

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Tire-Wear Particles as a Source of Zinc to the Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(11, 15), brake linings (11, 15, 16), and rubber tires (9, 12, 17). Tire-wear particles have been.S. Geological Survey, MS 430, 12201 Sunrise Valley Drive, Reston, Virginia 20192 Tire-tread material has a zinc (Zn) content of about 1 wt %. The quantity of tread material lost to road surfaces by abrasion has

83

Dynamic Friction Models for Longitudinal Road/Tire Interaction: Theoretical Advances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic Friction Models for Longitudinal Road/Tire Interaction: Theoretical Advances C. Canudas we derive a new dynamic friction force model for the longitudinal road/tire interaction for wheeled-point friction problems, called the LuGre model [1]. By assuming a con- tact patch between the tire

Tsiotras, Panagiotis

84

Triaxial determination of shear strength of tire chips  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Triaxial compression tests following stress paths of constant {sigma}{sub 1} were conducted to determine the shear strength of five processed scrap tire products having different gradations and particle shapes. The interparticle frictional component was separated from the total shear strength according to the energy correction concept proposed by researchers. The experimental results show that all five tire chip products have ultimate internal friction angles of 45{degree} to over 60{degree}. The interparticle frictional component of the strength was fully mobilized and nearly reached a constant value after approximately 5% axial strain. The experimental results confirmed that the strength parameter obtained with constant {sigma}{sub 1} was more reasonable. This finding is supported by field observation in which the tire chips have an angle of repose ranging from 37{degree} to 43{degree} (loosely stock piled) and up to 85{degree} (compacted). The engineering applications of the experimental results are discussed.

Wu, W.Y.; Benda, C.C.; Cauley, R.F. [Vermont Agency of Transportation, Montpelier, VT (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Peace Corps | Agriculture Agriculture Volunteers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Peace Corps | Agriculture Agriculture Volunteers Agriculture is the primary economic activity Volunteers contribute sustain- able solutions to a community's agricultural issues and help preserve natural resources. Programs and Sample Projects Agriculture and Forestry Extension · Collaborate with farmers

Kaminsky, Werner

86

Recycling tires. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology and economic advantages of scrap tire recycling. The application of crumb rubber in the production of asphalt paving, floor-coverings, high performance composites, and other products is described. The production of fuels from scrap tires is also discussed. Legislation which promotes recycling, and the roles of government and the private sector in developing new markets and expanding existing markets are included.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Recycling tires. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology and economic advantages of scrap tire recycling. The application of crumb rubber in the production of asphalt paving, floor-coverings, high performance composites, and other products is described. The production of fuels from scrap tires is also discussed. Legislation which promotes recycling, and the roles of government and the private sector in developing new markets and expanding existing markets are included.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Scrap tire management in the New York/Mid Atlantic region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Scrap Tire Management Council (STMC) is a North American tire manufactures sponsored, advocacy organization, created to identify and promote environmentally and economically sound markets for scrap tires. The primary goal of the Council is to assist in the creation of demand for 100 percent of the annually generated scrap tires in the United States. Based on current market demand and projected market growth, we envision the primary goal to be met by the turn of the century. A national overview of the scrap tire situation is presented, and then the situations in New York/Mid Atlantic region are discussed.

Blumenthal, M. [Scrap Tire Management Council, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Geotechnical investigation of the potential use of shredded scrap tires in soil stabilization. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silt-tire and clay-tire mixtures, containing 0% to 100% shredded tire material by weight, with tire chips ranging in size from 7mm--13mm, 13mm--25mm, and 25mm--38mm, were tested for a series of engineering properties including compaction characteristics, permeability, unconfined compressive strength, friction angle, cohesion, and compression index. In addition, the leachate samples from shredded tire material, soil-tire mixtures, and a test embankment, containing 70% clay and 30% shredded tire material by weight, were analyzed for chemical composition. The results show that density and unconfined compressive strength decrease, and permeability increases, with increasing shredded tire content for both soil types and all three tire sizes used in the study. In general, the addition of shredded tire material improves the friction angle for both silt and clay by a few degrees but also increases their compression index values. The results of leachate analyses show that concentrations of trace elements from soil-tire mixtures are less than the maximum allowed contaminant levels specified in United States Environmental Protection Agency`s regulations.

Shakoor, A.; Chu, C.J.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Use of shredded tires in the subbase layer of asphalt pavements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research was conducted on the use of shredded scrap tires for use in the subbase layer of asphalt pavements. Mixtures of shredded scrap tires with virgin soil provide a means of recycling unwanted tires and conserving a finite supply of virgin soil. The mechanistic procedure for the design of pavement systems requires resilient modulus values. Plastic and elastic strains were measured using external LVDT`s and internal proximity sensors. Resilient modulus measurements were conducted on cohesionless soils mixed with various amounts of shredded tire chips. The performance f the shredded tire mixture is compared to that of the naturally occurring virgin soil used in subbase applications in New Jersey. A number of experimental issues are discussed such as: method of compaction, optimum ratio of shredded tire chips to soil, optimum size and gradation of shredded tire chips, and strength testing using California Bearing Ratio.

Papp, W.J. Jr.; Maher, M.H. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Baker, R.F. [New Jersey Dept. of Transportation, Trenton, NJ (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

91

The use of scrap tires in rotary cement kilns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of scrap tires as a supplemental fuel in the United States Portland cement industry has increased significantly in the past six years. In 1990, there were two kilns using tire-derived fuel (TDF), today 30 kilns use TDF. The outlook for continued and expanded use of TDF in the U.S. cement industry should be considered favorable, with 15 kilns conducting tests to determine TDF`s applicability or in the permitting process. The Council`s estimates are that by the end of 1996, the cement industry could be consuming some 75-100 million of the 253 million annually generated scrap tires in the United States. This level of TDF usage will make the cement industry the largest market segments for scrap tires in the United States. While the long-term outlook is at present positive, there are a series of factors that have, and will likely continue to adversely impact the near-term usage of TDF. These issues, as well as the factors that are likely to positively impact the cement kiln TDF market are the subject of this presentation.

Blumenthal, M. [Scrap Tire Management Council, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

92

Introduction Agriculture/Agricultural Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

38 Introduction Guide Entrance Life Career Inquiries Agriculture/Agricultural Science Mission and goal of the Graduate School of Agricultural Science The mission of agricultural science organization which aims to realize this agricultural ideal, the Graduate School of Agricultural Science's basic

Banbara, Mutsunori

93

Producing ground scrap tire rubber: A comparison between ambient and cryogenic technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prior to 1985, few, if any scrap tires were processed. The Minnesota program changed all that. The equipment first introduced to process scrap tires consisted of redesigned wood or metal shredders. The performance of these systems left much to be desired. In the past 10 years, many companies and equipment systems, designed especially for scrap tires, have come into existence. Until recently, scrap tires were typically processed by ambient systems. These systems consist of a mechanical process, which cuts and or grinds whole tire rubber into the desired sized particle at room temperatures. Historically, producing ground rubber, like all other rubber processing, was done by an ambient processes system. Within the last several years, cryogenic processing of scrap tires has been introduced for the preparation of ground rubber. In the cryogenic process, rubber is introduced into a bath of liquid nitrogen, instantly freezing the rubber. Once embrittled, the rubber is struck with an impact devise, effectively shattering the rubber.

Blumenthal, M.H. [Scrap Tire Management Council, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Numerical model for the vacuum pyrolysis of scrap tires in batch reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A quantitative model for scrap tire pyrolysis in a batch scale reactor developed comprises the following basic phenomena: conduction inside tire particles; conduction, convection, and radiation between the feedstock particles or between the fluids and the particles; tire pyrolysis reaction; exothermicity and endothermicity caused by tire decomposition and volatilization; and the variation of the composition and the thermal properties of tire particles. This model was used to predict the transient temperature and density distributions in the bed of particles, the volatile product evolution rate, the mass change, the energy consumption during the pyrolysis process, and the pressure history in a tire pyrolysis reactor with a load of 1 kg. The model predictions agree well with independent experimental data.

Yang, J.; Tanguy, P.A.; Roy, C. [Univ. Laval, Quebec, PQ (Canada). Dept. de Genie Chimique] [Univ. Laval, Quebec, PQ (Canada). Dept. de Genie Chimique

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Scrap tire recycling: Promising high value applications. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface modification of scrap tire rubber (rubber particles treated with chlorine gas) show promise for ameliorating the scrap tire problem (the treated rubber can be used as a component in high- performance, expensive polymer systems). The process has been proven in Phase I. Phase II covers market/applications, process development (Forberg-design mixer reactor was chosen), plant design, capital cost estimate, economics environmental/safety/health, and energy impact. Almost of the small amount of chlorine is consumed. The capital costs for a rubber particle treatment facility are attractive, being at least two orders of magnitude less than that of facilities for making new polymer materials. Large volume markets using treated rubber are needed. The amount of scrap rubber available is small compared to the polymers available for replacement. 7 tabs, 16 figs.

Bauman, B.D.; Leskovyansky, P.J.; Drela, H.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Characterization of chars from coal-tire copyrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work is the characterization of the solid conversion product from coal-tire copyrolysis because, nowadays, any new process should be faced without resolving the problem of the subproducts generated. A low-rank coal and a nonspecific mixture of scrap automotive tires, 50/50 w/w, have been coprocessed at 400 C for 30 min at different H{sub 2} pressures and atmospheres. Once the most valuable conversion products, the liquids, were recovered by tetrahydrofuran extraction, a complementary battery of analytical techniques was applied to characterize the solids or chars, looking for their possible use. {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, immediate and ultimate analyses, ASA, and scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry were performed on them. By X-ray diffractometry the presence of sphalerite, pyrrhotite, and anhydrite was detected. Thermogravimetric studies demonstrated that the combustion induction temperature is 400 C. Char combustion tests at 900 C with discussion of NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions are included. Mineral matter behaves as if only coal is processed with the Zn exception, from ZnO in the tire, which is converted into ZnS. It is shown that the char organic component has a higher aromaticity than the one from coal.

Mastral, A.M.; Callen, M.S.; Murillo, R. [CSIC, Zaragoza (Spain). Inst. de Carboquimica] [CSIC, Zaragoza (Spain). Inst. de Carboquimica; Alvarez, R.; Clemente, C. [UM, Madrid (Spain). ETS de Ingenieros de Minas] [UM, Madrid (Spain). ETS de Ingenieros de Minas

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Statewide plan for utilization of scrap tires in Kansas. Final report, September 1993-May 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was conducted to determine the current and future supply of scrap tire rubber and the feasibility of using scrap tires in Kansas for various purposes. The goal was to determine if a sufficient quantity of recycled rubber existed and what the cost would be to meet the ISTEA (Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act) requirements for 1995 and thereafter. The four tasks included in the study were: surveying scrap tire utilization plans in other states; inventory scrap tires in Kansas; estimating scrap tire generation in the future; and determiming cost effectiveness of various uses of scrap tires. Currently there are 4.5 to 5.5 million scrap tires in Kansas and the annual generation of scrap tires is estimated to be 2 to 3 million. The ISTEA mandate would require an estimated 367,000 scrap tires be recycled annually. KDOT has used more rubber in 1993 and 1994 than will be required by 1997 when the 20% required by ISTEA is in effect.

Nelson, R.G.; Hossain, M.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

E-Print Network 3.0 - automobile tires final Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: automobile tires final Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 VEHICLE FUEL Informing Consumers, Summary:...

99

Saskatchewan Agricultural  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Saskatchewan Agricultural Hall of Fame College of Agriculture and Bioresources Inductees 2014 Edition #12;"SALUTE TO SASKATCHEWAN FARM LEADERS" Photos courtesy of the Saskatchewan Agriculture Hall Williams 1941- Lorne Alan Babiuk 1946- #12;"SALUTE TO SASKATCHEWAN FARM LEADERS" Photos courtesy

Peak, Derek

100

IMPACT OF TIRE AND AERODYNAMIC AIDS ON TRUCK PERFORMANCE ALONG UPGRADE SECTIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMPACT OF TIRE AND AERODYNAMIC AIDS ON TRUCK PERFORMANCE ALONG UPGRADE SECTIONS Hesham Rakha1 and aerodynamics aids on the truck acceleration behavior. The objectives of this paper are two-fold. First of vehicle tires, the vehicle's aerodynamic features, the percentage mass on the tractive axle

Rakha, Hesham A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste tires agricultural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Copyright 2013 Clemson University 1 Clemson Tire Industry Conference -April 24 26, 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: TECHNOLOGY AND PRODUCTS: Moderator: Harvey Bordsky, Managing Director, Retread Tire Association toward the standard minimum. Due to the many influential factors leading to automobile accidents and international economic conditions in the major tire producing areas of the world ­ namely, Asia including Japan

Bolding, M. Chad

102

M.-T. DO, P. MARSAC, Y. DELANNE Prediction of Tire/Wet Road Friction from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M.-T. DO, P. MARSAC, Y. DELANNE 1 Prediction of Tire/Wet Road Friction from Road Surface, validation of a contact model for the prediction of low-speed friction from road surface microtexture the friction ­ speed curve from road- and tire measurable parameters. The model development is briefly

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

103

Dynamic Friction Models for Longitudinal Road/Tire Interaction: Experimental Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic Friction Models for Longitudinal Road/Tire Interaction: Experimental Results C. Canudas dynamic friction force model for the longitudinal road/tire interaction for wheeled ground vehicles is val- idated via experiments with an actual passenger vehicle. Contrary to common static friction/slip maps

Tsiotras, Panagiotis

104

Removal of polychlorinated phenols in sequential anaerobic-aerobic biofilm reactors packed with tire chips  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scrap vehicle tire chips were used as packing material for sequential anaerobic-aerobic biofilm reactors to remove persistent chlorinated hydrocarbons. Adsorption capacity of scrap tires was greater under acidic conditions than under basic conditions. However, it was only approximately 0.04 to 0.3% of that of activated carbon. The amount of biomass that attached to the surface of scrap tires was 3.16 and 3.72 mg volatile suspended solids/cm{sup 2} after 14 and 37 days, respectively. Two laboratory-scale, down-flow anaerobic-aerobic biofilm reactors packed with tire chips were operated to remove 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP) and 4-chlorophenol (CP). More than 98% of DCP was dehalogenated to CP in the anaerobic reactor, 70 to 98% of which was subsequently degraded in the aerobic reactor. Scrap tires did not cause any operational problems when used as biofilter media.

Shin, H.S.; Yoo, K.S.; Park, J.K.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Cooperative Research Program in Coal-Waste Liquefaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of a feasibility study for a demonstration plant for the liquefaction of waste plastic and tires and the coprocessing of these waste polymers with coal are presented. The study was conducted by a committee that included nine representatives from the CFFS, six from the U.S. Department of Energy - Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), and four from Burns and Roe, Inc. The study included: (1) An assessment of current recycling practices, particularly feedstock recycling in Germany; (2) A review of pertinent research, and a survey of feedstock availability for various types of waste polymers; and (3) A conceptual design for a demonstration plant was developed and an economic analysis for various feedstock mixes. The base case for feedstock scenarios was chosen to be 200 tons per day of waste plastic and 100 tons per day of waste tires. For this base case with oil priced at $20 per barrel, the return on investment (ROI) was found to range from 9% to 20%, using tipping fees for waste plastic and tires typical of those existing in the U.S. The most profitable feedstock appeared to waste plastic alone, with a plant processing 300 t/d of plastic yielding ROI's from 13 to 27 %, depending on the tipping fees for waste plastic. Feedstock recycling of tires was highly dependent on the price that could be obtained for recovered carbon. Addition of even relatively small amounts (20 t/d) of coal to waste plastic and/or coal feeds lowered the ROI's substantially. It should also be noted that increasing the size of the plant significantly improved all ROI's. For example, increasing plant size from 300 t/d to1200 t/d approximately doubles the estimated ROI's for a waste plastic feedstock.

Gerald Huffman

2000-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

106

Integration of waste pyrolysis with coal/oil coprocessing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HTI has developed a novel process, HTI CoPro Plus{trademark}, to produce alternative fuels and chemicals from the combined liquefaction of waste materials, coal, and heavy petroleum residues. Promising results have been obtained from a series of bench tests (PB-01 through PB-06) under the DOE Proof of Concept Program. Recently, HTI acquired a proven technology for the mild co-pyrolysis of used rubber tires and waste refinery or lube oils, developed by the University of Wyoming and Amoco. The feasibility of integration of pyrolysis with coal-oil coprocessing was studied in the eighth bench run (PB-08) of the program. The objective of Run PB-08 was to study the coprocessing of coal with oils derived from mild pyrolysis of scrap tires, waste plastics, and waste lube oils to obtain data required for economic comparisons with the DOE data base. A specific objective was also to study the performance of HTI`s newly improved GelCat{trademark} catalyst in coal-waste coprocessing under low-high (Reactor 1-Reactor 2 temperatures) operating mode. This paper presents the results obtained from Run PB-08, a 17-day continuous operation conducted in August 1997. A total of 5 conditions were tested, including a baseline coal-only condition. During the coprocessing conditions, 343{degrees}C+ pyrolysis oils derived from co-pyrolysis of rubber tires or a mixture of rubber tires and plastics with waste lube oil, were coprocessed with Black Thunder coal using HTI GelCat{trademark} catalyst. In the last condition, rubber tires were pyrolyzed with 524{degrees}C- coal liquid to study the possible elimination of lube oil used as pyrolysis processing oil. Overall coal conversion above 90 W% was achieved.

Hu, J.; Zhou, P.; Lee, T.L.K.; Comolli, A. [Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc., Lawrenceville, NJ (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Pyrolysis of scrap tires: Can it be profitable?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pyrolysis--the thermal degradation in the absence of oxygen--is one way to reprocess scrap tires. The products are fuel gas, oils, and a solid residue (char), which contains appreciable quantities of mineral matter and low-grade carbon black. The three products have comparable yields by weight. The two most important factors affecting process economics are the tipping fees charged for tire disposal and the selling prices of the products. Selling prices of the products yield low returns because of the low market value of the fuels and the low quality of the recovered char or carbon black. Therefore, to obtain a positive cash flow, it would be desirable to develop a process based on the recovery of value-added products such as high-grade carbon black, activated carbon, or valuable chemicals (e.g., benzene, toluene, and xylene). The authors believe that significant improvement in the economics can be accomplished by upgrading the primary pyrolysis products to secondary products of higher value.

Wojtowicz, M.A.; Serio, M.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Regulatory impacts and affects of emissions of the combustion of scrap tires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scrap tires have several advantages as a fuel for combustion. Combustion of scrap tires as a supplement to existing fuel is an economically viable alternative. In addition, policies that would reduce the growing stockpiles of scrap tires would also reduce its potential environmental hazards (emissions of toxic compounds from arson-caused fires and breeding ground for disease-carrying insects). The growing number of industrial applications as a supplemental fuel include cement kilns, the pulp and paper industry, and utility boilers. A growing body of studies of air emissions from scrap tire and tire-derived fuel (TDF-) supplemented combustion has been conducted over the past decade. For some pollutants and applications, co-combustion with TDF has been shown to decrease emissions. This paper summarizes trends in the effects of supplementing combustion with TDF on emissions of different pollutants. At the same time, scrap tire and TDF combustion are not currently regulated by a specific NSPS or MACT standard because these standards typically regulate an emission unit, not a fuel type. The USEPA is currently debating how to regulate facilities which supplement their combustion with scrap tires. This paper discusses some options that the USEPA is considering.

Karell, M.A.; Blumenthal, M.H.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Test burning of tire-derived fuel in solid fuel combustors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was commissioned to determine the overall viability of utilizing scrap tire chips, known as tire-derived fuel (TDF), as a supplemental fuel in conventional coal-fired boilers. The study involved actual tests at Monsanto Company`s W.G. Krummrich Plant in Sauget, Illinois, as well as general extrapolations as to the feasibility of using TDF at other sites. This report will show that TDF can be an excellent supplemental fuel supply, providing a cost-effective fuel source while helping to alleviate the dilemma of scrap tire disposal.

Dennis, D.C. [Monsanto Copany, Sauget, IL (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

110

Recovery and evaluation of the solid products produced by thermocatalytic decomposition of tire rubber compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and carbon blacks for reuse. It is noted that molten salts, especially aluminum chloride (AlCl3), of which the base metal has an electron structure t 4 requirement with the polymer undergoing decomposition, can act as catalysts for decomposing tire... rubbers.10 The fact that molten salt catalysis can be used to decompose tire rubbers has been known for several decades.11-12 However, to date no literature reports a successful commercial catalytic conversion process for the disposal of scrap tires...

Liang, Lan

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

111

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainable alternatives to traditional plastics and conventional plastic waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to traditional plastics and conventional plastic waste management in the agricultural setting of the UBC Farm alternatives to traditional plastics and conventional plastic waste management in the agricultural setting ................................................................................................................. 9 Agricultural plastics

112

Energy Efficiency in Heavy Vehicle Tires, Drivetrains, and Braking Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document was prepared to support the primary goals of the Department of Energy, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies. These were recently stated as follows: ''Develop by 2004 the enabling technologies for a class 7-8 truck with a fuel efficiency of 10 mpg (at 65 mph) which will meet prevailing emission standards. For Class 3-6 trucks operating on an urban driving cycle, develop by 2004 commercially viable vehicles that achieve at least double the fuel economy of comparable current vehicles (1999), and as a research goal, reduce criteria pollutants to 30% below EPA standards. Develop by 2004 the diesel engine enabling technologies to support large-scale industry dieselization of Class 1 and 2 trucks, achieving a 35 % fuel efficiency improvement over comparable gasoline-fueled trucks, while meeting applicable emissions standards.'' The enabling technologies for improving the fuel efficiency of trucks, include not only engine technologies but also technologies involved with lowering the rolling resistance of tires, reducing vehicle aerodynamic drag, improving thermal management, and reducing parasitic frictional losses in drive train components. Opportunities also exist for making better use of the energy that might ordinarily be dissipated during vehicle braking. Braking systems must be included in this evaluation since safety in truck operations is vital, and braking requirements are greater for vehicles having lowered resistance to rolling. The Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies has initiated a program to improve the aerodynamics of heavy vehicles through wind tunnel testing, computational modeling, and on-road evaluations. That activity is described in a separate multi-year plan; therefore, emphasis in this document will be on tires, drive trains, and braking systems. Recent, dramatic fluctuations in diesel fuel prices have emphasized the importance of effecting savings in truck fuel economy by implementing new component designs and materials.

Peter J. Blau

2000-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

113

College of Agriculture & Life Sciences Agricultural Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Agriculture & Life Sciences Agricultural Technology Applied Agricultural Management Option Checksheet for Students Graduating in Calendar Year 2013 Associate of Agriculture Degree Required Agricultural Technology Core Courses (31 credits) 3 AT 0104 Computer Applications 3 AT 0114 Applied

Virginia Tech

114

Water quality effects of tire chip fills placed above the groundwater table  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two field trials were constructed to investigate the effect on water quality of tire chip fills placed above the groundwater table. Control wells were used to distinguish the substances naturally present in groundwater from those that leached from tire chips. There was no evidence that tire chips increased the level of substances that have a primary drinking water standard. In addition, there was no evidence that tire chips increased the levels of aluminum, zinc, chloride or sulfate which have secondary (aesthetic) drinking water standards. Under some conditions iron levels may exceed their secondary standard. It is likely that manganese levels will exceed their secondary standard, however, manganese is naturally present in groundwater in many areas. Two sets of samples were tested for organics. Results were below the method detection limit for all compounds.

Humphrey, D.N.; Katz, L.E. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Blumenthal, M. [Scrap Tire Management Council, Washington, DC (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

115

Optimization of scrap tire pyrolysis using a continuous-feed steam environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Estimates of the generation of scrap tires produced in the United States are on the order of 2 million tons per year. Although these tires contain a high percentage of useful hydrocarbons, steel and carbon black, approximately 70% are not effectively recycled. Recently, pyrolytic recycling of scrap tire (thermal decomposition in the absence of O{sub 2}) is receiving renewed interest because of its ability to produce valuable hydrocarbon products. We have developed a process which permits a continuous feed processing of scrap tires in a non-combustible stream environment. This system utilizes a soft seal system that operates at atmospheric pressures while minimizing any fugitive emissions. This process increases the efficiency and control of present approaches by lowering the energy requirements while maximizing the collection of valuable products. Initial bench-scale results will be presented.

Burrell, T.W.; Frank, S.R.; Rich, M.L. [Univ. of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA (United States)] [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Camera that takes pictures of aircraft and ground vehicle tires can save lives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Camera that takes pictures of aircraft and ground vehicle tires can save lives Yair Wiseman Holon Institute of Technology Computer Science Department Holon 58102, Israel E-mail: wiseman

Wiseman, Yair

117

Agriculture INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

volatility following trade liberalization. This had an adverse effect on agricultural economies of regions impact on small and mar- ginal farmers. · Increased non-agricultural demand for land and water as a result of the higher overall GDP growth and urbanization. · Aggravation in social distress

Sohoni, Milind

118

Modeling the effect of soil structure on water flow and isoproturon dynamics in an agricultural field receiving repeated urban waste compost application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

field receiving repeated urban waste compost application Vilim Filipovi1,2,3 , Yves Coquet2 , Valťrie properties. Tillage practices and compost amendments can modify soil structure and create heterogeneity and compost application on transport processes. A modeling study was performed to evaluate how the presence

Boyer, Edmond

119

This is not a peer-reviewed article. Pp. 034-043 in the Ninth International Animal, Agricultural and Food Processing Wastes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of twelve different compost and mulch materials on total solids (TS) loss and water quality and found blankets and berms offer significant improvements in water quality through improved erosion control OF COMPOSTED WASTE MATERIALS IN EROSION CONTROL L. M. Risse and L. B. Faucette ABSTRACT The objective

Mukhtar, Saqib

120

Laboratory study on the use of tire shreds and rubber-sand in backfills and reinforced soil applications. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Millions of scrap tires are discarded annually in the United States, the bulk of which are currently landfilled or stockpiled. This consumes valuable landfill space, or, if improperly disposed, creates a fire hazard and provides a prolific breeding ground for rates and mosquitoes. The use of tire shreds as lightweight fill material can sharply reduce the tire disposal problem. The present study, based on laboratory testing and numerical modeling, examines the feasibility of incorporating tire shreds and rubber-sand mixtures as lightweight geomaterial in embankments and backfills.

Bernal, A.; Lovell, C.W.; Salgado, R.

1996-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste tires agricultural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Conversion of Waste Biomass into Useful Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste biomass includes municipal solid waste (MSW), municipal sewage sludge (SS), industrial biosludge, manure, and agricultural residues. When treated with lime, biomass is highly digestible by a mixed culture of acid-forming microorganisms. Lime...

Holtzapple, M.

122

Circulating fluidized bed gasification of a tire-derived fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A market available tire-derived fuel (TDF) was continuously fed in a laboratory scale CFB gasifier operated with air and steam as oxidizers. Silica sand, having a Sauter mean diameter of 155 {micro}m, was used as bed material. The riser and the recirculation column were maintained at 850 C by means of electric heaters driven by electronic controllers. The experiments were carried out at fixed values of solids mass flux (10 kg/sm{sup 2}) and superficial gas velocity in the primary (1.7 m/s) as well as in the secondary zone (2.7 m/s). The equivalence ratios and the H{sub 2}O/TDF d.a.f. ratio were varied between 0.3 and 0.6 and between 0.4 and 1.3, respectively. For each run, data from pressure electronic transducers, thermocouples and gas analyzers were processed to evaluate riser axial profiles of pressure, temperature and gas concentration (in terms of CO, H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, C{sub n}H{sub m} and CO{sub 2} content). Collecting, sieving and analyzing solids hold-up in the riser allowed estimation of the amount of carbon particles and their size distribution. Carbon conversion efficiency, specific gas yield and energy output were also determined.

Arena, U.; Cammarota, A. [Ist. di Ricerche Sulla Combustione-C.N.R., Napoli (Italy)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

123

Organic agriculture cannot replace conventional agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organic agriculture cannot replace conventional agriculture Sina Adl , David Iron and Theodore Agriculture | Pathogen Dispersal Introduction Organic farming [1, 2] is gaining in popularity in Eu- rope, because or- ganic agriculture avoids using environmentally harmful chem- icals that pollute soil

Kolokolnikov, Theodore

124

Effect of Wide-Based Single Tires on Fuel Efficiency of Class 8 Combination Trucks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2007 and 2008, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, in collaboration with several industry partners, collected real-world performance and situational data for long-haul operations of Class- 8 trucks from a fleet engaged in normal freight operations. Such data and information is useful to support Class-8 modeling of heavy-truck performance, technology evaluation efforts for energy efficiency, and to provide a means of accounting for real-world driving performance within heavy-truck research and analyses. This paper presents some general statistics, including distribution of idling times during long-haul trucking operations. However, the main focus is on the analysis of some of the extensive real-world information collected in this project, specifically on the assessment of the effect that different types of tires (i.e., dual tires vs. new generation single wide-based tires or NGSWBTs) have on the fuel efficiency of Class-8 trucks. The tire effect is also evaluated as a function of the vehicle load level. In all cases analyzed, the statistical tests performed strongly suggest that fuel efficiencies achieved when using all NGSWBTs or combinations of duals and NGSWBTs are higher than in the case of a truck equipped with all dual tires.

Franzese, Oscar [ORNL] [ORNL; Knee, Helmut E [ORNL] [ORNL; Slezak, Lee [U.S. Department of Energy] [U.S. Department of Energy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Comparing urban solid waste recycling from the viewpoint of urban metabolism based on physical input-output model: A case of Suzhou in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Impacts of solid waste recycling on Suzhou's urban metabolism in 2015 are analyzed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sludge recycling for biogas is regarded as an accepted method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Technical levels of reusing scrap tires and food wastes should be improved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Other fly ash utilization methods should be exploited. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Secondary wastes from reusing food wastes and sludge should be concerned. - Abstract: Investigating impacts of urban solid waste recycling on urban metabolism contributes to sustainable urban solid waste management and urban sustainability. Using a physical input-output model and scenario analysis, urban metabolism of Suzhou in 2015 is predicted and impacts of four categories of solid waste recycling on urban metabolism are illustrated: scrap tire recycling, food waste recycling, fly ash recycling and sludge recycling. Sludge recycling has positive effects on reducing all material flows. Thus, sludge recycling for biogas is regarded as an accepted method. Moreover, technical levels of scrap tire recycling and food waste recycling should be improved to produce positive effects on reducing more material flows. Fly ash recycling for cement production has negative effects on reducing all material flows except solid wastes. Thus, other fly ash utilization methods should be exploited. In addition, the utilization and treatment of secondary wastes from food waste recycling and sludge recycling should be concerned.

Liang Sai, E-mail: liangsai09@gmail.com [School of Environment, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhang Tianzhu, E-mail: zhangtz@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [School of Environment, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

Pyrolysis kinetics of scrap tire rubbers. 1: Using DTG and TGA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tire pyrolysis kinetics was investigated to explore an economically viable design for the pyrolysis process. Derivative thermogravimetry (DTG) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were found to provide valuable information on pyrolysis kinetics and mechanisms of a heterogeneous compound like scrap tire rubbers. Kinetic parameters of each compositional compound were obtained by analyzing DTG and TGA results with a series of mathematical methods proposed in this study. The pyrolysis kinetics of the scrap tire rubbers tested was well accounted for by the first-order irreversible independent reactions of three compositional compounds. The sidewall and tread rubber exhibited different thermal degradation patterns, suggesting a compositional difference between them. Isothermal pyrolysis results showed that the sidewall rubber would hardly be degraded at low temperature regions (<600 K), whereas it would be more rapidly degraded than the tread rubber at higher temperatures ({>=}746 K). Because of the shorter pyrolysis time, the higher isothermal pyrolysis temperature appeared to be more economically favorable.

Kim, S.; Park, J.K. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Chun, H.D. [Research Inst. of Industrial Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Design of a bench-scale apparatus for processing carbon black derived from scrap tires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(incineration) or as a filler for asphalt. Incineration has been employed in an attempt to harness the high calorific value of scrap tires. However, disposal via incineration may not maximize the potential economic recovery of energy and chemical materials... into liquid fuels and forms of solid carbon such as carbon black and activated carbon. Previous work in this area utilizes pyrolysis. ' There are several commercial, pilot, and bench-scale tire 2-4, 6-8 pyrolysis systems in use today. Many of these employ...

Woodrow, Philip Travis

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Investigating citizens' preferences for recycling Residual Organic Products in agriculture: a choice experiment approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in France (excluding agriculture waste) [1], the recycling of urban organic waste is a strong environmentalInvestigating citizens' preferences for recycling Residual Organic Products in agriculture or mineral fertilizers. The paper addresses in particular 3 environmental effects: the organic waste

Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

129

About California Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Submissions. California Agriculture manages the peer reviewread our CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE ē VOLUME 67 , NUMBER 2Carol Lovatt California Agriculture (ISSN 0008-0845, print,

Editor, The

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

About California Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Form 3579Ē to California Agriculture at the address above. ©Submissions. California Agriculture manages the peer reviewour Writing CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE ē VOLUME 66 , NUMBER 4

Editors, The

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

About California Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Submissions. California Agriculture manages the peer reviewread our CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE ē VOLUME 67 , NUMBER 1Carol Lovatt California Agriculture (ISSN 0008-0845, print,

Editor, The

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Pennsylvania Agricultural  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- mental regulations cover industrial pollution as well as pollution controls for agriculture. Two of PA but must be kept on the farm and made available upon request. Plans NPDES Permits The National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit is a requirement for construction activities that disturb 1 acre

Guiltinan, Mark

133

Radioactive Waste Radioactive Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Radioactive Waste at UF Bldg 831 392-8400 #12;Radioactive Waste · Program is designed to;Radioactive Waste · Program requires · Generator support · Proper segregation · Packaging · labeling #12;Radioactive Waste · What is radioactive waste? · Anything that · Contains · or is contaminated

Slatton, Clint

134

Product formulations using recycled tire crumb rubber. Final report/project accomplishments summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to combine crumb rubber and synthetic fiber obtained from scrap tires with thermoplastic polymers and convert these materials into commercially useful, high-value products. A specific goal was to use these materials for roofing, while remaining cognizance of other potential applications.

Lula, J.W.; Bohnert, G.W.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Estimation of vehicle lateral tire-road forces: a comparison between extended and unscented Kalman filtering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimation of vehicle lateral tire-road forces: a comparison between extended and unscented Kalman of accident data reveals that losing the vehicle control is responsible for a huge proportion of car accidents. Preventing such kind of accidents using vehicle control systems, requires certain input data concerning

Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

136

On bicycle tire tracks geometry, hatchet planimeter, Menzin's conjecture and oscillation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On bicycle tire tracks geometry, hatchet planimeter, Menzin's conjecture and oscillation of unicycle tracks Mark Levi and Serge Tabachnikov April 13, 2008 Abstract The model of a bicycle is a unit wheel is fixed on the bicycle frame); the same model describes the hatchet planimeter. The trajectory

Tabachnikov, Sergei

137

Tractrices, Bicycle Tire Tracks, Hatchet Planimeters, and a 100-year-old Conjecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tractrices, Bicycle Tire Tracks, Hatchet Planimeters, and a 100-year-old Conjecture Robert Foote, Mark Levi, and Serge Tabachnikov Abstract. We study a simple model of bicycle motion: A bicycle measuring area of plane domains. The trajectory of the front wheel and the initial position of the bicycle

Foote, Robert L.

138

Tractrices, Bicycle Tire Tracks, Hatchet Planimeters, and a 100-year-old Conjecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tractrices, Bicycle Tire Tracks, Hatchet Planimeters, and a 100-year-old Conjecture R. L. Foote M. Levi S. Tabachnikov 1 Introduction The geometry of the tracks left by a bicycle has received much of a bicycle and that of a curious device known as a hatchet planimeter, and we will prove a conjecture about

Tabachnikov, Sergei

139

Factors affecting agricultural journalists and agricultural communicators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agricultural journalism and agricultural communication have been researched in depth, identifying job skills, job satisfaction, educational backgrounds, and curriculum issues. However, a study examining the spheres (subjective, institutional...

Chenault, Edith Anne

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Framtidens lantbruk / Future Agriculture Future Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Framtidens lantbruk / Future Agriculture Future Agriculture ­ Livestock, Crops and Land Use Report from a multidisciplinary research platform. Phase I (2009 ­ 2012) #12;Future Agriculture ­ Livestock Waldenström Utgivningsår: 2012, Uppsala Utgivare: SLU, Framtidens lantbruk/Future Agriculture Layout: Pelle

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste tires agricultural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Subsurface flow constructed wetland: treatment of domestic wastewater by gravel and tire chip media and ultraviolet disinfection of effluent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and volatile suspended solids, NH?, P, and fecal and total coliforms. Differences between medium types in wetland performance were found for the parameters of BOD? and P, in which tire chip wetlands outperformed gravel wetlands. The average percent reduction...

Richmond, Amanda Yvette

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Improving Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Through Tire Design, Materials, and Reduced Weight  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Cooper Tire at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about improving vehicle fuel efficiency...

143

Wave transmission and mooring-force characteristics of pipe-tire floating breakwaters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results are presented of a series of prototype scale tests of a floating breakwater that incorporates massive cylindrical members (steel or concrete pipes, telephone poles, etc.) in a matrix of scrap truck or automobile tires, referred to as the Pipe-Tire Breakwater (PT-Breakwater). Tests were conducted in the large wave tank at the US Army Coastal Engineering Research Center (CERC). Breakwater modules were preassembled at SUNY in Buffalo, New York, and then transported to CERC by truck, where final assembly on location was again performed by SUNY personnel. Wave-tank tests were conducted jointly by CERC and SUNY personnel. A series of wave-tank experiments and mooring system load-deflection tests were performed, and are described. Wave-transmission and mooring-load characteristics, based on 402 separate tests, were established and are reported. (LCL)

Harms, Volker W.; Westerink, Joannes J.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Wisconsin Agriculture SPECIAL ARTICLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 · Corn Ethanol: Impacts on Markets Communities and the Environment . . . . . . 33 · BioenergySTATUS OF Wisconsin Agriculture 2009 · SPECIAL ARTICLE: Bioenergy and Agriculture in Wisconsin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 III Special Article: Bioenergy and Agriculture in Wisconsin

Radeloff, Volker C.

145

Missouri Agriculture Outlook Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Missouri Agriculture Outlook Conference Conference Information This conference will discuss the drivers of Missouri agricultural and bio-fuel markets and the implications for Missouri farmsDr.JonHagler, DirectoroftheMissouriDepartment ofAgriculture. · Outlookpresentationsderivedfrom thelatestbaselineresultsof

Noble, James S.

146

Energy Intensity of Agriculture and Food Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dependencies in the light of energy price volatility and concerns as to long-term fossil energy availabilities ENERGY USE. . . . . . . . . . 232 6. FOOD WASTE AND ENERGY USE. . . . . . . . . . . . . Energy Intensity of Agriculture and Food Systems Nathan Pelletier,1 Eric Audsley,2 Sonja Brodt,3

Wang, Changlu

147

Kentucky Department of Agriculture  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Kentucky Department Kentucky Department of Agriculture of Agriculture Motor Fuel and Pesticide Motor Fuel and Pesticide Testing Laboratory Testing Laboratory Introduction...

148

College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

40 College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences 40 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND LIFE SCIENCES The College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sci- ences (virtual- nity and Economic Development Concentration; Agricultural Education; Agricultural Mechanization

Stuart, Steven J.

149

environment and agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environment and agriculture environmentagriculture.curtin.edu.au Bachelor of Science - majorS in agriculture, environmental Biology or coaStal Zone management Science and engineering #12;t he department of environment and agriculture caters for students who are passionate about agriculture, biology, conserving

150

Roadmap for Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Science Roadmap for Food and Agriculture A Science Roadmap for Food and Agriculture Prepared and Policy (ESCOP)-- Science and Technology Committee November 2010 #12;2 pA Science Roadmap for Food and Agriculture #12;A Science Roadmap for Food and Agriculture p i About this Publication To reference

Buckel, Jeffrey A.

151

Agricultural and Food Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) #12;86 Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Undergraduate Catalogue 2014­15 Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Officers-level courses in agriculture were offered by the School of Arts and Sciences at AUB as early as 1914. Between

152

Agricultural and Food Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) #12;88 Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Graduate Catalogue 2013­14 Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Officers aims to offer specialized training in a variety of fields in food and agriculture, and to prepare

153

Undergraduate Education The College of Agricultural Sciences will provide undergraduate degrees in Agricultural Business, Agricultural Economics,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Undergraduate Education The College of Agricultural Sciences will provide undergraduate degrees in Agricultural Business, Agricultural Economics, Agricultural Education, Animal Sciences, Equine Sciences, economics, business, and communications. The program in Agricultural Education recently has been renovated

154

Federal Waste Management www.lebensministerium.at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF AGRICULTURE AND FORESTRY ENVIRONMENT AND WATER MANAGEMENT FEDERAL WASTE MANAGEMENT PLAN 2001 Issued by the Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry, Environment and Water Management on June 30, 2001 #12;Note, Environment and Water Management, Division III/3 U; Stubenbastei 5, 1010 Vienna Printed and layouted by

Columbia University

155

Agriculture and Environmental Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

practices, land application of biosolids and organic wastes, bioenergy, pesticides, and wetlands. Course Water Act, wetlands, bioenergy, food waste and pesticides. Students will examine the nitrogen

Ma, Lena

156

Immigration reform and California agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reform and California agriculture Philip Martin Professor,proposals for California agriculture. Immigration reformCenter. 196 CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE ē VOLUME 67 , NUMBER 4

Martin, Philip

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Networks, Local Institutions and Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Working Paper Series Agriculture for Development Paper No.Institutions and Agriculture. Chris Udry Yale UniversityMay 2009 Conference on ďAgriculture for Development in Sub-

Udry, Chris

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsidered  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2009 Paper 1080 Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsideredby author(s). Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsideredimpact of climate change on agriculture, there still exists

Fisher, Anthony

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

A summary of the report on prospects for pyrolysis technologies in managing municipal, industrial, and Department of Energy cleanup wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pyrolysis converts portions of municipal solid wastes, hazardous wastes and special wastes such as tires, medical wastes and even old landfills into solid carbon and a liquid or gaseous hydrocarbon stream. In the past twenty years, advances in the engineering of pyrolysis systems and in sorting and feeding technologies for solid waste industries have ensured consistent feedstocks and system performance. Some vendors now offer complete pyrolysis systems with performance warranties. This report analyzes the potential applications of pyrolysis in the Long Island region and evaluates the four most promising pyrolytic systems for their readiness, applicability to regional waste management needs and conformity with DOE environmental restoration and waste management requirements. This summary characterizes the engineering performance, environmental effects, costs, product applications and markets for these pyrolysis systems.

Reaven, S.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

College of Agricultural Sciences College of Agricultural Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Agricultural Sciences College of Agricultural Sciences Office in Shepardson Building and maintaining a productive, safe, and sustainable environment. Agricultural programs integrate biological agricultural systems. COLLEGE PROGRAMS Undergraduate Majors Undergraduate programs lead to a Bachelor

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste tires agricultural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

College of Agriculture, Food and Environment GEN General Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Agriculture, Food and Environment GEN General Agriculture KEY: # = new course * = course IN AGRICULTURE. (3) Anintroductorycourserequiringcriticalanalysisofthemajorsocial. Prereq: Students enrolled in the College of Agriculture; freshmen only in fall semesters and transfers

MacAdam, Keith

162

College of Agriculture, Food and Environment AEC Agricultural Economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Agriculture, Food and Environment AEC Agricultural Economics KEY: # = new course THE ECONOMICS OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE. (3 of agriculture in both a national and international dimension. Students who have completed ECO 201

MacAdam, Keith

163

College of Agriculture, Food and Environment SAG Sustainable Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Agriculture, Food and Environment SAG Sustainable Agriculture KEY: # = new course INTRODUCTION TO SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE. (3) Broad introduction to the environmental, economic and cultural agriculture are discussed along with pertinent soil, crop and livestock management practices. Relationships

MacAdam, Keith

164

Russell Ranch Sustainable Agriculture Facility Agricultural Sustainability Institute  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Russell Ranch Sustainable Agriculture Facility Agricultural Sustainability Institute College of Agricultural Sustainability Institute Professor, Department of LAWR With input from Steve Kaffka, Ford Denison Sustainability Institute The Russell Ranch Sustainable Agriculture Facility is a unique 300-acre facility near

California at Davis, University of

165

Fulbrighters Agricultural scientists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fulbrighters are... Agricultural scientists Anthropologists Archeologists Architects Art historians. Jenny Montgomery Film Studies Vijay Narasimhan Material Sciences/ Nanotechnology Michael Haughton

166

Prospects for pyrolysis technologies in managing municipal, industrial, and DOE cleanup wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pyrolysis converts portions of municipal solid wastes, hazardous wastes, and special wastes such as tires, medical wastes, and even old landfills into solid carbon and a liquid or gaseous hydrocarbon stream. Pyrolysis heats a carbonaceous waste stream typically to 290--900 C in the absence of oxygen, and reduces the volume of waste by 90% and its weight by 75%. The solid carbon char has existing markets as an ingredient in many manufactured goods, and as an adsorbent or filter to sequester certain hazardous wastes. Pyrolytic gases may be burned as fuel by utilities, or liquefied for use as chemical feedstocks, or low-pollution motor vehicle fuels and fuel additives. This report analyzes the potential applications of pyrolysis in the Long Island region and evaluates for the four most promising pyrolytic systems their technological and commercial readiness, their applicability to regional waste management needs, and their conformity with DOE requirements for environmental restoration and waste management. This summary characterizes their engineering performance, environmental effects, costs, product applications, and markets. Because it can effectively treat those wastes that are inadequately addressed by current systems, pyrolysis can play an important complementing role in the region`s existing waste management strategy. Its role could be even more significant if the region moves away from existing commitments to incineration and MSW composting. Either way, Long Island could become the center for a pyrolysis-based recovery services industry serving global markets in municipal solid waste treatment and hazardous waste cleanup. 162 refs.

Reaven, S.J. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

A LuGre Tire Friction Model with Exact Aggregate Dynamics Panagiotis Tsiotras, Efstathios Velenis and Michel Sorine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A LuGre Tire Friction Model with Exact Aggregate Dynamics Panagiotis Tsiotras, Efstathios Velenis and Michel Sorine Abstract-- The LuGre dynamic point contact friction model for the two-dimensional translation of a body on a surface has been used in the past to derive a model for the friction forces

Tsiotras, Panagiotis

168

Tired of changing light bulbs AND want to save money? Still using 100 year-old technology?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE COMPACT FLUORESCENT LIGHT BULB CHALLENGE! · A 23 W Compact bulb gives the same light as a 100W regular with compact fluorescent bulbs! Toss `Em Install `Em Most big stores stock them. We bought ours at Costco @ $2Tired of changing light bulbs AND want to save money? Still using 100 year-old technology? TAKE

Glashausser, Charles

169

European Commission Agriculture and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

European Commission Agriculture and Rural Development Good practice guidance on the sustainable Commission (EC) DG Agriculture and Rural Development 130, Rue de la Loi B ­ 1049 Brussels, Belgium Phone: +32 (0) 2-2969909 Fax: +32 (0) 2-29211 33 E-mail: info@ec.europa.eu Web: https://www.ec.europa.eu/agriculture

170

Growing Hawaii's agriculture industry,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Program Overview Growing Hawaii's agriculture industry, one business at a time Website: http-3547 agincubator@ctahr.hawaii.edu Grow Your Business If you are looking to start an agriculture-related business with our program · Positively impact the agriculture industry in Hawaii with their success

171

International Programs in Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International Programs in Agriculture MessagefromtheDirector­ Staying Ahead of Globalization and more prosperous place for all. Fortunately, Purdue International Programs in Agriculture (IPIA) has natural disasters caution us to remember the power of nature. The United Nations Food and Agriculture

172

Missouri Agriculture Outlook Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Missouri Agriculture Outlook Conference Conference Information Join us to discuss the drivers of Missouri agricultural and bio-fuels markets and participate in a special review of international policy implications for Missouri agriculture. Registration Deadline To guarantee space availability, please register

Noble, James S.

173

Division of Agriculture,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DAFVM Division of Agriculture, Forestry, and Veterinary M e d i c i n e Visit us online at www to the Mississippi State University Division of Agriculture, Forestry, and Veterinary Medicine. Discrimination based-3-14) Mississippi State University's Division of Agriculture, Forestry, and Veterinary Medicine, or DAFVM

Ray, David

174

Agriculture KENNETH L. KOONCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COLLEGE OF Agriculture KENNETH L. KOONCE Dean M. E. GARRISON Associate Dean JACQUELINE M. MALLET BAKER Recruitment Coordinator 104 Agricultural Administration Building 225/578-2362 FAX 225/578-2526 Student Services 138 Agricultural Administration Building 225/578-2065 FAX 225/578-2526 The College

Harms, Kyle E.

175

Meats & Products Agricultural Inputs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Meats & Products Agricultural Inputs Processing Idaho B20 C C B Meats and Livestock Products Index to agriculture? Legend Overall weighted grade Weighted rank Northwest Midwest Southwest East Meats & ProductsProcessingessing Maine B11 B A A Meats & Products Agricultural Inputs Processing New York F49 F F F soductsoducts

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

176

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal waste recycling Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

measure for recycling of house-hold waste to agriculture 12;Sustainability analysis Bioenergy... , cereal grain), grass from seminatural ecosystem e.g. ... Source: Ris...

177

Montana State University 1 College of Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Montana State University 1 College of Agriculture Graduate Programs Available Agricultural Education Program (http:// catalog.montana.edu/graduate/agriculture/agricultural- education) · M.S. in Agricultural Education (http://catalog.montana.edu/graduate/ agriculture/agricultural-education) Department

Lawrence, Rick L.

178

Session Title Climate Smart Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Session Title Climate Smart Agriculture Session Date Khosla (moderator) Professor, Soil and Crop Sciences College of Agricultural Climate Smart Agriculture is a multi-disciplinary approach to practice agriculture

Barnes, Elizabeth A.

179

Agricultural and Resource Economics Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

forecasting drought effects on agriculture based on waterEffects of 2009 Drought on San Joaquin Valley Agriculture

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Characterization of asphalt cements modified with crumbed rubber from discarded tires. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential legislative requirement for incorporation of scrap rubber into asphalt blends mandated a thorough evaluation of the influence of scrap rubber additives on the physical properties and aging characteristics of rubber/asphalt blends. Blends with up to 20 percent ground vulcanized rubber (both crumb and 200 mesh powder particles) from recycled tires were prepared with asphalt cements of various grades (AC5 - AC30) and evaluated using DMA. Blends produced from powdered rubber particles exhibited Newtonian behavior at high temperatures; similar behavior was not observed with crumb rubber blends. The mechanical properties of asphalt-rubber blends depend upon the concentration of rubber additives, the particle dimensions, and the chemical composition of the asphalt.

Daly, W.H.; Negulescu, I.I.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste tires agricultural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Hydrocoprocessing of scrap automotive tires and coal. Analysis of oils from autoclave coprocessing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrocoprocessing of scrap automotive tires and a low-rank coal was carried out in a magnetically stirred autoclave. Reaction temperature (400 C) and time (30 min) were kept constant in every experiment, while different pressures (10, 5, and 1 MPa of H{sub 2} and 0.1 MPa of N{sub 2}) were studied. An iron-based catalyst was used to improve yields. Derived oils were analyzed by GC-MS and TLC-FID. In terms of yields, it is shown that there is a synergism between these two materials, although it can only be observed working at low hydrogen pressure. The oils obtained in the coprocessing showed a more aromatic nature than those obtained when both materials are processed alone, and higher boiling points, suggesting that radicals from rubber and coal react between each other instead of reacting with hydrogen radicals.

Anderson, L.L.; Ding, W.; Liang, J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Fuels Engineering] [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Fuels Engineering; Callen, M.; Mastral, A.M.; Mayoral, M.C.; Murillo, R. [CSIC, Zaragoza (Spain). Inst. de Carboquimica] [CSIC, Zaragoza (Spain). Inst. de Carboquimica

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Solid waste programs updated July 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The module focuses on EPA`s efforts in two areas: municipal and industrial solid waste. The garbage that is managed by the local governments is known as municipal solid waste (MSW). Garbage excluded from hazardous waste regulation but not typically collected by local governments is commonly known as industrial solid waste. This category includes domestic sewage and other wastewater treatment sludge, demolition and construction wastes, agricultural and mining residues, combustion ash, and industrial process wastes.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Waste Plastics as Fuel The concept of PlastofuelTM is the use of waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste Plastics as Fuel The concept of PlastofuelTM is the use of waste agricultural plastic as a fuel source. The PlastofuelTM process creates a dense plastic nugget of compressed shredded plastic that can be burned cleanly in a high temperature combustion process. The shredded plastic is composed

Demirel, Melik C.

184

Development of statistical wet weather model to evaluate frictional properties at the pavement-tire interface on hot mix asphalt concrete  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Skid resistance on wet pavements is influenced by friction at the tire-pavement interface as well as overall hot mix asphalt (HMA) performance. It is important to control aggregate, asphalt, and mix properties to achieve desirable frictional...

Bedi, Harpreet

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Thermochemical conversion of waste materials to valuable products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential offered by a large variety of solid and liquid wastes for generating value added products is widely recognized. Extensive research and development has focused on developing technologies to recover energy and valuable products from waste materials. These treatment technologies include use of waste materials for direct combustion, upgrading the waste materials into useful fuel such as fuel gas or fuel oil, and conversion of waste materials into higher value products for the chemical industry. Thermal treatment in aerobic (with oxygen) conditions or direct combustion of waste materials in most cases results in generating air pollution and thereby requiring installation of expensive control devices. Thermochemical conversion in aerobic (without oxygen) conditions, referred to as thermal decomposition (destructive distillation) results in formation of usable liquid, solid, and gaseous products. Thermochemical conversion includes gasification, liquefaction, and thermal decomposition (pyrolysis). Each thermochemical conversion process yields a different range of products and this paper will discuss thermal decomposition in detail. This paper will also present results of a case study for recovering value added products, in the form of a liquid, solid, and gas, from thermal decomposition of waste oil and scrap tires. The product has a high concentration of benzene, xylene, and toluene. The solid product has significant amounts of carbon black and can be used as an asphalt modifier for road construction. The gas product is primarily composed of methane and is used for heating the reactor.

Saraf, S. [Engineering Technologies, Lombard, IL (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

186

Sustainable Agriculture Loan Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Minnesota Sustainable Agriculture Loan program will provide loans to Minnesota residents actively engaged in farming for capital expenditures which enhance the environmental and economic...

187

Wisconsin Agriculture Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wisconsin Agriculture 2012 STATUS OF Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics · Status­Extension College of Agricultural & Life Sciences UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN­MADISON #12;#12;Status of Wisconsin Agriculture, 2012 An annual report by the Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics, UW

Radeloff, Volker C.

188

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waste (i.e, mixture of biohazardous and chemical or radioactive waste), call Environment, Health2/2009 Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 200 West Arbor Dr. San Diego, CA 92103 (619

Tsien, Roger Y.

189

AGRICULTURAL REPORT MAY 1998  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Farmer Crop Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . 12 #12;2 MAY 1998 ¬ģ Will the trend of increasing high and the future of the industry, fac- ulty in the School of Agriculture at Purdue University in collaboration and will continue to dominate trade trends. Potential demand for agricultural products is greatest in Asia

190

An investigation of the thermal degradation mechanisms of a waste tire through chemical analysis including hydrocarbons, benzene derivatives, and Polycyclic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as gasification and oxy-fuel combustion. Considerable study has been done investigating the overall gasification has been focused on pyrolysis/gasification and combustion at various oxygen concentrations

191

Administration ....................................................................................................................................3 School of Agriculture Faculty ............................................................................  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

....................................................................................................................................3 School of Agriculture Faculty .............................................................................................................4 Agricultural and Biological Engineering ­ ABE Agricultural Economics ­ AG ECON Agronomy ­ AGRY .............................................................................................................17 Research Projects School of Agriculture

192

Administration....................................................................................................................................3 School of Agriculture Faculty..............................................................................  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

....................................................................................................................................3 School of Agriculture Faculty.............................................................................................................4 Agricultural and Biological Engineering ­ ABE Agricultural Economics ­ AG ECON Agronomy ­ AGRY .............................................................................................................17 Research Projects School of Agriculture

193

Administration....................................................................................................................................3 School of Agriculture Faculty..............................................................................  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

....................................................................................................................................3 School of Agriculture Faculty.............................................................................................................4 Agricultural and Biological Engineering ­ ABE Agricultural Economics ­ AG ECON Agronomy ­ AGRY .............................................................................................................18 Research Projects School of Agriculture

194

Administration ............................................................................................................2 School of Agriculture Faculty .........................................................................................3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................................................................2 School of Agriculture Faculty .........................................................................................3 Agricultural and Biological Engineering ­ ABE Agricultural Economics ­ AG ECON Agronomy ­ AGRY Research Projects School of Agriculture

195

Essays on Development, Ownership Structure, and Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of climate change on Indian agriculture. Ē Manuscript,study of climate change impacts on Indian agriculture hasclimate change on agricultural output, because of the relevance of agriculture

Moorthy, Aravind

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

University College Dublin Agriculture, Food Science and Human Nutrition AgriculturAl Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 University College Dublin Agriculture, Food Science and Human Nutrition AgriculturAl Science DN250 Agricultural Science Dn250AeS Agri-environmental Sciences Dn250AcP Animal and crop Production Dn Engineering Technology DN250FAM Food and Agribusiness Management #12;1 Contents Agricultural Science DN250 1

Buehrer, R. Michael

197

Oregon Agriculture and the Economy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oregon Agriculture and the Economy: An Update Oregon State University Extension Service Rural Analyst Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics Oregon State University #12;Contents ...........................................................................................................................................12 Agricultural Support Services, Wholesale Trade, Transportation and Warehousing, Retail Trade

Tullos, Desiree

198

Public Parking > Agriculture Building Parkade**  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering Poultry Science Kirk Hall Agriculture Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada SCIENCE PLACE VETERINARY > Agriculture Building Parkade** > Pay Parking Lots** > Stadium Parkade** > Diefenbaker Lot > Health Sciences Parkade** Disabled Persons' Parking* Motorcyle Parking* Faculty & Sta Parking Lots* Student Parking Lots

Saskatchewan, University of

199

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 534) and identity of liquid waste Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 534

Tsien, Roger Y.

200

College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

40 College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences 40 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research, and service in agriculture, forestry, and life sciences that will benefit the citizens of South

Stuart, Steven J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste tires agricultural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

43 College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND LIFE SCIENCES The College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Scienc- es (CAFLS) supports Clemson University's land-grant mission to provide education, research and service to the public. The College of Agriculture

Stuart, Steven J.

202

College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

39 College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND LIFE SCIENCES The College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sci- ences (www.clemson.edu/CAFLS) offers a broad. The undergraduate academic programs include Agricultural and Applied Economics with a Community and Economic

Stuart, Steven J.

203

College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research and service in agriculture, forestry and life sciences that will benefit the citizens of South

Bolding, M. Chad

204

College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

46 College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences 46 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND LIFE SCIENCES The College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sci- ences offers graduate programs in 17 traditional disciplines in agriculture, forestry, and a wide variety of biological sciences, from

Stuart, Steven J.

205

College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

44 College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences 44 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND LIFE SCIENCES The College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sci- ences offers graduate programs in 17 traditional disciplines in agriculture, forestry, and a wide variety of biological sciences, from

Stuart, Steven J.

206

College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

20 College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences 20 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research, and service in agriculture, forestry, and life sciences that will benefit the citizens

Stuart, Steven J.

207

College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

40 College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences 40 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research, and service in agriculture, forestry, and life sciences that will benefit the citizens

Stuart, Steven J.

208

College of Agriculture, Food and Environment AEN Agricultural Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Agriculture, Food and Environment AEN Agricultural Engineering KEY: # = new course of engineering systems, earthwork computations, and introduction to boundary surveys for Agriculture students in the College of Agriculture and/or consent of instructor. AEN 220 FARM TRACTORS AND ENGINES. (3) Principles

MacAdam, Keith

209

College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

41 College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research, and service in agriculture, forestry, and life sciences that will benefit the citizens of South

Stuart, Steven J.

210

College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

20 College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences 20 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research and service in agriculture, forestry and life sciences that will benefit the citizens of South

Stuart, Steven J.

211

College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

42 College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research, and service in agriculture, forestry, and life sciences that will benefit the citizens of South

Stuart, Steven J.

212

AGRICULTURAL SPRING 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In 1877, William Beal established the first seed testing laboratory in the United States at what was then the Michigan Agricultural College. Beal was also the first person to cross-fertilize corn to increase yield

213

BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Provincial Report #12;published March 2012 by the British Columbia Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada BC Ministry of Agriculture BC Ministry

Pedersen, Tom

214

Purdue Agriculture Annual Statistical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Purdue Agriculture Research Works Annual Statistical Report 2005-2006 Purdue AGrICuLTure Read the full report on the Web www.ag.purdue.edu/arp/stat_report_05-06 #12;Purdue AGrICuLTure Purdue Agriculture Research Works Here's why. We are riding the wave of revolutionary changes brought about

215

BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Provincial Report executive summary #12;published March 2012 by the British Columbia Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada BC Ministry of Agriculture BC Ministry

Pedersen, Tom

216

Hazardous Waste Program (Alabama)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This rule states criteria for identifying the characteristics of hazardous waste and for listing hazardous waste, lists of hazardous wastes, standards for the management of hazardous waste and...

217

AGRICULTURE, 2003 Current Wisconsin Farm Financial Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STATUS OF WISCONSIN AGRICULTURE, 2003 Current Wisconsin Farm Financial Conditions Situation and Challenges Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics College of Agricultural and Life Sciences OF WISCONSIN AGRICULTURE, 2003 An Annual Report by: Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics College

Radeloff, Volker C.

218

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

MHRC System Concept ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy Conversion, and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with...

219

MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of solid and liquid wastes generated at mushroom producing facilities. Environmental guidelines#12;MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT PHASE I: AUDIT OF CURRENT PRACTICE The Mushroom Waste Management Project (MWMP) was initiated by Environment Canada, the BC Ministry

220

Fuel Economy and Emissions Effects of Low Tire Pressure, Open Windows, Roof Top and Hitch-Mounted Cargo, and Trailer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To quantify the fuel economy (FE) effect of some common vehicle accessories or alterations, a compact passenger sedan and a sport utility vehicle (SUV) were subjected to SAE J2263 coastdown procedures. Coastdowns were conducted with low tire pressure, all windows open, with a roof top or hitch-mounted cargo carrier, and with the SUV pulling an enclosed cargo trailer. From these coastdowns, vehicle dynamometer coefficients were developed which enabled the execution of vehicle dynamometer experiments to determine the effect of these changes on vehicle FE and emissions over standard drive cycles and at steady highway speeds. The FE penalty associated with the rooftop cargo box mounted on the compact sedan was as high as 25-27% at higher speeds, where the aerodynamic drag is most pronounced. For both vehicles, use of a hitch mounted cargo tray carrying a similar load resulted in very small FE penalties, unlike the rooftop cargo box. The results for the SUV pulling a 3500 pound enclosed cargo trailer were rather dramatic, resulting in FE penalties ranging from 30%, for the city cycle, to 50% at 80 mph, at which point significant CO generation indicated protective enrichment due to high load. Low tire pressure cases resulted in negligible to 10% FE penalty depending on the specific case and test point. Driving with all four windows open decreased FE by 4-8.5% for the compact sedan, and 1-4% for the SUV.

Thomas, John F [ORNL] [ORNL; Huff, Shean P [ORNL] [ORNL; West, Brian H [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste tires agricultural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Alumni Organization With a special presentation. Agricultural Research and Extension Center With updates from: Alan Grant, Dean, College of Agriculture and Life

Buehrer, R. Michael

222

Maximizing (Productivity and Efficiency) in Contemporary Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Paris, France. Dupont. 2009. Agriculture is up to globalFAO. 2008. State of Food and Agriculture (page 62).Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

Fixen, Paul

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Essays on Development, Ownership Structure, and Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

change on Indian agriculture. Ē Manuscript, Department ofJ. Parikh. ďIndian agriculture and climate sensitivity. Ē3):353Ė368, 1979. Food and Agriculture Organization of the

Moorthy, Aravind

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Farm Workers and Unions in California Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Unions in California Agriculture Philip Martin June 30,unions and immigration in California agriculture 2. scanningbargaining agreements signed in CA agriculture (http://

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Three ACE awards for California Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2012): Can Cali- fornia Agriculture disprove the allegedweed. Three ACE awards for California Agriculture TheCalifornia Agriculture team has won three awards from the

Editors, by

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

2012 Annual Report Agricultural  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Covered iii Funding Sources; Expenditure Breakdown Commercial Agriculture 1 Putting New Jersey Vintages for Librarians Economic Development 25 Food Industry Gateway 26 New Jersey Clean Energy Resource Network counties: Rutgers Cooperative Extension Statistics NJAES plays a significant role in the state's economic

Goodman, Robert M.

227

Economic Value of Agricultural  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

all sources of $0.4 billion and assuming that 50% of the $3.6 billion is from publicly funded research for the nation) by the appropriate agricultural statistics (e.g. the ratio of irrigated sprinkler acres in Texas Developed LEPA Irrigation Low Energy Precision Application (LEPA) irrigation technology increases water

228

PhosPhorus, Agriculture &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phosphorus lost from agricultural soils can increase the fertility status of natural waters (eutrophication that controls eutrophication of fresh waters.The USEPA has recommended a limit for controlling eutrophication have not been established. Numerous water quality problems have been associated with eutrophication

Liskiewicz, Maciej

229

AGRICULTURAL REPORT MAY 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

supply will shape the future of the agricultural industry. We will discuss each in turn. Ethanol and energy Ethanol will be using almost 30% of the U.S. corn crop by 2009 with total ethanol production reaching almost 14 billion gallons. Numerous analysts have suggested that total demand for ethanol longer

230

AGRICULTURAL REPORT OCTOBER 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as Indiana agriculture enters the energy business in a big way. The advent of four new Indiana ethanol plants. Ethanol means theres a monstrous increase in the need for corn production in 2007, and beyond. Acres have of the process to produce ethanol from cellulose (plant material). Indiana biofuels are both ethanol (corn

231

futuresMICHIGAN AGRICULTURAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

research in both the plant and animal sciences to improve disease resistance and reduce dependency on chemicals, as well as research to identify and develop value- added opportunities for agriculture Economic and Environmental Needs -- was conceived in 1995, its goal was to make Michigan agri- cultural

232

AGRICULTURAL REPORT FEBRUARY 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

trading framework. The largest GHG market in the world is the European Union-Emissions Trading Scheme' sulfur diox- ide (SO2) emissions trading program Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets from Agriculture and states have enacted policies individually or in cooperation to reduce GHG emissions through an emissions

233

United States of Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in wildlife management from the University of New Hampshire in 1988. She joined the Intermountain Research Station in 1993 after working for the States of New Hampshire and Wyoming on projects involving wetlandUnited States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Intermountain Research Station General

234

What is Sustainable Agriculture?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

security, its midwives were not gov- ernment policy makers but small farmers, environmentalists model has degraded soil and water, reduced the biodiversity that is a key element to food security Photo courtesy USDA NRCS #12;Page 2 ATTRA Sustainable Agriculture: An Introduction on imported oil

Wang, Changlu

235

Action Plan Agricultural Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

research for agricultural and forestry interest (nutrition, photosynthesis, enhancements, fruit cultivation stress and crop protection), and the study of farm animal resources (nutrition, production and animal change, energy or water). Institutes and Centres that comprise the Area The Area comprises a total of 17

Fitze, Patrick

236

Agricultural biotechnology and Indian newspapers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study is designed to look into how agricultural biotechnology is covered by Indian newspapers. A through study of the literature showed that agricultural biotechnology is a much debated topic and there is a vast difference between the concerns...

Sivakumar, Gayathri

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

Child Labor in Texas Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Workers under age 18 involved in agriculture have a disproportionate rate of injury and death when compared to older workers. This publication explains potential risks to young agricultural workers as well as the laws designed to protect these under...

Smith, David

2005-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

238

Taiwan`s experience with municipal waste recycling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, each person on the average produces 1.15 kg of the municipal waste per day and a total of 9 million metric tons were generated annually in Taiwan. The disposal of such a huge amount of waste presents tremendous challenge for the island due to the scarcity of landfills and incineration facilities available locally. EPA of Taiwan, R.O.C. thus takes an active role in promoting waste recycling to reduce the garbage produced in municipalities. In order to efficiently utilize the government`s human and financial resources used in recycling, started from January 31, 1989, EPA has mandated the producer responsibility recycling program for several designated post-consumer products such as PET, PVC bottles, scrap tires, scrap motor vehicles, etc. Producer responsibility recycling program specifies that the manufacturers, importers and sellers of these designated products have the responsibility to retrieve their products and recycle them properly. Several negative effects have been encountered while the implementation of this producer responsibility recycling program in Taiwan which resulted in a modification of this recycling program recently. This paper presents the encountered experiences on the implementation of municipal waste recycling program in Taiwan.

Lee, C.H. [Da-Yeh Univ., Chang-Hwa (Taiwan, Province of China)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

239

Agricultural and Resource Economics Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

despite globalization tendencies elsewhere in the economy.globalization in the non-agricultural sectors of the world economy.

Carter, Colin A.; Novan, Kevin; Rausser, Gordon; Iho, Antti; Parker, Doug; Zilberman, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

The research programme Future Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The research programme Future Agriculture ­ livestock, crops and land use Welcome to a lunch.slu.se/futureagriculture For questions, please contact KatarinaVrede (katarina.vrede@slu.se) About Future Agriculture ­ livestock, crops and land use The changes and challenges facing agriculture in the future will be substantial, not only

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste tires agricultural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Sponsorship includes: Agriculture in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sponsorship includes: · Agriculture in the Classroom · Douglas County Farm Bureau · Gifford Farm · University of Nebraska Agricultural Research and Development Center · University of Nebraska- Lincoln Awareness Coalition is to help youth, primarily from urban communities, become aware of agriculture

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

242

Wasted Wind  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

why turbulent airflows are causing power losses and turbine failures in America's wind farms-and what to do about it April 1, 2014 Wasted Wind This aerial photo of Denmark's Horns...

243

Agricultural Marketing Toolkit  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the BuildingInnovation 2011Oversupply ManagementAgricultural

244

Waste processing air cleaning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste processing and preparing waste to support waste processing relies heavily on ventilation. Ventilation is used at the Hanford Site on the waste storage tanks to provide confinement, cooling, and removal of flammable gases.

Kriskovich, J.R.

1998-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

245

Waste Disposal (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article lays an outline of waste disposal regulations, permits and fees, hazardous waste management and underground storage tank requirements.

246

Agricultural Waste Solutions Inc AWS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWende NewSowitecAWSAgri-Energy LLC Place: Luverne,Solutions Inc

247

Further investigation of the impact of the co-combustion of tire-derived fuel and petroleum coke on the petrology and chemistry of coal combustion products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Kentucky cyclone-fired unit burns coal and tire-derived fuel, sometimes in combination with petroleum coke. A parallel pulverized combustion (pc) unit at the same plant burns the same coal, without the added fuels. The petrology, chemistry, and sulfur isotope distribution in the fuel and resulting combustion products was investigated for several configurations of the fuel blend. Zinc and Cd in the combustion products are primarily contributed from the tire-derived fuel, the V and Ni are primarily from the petroleum coke, and the As and Hg are probably largely from the coal. The sulfur isotope distribution in the cyclone unit is complicated due to the varying fuel sources. The electrostatic precipitator (ESP) array in the pc unit shows a subtle trend towards heavier S isotopic ratios in the cooler end of the ESP.

Hower, J.C.; Robertson, J.D.; Elswick, E.R.; Roberts, J.M.; Brandsteder, K.; Trimble, A.S.; Mardon, S.M. [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

AGRICULTURE, 2002 Current Wisconsin Farm Financial Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STATUS OF WISCONSIN AGRICULTURE, 2002 Current Wisconsin Farm Financial Conditions Situation of the Wisconsin Cranberry Industry Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics College of Agricultural-Extension #12;STATUS OF WISCONSIN AGRICULTURE, 2002 An Annual Report by: Department of Agricultural and Applied

Radeloff, Volker C.

249

Cole Museum/AMS New Agriculture Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cole Museum/AMS New Agriculture Building Whiteknights Hall Windsor Hall Students Union Shop IMA 3rd House Annexe 59 Agricultural and Food Economics D8 Agriculture, Policy & Development 59 Agriculture D8 Agriculture, Policy & Development 48 Allen Laboratory D5 The Allen Laboratory 41 Alumni Office D4 Whiteknights

Chandler-Wilde, Simon N.

250

Public Policy and Agriculture Dr. Jeff Burkhardt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Public Policy and Agriculture Dr. Jeff Burkhardt With Dr. John VanSickle Food & Resource Economics & Agriculture? #12;Why Public Policy for Food & Agriculture? · Economic instability #12;Why Public Policy for Food & Agriculture? · Economic instability · Globalization #12;Why Public Policy for Food & Agriculture

Hill, Jeffrey E.

251

Recent Agricultural Ergonomics Research at UC Davis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1 Recent Agricultural Ergonomics Research at UC Davis Fadi Fathallah Biological and Agricultural Engineering UC Agricultural Ergonomics Research Center Western Center for Agricultural Health and Safety WCAHS Seminar, December 5, 2011 Recent Agricultural Ergonomics Research at UC Davis Fadi Fathallah

Nguyen, Danh

252

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Climate protection in light of the· Waste Framework Directive. The "energy package", e.g. the RenewablesWASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource! energy forum Case Studies from Estonia, Switzerland, Germany Bossart,· ABB Waste-to-Energy Plants Edmund Fleck,· ESWET Marcel van Berlo,· Afval Energie Bedrijf From

Columbia University

253

UWA Institute of Agriculture 1 "Sustaining productive agriculture for a growing world"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UWA Institute of Agriculture 1 "Sustaining productive agriculture for a growing world" Agriculture Science graduates show their talents at the Young Professionals in Agriculture Forum Institute of Agriculture photo:MrPeterMaloney The Australian Institute of Agricultural Science and Technology (AIAST

Tobar, Michael

254

Slide 1 of 19NCA -Agriculture with a California Focus Agriculture with a California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Slide 1 of 19NCA - Agriculture with a California Focus Agriculture with a California Focus (NCA 2013 #12;Slide 2 of 19NCA - Agriculture with a California Focus Authors of Chapter 6: Agriculture of Agriculture #12;Slide 3 of 19NCA - Agriculture with a California Focus Outline · 6 key messages (nationwide

Grotjahn, Richard

255

LIST OF SUBJECT AREA -CODES ISCED -(01.0 Agricultural Sciences) 62 Agriculture, forestry and fishery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIST OF SUBJECT AREA - CODES ISCED - (01.0 Agricultural Sciences) 62 Agriculture, forestry and fishery (01.1 Agriculture) 620 Agriculture, forestry and fishery (broad programmes) (01.2 Agricultural Economics) 629 Agriculture, forestry and fishery (others) (01.3 Food Science and Technology) 541 Food

256

Status of Wisconsin Agriculture, 2012 An annual report by the Department of Agricultural and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Status of Wisconsin Agriculture, 2012 An annual report by the Department of AgriculturalSconSin agriculture 2012 i #12;ii StatuS of WiSconSin agriculture 2012 #12;Preface Status of Wisconsin Agriculture is an annual agricultural situation and outlook report authored (except where noted) by faculty

Radeloff, Volker C.

257

AgExcellence 2006 The College of Agriculture and Montana Agricultural Experiment Station in Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AgExcellence 2006 The College of Agriculture and Montana Agricultural Experiment Station in Review #12;ACAdEMiC pRogRAMS College of Agriculture Baccalaureate: Agricultural Education Options: AgRelations Teaching Agricultural Operations Technology MasterofScience: Agricultural Education Baccalaureate

Maxwell, Bruce D.

258

2012-2013 Series College of Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2012-2013 Series College of Agriculture and School of Human Environmental Sciences University about the accreditation of University of Kentucky. AgriculturalBiotechnology Agriculturalbiotechnologyencompassescellularandmolecularapproaches to the manipulation and improvement of agricultural plants, animals and microorganisms

Hayes, Jane E.

259

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 1, Part 1, Generator dangerous waste report, dangerous waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, weight, and waste designation.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

260

Growth Through Agriculture (GTA) Program (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Agriculture Development Council is tasked with enhancing the future development of agriculture in Montana through establishing policies and priorities, and awarding loans or grants that have a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste tires agricultural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an Application of the EX-Ante Carbon-balance Tool (EX-ACT) AgencyCompany Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of...

262

Kentucky Department of Agriculture | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of Agriculture Kentucky Department of Agriculture At the August 7, 2008 quarterly joint Web conference of DOE's Biomass and Clean Cities programs, Wilbur Frye (Office of Consumer...

263

Greenhouse gas mitigation by agricultural intensification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

et al. (2007) Agriculture. Climate Change 2007: Mitigationagricultureís future contributions to climate change,agriculture greenhouse gas emissions mitigation carbon price | land use change | climate

Burney, J. A; Davis, S. J; Lobell, D. B

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

AgriculturAl Economics http://agrecon.mcgill.ca  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AgriculturAl Economics http://agrecon.mcgill.ca M.Sc. (Thesis) AnAtomy And cEll Biology www.medicine.mcgill.ca AnimAl sciEncE www.mcgill.ca/animal M.Sc. (Thesis; Applied) Ph.D. (Thesis) Anthropology www.mcgill.ca.A. (Special with research paper) M.A. in Medical Anthropology (Thesis) Ph.D. (Thesis) ArchitEcturE www.mcgill.ca

Barthelat, Francois

265

Pulmonary function and symptoms of Nigerian workers exposed to carbon black in dry cell battery and tire factories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pulmonary function and symptoms of 125 workers exposed to carbon black in dry cell battery and tire manufacturing plants were investigated. There was no significant difference in the pulmonary function of the subjects in the two plants. There was good agreement in the symptoms reported in the two different factories: cough with phlegm production, tiredness, chest pain, catarrh, headache, and skin irritation. The symptoms also corroborate those reported in the few studies on the pulmonary effects of carbon black. The suspended particulate levels in the dry cell battery plant ranged from 25 to 34 mg/m/sup 3/ and the subjects with the highest probable exposure level had the most impaired pulmonary function. The pulmonary function of the exposed subjects was significantly lower than that of a control, nonindustrially exposed population. The drop in the lung function from the expected value per year of age was relatively constant for all the study subgroups but the drop per year of duration of employment was more severe in the earlier years of employment. This study has underscored the need for occupational health regulations in the industries of developing countries.

Oleru, U.G.; Elegbeleye, O.O.; Enu, C.C.; Olumide, Y.M.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

New directions at TVA with special reference to agricultural research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Public Support for the Tennessee Valley Authority`s (TVA) fertilizer research and development program in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, ended in fiscal year 1993. TVA`s research center at Muscle Shoals, formerly known as the National Fertilizer and Environmental Research Center, is now the TVA Environmental Research Center. Efforts at the Center have diversified to include research and support areas of Agricultural Research and Practices, Atmospheric Sciences, Biotechnology, Waste Management, and Remediation, Environmental Site Remediation, Support Services, Environmental Management, and Technology Transfer. ``We`re building on the expertise and success of our earlier research and focusing our new projects on emerging problems of the 21st century,`` TVA`s Chairman Craven Crowell said in prepared remarks to Congress on March 2, 1994. Agricultural Research in TVA has been aligned with corporate objectives to develop solutions to environmental problems of regional, national and international significance because the agency`s business incorporates a broad mix of responsibilities, including power generation, navigation, flood control, shoreline management, recreation, environmental research, and economic development. Agricultural strategies for watershed protection lie at the core of TVA`s new agricultural research agenda. The major influences for this agenda are TVA`s direct stewardship responsibilities for the 60,000 miles of streams that feed the 652-mile-long Tennessee River; the 11,000 miles of shoreline; and 470,000 acres of TVA-managed public land.

Williams, R.J.; Rylant, K.E.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

ELLEFSON, M.D.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Radioactive Waste Management (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section regulates the transportation and disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Minnesota, and establishes a Nuclear Waste Council to monitor the federal high-level radioactive waste...

269

Waste Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface.Laboratory30,WP-073.99 4.22PrimaryWaste

270

Heavy metals in composted municipal solid wastes for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heavy metals in composted municipal solid wastes for amendment of agricultural soils/ Mťtaux lourds dans le compost de dťchets municipaux pour application agricole Valťrie Duchesneau, #4634809 EVS4904 mťtaux lourds des compostes de dťchets municipaux? http://www.ecometiers.com/fiche/images/43.jpg La

Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

271

Adding Value to Agricultural Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

You can significantly increase farm income by adding value to agricultural products and marketing those products effectively. This publication explains how to design a value-added product based on consumer preferences and how to build a business...

Anderson, David P.; Hanselka, Daniel

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

agricultural vocational education: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

... 11 Air Temperature and Solar Radiation 108 Agricultural Environmental Geosciences Websites Summary: Agricultural...

273

agricultural cooperative ludanice: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

... 11 Air Temperature and Solar Radiation 104 Agricultural Environmental Geosciences Websites Summary: Agricultural...

274

agriculture habitat loss: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

... 11 Air Temperature and Solar Radiation 82 Agricultural Environmental Geosciences Websites Summary: Agricultural...

275

agricultural cooperatives: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

... 11 Air Temperature and Solar Radiation 104 Agricultural Environmental Geosciences Websites Summary: Agricultural...

276

Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation gives regulatory authority to the Department of Environmental Management to monitor commercial sites for hazardous wastes; fees on waste received at such sites; hearings and...

277

Waste Treatment Plant Overview  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the...

278

Salt Waste Processing Initiatives  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

1 Patricia Suggs Salt Processing Team Lead Assistant Manager for Waste Disposition Project Office of Environmental Management Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Initiatives...

279

Solid Waste (New Mexico)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The New Mexico Environment Department's Solid Waste Bureau manages solid waste in the state. The Bureau implements and enforces the rules established by the Environmental Improvement Board.

280

Nuclear Waste Reduction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Waste Reduction Pyroprocessing is a promising technology for recycling used nuclear fuel and improving the associated waste management options. The process...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste tires agricultural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Radioactive Waste Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish policies and guidelines by which the Department of Energy (DOE) manages tis radioactive waste, waste byproducts, and radioactively contaminated surplus facilities.

1984-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

282

Transuranic Waste Requirements  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The guide provides criteria for determining if a waste is to be managed in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter III, Transuranic Waste Requirements.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

283

Upgrading the Radioactive Waste Management Infrastructure in Azerbaijan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radionuclide uses in Azerbaijan are limited to peaceful applications in the industry, medicine, agriculture and research. The Baku Radioactive Waste Site (BRWS) 'IZOTOP' is the State agency for radioactive waste management and radioactive materials transport. The radioactive waste processing, storage and disposal facility is operated by IZOTOP since 1963 being significantly upgraded from 1998 to be brought into line with international requirements. The BRWS 'IZOTOP' is currently equipped with state-of-art devices and equipment contributing to the upgrade the radioactive waste management infrastructure in Azerbaijan in line with current internationally accepted practices. The IAEA supports Azerbaijan specialists in preparing syllabus and methodological materials for the Training Centre that is currently being organized on the base of the Azerbaijan BRWS 'IZOTOPE' for education of specialists in the area of safety management of radioactive waste: collection, sorting, processing, conditioning, storage and transportation. (authors)

Huseynov, A. [Baku Radioactive Waste Site IZOTOP, Baku (Azerbaijan); Batyukhnova, O. [State Unitary Enterprise Scientific and Industrial Association Radon, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ojovan, M. [Sheffield Univ., Immobilisation Science Lab. (United Kingdom); Rowat, J. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Dept. of Nuclear Safety and Security, Vienna (Austria)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Radioactive and chemotoxic wastes: Only radioactive wastes?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive waste arising from Italian Nuclear Power Plants and Research Centers, classified as 1st and 2nd Category wastes, are managed only as radioactive wastes following the Technical Guide No. 26 issued by the Italian Regulatory Body: ENEA DISP on 1987. A very important Regulatory Regime revision for Italian Nuclear Activities started at the end of 1991. This paper considers the need to develop a new strategy dedicated to mixed waste in line with current international trends.

Eletti, G.F.; Tocci, M. [ENEA DISP, Rome (Italy)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

285

Solid Waste and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This chapter of the law that establishes the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency establishes the rules and regulations regarding solid waste.

286

2014-2015Series College of Agriculture,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2014-2015Series College of Agriculture, Food and Environment University of Kentucky is accredited of University of Kentucky. Agricultural Economics The Agricultural Economics program enables graduates to pursue and production. Opportunities are also available in public policy for agriculture and rural America

MacAdam, Keith

287

2012-2013 Series College of Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2012-2013 Series College of Agriculture and School of Human Environmental Sciences University about the accreditation of University of Kentucky. AgriculturalEconomics The Agricultural Economics for agriculture and rural America and environmental economics. These career opportunities may be found in both

Hayes, Jane E.

288

The Value Chain of Colorado Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Value Chain of Colorado Agriculture Gregory Graff, Ryan Mortenson, Rebecca Goldbach, Dawn of Agricultural and Resource Economics, College of Agricultural Sciences, and the Office of Engagement Colorado by support from the Colorado Department of Agriculture and the Colorado State University Office of Engagement

289

AGRICULTURE, 2001 Current Wisconsin Farm Financial Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STATUS OF WISCONSIN AGRICULTURE, 2001 Current Wisconsin Farm Financial Conditions Situation and Outlook for Farm Products and Inputs Special Articles · Outlook for the National Economy and Agricultural Policies · Smart Growth and Wisconsin Agriculture · The Wisconsin Agricultural Economy: A Broader

Radeloff, Volker C.

290

"Celebrate Agriculture" 8:30 Registration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Celebrate Agriculture" 8:30 Registration 9:00 ­ 9:05 Welcome Waded Cruzado, Montana State University President 9:05 ­ 9:25 Montana and U.S. Agriculture Outlook George Haynes, Agriculture Policy Specialist Department of Agricultural Economics & Economics 9:30 ­ 9:50 Cattle Cycles Gary Brester, Professor

Maxwell, Bruce D.

291

Deproletarianizing Agriculture Lemmens, P.C.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deproletarianizing Agriculture Lemmens, P.C. ISDA 2010, Montpellier, June 28-30, 2010 1 DEPROLETARIANIZING AGRICULTURE RECOVERING AGRICULTURE FROM AGRIBUSINESS AND THE NEED FOR A COMMONS-BASED, OPEN SOURCE AGRICULTURE Dr. Pieter LEMMENS Wageningen University Centre for Methodical Ethics and Technology Assessment

Boyer, Edmond

292

RULES AND REGULATIONS Title 7--AGRICULTURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RULES AND REGULATIONS Title 7--AGRICULTURE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE [7 PA. CODE CH. 130b] Nutrient Management Certification [35 Pa.B. 6504] The Department of Agriculture (Department), under section 7(a or the Senate or House Agricultural and Rural Affairs Committees regarding the proposed rulemaking

Guiltinan, Mark

293

The Value Chain of Colorado Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Value Chain of Colorado Agriculture Gregory Graff, Ryan Mortenson, Rebecca Goldbach, Dawn of Agricultural and Resource Economics, College of Agricultural Sciences, and the Office of Engagement Colorado the Colorado Department of Agriculture and the Colorado State University Office of Engagement. The authors

Stephens, Graeme L.

294

Agriculture Club Compiled by Christopher Hives (2000)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agriculture Club fonds Compiled by Christopher Hives (2000) Revised April 2010 University;Fonds Description Agriculture Club fonds. ­ 1928-1935. 1 volume. Administrative History Established in 1928/29, the Agriculture Club succeeded the Agricultural Discussion Club and the Livestock Club

Handy, Todd C.

295

Statistical Review of California's Organic Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Statistical Review of California's Organic Agriculture 2005 ­ 2009 Karen Klonsky Kurt Richter Agricultural Issues Center University of California March 2011 #12;Statistical Review of California's Organic Agriculture 2005 ­ 2009 Karen Klonsky Extension Specialist Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics

Ferrara, Katherine W.

296

Agricultural productivity and industrialization: A reformulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agricultural productivity and industrialization: A reformulation Debasis Mondal Sept 20, 2014 Abstract In this paper we examine the role of agricultural productivity on the process of industrialization industrialization by releasing labor from agriculture to industry. In fact, when agriculture is highly productive

Bandyopadhyay, Antar

297

WasteTraining Booklet Waste & Recycling Impacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WasteTraining Booklet #12;Waste & Recycling Impacts Environment: The majority of our municipal jobs while recycling 10,000 tons of waste creates 36 jobs. Environment: Recycling conserves resources. It takes 95% less energy to make aluminum from recycled aluminum than from virgin materials, 60% less

Saldin, Dilano

298

Minor in Agricultural Systems Management The Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Minor in Agricultural Systems Management Offered by The Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering College of Agriculture and Life Sciences The minor in Agricultural Systems Management is available systems management. The courses listed below constitute the 18 hours required for a minor in Agricultural

299

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Civic Agriculture and Food Systems Minor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Civic Agriculture and Food Systems Minor The proposed Civic Agriculture and Food Systems (CAFS) minor within the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences agriculture and food system that relies on local resources and serves local markets and citizens. The minor

Virginia Tech

300

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES CHECKSHEET for a MINOR in INTERNATIONAL AGRICULTURAL AND LIFE SCIENCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES CHECKSHEET for a MINOR in INTERNATIONAL AGRICULTURAL AND LIFE SCIENCES Offered by Academic Programs in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Effective for Students Graduating 2015 The minor in International Agricultural and Life Sciences focuses on agricultural

Liskiewicz, Maciej

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste tires agricultural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

for a Minor in International Agriculture Academic Programs in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Checksheet for a Minor in International Agriculture Academic Programs in the College of Agriculture number: __________________ The minor in International Agriculture focuses on agricultural issues, and illiteracy, as well as the role of agriculture in finding solutions to alleviate these problems. The minor

Liskiewicz, Maciej

302

Five year rollover hedges for agricultural lenders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FIVE YEAR ROLLOVER HEDGES FOR AGRICULTURAL LEADERS A Professional Paper by John Christopher Floyd. Jr. Submitted to the College of Agriculture of Texas ARM University In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master... of Agriculture May, 19BB Advisor Or. David J. Leatham Major Subject: Agricultural Economics FIVE YEAR ROLLOVER HEDGE FOR AGRICULTURAL LEMDERS A Professional Paper by John Christopher Floyd, Jr. Approved as to style and content by: an. Advis ry C...

Floyd, John Christopher

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 4, Waste Management Facility report, Radioactive mixed waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, handling method and containment vessel, waste number, waste designation and amount of waste.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

304

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

305

Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source special nuclear and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this document. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge. This document has been revised to meet the interim status waste analysis plan requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173 303-300(5). When the final status permit is issued, permit conditions will be incorporated and this document will be revised accordingly.

ELLEFSON, M.D.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

306

Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Timothy D. Stark, F.ASCE1 landfills may contain aluminum from residential and commercial solid waste, industrial waste, and aluminum pro- duction wastes. Some aluminum-bearing waste materials, particularly aluminum production wastes

307

Radioactive mixed waste disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various types of waste have been generated during the 50-year history of the Hanford Site. Regulatory changes in the last 20 years have provided the emphasis for better management of these wastes. Interpretations of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA), and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) have led to the definition of radioactive mixed wastes (RMW). The radioactive and hazardous properties of these wastes have resulted in the initiation of special projects for the management of these wastes. Other solid wastes at the Hanford Site include low-level wastes, transuranic (TRU), and nonradioactive hazardous wastes. This paper describes a system for the treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of solid radioactive waste.

Jasen, W.G.; Erpenbeck, E.G.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Understanding radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

Murray, R.L.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Economics of co-firing waste materials in an advanced pressurized fluidized-bed combustor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study was undertaken to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of co-firing a PFBC with coal and municipal and industrial wastes. Focus was placed on the production of electricity and the efficient disposal of wastes for application in central power station and distributed locations. Issues concerning waste material preparation and feed, PFBC operation, plant emissions, and regulations are addressed. The results and conclusions developed are generally applicable to current and advanced PFBC design concepts. Wastes considered for co-firing include municipal solid waste (MSW), tire derived fuel (TDF), sewage sludge and industrial de-inking sludge. Conceptual designs of three power plants rated at 250 MWe, 150 MWe and 4 MWe were developed. The 4 MWe facility was chosen to represent a distributed power source for a remote location and designated to co-fire coal with MSW, TDF and sewage sludge while producing electricity for a small town. Heat and material balances were completed for each plant and costs determined including capital costs, operating costs and cost of electricity. With the PFBCs operation at high temperature and pressure, efforts were centered on defining feeding systems capable of operating at these conditions. Since PFBCs have not been tested co-firing wastes, other critical performance factors were addressed and recommendations were provided for resolving potential technical issues. Air emissions and solid wastes were characterized to assess the environmental performance comparing them to state and federal regulations. This paper describes the results of this investigation, presents conclusions on the key issues, and provides recommendations for further evaluation.

Bonk, D.L.; McDaniel, H.M. [Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States). Morgantown Energy Technology Center; DeLallo, M.R. Jr.; Zaharchuk, R. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Reading, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

310

EXTENSION CENTER FOR FOOD, AGRICULTURAL AND NATURAL RESOURCE SCIENCES Strengthening Minnesota's food, agriculture,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXTENSION CENTER FOR FOOD, AGRICULTURAL AND NATURAL RESOURCE SCIENCES Strengthening Minnesota's food, agriculture, and environment ISSUE: Many challenges facing society today are rooted in food, agriculture, and the environment. Minnesota's land and resources are expected to provide an ever

Netoff, Theoden

311

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

312

Agriculture-related radiation dose calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Estimates of radiation dose to the public must be made at each stage in the identification and qualification process leading to siting a high-level nuclear waste repository. Specifically considering the ingestion pathway, this paper examines questions of reliability and adequacy of dose calculations in relation to five stages of data availability (geologic province, region, area, location, and mass balance) and three methods of calculation (population, population/food production, and food production driven). Calculations were done using the model PABLM with data for the Permian and Palo Duro Basins and the Deaf Smith County area. Extra effort expended in gathering agricultural data at succeeding environmental characterization levels does not appear justified, since dose estimates do not differ greatly; that effort would be better spent determining usage of food types that contribute most to the total dose; and that consumption rate and the air dispersion factor are critical to assessment of radiation dose via the ingestion pathway. 17 refs., 9 figs., 32 tabs.

Furr, J.M.; Mayberry, J.J.; Waite, D.A.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE, FISHERIES AND FOOD DIRECTORATE OF FISHERIES RESEARCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..................................................................................................................................................5 2. Discharges of radioactive waste .................................................................................................................5 2.1 Liquid radioactive waste .................................................................................................................5 2.2 Solid radioactive waste

314

MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE, FISHERIES AND FOOD DIRECTORATE OF FISHERIES RESEARCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

................................................................................................................................................... 9 2. Discharges of radioactive waste ................................................................................................................... 9 2.1 Liquid radioactive waste ...................................................................................................................... 9 2.2 Solid radioactive waste

315

MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE, FISHERIES AND FOOD DIRECTORATE OF FISHERIES RESEARCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..................................................................................................................................................... 9 2. Discharges of radioactive waste ..................................................................................................................... 9 2.1 Liquid radioactive waste ...................................................................................................................... 9 2.2 Solid radioactive waste

316

Agricultural and Biological Engineering College of Agricultural Sciences Cooperative Extension  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solar energy or "green sunshine" derived from the solar- powered photosynthesis process during. The relatively low cost of biomass and the environmental benefits more than offset any boiler efficiency losses, and Pennsylvania Counties Cooperating Biomass Energy Dennis E. Buffington, Professor, Agricultural and Biological

Lee, Dongwon

317

E-Print Network 3.0 - agriculture-agricultural research service...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences, Montana State University Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 16 COPPICE DUNES Duned (39,880 -22) Summary: States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural...

318

E-Print Network 3.0 - agriculture agricultural research Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to students and advocate for agricultural education, research and extension... Potato Products facility. Keith is a graduate of Penn State with a B.S. in Agricultural...

319

Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act (HWMA) describes a comprehensive, Statewide program to manage hazardous wastes through regulating hazardous waste generation, transportation, storage,...

320

Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Revision 6 Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan Waste6 WM QA Plan Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan LBNL/4 Management Quality Assurance

Waste Management Group

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste tires agricultural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Hazardous Waste Act (New Mexico)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"Hazardous waste" means any solid waste or combination of solid wastes that because of their quantity, concentration or physical, chemical or infectious characteristics may:† cause or significantly...

322

agricultural irrigation recharge: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Ecology Websites Summary: STATUS OF Wisconsin Agriculture 2009 SPECIAL ARTICLE: Bioenergy and Agriculture in Wisconsin Economy Department of Agricultural and Applied...

323

Determinants of sustainability in urban and peri-urban agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Food Agriculture, Nutrition and Development 7:1-and Sustainability in Sub-Saharan African Agriculture.Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment Bernholt H,

Buerkert, Andreas; Schlecht, Eva; Predotova, Martina; Diogo, Rodrigue V.C.; Kehlenbeck, Katja; Gebauer, Jens

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Urban agriculture is a gateway to healthy foods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

healthy tomorrow. Urban agriculture has multiple benefitsWestlake. 192 CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE ē VOLUME 67 , NUMBER 4Editorial Urban agriculture is a gateway to healthy foods A

Pťrez, John A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Radically rethinking agriculture for the 21st century.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

titled ďAdapting Agriculture to Climate Change: What Will It7). Climate change will further affect agriculture as theclimate change have profound implications for the ability of agriculture

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

commercializaTion office Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology commercializaTion office Agriculture ·Biotechnology ·Blueberries ·Cotton ·Forages Utilization, Renewable Energy ·Algalbiofuels ·Biodiesel ·Biomassengineering ·Biomasspre,skincare,andwoundhealing ·Vaccines Information Technology ·Bioinformaticstools ·Imagerenderingandenhancement ·3

Arnold, Jonathan

327

A Guide to Brazil's Agricultural  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the World Trade Organization (WTO) and acts as the national enquiry point under the WTO Agreement the National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA), Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Supply (MAPA), the National Petroleum Agency, Natural Gas and Biofuels (ANP), the Ministry of Mines and Energy (MME), as well

Perkins, Richard A.

328

Purdue extension Agricultural&Biological  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for an extended period and encourage biological treatment to minimize organic matter (BOD), nitrogenPurdue extension Don Jones Agricultural&Biological Engineering Alan Sutton AnimalSciences Purdue structures must be designed and managed to contain manure, wastewater, contaminated runoff, and ma- nure

329

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities July 24, 2014 9:00AM to 3:30PM EDT U.S....

330

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. - Allentown, PA A microbial reverse electrodialysis...

331

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demonstration LLNL Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory MSW Municipal Solid Waste OSHA Occupational Safety and Health Administration PPE Personal Protective Equipment POTW Publicly Owned Treatment Works RCRA Resource

332

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. The purpose of the Manual is to catalog those procedural requirements and existing practices that ensure that all DOE elements and contractors continue to manage DOE's radioactive waste in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety, and the environment. Does not cancel other directives.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

333

Source selection of agricultural journalists in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journalists rely on sources in their daily routines, and the sources they choose affect news content over time. Agricultural journalists are no exception. Eleven agricultural journalists in Texas were studied to determine what types of sources...

Banks, Penelope Jean

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Agricultural & Environmental Sciences eap.ucop.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agricultural & Environmental Sciences eap.ucop.edu #12;UC Education Abroad Program Special Focus Pilot Program in Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Wageningen University and Research Centre, animal sciences, environmental sciences, agrotechnology, food technology, nutrition, and biodiversity

Hernes, Peter J.

335

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES AND NATURAL RESOURCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES AND NATURAL RESOURCES REVISION OF MINOR1 (Return completed form of _________________________________bulletin. College of Agricultural Sciences & Natural Resources (Circle One) 12 hour minor 18 hour minor

Powers, Robert

336

Financial Engineering Proposal Department of Agricultural Economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Financial Engineering Proposal Department of Agricultural Economics and Economics and Department engineering is a multidisciplinary field that emphasizes the engineering of new financial economic instruments the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering and the Department of Agricultural Economics

Lawrence, Rick L.

337

Solid Waste Management Written Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solid Waste Management Program Written Program Cornell University 8/28/2012 #12;Solid Waste.................................................................... 4 4.2.1 Compost Solid Waste Treatment Facility.................................................................... 4 4.2.2 Pathological Solid Waste Treatment Facility

Pawlowski, Wojtek

338

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is collected by the RSO. 2. Dry radioactive waste must be segregated by isotope. 3. Liquid radioactive waste must be separated by isotope. 4. Liquid frequently and change them if contaminated. 5. Use radioactive waste container to collect the waste. 6. Check

Jia, Songtao

339

www.d-waste.com info@d-waste.com  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the International Solid Waste Association, GIZ/SWEEP-Net, the Waste to Energy Research Council (WTERT) and the Solidwww.d-waste.com info@d-waste.com Acharnon 141 10446 ATHENS GREECE T: +30 2155302449 F: +30 2155302447 For Release November 13, 2013 Waste Atlas shows how the world handles its refuse D-Waste

340

Agriculture on Exchange InternationalExchangeProgram  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agriculture on Exchange InternationalExchangeProgram Students enrolled in courses offered through the Faculty of Agriculture and Environment are welcome to apply for exchange. However, to ensure that you Academic Adviser before submitting an exchange application. Undergraduate Agriculture students normally go

Viglas, Anastasios

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste tires agricultural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

1996 1997 1998 1999 College of Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1996 1997 1998 1999 College of Agriculture Dean's Office $414,061 $934,007 $5,697,764 $847,980 Agricultural Economics and Economics $367,925 $474,710 $1,271,980 $1,649,079 Agricultural Education Arts(7) $31,117 $38,328 $0 $0 School of Film and Photography Shakespeare in the Parks

Lawrence, Rick L.

342

College of Agricultural Sciences Agricultural and Biological Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

residues, animal wastes, and landfills. Major biofuels are biodiesel, ethanol, and methane. Biofuels­by, which is one-fourth of the 80 million barrels pumped per day worldwide. The worldwide pumping capacity. The use of biofuels holds real promise to: 1) decrease our country's dependency on foreign nations

Lee, Dongwon

343

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES CHECKSHEET for a MINOR in CIVIC AGRICULTURE AND FOOD SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES CHECKSHEET for a MINOR in CIVIC AGRICULTURE AND FOOD SYSTEMS Offered by Academic Programs in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Effective for Students Graduating 2015 The minor in Civic Agriculture and Food Systems embodies a commitment

Liskiewicz, Maciej

344

A threshold area ratio of organic to conventional agriculture causes recurrent pathogen outbreaks in organic agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A threshold area ratio of organic to conventional agriculture causes recurrent pathogen outbreaks in organic agriculture S. Adl a, , D. Iron b , T. Kolokolnikov b a Department of Biology, Dalhousie Fungal spores Organic agriculture Pathogen dispersal Conventional agriculture uses herbicides, pesticides

Kolokolnikov, Theodore

345

Outstanding Ag Leader Award Presented by MSU College of Agriculture and Montana Agricultural  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Outstanding Ag Leader Award Presented by MSU College of Agriculture and Montana Agricultural Experiment Station (MAES) Criteria for Selection Be well respected in their agricultural community of achievement in agriculture, be an industry leader, or an upcoming active innovative producer (or a combination

Maxwell, Bruce D.

346

Status of Wisconsin Agriculture, 2013 An annual report by the Department of Agricultural and Applied  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of agricultural and applied economics, university of Wisconsin-Madison. Because of the large and complex effects of the 2012 drought on Wisconsin agriculture, we begin this issue with a summary of the nature and impactsSconSin agriculture 2013 #12;StatuS of WiSconSin agriculture 2013--executiVe SuMMary iii Drought, high temperatures

Williams, Justin

347

Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Hazardous Waste Program is carried out by the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality which administers its' program under the Hazardous Waste management Act (Arkansas Code Annotated 8-7...

348

Hazardous Waste Management (Delaware)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The act authorizes the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environment Control (DNREC) to regulate hazardous waste and create a program to manage sources of hazardous waste. The act...

349

Hazardous Waste Management (Oklahoma)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article states regulations for the disposal of hazardous waste. It also provides information about permit requirements for the transport, treatment and storage of such waste. It also mentions...

350

Pet Waste Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

About 1 million pounds of dog waste is deposited daily in North Texas alone. That's why proper disposal of pet waste can make a big difference in the environment. 5 photos, 2 pages...

Mechell, Justin; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

351

Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University College of Agriculture & Life Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University College of Agriculture & Life Sciences l Business Management and Entrepreneurship Marketing Ag. Products Agricultural Law Advanced Agribusiness Marketing Agricultural Financial Management Agricultural Management and Problem Solving Monetary and Global

Virginia Tech

352

Waste Management and WasteWaste Management and Waste--toto--EnergyEnergy Status in SingaporeStatus in Singapore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste Management and WasteWaste Management and Waste--toto--EnergyEnergy Status in Singapore #12;Singapore's Waste Management · In 2003, 6877 tonnes/day (2.51 M tonnes/year) of MSW collected plants · 8% (non-incinerable waste) and incineration ash goes to the offshore Semakau Landfill · To reach

Columbia University

353

AGRICHEMICAL FACT SHEET College of Agricultural Sciences Cooperative Extension  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

changes in regulations affecting over-the-road transport of hazardous materials have made it impor- tant- nents such as brakes, tires, and steering are in good working order. A poorly main- tained vehicle is should a mishap occur. Regularly inspect sprayer tanks, fittings and lines (especially those under

Kaye, Jason P.

354

Waste disposal package  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This is a claim for a waste disposal package including an inner or primary canister for containing hazardous and/or radioactive wastes. The primary canister is encapsulated by an outer or secondary barrier formed of a porous ceramic material to control ingress of water to the canister and the release rate of wastes upon breach on the canister. 4 figs.

Smith, M.J.

1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

355

Rethinking the Waste Hierarchy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

principles of EU waste policies. The environmental damage caused by waste depends on which type of manage, Environmental Assessment Institute For further information please contact: Environmental Assessment Institute.imv.dk #12;Environmental Assessment Institute Rethinking the Waste Hierarchy March 2005 Recommendations

356

Agricultural capital project analysis system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analysis. Three specific objectives were established: (1) To select the most suitable procedures for economic and finan- cial evaluation of agricultural projects in developing countries, in- cluding the incorporation of an appropriate sensitivity..., Mercedes and Segismundo Lopez. TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION General Objectives Procedure Page 1 1 3 4 LITERATURE REVIEW Evaluation Financial Evaluation Payback Period Accounting Rate of Return Net Present Value Internal Rate of Return...

Lopez, Ramon Antonio

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

357

Public Parking > Agriculture Building Parkade**  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P P P P P P P P P P M M M 1 C 3 2 B A R O O 9 L 5 Y Q T U U 16 15 4 P 18 17 7 H Public Parking > Agriculture Building Parkade** > Pay Parking Lots** > Stadium Parkade** > Diefenbaker Lot > Health Sciences Lots Buildings Place Riel Student Centre - PH 306-966-6988 1 Campus Drive Royal University Hospital

Saskatchewan, University of

358

Identifying Mixed Chemical and Radioactive Waste Mixed waste is: any waste material containing both radioactive materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identifying Mixed Chemical and Radioactive Waste Mixed waste is: any waste material containing both as noted on the list, you do not have a mixed waste and it may be managed as a normal radioactive waste radioactive waste after initially dating the container, the hold for decay time is extended, but you cannot

Straight, Aaron

359

Municipal waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to apparatus for processing municipal waste, and more particularly to vibrating mesh screen conveyor systems for removing grit, glass, and other noncombustible materials from dry municipal waste. Municipal waste must be properly processed and disposed of so that it does not create health risks to the community. Generally, municipal waste, which may be collected in garbage trucks, dumpsters, or the like, is deposited in processing areas such as landfills. Land and environmental controls imposed on landfill operators by governmental bodies have increased in recent years, however, making landfill disposal of solid waste materials more expensive. 6 figs.

Mayberry, J.L.

1988-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

360

Radioactive Waste Management Basis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

Perkins, B K

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste tires agricultural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07. Admin Chg 2, dated 6-8-11, cancels DOE M 435.1-1 Chg 1.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

362

Mixed waste: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains the peer-reviewed and edited versions of papers submitted for presentation a the Second International Mixed Waste Symposium. Following the tradition of the First International Mixed Waste Symposium, these proceedings were prepared in advance of the meeting for distribution to participants. The symposium was organized by the Mixed Waste Committee of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The topics discussed at the symposium include: stabilization technologies, alternative treatment technologies, regulatory issues, vitrification technologies, characterization of wastes, thermal technologies, laboratory and analytical issues, waste storage and disposal, organic treatment technologies, waste minimization, packaging and transportation, treatment of mercury contaminated wastes and bioprocessing, and environmental restoration. Individual abstracts are catalogued separately for the data base.

Moghissi, A.A.; Blauvelt, R.K.; Benda, G.A.; Rothermich, N.E. [eds.] [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Safety and Health

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

363

The mutagenic potential of soil and runoff water from land treatment of three hazardous industrial wastes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of agricultural chemicals and the performance of hazardous waste land treatment facilities. This study used a bioassay directed chemical analysis protocol to monitor the environmental fate of mutagenic constituents from a simulated land treatment demonstration...THE MUTAGENIC POTENTIAL OF SOIL AND RUNOFF WATER FROM LAND TREATMENT OF THREE HAZARDOUS INDUSTRIAL WASTES A Thesis by PHEBE DAYOL Submitted to the Graduate College of Te xa s ASM Un i ver s i ty in partial fulfillment of the requirement...

Davol, Phebe

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Vegetative covers for sediment control and phosphorus sequestration from dairy waste application fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VEGETATIVE COVERS FOR SEDIMENT CONTROL AND PHOSPHORUS SEQUESTRATION FROM DAIRY WASTE APPLICATION FIELDS A Thesis by SUBHASIS GIRI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2008 Major Subject: Biological and Agricultural Engineering VEGETATIVE COVERS FOR SEDIMENT CONTROL AND PHOSPHORUS SEQUESTRATION FROM DAIRY WASTE APPLICATION FIELDS A Thesis...

Giri, Subhasis

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

365

An economic analysis of costs of solid waste management in rural Texas communities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF COSTS OF SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT IN RURAL TEXAS COMMUNITIES A Thesis by John Patrick Hall Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1973 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics AN ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF COSTS OF SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT IN RURAL TEXAS COMMUNITIES A Thesis by John Patrick Hall Approved as to style and content by: hairman of mmi, ttee j ead...

Hall, John Patrick

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

electrolytic cell, designed to integrate waste heat recovery (i.e a microbial heat recovery cell or MHRC), can operate as a fuel cell and convert effluent streams into...

367

New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the issues of conducting debris treatment in the New Waste Calcine Facility (NWCF) decontamination area and the methods currently being used to decontaminate material at the NWCF.

K. E. Archibald

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Transuranic (TRU) Waste | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Defined by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act as "waste containing more than 100 nanocuries of alpha-emitting...

369

Solid Waste Management Plan. Revision 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The waste types discussed in this Solid Waste Management Plan are Municipal Solid Waste, Hazardous Waste, Low-Level Mixed Waste, Low-Level Radioactive Waste, and Transuranic Waste. The plan describes for each type of solid waste, the existing waste management facilities, the issues, and the assumptions used to develop the current management plan.

NONE

1995-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

370

Ferrocyanide tank waste stability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ferrocyanide wastes were generated at the Hanford Site during the mid to late 1950s as a result of efforts to create more tank space for the storage of high-level nuclear waste. The ferrocyanide process was developed to remove [sup 137]CS from existing waste and newly generated waste that resulted from the recovery of valuable uranium in Hanford Site waste tanks. During the course of research associated with the ferrocyanide process, it was recognized that ferrocyanide materials, when mixed with sodium nitrate and/or sodium nitrite, were capable of violent exothermic reaction. This chemical reactivity became an issue in the 1980s, when safety issues associated with the storage of ferrocyanide wastes in Hanford Site tanks became prominent. These safety issues heightened in the late 1980s and led to the current scrutiny of the safety issues associated with these wastes, as well as current research and waste management programs. Testing to provide information on the nature of possible tank reactions is ongoing. This document supplements the information presented in Summary of Single-Shell Tank Waste Stability, WHC-EP-0347, March 1991 (Borsheim and Kirch 1991), which evaluated several issues. This supplement only considers information particular to ferrocyanide wastes.

Fowler, K.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste Read more overleaf Introduction Energy from waste provides us with an opportunity for a waste solution and a local source of energy rolled,itcan onlyaddressaportionofthewastestream andisnotsufficientonitsown. Energy obtained from the combustion of residual waste (Energy from

372

Hanford Tank Waste Information Enclosure 1 Hanford Tank Waste Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hanford Tank Waste Information Enclosure 1 1 Hanford Tank Waste Information 1.0 Summary This information demonstrates the wastes in the twelve Hanford Site tanks meet the definition of transuranic (TRU. The wastes in these twelve (12) tanks are not high-level waste (HLW), and contain more than 100 nanocuries

373

Stabilization of compactible waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of series of experiments performed to determine the feasibility of stabilizing compacted or compactible waste with polymers. The need for this work arose from problems encountered at disposal sites attributed to the instability of this waste in disposal. These studies are part of an experimental program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) investigating methods for the improved solidification/stabilization of DOE low-level wastes. The approach taken in this study was to perform a series of survey type experiments using various polymerization systems to find the most economical and practical method for further in-depth studies. Compactible dry bulk waste was stabilized with two different monomer systems: styrene-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and polyester-styrene, in laboratory-scale experiments. Stabilization was accomplished by wetting or soaking compactible waste (before or after compaction) with monomers, which were subsequently polymerized. Three stabilization methods are described. One involves the in-situ treatment of compacted waste with monomers in which a vacuum technique is used to introduce the binder into the waste. The second method involves the alternate placement and compaction of waste and binder into a disposal container. In the third method, the waste is treated before compaction by wetting the waste with the binder using a spraying technique. A series of samples stabilized at various binder-to-waste ratios were evaluated through water immersion and compression testing. Full-scale studies were conducted by stabilizing two 55-gallon drums of real compacted waste. The results of this preliminary study indicate that the integrity of compacted waste forms can be readily improved to ensure their long-term durability in disposal environments. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Selected Students' Eurocentric Attitudes About Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

16 Eurocentric propositions regarding North American and European agriculture. These propositions included statements regarding Eurocentric perceptions of climate, natural disasters, soils, land degradation, overpopulation, culture, and agriculture... practices. Example proposition statements included: The climate of North America/Europe is more favorable for agriculture than are the climates of other continents; The soils in North America/Europe are more fertile than in the other continents; and North...

Rouse, Lauren Ashley

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

375

The Texas Legislative Process: An agricultural perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Agriculture and Livestock, it was established that many Texas Senators and Representatives are grassroots agriculturalists who require and deserve the input of Texas' agriculture producers in order to create beneficial agricultural policy. 111 THE TEXAS... or creation of new law. Bills which do not contain statewide implications are either Local or Consent. A Local bill is defined as one which creates or affects a water district, hospital district, or road utility district; relates to hunting, fishing...

Green, Todd E.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

376

Underground waste barrier structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is an underground waste barrier structure that consists of waste material, a first container formed of activated carbonaceous material enclosing the waste material, a second container formed of zeolite enclosing the first container, and clay covering the second container. The underground waste barrier structure is constructed by forming a recessed area within the earth, lining the recessed area with a layer of clay, lining the clay with a layer of zeolite, lining the zeolite with a layer of activated carbonaceous material, placing the waste material within the lined recessed area, forming a ceiling over the waste material of a layer of activated carbonaceous material, a layer of zeolite, and a layer of clay, the layers in the ceiling cojoining with the respective layers forming the walls of the structure, and finally, covering the ceiling with earth.

Saha, Anuj J. (Hamburg, NY); Grant, David C. (Gibsonia, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Guidelines for mixed waste minimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, there is no commercial mixed waste disposal available in the United States. Storage and treatment for commercial mixed waste is limited. Host States and compacts region officials are encouraging their mixed waste generators to minimize their mixed wastes because of management limitations. This document provides a guide to mixed waste minimization.

Owens, C.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

OTEC- Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Oregon Trail Electric Consumers Cooperative (OTEC) offers two programs to agricultural customers. The first program, the Irrigation Sprinkler and Pump Motor Program, offers rebates to customers to...

379

Comparison of Agricultural Runoff between Organic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of Agricultural Runoff between Organic Farming and Conventional Chemical Farming Nicole release #12;Organic Walnuts Filter strips Compost Organic pesticides Cover crops Monitoring of insects

380

Operational Waste Volume Projection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of June. 2000.

STRODE, J.N.

2000-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste tires agricultural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Operational waste volume projection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of June 1996.

Koreski, G.M.

1996-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

382

College of Agricultural Sciences Agricultural Research and Cooperative Extension Land Application of Sewage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Agricultural Sciences · Agricultural Research and Cooperative Extension Land Application of Sewage Sludge in Pennsylvania Effects of Biosolids on Soil and Crop Quality ENVIRONME NTAL· ISSUES land application of biosolids represents a beneficial reuse alternative to landfill disposal

Kaye, Jason P.

383

Perceptions Of Texas Agricultural Education Teachers Regarding Diversity Inclusion In Secondary Agricultural Education Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of this study was to explore and analyze Texas secondary agricultural education teachers' attitudes toward diversity inclusion in Texas secondary agricultural education programs. Using a web-based questionnaire, the researcher employed a nonproportional...

Lavergne, Douglas D.

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

384

Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Department of Environmental...

385

Waste Heat Recovery  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

DRAFT - PRE-DECISIONAL - DRAFT 1 Waste Heat Recovery 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the TechnologySystem ......

386

Norcal Waste Systems, Inc.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fact sheet describes the LNG long-haul heavy-duty trucks at Norcal Waste Systems Inc.'s Sanitary Fill Company.

Not Available

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Solid Waste Management (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Solid waste facilities operating in Connecticut must abide by these regulations, which describe requirements and procedures for issuing construction and operating permits; environmental...

388

Solid Waste Policies (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute establishes the support of the state for alternative waste management practices that reduce the reliance upon land disposal and incorporate resource recovery. Cities and counties are...

389

Solid Waste Management (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Indiana Department of...

390

Avoidable waste management costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the activity based costing method used to acquire variable (volume dependent or avoidable) waste management cost data for routine operations at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Waste volumes from environmental restoration, facility stabilization activities, and legacy waste were specifically excluded from this effort. A core team consisting of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, and Oak Ridge Reservation developed and piloted the methodology, which can be used to determine avoidable waste management costs. The method developed to gather information was based on activity based costing, which is a common industrial engineering technique. Sites submitted separate flow diagrams that showed the progression of work from activity to activity for each waste type or treatability group. Each activity on a flow diagram was described in a narrative, which detailed the scope of the activity. Labor and material costs based on a unit quantity of waste being processed were then summed to generate a total cost for that flow diagram. Cross-complex values were calculated by determining a weighted average for each waste type or treatability group based on the volume generated. This study will provide DOE and contractors with a better understanding of waste management processes and their associated costs. Other potential benefits include providing cost data for sites to perform consistent cost/benefit analysis of waste minimization and pollution prevention (WMIN/PP) options identified during pollution prevention opportunity assessments and providing a means for prioritizing and allocating limited resources for WMIN/PP.

Hsu, K.; Burns, M.; Priebe, S.; Robinson, P.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Solid Waste Permits (Louisiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality administers the rules and regulations governing the storage, collection, processing, recovery, and reuse of solid waste protect the air,...

392

Solid Waste Management (Michigan)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act encourages the Department of Environmental Quality and Health Department representatives to develop and encourage methods for disposing solid waste that are environmentally sound, that...

393

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300.degree. C. to 800.degree. C. to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100.degree. C. to 1400.degree. C. at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300 C to 800 C to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100 C to 1400 C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, G.G.

1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

395

Waste minimization assessment procedure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Perry Nuclear Power Plant began developing a waste minimization plan early in 1991. In March of 1991 the plan was documented following a similar format to that described in the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual. Initial implementation involved obtaining management's commitment to support a waste minimization effort. The primary assessment goal was to identify all hazardous waste streams and to evaluate those streams for minimization opportunities. As implementation of the plan proceeded, non-hazardous waste streams routinely generated in large volumes were also evaluated for minimization opportunities. The next step included collection of process and facility data which would be useful in helping the facility accomplish its assessment goals. This paper describes the resources that were used and which were most valuable in identifying both the hazardous and non-hazardous waste streams that existed on site. For each material identified as a waste stream, additional information regarding the materials use, manufacturer, EPA hazardous waste number and DOT hazard class was also gathered. Once waste streams were evaluated for potential source reduction, recycling, re-use, re-sale, or burning for heat recovery, with disposal as the last viable alternative.

Kellythorne, L.L. (Centerior Energy, Cleveland, OH (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Secondary Waste Cast Stone Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Cast Stone Ė a cementitious waste form, has been selected for solidification of this secondary waste stream after treatment in the ETF. The secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. This secondary waste Cast Stone waste form qualification testing plan outlines the testing of the waste form and immobilization process to demonstrate that the Cast Stone waste form can comply with the disposal requirements. Specifications for the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form have not been established. For this testing plan, Cast Stone specifications are derived from specifications for the immobilized LAW glass in the WTP contract, the waste acceptance criteria for the IDF, and the waste acceptance criteria in the IDF Permit issued by the State of Washington. This testing plan outlines the testing needed to demonstrate that the waste form can comply with these waste form specifications and acceptance criteria. The testing program must also demonstrate that the immobilization process can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. This testing plan also outlines the testing needed to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support performance assessment analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form in the IDF

Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

397

Operating limit study for the proposed solid waste landfill at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A proposed solid waste landfill at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) would accept wastes generated during normal operations that are identified as non-radioactive. These wastes may include small amounts of radioactive material from incidental contamination during plant operations. A site-specific analysis of the new solid waste landfill is presented to determine a proposed operating limit that will allow for waste disposal operations to occur such that protection of public health and the environment from the presence of incidentally contaminated waste materials can be assured. Performance objectives for disposal were defined from existing regulatory guidance to establish reasonable dose limits for protection of public health and the environment. Waste concentration limits were determined consistent with these performance objectives for the protection of off-site individuals and inadvertent intruders who might be directly exposed to disposed wastes. Exposures of off-site individuals were estimated using a conservative, site-specific model of the groundwater transport of contamination from the wastes. Direct intrusion was analyzed using an agricultural homesteader scenario. The most limiting concentrations from direct intrusion or groundwater transport were used to establish the concentration limits for radionuclides likely to be present in PGDP wastes.

Lee, D.W.; Wang, J.C.; Kocher, D.C.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

COALITION FOR A SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURAL WORKFORCE 2013 AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE WORKFORCE CENSUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

workforce planning and development data to create a broad inventory of the future need for scientistsCOALITION FOR A SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURAL WORKFORCE 2013 AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE WORKFORCE CENSUS #12;Summary SUMMARY In January 2013, CSAW (Coalition for a Sustainable Agricultural Workforce) conducted

Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

399

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

6 Technology Readiness Assessment for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW Waste Vitrification Facility L. Holton D. Alexander C. Babel H. Sutter J. Young August...

400

Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This act provides for planning for the processing and disposal of municipal waste; requires counties to submit plans for municipal waste management systems within their boundaries; authorizes...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste tires agricultural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Catalytic bromine recovery from HBr waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste HBr is formed during the bromination of many organic molecules, such as flame retardants, pharmaceuticals, and agricultural chemicals. For over 50 years attempts to recover the bromine from waste HBr by catalytic oxidation have been unsuccessful due to low catalyst activity and stability. The discovery of a new high-activity catalysts with excellent long-term stability and life capable of high HBr conversion below 300{degrees}C has made catalytic oxidation of waste HBr commercially feasible. The oxidation of anhydrous HBr using oxygen is highly exothermic, giving an adiabatic temperature rise of 2000{degrees}C. Use of 48 wt% HBr in the oxidation reduces the adiabatic temperature rise to only 300{degrees}C. A multitubular heat exchanger type of reactor can then be used to manage the heat. A 5,000 kg/yr pilot plant was built to verify the performance of the catalyst, the suitability of the reactor materials of construction, and the multibular reactor concept. The pilot unit has a single full-scale reactor tube 4 m long and 2.54 cm in diameter with a hot oil jacket for heat management. Excellent catalyst stability was observed during a 600 h catalyst-life test. HBr conversion of 99% was maintained throughout the run, and over 360 kg of bromine was produced. The temperature at a localized hot spot near the reactor inlet was only 15-20{degrees}C above the reactor inlet temperature, indicating efficient heat management.

Schubert, P.F.; Beatty, R.D.; Mahajan, S. [Catalytica Inc., Mountain View, CA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

402

Hazardous Waste Management (North Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These rules identify and list hazardous waste and set standards for the generators and operators of such waste as well as owners or operators of waste facilities. They also stats standards for...

403

Virginia Waste Management Act (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Solid waste and hazardous waste are regulated under a number of programs at the Department of Environmental Quality. These programs are designed to encourage the reuse and recycling of solid waste...

404

Solid Waste Disposal Act (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality is responsible for the regulation and management of municipal solid waste and hazardous waste. A fee is applied to all solid waste disposed in the...

405

Solid Waste Act (New Mexico)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The main purpose of the Solid Waste Act is to authorize and direct the establishment of a comprehensive solid waste management program. The act states details about specific waste management...

406

Georgia Waste Control Law (Georgia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Waste Control Law makes it unlawful to dump waste in any lakes, streams or surfaces waters of the State or on any private property without consent of the property owner. Waste is very broadly...

407

Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

support in a precision farming context. Keywords: Carbon balances, carbon sequestration, decompositionCarbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils Model Applications at Different Scales in Time Print: SLU Service/Repro, Uppsala 2012 #12;Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils. Model

408

Insights from Agricultural GHG Offset studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sequestration MMt arising at an offset price giving $/tonne carbon equiv ·Many contributions ·DifferentInsights from Agricultural GHG Offset studies Bruce A. McCarl Regents Professor of Agricultural Economics Texas A&M University Presented at EPRI Workshop on Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration Alexandria VA

McCarl, Bruce A.

409

Announcing: Patrick Chan Award in Sustainable Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Science building. He contributed to projects on sustainable management of agriculture, soil, water, miningAnnouncing: Patrick Chan Award in Sustainable Agriculture (Printed in the Lethbridge Herald, Dec 31, 2011; article by Dan Johnson) While colleges and universities receive a certain amount of core funding

Johnson, Dan L.

410

Markets for Ecosystem Services from Agriculture: Outlook  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Credit Trading, potential for but does not exist yet for agriculture in FL · Renewable Energy: ­ Growing from Agriculture: Policy & Market Trends · Increased federal funding in recent years dedicated Participates in ES Markets? BUYERS - Government agencies - NGOs - Private individuals - Corporations

Hill, Jeffrey E.

411

Agricultural Opportunities in the Pacific Rim  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(thousands) Developed Asia (Japan...) China Developing Asia (India...) #12;Asia Real GDP (2005 Dollars) Developing Asia-Term Agricultural Projection Tables #12;US Agricultural Export Destination Value Shares, 2012 China Canada MexicoWeb #12;World Population Projections by Region 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 1950 1956 1962 1968 1974 1980 1986 1992

Todd, Brian

412

Agricultural Management, Water Quality and Phosphorus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agricultural Management, Water Quality and Phosphorus: The Long and Winding Road Andrew Sharpley #12;In the beginning Agriculture and water quality Targeted watershed P management Linking ecosystem;#12;Optimal soil PO concentrations for plant growth ~0.20 mg/L #12;For flowing waters ~0.01 to 0.10 mg/L #12

413

Agricultural Management Practices And Soil Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agricultural Management Practices And Soil Quality: Measuring, assessing, and comparing laboratory and field test kit indicators of soil quality attributes. Publication 452-400 #12;Agricultural Management Associate, respectively, Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences, Virginia Tech #12;1 Introduction What makes

Liskiewicz, Maciej

414

WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DESCRIPTION DETAILS * Radioactive Waste Source Reduction 1,500 Radioactive Waste $6,000 $2,500 $6,000 Waste Yard Sorting Table surveying to sort clean waste from radioactive waste Radioactive Emissions Emission lives. Radioactive Waste generated through wet chemistry Waste Minimization 30 Mixed waste / Liquid

415

Solid Waste Paul Woodson, East Central University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of groundwater contamination, air pollution, and odor. Solid wastes may be displeasing to the public either, industrial and medical wastes, food wastes, mineral waste, and nonhazardous wastes. In addition/reservoirs, special wastes, such as medical wastes, low level radioactive wastes, construction/demolition debris

416

Nebraska Hazardous Waste Regulations (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Environmental Quality, contain provisions pertaining to hazardous waste management, waste standards, permitting requirements, and land disposal...

417

RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL IN GRANITE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL IN GRANITE Paul A. WitherspoonRADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL IN GRANITE Paul A. Wither spoona repository site in granite are to evaluate the suitability

Witherspoon, P.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Solid Waste Management Act (Oklahoma)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act establishes rules for the permitting, posting of security, construction, operation, closure, maintenance and remediation of solid waste disposal sites; disposal of solid waste in ways that...

419

Solid Waste Management (South Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute contains provisions for solid waste management systems, groundwater monitoring, liability for pollution, permitting, inspections, and provisions for waste reduction and recycling...

420

Hazardous Waste Management (New Mexico)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The New Mexico Environment Department's Hazardous Waste Bureau is responsible for the management of hazardous waste in the state. The Bureau enforces the rules established by the Environmental...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste tires agricultural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Solid Waste Rules (New Hampshire)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The solid waste statute applies to construction and demolition debris, appliances, recyclables, and the facilities that collect, process, and dispose of solid waste. DES oversees the management of...

422

Solid Waste Management (North Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Solid Waste Program regulates safe management of solid waste through guidance, technical assistance, regulations, permitting, environmental monitoring, compliance evaluation and enforcement....

423

Radioactive waste disposal package  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

Lampe, Robert F. (Bethel Park, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Hazardous Waste Management Training  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hazardous Waste Management Training Persons (including faculty, staff and students) working with hazardous materials should receive annual training that addresses storage, use, and disposal of hazardous before handling hazardous waste. Departments are re- quired to keep records of training for as long

Dai, Pengcheng

425

Nuclear waste solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

High efficiency removal of technetium values from a nuclear waste stream is achieved by addition to the waste stream of a precipitant contributing tetraphenylphosphonium cation, such that a substantial portion of the technetium values are precipitated as an insoluble pertechnetate salt.

Walker, Darrel D. (1684 Partridge Dr., Aiken, SC 29801); Ebra, Martha A. (129 Hasty Rd., Aiken, SC 29801)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Waste classification sampling plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this sampling is to explain the method used to collect and analyze data necessary to verify and/or determine the radionuclide content of the B-Cell decontamination and decommissioning waste stream so that the correct waste classification for the waste stream can be made, and to collect samples for studies of decontamination methods that could be used to remove fixed contamination present on the waste. The scope of this plan is to establish the technical basis for collecting samples and compiling quantitative data on the radioactive constituents present in waste generated during deactivation activities in B-Cell. Sampling and radioisotopic analysis will be performed on the fixed layers of contamination present on structural material and internal surfaces of process piping and tanks. In addition, dose rate measurements on existing waste material will be performed to determine the fraction of dose rate attributable to both removable and fixed contamination. Samples will also be collected to support studies of decontamination methods that are effective in removing the fixed contamination present on the waste. Sampling performed under this plan will meet criteria established in BNF-2596, Data Quality Objectives for the B-Cell Waste Stream Classification Sampling, J. M. Barnett, May 1998.

Landsman, S.D.

1998-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

427

Elementary School Teachers' Perception of Agricultural-Related Literature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Throughout the construction of the United States, agriculture and education have been closely intertwinedóuntil recent years. In 1981, agricultural professionals, educators and policy makers noted the decline in standard agricultural curriculum...

Leventini, Alexa Marie

2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

428

Sustainable agriculture: possible trajectories from mutualistic symbiosis and plant neodomestication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainable agriculture: possible trajectories from mutualistic symbiosis and plant. Based on recent findings, new trajectories for agriculture and plant breeding which take into account symbiosis in an innovative ecologically intensive agriculture. A sustainable food production ? Feeding

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

429

Agriculture Education Curriculum Grades 6-12 (BS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agriculture Education Curriculum Grades 6-12 (BS) Freshman Year English (GER) English 101, 102..................................................... 3 Agricultural Science 209,211..............................3 Animal Science 111...................................................3 Agricultural Business 220................................... 3 Content Electives

Selmic, Sandra

430

Essays on Water Resource Economics and Agricultural Extension  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

impact of climate change on irrigated agriculture inclimate change, environmental regulations can also impact the availability of water for agriculture.agriculture can be affected by numerous factors. Climate change

Buck, Steven Charles

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Nitrate Salt Bearing Waste Container  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Energy (DOE) and Nuclear Waste Partnership LLC (NWP), collectively referred to as the Permittees Isolation Plan (Plan) for identified nitrate salt bearing waste disposed in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant detailed proposal for the expedited closure of underground Hazardous Waste Disposal Unit (HWDU) Panel 6, so

Napp, Nils

432

TRU Waste Sampling Program: Volume I. Waste characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume I of the TRU Waste Sampling Program report presents the waste characterization information obtained from sampling and characterizing various aged transuranic waste retrieved from storage at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The data contained in this report include the results of gas sampling and gas generation, radiographic examinations, waste visual examination results, and waste compliance with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant-Waste Acceptance Criteria (WIPP-WAC). A separate report, Volume II, contains data from the gas generation studies.

Clements, T.L. Jr.; Kudera, D.E.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Improving the Water Component of an Agricultural Climate Change Assessment : Issues from the Standpoint of Agricultural Economists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improving the Water Component of an Agricultural Climate Change Assessment : Issues from The National Global Climate Change Research Program is supporting appraisals of water and agriculture among assessment. Key Terms; Economics, Climate Change Assessment, Agriculture, Irrigation, Water use tradeoffs

McCarl, Bruce A.

434

Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling and Scenarios Jump to: navigation, search Name Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for Mitigation in Agricultural Landscapes using...

435

Farming in a Changing Climate: Agricultural Adaptation in Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agricultural Adaptation in Canada Ellen Wall, Barry Smit,Agricultural Adaptation in Canada. Vancouver, BC: Universitythe agri-food sector in Canada, the insights provided are so

Jain, Varinder

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

agriculturally important genes: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Websites Summary: May 2011 New Challenges in Agricultural Modeling: Relating Enegy and Farm of Education, Office of Civil Rights. 12;1 New Challenges in Agricultural...

437

abandoned agricultural field: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Websites Summary: May 2011 New Challenges in Agricultural Modeling: Relating Enegy and Farm of Education, Office of Civil Rights. 12;1 New Challenges in Agricultural...

438

agricultural pesticide operations: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Websites Summary: May 2011 New Challenges in Agricultural Modeling: Relating Enegy and Farm of Education, Office of Civil Rights. 12;1 New Challenges in Agricultural...

439

agricultural food chains: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AGRICULTURE, FOOD & WINE Physics Websites Summary: Graduate Profile AGRICULTURE, FOOD & WINE "I was amazed that I could be a part of the food industry in a scientific way."...

440

Climate Change and China's Agricultural Sector: An Overview of...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

from agriculture, and analyze how these efforts would in turn impact agricultural productivity and trade. In order to realize this goal, we have the following specific...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste tires agricultural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Agricultural Progress in Cameroon, Mali and Ghana: Why it Happened...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis of agricultural performance focused on trends in output, factor use, and productivity. Analysis of agricultural policy featured measurement of domestic and international...

442

agricultural experiment station: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12;Agriculture performance standards & County Land and Water Resource Management Plan Balser, Teri C. 455 Agricultural Outlook ORGANISATION FOR ECONOMIC Environmental...

443

agriculture mudancas na: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Agriculture, Forestry, and Veterinary Medicine, or DAFVM Ray, David 29 Action Plan Agricultural Sciences Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Action Plan...

444

agricultural experiment stations: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12;Agriculture performance standards & County Land and Water Resource Management Plan Balser, Teri C. 455 Agricultural Outlook ORGANISATION FOR ECONOMIC Environmental...

445

agricultural initiative request: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Agriculture, Forestry, and Veterinary Medicine, or DAFVM Ray, David 102 Action Plan Agricultural Sciences Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Action Plan...

446

agricultural workers diseases: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Agriculture, Forestry, and Veterinary Medicine, or DAFVM Ray, David 80 Action Plan Agricultural Sciences Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Action Plan...

447

agricultural pesticide handlers: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Agriculture, Forestry, and Veterinary Medicine, or DAFVM Ray, David 144 Action Plan Agricultural Sciences Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Action Plan...

448

Abstract: Design and Demonstration of an Advanced Agricultural...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Design and Demonstration of an Advanced Agricultural Feedstock Supply System for Lignocellulosic Bioenergy Production Abstract: Design and Demonstration of an Advanced Agricultural...

449

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide. 3 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

450

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide.

Forsberg, Charles W. (155 Newport Dr., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Beahm, Edward C. (106 Cooper Cir., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Parker, George W. (321 Dominion Cir., Knoxville, TN 37922)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Hazardous Waste Disposal Sites (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These sections contain information on fees and monitoring relevant to operators of hazardous waste disposal sites.

452

Waste incineration and the community -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

strategy followed by the operator of Amsterdam's waste-to- energy plant has convinced the public and other growing amounts of waste In 1992, the City of Amsterdam created Afval Energie Bedrijf (AEB), a waste-to-energy as much energy and materials as possible from municipal waste while protecting the environment. It seeks

Columbia University

453

Waste to Energy Time Activities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEMINAR Waste to Energy Time Activities 9:30-9:40 Brief introduction of participants 9:40-10:10 Presentation of Dr. Kalogirou, "Waste to Energy: An Integral Part of Worldwide Sustainable Waste Management" 10. Sofia Bethanis, "Production of synthetic aggregates for use in structural concrete from waste to energy

454

Copenhagen Waste Management and Incineration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Copenhagen Waste Management and Incineration Florence, April 24 2009 Julie B. Svendsen incentives · Waste Management plan 2012 · Incineration plants #12;Florence, April 24 20093 Copenhagen Waste ownership of treatment facilities · Incineration plants · Land fill · Disposal of hazardous waste · Source

455

Generating power with waste wood  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Among the biomass renewables, waste wood has great potential with environmental and economic benefits highlighting its resume. The topics of this article include alternate waste wood fuel streams; combustion benefits; waste wood comparisons; waste wood ash; pilot scale tests; full-scale test data; permitting difficulties; and future needs.

Atkins, R.S.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Methane generation from waste materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An organic solid waste digester for producing methane from solid waste, the digester comprising a reactor vessel for holding solid waste, a sprinkler system for distributing water, bacteria, and nutrients over and through the solid waste, and a drainage system for capturing leachate that is then recirculated through the sprinkler system.

Samani, Zohrab A. (Las Cruces, NM); Hanson, Adrian T. (Las Cruces, NM); Macias-Corral, Maritza (Las Cruces, NM)

2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

457

Certification Plan, low-level waste Hazardous Waste Handling Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan also incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end-product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; an executive summary of the Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP) for the HWHF and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification. This plan provides guidance from the HWHF to waste generators, waste handlers, and the Waste Certification Specialist to enable them to conduct their activities and carry out their responsibilities in a manner that complies with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Waste generators have the primary responsibility for the proper characterization of LLW. The Waste Certification Specialist verifies and certifies that LBL LLW is characterized, handled, and shipped in accordance with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Certification is the governing process in which LBL personnel conduct their waste generating and waste handling activities in such a manner that the Waste Certification Specialist can verify that the requirements of WHC-WAC are met.

Albert, R.

1992-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

458

DESIGNING AND OPPORTUNITY FUEL WITH BIOMASS AND TIRE-DERIVED FUEL FOR COFIRING AT WILLOW ISLAND GENERATING STATION AND COFIRING SAWDUST WITH COAL AT ALBRIGHT GENERATING STATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the period July 1, 2000-March 31, 2004, Allegheny Energy Supply Co., LLC (Allegheny) conducted an extensive demonstration of woody biomass cofiring at its Willow Island and Albright Generating Stations. This demonstration, cofunded by USDOE and Allegheny, and supported by the Biomass Interest Group (BIG) of EPRI, evaluated the impacts of sawdust cofiring in both cyclone boilers and tangentially-fired pulverized coal boilers. The cofiring in the cyclone boiler--Willow Island Generating Station Unit No.2--evaluated the impacts of sawdust alone, and sawdust blended with tire-derived fuel. The biomass was blended with the coal on its way to the combustion system. The cofiring in the pulverized coal boiler--Albright Generating Station--evaluated the impact of cofiring on emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) when the sawdust was injected separately into the furnace. The demonstration of woody biomass cofiring involved design, construction, and testing at each site. The results addressed impacts associated with operational issues--capacity, efficiency, and operability--as well as formation and control of airborne emissions such as NO{sub x}, sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}2), opacity, and mercury. The results of this extensive program are detailed in this report.

K. Payette; D. Tillman

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Waste management experience at IPEN-Brazil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Institute for Energy and Nuclear Research (Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares--IPEN) is the biggest nuclear research center in Brazil. Located in the campus of the University of Sao Paulo, it is maintained and operated by the National Commission on Nuclear Energy (Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear--CNEN). Its objectives are the development of nuclear energy and its fuel cycle, the applications of radiation and radioisotopes in industry, medicine, agriculture, research, education, and environmental preservation, and the realization of basic and applied research in related fields. This paper describes the history and the practices of the waste management at a nuclear research center in Brazil where research on the nuclear fuel cycle and on the applications of radioisotopes are in progress.

Vicente, R. [Inst. de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleaires, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

460

Hazardous Waste Management (Michigan)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A person shall not generate, dispose, store, treat, or transport hazardous waste in this state without complying with the requirements of this article. The department, in the conduct of its duties...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste tires agricultural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Waste and Recycling  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Nuclear engineer Dr. Kathy McCarthy talks about nuclear energy, the challenge of nuclear waste and the research aimed at solutions. For more information about nuclear energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

McCarthy, Kathy

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

462

Solid Waste Management (Kansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This act aims to establish and maintain a cooperative state and local program of planning and technical and financial assistance for comprehensive solid waste management. No person shall construct,...

463

UMC Construction Waste (4493)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

collect all Construction waste identified in 2006 and excess through plant sales, recycle through plant scrap metal recycle program, dispose in Y-12 on-site landfill, or ship to...

464

Citrus Waste Biomass Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Renewable Spirits is developing an innovative pilot plant bio-refinery to establish the commercial viability of ehtanol production utilizing a processing waste from citrus juice production. A novel process based on enzymatic hydrolysis of citrus processing waste and fermentation of resulting sugars to ethanol by yeasts was successfully developed in collaboration with a CRADA partner, USDA/ARS Citrus and Subtropical Products Laboratory. The process was also successfully scaled up from laboratory scale to 10,000 gal fermentor level.

Karel Grohman; Scott Stevenson

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

465

ORISE: Multiple research appointments available through Agricultural...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RELEASE March 26, 2014 FY14-23 OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-ORAU and the U.S. Department of Agriculture are currently seeking recent doctoral degree recipients for various appointments in...

466

Industrial and Agricultural Production Efficiency Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Energy Trust of Oregon offers the Industrial and Agricultural Production Efficiency Program to customers of Portland General Electric, Pacific Power, NW Natural and Cascade Natural Gas. In order to...

467

U.S. Agriculture and International Trade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International markets are important for many U.S. farm products and greatly affect U.S. agriculture. This publication discusses the causes of import change, the export product mix, major markets, and markets of the future....

McCorkle, Dean; Benson, Geoffrey A.; Marchant, Mary; Rosson, C. Parr

1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

468

Quantifying the parameters of successful agricultural producers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The primary purpose of the study was to quantify the parameters of successful agricultural producers. Through the use of the Financial and Risk Management (FARM) Assistance database, this study evaluated economic measures for row-crop producers...

Kaase, Gregory Herman

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

469

BIOLOGICAL & AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/Associate Professor and Extension Specialist (Water/Wastewater Engineering) Appointment: 70% Texas A&M Agri) and other environmental issues of concern to rural communities, agricultural producers, agri treatment technologies (such as desalination), water capture and reuse, and conservation technologies

470

Modeling Water, Climate, Agriculture, and the Economy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Describes two models used in the integrated modeling framework designed to study water, climate, agriculture and the economy in Pakistan's Indus Basin: (1) the Indus Basin Model Revised (IBMR-1012), a hydro-economic ...

Yu, Winston

471

Food sovereignty and agricultural trade policy commitments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Agricultural, Food and Bioenergy Trade (AGFOODTRADE)" (Grant Agreement No. 212036) research project, funded production with enough barrier protection to shelter it from world price fluctuations and unfair trading

Boyer, Edmond

472

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report. Volume 1, Part 2, Generator dangerous waste report dangerous waste: Calendar Year 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, weight, waste description, and waste designation.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

473

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report. Volume 1, Part 1, Generator dangerous waste report dangerous waste: Calendar Year 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, weight, waste description, and waste designation.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

474

E-Print Network 3.0 - agriculture agricultural knowledge Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

www.slu.se Symptom 12;Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences www.slu.se Potato late blight life Source: Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet (Swedish University of...

475

Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities Project Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This feasibility study report presents a draft design of the Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility (VWISF), which is one of three subprojects of the Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities (IWVF) project. The primary goal of the IWVF project is to design and construct a treatment process system that will vitrify the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) to a final waste form. The project will consist of three subprojects that include the Waste Collection Tanks Facility, the Waste Vitrification Facility (WVF), and the VWISF. The Waste Collection Tanks Facility will provide for waste collection, feed mixing, and surge storage for SBW and newly generated liquid waste from ongoing operations at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The WVF will contain the vitrification process that will mix the waste with glass-forming chemicals or frit and turn the waste into glass. The VWISF will provide a shielded storage facility for the glass until the waste can be disposed at either the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as mixed transuranic waste or at the future national geological repository as high-level waste glass, pending the outcome of a Waste Incidental to Reprocessing determination, which is currently in progress. A secondary goal is to provide a facility that can be easily modified later to accommodate storage of the vitrified high-level waste calcine. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of the VWISF, which would be constructed in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local laws. This project supports the Department of Energyís Environmental Management missions of safely storing and treating radioactive wastes as well as meeting Federal Facility Compliance commitments made to the State of Idaho.

Bonnema, Bruce Edward

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

FACT SHEET Agriculture and Natural Resources AEX-651.1-11  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Farmers are familiar with storing high-moisture forage crops as silage. Tall silos, horizontal or bunker silos, and more recently ďshrink-wrappedĒ round bales are common examples of storing crops ďwet Ē instead of ďdry.Ē Today, scientists and engineers are looking at ďsilage Ē techniques as a way of preserving lignocellulosic biomass for use as a feedstock for biobased energy and products. Lignocellulosic biomass is an abundant, widely available resource and includes agricultural crop residues, such as corn stover and wheat straw; energy crops, such as switchgrass; and municipal waste. The most common lignocellulosic biomass on Ohio farms is corn stover. The ability to store biomass feedstocks year-round is essential

Storing Lignocellulosic Biomass; Jian Shi

477

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - December 2012 December 2012 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process...

478

BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Series Wine Grape & Tree Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada BC Ministry of Agriculture BC Ministry of Environment Pacific Institute for Climate

Pedersen, Tom

479

BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Series Livestock Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada BC Ministry of Agriculture BC Ministry of Environment Pacific Institute for Climate

Pedersen, Tom

480

University of Connecticut Ratcliffe Hicks School of Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Connecticut Ratcliffe Hicks School of Agriculture New Student PRESentation #12;College of Agriculture & Natural Resources (CANR) 4-year B.S. degree program Ratcliffe Hicks School of Agriculture (RHSA) 2-year A.A.S. degree program · Agriculture and Natural Resources · Allied Health Sciences

Alpay, S. Pamir

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste tires agricultural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

AGRICULTURE, 2004 Status of the Wisconsin Farm Economy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STATUS OF WISCONSIN AGRICULTURE, 2004 Status of the Wisconsin Farm Economy Situation and Outlook Situation: Implications for U.S. Agriculture · The Evolution and Current Status of Livestock Production and Meat Processing in Wisconsin Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics College of Agricultural

Radeloff, Volker C.

482

Wisconsin Agriculture Status of the Wisconsin Farm Economy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STATUS OF Wisconsin Agriculture 2011 · Status of the Wisconsin Farm Economy · Current Outlook: Farm of Agricultural and Applied Economics College of Agricultural and Life Sciences University of Wisconsin-Madison Cooperative Extension University of Wisconsin-Extension #12;Status of Wisconsin Agriculture, 2011 An annual

Radeloff, Volker C.

483

AGRICULTURE, 2006 Status of the Wisconsin Farm Economy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STATUS OF WISCONSIN AGRICULTURE, 2006 Status of the Wisconsin Farm Economy Situation and Outlook-Added Agriculture · Organic Farming in Wisconsin · A New Wisconsin Cooperative Law Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics College of Agricultural and Life Sciences University of Wisconsin-Madison Cooperative

Radeloff, Volker C.

484

The Economic Impacts of Agriculture in Wisconsin Counties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Economic Impacts of Agriculture in Wisconsin Counties Steven Deller Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics University of Wisconsin­Madison/Extension David Williams Agricultural and Natural-Extension, Cooperative Extension program areas of Agriculture and Natural Resources and Community, Natural Resource

Radeloff, Volker C.

485

SECONDARY WASTE MANAGEMENT STRATEGY FOR EARLY LOW ACTIVITY WASTE TREATMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study evaluates parameters relevant to River Protection Project secondary waste streams generated during Early Low Activity Waste operations and recommends a strategy for secondary waste management that considers groundwater impact, cost, and programmatic risk. The recommended strategy for managing River Protection Project secondary waste is focused on improvements in the Effiuent Treatment Facility. Baseline plans to build a Solidification Treatment Unit adjacent to Effluent Treatment Facility should be enhanced to improve solid waste performance and mitigate corrosion of tanks and piping supporting the Effiuent Treatment Facility evaporator. This approach provides a life-cycle benefit to solid waste performance and reduction of groundwater contaminants.

CRAWFORD TW

2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

486

NH Agricultural Experiment Station -COLLEGE OF LIFE SCIENCES & AGRICULTURE yhttp://extension.unh.edu/Agric http://www.colsa.unh.edu/aes/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NH Agricultural Experiment Station - COLLEGE OF LIFE SCIENCES & AGRICULTURE yhttp of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA; 3 Ohio Agricultural Research & Development Center mil IR greenhouse film Data Collection

New Hampshire, University of

487

Waste Treatment Plant - 12508  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will immobilize millions of gallons of Hanford's tank waste into solid glass using a proven technology called vitrification. The vitrification process will turn the waste into a stable glass form that is safe for long-term storage. Our discussion of the WTP will include a description of the ongoing design and construction of this large, complex, first-of-a-kind project. The concept for the operation of the WTP is to separate high-level and low-activity waste fractions, and immobilize those fractions in glass using vitrification. The WTP includes four major nuclear facilities and various support facilities. Waste from the Tank Farms is first pumped to the Pretreatment Facility at the WTP through an underground pipe-in-pipe system. When construction is complete, the Pretreatment Facility will be 12 stories high, 540 feet long and 215 feet wide, making it the largest of the four major nuclear facilities that compose the WTP. The total size of this facility will be more than 490,000 square feet. More than 8.2 million craft hours are required to construct this facility. Currently, the Pretreatment Facility is 51 percent complete. At the Pretreatment Facility the waste is pumped to the interior waste feed receipt vessels. Each of these four vessels is 55-feet tall and has a 375,000 gallon capacity, which makes them the largest vessels inside the Pretreatment Facility. These vessels contain a series of internal pulse-jet mixers to keep incoming waste properly mixed. The vessels are inside the black-cell areas, completely enclosed behind thick steel-laced, high strength concrete walls. The black cells are designed to be maintenance free with no moving parts. Once hot operations commence the black-cell area will be inaccessible. Surrounded by black cells, is the 'hot cell canyon'. The hot cell contains all the moving and replaceable components to remove solids and extract liquids. In this area, there is ultrafiltration equipment, cesium-ion exchange columns, evaporator boilers and recirculation pumps, and various mechanical process pumps for transferring process fluids. During the first phase of pretreatment, the waste will be concentrated using an evaporation process. Solids will be filtered out, and the remaining soluble, highly radioactive isotopes will be removed using an ion-exchange process. The high-level solids will be sent to the High-Level Waste (HLW) Vitrification Facility, and the low activity liquids will be sent to the Low-Activity Waste (LAW) Vitrification Facility for further processing. The high-level waste will be transferred via underground pipes to the HLW Facility from the Pretreatment Facility. The waste first arrives at the wet cell, which rests inside a black-cell area. The pretreated waste is transferred through shielded pipes into a series of melter preparation and feed vessels before reaching the melters. Liquids from various facility processes also return to the wet cell for interim storage before recycling back to the Pretreatment Facility. (authors)

Harp, Benton; Olds, Erik [US DOE (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Mixed waste characterization reference document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste characterization and monitoring are major activities in the management of waste from generation through storage and treatment to disposal. Adequate waste characterization is necessary to ensure safe storage, selection of appropriate and effective treatment, and adherence to disposal standards. For some wastes characterization objectives can be difficult and costly to achieve. The purpose of this document is to evaluate costs of characterizing one such waste type, mixed (hazardous and radioactive) waste. For the purpose of this document, waste characterization includes treatment system monitoring, where monitoring is a supplement or substitute for waste characterization. This document establishes a cost baseline for mixed waste characterization and treatment system monitoring requirements from which to evaluate alternatives. The cost baseline established as part of this work includes costs for a thermal treatment technology (i.e., a rotary kiln incinerator), a nonthermal treatment process (i.e., waste sorting, macronencapsulation, and catalytic wet oxidation), and no treatment (i.e., disposal of waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)). The analysis of improvement over the baseline includes assessment of promising areas for technology development in front-end waste characterization, process equipment, off gas controls, and monitoring. Based on this assessment, an ideal characterization and monitoring configuration is described that minimizes costs and optimizes resources required for waste characterization.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Treatment Building throughput study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hazardous waste/mixed waste HW/MW Treatment Building (TB) is the specified treatment location for solid hazardous waste/mixed waste at SRS. This report provides throughput information on the facility based on known and projected waste generation rates. The HW/MW TB will have an annual waste input for the first four years of approximately 38,000 ft{sup 3} and have an annual treated waste output of approximately 50,000 ft{sup 3}. After the first four years of operation it will have an annual waste input of approximately 16,000 ft{sup 3} and an annual waste output of approximately 18,000 ft. There are several waste streams that cannot be accurately predicted (e.g. environmental restoration, decommissioning, and decontamination). The equipment and process area sizing for the initial four years should allow excess processing capability for these poorly defined waste streams. A treatment process description and process flow of the waste is included to aid in understanding the computations of the throughput. A description of the treated wastes is also included.

England, J.L.; Kanzleiter, J.P.

1991-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

490

College of Agriculture Rules of Procedure, Approved by College Faculty on February 18, 2013 UK COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Agriculture Rules of Procedure, Approved by College Faculty on February 18, 2013 UK COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE RULES OF PROCEDURE Amended and approved by Ag Faculty Council November 8, 2012 to the College of Agriculture Faculty: February 4, 2013 College of Agriculture Faculty Approval: February 18

Hayes, Jane E.

491

AFRICAN AGRICULTURE TODAY CURRENT ISSUES IN INTERNATIONAL RURAL DEVELOPMENT PUBLISHED BY THE SWEDISH UNIVERSITY OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES ! AUGUST 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AFRICAN AGRICULTURE TODAY 34 CURRENT ISSUES IN INTERNATIONAL RURAL DEVELOPMENT PUBLISHED BY THE SWEDISH UNIVERSITY OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES ! AUGUST 2004 #12;Currents No. 34 August 2004 In this issue Agriculture Today 4 Flashback: Fifty Years of Donor Aid to African Agriculture Executive summary of Conference

492

MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE, FISHERIES AND FOOD DIRECTORATE OF FISHERIES RESEARCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Discharges of radioactive waste 2.1 Liquid radioactive waste 2.2 Solid radioactive waste 3. Methods;MAJOR DISPOSALS OF LIQUID RADIOACTIVE WASTE IN THE UNITED K I N G D O M B N FL ESTABLISHMENTS 0 U K A EA Figure 1 UK nuclear establishments giving rise to principal discharges of liquid radioactive waste. #12;l

493

Waste segregation procedures and benefits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Segregation is a critical first step in handling hazardous and radioactive materials to minimize the generation of regulated wastes. In addition, segregation can significantly reduce the complexity and the total cost of managing waste. Procedures at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque require that wastes be segregated, first, by waste type (acids, solvents, low level radioactive, mixed, classified, etc.). Higher level segregation requirements, currently under development, are aimed at enhancing the possibilities for recovery, recycle and reapplication; reducing waste volumes; reducing waste disposal costs, and facilitating packaging storage, shipping and disposal. 2 tabs.

Fish, J.D.; Massey, C.D.; Ward, S.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

ZERO WASTE STANFORD WASTE REDUCTION, RECYCLING AND COMPOSTING GUIDELINES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ZERO WASTE STANFORD WASTE REDUCTION, RECYCLING AND COMPOSTING GUIDELINES PLASTICS, METALS & GLASS pleaseemptyandflatten COMPOSTABLES kitchenandyardwasteonly LANDFILL ONLY ifallelsefails All Plastic Containers Metal Material All Food Paper Plates & Napkins *including pizza & donut boxes Compostable & Biodegradable

Gerdes, J. Christian

495

RECYCLING AND GENERAL WASTE MANAGEMENT OPERATIONAL PROCEDURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RECYCLING AND GENERAL WASTE MANAGEMENT OPERATIONAL PROCEDURE Swansea University Estates Services.6.1/1 Recycling & General Waste Management Department: Estates & Facilities Management Site: Swansea University recycling and waste management facilities in Swansea university To ensure that Waste Management Objectives

Harman, Neal.A.

496

FROM WASTE TO WORTH: THE ROLE OF WASTE DIVERSION IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Canadian Energy-From-Waste Coalition (CEFWC) 1 There is considerable merit to the ideas outlined commitment to foster a green and sustainable economy. The Canadian Energy-From-Waste Coalition (CEFWC sign that the system is failing. #12;Canadian Energy-From-Waste Coalition (CEFWC) 2 Like you, the CEFWC

Columbia University

497

Waste IncIneratIon and Waste PreventIon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

disposing of waste, it also makes consider- able amounts of energy available in the form of electricity emissions annu- ally. About 50 percent of the energy contained in residual municipal waste comes from- sions from the fossil waste fraction and the fos- sil energy purchased from external sources

498

Waste Management & Research172 Waste Manage Res 2003: 21: 172177  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Keywords: Waste incineration, PVC (polyvinylchloride), energy recovery, material recycling, HCLWaste Management & Research172 Waste Manage Res 2003: 21: 172­177 Printed in UK ­ all rights reserved Copyright © ISWA 2003 Waste Management & Research ISSN 0734­242X In many market segments

Columbia University

499

Swedish nuclear waste efforts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After the introduction of a law prohibiting the start-up of any new nuclear power plant until the utility had shown that the waste produced by the plant could be taken care of in an absolutely safe way, the Swedish nuclear utilities in December 1976 embarked on the Nuclear Fuel Safety Project, which in November 1977 presented a first report, Handling of Spent Nuclear Fuel and Final Storage of Vitrified Waste (KBS-I), and in November 1978 a second report, Handling and Final Storage of Unreprocessed Spent Nuclear Fuel (KBS II). These summary reports were supported by 120 technical reports prepared by 450 experts. The project engaged 70 private and governmental institutions at a total cost of US $15 million. The KBS-I and KBS-II reports are summarized in this document, as are also continued waste research efforts carried out by KBS, SKBF, PRAV, ASEA and other Swedish organizations. The KBS reports describe all steps (except reprocessing) in handling chain from removal from a reactor of spent fuel elements until their radioactive waste products are finally disposed of, in canisters, in an underground granite depository. The KBS concept relies on engineered multibarrier systems in combination with final storage in thoroughly investigated stable geologic formations. This report also briefly describes other activities carried out by the nuclear industry, namely, the construction of a central storage facility for spent fuel elements (to be in operation by 1985), a repository for reactor waste (to be in operation by 1988), and an intermediate storage facility for vitrified high-level waste (to be in operation by 1990). The R and D activities are updated to September 1981.

Rydberg, J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Skutterudite TE modules were...