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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste storage building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

EA-0820: Construction of Mixed Waste Storage RCRA Facilities, Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Construction of Mixed Waste Storage RCRA Facilities, 0: Construction of Mixed Waste Storage RCRA Facilities, Buildings 7668 and 7669, Oak Ridge, Tennessee EA-0820: Construction of Mixed Waste Storage RCRA Facilities, Buildings 7668 and 7669, Oak Ridge, Tennessee SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate two mixed (both radioactive and hazardous) waste storage facilities (Buildings 7668 and 7669) in accordance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requirements. Site preparation and construction activities would take place at the U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 16, 1994 EA-0820: Finding of No Significant Impact

2

Alternative design concept for the second Glass Waste Storage Building  

SciTech Connect

This document presents an alternative design concept for storing canisters filled with vitrified waste produced at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The existing Glass Waste Storage Building (GWSB1) has the capacity to store 2,262 canisters and is projected to be completely filled by the year 2000. Current plans for glass waste storage are based on constructing a second Glass Waste Storage Building (GWSB2) once the existing Glass Waste Storage Building (GWSB1) is filled to capacity. The GWSB2 project (Project S-2045) is to provide additional storage capacity for 2,262 canisters. This project was initiated with the issue of a basic data report on March 6, 1989. In response to the basic data report Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) prepared a draft conceptual design report (CDR) for the GWSB2 project in April 1991. In May 1991 WSRC Systems Engineering issued a revised Functional Design Criteria (FDC), the Rev. I document has not yet been approved by DOE. This document proposes an alternative design for the conceptual design (CDR) completed in April 1991. In June 1992 Project Management Department authorized Systems Engineering to further develop the proposed alternative design. The proposed facility will have a storage capacity for 2,268 canisters and will meet DWPF interim storage requirements for a five-year period. This document contains: a description of the proposed facility; a cost estimate of the proposed design; a cost comparison between the proposed facility and the design outlined in the FDC/CDR; and an overall assessment of the alternative design as compared with the reference FDC/CDR design.

Rainisch, R.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Warehouse and Storage Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Warehouse and Storage Warehouse and Storage Characteristics by Activity... Warehouse and Storage Warehouse and storage buildings are those used to store goods, manufactured products, merchandise, raw materials, or personal belongings. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Warehouse and Storage Buildings... While the idea of a warehouse may bring to mind a large building, in reality most warehouses were relatively small. Forty-four percent were between 1,001 and 5,000 square feet, and seventy percent were less than 10,000 square feet. Many warehouses were newer buildings. Twenty-five percent were built in the 1990s and almost fifty percent were constructed since 1980. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics

4

Radioactive waste storage issues  

SciTech Connect

In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state`s boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected.

Kunz, D.E.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

5

EA-0820: Construction of Mixed Waste Storage RCRA Facilities...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

waste storage facilities (Buildings 7668 and 7669) in accordance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requirements. Site preparation and construction activities would...

6

The necessity for permanence : making a nuclear waste storage facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy is proposing to build a nuclear waste storage facility in southern Nevada. This facility will be designed to last 10,000 years. It must prevent the waste from contaminating the ...

Stupay, Robert Irving

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

EA-1146: Radioactive Waste Storage at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

46: Radioactive Waste Storage at Rocky Flats Environmental 46: Radioactive Waste Storage at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado EA-1146: Radioactive Waste Storage at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to convert buildings at the U.S. Department of Energy Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site from their former uses to interim waste storage facilities in order to increase storage capacity for low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, transuranic waste, and transuranic mixed waste. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 9, 1996 EA-1146: Finding of No Significant Impact Radioactive Waste Storage at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado

8

Waste canister for storage of nuclear wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A waste canister for storage of nuclear wastes in the form of a solidified glass includes fins supported from the center with the tips of the fins spaced away from the wall to conduct heat away from the center without producing unacceptable hot spots in the canister wall.

Duffy, James B. (Fullerton, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Decision analysis for INEL hazardous waste storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In mid-November 1993, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Waste Reduction Operations Complex (WROC) Manager requested that the INEL Hazardous Waste Type Manager perform a decision analysis to determine whether or not a new Hazardous Waste Storage Facility (HWSF) was needed to store INEL hazardous waste (HW). In response to this request, a team was formed to perform a decision analysis for recommending the best configuration for storage of INEL HW. Personnel who participated in the decision analysis are listed in Appendix B. The results of the analysis indicate that the existing HWSF is not the best configuration for storage of INEL HW. The analysis detailed in Appendix C concludes that the best HW storage configuration would be to modify and use a portion of the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) Waste Storage Building (WWSB), PBF-623 (Alternative 3). This facility was constructed in 1991 to serve as a waste staging facility for WERF incineration. The modifications include an extension of the current Room 105 across the south end of the WWSB and installing heating, ventilation, and bay curbing, which would provide approximately 1,600 ft{sup 2} of isolated HW storage area. Negotiations with the State to discuss aisle space requirements along with modifications to WWSB operating procedures are also necessary. The process to begin utilizing the WWSB for HW storage includes planned closure of the HWSF, modification to the WWSB, and relocation of the HW inventory. The cost to modify the WWSB can be funded by a reallocation of funding currently identified to correct HWSF deficiencies.

Page, L.A.; Roach, J.A.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities  

SciTech Connect

This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 612 (A612) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities (DSA) (LLNL 2006). The analysis presented therein determined that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., drum crushing, size reduction, and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are located in two portions of the LLNL main site. A612 is located in the southeast quadrant of LLNL. The A612 fenceline is approximately 220 m west of Greenville Road. The DWTF Storage Area, which includes Building 693 (B693), Building 696 Radioactive Waste Storage Area (B696R), and associated yard areas and storage areas within the yard, is located in the northeast quadrant of LLNL in the DWTF complex. The DWTF Storage Area fenceline is approximately 90 m west of Greenville Road. A612 and the DWTF Storage Area are subdivided into various facilities and storage areas, consisting of buildings, tents, other structures, and open areas as described in Chapter 2 of the DSA. Section 2.4 of the DSA provides an overview of the buildings, structures, and areas in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, including construction details such as basic floor plans, equipment layout, construction materials, controlling dimensions, and dimensions significant to the hazard and accident analysis. Chapter 5 of the DSA documents the derivation of the TSRs and develops the operational limits that protect the safety envelope defined for the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. This TSR document is applicable to the handling, storage, and treatment of hazardous waste, TRU WASTE, LLW, mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste received or generated in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Section 5, Administrative Controls, contains those Administrative Controls necessary to ensure safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Programmatic Administrative Controls are in Section 5.6. This Introduction to the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES TSRs is not part of the TSR limits or conditions and contains no requirements related to WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES operations or to the safety analyses of the DSA.

Larson, H L

2007-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

11

Preparing Class B and C Waste for Long Term Storage  

SciTech Connect

Commercial Nuclear Generating Stations outside of the Atlantic Compact will lose access to the Barnwell Disposal Facility in July of 2008. Many generators have constructed Interim On-Site Storage Buildings (IOSB) in which to store class B and C waste in the future as other permanent disposal options are developed. Until such time it is important for these generators to ensure class B and C waste generation is minimized and waste generated is packaged to facilitate long term storage. (authors)

Snyder, M.W. [Sacramento Municipal Utility District - Rancho Seco (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities  

SciTech Connect

This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities (DSA) (LLNL 2009). The analysis presented therein determined that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., size reduction and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are located in two portions of the LLNL main site. A625 is located in the southeast quadrant of LLNL. The A625 fenceline is approximately 225 m west of Greenville Road. The DWTF Storage Area, which includes Building 693 (B693), Building 696 Radioactive Waste Storage Area (B696R), and associated yard areas and storage areas within the yard, is located in the northeast quadrant of LLNL in the DWTF complex. The DWTF Storage Area fenceline is approximately 90 m west of Greenville Road. A625 and the DWTF Storage Area are subdivided into various facilities and storage areas, consisting of buildings, tents, other structures, and open areas as described in Chapter 2 of the DSA. Section 2.4 of the DSA provides an overview of the buildings, structures, and areas in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, including construction details such as basic floor plans, equipment layout, construction materials, controlling dimensions, and dimensions significant to the hazard and accident analysis. Chapter 5 of the DSA documents the derivation of the TSRs and develops the operational limits that protect the safety envelope defined for the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. This TSR document is applicable to the handling, storage, and treatment of hazardous waste, TRU WASTE, LLW, mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste received or generated in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Section 5, Administrative Controls, contains those Administrative Controls necessary to ensure safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Programmatic Administrative Controls are in Section 5.4.

Laycak, D T

2010-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

13

Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities  

SciTech Connect

This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the 'Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities' (DSA) (LLNL 2008). The analysis presented therein determined that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., size reduction and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are located in two portions of the LLNL main site. A625 is located in the southeast quadrant of LLNL. The A625 fenceline is approximately 225 m west of Greenville Road. The DWTF Storage Area, which includes Building 693 (B693), Building 696 Radioactive Waste Storage Area (B696R), and associated yard areas and storage areas within the yard, is located in the northeast quadrant of LLNL in the DWTF complex. The DWTF Storage Area fenceline is approximately 90 m west of Greenville Road. A625 and the DWTF Storage Area are subdivided into various facilities and storage areas, consisting of buildings, tents, other structures, and open areas as described in Chapter 2 of the DSA. Section 2.4 of the DSA provides an overview of the buildings, structures, and areas in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, including construction details such as basic floor plans, equipment layout, construction materials, controlling dimensions, and dimensions significant to the hazard and accident analysis. Chapter 5 of the DSA documents the derivation of the TSRs and develops the operational limits that protect the safety envelope defined for the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. This TSR document is applicable to the handling, storage, and treatment of hazardous waste, TRU WASTE, LLW, mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste received or generated in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Section 5, Administrative Controls, contains those Administrative Controls necessary to ensure safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Programmatic Administrative Controls are in Section 5.6.

Laycak, D T

2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

14

Environmental Degradation of Nuclear Waste Storage Canister ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The interaction between mild steel nuclear waste storage containers ... Durable and Highly Efficient Energy-harvesting Electrochromic Window ...

15

Model Predictive Control of Thermal Energy Storage in Building...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Model Predictive Control of Thermal Energy Storage in Building Cooling Systems Title Model Predictive Control of Thermal Energy Storage in Building Cooling Systems Publication Type...

16

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Commercial Building Thermal Energy _Storage in ASEANGas Electric Company, "Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling,"LBL--25393 DE91 ,THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR COOLING OF

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building Thermal Energy _Storage in ASEAN Countries,"Company, "Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling," Seminar25393 DE91 ,THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR COOLING OF COMMERCIAL

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

EA-1146: Radioactive Waste Storage at Rocky Flats Environmental...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

46: Radioactive Waste Storage at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado EA-1146: Radioactive Waste Storage at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site,...

19

Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities Project Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility  

SciTech Connect

This feasibility study report presents a draft design of the Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility (VWISF), which is one of three subprojects of the Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities (IWVF) project. The primary goal of the IWVF project is to design and construct a treatment process system that will vitrify the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) to a final waste form. The project will consist of three subprojects that include the Waste Collection Tanks Facility, the Waste Vitrification Facility (WVF), and the VWISF. The Waste Collection Tanks Facility will provide for waste collection, feed mixing, and surge storage for SBW and newly generated liquid waste from ongoing operations at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The WVF will contain the vitrification process that will mix the waste with glass-forming chemicals or frit and turn the waste into glass. The VWISF will provide a shielded storage facility for the glass until the waste can be disposed at either the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as mixed transuranic waste or at the future national geological repository as high-level waste glass, pending the outcome of a Waste Incidental to Reprocessing determination, which is currently in progress. A secondary goal is to provide a facility that can be easily modified later to accommodate storage of the vitrified high-level waste calcine. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of the VWISF, which would be constructed in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local laws. This project supports the Department of Energy’s Environmental Management missions of safely storing and treating radioactive wastes as well as meeting Federal Facility Compliance commitments made to the State of Idaho.

Bonnema, Bruce Edward

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

PUREX storage tunnels waste analysis plan  

SciTech Connect

Washington Administrative Code 173-303-300 requires that a facility develop and follow a written waste analysis plan which describes the procedures that will be followed to ensure that its dangerous waste is managed properly. This document covers the activities at the PUREX Storage Tunnels used to characterize and designate waste that is generated within the PUREX Plant, as well as waste received from other on-site sources.

Haas, C.R., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste storage building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Permitting plan for the high-level waste interim storage  

SciTech Connect

This document addresses the environmental permitting requirements for the transportation and interim storage of solidified high-level waste (HLW) produced during Phase 1 of the Hanford Site privatization effort. Solidified HLW consists of canisters containing vitrified HLW (glass) and containers that hold cesium separated during low-level waste pretreatment. The glass canisters and cesium containers will be transported to the Canister Storage Building (CSB) in a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-provided transportation cask via diesel-powered tractor trailer. Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) Milestone M-90 establishes a new major milestone, and associated interim milestones and target dates, governing acquisition and/or modification of facilities necessary for: (1) interim storage of Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) immobilized HLW (IHLW) and other canistered high-level waste forms; and (2) interim storage and disposal of TWRS immobilized low-activity tank waste (ILAW). An environmental requirements checklist and narrative was developed to identify the permitting path forward for the HLW interim storage (HLWIS) project (See Appendix B). This permitting plan will follow the permitting logic developed in that checklist.

Deffenbaugh, M.L.

1997-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

22

Environmental assessment, finding of no significant impact, and response to comments. Radioactive waste storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (the Site), formerly known as the Rocky Flats Plant, has generated radioactive, hazardous, and mixed waste (waste with both radioactive and hazardous constituents) since it began operations in 1952. Such wastes were the byproducts of the Site`s original mission to produce nuclear weapons components. Since 1989, when weapons component production ceased, waste has been generated as a result of the Site`s new mission of environmental restoration and deactivation, decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of buildings. It is anticipated that the existing onsite waste storage capacity, which meets the criteria for low-level waste (LL), low-level mixed waste (LLM), transuranic (TRU) waste, and TRU mixed waste (TRUM) would be completely filled in early 1997. At that time, either waste generating activities must cease, waste must be shipped offsite, or new waste storage capacity must be developed.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Tennessee Department Of Environment and Conservation The Solid Waste Disposal Laws and Regulations are found in Tenn. Code 68-211. These rules are enforced and subject to change by the Public Waste Board (PWB), which is established by the Division of Solid and Hazardous

24

WASTE HANDLING BUILDING ELECTRICAL SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Handling Building Electrical System performs the function of receiving, distributing, transforming, monitoring, and controlling AC and DC power to all waste handling building electrical loads. The system distributes normal electrical power to support all loads that are within the Waste Handling Building (WHB). The system also generates and distributes emergency power to support designated emergency loads within the WHB within specified time limits. The system provides the capability to transfer between normal and emergency power. The system provides emergency power via independent and physically separated distribution feeds from the normal supply. The designated emergency electrical equipment will be designed to operate during and after design basis events (DBEs). The system also provides lighting, grounding, and lightning protection for the Waste Handling Building. The system is located in the Waste Handling Building System. The system consists of a diesel generator, power distribution cables, transformers, switch gear, motor controllers, power panel boards, lighting panel boards, lighting equipment, lightning protection equipment, control cabling, and grounding system. Emergency power is generated with a diesel generator located in a QL-2 structure and connected to the QL-2 bus. The Waste Handling Building Electrical System distributes and controls primary power to acceptable industry standards, and with a dependability compatible with waste handling building reliability objectives for non-safety electrical loads. It also generates and distributes emergency power to the designated emergency loads. The Waste Handling Building Electrical System receives power from the Site Electrical Power System. The primary material handling power interfaces include the Carrier/Cask Handling System, Canister Transfer System, Assembly Transfer System, Waste Package Remediation System, and Disposal Container Handling Systems. The system interfaces with the MGR Operations Monitoring and Control System for supervisory monitoring and control signals. The system interfaces with all facility support loads such as heating, ventilation, and air conditioning, office, fire protection, monitoring and control, safeguards and security, and communications subsystems.

S.C. Khamamkar

2000-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

25

Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis.

Burgard, K.C.

1998-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

26

Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis.

Burgard, K.C.

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

27

WASTE TREATMENT BUILDING VENTILATION SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Treatment Building Ventilation System provides heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) for the contaminated, potentially contaminated, and uncontaminated areas of the Monitored Geologic Repository's (MGR) Waste Treatment Building (WTB). In the uncontaminated areas, the non-confinement area ventilation system maintains the proper environmental conditions for equipment operation and personnel comfort. In the contaminated and potentially contaminated areas, in addition to maintaining the proper environmental conditions for personnel comfort and equipment operation, the contamination confinement area ventilation system directs potentially contaminated air away from personnel in the WTB and confines the contamination within high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration units. The contamination confinement area ventilation system creates airflow paths and pressure zones to minimize the potential for spreading contamination with the building. The contamination confinement ventilation system also protects the environment and the public by limiting airborne releases of radioactive or other hazardous contaminants from the WTB. The Waste Treatment Building Ventilation System confines the radioactive and hazardous material within the building such that the release rates comply with regulatory limits, The system design, operations, and maintenance activities incorporate ALARA (as low as is reasonably achievable) principles to maintain personnel radiation doses to all occupational workers below regulatory limits and as low as is reasonably achievable. The system provides status of important system parameters and equipment operation, and provides audible and/or visual indication of off-normal conditions and equipment failures. The Waste Treatment Building Ventilation System interfaces with the Waste Treatment Building System by being located in the WTB, and by maintaining specific pressure, temperature, and humidity environments within the building. The system also depends on the WTB for normal electric power supply and the required supply of water for heating, cooling, and humidification. Interface with the Waste Treatment Building System includes the WTB fire protection subsystem for detection of fire and smoke. The Waste Treatment Building Ventilation System interfaces with the Site Radiological Monitoring System for continuous monitoring of the exhaust air and key areas within the WTB, the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System for monitoring and control of system operations, and the Site Generated Radiological Waste Handling System and Site Generated Hazardous, Non-Hazardous & Sanitary Waste Disposal System for routing of pretreated toxic, corrosive, and radiologically contaminated effluent from process equipment to the HEPA filter exhaust ductwork and air-cleaning unit.

P.A. Kumar

2000-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

28

WASTE HANDLING BUILDING VENTILATION SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Handling Building Ventilation System provides heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) for the contaminated, potentially contaminated, and uncontaminated areas of the Monitored Geologic Repository's (MGR) Waste Handling Building (WHB). In the uncontaminated areas, the non-confinement area ventilation system maintains the proper environmental conditions for equipment operation and personnel comfort. In the contaminated and potentially contaminated areas, in addition to maintaining the proper environmental conditions for equipment operation and personnel comfort, the contamination confinement area ventilation system directs potentially contaminated air away from personnel in the WHB and confines the contamination within high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration units. The contamination confinement areas ventilation system creates airflow paths and pressure zones to minimize the potential for spreading contamination within the building. The contamination confinement ventilation system also protects the environment and the public by limiting airborne releases of radioactive or other hazardous contaminants from the WHB. The Waste Handling Building Ventilation System is designed to perform its safety functions under accident conditions and other Design Basis Events (DBEs) (such as earthquakes, tornadoes, fires, and loss of the primary electric power). Additional system design features (such as compartmentalization with independent subsystems) limit the potential for cross-contamination within the WHB. The system provides status of important system parameters and equipment operation, and provides audible and/or visual indication of off-normal conditions and equipment failures. The Waste Handling Building Ventilation System confines the radioactive and hazardous material within the building such that the release rates comply with regulatory limits. The system design, operations, and maintenance activities incorporate ALARA (as low as is reasonably achievable) principles to maintain personnel radiation doses to all occupational workers below regulatory limits and as low as is reasonably achievable. The Waste Handling Building Ventilation System interfaces with the Waste Handling Building System by being located within the WHB and by maintaining specific pressures, temperatures, and humidity within the building. The system also depends on the WHB for water supply. The system interfaces with the Site Radiological Monitoring System for continuous monitoring of the exhaust air; the Waste Handling Building Fire Protection System for detection of fire and smoke; the Waste Handling Building Electrical System for normal, emergency, and standby power; and the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System for monitoring and control of the system.

P.A. Kumar

2000-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

29

The Role of Energy Storage in Commercial Building  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Motivation and Background of Study This project was motivated by the need to understand the full value of energy storage (thermal and electric energy storage) in commercial buildings, the opportunity of benefits for building operations and the potential interactions between a building and a smart grid infrastructure. On-site or local energy storage systems are not new to the commercial building sector; they have been in place in US buildings for decades. Most building-scale storage technologies are based on thermal or electrochemical storage mechanisms. Energy storage technologies are not designed to conserve energy, and losses associated with energy conversion are inevitable. Instead, storage provides flexibility to manage load in a building or to balance load and generation in the power grid. From the building owner's perspective, storage enables load shifting to optimize energy costs while maintaining comfort. From a grid operations perspective, building storage at scale could provide additional flexibility to grid operators in managing the generation variability from intermittent renewable energy resources (wind and solar). To characterize the set of benefits, technical opportunities and challenges, and potential economic values of storage in a commercial building from both the building operation's and the grid operation's view-points is the key point of this project. The research effort was initiated in early 2010 involving Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to quantify these opportunities from a commercial buildings perspective. This report summarizes the early discussions, literature reviews, stakeholder engagements, and initial results of analyses related to the overall role of energy storage in commercial buildings. Beyond the summary of roughly eight months of effort by the laboratories, the report attempts to substantiate the importance of active DOE/BTP R&D activities in this space.

Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Subbarao, Krishnappa; Prakash Kumar, Nirupama; Bandyopadhyay, Gopal K.; Finley, C.; Koritarov, V. S.; Molburg, J. C.; Wang, J.; Zhao, Fuli; Brackney, L.; Florita, A. R.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

30

Report of Survey of Oak Ridge Building 3597 Hot Storage Garden | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building 3597 Hot Storage Garden Building 3597 Hot Storage Garden Report of Survey of Oak Ridge Building 3597 Hot Storage Garden The purpose of this document is to report the results of a survey conducted at the Hot Storage Garden facility (identified as "Building" 3597) on the Y-12 Plant property at the Oak Ridge Site. The survey was conducted during the week of 11/15/99. The primary purpose of the survey is to identify facility conditions and to define the characterization, stabilization, and material/waste/equipment removal (if any) requirements that need to be met to transfer responsibility for the facility from the Office of Science (SC) to the Office of Environmental Management (EM). Additionally, estimated post stabilization surveillance and maintenance (S&M) activities and costs are

31

Report of Survey of Oak Ridge Building 3597 Hot Storage Garden | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building 3597 Hot Storage Garden Building 3597 Hot Storage Garden Report of Survey of Oak Ridge Building 3597 Hot Storage Garden The purpose of this document is to report the results of a survey conducted at the Hot Storage Garden facility (identified as "Building" 3597) on the Y-12 Plant property at the Oak Ridge Site. The survey was conducted during the week of 11/15/99. The primary purpose of the survey is to identify facility conditions and to define the characterization, stabilization, and material/waste/equipment removal (if any) requirements that need to be met to transfer responsibility for the facility from the Office of Science (SC) to the Office of Environmental Management (EM). Additionally, estimated post stabilization surveillance and maintenance (S&M) activities and costs are

32

Method for storage of solid waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Metal canisters for long-term storage of calcined highlevel radioactive wastes can be made self-sealing against a breach in the canister wall by the addition of powdered cement to the canister with the calcine before it is sealed for storage. Any breach in the canister wall will permit entry of water which will mix with the cement and harden to form a concrete patch, thus sealing the opening in the wall of the canister and preventing the release of radioactive material to the cooling water or atmosphere.

Mecham, William J. (La Grange, IL)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility, January 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 11, 2011 February 11, 2011 Site Visit Report Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility, January 2011 INTRODUCTION This report documents the results of a review conducted by the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) of the Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility (WESF) documented safety analysis (DSA) at the Hanford Site. During discussions with the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (DOE- RL), the review of WESF was jointly selected by HSS and DOE-RL based on the high hazards of the facility and the need to periodically evaluate the facility and DSA by independent reviewers. SCOPE The scope of the review was to evaluate the WESF safety and support systems in detecting, preventing and mitigating analyzed events as described in the facility's DSA, PRC-EDC-10-45190, 2010, Executive

34

Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility, January 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 11, 2011 February 11, 2011 Site Visit Report Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility, January 2011 INTRODUCTION This report documents the results of a review conducted by the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) of the Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility (WESF) documented safety analysis (DSA) at the Hanford Site. During discussions with the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (DOE- RL), the review of WESF was jointly selected by HSS and DOE-RL based on the high hazards of the facility and the need to periodically evaluate the facility and DSA by independent reviewers. SCOPE The scope of the review was to evaluate the WESF safety and support systems in detecting, preventing and mitigating analyzed events as described in the facility's DSA, PRC-EDC-10-45190, 2010, Executive

35

Canister Storage Building (CSB) Design Basis Accident Analysis Documentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provided the detailed accident analysis to support HNF-3553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report, Annex A, ''Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report''. All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.

CROWE, R.D.; PIEPHO, M.G.

2000-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

36

324 Building Compliance Project: Selection and evaluation of alternatives for the removal of solid remote-handled mixed wastes from the 324 Building  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Six alternatives for the interim storage of remote-handled mixed wastes from the 324 Building on the Hanford Site have been identified and evaluated. The alternatives focus on the interim storage facility and include use of existing facilities in the 200 Area, the construction of new facilities, and the vitrification of the wastes within the 324 Building to remove the majority of the wastes from under RCRA regulations. The six alternatives are summarized in Table S.1, which identifies the primary facilities to be utilized, the anticipated schedule for removal of the wastes, the costs of the transfer from 324 Building to the interim storage facility (including any capital costs), and an initial risk comparison of the alternatives. A recently negotiated Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) change requires the last of the mixed wastes to be removed by May 1999. The ability to use an existing facility reduces the costs since it eliminates the need for new capital construction. The basic regulatory approvals for the storage of mixed wastes are in place for the PUREX facility, but the Form HI permit will need some minor modifications since the 324 Building wastes have some additional characteristic waste codes and the current permit limits storage of wastes to those from the facility itself. Regulatory reviews have indicated that it will be best to use the tunnels to store the wastes. The PUREX alternatives will only provide storage for about 65% of the wastes. This results from the current schedule of the B-Cell Clean Out Project, which projects that dispersible debris will continue to be collected in small quantities until the year 2000. The remaining fraction of the wastes will then be stored in another facility. Central Waste Complex (CWC) is currently proposed for that residual waste storage; however, other options may also be available.

Ross, W.A.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Dukelow, J.S. Jr. [and others

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities March 2010  

SciTech Connect

This Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) for the Waste Storage Facilities was developed in accordance with 10 CFR 830, Subpart B, 'Safety Basis Requirements,' and utilizes the methodology outlined in DOE-STD-3009-94, Change Notice 3. The Waste Storage Facilities consist of Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area portion of the DWTF complex. These two areas are combined into a single DSA, as their functions as storage for radioactive and hazardous waste are essentially identical. The B695 Segment of DWTF is addressed under a separate DSA. This DSA provides a description of the Waste Storage Facilities and the operations conducted therein; identification of hazards; analyses of the hazards, including inventories, bounding releases, consequences, and conclusions; and programmatic elements that describe the current capacity for safe operations. The mission of the Waste Storage Facilities is to safely handle, store, and treat hazardous waste, transuranic (TRU) waste, low-level waste (LLW), mixed waste, combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL (as well as small amounts from other DOE facilities).

Laycak, D T

2010-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

38

Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This documented safety analysis (DSA) for the Waste Storage Facilities was developed in accordance with 10 CFR 830, Subpart B, 'Safety Basis Requirements', and utilizes the methodology outlined in DOE-STD-3009-94, Change Notice 3. The Waste Storage Facilities consist of Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area portion of the DWTF complex. These two areas are combined into a single DSA, as their functions as storage for radioactive and hazardous waste are essentially identical. The B695 Segment of DWTF is addressed under a separate DSA. This DSA provides a description of the Waste Storage Facilities and the operations conducted therein; identification of hazards; analyses of the hazards, including inventories, bounding releases, consequences, and conclusions; and programmatic elements that describe the current capacity for safe operations. The mission of the Waste Storage Facilities is to safely handle, store, and treat hazardous waste, transuranic (TRU) waste, low-level waste (LLW), mixed waste, combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL (as well as small amounts from other DOE facilities).

Laycak, D

2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

39

Clean Cities: Waste-to-Wheels: Building for Success Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Events Events Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Clean Cities: Waste-to-Wheels: Building for Success Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Waste-to-Wheels: Building for Success Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Waste-to-Wheels: Building for Success Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Waste-to-Wheels: Building for Success Workshop on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Waste-to-Wheels: Building for Success Workshop on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Waste-to-Wheels: Building for Success Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Waste-to-Wheels: Building for Success Workshop on AddThis.com... Conferences & Workshops Clean Cities 20th Anniversary Electric Vehicle Community Readiness Stakeholder Summit Waste-to-Wheels

40

EA-0874: Low-level Waste Drum Staging Building at Weapons Engineering  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

74: Low-level Waste Drum Staging Building at Weapons 74: Low-level Waste Drum Staging Building at Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility, TA-16 Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico EA-0874: Low-level Waste Drum Staging Building at Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility, TA-16 Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to place a 3 meter (m) by 4.5 m prefabricated storage building (transportainer) adjacent to the existing Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility at Technical Area 16, U.S. Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos, New Mexico, and to use the building as a staging site for sealed 55-gallon drums of noncompactible waste contaminated with low levels of tritium. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste storage building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Storage and disposal of radioactive waste as glass in canisters  

SciTech Connect

A review of the use of waste glass for the immobilization of high-level radioactive waste glass is presented. Typical properties of the canisters used to contain the glass, and the waste glass, are described. Those properties are used to project the stability of canisterized waste glass through interim storage, transportation, and geologic disposal.

Mendel, J.E.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

324 Building special-case waste assessment in support of the 324 Building closure (TPA milestone M-89-05)  

SciTech Connect

Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-89-05 requires US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office to complete a 324 Building Special Case Waste Assessment in Support of the 324 Building Closure. This document has been prepared with the intent of meeting this regulatory commitment. Alternatives for the Special Case Wastes located in the 324 Building were defined and analyzed. Based on the criteria of safety, environmental, complexity of interfaces, risk, cost, schedule, and long-term operability and maintainability, the best alternative was chosen. Waste packaging and transportation options are also included in the recommendations. The waste disposition recommendations for the B-Cell dispersibles/tank heels and High-Level Vault packaged residuals are to direct them to the Plutonium Uranium Extraction Facility (PUREX) Number 2 storage tunnel.

Hobart, R.L.

1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

43

Mixed waste removal from a hazardous waste storage tank  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spent fuel transfer canal at the Oak Ridge Graphite Reactor was found to be leaking 400 gallons of water per day into the surrounding soil. Sampling of the sediment layer on the floor of the canal to determine the environmental impact of the leak identified significant radiological contamination and elevated levels of cadmium and lead which are hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Under RCRA regulations and Rules of Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, the canal was considered a hazardous waste storage tank. This paper describes elements of the radiological control program established in support of a fast-track RCRA closure plan that involved underwater mapping of the radiation fields, vacuuming, and ultra-filtration techniques that were successfully used to remove the mixed waste sediments and close the canal in a method compliant with state and federal regulations.

Geber, K.R.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According to the Load Profile. $1 is the daily coolingload,c) illus- trates a design load profile for a partial storageDay Design Day Hourly Load Profile for a Building with a

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Mixed Waste Storage and Treatment: Regulatory Compliance Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The management and storage of mixed wastes represents one of the most challenging regulatory issues currently facing NRC licensees. This report provides instructions and guidance regarding the on-site storage and treatment of mixed waste in compliance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

46

Integrated Building Energy Systems Design Considering Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the fact that the off-peak power plant might be coal and substitute "clean" on- peak natural gas plants@lbl.gov Keywords Combined heat and power, CO2 emissions, demand response, electric storage, energy efficiency, heat storage, micro-generation systems, photovoltaic, software, solar thermal systems Abstract The addition

47

Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

complexity of the DER interactions at buildings also show that a reduction in stationary battery costs increases the local PV adoption, but can also increase the fossil based...

48

An Underwater Robotic Network for Monitoring Nuclear Waste Storage Pools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Underwater Robotic Network for Monitoring Nuclear Waste Storage Pools Sarfraz Nawaz1 , Muzammil must be stored for around 60 years in underwater storage pools before permanent disposal. These underwater storage environments must be carefully monitored and controlled to avoid an environmental

Jeavons, Peter

49

Safety analysis report for the Waste Storage Facility. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

This safety analysis report outlines the safety concerns associated with the Waste Storage Facility located in the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The three main objectives of the report are: define and document a safety basis for the Waste Storage Facility activities; demonstrate how the activities will be carried out to adequately protect the workers, public, and environment; and provide a basis for review and acceptance of the identified risk that the managers, operators, and owners will assume.

Bengston, S.J.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Advanced building skins : translucent thermal storage elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advances in the material sciences continue to provide designers with a wealth of new materials that challenge preconceived notions of the building envelope and its performance. These new technologies can be used to create ...

Kienzl, Nico, 1971-

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Simplified analysis of building thermal storage effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Whatever performance is offered by simulation software, simple performance characterization is very welcome at all stages of a building's life cycle. Building designers, contractors, and operators need such characterization in order to interpret and to judge simulation as well as measurement results. It is common knowledge that most of building perturbations are not sinusoidal and not even harmonic. But it is, nevertheless, very convenient to define each time function as the superposition of a time average and a (fictitious) oscillation around this average. This is the old fashion method of performing a manual calculation. The CIBSE admittance procedure was developed on such basis. This paper demonstrates how such very simplified analysis can help in detailed simulation. A practical example is presented, which deals with overheating risk calculation and fan coil sizing for an office building located in Brussels. Detailed simulation results are translated into two very synthetic building characteristics, which appear as very convenient references when having to compare different cooling strategies. Such analysis should also offer better possibilities of comparisons among problems encountered and among solutions selected in different projects.

Lebrun, J.J.; Nusgens, P.J.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Method of preparing nuclear wastes for tansportation and interim storage  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear waste is formed into a substantially water-insoluble solid for temporary storage and transportation by mixing the calcined waste with at least 10 weight percent powdered anhydrous sodium silicate to form a mixture and subjecting the mixture to a high humidity environment for a period of time sufficient to form cementitious bonds by chemical reaction. The method is suitable for preparing an interim waste form from dried high level radioactive wastes.

Bandyopadhyay, Gautam (Naperville, IL); Galvin, Thomas M. (Darien, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Heat storage and distribution inside passive-solar buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Passive-solar buildings are investigated from the viewpoint of the storage of solar heat in materials of the building: walls, floors, ceilings, and furniture. The effects of the location, material, thickness, and orientation of each internal building surface are investigated. The concept of diurnal heat capacity is introduced and a method of using this parameter to estimate clear-day temperature swings is developed. Convective coupling to remote rooms within a building is discussed, including both convection through single doorways and convective loops that may exist involving a sunspace. Design guidelines are given.

Balcomb, J.D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Spent nuclear fuel Canister Storage Building CDR Review Committee report  

SciTech Connect

The Canister Storage Building (CSB) is a subproject under the Spent Nuclear Fuels Major System Acquisition. This subproject is necessary to design and construct a facility capable of providing dry storage of repackaged spent fuels received from K Basins. The CSB project completed a Conceptual Design Report (CDR) implementing current project requirements. A Design Review Committee was established to review the CDR. This document is the final report summarizing that review

Dana, W.P.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Method of encapsulating solid radioactive waste material for storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High-level radioactive wastes are encapsulated in vitreous carbon for long-term storage by mixing the wastes as finely divided solids with a suitable resin, formed into an appropriate shape and cured. The cured resin is carbonized by heating under a vacuum to form vitreous carbon. The vitreous carbon shapes may be further protected for storage by encasement in a canister containing a low melting temperature matrix material such as aluminum to increase impact resistance and improve heat dissipation.

Bunnell, Lee Roy (Kennewick, WA); Bates, J. Lambert (Richland, WA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Waste Containers for Extended Storage of Class A, B and C Wastes, Rev. 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to the potential loss of low-level waste (LLW) disposal capacity for Class B and C Wastes in 2008, EPRI is updating its guidance documents on the interim storage of LLW wastes. This volume provides a comprehensive review of LLW containers and container technologies to help utilities evaluate their options and make selections for extended on-site storage. This revision updates the listings of commercially available containers, adds international containers, and provides minor technical changes...

2003-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

57

Volume 5: Waste Forms for Interim Storage, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the 1990s, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) published a series of guidance reports on Interim On-Site Storage of Low Level Waste due to concern that loss of access to disposal pathways might one day lead to the need for interim on-site storage of low level waste (LLW). With the closure of the Barnwell Disposal Site to out-of-compact waste in 2008, 85% of the industry has, in fact, been faced with the loss of a disposal pathway for their Class B and C LLW, resulting in the reality of on-sit...

2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

58

Interim Storage of Low and Intermediate Level Wastes: Guidelines for Extended Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Domestic utilities are responding to impending changes in low-level waste (LLW) disposal site facility availability by extending their capabilities for interim on-site storage of LLW. International utilities likewise face challenges in implementing complete low and intermediate waste disposal options. Therefore, our members asked EPRI to revise and update our series of documents devoted to on-site interim LLW storage. This report represents the key guidelines document for the series.

2002-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

59

Interim Storage of Greater Than Class C Low Level Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report serves as a guideline for the safe, interim, on-site storage of low level radioactive waste (LLW) that exceeds the activity limitations for near-surface disposal set forth in 10 CFR 61.55. This waste, referred to as greater than Class C (GTCC) waste, exceeds the Class C limits in the referenced regulation. At the present time, there is no licensed disposal facility for GTCC waste in the United States. This situation forces commercial nuclear reactors to store it on site until a disposal facil...

2001-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

60

Risk assessment of CST-7 proposed waste treatment and storage facilities Volume I: Limited-scope probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of proposed CST-7 waste treatment & storage facilities. Volume II: Preliminary hazards analysis of proposed CST-7 waste storage & treatment facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In FY 1993, the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Management Group [CST-7 (formerly EM-7)] requested the Probabilistic Risk and Hazards Analysis Group [TSA-11 (formerly N-6)] to conduct a study of the hazards associated with several CST-7 facilities. Among these facilities are the Hazardous Waste Treatment Facility (HWTF), the HWTF Drum Storage Building (DSB), and the Mixed Waste Receiving and Storage Facility (MWRSF), which are proposed for construction beginning in 1996. These facilities are needed to upgrade the Laboratory`s storage capability for hazardous and mixed wastes and to provide treatment capabilities for wastes in cases where offsite treatment is not available or desirable. These facilities will assist Los Alamos in complying with federal and state requlations.

Sasser, K.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste storage building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Hazards assessment for the Hazardous Waste Storage Facility  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the hazards assessment for the Hazardous Waste Storage Facility (HWSF) located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The hazards assessment was performed to ensure that this facility complies with DOE and company requirements pertaining to emergency planning and preparedness for operational emergencies. The hazards assessment identifies and analyzes hazards that are significant enough to warrant consideration in a facility`s operational emergency management program. The area surrounding HWSF, the buildings and structures at HWSF, and the processes used at HWSF are described in this report. All nonradiological hazardous materials at the HWSF were identified (radiological hazardous materials are not stored at HWSF) and screened against threshold quantities according to DOE Order 5500.3A guidance. Two of the identified hazardous materials exceeded their specified threshold quantity. This report discusses the potential release scenarios and consequences associated with an accidental release for each of the two identified hazardous materials, lead and mercury. Emergency considerations, such as emergency planning zones, emergency classes, protective actions, and emergency action levels, are also discussed based on the analysis of potential consequences. Evaluation of the potential consequences indicated that the highest emergency class for operational emergencies at the HWSF would be a Site Area Emergency.

Knudsen, J.K.; Calley, M.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Evaluation of accident frequencies at the canister storage building  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

By using the fault tree logic, an evaluation of the design basis accident frequencies at the Canister Storage Building has been performed. The evaluation demonstrates that due to low frequency of occurrences, the following design basis accidents are considered not credible (annual frequency of less than 10{sup -6}): Rearrangement of multi-canister overpack (MCO) internals; Gaseous release from the MCO; MCO internal hydrogen explosion; MCO external hydrogen explosion; Thermal runaway reactions inside the MCO; and Violation of design temperature criteria.

LIU, Y.J.

1999-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

63

Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Canister Storage Building Functions and Requirements  

SciTech Connect

In 1998, a major change in the technical strategy for managing Multi Canister Overpacks (MCO) while stored within the Canister Storage Building (CSB) occurred. The technical strategy is documented in Baseline Change Request (BCR) No. SNF-98-006, Simplified SNF Project Baseline (MCO Sealing) (FDH 1998). This BCR deleted the hot conditioning process initially adopted for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNF Project) as documented in WHC-SD-SNF-SP-005, Integrated Process Strategy for K Basins Spent Nuclear Fuel (WHC 199.5). In summary, MCOs containing Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) from K Basins would be placed in interim storage following processing through the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) facility. With this change, the needs for the Hot Conditioning System (HCS) and inerting/pressure retaining capabilities of the CSB storage tubes and the MCO Handling Machine (MHM) were eliminated. Mechanical seals will be used on the MCOs prior to transport to the CSB. Covers will be welded on the MCOs for the final seal at the CSB. Approval of BCR No. SNF-98-006, imposed the need to review and update the CSB functions and requirements baseline documented herein including changing the document title to ''Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Canister Storage Building Functions and Requirements.'' This revision aligns the functions and requirements baseline with the CSB Simplified SNF Project Baseline (MCO Sealing). This document represents the Canister Storage Building (CSB) Subproject technical baseline. It establishes the functions and requirements baseline for the implementation of the CSB Subproject. The document is organized in eight sections. Sections 1.0 Introduction and 2.0 Overview provide brief introductions to the document and the CSB Subproject. Sections 3.0 Functions, 4.0 Requirements, 5.0 Architecture, and 6.0 Interfaces provide the data described by their titles. Section 7.0 Glossary lists the acronyms and defines the terms used in this document. Section 8.0 References lists the references used for this document.

KLEM, M.J.

2000-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

64

Thermal energy storage for cooling of commercial buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The storage of coolness'' has been in use in limited applications for more than a half century. Recently, because of high electricity costs during utilities' peak power periods, thermal storage for cooling has become a prime target for load management strategies. Systems with cool storage shift all or part of the electricity requirement from peak to off-peak hours to take advantage of reduced demand charges and/or off-peak rates. Thermal storage technology applies equally to industrial, commercial, and residential sectors. In the industrial sector, because of the lack of economic incentives and the custom design required for each application, the penetration of this technology has been limited to a few industries. The penetration rate in the residential sector has been also very limited due to the absence of economic incentives, sizing problems, and the lack of compact packaged systems. To date, the most promising applications of these systems, therefore, appear to be for commercial cooling. In this report, the current and potential use of thermal energy storage systems for cooling commercial buildings is investigated. In addition, a general overview of the technology is presented and the applicability and cost-effectiveness of this technology for developed and developing countries are discussed. 28 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Akbari, H. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Mertol, A. (Science Applications International Corp., Los Altos, CA (USA))

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Integrated Building Energy Systems Design Considering Storage Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The addition of storage technologies such as flow batteries, conventional batteries, and heat storage can improve the economic, as well as environmental attraction of micro-generation systems (e.g., PV or fuel cells with or without CHP) and contribute to enhanced demand response. The interactions among PV, solar thermal, and storage systems can be complex, depending on the tariff structure, load profile, etc. In order to examine the impact of storage technologies on demand response and CO2 emissions, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program that can pursue two strategies as its objective function. These two strategies are minimization of its annual energy costs or of its CO2 emissions. The problem is solved for a given test year at representative customer sites, e.g., nursing homes, to obtain not only the optimal investment portfolio, but also the optimal hourly operating schedules for the selected technologies. This paper focuses on analysis of storage technologies in micro-generation optimization on a building level, with example applications in New York State and California. It shows results from a two-year research projectperformed for the U.S. Department of Energy and ongoing work. Contrary to established expectations, our results indicate that PV and electric storage adoption compete rather than supplement each other considering the tariff structure and costs of electricity supply. The work shows that high electricity tariffs during on-peak hours are a significant driver for the adoption of electric storage technologies. To satisfy the site's objective of minimizing energy costs, the batteries have to be charged by grid power during off-peak hours instead of PV during on-peak hours. In contrast, we also show a CO2 minimization strategy where the common assumption that batteries can be charged by PV can be fulfilled at extraordinarily high energy costs for the site.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy; Aki, Hirohisa

2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

66

Computer modeling of forced mixing in waste storage tanks  

SciTech Connect

Numerical simulation results of fluid dynamic and physical processes in radioactive waste storage tanks are presented. Investigations include simulation of jet mixing pump induced flows intended to mix and maintain particulate material uniformly distributed throughout the liquid volume. Physical effects of solids are included in the code. These are particle size through a settling velocity and mixture properties through density and viscosity. Calculations have been accomplished for a centrally located, rotationally-oscillating, horizontally-directed jet mixing pump for two cases. One case is with low jet velocity and high settling velocity. It results in nonuniform distribution. The other case is with high jet velocity and low settling velocity. It results in uniform conditions. Results are being used to aid in experiment design and to understand mixing in the waste tanks. These results are to be used in conjunction with scaled experiments to define limits of pump operation to maintain uniformity of the mixture in the storage tanks during waste retrieval operations.

Eyler, L.L.; Michener, T.E.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Radiogenic gas accumulation in TRU waste storage drums  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A field experiment was conducted over a four-year time span to determine the effect of high-activity transuranic (TRU) waste on the atmosphere within TRU waste storage drums typical of those generated in Savannah River Plant operation. Routine gas composition analyses showed that a significant amount of hydrogen can accumulate in drums that contain high alpha activity, and that flammable gas mixtures could form in such drums in spite of the radiolytic consumption of oxygen. According to this study, gas pressure accumulation does not pose a threat to the integrity of the TRU waste containers that are now being stored at the Savannah River Plant. Therefore, the 20-year storage criterion is still viable. However, the continued avoidance of a perfectly gas-tight drum seal (e.g., epoxy, metal welding) is recommended. The test drums will continue to be monitored.

Ryan, J.P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Degradation of transuranic waste drums in underground storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford site is one of several U.S. Department of Energy locations that has transuranic radioactive Waste in storage, resulting from nuclear weapons material production. Transuranic waste has extremely long-lived radionuclides requiring great care in management; such waste is slated for eventual disposal in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. Most of this waste is stored in 208-{ell} (55-gal) drums below ground. At the Hanford site 37 641 drums are stored in several trenches. The drums were stacked up to five high with plywood sheeting between the layers and on top of the stacks. Plastic tarps were used to cover the drums and the plywood, with several feet of earth backfilled on top of the plastic. A fraction of the drums ({approximately}20%) were covered only with earth, not with plywood and plastic. The drums are either painted low-carbon steel or galvanized low-carbon steel. They have been placed in storage from 1970 to 1988, resulting in between 7 and 25 yr of storage. The environment is either soil or air atmosphere. The air atmosphere environment also includes, for some drum surfaces, contact with the underside of the tarp. The temperature of the air atmosphere is relatively uniform. Year-round measurements have not been taken, but available data suggest that the temperature span should be from {approximately} 10 to 30{degrees}C (50 to 86{degrees}F). Humidity in underground storage module mock-ups has been measured at nearly 90% during testing in the summer months. Subsequent tests have shown that the humidity probably drops to 50 to 60% during other seasons. This report describes results of a project to inspect the condition of the waste drums.

Duncan, D.; DeRosa, D.C.; Demiter, J.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland, WA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

69

Lessons Learned from Radioactive Waste Storage and Disposal Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The safety of radioactive waste disposal facilities and the decommissioning of complex sites may be predicated on the performance of engineered and natural barriers. For assessing the safety of a waste disposal facility or a decommissioned site, a performance assessment or similar analysis is often completed. The analysis is typically based on a site conceptual model that is developed from site characterization information, observations, and, in many cases, expert judgment. Because waste disposal facilities are sited, constructed, monitored, and maintained, a fair amount of data has been generated at a variety of sites in a variety of natural systems. This paper provides select examples of lessons learned from the observations developed from the monitoring of various radioactive waste facilities (storage and disposal), and discusses the implications for modeling of future waste disposal facilities that are yet to be constructed or for the development of dose assessments for the release of decommissioning sites. Monitoring has been and continues to be performed at a variety of different facilities for the disposal of radioactive waste. These include facilities for the disposal of commercial low-level waste (LLW), reprocessing wastes, and uranium mill tailings. Many of the lessons learned and problems encountered provide a unique opportunity to improve future designs of waste disposal facilities, to improve dose modeling for decommissioning sites, and to be proactive in identifying future problems. Typically, an initial conceptual model was developed and the siting and design of the disposal facility was based on the conceptual model. After facility construction and operation, monitoring data was collected and evaluated. In many cases the monitoring data did not comport with the original site conceptual model, leading to additional investigation and changes to the site conceptual model and modifications to the design of the facility. The following cases are discussed: commercial LLW disposal facilities; uranium mill tailings disposal facilities; and reprocessing waste storage and disposal facilities. The observations developed from the monitoring and maintenance of waste disposal and storage facilities provide valuable lessons learned for the design and modeling of future waste disposal facilities and the decommissioning of complex sites.

Esh, David W.; Bradford, Anna H. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Two White Flint North, MS T7J8, 11545 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

70

Hydrogen Trailer Storage Facility (Building 878). Consequence analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Order 5500.3A requires facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This consequence analysis documents the impact that a hydrogen accident could have to employees, the general public, and nearby facilities. The computer model ARCHIE was utilized to determine discharge rates, toxic vapor dispersion analyses, flammable vapor cloud hazards, explosion hazards, and flame jets for the Hydrogen Trailer Storage Facility located at Building 878. To determine over pressurization effects, hand calculations derived from the Department of the Air Force Manual, ``Structures to Resist the Effects of Accidental Explosions,`` were utilized. The greatest distances at which a postulated facility event will produce the Lower Flammability and the Lower Detonation Levels are 1,721 feet and 882 feet, respectively. The greatest distance at which 10.0 psi overpressure (i.e., total building destruction) is reached is 153 feet.

Banda, Z.; Wood, C.L.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

SRS seeks RCRA Hazardous Waste Permit Renewal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ery Act (RCRA) permit be renewed. The current permit for the Mixed Waste Storage Buildings (MWSB), Mixed Waste Man- agement Facility (MWMF), and Sanitary Landfill (SLF)...

72

Foreign programs for the storage of spent nuclear power plant fuels, high-level waste canisters and transuranic wastes  

SciTech Connect

The various national programs for developing and applying technology for the interim storage of spent fuel, high-level radioactive waste, and TRU wastes are summarized. Primary emphasis of the report is on dry storage techniques for uranium dioxide fuels, but data are also provided concerning pool storage.

Harmon, K.M.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Steam reforming as a method to treat Hanford underground storage tank (UST) wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes a Sandia program that included partnerships with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Synthetica Technologies, Inc. to design and test a steam reforming system for treating Hanford underground storage tank (UST) wastes. The benefits of steam reforming the wastes include the resolution of tank safety issues and improved radionuclide separations. Steam reforming destroys organic materials by first gasifying, then reacting them with high temperature steam. Tests indicate that up to 99% of the organics could be removed from the UST wastes by steam exposure. In addition, it was shown that nitrates in the wastes could be destroyed by steam exposure if they were first distributed as a thin layer on a surface. High purity alumina and nickel alloys were shown to be good candidates for materials to be used in the severe environment associated with steam reforming the highly alkaline, high nitrate content wastes. Work was performed on designing, building, and demonstrating components of a 0.5 gallon per minute (gpm) system suitable for radioactive waste treatment. Scale-up of the unit to 20 gpm was also considered and is feasible. Finally, process demonstrations conducted on non-radioactive waste surrogates were carried out, including a successful demonstration of the technology at the 0.1 gpm scale.

Miller, J.E.; Kuehne, P.B. [eds.] [and others

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, PUREX storage tunnels  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the Unit-Specific Portion is limited to Part B permit application documentation submitted for individual, operating treatment, storage, and/or disposal units, such as the PUREX Storage Tunnels (this document, DOE/RL-90-24). Both the General Information and Unit-Specific portions of the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application address the content of the Part B permit application guidance prepared by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology 1996) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (40 Code of Federal Regulations 270), with additional information needs defined by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments and revisions of Washington Administrative Code 173-303. For ease of reference, the Washington State Department of Ecology alpha-numeric section identifiers from the permit application guidance documentation (Ecology 1996) follow, in brackets, the chapter headings and subheadings. A checklist indicating where information is contained in the PUREX Storage Tunnels permit application documentation, in relation to the Washington State Department of Ecology guidance, is located in the Contents Section. Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units (e.g., the glossary provided in the General Information Portion). Wherever appropriate, the PUREX Storage Tunnels permit application documentation makes cross-reference to the General Information Portion, rather than duplicating text. Information provided in this PUREX Storage Tunnels permit application documentation is current as of April 1997.

Price, S.M.

1997-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

75

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF THIS DOCUME THERMAL FOR COOLING ENERGY STORAGE BUILDINGSi- LBL-25393 THERMAL FOR COOLING w ENERGY STORAGE BUILDINGSpeak power periods, thermal storage for cooling has become a

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

RCRA closure of the Building 3001 Storage Canal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 3001 Storage Canal is located under portions of Buildings 3001 and 3019 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and has a capacity of approximately 62,000 gallons of water. The term canal has historically been used to identify this structure, however, the canal is an in-ground reinforced concrete structure satisfying the regulatory definition of a tank. From 1943 through 1963, the canal in Building 3001 was designed to be an integral part of the system for handling irradiated fuel from the Oak Ridge Graphite Reactor. Because one of the main initial purposes of the reactor was to produce plutonium for the chemical processing pilot plant in Building 3019, the canal was designed to be the connecting link between the reactor and the pilot plant. During the war years, natural uranium slugs were irradiated in the reactor and then pushed out of the graphite matrix into the system of diversion plates and chutes which directed the fuel into the deep pit of the canal. After shutdown of the reactor, the canal was no longer needed for its designed purpose. Since 1964, the canal has only been used to store radioisotopes and irradiated samples under a water pool for radiation protection. This report describes closure alternatives.

Etheridge, J.T.; Thompson, W.T.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Pipe overpack container for transuranic waste storage and shipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Pipe Overpack Container is described for transuranic waste storage and shipment. The system consists of a vented pipe component which is positioned in a vented, insulated 55 gallon steel drum. Both the vented pipe component and the insulated drum are capable of being secured to prevent the contents from leaving the vessel. The vented pipe component is constructed of 1/4 inch stainless steel to provide radiation shielding, thus allowing shipment having high Americium-241 content. Several Pipe Overpack Containers are then positioned in a type B, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approved, container. In the current embodiment, a TRUPACT-II container was employed and a maximum of fourteen Pipe Overpack Containers were placed in the TRUPACT-II. The combination received NRC approval for the shipment and storage of transuranic waste.

Geinitz, R.R.; Thorp, D.T.; Rivera, M.A.

1999-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

78

Pipe overpack container for trasuranic waste storage and shipment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A Pipe Overpack Container for transuranic waste storage and shipment. The system consists of a vented pipe component which is positioned in a vented, insulated 55 gallon steel drum. Both the vented pipe component and the insulated drum are capable of being secured to prevent the contents from leaving the vessel. The vented pipe component is constructed of 1/4 inch stainless steel to provide radiation shielding. Thus, allowing shipment having high Americium-241 content. Several Pipe Overpack Containers are then positioned in a type B, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approved, container. In the current embodiment, a TRUPACT-II container was employed and a maximum of fourteen Pipe Overpack Containers were placed in the TRUPACT-II. The combination received NRC approval for the shipment and storage of transuranic waste.

Geinitz, Richard R. (Arvada, CO); Thorp, Donald T. (Broomfield, CO); Rivera, Michael A. (Boulder, CO)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility mission analysis report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report defines the mission for the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). It contains summary information regarding the mission analysis which was performed by holding workshops attended by relevant persons involved in the WESF operations. The scope of the WESF mission is to provide storage of Cesium (Cs) and Strontium (Sr) capsules, previously produced at WESF, until every capsule has been removed from the facility either to another storage location, for disposal or for beneficial use by public or private enterprises. Since the disposition of the capsules has not yet been determined, they may be stored at WESF for many years, even decades. The current condition of the WESF facility must be upgraded and maintained to provide for storage which is safe, cost effective, and fully compliant with DOE direction as well as federal, state, and local laws and regulations. The Cs capsules produced at WESF were originally released to private enterprises for uses such as the sterilization of medical equipment; but because of the leakage of one capsule, all are being returned. The systems, subsystems, and equipment not required for the storage mission will be available for use by other projects or private enterprises. Beyond the storage of the Cs and Sr capsules, no future mission for the WESF has been identified.

Lund, D.P.

1995-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

80

Heat recovery and thermal storage : a study of the Massachusetts State Transportation Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study of the energy system at the Massachusetts State Transportation Building was conducted. This innovative energy system utilizes internal-source heat pumps and a water thermal storage system to provide building heating ...

Bjorklund, Abbe Ellen

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste storage building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Design Verification Report Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Canister Storage Building (CSB)  

SciTech Connect

The Sub-project W379, ''Spent Nuclear Fuel Canister Storage Building (CSB),'' was established as part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project. The primary mission of the CSB is to safely store spent nuclear fuel removed from the K Basins in dry storage until such time that it can be transferred to the national geological repository at Yucca Mountain Nevada. This sub-project was initiated in late 1994 by a series of studies and conceptual designs. These studies determined that the partially constructed storage building, originally built as part of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) Project, could be redesigned to safely store the spent nuclear fuel. The scope of the CSB facility initially included a receiving station, a hot conditioning system, a storage vault, and a Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) Handling Machine (MHM). Because of evolution of the project technical strategy, the hot conditioning system was deleted from the scope and MCO welding and sampling stations were added in its place. This report outlines the methods, procedures, and outputs developed by Project W379 to verify that the provided Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs): satisfy the design requirements and acceptance criteria; perform their intended function; ensure that failure modes and hazards have been addressed in the design; and ensure that the SSCs as installed will not adversely impact other SSCs. Because this sub-project is still in the construction/start-up phase, all verification activities have not yet been performed (e.g., canister cover cap and welding fixture system verification, MCO Internal Gas Sampling equipment verification, and As-built verification.). The verification activities identified in this report that still are to be performed will be added to the start-up punchlist and tracked to closure.

PICKETT, W.W.

2000-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

82

Stamp out energy waste | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stamp out energy waste Stamp out energy waste Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Learn the benefits Get started Use Portfolio Manager Save energy Stamp out energy waste Find cost-effective investments Engage occupants Purchase energy-saving products Put computers to sleep Get help from an expert Take a comprehensive approach Install renewable energy systems

83

Waste analysis plan for 222-S dangerous and mixed waste storage area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 222-S Laboratory Complex, in the southeast corner of the 200 West Area, consists of the 222-S Laboratory, the 222-SA Standards Laboratory, and several ancillary facilities. Currently, 222-S Laboratory activities are in supporting efforts to characterize the waste stored in the 200 Areas single shell and double shell tanks. Besides this work, the laboratory also provides analytical services for waste-management processing plants, Tank Farms, B Plant, 242-A Evaporator Facility, Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant, Plutonium Finishing Plant, Uranium-Oxide Plant, Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility, environmental monitoring and surveillance programs, and activities involving essential materials and research and development. One part of the 222-SA Laboratory prepares nonradioactive standards for the 200 Area laboratories. The other section of the laboratory is used for cold (nonradioactive) process development work and standards preparation. The 219-S Waste Handling Facility has three storage tanks in which liquid acid waste from 222-S can be received, stored temporarily, and neutralized. From this facility, neutralized waste, containing radionuclides, is transferred to the Tank Farms. A 700-gallon sodium-hydroxide supply tank is also located in this facility. This plan provides the methods used to meet the acceptance criteria required by the 204-AR Waste Receiving Facility.

Warwick, G.J.

1994-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

84

Waste Technology Engineering Laboratory (324 building)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 324 Facility Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is comprised of twenty functional areas. Two of the twenty functional areas (Decontamination and Decommissioning and Environmental Restoration) were determined as nonapplicable functional areas and one functional area (Research and Development and Experimental Activities) was determined applicable, however, requirements are found in other functional areas and will not be duplicated. Each functional area follows as a separate chapter, either containing the S/RID or a justification for nonapplicability. The twenty functional areas listed below follow as chapters: 1. Management Systems; 2. Quality Assurance; 3. Configuration Management; 4. Training and Qualification; 5. Emergency Management; 6. Safeguards and Security; 7. Engineering Program; 8. Construction; 9. Operations; 10. Maintenance; 11. Radiation Protection; 12. Fire Protection; 13. Packaging and Transportation; 14. Environmental Restoration; 15. Decontamination and Decommissioning; 16. Waste Management; 17. Research and Development and Experimental Activities; 18. Nuclear Safety; 19. Occupational Safety and Health; 20. Environmental Protection.

Kammenzind, D.E.

1997-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

85

Integrated Building Energy Systems Design Considering Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 5. Low Storage and PV Price (run 3) Diurnal Heat6. Low Storage and PV Price (run 3) Diurnal ElectricityFigure 9. Low Storage and PV Price (run 3) Diurnal Heat

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Excess Weapons Plutonium Disposition: Plutonium Packaging, Storage and Transportation and Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal Activities  

SciTech Connect

A fifth annual Excess Weapons Plutonium Disposition meeting organized by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was held February 16-18, 2004, at the State Education Center (SEC), 4 Aerodromnya Drive, St. Petersburg, Russia. The meeting discussed Excess Weapons Plutonium Disposition topics for which LLNL has the US Technical Lead Organization responsibilities. The technical areas discussed included Radioactive Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal, Plutonium Oxide and Plutonium Metal Packaging, Storage and Transportation and Spent Fuel Packaging, Storage and Transportation. The meeting was conducted with a conference format using technical presentations of papers with simultaneous translation into English and Russian. There were 46 Russian attendees from 14 different Russian organizations and six non-Russian attendees, four from the US and two from France. Forty technical presentations were made. The meeting agenda is given in Appendix B and the attendance list is in Appendix C.

Jardine, L J; Borisov, G B

2004-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

87

Central unresolved issues in thermal energy storage for building heating and cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document explores the frontier of the rapidly expanding field of thermal energy storage, investigates unresolved issues, outlines research aimed at finding solutions, and suggests avenues meriting future research. Issues related to applications include value-based ranking of storage concepts, temperature constraints, consistency of assumptions, nomenclature and taxonomy, and screening criteria for materials. Issues related to technologies include assessing seasonal storage concepts, diurnal coolness storage, selection of hot-side storage concepts for cooling-only systems, phase-change storage in building materials, freeze protection for solar water heating systems, and justification of phase-change storage for active solar space heating.

Swet, C.J.; Baylin, F.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Robotics for waste storage inspection: A user`s perspective  

SciTech Connect

Self-navigating robotic vehicles are now commercially available, and the technology supporting other important system components has also matured. Higher reliability and the obtainability of system support now make it practical to consider robotics as a way of addressing the growing operational requirement for the periodic inspection and maintenance of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed waste inventories. This paper describes preparations for the first field deployment of an autonomous container inspection robot at a Department of Energy (DOE) site. The Stored Waste Autonomous Mobile Inspector (SWAMI) is presently being completed by engineers at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). It is a modified version of a commercially available robot. It has been outfitted with sensor suites and cognition that allow it to perform inspections of drum inventories and their storage facilities.

Hazen, F.B.

1994-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

89

Thermal energy storage application areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of thermal energy storage in the areas of building heating and cooling, recovery of industrial process and waste heat, solar power generation, and off-peak energy storage and load management in electric utilities is reviewed. (TFD)

Not Available

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Conceptual design statement of work for the immobilized low-activity waste interim storage facility project  

SciTech Connect

The Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Interim Storage subproject will provide storage capacity for immobilized low-activity waste product sold to the U.S. Department of Energy by the privatization contractor. This statement of work describes the work scope (encompassing definition of new installations and retrofit modifications to four existing grout vaults), to be performed by the Architect-Engineer, in preparation of a conceptual design for the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Interim Storage Facility.

Carlson, T.A., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

91

Vapor sampling of the headspace of radioactive waste storage tanks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper recants the history of vapor sampling in the headspaces of radioactive waste storage tanks at Hanford. The first two tanks to receive extensive vapor pressure sampling were Tanks 241-SY-101 and 241-C-103. At various times, a gas chromatography, on-line mass spectrometer, solid state hydrogen monitor, FTIR, and radio acoustic ammonia monitor have been installed. The head space gas sampling activities will continue for the next few years. The current goal is to sample the headspace for all the tanks. Some tank headspaces will be sampled several times to see the data vary with time. Other tanks will have continuous monitors installed to provide additional data.

Reynolds, D.A., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

92

SRS Waste Solidification Building Project Peer Review, July 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRS-2011-07-15 SRS-2011-07-15 Site: Savannah River Site, NA-26 Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Waste Solidification Building Project Peer Review Dates of Activity : 07/12/2011 - 07/15/2011 Report Preparer: James Lockridge Activity Description/Purpose: At the request of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Enterprise Project Management (NA- APM-20), the Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), provided an expert to review the Waste Solidification Building (WSB) startup programs and procedures associated with worker safety and health, environment, and security. Criteria for the review was detailed in the Criteria,

93

The Middle Ground for Nuclear Waste Management: Social and Ethical Aspects of Shallow Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2001 terrorist attacks in the USA and the 2011 seismic events in Japan have brought into sharp relief the vulnerabilities involved in storing nuclear waste on the land's surface. Nuclear engineers and waste managers are deciding that disposing nuclear ... Keywords: Ethics, Inter-Generational Equity, Nuclear Waste, Shallow Storage, Waste Disposal

Alan Marshall

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR WASTE HANDLING BUILDING ELECTRICAL SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) waste handling building electrical system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998).

S.E. Salzman

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

95

EA-1900: Radiological Work and Storage Building at the Knolls Atomic Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Radiological Work and Storage Building at the Knolls 0: Radiological Work and Storage Building at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory Kesselring Site, West Milton, New York EA-1900: Radiological Work and Storage Building at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory Kesselring Site, West Milton, New York Summary The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program (NNPP) intent to prepare an Environmental Assessment for a radiological work and storage building at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (Kesselring Site in West Milton, New York. A new facility is needed to streamline radioactive material handling and storage operations, permit demolition of aging facilities, and accommodate efficient maintenance of existing nuclear reactors. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download July 16, 2012

96

Guide for Operating an Interim On-Site Low Level Radioactive Waste Storage Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a result of increasing low-level waste (LLW) disposal site uncertainty, the industry expects that utilities will have to rely on their own on-site storage LLW storage programs in the near future. This report captures essential information related to the operation of an on-site LLW storage program. The report is a comprehensive reference to which utilities can routinely refer throughout the development and implementation of the storage program and operation of the storage facility.

2004-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

97

Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Treatment Building Safety Information Document (SID)  

SciTech Connect

This Safety Information Document (SID) provides a description and analysis of operations for the Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility Treatment Building (the Treatment Building). The Treatment Building has been classified as a moderate hazard facility, and the level of analysis performed and the methodology used are based on that classification. Preliminary design of the Treatment Building has identified the need for two separate buildings for waste treatment processes. The term Treatment Building applies to all these facilities. The evaluation of safety for the Treatment Building is accomplished in part by the identification of hazards associated with the facility and the analysis of the facility`s response to postulated events involving those hazards. The events are analyzed in terms of the facility features that minimize the causes of such events, the quantitative determination of the consequences, and the ability of the facility to cope with each event should it occur. The SID presents the methodology, assumptions, and results of the systematic evaluation of hazards associated with operation of the Treatment Building. The SID also addresses the spectrum of postulated credible events, involving those hazards, that could occur. Facility features important to safety are identified and discussed in the SID. The SID identifies hazards and reports the analysis of the spectrum of credible postulated events that can result in the following consequences: Personnel exposure to radiation; Radioactive material release to the environment; Personnel exposure to hazardous chemicals; Hazardous chemical release to the environment; Events leading to an onsite/offsite fatality; and Significant damage to government property. The SID addresses the consequences to the onsite and offsite populations resulting from postulated credible events and the safety features in place to control and mitigate the consequences.

Fatell, L.B.; Woolsey, G.B.

1993-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Design Verification Report Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Canister Storage Building (CSB)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sub-project W379, ''Spent Nuclear Fuel Canister Storage Building (CSB),'' was established as part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project. The primary mission of the CSB is to safely store spent nuclear fuel removed from the K Basins in dry storage until such time that it can be transferred to the national geological repository at Yucca Mountain Nevada. This sub-project was initiated in late 1994 by a series of studies and conceptual designs. These studies determined that the partially constructed storage building, originally built as part of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) Project, could be redesigned to safely store the spent nuclear fuel. The scope of the CSB facility initially included a receiving station, a hot conditioning system, a storage vault, and a Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) Handling Machine (MHM). Because of evolution of the project technical strategy, the hot conditioning system was deleted from the scope and MCO welding and sampling stations were added in its place. This report outlines the methods, procedures, and outputs developed by Project W379 to verify that the provided Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs): satisfy the design requirements and acceptance criteria; perform their intended function; ensure that failure modes and hazards have been addressed in the design; and ensure that the SSCs as installed will not adversely impact other SSCs. The original version of this document was prepared by Vista Engineering for the SNF Project. The purpose of this revision is to document completion of verification actions that were pending at the time the initial report was prepared. Verification activities for the installed and operational SSCs have been completed. Verification of future additions to the CSB related to the canister cover cap and welding fixture system and MCO Internal Gas Sampling equipment will be completed as appropriate for those components. The open items related to verification of those requirements are noted in section 3.1.5 and will be tracked as part of the CSB Facility action tracking system.

BAZINET, G.D.

2000-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

99

EA-0942: Return of Isotope Capsules to the Waste Encapsulation and Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

42: Return of Isotope Capsules to the Waste Encapsulation and 42: Return of Isotope Capsules to the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-0942: Return of Isotope Capsules to the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the return of all leased cesium-137 and strontium-90 leased capsules to the U.S. Department of Energy's Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility on the Hanford Site, to ensure safe management and storage, pending final disposition. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD May 11, 1994 EA-0942: Finding of No Significant Impact Return of Isotope Capsules to the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

100

Press Release Von Roll Inova to build the UK's largest energy-from-waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Press Release Von Roll Inova to build the UK's largest energy-from-waste plant Zürich, September, 1 Roll Inova will build the UK's largest energy-from-waste facility. The contract is worth approximately and energy recovery. Apart from building and commissioning the plant, Von Roll Inova's scope of delivery also

Columbia University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste storage building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Integrated Building Energy Systems Design Considering Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an average efficiency of 0.5 for solar thermal and 0.13 forefficiency, heat storage, micro-generation systems, photovoltaic, software, solar thermal

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

EA-1900: Radiological Work and Storage Building at the Knolls...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

streamline radioactive material handling and storage operations, permit demolition of aging facilities, and accommodate efficient maintenance of existing nuclear reactors. Public...

103

Waste-Lithium-Liquid (WLL) Flow Battery for Stationary Energy Storage Applications Youngsik Kim* and Nina MahootcheianAsl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste-Lithium-Liquid (WLL) Flow Battery for Stationary Energy Storage Applications Youngsik Kim in a Waste-Lithium-Liquid (WLL) flow battery that can be used in a stationary energy storage application. Li

Zhou, Yaoqi

104

Low Level Waste On Site Storage Operating Guidelines -- Supplemental Information Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Supplemental Information Manual captures essential information related to the implementation of an on-site low level waste (LLW) storage program. It summarizes the guidance and experience provided in the Interim On-Site Storage series of reports and should be used in concert with EPRI report 1018644, "Guidelines for Operating an Interim On Site Low Level Radioactive Waste Storage FacilityRevision 1," 2009.

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

105

Interim On-Site Storage of Low Level Waste: Volume 1: Licensing and Regulatory Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an all-inclusive resource guide for evaluating a utility's on-site storage licensing requirements. Specifically, the report offers an extensive review of licensing and regulatory documents related to on-site storage of low level waste as well as a methodology for evaluating on-site storage licensing issues.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Extended storage of low-level radioactive waste: potential problem areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

If a state or state compact does not have adequate disposal capacity for low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) by 1986 as required by the Low-Level Waste Policy Act, then extended storage of certain LLRW may be necessary. The issue of extended storage of LLRW is addressed in order to determine for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission the areas of concern and the actions recommended to resolve these concerns. The focus is on the properties and behavior of the waste form and waste container. Storage alternatives are considered in order to characterize the likely storage environments for these wastes. The areas of concern about extended storage of LLRW are grouped into two categories: 1. Behavior of the waste form and/or container during storage, e.g., radiolytic gas generation, radiation-enhanced degradation of polymeric materials, and corrosion. 2. Effects of extended storage on the properties of the waste form and/or container that are important after storage (e.g., radiation-induced oxidative embrittlement of high-density polyethylene and the weakening of steel containers resulting from corrosion by the waste). The additional information and actions required to address these concerns are discussed and, in particular, it is concluded that further information is needed on the rates of corrosion of container material by Class A wastes and on the apparent dose-rate dependence of radiolytic processes in Class B and C waste packages. Modifications to the guidance for solidified wastes and high-integrity containers in NRC's Technical Position on Waste Form are recommended. 27 references.

Siskind, B.; Dougherty, D.R.; MacKenzie, D.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Criticality Safety Evaluation of Hanford Site High Level Waste Storage Tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This criticality safety evaluation covers operations for waste in underground storage tanks at the high-level waste tank farms on the Hanford site. This evaluation provides the bases for criticality safety limits and controls to govern receipt, transfer, and long-term storage of tank waste. Justification is provided that a nuclear criticality accident cannot occur for tank farms operations, based on current fissile material and operating conditions.

ROGERS, C.A.

2000-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

108

DOE/EA-0820 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Construction of Mixed Waste Storage RCRA Facilities,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20 20 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Construction of Mixed Waste Storage RCRA Facilities, Buildings 7668 and 7669 u.s. Department of Energy Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee April 1994 ER t>ISTRf8UT!Q~~ Or-~I-:r8 DOCUMENT IS UNLlMIT~ DISCLAIMER This report was .prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial

109

EA-0874: Low-level Waste Drum Staging Building at Weapons Engineering...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

74: Low-level Waste Drum Staging Building at Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility, TA-16 Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico EA-0874: Low-level Waste Drum...

110

Integrated Building Energy Systems Design Considering Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

N. et al. , (2007), “Microgrids, An Overview of Ongoingand Operation of Microgrids in Commercial Buildings”, IEEEsuccessful deployment of microgrids will depend heavily on

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Vertical displacement of the storage ring floor due to building distortion in the Photon Factory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Light Source Building of the Photon Factory was found to distort so much as to induce the displacement of magnets in the storage ring. This resulted in drifting of the beam orbit. It was considered that the building was distorted by the variations of thermal stress

Tomotaro Katsura; Yutaka Fujita

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Alternatives for managing wastes from reactors and post-fission operations in the LWR fuel cycle. Volume 3. Alternatives for interim storage and transportation  

SciTech Connect

Volume III of the five-volume report contains information on alternatives for interim storage and transportation. Section titles are: interim storage of spent fuel elements; interim storage of chop-leach fuel bundle residues; tank storage of high-level liquid waste; interim storage of solid non-high-level wastes; interim storage of solidified high-level waste; and, transportation alternatives. (JGB)

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Calcine Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A potential option in the program for long-term management of high-level wastes at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, calls for retrieving calcine waste and converting it to a more stable and less dispersible form. An inventory of calcine produced during the period December 1963 to May 1999 has been prepared based on calciner run, solids storage facilities operating, and miscellaneous operational information, which gives the range of chemical compositions of calcine waste stored at INTEC. Information researched includes calciner startup data, waste solution analyses and volumes calcined, calciner operating schedules, solids storage bin capacities, calcine storage bin distributor systems, and solids storage bin design and temperature monitoring records. Unique information on calcine solids storage facilities design of potential interest to remote retrieval operators is given.

M. D. Staiger

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pp. 22.1- 22.12, Electric Power Research Institute Report,pp. 21.1-21.33, Electric Power Research Institute Report,Commercial Cool Storage," Electric Power Research Institute

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Integrated Building Energy Systems Design Considering Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DC, USA, October 28th 2008. Microgrid Symposium. Held atStorage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study ofand CO 2 emissions, a microgrid’s distributed energy

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Assessment of a Low-Level Waste Outside Storage Pad Design Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has developed a method for designing an outside pad and modules for interim on-site storage of low-level waste. A detailed comparison between EPRI's outside storage pad facility design and cost projections and those of Boston Edison revealed excellent agreement between the two estimates. This report provides detailed information on how to approach the design of an outside storage pad facility as well as use of the EPRI method for an on-site storage project.

1996-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

117

GRR/Section 18-HI-b - RCRA - Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8-HI-b - RCRA - Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and 8-HI-b - RCRA - Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Permit (TSD) < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-HI-b - RCRA - Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Permit (TSD) 18HIB - RCRAHazardousWasteTreatmentStorageAndDisposalPermitTSD.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Hawaii Department of Health Solid and Hazardous Waste Branch United States Environmental Protection Agency Regulations & Policies Resource Conversation and Recovery Act (42 U.S.C. 6901, et seq.) 40 CFR 270 Hawaii Administrative Rules Title 11, Chapter 261 Hawaii Administrative Rules Title 11, Chapter 265 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

118

Removal plan for Shippingport pressurized water reactor core 2 blanket fuel assemblies form T plant to the canister storage building  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents the current strategy and path forward for removal of the Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 blanket fuel assemblies from their existing storage configuration (wet storage within the T Plant canyon) and transport to the Canister Storage Building (designed and managed by the Spent Nuclear Fuel. Division). The removal plan identifies all processes, equipment, facility interfaces, and documentation (safety, permitting, procedures, etc.) required to facilitate the PWR Core 2 assembly removal (from T Plant), transport (to the Canister storage Building), and storage to the Canister Storage Building. The plan also provides schedules, associated milestones, and cost estimates for all handling activities.

Lata

1996-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

119

Spent Nuclear Fuel project stage and store K basin SNF in canister storage building functions and requirements. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the functions and requirements baseline for the implementation of the Canister Storage Building Subproject. The mission allocated to the Canister Storage Building Subproject is to provide safe, environmentally sound staging and storage of K Basin SNF until a decision on the final disposition is reached and implemented

Womack, J.C.

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

120

Design requirements document for project W-465, immobilized low activity waste interim storage  

SciTech Connect

The scope of this design requirements document is to identify the functions and associated requirements that must be performed to accept, transport, handle, and store immobilized low-activity waste produced by the privatized Tank Waste Remediation System treatment contractors. The functional and performance requirements in this document provide the basis for the conceptual design of the Tank Waste Remediation System Immobilized low-activity waste interim storage facility project and provides traceability from the program level requirements to the project design activity.

Burbank, D.A.

1997-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste storage building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

4.0 RISK FROM URANIUM MINING WASTE IN BUILDING In general, building materials contain low levels of radioactivity. For example, the range of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4.0 RISK FROM URANIUM MINING WASTE IN BUILDING MATERIALS In general, building materials contain low, especially in buildings constructed with materials containing uranium TENORM mine wastes. In the Grand the wastes from uranium mines have been removed from mining sites and used in local and nearby communities

122

Predictive Optimal Control of Active and Passive Building Thermal Storage Inventory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cooling of commercial buildings contributes significantly to the peak demand placed on an electrical utility grid. Time-of-use electricity rates encourage shifting of electrical loads to off-peak periods at night and weekends. Buildings can respond to these pricing signals by shifting cooling-related thermal loads either by precooling the building's massive structure or the use of active thermal energy storage systems such as ice storage. While these two thermal batteries have been engaged separately in the past, this project investigates the merits of harnessing both storage media concurrently in the context of predictive optimal control. This topical report describes the demonstration of the model-based predictive optimal control for active and passive building thermal storage inventory in a test facility in real-time using time-of-use differentiated electricity prices without demand charges. The laboratory testing findings presented in this topical report cover the second of three project phases. The novel supervisory controller successfully executed a three-step procedure consisting of (1) short-term weather prediction, (2) optimization of control strategy over the next planning horizon using a calibrated building model, and (3) post-processing of the optimal strategy to yield a control command for the current time step that can be executed in the test facility. The primary and secondary building mechanical systems were effectively orchestrated by the model-based predictive optimal controller in real-time while observing comfort and operational constraints. The findings reveal that when the optimal controller is given imperfect weather fore-casts and when the building model used for planning control strategies does not match the actual building perfectly, measured utility costs savings relative to conventional building operation can be substantial. This requires that the facility under control lends itself to passive storage utilization and the building model includes a realistic plant model. The savings associated with passive building thermal storage inventory proved to be small be-cause the test facility is not an ideal candidate for the investigated control technology. Moreover, the facility's central plant revealed the idiosyncratic behavior that the chiller operation in the ice-making mode was more energy efficient than in the chilled-water mode. Field experimentation (Phase III) is now required in a suitable commercial building with sufficient thermal mass, an active TES system, and a climate conducive to passive storage utilization over a longer testing period to support the laboratory findings presented in this topical report.

Gregor P. Henze; Moncef Krarti

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

123

Cooling Strategies Based on Indicators of Thermal Storage in Commercial Building Mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building thermal mass and multi-day regimes of hot weather are important, yet poorly understood, contributors to cooling energy requirements. This paper develops load-shifting sub-cooling and precooling equipment operating strategies to address a specific instance of this phenomenon, in which thermal storage by building mass over weekends exacerbates Monday cooling energy requirements. The study relies on computer simulations of energy use for a large, office building prototype in El Paso, TX using the DOE-2 building energy analysis program. The economic value of the strategies is evaluated with direct reference to utility rate schedules and a crude measure of thermal storage is related to the energy impacts of the strategies. The indicators are based on core zone air temperatures, which are sampled a t night when HVAC systems are not in use. The suggestion is made that the results and proposed strategies could be adapted for use by computerized energy management systems to reduce building energy operating costs.

Eto, J. H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

ALARA Analysis for Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 Fuel Storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The addition of Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Core 2 Blanket Fuel Assembly storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB) will increase the total cumulative CSB personnel exposure from receipt and handling activities. The loaded Shippingport Spent Fuel Canisters (SSFCs) used for the Shippingport fuel have a higher external dose rate. Assuming an MCO handling rate of 170 per year (K East and K West concurrent operation), 24-hr CSB operation, and nominal SSFC loading, all work crew personnel will have a cumulative annual exposure of less than the 1,000 mrem limit.

Lewis, M E

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Heat pipe cooling system for underground, radioactive waste storage tanks  

SciTech Connect

An array of 37 heat pipes inserted through the central hole at the top of a radioactive waste storage tank will remove 100,000 Btu/h with a heat sink of 70/sup 0/F atmospheric air. Heat transfer inside the tank to the heat pipe is by natural convection. Heat rejection to outside air utilizes a blower to force air past the heat pipe condenser. The heat pipe evaporator section is axially finned, and is constructed of stainless steel. The working fluid is ammonia. The finned pipes are individually shrouded and extend 35 ft down into the tank air space. The hot tank air enters the shroud at the top of the tank and flows downward as it is cooled, with the resulting increased density furnishing the pressure difference for circulation. The cooled air discharges at the center of the tank above the sludge surface, flows radially outward, and picks up heat from the radioactive sludge. At the tank wall the heated air rises and then flows inward to comple the cycle.

Cooper, K.C.; Prenger, F.C.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Plutonium Finishing Plan (PFP) Treatment and Storage Unit Waste Analysis Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document waste analysis activities associated with the Plutonium Finishing Plant Treatment and Storage Unit (PFP Treatment and Storage Unit) to comply with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-300(1), (2), (4)(a) and (5). The PFP Treatment and Storage Unit is an interim status container management unit for plutonium bearing mixed waste radiologically managed as transuranic (TRU) waste. TRU mixed (TRUM) waste managed at the PFP Treatment and Storage Unit is destined for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and therefore is not subject to land disposal restrictions [WAC 173-303-140 and 40 CFR 268]. The PFP Treatment and Storage Unit is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland Washington (Figure 1). Because dangerous waste does not include source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

PRIGNANO, A.L.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

GRR/Section 18-HI-b - RCRA - Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8-HI-b - RCRA - Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Permit (TSD) < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help...

128

Immobilized low-activity waste interim storage facility, Project W-465 conceptual design report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report outlines the design and total estimated cost to modify the four unused grout vaults for the remote handling and interim storage of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW).

Pickett, W.W.

1998-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

129

EA-0981: Solid Waste Retrieval Complex, Enhanced Radioactive and Mixed Waste Storage Facility, Infrastructure Upgrades, and Central Waste Support Complex, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to retrieve transuranic waste (TRU), provide storage capacity for retrieved and newly generated TRU, Greater-than-Category 3, and mixed...

130

Calcine Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

SciTech Connect

This report documents an inventory of calcined waste produced at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center during the period from December 1963 to May 2000. The report was prepared based on calciner runs, operation of the calcined solids storage facilities, and miscellaneous operational information that establishes the range of chemical compositions of calcined waste stored at Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The report will be used to support obtaining permits for the calcined solids storage facilities, possible treatment of the calcined waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and to ship the waste to an off-site facility including a geologic repository. The information in this report was compiled from calciner operating data, waste solution analyses and volumes calcined, calciner operating schedules, calcine temperature monitoring records, and facility design of the calcined solids storage facilities. A compact disk copy of this report is provided to facilitate future data manipulations and analysis.

Staiger, Merle Daniel; M. C. Swenson

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Predictive Optimal Control of Active and Passive Building Thermal Storage Inventory  

SciTech Connect

Cooling of commercial buildings contributes significantly to the peak demand placed on an electrical utility grid. Time-of-use electricity rates encourage shifting of electrical loads to off-peak periods at night and weekends. Buildings can respond to these pricing signals by shifting cooling-related thermal loads either by precooling the building's massive structure or the use of active thermal energy storage systems such as ice storage. While these two thermal batteries have been engaged separately in the past, this project investigated the merits of harnessing both storage media concurrently in the context of predictive optimal control. To pursue the analysis, modeling, and simulation research of Phase 1, two separate simulation environments were developed. Based on the new dynamic building simulation program EnergyPlus, a utility rate module, two thermal energy storage models were added. Also, a sequential optimization approach to the cost minimization problem using direct search, gradient-based, and dynamic programming methods was incorporated. The objective function was the total utility bill including the cost of reheat and a time-of-use electricity rate either with or without demand charges. An alternative simulation environment based on TRNSYS and Matlab was developed to allow for comparison and cross-validation with EnergyPlus. The initial evaluation of the theoretical potential of the combined optimal control assumed perfect weather prediction and match between the building model and the actual building counterpart. The analysis showed that the combined utilization leads to cost savings that is significantly greater than either storage but less than the sum of the individual savings. The findings reveal that the cooling-related on-peak electrical demand of commercial buildings can be considerably reduced. A subsequent analysis of the impact of forecasting uncertainty in the required short-term weather forecasts determined that it takes only very simple short-term prediction models to realize almost all of the theoretical potential of this control strategy. Further work evaluated the impact of modeling accuracy on the model-based closed-loop predictive optimal controller to minimize utility cost. The following guidelines have been derived: For an internal heat gain dominated commercial building, reasonable geometry simplifications are acceptable without a loss of cost savings potential. In fact, zoning simplification may improve optimizer performance and save computation time. The mass of the internal structure did not show a strong effect on the optimization. Building construction characteristics were found to impact building passive thermal storage capacity. It is thus advisable to make sure the construction material is well modeled. Zone temperature setpoint profiles and TES performance are strongly affected by mismatches in internal heat gains, especially when they are underestimated. Since they are a key factor in determining the building cooling load, efforts should be made to keep the internal gain mismatch as small as possible. Efficiencies of the building energy systems affect both zone temperature setpoints and active TES operation because of the coupling of the base chiller for building precooling and the icemaking TES chiller. Relative efficiencies of the base and TES chillers will determine the balance of operation of the two chillers. The impact of mismatch in this category may be significant. Next, a parametric analysis was conducted to assess the effects of building mass, utility rate, building location and season, thermal comfort, central plant capacities, and an economizer on the cost saving performance of optimal control for active and passive building thermal storage inventory. The key findings are: (1) Heavy-mass buildings, strong-incentive time-of-use electrical utility rates, and large on-peak cooling loads will likely lead to attractive savings resulting from optimal combined thermal storage control. (2) By using economizer to take advantage of the cool fresh air during the night, t

Gregor P. Henze; Moncef Krarti

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

132

Predictive Optimal Control of Active and Passive Building Thermal Storage Inventory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cooling of commercial buildings contributes significantly to the peak demand placed on an electrical utility grid. Time-of-use electricity rates encourage shifting of electrical loads to off-peak periods at night and weekends. Buildings can respond to these pricing signals by shifting cooling-related thermal loads either by precooling the building's massive structure or the use of active thermal energy storage systems such as ice storage. While these two thermal batteries have been engaged separately in the past, this project investigated the merits of harnessing both storage media concurrently in the context of predictive optimal control. To pursue the analysis, modeling, and simulation research of Phase 1, two separate simulation environments were developed. Based on the new dynamic building simulation program EnergyPlus, a utility rate module, two thermal energy storage models were added. Also, a sequential optimization approach to the cost minimization problem using direct search, gradient-based, and dynamic programming methods was incorporated. The objective function was the total utility bill including the cost of reheat and a time-of-use electricity rate either with or without demand charges. An alternative simulation environment based on TRNSYS and Matlab was developed to allow for comparison and cross-validation with EnergyPlus. The initial evaluation of the theoretical potential of the combined optimal control assumed perfect weather prediction and match between the building model and the actual building counterpart. The analysis showed that the combined utilization leads to cost savings that is significantly greater than either storage but less than the sum of the individual savings. The findings reveal that the cooling-related on-peak electrical demand of commercial buildings can be considerably reduced. A subsequent analysis of the impact of forecasting uncertainty in the required short-term weather forecasts determined that it takes only very simple short-term prediction models to realize almost all of the theoretical potential of this control strategy. Further work evaluated the impact of modeling accuracy on the model-based closed-loop predictive optimal controller to minimize utility cost. The following guidelines have been derived: For an internal heat gain dominated commercial building, reasonable geometry simplifications are acceptable without a loss of cost savings potential. In fact, zoning simplification may improve optimizer performance and save computation time. The mass of the internal structure did not show a strong effect on the optimization. Building construction characteristics were found to impact building passive thermal storage capacity. It is thus advisable to make sure the construction material is well modeled. Zone temperature setpoint profiles and TES performance are strongly affected by mismatches in internal heat gains, especially when they are underestimated. Since they are a key factor in determining the building cooling load, efforts should be made to keep the internal gain mismatch as small as possible. Efficiencies of the building energy systems affect both zone temperature setpoints and active TES operation because of the coupling of the base chiller for building precooling and the icemaking TES chiller. Relative efficiencies of the base and TES chillers will determine the balance of operation of the two chillers. The impact of mismatch in this category may be significant. Next, a parametric analysis was conducted to assess the effects of building mass, utility rate, building location and season, thermal comfort, central plant capacities, and an economizer on the cost saving performance of optimal control for active and passive building thermal storage inventory. The key findings are: (1) Heavy-mass buildings, strong-incentive time-of-use electrical utility rates, and large on-peak cooling loads will likely lead to attractive savings resulting from optimal combined thermal storage control. (2) By using economizer to take advantage of the cool fresh air during the night, the bu

Gregor P. Henze; Moncef Krarti

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

133

Hanford Site waste treatment/storage/disposal integration  

SciTech Connect

In 1998 Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc. began the integration of all low-level waste, mixed waste, and TRU waste-generating activities across the Hanford site. With seven contractors, dozens of generating units, and hundreds of waste streams, integration was necessary to provide acute waste forecasting and planning for future treatment activities. This integration effort provides disposition maps that account for waste from generation, through processing, treatment and final waste disposal. The integration effort covers generating facilities from the present through the life-cycle, including transition and deactivation. The effort is patterned after the very successful DOE Complex EM Integration effort. Although still in the preliminary stages, the comprehensive onsite integration effort has already reaped benefits. These include identifying significant waste streams that had not been forecast, identifying opportunities for consolidating activities and services to accelerate schedule or save money; and identifying waste streams which currently have no path forward in the planning baseline. Consolidation/integration of planned activities may also provide opportunities for pollution prevention and/or avoidance of secondary waste generation. A workshop was held to review the waste disposition maps, and to identify opportunities with potential cost or schedule savings. Another workshop may be held to follow up on some of the long-term integration opportunities. A change to the Hanford waste forecast data call would help to align the Solid Waste Forecast with the new disposition maps.

MCDONALD, K.M.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

134

EVALUATION OF ULTIMATE DISPOSAL METHOD FOR LIQUID AND SOLID RADIOACTIVE WASTES. PART I. INTERIM LIQUID STORAGE  

SciTech Connect

As the first part of a study to evaluate the economics of the various steps leading to and including the permanent disposal of high-activity liquid and solid radioactive waste, costs of interim liquid storage of acid and alkaline Purex and Thorex wastes were estimated for storage times of 0.5 to 30 years. A 6- ton/day plant was assumed, processing 1500 tons/year of uranium converter fuel at a burnup of 10,000 Mwd/ton and 270 tons/year of thorium converter fuel at a burnup of 20,000 Mwd/ton. Tanks of Savannah River design were assumed, with stainless steel construction for acid wastes and mild steel construction for neutralized wastes. The operating cycle of each tank was assumed to consist of equal filling and emptying periods plus a full (or dead) period. With interim storage time defined as filling time plus full time, tank costs were minimum when full time was 40 to 70% of the interim storage time, using present worth considerations. For waste storage times of 0.5 to 30 years, costs ranged from 2.2 x 10/sup -3/ to 9.5 x 10/sup -3/ mill/kwh/sub e/ for acid wastes and from 1.7 x 10/sup -3/ to 5.1 x 10/sup -3/ mill/kwh/sub e/ for neutralized wastes. (auth)

Bradshaw, R.L.; Perona, J.J.; Roberts, J.T.; Blomeke, J.O.

1961-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

135

Proceedings of the 6th Annual Meeting for Excess Weapons Plutonium Disposition: Plutonium Packaging, Storage and Transportation and WasteTreatment, Storage and Disposal Activities  

SciTech Connect

The sixth annual Excess Weapons Plutonium Disposition meeting organized by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was held November 15-17, 2004, at the State Education Center (SEC), 4 Aerodromnya Drive, St. Petersburg, Russia. The meeting discussed Excess Weapons Plutonium Disposition topics for which LLNL has the US Technical Lead Organization responsibilities. The technical areas discussed included Radioactive Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal, and Plutonium Oxide and Plutonium Metal Packaging, Storage and Transportation and Spent Fuel Packaging, Storage and Transportation. The meeting was conducted with a conference format using technical presentations of papers with simultaneous translation into English and Russian. There were 55 Russian attendees from 16 different Russian organizations and four non-Russian attendees from the US. Forty technical presentations were made. The meeting agenda is given in Appendix B and the attendance list is in Appendix C. The 16 different Russian design, industrial sites, and scientific organizations in attendance included staff from Rosatom/Minatom, Federal Nuclear and Radiation Safety Authority of Russia (GOSATOMNADZOR, NIERA/GAN), All Russian Designing & Scientific Research Institute of Complex Power Technology (VNIPIET), Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI), A. A. Bochvar All Russian Scientific Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM), All Russian & Design Institute of Production Engineering (VNIPIPT), Ministry of Atomic Energy of Russian Federation Specialized State Designing Institute (GSPI), State Scientific Center Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (RIAR), Siberian Chemical Combine Tomsk (SCC), Mayak PO, Mining Chemical Combine (MCC K-26), Institute of Biophysics (IBPh), Sverdlosk Scientific Research Institute of Chemical Machine Building (SNIIChM), Kurchatov Institute (KI), Institute of Physical Chemistry Russian Academy of Science (IPCh RAS) and Radon PO-Moscow. The four non-Russian attendees included one representative from DOE NNSA, and LLNL, and two from Duratek, The meeting was organized into three major sessions: (1) Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal; (2) Plutonium Packaging, Storage and Transportation; (3) Spent Fuel Packaging, Storage and Transportation. Twenty presentations were made on the topic of Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal (Session II), ten presentations on Plutonium Packaging, Storage and Transportation (Session III), and four presentations on Spent Fuel Packaging, Storage and Transportation (Session IV). In addition, DOE/NNSA, Minatom/Rosatom and TVEL summarized the bases for the conference at the beginning of the meeting (Session I). Nine months had passed since the last LLNL contracts review meeting. During that time period, LLNL and TVEL have been able to sign six contracts for a total of $1,700,000 in the areas of: (1) Waste treatment, storage and disposal; and (2) Plutonium packaging, storage and transportation. The scope of several other work projects are now in various stages of development in these areas. It is anticipated that more contracts will be signed before the next meeting of this type. These events have allowed us to start work in our technical activities under new direction from TVEL, which is now the single Russian organization to coordinate and conclude contracts with LLNL. The meeting presentations and discussions have defined where we are and where we are going in the near term in regard to our joint interests in excess weapons plutonium disposition. Each topical section of this Proceedings is introduced by a summary of the presentations in that section.

Jardine, L J

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

136

Calcined Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a quantitative inventory and composition (chemical and radioactivity) of calcined waste stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. From December 1963 through May 2000, liquid radioactive wastes generated by spent nuclear fuel reprocessing were converted into a solid, granular form called calcine. This report also contains a description of the calcine storage bins.

M. D. Staiger M. C. Swenson

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Energy Analysis and Energy Conservation Options for the Addition to Records Storage Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy use and peak load requirements of the addition to Records Storage Building in Austin, Texas were analyzed using the DOE 2.1B building energy simulation program. An analysis was made for the building as specified in schematic designs and primary drawings. To reduce the solar heat gain of the building through the windows and skylights, a glass with high reflectivity and low overall heat transfer coefficient was used to study the reduction of glass conduction and glass solar loads. Other options which were studied included increasing the wall and roof insulation,- reducing the light level, temperature setback, and implementing the proposed ASHRAE standards. Finally, the energy consumption of the building was compared with the energy consumption of the building with solar film and other options which conformed to the proposed ASHRAE energy standard.

Farzad, M.; O'Neal, D. L.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Waste slurry particle properties for use in slurry flow modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's River Protection Project is building a Waste Treatment Plant to convert the nuclear waste stored in the Hanford Site's underground storage tank system into final waste forms

JEWETT, J.R.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Final Environmental Impact Statement Safe Interim Storage Of Hanford Tank Wastes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1995/01eis0212_cl.html[6/27/2011 1:02:59 PM] 1995/01eis0212_cl.html[6/27/2011 1:02:59 PM] Final Environmental Impact Statement Safe Interim Storage Of Hanford Tank Wastes DOE/EIS-0212 VOLUME 1 OF 2 VOLUME 1 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT SAFE INTERIM STORAGE OF HANFORD TANK WASTES Hanford Site Richland, Washington October, 1995 WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY NUCLEAR WASTE PROGRAM LACEY, WASHINGTON 98503 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY RICHLAND OPERATIONS OFFICE

140

Statement of work for conceptual design of solidified high-level waste interim storage system project (phase I)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has embarked upon a course to acquire Hanford Site tank waste treatment and immobilization services using privatized facilities. This plan contains a two phased approach. Phase I is a ``proof-of-principle/commercial demonstration- scale`` effort and Phase II is a full-scale production effort. In accordance with the planned approach, interim storage (IS) and disposal of various products from privatized facilities are to be DOE furnished. The path forward adopted for Phase I solidification HLW IS entails use of Vaults 2 and 3 in the Spent Nuclear Fuel Canister Storage Building, to be located in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. This Statement of Work describes the work scope to be performed by the Architect-Engineer to prepare a conceptual design for the solidified HLW IS System.

Calmus, R.B., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste storage building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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141

Settlement Agreement on TRU Mixed Waste Storage at Nevada Test Site Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Settlement Agreement for Transuranic (TRU) Mixed Settlement Agreement for Transuranic (TRU) Mixed Waste Storage Issues at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) State Nevada Agreement Type Settlement Agreement Legal Driver(s) RCRA Scope Summary Settle the Finding of Alleged Violation (FOAV) and Order of November 1, 1990, and the FOAV of June 24, 1991, related to the TRU waste storage pad at Area 5 of the NTS Parties DOE; Nevada Department of Environmental Protection Date 6/11/1992 SCOPE * Settle the Finding of Alleged Violation (FOAV) and Order of November 1, 1990, and the FOAV of June 24, 1991, related to the TRU waste storage pad at Area 5 of the NTS. ESTABLISHING MILESTONES * Within 90 days of the effective date of this Agreement, DOE will provide to NDEP documentation of why the current inventory of TRU mixed waste cannot be removed

142

METHODOLOGY & CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE GROUPS FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Waste stored within tank farm double-shell tanks (DST) and single-shell tanks (SST) generates flammable gas (principally hydrogen) to varying degrees depending on the type, amount, geometry, and condition of the waste. The waste generates hydrogen through the radiolysis of water and organic compounds, thermolytic decomposition of organic compounds, and corrosion of a tank's carbon steel walls. Radiolysis and thermolytic decomposition also generates ammonia. Nonflammable gases, which act as dilutents (such as nitrous oxide), are also produced. Additional flammable gases (e.g., methane) are generated by chemical reactions between various degradation products of organic chemicals present in the tanks. Volatile and semi-volatile organic chemicals in tanks also produce organic vapors. The generated gases in tank waste are either released continuously to the tank headspace or are retained in the waste matrix. Retained gas may be released in a spontaneous or induced gas release event (GRE) that can significantly increase the flammable gas concentration in the tank headspace as described in RPP-7771. The document categorizes each of the large waste storage tanks into one of several categories based on each tank's waste characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement event. Revision 5 is the annual update of the methodology and calculations of the flammable gas Waste Groups for DSTs and SSTs.

BARKER, S.A.

2006-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

143

METHODOLOGY & CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Waste stored within tank farm double-shell tanks (DST) and single-shell tanks (SST) generates flammable gas (principally hydrogen) to varying degrees depending on the type, amount, geometry, and condition of the waste. The waste generates hydrogen through the radiolysis of water and organic compounds, thermolytic decomposition of organic compounds, and corrosion of a tank's carbon steel walls. Radiolysis and thermolytic decomposition also generates ammonia. Nonflammable gases, which act as dilutents (such as nitrous oxide), are also produced. Additional flammable gases (e.g., methane) are generated by chemical reactions between various degradation products of organic chemicals present in the tanks. Volatile and semi-volatile organic chemicals in tanks also produce organic vapors. The generated gases in tank waste are either released continuously to the tank headspace or are retained in the waste matrix. Retained gas may be released in a spontaneous or induced gas release event (GRE) that can significantly increase the flammable gas concentration in the tank headspace as described in RPP-7771, Flammable Gas Safety Isme Resolution. Appendices A through I provide supporting information. The document categorizes each of the large waste storage tanks into one of several categories based on each tank's waste and characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement event. Revision 6 is the annual update of the flammable gas Waste Groups for DSTs and SSTs.

TU, T.A.

2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

144

Environmental assessment for the construction and operation of waste storage facilities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOE is proposing to construct and operate 3 waste storage facilities (one 42,000 ft{sup 2} waste storage facility for RCRA waste, one 42,000 ft{sup 2} waste storage facility for toxic waste (TSCA), and one 200,000 ft{sup 2} mixed (hazardous/radioactive) waste storage facility) at Paducah. This environmental assessment compares impacts of this proposed action with those of continuing present practices aof of using alternative locations. It is found that the construction, operation, and ultimate closure of the proposed waste storage facilities would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA; therefore an environmental impact statement is not required.

NONE

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The addition of storage technologies such as flow batteries, conventional batteries, and heat storage can improve the economic as well as environmental attractiveness of on-site generation (e.g., PV, fuel cells, reciprocating engines or microturbines operating with or without CHP) and contribute to enhanced demand response. In order to examine the impact of storage technologies on demand response and carbon emissions, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program that has the minimization of annual energy costs as its objective function. By implementing this approach in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS), the problem is solved for a given test year at representative customer sites, such as schools and nursing homes, to obtain not only the level of technology investment, but also the optimal hourly operating schedules. This paper focuses on analysis of storage technologies in DER optimization on a building level, with example applications for commercial buildings. Preliminary analysis indicates that storage technologies respond effectively to time-varying electricity prices, i.e., by charging batteries during periods of low electricity prices and discharging them during peak hours. The results also indicate that storage technologies significantly alter the residual load profile, which can contribute to lower carbon emissions depending on the test site, its load profile, and its adopted DER technologies.

Lacommare, Kristina S H; Stadler, Michael; Aki, Hirohisa; Firestone, Ryan; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

146

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The addition of storage technologies such as flow batteries, conventional batteries, and heat storage can improve the economic as well as environmental attractiveness of on-site generation (e.g., PV, fuel cells, reciprocating engines or microturbines operating with or without CHP) and contribute to enhanced demand response. In order to examine the impact of storage technologies on demand response and carbon emissions, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program that has the minimization of annual energy costs as its objective function. By implementing this approach in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS), the problem is solved for a given test year at representative customer sites, such as schools and nursing homes, to obtain not only the level of technology investment, but also the optimal hourly operating schedules. This paper focuses on analysis of storage technologies in DER optimization on a building level, with example applications for commercial buildings. Preliminary analysis indicates that storage technologies respond effectively to time-varying electricity prices, i.e., by charging batteries during periods of low electricity prices and discharging them during peak hours. The results also indicate that storage technologies significantly alter the residual load profile, which can contribute to lower carbon emissions depending on the test site, its load profile, and its adopted DER technologies.

Lacommare, Kristina S H; Stadler, Michael; Aki, Hirohisa; Firestone, Ryan; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

A STUDY OF CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE TANKS  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford reservation Tank Farms in Washington State has 177 underground storage tanks that contain approximately 50 million gallons of liquid legacy radioactive waste from cold war plutonium production. These tanks will continue to store waste until it is treated and disposed. These nuclear wastes were converted to highly alkaline pH wastes to protect the carbon steel storage tanks from corrosion. However, the carbon steel is still susceptible to localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. The waste chemistry varies from tank to tank, and contains various combinations of hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, chloride, carbonate, aluminate and other species. The effect of each of these species and any synergistic effects on localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of carbon steel have been investigated with electrochemical polarization, slow strain rate, and crack growth rate testing. The effect of solution chemistry, pH, temperature and applied potential are all considered and their role in the corrosion behavior will be discussed.

BOOMER, K.D.

2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

148

Immobilized low-activity waste interim storage facility, Project W-465 conceptual design report  

SciTech Connect

This report outlines the design and Total Estimated Cost to modify the four unused grout vaults for the remote handling and interim storage of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW). The grout vault facilities in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site were constructed in the 1980s to support Tank Waste disposal activities. The facilities were to serve project B-714 which was intended to store grouted low-activity waste. The existing 4 unused grout vaults, with modifications for remote handling capability, will provide sufficient capacity for approximately three years of immobilized low activity waste (ILAW) production from the Tank Waste Remediation System-Privatization Vendors (TWRS-PV). These retrofit modifications to the grout vaults will result in an ILAW interim storage facility (Project W465) that will comply with applicable DOE directives, and state and federal regulations.

Pickett, W.W.

1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

149

Fire hazards analysis of transuranic waste storage and assay facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document analyzes the fire hazards associated with operations at the Central Waste Complex. It provides the analysis and recommendations necessary to ensure compliance with applicable fire codes.

Busching, K.R., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

150

Radioactive waste shipments to Hanford Retrievable Storage from the General Electric Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Pleasanton, California  

SciTech Connect

During the next two decades the transuranic (TRU) wastes now stored in the burial trenches and storage facilities at the Hanford Site are to be retrieved, processed at the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, and shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, New Mexico for final disposal. Approximately 3.8% of the TRU waste to be retrieved for shipment to WIPP was generated at the General Electric (GE) Vallecitos Nuclear Center (VNC) in Pleasanton, California and shipped to the Hanford Site for storage. The purpose of this report is to characterize these radioactive solid wastes using process knowledge, existing records, and oral history interviews. The waste was generated almost exclusively from the activities, of the Plutonium Fuels Development Laboratory and the Plutonium Analytical Laboratory. Section 2.0 provides further details of the VNC physical plant, facility operations, facility history, and current status. The solid radioactive wastes were associated with two US Atomic Energy Commission/US Department of Energy reactor programs -- the Fast Ceramic Reactor (FCR) program, and the Fast Flux Test Reactor (FFTR) program. These programs involved the fabrication and testing of fuel assemblies that utilized plutonium in an oxide form. The types and estimated quantities of waste resulting from these programs are discussed in detail in Section 3.0. A detailed discussion of the packaging and handling procedures used for the VNC radioactive wastes shipped to the Hanford Site is provided in Section 4.0. Section 5.0 provides an in-depth look at this waste including the following: weight and volume of the waste, container types and numbers, physical description of the waste, radiological components, hazardous constituents, and current storage/disposal locations.

Vejvoda, E.J.; Pottmeyer, J.A.; DeLorenzo, D.S.; Weyns-Rollosson, M.I. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc., NM (United States); Duncan, D.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Application of rock melting to construction of storage holes for nuclear waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rock melting technology can provide in-situ glass liners in nuclear waste package emplacement holes to reduce permeability and increase borehole stability. Reduction of permeability would reduce the time and probability of groundwater contacting the waste packages. Increasing the stability of the storage boreholes would enhance the retrievability of the nuclear waste packages. The rock melting hole forming technology has already been tested in volcanic tuff similar to the geology at the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. 6 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Neudecker, J.W. Jr.

1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

152

Interim Storage of Greater than Class C Low Level Waste, Rev. 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report serves as a guideline for the safe, interim on-site storage of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) that exceeds the activity limitations for near-surface disposal set forth in 10 CFR 61.55. The nuclear industry refers to this waste as "greater than Class C (GTTC) waste" as it exceeds the Class C limits in the referenced regulation. At the present time, there is no licensed disposal facility for GTCC waste in the United States . This situation forces commercial nuclear reactors to store it on si...

2003-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

153

METHODOLOGY & CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT HANFORD SITE [SEC 1 & 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Waste stored within tank farm double-shell tanks (DST) and single-shell tanks (SST) generates flammable gas (principally hydrogen) to varying degrees depending on the type, amount, geometry, and condition of the waste. The waste generates hydrogen through the radiolysis of water, thermolytic decomposition of organic compounds, and corrosion of a tank's carbon steel walls. Radiolysis and thermolytic decomposition also generate ammonia. Nonflammable gases, which act as diluents (such as nitrous oxide), are also produced. Additional flammable gases (e.g., methane) are generated by chemical reactions between various degradation products of organic chemicals present in the tanks. Volatile and semivolatile organic chemicals in tanks also produce organic vapors. The generated gases in tank waste are either released continuously to the tank headspace or are retained in the waste matrix. Retained gas may be released in a spontaneous or induced gas release event (GRE) that can significantly increase the flammable gas concentration in tank headspace as described in RPP-7771, Flammable Gas Safety Issue Resolution. Appendices A through L provide supporting information. This document categorizes each of the large waste storage tanks into one of several categories based on each tank's waste and characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement event.

BARKER, S.A.; HEDENGREN, D.C.

2003-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

154

Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, 616 Nonradioactive dangerous waste storage facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter provides information on the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of the waste stored at the 616 NRDWSF. A waste analysis plan is included that describes the methodology used for determining waste types.

Price, S.M.

1997-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

155

Thermal Energy Storage/Waste Heat Recovery Applications in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cement industry is the most energy-intensive industry in the United States in terms of energy cost as a percentage of the product according to a 1973 report by the Cost of Living Council. Martin Marietta Aerospace, Denver Division, and the Portland Cement Association have studied the potential benefits of using waste heat recovery methods and thermal energy storage systems in the cement manufacturing process. This work was performed under DOE Contract No. EC-77-C-01-50S4. The study has been completed and illustrates very attractive cost benefits realized from waste heat recovery/thermal storage systems. This paper will identify and quantify the sources of rejected energy in the cement manufacturing process, establish uses of this energy, exhibit various energy storage concepts, and present a methodology for selection of most promising energy storage systems. Two storage systems show the best promise - rock beds and draw salt storage. Thermal performance and detailed economic analyses have been performed on these systems and will be presented. Through use of thermal energy storage in conjunction with waste heat electric power generation units, an estimated 2.4 x 1013 BTU per year, or an equivalent of 4.0 x 10 barrels of oil per year, can be conserved. Attractive rates of return on investment of the proposed systems are an incentive for utilization and further development.

Beshore, D. G.; Jaeger, F. A.; Gartner, E. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

U.S. Department of Energy Awards Contracts for Waste Storage Canisters for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Awards Contracts for Waste Storage U.S. Department of Energy Awards Contracts for Waste Storage Canisters for Yucca Mountain U.S. Department of Energy Awards Contracts for Waste Storage Canisters for Yucca Mountain May 21, 2008 - 12:00pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that Areva Federal Services and NAC International have been awarded contracts for the design, licensing, and demonstration of the Transportation, Aging, and Disposal (TAD) canister system. The two contracts have a total value of up to $13.8 million if all options are exercised by DOE and are each for a term of up to five years. The TAD canister will be the primary means for packaging spent nuclear fuel for transportation to and disposal in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, about 90 miles northwest of Las

157

U.S. Department of Energy Awards Contracts for Waste Storage Canisters for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Awards Contracts for Waste Storage U.S. Department of Energy Awards Contracts for Waste Storage Canisters for Yucca Mountain U.S. Department of Energy Awards Contracts for Waste Storage Canisters for Yucca Mountain May 21, 2008 - 12:00pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that Areva Federal Services and NAC International have been awarded contracts for the design, licensing, and demonstration of the Transportation, Aging, and Disposal (TAD) canister system. The two contracts have a total value of up to $13.8 million if all options are exercised by DOE and are each for a term of up to five years. The TAD canister will be the primary means for packaging spent nuclear fuel for transportation to and disposal in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, about 90 miles northwest of Las

158

The integration of water loop heat pump and building structural thermal storage systems  

SciTech Connect

Many commercial buildings need heat in one part and, at the same time, cooling in another part. Even more common is the need for heating during one part of the day and cooling during another in the same spaces. If that energy could be shifted or stored for later use, significant energy might be saved. If a building's heating and cooling subsystems could be integrated with the building's structural mass and used to collect, store, and deliver energy, the energy might be save cost-effectively. To explore this opportunity, researchers at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) examined the thermal interactions between the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system and the structure of a commercial building. Computer models were developed to simulate the interactions in an existing building located in Seattle, Washington, to determine how these building subsystems could be integrated to improve energy efficiency. The HVAC subsystems in the existing building were modeled. These subsystems consist of decentralized water-source heat pumps (WSHP) in a closed water loop, connected to cooling towers for heat rejection during cooling mode and boilers to augment heating. An initial base case'' computer model of the Seattle building, as-built, was developed. Metered data available for the building were used to calibrate this model to ensure that the analysis would provide information that closely reflected the operation of a real building. The HVAC system and building structure were integrated in the model using the concrete floor slabs as thermal storage media. The slabs may be actively charged during off-peak periods with the chilled water in the loop and then either actively or passively discharged into the conditioned space during peak periods. 21 refs., 37 figs., 17 tabs.

Marseille, T.J.; Schliesing, J.S.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

The integration of water loop heat pump and building structural thermal storage systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many commercial buildings need heat in one part and, at the same time, cooling in another part. Even more common is the need for heating during one part of the day and cooling during another in the same spaces. If that energy could be shifted or stored for later use, significant energy might be saved. If a building's heating and cooling subsystems could be integrated with the building's structural mass and used to collect, store, and deliver energy, the energy might be save cost-effectively. To explore this opportunity, researchers at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) examined the thermal interactions between the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system and the structure of a commercial building. Computer models were developed to simulate the interactions in an existing building located in Seattle, Washington, to determine how these building subsystems could be integrated to improve energy efficiency. The HVAC subsystems in the existing building were modeled. These subsystems consist of decentralized water-source heat pumps (WSHP) in a closed water loop, connected to cooling towers for heat rejection during cooling mode and boilers to augment heating. An initial base case'' computer model of the Seattle building, as-built, was developed. Metered data available for the building were used to calibrate this model to ensure that the analysis would provide information that closely reflected the operation of a real building. The HVAC system and building structure were integrated in the model using the concrete floor slabs as thermal storage media. The slabs may be actively charged during off-peak periods with the chilled water in the loop and then either actively or passively discharged into the conditioned space during peak periods. 21 refs., 37 figs., 17 tabs.

Marseille, T.J.; Schliesing, J.S.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Record of Decision for the Department of Energy's Waste Management Program; Treatment and Storage of Transuranic Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3630 3630 Federal Register / Vol. 63, No. 15 / Friday, January 23, 1998 / Notices to agreements DOE has entered into, such as those with States, relating to the treatment and storage of TRU waste. Future NEPA review could include, but would not necessarily be limited to, analysis of the need to supplement existing environmental reviews. DOE would conduct all such TRU waste shipments between sites in accordance with applicable transportation requirements and would coordinate these shipments with appropriate State, Tribal and local authorities. This Record of Decision was prepared in coordination with the Record of Decision issued on January 16, 1998, on disposal of DOE's TRU waste, which is based on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Phase Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (WIPP

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste storage building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Comprehensive work plan for Building 3001 storage canal at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Comprehensive Work Plan describes the method of accomplishment to replace the shielding protection of the water in the canal with a controlled low strength material (CLSM) 4. The canal was used during the operation of the Oak Ridge Graphite Reactor in the 1940s and 1950s to transport spent fuel slugs and irradiated test materials from the reactor, under water to the hot cell in Building 3019 for further processing, packaging, and handling. After the reactor was shut down, the canal was used until 1990 to store some irradiated materials until they could be transferred to a Solid Waste Storage Area. This task has the following objectives and components: (1) minimize potential future risk to human health and the environment; (2) reduce surveillance and maintenance cost of the canal; (3) perform site preparation activities; (4) replace the water in the canal with a solid CLSM; (5) pump the water to the Process Waste Treatment System (PWTS) for further processing at the same rate that the CLSM is pumped under the water; (6) remove the water using a process that will protect the workers and the public in the visitors area from contamination while the CLSM is being pumped underneath the water; (7) painting a protective coating material over the CLSM after the CLSM has cured.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Computational Study on Thermal Properties of HVAC System with Building Structure Thermal Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building structure thermal storage (BSTS) HVAC systems can store heat during nighttime thermal storage operation (nighttime operation hours) by using off-peak electricity and release it in the daytime air-conditioning operation (daytime operation hours) by utilizing a large amount of the thermal capacity of building structures such as beams, columns and floors composed of concrete. These BSTS systems have recently been considered as one method for leveling hourly electricity demands for HVAC on a day-to-day basis. Through a simulation using a model developed with experimental data, this paper describes how various factors for the design and operation of a BSTS quantitatively affect the charge/discharge performances of a HVAC system. As a result, the following was revealed: the thermal performance of the system is strongly influenced by the daily heat storage operation hours, supply air volume and supply air temperature during the nighttime operation hours, stored heat caused the total daytime cooling extraction to decrease by 11% to 58% and the daily total cooling extraction through nighttime to daytime to increase by 4% to 17% compared with the values of non- thermal storage HVAC system.

Sato, Y.; Sagara, N.; Ryu, Y.; Maehara, K.; Nagai, T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Interim waste storage for the Integral Fast Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR), which Argonne National Laboratory is developing, is an innovative liquid metal breeder reactor that uses metallic fuel and has a close coupled fuel recovery process. A pyrochemical process is used to separate the fission products from the actinide elements. These actinides are used to make new fuel for the reactor. As part of the overall IFR development program, Argonne has refurbished an existing Fuel Cycle Facility at ANL-West and is installing new equipment to demonstrate the remote reprocessing and fabrication of fuel for the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II). During this demonstration the wastes that are produced will be treated and packaged to produce waste forms that would be typical of future commercial operations. These future waste forms would, assuming Argonne development goals are fulfilled, be essentially free of long half-life transuranic isotopes. Promising early results indicate that actinide extraction processes can be developed to strip these isotopes from waste stream and return them to the IFR type reactors for fissioning. 1 fig.

Benedict, R.W.; Phipps, R.D. (Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (USA)); Condiff, D.W. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Vascular plants of waste storage sites in the 200 areas of the Hanford reservation  

SciTech Connect

A brief accounting of terrestrial, riparian and semi-aquatic plants known to be associated with radioactive waste storage sites in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Reservation is given. In most cases the species are characteristic of those which generally inhabit the reservation, but some plants are restricted to specialized habitats provided by particular waste storage sites. It is impractical to list all species growing at each waste storage site because of seasonal variation and changes brought about by environmental management practices. An alpbabetical listing has been prepared with an example of where each species is known to occur. The list will be updated as needed and expanded to include other waste storage areas. Plant specimens were collected during spring and fall when flowering material was available. Herbarium mounts were prepared of many specimens and have been retained as part of the Hanford Reservation herbarium collection. Identification to species level was made whenever possible. Color photographs of the specimen mounts are used as training aids and demonstration material by ARHCO Radiation Monitoring personnel. (auth)

Price, K.R.; Rickard, W.H.

1973-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Performance assessment for continuing and future operations at solid waste storage area 6. Appendices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This appendix provides the radionuclide inventory data used for the Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 Performance Assessment (PA). The uncertainties in the radionuclide inventory data are also provided, along with the descriptions of the methods used to estimate the uncertainties.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Borehole Miner - Extendible Nozzle Development for Radioactive Waste Dislodging and Retrieval from Underground Storage Tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes development of borehole-miner extendible-nozzle water-jetting technology for dislodging and retrieving salt cake, sludge} and supernate to remediate underground storage tanks full of radioactive waste. The extendible-nozzle development was based on commercial borehole-miner technology.

CW Enderlin; DG Alberts; JA Bamberger; M White

1998-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

167

Nondestructive examination of DOE high-level waste storage tanks  

SciTech Connect

A number of DOE sites have buried tanks containing high-level waste. Tanks of particular interest am double-shell inside concrete cylinders. A program has been developed for the inservice inspection of the primary tank containing high-level waste (HLW), for testing of transfer lines and for the inspection of the concrete containment where possible. Emphasis is placed on the ultrasonic examination of selected areas of the primary tank, coupled with a leak-detection system capable of detecting small leaks through the wall of the primary tank. The NDE program is modelled after ASME Section XI in many respects, particularly with respects to the sampling protocol. Selected testing of concrete is planned to determine if there has been any significant degradation. The most probable failure mechanisms are corrosion-related so that the examination program gives major emphasis to possible locations for corrosion attack.

Bush, S.; Bandyopadhyay, K.; Kassir, M.; Mather, B.; Shewmon, P.; Streicher, M.; Thompson, B.; van Rooyen, D.; Weeks, J.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Making Green Building Units By Using Some Wastes of Ceramic Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ceramic tiles industry produces a lot of wastes such as ceramic sludge, broken under quality tiles and the ceramic dust. The accumulated wastes comprise a great pollution problem on the surrounded environment. The ceramic properties of Egyptian clays show that they are highly plastic and very sensitive upon drying. Accordingly, they are continuously in need to some additives for adjusting such properties. The environmental impact of this work is producing a green building unit has a zero waste energy. The recycling of ceramic solid waste industry in building operations contributes with minimizing the energy consumption and the cost of building to achieve building sustainability. In this work each of 15, 25 and 50% ceramic sludge solid waste were mixed with a chosen clayey raw material for making green building bricks. The mix contains 15% sludge and 85% clay shows a lower plasticity coefficient and an insensitive behaviour upon drying in addition to suitable physico-mechanical properties for the fired clay articles. This suggested mix was applied within a common brick fabric in Egypt for studying the possibility of its industrial application.

Abd El-Ghafour, N.G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

SRS Waste Solidification Building Project Peer Review, July...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRS-2011-07-15 Site: Savannah River Site, NA-26 Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Waste...

170

Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) Dangerous Waste Training Plan (DWTP)  

SciTech Connect

This training plan describes general requirements, worker categories, and provides course descriptions for operation of the WESF permitted miscellaneous storage units, and the < 90 day accumulation areas.

LEBARON, G.J.

1999-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

171

Calcined Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This comprehensive report provides definitive volume, mass, and composition (chemical and radioactivity) of calcined waste stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. Calcine composition data are required for regulatory compliance (such as permitting and waste disposal), future treatment of the caline, and shipping the calcine to an off-Site-facility (such as a geologic repository). This report also contains a description of the calcine storage bins. The Calcined Solids Storage Facilities (CSSFs) were designed by different architectural engineering firms and built at different times. Each CSSF has a unique design, reflecting varying design criteria and lessons learned from historical CSSF operation. The varying CSSF design will affect future calcine retrieval processes and equipment. Revision 4 of this report presents refinements and enhancements of calculations concerning the composition, volume, mass, chemical content, and radioactivity of calcined waste produced and stored within the CSSFs. The historical calcine samples are insufficient in number and scope of analysis to fully characterize the entire inventory of calcine in the CSSFs. Sample data exist for all the liquid wastes that were calcined. This report provides calcine composition data based on liquid waste sample analyses, volume of liquid waste calcined, calciner operating data, and CSSF operating data using several large Microsoft Excel (Microsoft 2003) databases and spreadsheets that are collectively called the Historical Processing Model. The calcine composition determined by this method compares favorably with historical calcine sample data.

Staiger, M. Daniel, Swenson, Michael C.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Decision and systems analysis for underground storage tank waste retrieval systems and tank waste remediation system  

SciTech Connect

Hanford`s underground tanks (USTs) pose one of the most challenging hazardous and radioactive waste problems for the Department of Energy (DOE). Numerous schemes have been proposed for removing the waste from the USTs, but the technology options for doing this are largely unproven. To help assess the options, an Independent Review Group (IRG) was established to conduct a broad review of retrieval systems and the tank waste remediation system. The IRG consisted of the authors of this report.

Bitz, D.A. [Independent Consultant, Kirkland, WA (United States); Berry, D.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jardine, L.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

CSER 94-004: Criticality safety of double-shell waste storage tanks  

SciTech Connect

This criticality safety evaluation covers double-shell waste storage tanks (DSTs), double-contained receiver tanks (DCRTs), vault tanks, and the 242-A Evaporator located in the High Level Waste (HLW) Tank Farms on the Hanford Site. Limits and controls are specified and the basis for ensuring criticality safety is discussed. A minimum limit of 1,000 is placed upon the solids/plutonium mass ratio in incoming waste. The average solids/Pu mass ratio over all waste in tank farms is estimated to be about 74,500, about 150 times larger than required to assure subcriticality in homogeneous waste. PFP waste in Tank-102-SY has an estimated solids/Pu mass ratio of 10,000. Subcriticality is assured whenever the plutonium concentration is less than 2.6 g. The median reported plutonium concentration for 200 samples of waste solids is about 0.01 g (0.038 g/gal). A surveillance program is proposed to increase the knowledge of the waste and provide added assurance of the high degree of subcriticality.

Rogers, C.A.

1994-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

174

National Waste Terminal Storage Program: potenial problems in the waste transportation system  

SciTech Connect

Potential problems are identified which may impact the planning, organization, and operation of nuclear waste transportation systems serving federal repositories. These system-level problems have the potential of seriously interfering with the overall OWI Transportation/Logistics Study objective of having a viable nuclear waste transportation system in 1985. This report includes recommended action and priority judgments to address these problems and minimize their impact. The potential problems identified as most important have consequences which may impact the overall state of future preparedness for transporting nuclear waste. Other important concerns relate to the imposition of unnecessarily severe and costly restrictions on nuclear waste transportation, public and carrier acceptance, and the involvement of interested parties in planning and decision-making. The major recommendation of this report is that the planning and development of the waste transportation system should be controlled by a central planning activity which anticipates the impact of uncertainties and undesirable events.

DeSteese, J.G.; Rhoads, R.E.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

A Short History of Hanford Waste Generation, Storage, and Release  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nine nuclear reactors and four reprocessing plants at Hanford produced nearly two-thirds of the plutonium used in the United States for government purposes . These site operations also created large volumes of radioactive and chemical waste. Some contaminants were released into the environment, exposing people who lived downwind and downstream. Other contaminants were stored. The last reactor was shut down in 1987, and the last reprocessing plant closed in 1990. Most of the human-made radioactivity and about half of the chemicals remaining onsite are kept in underground tanks and surface facilities. The rest exists in the soil, groundwater, and burial grounds. Hanford contains about 40% of all the radioactivity that exists across the nuclear weapons complex. Today, environmental restoration activities are under way.

Gephart, Roy E.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Nondestructive testing methods for 55-gallon, waste storage drums  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) authorized Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to conduct a feasibility study to identify promising nondestructive testing (NDT) methods for detecting general and localized (both pitting and pinhole) corrosion in the 55-gal drums that are used to store solid waste materials at the Hanford Site. This document presents results obtained during a literature survey, identifies the relevant reference materials that were reviewed, provides a technical description of the methods that were evaluated, describes the laboratory tests that were conducted and their results, identifies the most promising candidate methods along with the rationale for these selections, and includes a work plan for recommended follow-on activities. This report contains a brief overview and technical description for each of the following NDT methods: magnetic testing techniques; eddy current testing; shearography; ultrasonic testing; radiographic computed tomography; thermography; and leak testing with acoustic detection.

Ferris, R.H.; Hildebrand, B.P.; Hockey, R.L.; Riechers, D.M.; Spanner, J.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Duncan, D.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

DQO Summary Report for 324 and 327 Building Hot Cells D4 Project Waste Characterization  

SciTech Connect

This data quality objective (DQO) summary report provides the results of the DQO process conducted for waste characterization activities for the 324 and 327 Building hot cells decommission, deactivate, decontaminate, and demolish activities. This DQO summary report addresses the systems and processes related to the hot cells, air locks, vaults, tanks, piping, basins, air plenums, air ducts, filters, an adjacent elements that have high dose rates, high contamination levels, and/or suspect transuranic waste, which will require nonstandard D4 techniques.

T.A. Lee

2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

178

Canister storage building (CSB) safety analysis report phase 3: Safety analysis documentation supporting CSB construction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Canister Storage Building (CSB) will be constructed in the 200 East Area of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. The CSB will be used to stage and store spent nuclear fuel (SNF) removed from the Hanford Site K Basins. The objective of this chapter is to describe the characteristics of the site on which the CSB will be located. This description will support the hazard analysis and accident analyses in Chapter 3.0. The purpose of this report is to provide an evaluation of the CSB design criteria, the design's compliance with the applicable criteria, and the basis for authorization to proceed with construction of the CSB.

Garvin, L.J.

1997-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

179

Analysis of Heat Charging and Discharging on the Phase Change Energy-Storage Composite Wallboard (PCECW) in Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research paper combines the phase change material and the basal building material to constitute a kind of new phase change energy- storage composite wallboard (PCECW), applied in a residential building in Beijing. We analyzed the energy-storage characteristics of the PCECW according to phase change energy-storage theory, which is used as the storage-heat body in the “light" inner wallboards, compared to the normal “heavy" inner wallboards. Through computer simulation, we measured the effects on the heating and energy consumption of the room when the enthalpy, thermal coefficient and thickness of the PCECW were changed. The results show that the PCECW the phase change wall could effectively reduce the temperature fluctuation and the winter heating energy consumption in the residential building.

Yue, H.; Chen, C.; Liu, Y.; Guo, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Safe interim storage of Hanford tank wastes, draft environmental impact statement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Draft EIS is prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Washington State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA). DOE and Ecology have identified the need to resolve near-term tank safety issues associated with Watchlist tanks as identified pursuant to Public Law (P.L.) 101-510, Section 3137, ``Safety Measures for Waste Tanks at Hanford Nuclear Reservation,`` of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1991, while continuing to provide safe storage for other Hanford wastes. This would be an interim action pending other actions that could be taken to convert waste to a more stable form based on decisions resulting from the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) EIS. The purpose for this action is to resolve safety issues concerning the generation of unacceptable levels of hydrogen in two Watchlist tanks, 101-SY and 103-SY. Retrieving waste in dilute form from Tanks 101-SY and 103-SY, hydrogen-generating Watchlist double shell tanks (DSTs) in the 200 West Area, and storage in new tanks is the preferred alternative for resolution of the hydrogen safety issues.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste storage building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Addendum to the Calcined Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an addendum to the report Calcined Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, INEEL/EXT-98-00455 Rev. 1, June 2003. The original report provided a summary description of the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities (CSSFs). It also contained dozens of pages of detailed data tables documenting the volume and composition (chemical content and radionuclide activity) of the calcine stored in the CSSFs and the liquid waste from which the calcine was derived. This addendum report compiles the calcine composition data from the original report. It presents the compiled data in a graphical format with units (weight percent, curies per cubic meter, and nanocuries per gram) that are commonly used in regulatory and waste acceptance criteria documents. The compiled data are easier to use and understand when comparing the composition of the calcine with potential regulatory or waste acceptance criteria. This addendum report also provides detailed explanations for the large variability in the calcine composition among the CSSFs. The calcine composition varies as a result of reprocessing different types of fuel that had different cladding materials. Different chemicals were used to dissolve the various types of fuel, extract the uranium, and calcine the resulting waste. This resulted in calcine with variable compositions. This addendum report also identifies a few trace chemicals and radionuclides for which the accuracy of the amounts estimated to be in the calcine could be improved by making adjustments to the assumptions and methods used in making the estimates.

M. D. Staiger; Michael Swenson; T. R. Thomas

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

WASTE SOLIDIFICATION BUILDING BENCH SCALE HIGH ACTIVITY WASTE SIMULANT VARIABILITY STUDY FY2008  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this task was to perform a variability study of the high activity waste (HAW) acidic feed to determine the impact of feed variability on the quality of the final grout and on the mixability of the salt solution into the dry powders. The HAW acidic feeds were processed through the neutralization/pH process, targeting a final pH of 12. These fluids were then blended with the dry materials to make the final waste forms. A secondary objective was to determine if elemental substitution for cost prohibitive or toxic elements in the simulant affects the mixing response, thus providing a more economical simulant for use in full scale tests. Though not an objective, the HAW simulant used in the full scale tests was also tested and compared to the results from this task. A statistically designed test matrix was developed based on the maximum molarity inputs used to make the acidic solutions. The maximum molarity inputs were: 7.39 HNO{sub 3}, 0.11618 gallium, 0.5423 silver, and 1.1032 'other' metals based on their NO{sub 3}{sup -} contribution. Substitution of the elements aluminum for gallium and copper for silver was also considered in this test matrix, resulting in a total of 40 tests. During the NaOH addition, the neutralization/pH adjustment process was controlled to a maximum temperature of 60 C. The neutralized/pH adjusted simulants were blended with Portland cement and zircon flour at a water to cement mass ratio of 0.30. The mass ratio of zircon flour to Portland cement was 1/12. The grout was made using a Hobart N-50 mixer running at low speed for two minutes to incorporate and properly wet the dry solids with liquid and at medium speed for five minutes for mixing. The resulting fresh grout was measured for three consecutive yield stress measurements. The cured grout was measured for set, bleed, and density. Given the conditions of preparing the grout in this task, all of the grouts were visually well mixed prior to preparing the grouts for measurements. All of the cured grouts were measured for bleed and set. All of the cured grouts satisfied the bleed and set requirements, where no bleed water was observed on any of the grout samples after one day and all had set within 3 days of curing. This data indicates, for a well mixed product, bleed and set requirement are satisfied for the range of acidic feeds tested in this task. The yield stress measurements provide both an indication on the mixability of the salt solution with dry materials and an indication of how quickly the grout is starting to form structure. The inability to properly mix these two streams into a well mixed grout product will lead to a non-homogeneous mixture that will impact product quality. Product quality issues could be unmixed regions of dry material and hot spots having high concentrations of americium 241. Mixes that were more difficult to incorporate typically resulted in grouts with higher yield stresses. The mixability from these tests will provide Waste Solidification Building (WSB) an indication of which grouts will be more challenging to mix. The first yield stress measurements were statistically compared to a list of variables, specifically the batched chemicals used to make the acidic solutions. The first yield stress was also compared to the physical properties of the acidic solutions, physical and pH properties of the neutralized/pH adjusted solutions, and chemical and physical properties of the grout.

Hansen, E; Timothy Jones, T; Tommy Edwards, T; Alex Cozzi, A

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

183

Plan for waste package environment for NNWSI [Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations  

SciTech Connect

The purpose and objective of the Waste Package Environment task is to establish and characterize the environmental processes affecting the near-field repository host rock after waste package emplacement. These processes, which reflect the perturbation induces in the environment by engineering effects and by the waste package decay heat and radiation, will influence chemical, mineralogical and hydrological features of the environment. The thermal and radiation output of the waste packages will change with time, resulting in an environment in which the chemical, mineralogical and physical attributes may also change through time. To assure that waste package design considerations reflect the characteristics of this evolving environment, it is necessary to determine the range of conditions that may develop in the pre- and post-emplacement waste package environment. To assure that the emplacement configurations do not compromise the lifetime of the repository or the waste packages, the design of the emplacement configuration must also consider the environmental features. Recognition of these requirements resulted in the development of the issue an information needs. 20 refs.

Glassley, W.E.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Review of private sector treatment, storage, and disposal capacity for radioactive waste. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This report is an update of a report that summarized the current and near-term commercial and disposal of radioactive and mixed waste. This report was capacity for the treatment, storage, dating and written for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) with the objective of updating and expanding the report entitled ``Review of Private Sector Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Capacity for Radioactive Waste``, (INEL-95/0020, January 1995). The capacity to process radioactively-contaminated protective clothing and/or respirators was added to the list of private sector capabilities to be assessed. Of the 20 companies surveyed in the previous report, 14 responded to the request for additional information, five did not respond, and one asked to be deleted from the survey. One additional company was identified as being capable of performing LLMW treatability studies and six were identified as providers of laundering services for radioactively-contaminated protective clothing and/or respirators.

Smith, M.; Harris, J.G.; Moore-Mayne, S.; Mayes, R.; Naretto, C.

1995-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

185

LIMITATIONS FOR EXISTING STORAGE TANKS FOR RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM SEPARATIONS PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

The physical limitations of existing storage tanks for radioactive wastes from separations plants are defined as a guide for preparing process and operating criteria for the existing tank forms to assure continued integrity of the tanks. A "safe-load" curve for each of the four groups of tanks based on current technology is presented. Loading conditions, operation procedures, and thermal stresses are discussed. (M.C.G.)

Doud, E.; Stivers, H.W.

1959-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

186

MRS (monitored retrievable storage) Systems Study Task 1 report: Waste management system reliability analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is one of nine studies undertaken by contractors to the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), to provide a technical basis for re-evaluating the role of a monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility. The study evaluates the relative reliabilities of systems with and without an MRS facility using current facility design bases. The principal finding of this report is that the MRS system has several operational advantages that enhance system reliability. These are: (1) the MRS system is likely to encounter fewer technical issues, (2) the MRS would assure adequate system surface storage capacity to accommodate repository construction and startup delays of up to five years or longer if the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act (NWPAA) were amended, (3) the system with an MRS has two federal acceptance facilities with parallel transportation routing and surface storage capacity, and (4) the MRS system would allow continued waste acceptance for up to a year after a major disruption of emplacement operations at the repository.

Clark, L.L.; Myers, R.S.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Thermal energy storage for building heating and cooling applications. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the first in a series of quarterly progress reports covering activities at ORNL to develop thermal energy storage (TES) technology applicable to building heating and cooling. Studies to be carried out will emphasize latent heat storage in that sensible heat storage is held to be an essentially existing technology. Development of a time-dependent analytical model of a TES system charged with a phase-change material was started. A report on TES subsystems for application to solar energy sources is nearing completion. Studies into the physical chemistry of TES materials were initiated. Preliminary data were obtained on the melt-freeze cycle behavior and viscosities of sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate and a mixture of Glauber's salt and Borax; limited melt-freeze data were obtained on two paraffin waxes. A subcontract was signed with Monsanto Research Corporation for studies on form-stable crystalline polymer pellets for TES; subcontracts are being negotiated with four other organizations (Clemson University, Dow Chemical Company, Franklin Institute, and Suntek Research Associates). Review of 10 of 13 unsolicited proposals received was completed by the end of June 1976.

Hoffman, H.W.; Kedl, R.J.

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Nuclear heat-load limits for above-grade storage of solid transuranium wastes  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear safety and heat load limits were established for above-grade storage of transuranium (TRU) wastes. Nuclear safety limits were obtained from a study by J.L. Forstner and are summarized. Heat load limits are based on temperature calculations for TRU waste drums stored in concrete containers (hats), and results are summarized. Waste already in storage is within these limits. The limiting factors for individual drum heat load limits were (1) avoidance of temperatures in excess of 190/sup 0/F (decomposition temperature of anion resin) when anion resin is present in a concrete hat, and (2) avoidance of temperatures in excess of 450/sup 0/F (ignition temperature of paper) at any point inside a waste drum. The limiting factor for concrete had heat load limits was avoidance of temperatures in excess of 265/sup 0/F (melt point of high density polyethylene) at the drum liners. A temperature profile for drums and hats filled to recommended limits is shown. Equations and assumptions used were conservative.

Clontz, B.G.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Existing nuclear sites can be used for new powerplants and nuclear waste storage  

SciTech Connect

Locating future nuclear powerplants at existing sites offers important advantages which warrant consideration by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The number of locations committed to long-term restricted use and periodic surveillance and maintenance could be limited. The burden of long-term care and final disposition of retired nuclear powerplants could be eased. Overall environmental impacts from the construction and operation of the powerplants could be reduced. Time and money in completing licensing proceedings could be saved. GAO also found that low-level wastes can be stored at nuclear powerplant sites, but such storage only postpones the inevitable need for disposal. Finally, permanent waste disposal at powerplant sites should only be permitted when sites conform to the national low-level waste disposal plan being prepared by the Department of Energy.

Staats, E.B.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Design requirements document for Project W-465, immobilized low-activity waste interim storage  

SciTech Connect

The scope of this Design Requirements Document (DRD) is to identify the functions and associated requirements that must be performed to accept, transport, handle, and store immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) produced by the privatized Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) treatment contractors. The functional and performance requirements in this document provide the basis for the conceptual design of the TWRS ILAW Interim Storage facility project and provides traceability from the program level requirements to the project design activity. Technical and programmatic risk associated with the TWRS planning basis are discussed in the Tank Waste Remediation System Decisions and Risk Assessment (Johnson 1994). The design requirements provided in this document will be augmented by additional detailed design data documented by the project.

Burbank, D.A.

1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

191

Operations and Maintenance Concept Plan for the Immobilized High Level Waste (IHLW) Interim Storage Facility  

SciTech Connect

This O&M Concept looks at the future operations and maintenance of the IHLW/CSB interim storage facility. It defines the overall strategy, objectives, and functional requirements for the portion of the building to be utilized by Project W-464. The concept supports the tasks of safety basis planning, risk mitigation, alternative analysis, decision making, etc. and will be updated as required to support the evolving design.

JANIN, L.F.

2000-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

192

Immobilized High Level Waste (HLW) Interim Storage Alternative Generation and analysis and Decision Report 2nd Generation Implementing Architecture  

SciTech Connect

Two alternative approaches were previously identified to provide second-generation interim storage of Immobilized High-Level Waste (IHLW). One approach was retrofit modification of the Fuel and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) to accommodate IHLW. The results of the evaluation of the FMEF as the second-generation IHLW interim storage facility and subsequent decision process are provided in this document.

CALMUS, R.B.

2000-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

193

Independent review of inappropriate identification, storage and treatment methods of polychlorinated biphenyl waste streams  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the review was to evaluate incidents involving the inappropriate identification, storage, and treatment methods associated with polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) waste streams originating from the V-tank system at the Test Area North (TAN). The team was instructed to perform a comprehensive review of Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO`s) compliance programs related to these incidents to assess the adequacy and effectiveness of the management program in all respects including: adequacy of the waste management program in meeting all LMITCO requirements and regulations; adequacy of policies, plans, and procedures in addressing and implementing all federal and state requirements and regulations; and compliance status of LMITCO, LMITCO contract team members, and LMITCO contract/team member subcontractor personnel with established PCB management policies, plans, and procedures. The V-Tanks are part of an intermediate waste disposal system and are located at the Technical Support Facility (TSF) at TAN at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The IRT evaluated how a waste was characterized, managed, and information was documented; however, they did not take control of wastes or ensure followup was performed on all waste streams that may have been generated from the V-Tanks. The team has also subsequently learned that the Environmental Restoration (ER) program is revising the plans for the decontamination and decommissioning of the intermediate waste disposal system based on new information listed and PCB wastes. The team has not reviewed those in-process changes. The source of PCB in the V-Tank is suspected to be a spill of hydraulic fluid in 1968.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

High level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID), Volume 6  

SciTech Connect

The High-Level Waste Storage Tank Farms/242-A Evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is contained in multiple volumes. This document (Volume 6) outlines the standards and requirements for the sections on: Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Research and Development and Experimental Activities, and Nuclear Safety.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

US Department of Energy Storage of Spent Fuel and High Level Waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

ABSTRACT This paper provides an overview of the Department of Energy's (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high level waste (HLW) storage management. Like commercial reactor fuel, DOE's SNF and HLW were destined for the Yucca Mountain repository. In March 2010, the DOE filed a motion with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to withdraw the license application for the repository at Yucca Mountain. A new repository is now decades away. The default for the commercial and DOE research reactor fuel and HLW is on-site storage for the foreseeable future. Though the motion to withdraw the license application and delay opening of a repository signals extended storage, DOE's immediate plans for management of its SNF and HLW remain the same as before Yucca Mountain was designated as the repository, though it has expanded its research and development efforts to ensure safe extended storage. This paper outlines some of the proposed research that DOE is conducting and will use to enhance its storage systems and facilities.

Sandra M Birk

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Storage DUF6 Health Risks line line Accidents Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Transportation Storage A discussion of depleted UF6 cylinder storage activities and associated risks. Management Activities for Cylinders in Storage The long-term management of the existing DUF6 storage cylinders and the continual effort to remediate and maintain the safe condition of the DUF6 storage cylinders will remain a Departmental responsibility for many years into the future. The day to day management of the DUF6 cylinders includes actions designed to cost effectively maintain and improve their storage conditions, such as: General storage cylinder and storage yard maintenance; Performing regular inspections of cylinders; Restacking and respacing the cylinders to improve drainage and to

197

Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Risks » Storage Environmental Risks » Storage Depleted UF6 Environmental Risks line line Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Environmental Risks of Depleted UF6 Storage Discussion of the potential environmental impacts from storage of depleted UF6 at the three current storage sites, as well as potential impacts from the storage of depleted uranium after conversion to an oxide form. Impacts Analyzed in the PEIS The PEIS included an analysis of the potential environmental impacts from continuing to store depleted UF6 cylinders at the three current storage sites, as well as potential impacts from the storage of depleted uranium after conversion to an oxide form. Impacts from Continued Storage of UF6 Cylinders Continued storage of the UF6 cylinders would require extending the use of a

198

Final Environmental Impact Statement (Supplement to ERDA-1537, September 1977) Waste Management Operations Double-Shell Tanks for Defense High-Level Radioactive Waste Storage Savannah River Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Do Do E/EIS-0062 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT mATEIUIENT (Supplement to ERDA-1537, September 1977) Waste ~ Management Operations Savannah River Plant ! Aiken, South Carolina Double-Shell Tanks for Defense High-Level Radioactive Waste Storage April 1980 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WASHINGTON. D.C.20545 1980 WL 94273 (F.R.) NOTICES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Deputy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Waste Management Double-Shell Tanks for Defense High-Level Radioactive Waste Storage, Savannah River Plant, Aiken, S.C. Wednesday, July 9, 1980 *46154 Record of Decision Decision. The decision has been made to complete the construction of the 14 double-shell tanks and use them to store defense high-level radioactive waste at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). Background. The SRP, located near Aiken, South Carolina, is a major installation of the

199

Nevada Nuclear-Waste-Storage Investigations. Quarterly report, April-June 1982  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) are studying the Nevada Test Site (NTS) area to establish whether it would qualify as a licensable location for a commercial nuclear waste repository; determining whether specific underground rock masses in the NTS area are technically acceptable for permanently disposing of highly radioactive solid wastes; and developing and demonstrating the capability to safely handle and store commercial spent reactor fuel and high-level waste. Progress reports for the following eight tasks are presented: systems; waste package; site; repository; regulatory and institutional; test facilities; land acquisition; and program management. Some of the highlights are: A code library was established to provide a central location for documentation of repository performance assessment codes. A two-dimensional finite element code, SAGUARO, was developed for modeling saturated/unsaturated groundwater flow. The results of an initial experiment to determine canister penetration rates due to corrosion indicate the expected strong effect of toxic environmental conditions on the corrosion rate of carbon steel in tuff-conditioned water. Wells USW-H3 and USW-H4 at Yucca Mountain have been sampled for groundwater analysis. A summary characterizing and relating the mineralogy and petrology of Yucca Mountain tuffs was compiled from the findings of studies of core samples from five drill holes.

None

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Risk perception on management of nuclear high-level and transuranic waste storage  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy`s program for disposing of nuclear High-Level Waste (HLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste has been impeded by overwhelming political opposition fueled by public perceptions of actual risk. Analysis of these perceptions shows them to be deeply rooted in images of fear and dread that have been present since the discovery of radioactivity. The development and use of nuclear weapons linked these images to reality and the mishandling of radioactive waste from the nations military weapons facilities has contributed toward creating a state of distrust that cannot be erased quickly or easily. In addition, the analysis indicates that even the highly educated technical community is not well informed on the latest technology involved with nuclear HLW and TRU waste disposal. It is not surprising then, that the general public feels uncomfortable with DOE`s management plans for with nuclear HLW and TRU waste disposal. Postponing the permanent geologic repository and use of Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) would provide the time necessary for difficult social and political issues to be resolved. It would also allow time for the public to become better educated if DOE chooses to become proactive.

Dees, L.A.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste storage building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Recommended Changes to Guidelines for Operating an Interim On-Site Low Level Radioactive Waste Storage Facility - For NRC Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The majority of commercial U.S. nuclear stations have constructed on-site low-level waste (LLW) storage facilities, and most of these same utilities are experiencing or have experienced at least one period of interim on-site storage. EPRI has issued two revisions of Guidelines for Operating an Interim On-Site Low Level Radioactive Waste Storage Facility. Revision 1 of these Guidelines focused on operational considerations and incorporated many of the lessons learned while operating various types of LLW s...

2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

202

Report of the committee to review the use of J-13 well water in Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Management Project Office of the Department of Energy conducted a special audit of the activities of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation Project at Livermore. It was noted that there never has been a comprehensive, well-documented examination of the basis for the use of J-13 water in the nuclear waste storage investigations. In each of the sections of This Report, an issue relating to the use of J-13 water has been addressed. 58 refs., 19 figs., 8 tabs.

Harrar, J.E.; Carley, J.F.; Isherwood, W.F.; Raber, E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Building the Cost Curve for CO2 Storage: North American Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study has assessed geological storage opportunities both in on-shore USA and Canada. The Canadian component concentrated on the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin where the main storage potential for Canada is considered to exist. The CO2 storage options considered in the study included: Storage in depleted/disused oil and gas fields, Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) combined with CO2 storage, Enhanced coal bed methane recovery (ECBM) combined with CO2 storage, Storage in deep saline aquifers (open and cl...

2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

204

Radioactive waste shipments to Hanford retrievable storage from Westinghouse Advanced Reactors and Nuclear Fuels Divisions, Cheswick, Pennsylvania  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the next two decades the transuranic (TRU) waste now stored in the burial trenches and storage facilities at the Hanford Sits in southeastern Washington State is to be retrieved, processed at the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, and shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), near Carlsbad, New Mexico for final disposal. Approximately 5.7 percent of the TRU waste to be retrieved for shipment to WIPP was generated by the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division (WARD) and the Westinghouse Nuclear Fuels Division (WNFD) in Cheswick, Pennsylvania and shipped to the Hanford Sits for storage. This report characterizes these radioactive solid wastes using process knowledge, existing records, and oral history interviews.

Duncan, D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Pottmeyer, J.A.; Weyns, M.I.; Dicenso, K.D.; DeLorenzo, D.S. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc., NM (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Title: An Advanced Solution for the Storage, Transportation and Disposal of Vitrified High Level Waste  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presented at Global 99, Jackson, Wyoming, August 29 - September 2, 1999 Presented at Global 99, Jackson, Wyoming, August 29 - September 2, 1999 1 AN ADVANCED SOLUTION FOR THE STORAGE, TRANSPORTATION AND DISPOSAL OF SPENT FUEL AND VITRIFIED HIGH LEVEL WASTE William J. Quapp Teton Technologies, Inc. 860 W. Riverview Dr. Idaho Falls, ID 83401 208-535-9001 ABSTRACT For future nuclear power deployment in the US, certain changes in the back end of the fuel cycle, i.e., disposal of high level waste and spent fuel, must become a real options. However, there exists another problem from the front end of the fuel cycle which has until recently, received less attention. Depleted uranium hexafluoride is a by-product of the enrichment process and has accumulated for over 50 years. It now represents a potential environmental problem. This paper describes a

206

Use of Thermal Energy Storage to Enhance the Recovery and Utilization of Industrial Waste Heat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recovery and reuse of industrial waste heat may be limited if an energy source cannot be fully utilized in an otherwise available out of phase or unequal capacity end-use process. This paper summarizes the results of a technical and economic evaluation involving process data from 12 industrial plants to determine if thermal energy storage (TES) systems can be used with commercially available energy management equipment to enhance the recovery and utilization of industrial waste heat. Results showing estimated installed costs, net energy savings, economic benefits, and utility impact are presented at both single plant and industry levels for 14 of 24 applications having after tax ROR's in excess of 20 percent. Maximum energy and cost savings for 9 of these 14 systems are shown to be conditional on the use of TES.

McChesney, H. R.; Bass, R. W.; Landerman, A. M.; Obee, T. N.; Sgamboti, C. T.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations: exploratory shaft. Phase I. Conceptual design report  

SciTech Connect

It is proposed that an Exploratory Shaft (ES) be constructed in Yucca Mountain on or near the southwest portion of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) as part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations. This document describes a conceptual design for an ES and a cost estimate based on a set of construction assumptions. Included in this document are appendixes consisting of supporting studies done at NTS by Fenix and Scisson, Inc. and Holmes and Narver, Inc. These appendixes constitute a history of the development of the design and are included as part of the record.

Nelson, D.C.; Merson, T.J.; McGuire, P.L.; Sibbitt, W.L.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

616 Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Storage Facility -- Essential/support drawing list. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

This document identifies the essential and supporting engineering drawings for the 616 Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Storage Facility. The purpose of the documents is to describe the criteria used to identify and the plan for updating and maintaining their accuracy. Drawings are designated as essential if they relate to safety systems, environmental monitoring systems, effluents, and facility HVAC, electrical, and plumbing systems. Support drawings are those which are frequently used or describe a greater level of detail for equipment, components, or systems shown on essential drawings. A listing of drawings identified as essential or support is provided in Table A.

Busching, K.R.

1994-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

209

Simple empirical method for estimating the performance of a passive solar heated building of the thermal storage wall type  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two methods are presented for estimating the annual solar heating performance of a building utilizing a passive thermal storage wall of the Trombe wall or water wall type with or without night insulation and with or without a reflector. The method is accurate to +-3% as compared with hour-by-hour computer simulations.

Balcomb, J.D.; McFarland, R.D.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

MRS (monitored retrievable storage) systems study Task G report: The role and functions of surface storage of radioactive material in the federal waste management system  

SciTech Connect

This is one of nine studies undertaken by contractors to the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), to provide a technical basis for re-evaluating the role of a monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility. The study investigates the functions that could be performed by surface storage of radioactive material within the federal radioactive waste management system, including enabling acceptance of spent fuel from utility owners, scheduling of waste-preparation processes within the system, enhancement of system operating reliability, and conditioning the thermal (decay heat) characteristics of spent fuel emplaced in a repository. The analysis focuses particularly on the effects of storage capacity and DOE acceptance schedule on power reactors. Figures of merit developed include the storage capacity (in metric tons of uranium (MTU)) required to be added beyond currently estimated maximum spent fuel storage capacities and its associated cost, and the number of years that spent fuel pools would remain open after last discharge (in pool-years) and the cost of this period of operation. 27 refs., 36 figs., 18 tabs.

Wood, T.W.; Short, S.M.; Woodruff, M.G.; Altenhofen, M.K.; MacKay, C.A.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investment; 3. a low storage and PV price run; 4. to assessFigure 5. Low Storage and PV Price (run 3) Diurnal Heat6. Low storage and PV Price (run 3) Diurnal Electricity

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

A facility design for repackaging ORNL CH-TRU legacy waste in Building 3525  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the last 25 years, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has conducted operations which have generated solid, contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste. At present the CH-TRU waste inventory at ORNL is about 3400 55-gal drums retrievably stored in RCRA-permitted, aboveground facilities. Of the 3400 drums, approximately 2600 drums will need to be repackaged. The current US Department of Energy (DOE) strategy for disposal of these drums is to transport them to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico which only accepts TRU waste that meets a very specific set of criteria documented in the WIPP-WAC (waste acceptance criteria). This report describes activities that were performed from January 1994 to May 1995 associated with the design and preparation of an existing facility for repackaging and certifying some or all of the CH-TRU drums at ORNL to meet the WIPP-WAC. For this study, the Irradiated Fuel Examination Laboratory (IFEL) in Building 3525 was selected as the reference facility for modification. These design activities were terminated in May 1995 as more attractive options for CH-TRU waste repackaging were considered to be available. As a result, this document serves as a final report of those design activities.

Huxford, T.J.; Cooper, R.H. Jr.; Davis, L.E.; Fuller, A.B.; Gabbard, W.A.; Smith, R.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Guay, K.P. [S. M. Stroller Corp. (United States); Smith, L.C. [United Energy Services Corp. (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by US Department of Energy waste management operations  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms evaluated. A personal-computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for the calculation of human health risk impacts. The WM PEIS addresses management of five waste streams in the DOE complex: low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste (HW), high-level waste (HLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (TRUW). Currently projected waste generation rates, storage inventories, and treatment process throughputs have been calculated for each of the waste streams. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated, and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. Key assumptions in the development of the source terms are identified. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also discuss specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Policastro, A.; Freeman, W.; Jackson, R.; Mishima, J.; Turner, S.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Interim On-Site Storage of Low-Level Waste: Volume 4, Part 3: Waste Container Closures, Seals, and Gas Vents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume of the Interim On-Site Storage report series supplements Volume 4, Part 1, which includes an extensive methodology and detailed information on the types and availability of low-level waste (LLW) containers and container coatings for extended storage. Part 2, soon to be published, addresses monitoring and inspection requirements for stored LLW containers. Part 3 continues the series by providing detailed guidance on container closures, seals, and gas vents, including performance goals and key ...

1993-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

215

Decontamination and decommissioning assessment for the Waste Incineration Facility (Building 232-Z) Hanford Site, [Hanford], WA  

SciTech Connect

Building 232-Z is an element of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. From 1961 until 1972, plutonium-bearing combustible materials were incinerated in the building. Between 1972 and 1983, following shutdown of the incinerator, the facility was used for waste segregation activities. The facility was placed in retired inactive status in 1984 and classified as a Limited Control Facility pursuant to DOE Order 5480.5, Safety of Nuclear Facilities, and 6430.1A, General Design Criteria. The current plutonium inventory within the building is estimated to be approximately 848 grams, the majority of which is retained within the process hood ventilation system. As a contaminated retired facility, Building 232-Z is included in the DOE Surplus Facility Management Program. The objective of this Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) assessment is to remove Building 232-Z, thereby elmininating the radiological and environmental hazards associated with the plutonium inventory within the structure. The steps to accomplish the plan objectives are: (1) identifying the locations of the most significant amounts of plutonium, (2) removing residual plutonium, (3) removing and decontaminating remaining building equipment, (4) dismantling the remaining structure, and (5) closing out the project.

Dean, L.N. [Advanced Sciences, Inc., (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) Basis for Interim Operation (BIO)  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) is located in the 200 East Area adjacent to B Plant on the Hanford Site north of Richland, Washington. The current WESF mission is to receive and store the cesium and strontium capsules that were manufactured at WESF in a safe manner and in compliance with all applicable rules and regulations. The scope of WESF operations is currently limited to receipt, inspection, decontamination, storage, and surveillance of capsules in addition to facility maintenance activities. The capsules are expected to be stored at WESF until the year 2017, at which time they will have been transferred for ultimate disposition. The WESF facility was designed and constructed to process, encapsulate, and store the extracted long-lived radionuclides, {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs, from wastes generated during the chemical processing of defense fuel on the Hanford Site thus ensuring isolation of hazardous radioisotopes from the environment. The construction of WESF started in 1971 and was completed in 1973. Some of the {sup 137}Cs capsules were leased by private irradiators or transferred to other programs. All leased capsules have been returned to WESF. Capsules transferred to other programs will not be returned except for the seven powder and pellet Type W overpacks already stored at WESF.

COVEY, L.I.

2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

217

High-level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator standards/requirements identification document (S/RID), Vol. 6  

SciTech Connect

The scope of the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) Functional Area includes the programmatic controls associated with the management and operation of the Hanford Tank Farm Facility. The driving management organization implementing the programmatic controls is the Tank Farms Waste Management (WM)organization whose responsibilities are to ensure that performance objectives are established; and that measurable criteria for attaining objectives are defined and reflected in programs, policies and procedures. Objectives for the WM Program include waste minimization, establishment of effective waste segregation methods, waste treatment technology development, radioactive (low-level, high-level) hazardous and mixed waste transfer, treatment, and storage, applicability of a corrective action program, and management and applicability of a decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) program in future years.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Revised cost savings estimate with uncertainty for enhanced sludge washing of underground storage tank waste  

SciTech Connect

Enhanced Sludge Washing (ESW) has been selected to reduce the amount of sludge-based underground storage tank (UST) high-level waste at the Hanford site. During the past several years, studies have been conducted to determine the cost savings derived from the implementation of ESW. The tank waste inventory and ESW performance continues to be revised as characterization and development efforts advance. This study provides a new cost savings estimate based upon the most recent inventory and ESW performance revisions, and includes an estimate of the associated cost uncertainty. Whereas the author`s previous cost savings estimates for ESW were compared against no sludge washing, this study assumes the baseline to be simple water washing which more accurately reflects the retrieval activity along. The revised ESW cost savings estimate for all UST waste at Hanford is $6.1 B {+-} $1.3 B within 95% confidence. This is based upon capital and operating cost savings, but does not include development costs. The development costs are assumed negligible since they should be at least an order of magnitude less than the savings. The overall cost savings uncertainty was derived from process performance uncertainties and baseline remediation cost uncertainties, as determined by the author`s engineering judgment.

DeMuth, S.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Technical Support Document: The Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small Warehouse and Self-Storage Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Support Document (TSD) describes the process and methodology for development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small Warehouse and Self-storage Buildings (AEDG-WH or the Guide), a design guidance document intended to provide recommendations for achieving 30% energy savings in small warehouses over levels contained in ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-1999, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings. The AEDG-WH is the fourth in a series of guides being developed by a partnership of organizations, including the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE), the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA), the United States Green Buildings Council (USGBC), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

Liu, Bing; Jarnagin, Ronald E.; Jiang, Wei; Gowri, Krishnan

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Life Cycle cost Analysis of Waste Heat Operated Absorption Cooling Systems for Building HVAC Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) of waste heat operated vapour absorption air conditioning system (VARS) incorporated in a building cogeneration system is presented and discussed. The life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) based on present worth cost (PWC) method, which covers the initial costs, operating costs, maintenance costs, replacement costs and salvage values is the useful tool to merit various cooling and power generation systems for building applications. A life cycle of 23 years was used to calculate the PWC of the system for annual operating hours of 8760 and the same is compared with the electric based vapour compression chiller (VCRS) of same capacity. The life cycle cost (LCC) of waste heat operated absorption chiller is estimated to be US $ 1.5 million which is about 71.5 % low compared to electric powered conventional vapour compression chiller. From the analysis it was found that the initial cost of VARS system was 125 % higher than that of VCRS, while the PWC of operating cost of VARS was 78.2 % lower compared to VCRS. The result shows that the waste heat operated VARS would be preferable from the view point of operating cost and green house gas emission reduction.

Saravanan, R.; Murugavel, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste storage building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Study of the VOC emissions from a municipal solid waste storage pilot-scale cell: Comparison with biogases from municipal waste landfill site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: > Follow-up of the emission of VOCs in a municipal waste pilot-scale cell during the acidogenesis and acetogenesis phases. > Study from the very start of waste storage leading to a better understanding of the decomposition/degradation of waste. > Comparison of the results obtained on the pilot-scale cell with those from 3 biogases coming from the same landfill site. > A methodology of characterization for the progression of the stabilization/maturation of waste is finally proposed. - Abstract: The emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from municipal solid waste stored in a pilot-scale cell containing 6.4 tonnes of waste (storage facility which is left open during the first period (40 days) and then closed with recirculation of leachates during a second period (100 days)) was followed by dynamic sampling on activated carbon and analysed by GC-MS after solvent extraction. This was done in order to know the VOC emissions before the installation of a methanogenesis process for the entire waste mass. The results, expressed in reference to toluene, were exploited during the whole study on all the analyzable VOCs: alcohols, ketones and esters, alkanes, benzenic and cyclic compounds, chlorinated compounds, terpene, and organic sulphides. The results of this study on the pilot-scale cell are then compared with those concerning three biogases from a municipal waste landfill: biogas (1) coming from waste cells being filled or recently closed, biogas (2) from all the waste storage cells on site, and biogas (3) which is a residual gas from old storage cells without aspiration of the gas. The analysis of the results obtained revealed: (i) a high emission of VOCs, principally alcohols, ketones and esters during the acidogenesis; (ii) a decrease in the alkane content and an increase in the terpene content were observed in the VOCs emitted during the production of methane; (iii) the production of heavier alkanes and an increase in the average number of carbon atoms per molecule of alkane with the progression of the stabilisation/maturation process were also observed. Previous studies have concentrated almost on the analysis of biogases from landfills. Our research aimed at gaining a more complete understanding of the decomposition/degradation of municipal solid waste by measuring the VOCs emitted from the very start of the landfill process i.e. during the acidogenesis and acetogenesis phases.

Chiriac, R., E-mail: rodica.chiriac@univ-lyon1.fr [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS, UMR 5615, Laboratoire des Multimateriaux et Interfaces, 43 boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); De Araujos Morais, J. [Universite Federal de Paraiba, Campus I Departamento de Engenharia Civil e Ambiental, Joao Pessoa, Paraiba (Brazil); Carre, J. [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS, UMR 5256, Institut de Recherche sur la Catalyse et l'Environnement, 43 boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Bayard, R. [Universite de Lyon, INSA de Lyon, Laboratoire de Genie Civil et d'Ingenierie environnementale (LGCIE), F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Chovelon, J.M. [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS, UMR 5256, Institut de Recherche sur la Catalyse et l'Environnement, 43 boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Gourdon, R. [Universite de Lyon, INSA de Lyon, Laboratoire de Genie Civil et d'Ingenierie environnementale (LGCIE), F-69622 Villeurbanne (France)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

Application to ship nonmixed transuranic waste to the Nevada Test Site for interim storage. Waste Cerification Program  

SciTech Connect

This report documents various regulations on radioactive waste processing and discusses how the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant will comply with and meet these requirements. Specific procedures are discussed concerning transuranic, metal scrap, salt block, solid, and glove box wastes.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Revised corrective action plan for underground storage tank 2331-U at the Building 9201-1 Site  

SciTech Connect

This document represents the Corrective Action Plan for underground storage tank (UST) 2331-U, previously located at Building 9201-1, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Tank 2331-U, a 560-gallon UST, was removed on December 14, 1988. This document presents a comprehensive summary of all environmental assessment investigations conducted at the Building 9201-1 Site and the corrective action measures proposed for remediation of subsurface petroleum product contamination identified at the site. This document is written in accordance with the regulatory requirements of the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) Rule 1200-1-15-.06(7).

Bohrman, D.E.; Ingram, E.M. [Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Building waste management core indicators through Spatial Material Flow Analysis: Net recovery and transport intensity indexes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sustainability and proximity principles have a key role in waste management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Core indicators are needed in order to quantify and evaluate them. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A systematic, step-by-step approach is developed in this study for their development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transport may play a significant role in terms of environmental and economic costs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Policy action is required in order to advance in the consecution of these principles. - Abstract: In this paper, the material and spatial characterization of the flows within a municipal solid waste (MSW) management system are combined through a Network-Based Spatial Material Flow Analysis. Using this information, two core indicators are developed for the bio-waste fraction, the Net Recovery Index (NRI) and the Transport Intensity Index (TII), which are aimed at assessing progress towards policy-related sustainable MSW management strategies and objectives. The NRI approaches the capacity of a MSW management system for converting waste into resources through a systematic metabolic approach, whereas the TII addresses efficiency in terms of the transport requirements to manage a specific waste flow throughout the entire MSW management life cycle. Therefore, both indicators could be useful in assessing key MSW management policy strategies, such as the consecution of higher recycling levels (sustainability principle) or the minimization of transport by locating treatment facilities closer to generation sources (proximity principle). To apply this methodological approach, the bio-waste management system of the region of Catalonia (Spain) has been chosen as a case study. Results show the adequacy of both indicators for identifying those points within the system with higher capacity to compromise its environmental, economic and social performance and therefore establishing clear targets for policy prioritization. Moreover, this methodological approach permits scenario building, which could be useful in assessing the outcomes of hypothetical scenarios, thus proving its adequacy for strategic planning.

Font Vivanco, David, E-mail: font@cml.leidenuniv.nl [Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA), Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Puig Ventosa, Ignasi [ENT Environment and Management, Carrer Sant Joan 39, First Floor, 08800 Vilanova i la Geltru, Barcelona (Spain); Gabarrell Durany, Xavier [Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA), Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Waste and Encapsulation Storage Facility (WESF) Essential and Support Drawing List  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The drawings identified in this document will comprise the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility essential and support drawing list. This list will replace drawings identified as the ''WESF Essential and support drawing list''. Additionally, this document will follow the applicable requirements of HNF-PRO-242 ''Engineering Drawing Requirements'' and FSP-WESF-001, Section EN-1 ''Documenting Engineering Changes''. An essential drawing is defined as an engineering drawing identified by the facility staff as necessary to directly support the safe operation or maintenance of the facility. A support drawing is defined as a drawing identified by the facility staff that further describes the design details of structures, systems, or components shown on essential drawings or is frequently used by the support staff.

SHANNON, W.R.

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

226

Fractured rock modeling in the National Waste Terminal Storage Program: a review of requirements and status  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Generalized computer codes capable of forming the basis for numerical models of fractured rock masses are being used within the NWTS program. Little additional development of these codes is considered justifiable, except in the area of representation of discrete fractures. On the other hand, model preparation requires definition of medium-specific constitutive descriptions and site characteristics and is therefore legitimately conducted by each of the media-oriented projects within the National Waste Terminal Storage program. However, it is essential that a uniform approach to the role of numerical modeling be adopted, including agreement upon the contribution of modeling to the design and licensing process and the need for, and means of, model qualification for particular purposes. This report discusses the role of numerical modeling, reviews the capabilities of several computer codes that are being used to support design or performance assessment, and proposes a framework for future numerical modeling activities within the NWTS program.

St. John, C.; Krug, A.; Key, S.; Monsees, J.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Results from Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Series 3 spent fuel dissolution tests  

SciTech Connect

The dissolution and radionuclide release behavior of spent fuel in groundwater is being studied by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP), formerly the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project. Specimens prepared from pressurized water reactor fuel rod segments were tested in sealed stainless steel vessels in Nevada Test Site J-13 well water at 85{degree}C and 25{degree}C. The test matrix included three specimens of bare-fuel particles plus cladding hulls, two fuel rod segments with artificially defected cladding and water-tight end fittings, and an undefected fuel rod section with watertight end fittings. Periodic solution samples were taken during test cycles with the sample volumes replenished with fresh J-13 water. Test cycles were periodically terminated and the specimens restarted in fresh J-13 water. The specimens were run for three cycles for a total test duration of 15 months. 22 refs., 32 figs., 26 tabs.

Wilson, C.N.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

The National Building Competition: Working Off the Waste with ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 COMPETITION SUMMARY 0 COMPETITION SUMMARY 2 On April 27, 2010, EPA launched the first-ever Na- tional Building Competition. Teams from fourteen buildings of all shapes and sizes located around the country went head to head to see who could work off the waste with help from EPA's ENERGY STAR pro- gram and reduce their energy use the most. The teams faced numerous challenges, including equipment malfunctions, staff departures, extreme temperatures, and tight budgets. In the face of these challenges, the competitors demonstrated that a strategic approach to energy efficiency can help orga- nizations overcome obstacles and achieve sustained, lasting improvement. Together, the contestants reduced their energy con- sumption by more than 44 million KBtu a year, saved more than $950,000, and reduced greenhouse gas

229

Used Oil and Filter Disposal Used Oil: Create a segregated storage area or container. Label the container "Waste Oil Only".  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Used Oil and Filter Disposal Used Oil: Create a segregated storage area or container. Label the container "Waste Oil Only". Maintain a written log to document all amounts and types of oil added to the container. No solvents, oil contaminated with solvents, PCBs, non-petroleum based oils, or any other

Yener, Aylin

230

High-level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID)  

SciTech Connect

The High-Level Waste Storage Tank Farms/242-A Evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is contained in multiple volumes. This document (Volume 3) presents the standards and requirements for the following sections: Safeguards and Security, Engineering Design, and Maintenance.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

LESSONS LEARNED FROM PREVIOUS WASTE STORAGE TANK VAPOR CONTROL ATTEMPTS ON SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) & DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) FARMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report forms the basis for a feasibility study and conceptual design to control vapor emissions from waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site. The Carbtrol, Vapor Mixing, and High Efficiency Gas Absorber (HEGA) vapor controls were evaluated to determine the lessons learned from previous failed vapor control attempts. This document illustrates the resulting findings based on that evaluation.

BAKER, D.M.

2004-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

232

High-level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID), Volume 4  

SciTech Connect

The High-Level Waste Storage Tank Farms/242-A Evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is contained in multiple volumes. This document (Volume 4) presents the standards and requirements for the following sections: Radiation Protection and Operations.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

High-level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID), Volume 5  

SciTech Connect

The High-Level Waste Storage Tank Farms/242-A Evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is contained in multiple volumes. This document (Volume 5) outlines the standards and requirements for the Fire Protection and Packaging and Transportation sections.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

High-level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID), Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High-Level Waste Storage Tank Farms/242-A Evaporator Standards/Requirements Document (S/RID) is contained in multiple volumes. This document (Volume 2) presents the standards and requirements for the following sections: Quality Assurance, Training and Qualification, Emergency Planning and Preparedness, and Construction.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Submergible barge retrievable storage and permanent disposal system for radioactive waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A submergible barge and process for submerging and storing radioactive waste material along a seabed. A submergible barge receives individual packages of radwaste within segregated cells. The cells are formed integrally within the barge, preferably surrounded by reinforced concrete. The cells are individually sealed by a concrete decking and by concrete hatch covers. Seawater may be vented into the cells for cooling, through an integral vent arrangement. The vent ducts may be attached to pumps when the barge is bouyant. The ducts are also arranged to promote passive ventilation of the cells when the barge is submerged. Packages of the radwaste are loaded into individual cells within the barge. The cells are then sealed and the barge is towed to the designated disposal-storage site. There, the individual cells are flooded and the barge will begin descent controlled by a powered submarine control device to the seabed storage site. The submerged barge will rest on the seabed permanently or until recovered by a submarine control device.

Goldsberry, Fred L. (Spring, TX); Cawley, William E. (Richland, WA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

TWRS retrieval and disposal mission, immobilized high-level waste storage plan  

SciTech Connect

This project plan has a two fold purpose. First, it provides a plan specific to the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Immobilized High-Level Waste (EMW) Storage Subproject for the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) that meets the requirements of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestone M-90-01 (Ecology et al. 1996) and is consistent with the project plan content guidelines found in Section 11.5 of the Tri-Party Agreement action plan. Second, it provides an upper tier document that can be used as the basis for future subproject line item construction management plans. The planning elements for the construction management plans are derived from applicable U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) planning guidance documents (DOE Orders 4700.1 (DOE 1992a) and 430.1 (DOE 1995)). The format and content of this project plan are designed to accommodate the plan`s dual purpose. A cross-check matrix is provided in Appendix A to explain where in the plan project planning elements required by Section 11.5 of the Tri-Party Agreement are addressed.

Calmus, R.B.

1998-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

237

Use of depleted uranium metal as cask shielding in high-level waste storage, transport, and disposal systems  

SciTech Connect

The US DOE has amassed over 555,000 metric tons of depleted uranium from its uranium enrichment operations. Rather than dispose of this depleted uranium as waste, this study explores a beneficial use of depleted uranium as metal shielding in casks designed to contain canisters of vitrified high-level waste. Two high-level waste storage, transport, and disposal shielded cask systems are analyzed. The first system employs a shielded storage and disposal cask having a separate reusable transportation overpack. The second system employs a shielded combined storage, transport, and disposal cask. Conceptual cask designs that hold 1, 3, 4 and 7 high-level waste canisters are described for both systems. In all cases, cask design feasibility was established and analyses indicate that these casks meet applicable thermal, structural, shielding, and contact-handled requirements. Depleted uranium metal casting, fabrication, environmental, and radiation compatibility considerations are discussed and found to pose no serious implementation problems. About one-fourth of the depleted uranium inventory would be used to produce the casks required to store and dispose of the nearly 15,400 high-level waste canisters that would be produced. This study estimates the total-system cost for the preferred 7-canister storage and disposal configuration having a separate transportation overpack would be $6.3 billion. When credits are taken for depleted uranium disposal cost, a cost that would be avoided if depleted uranium were used as cask shielding material rather than disposed of as waste, total system net costs are between $3.8 billion and $5.5 billion.

Yoshimura, H.R.; Ludwigsen, J.S.; McAllaster, M.E. [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and N. Zhou, “Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery andattractiveness of distributed generation with storage. Thecosts for distributed generation (DG) investments. The

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

On scale and magnitude of pressure build-up induced by large-scale geologic storage of CO2  

SciTech Connect

The scale and magnitude of pressure perturbation and brine migration induced by geologic carbon sequestration is discussed assuming a full-scale deployment scenario in which enough CO{sub 2} is captured and stored to make relevant contributions to global climate change mitigation. In this scenario, the volumetric rates and cumulative volumes of CO{sub 2} injection would be comparable to or higher than those related to existing deep-subsurface injection and extraction activities, such as oil production. Large-scale pressure build-up in response to the injection may limit the dynamic storage capacity of suitable formations, because over-pressurization may fracture the caprock, may drive CO{sub 2}/brine leakage through localized pathways, and may cause induced seismicity. On the other hand, laterally extensive sedimentary basins may be less affected by such limitations because (i) local pressure effects are moderated by pressure propagation and brine displacement into regions far away from the CO{sub 2} storage domain; and (ii) diffuse and/or localized brine migration into overlying and underlying formations allows for pressure bleed-off in the vertical direction. A quick analytical estimate of the extent of pressure build-up induced by industrial-scale CO{sub 2} storage projects is presented. Also discussed are pressure perturbation and attenuation effects simulated for two representative sedimentary basins in the USA: the laterally extensive Illinois Basin and the partially compartmentalized southern San Joaquin Basin in California. These studies show that the limiting effect of pressure build-up on dynamic storage capacity is not as significant as suggested by Ehlig-Economides and Economides, who considered closed systems without any attenuation effects.

Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J. T.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Groundwater quality assessment report for Solid Waste Storage Area 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6, located at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) facility, is a shallow land burial site for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and other waste types. Wastes were disposed of in unlined trenches and auger holes from 1969 until May 1986, when it was determined that Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulated wastes were being disposed of there. DOE closed SWSA 6 until changes in operating procedures prevented the disposal of RCRA wastes at SWSA 6. The site, which reopened for waste disposal activities in July 1986, is the only currently operated disposal area for low-level radioactive waste at ORNL. This report provides the results of the 1998 RCRA groundwater assessment monitoring. The monitoring was performed in accordance with the proposed routine monitoring plan recommended in the 1996 EMP. Section 2 provides pertinent background on SWSA 6. Section 3 presents the 1998 monitoring results and discusses the results in terms of any significant changes from previous monitoring efforts. Section 4 provides recommendations for changes in monitoring based on the 1998 results. References are provided in Section 5. Appendix A provides the 1998 RCRA Sampling Data and Appendix B provides a summary of 1998 Quality Assurance results.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste storage building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Heating and cooling of municipal buildings with waste heat from ground water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of using waste heat from municipal water wells to replace natural gas for heating of the City Hall, Fire Station, and Community Hall in Wilmer, Texas was studied. At present, the 120/sup 0/F well water is cooled by dissipating the excess heat through evaporative cooling towers before entering the distribution system. The objective of the study was to determine the pumping cycle of the well and determine the amount of available heat from the water for a specified period. This data were correlated with the heating and cooling demand of the City's buildings, and a conceptual heat recovery system will be prepared. The system will use part or all of the excess heat from the water to heat the buildings, thereby eliminating the use of natural gas. The proposed geothermal retrofit of the existing natural gas heating system is not economical because the savings in natural gas does not offset the capital cost of the new equipment and the annual operating and maintenance costs. The fuel savings and power costs are a virtual trade-off over the 25-year period. The installation and operation of the system was estimated to cost $105,000 for 25 years which is an unamortized expense. In conclusion, retrofitting the City of Wilmer's municipal buildings is not feasible based on the economic analysis and fiscal projections as presented.

Morgan, D.S.; Hochgraf, J.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Criticality Safety Evaluations on the Use of 200-gram Pu Mass Limit for RHWM Waste Storage Operations  

SciTech Connect

This work establishes the criticality safety technical basis to increase the fissile mass limit from 120 grams to 200 grams for Type A 55-gallon drums and their equivalents. Current RHWM fissile mass limit is 120 grams Pu for Type A 55-gallon containers and their equivalent. In order to increase the Type A 55-gallon drum limit to 200 grams, a few additional criticality safety control requirements are needed on moderators, reflectors, and array controls to ensure that the 200-gram Pu drums remain criticality safe with inadvertent criticality remains incredible. The purpose of this work is to analyze the use of 200-gram Pu drum mass limit for waste storage operations in Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) Facilities. In this evaluation, the criticality safety controls associated with the 200-gram Pu drums are established for the RHWM waste storage operations. With the implementation of these criticality safety controls, the 200-gram Pu waste drum storage operations are demonstrated to be criticality safe and meet the double-contingency-principle requirement per DOE O 420.1.

Chou, P

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

243

HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the CPP-648 Radioactive Solid and Liquid Waste Storage Tank System (VES-SFE-106)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan for the Radioactive Solid and Liquid Waste Storage Tank System located in the adjacent to the Sludge Tank Control House (CPP-648), Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Idaho National Laboratory, was developed to meet the interim status closure requirements for a tank system. The system to be closed includes a tank and associated ancillary equipment that were determined to have managed hazardous waste. The CPP-648 Radioactive Solid and Liquid Waste Storage Tank System will be "cleaned closed" in accordance with the requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods of acheiving those standards for the CPP-648 Radioactive Solid and Liquid Waste Storage Tank System.

S. K. Evans

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003. Hatziargyriou, N. et al. , “Microgrids, An Overview ofand Operation of Microgrids in Commercial Buildings”, IEEEsuccessful deployment of microgrids will depend heavily on

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) Eligibility...

246

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and heat-driven absorption chillers. Figure 1 shows a high-contains also heat for absorption chillers, and therefore,storage 11 flow battery absorption chiller solar thermal

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and installed DG equipment (PV, solar thermal, natural gas5. a low storage, PV, and solar thermal price run; and 6. aenergy sources such as PV or solar thermal. However, this

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Initial findings: The integration of water loop heat pump and building structural thermal storage systems  

SciTech Connect

This report is one in a series of reports describing research activities in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Commercial Building System Integration Research Program. The goal of the program is to develop the scientific and technical basis for improving integrated decision-making during design and construction. Improved decision-making could significantly reduce buildings' energy use by the year 2010. The objectives of the Commercial Building System Integration Research Program are: to identify and quantify the most significant energy-related interactions among building subsystems; to develop the scientific and technical basis for improving energy related interactions in building subsystems; and to provide guidance to designers, owners, and builders for improving the integration of building subsystems for energy efficiency. The lead laboratory for this program is the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. A wide variety of expertise and resources from industry, academia, other government entities, and other DOE laboratories are used in planning, reviewing and conducting research activities. Cooperative and complementary research, development, and technology transfer activities with other interested organizations are actively pursued. In this report, the interactions of a water loop heat pump system and building structural mass and their effect on whole-building energy performance is analyzed. 10 refs., 54 figs., 1 tab.

Marseille, T.J.; Johnson, B.K.; Wallin, R.P.; Chiu, S.A.; Crawley, D.B.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

The Technical and Economical Analysis of a Centralized Air-Conditioning System with Cold Storage Refrigeration in High-Rise Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, the application of a centralized air-conditioning system (CACS) with cold storage refrigeration in high-rise residential buildings has gradually increased. Due to the large difference between civil residential buildings and commercial buildings, characteristics such as the cooling load in summer and the storey height must be considered in the design of the air-conditioning system, and the cold storage equipment and the cold supplying means must be properly selected. The option of establishing centralized air-conditioning equipment with cold storage and supplying unified cold in high-rise residential buildings is analyzed objectively with technical and economical methods in this paper. It is not true that the option of supplying unified cold can save energy all the time. CACS with cold storage will not always be economical. Based on a 27-floor building, the running costs in summer and the first costs are both compared between CACS with and without cold storage refrigeration. The cold storage method selected will significantly impact the residents.

Xiang, C.; Xie, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INCIPIENT SLUDGE MIXING IN RADIOACTIVE LIQUID WASTE STORAGE TANKS DURING SALT SOLUTION BLENDING  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper is the second in a series of four publications to document ongoing pilot scale testing and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of mixing processes in 85 foot diameter, 1.3 million gallon, radioactive liquid waste, storage tanks at Savannah River Site (SRS). Homogeneous blending of salt solutions is required in waste tanks. Settled solids (i.e., sludge) are required to remain undisturbed on the bottom of waste tanks during blending. Suspension of sludge during blending may potentially release radiolytically generated hydrogen trapped in the sludge, which is a safety concern. The first paper (Leishear, et. al. [1]) presented pilot scale blending experiments of miscible fluids to provide initial design requirements for a full scale blending pump. Scaling techniques for an 8 foot diameter pilot scale tank were also justified in that work. This second paper describes the overall reasons to perform tests, and documents pilot scale experiments performed to investigate disturbance of sludge, using non-radioactive sludge simulants. A third paper will document pilot scale CFD modeling for comparison to experimental pilot scale test results for both blending tests and sludge disturbance tests. That paper will also describe full scale CFD results. The final paper will document additional blending test results for stratified layers in salt solutions, scale up techniques, final full scale pump design recommendations, and operational recommendations. Specifically, this paper documents a series of pilot scale tests, where sludge simulant disturbance due to a blending pump or transfer pump are investigated. A principle design requirement for a blending pump is UoD, where Uo is the pump discharge nozzle velocity, and D is the nozzle diameter. Pilot scale test results showed that sludge was undisturbed below UoD = 0.47 ft{sup 2}/s, and that below UoD = 0.58 ft{sup 2}/s minimal sludge disturbance was observed. If sludge is minimally disturbed, hydrogen will not be released. Installation requirements were also determined for a transfer pump which will remove tank contents, and which is also required to not disturb sludge. Testing techniques and test results for both types of pumps are presented.

Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Lee, S.; Steeper, T.; Fowley, M.; Parkinson, K.

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

251

Scenario development for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Building confidence in the assessment  

SciTech Connect

Scenario development is part of the iterative performance assessment (PA) process for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Scenario development for the WIPP has been the subject of intense external review and is certain to be the subject of continued scrutiny as the project proceeds toward regulatory compliance. The principal means of increasing confidence in this aspect of the PA will be through the use of the systematic and thorough procedure toward developing the scenarios and conceptual models on which the assessment is to be based. Early and ongoing interaction with project reviewers can assist with confidence building. Quality of argument and clarity of presentation in PA will be of key concern. Appropriate tools are required for documenting and tracking assumptions, through a single assessment phase, and between iterative assessment phases. Risks associated with future human actions are of particular concern to the WIPP project, and international consensus on the principles for incorporation of future human actions in assessments would be valuable.

Galson, D.A.; Swift, P.N.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

CHARACTERIZING DOE HANFORD SITE WASTE ENCAPSULATION STORAGE FACILITY CELLS USING RADBALL  

SciTech Connect

RadBall{trademark} is a novel technology that can locate and quantify unknown radioactive hazards within contaminated areas, hot cells, and gloveboxes. The device consists of a colander-like outer tungsten collimator that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer semi-sphere. The collimator has a number of small holes with tungsten inserts; as a result, specific areas of the polymer are exposed to radiation becoming increasingly more opaque in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer semi-sphere is imaged in an optical computed tomography scanner that produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. A subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation data using a reverse ray tracing or backprojection technique provides information on the spatial distribution of gamma-ray sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. RadBall{trademark} was originally designed for dry deployments and several tests, completed at Savannah River National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, substantiate its modeled capabilities. This study involves the investigation of the RadBall{trademark} technology during four submerged deployments in two water filled cells at the DOE Hanford Site's Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility.

Farfan, E.; Coleman, R.

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

253

The integration of water loop heat pump and building structural thermal storage systems  

SciTech Connect

Commercial buildings often have extensive periods where one space needs cooling and another heating. Even more common is the need for heating during one part of the day and cooling during another in the same spaces. If a building's heating and cooling system could be integrated with the building's structural mass such that the mass can be used to collect, store, and deliver energy, significant energy might be saved. Computer models were developed to simulate this interaction for an existing office building in Seattle, Washington that has a decentralized water-source heat pump system. Metered data available for the building was used to calibrate a base'' building model (i.e., nonintegrated) prior to simulation of the integrated system. In the simulated integration strategy a secondary water loop was manifolded to the main HVAC hydronic loop. tubing in this loop was embedded in the building's concrete floor slabs. Water was routed to this loop by a controller to charge or discharge thermal energy to and from the slabs. The slabs were also in thermal communication with the conditioned spaces. Parametric studies of the building model, using weather data for five other cities in addition to Seattle, predicted that energy can be saved on cooling dominated days. On hot, dry days and during the night the cooling tower can beneficially be used as a free cooling'' source for thermally charging'' the floor slabs using cooled water. Through the development of an adaptive/predictive control strategy, annual HVAC energy savings as large as 30% appear to be possible in certain climates. 8 refs., 13 figs.

Marseille, T.J.; Schliesing, J.S.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Implementation of seismic design and evaluation guidelines for the Department of Energy high-level waste storage tanks and appurtenances  

SciTech Connect

In the fall of 1992, a draft of the Seismic Design and Evaluation Guidelines for the Department of Energy (DOE) High-level Waste Storage Tanks and Appurtenances was issued. The guidelines were prepared by the Tanks Seismic Experts Panel (TSEP) and this task was sponsored by DOE, Environmental Management. The TSEP is comprised of a number of consultants known for their knowledge of seismic ground motion and expertise in the analysis of structures, systems and components subjected to seismic loads. The development of these guidelines was managed by staff from Brookhaven National Laboratory, Engineering Research and Applications Division, Department of Nuclear Energy. This paper describes the process used to incorporate the Seismic Design and Evaluation Guidelines for the DOE High-Level Waste Storage Tanks and Appurtenances into the design criteria for the Multi-Function Waste Tank Project at the Hanford Site. This project will design and construct six new high-level waste tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. This paper also discusses the vehicles used to ensure compliance to these guidelines throughout Title 1 and Title 2 design phases of the project as well as the strategy used to ensure consistent and cost-effective application of the guidelines by the structural analysts. The paper includes lessons learned and provides recommendations for other tank design projects which might employ the TSEP guidelines.

Conrads, T.J.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Guidelines for Operating an Interim On Site Low Level Radioactive Waste Storage Facility - Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The majority of commercial USA nuclear stations have constructed on-site LLW storage facilities, and most of these same utilities are experiencing or have experienced at least one period of interim on-site storage. These Guidelines focus on operational considerations and incorporate many of the lessons learned while operating various types of LLW storage facilities. This document was reviewed by the USNRC. Subsequently, the USNRC issued RIS 2008-32, Interim LLRW Storage at NPPs, which recognizes the meth...

2009-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

256

Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) advances building energy performance through the development and promotion of efficient, affordable, and high impact technologies, systems, and practices. The...

257

Real-Time Forcast Model Analysis of Daily Average Building Load for a Thermal Storage System Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal storage systems were originally designed to shift the on-peak cooling production to off-peak cooling production to reduce the on-peak demand. Based on the current electricity charging structure, the reduction of both on-peak and off-peak demands is becoming an exceedingly important issue. Reduction of both on-peak and off-peak demands can also extend the life span and defer or eliminate the replacement of power transformers due to potential shortage of building power capacity with anticipated equipment load increases. The next day daily average electricity demand is a critical set point to operate chillers and associated pumps at the appropriate time. For this paper, a mathematic analysis was conducted for annual daily average cooling of a building and three real-time building load forecasting models were developed. They are first-order autogressive model, random walk model and linear regression model. Finally, the comparison of results show the random walk model provides the best forecast.

Song, L.; Joo, I. S.; Guwana, S.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at waste treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations, Volume 1: Sections 1-9  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies are assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms are evaluated. A personal computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for calculation of human health risk impacts. The methodology is in compliance with the most recent guidance from DOE. It considers the spectrum of accident sequences that could occur in activities covered by the WM PEIS and uses a graded approach emphasizing the risk-dominant scenarios to facilitate discrimination among the various WM PEIS alternatives. Although it allows reasonable estimates of the risk impacts associated with each alternative, the main goal of the accident analysis methodology is to allow reliable estimates of the relative risks among the alternatives. The WM PEIS addresses management of five waste streams in the DOE complex: low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste (HW), high-level waste (HLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (TRUW). Currently projected waste generation rates, storage inventories, and treatment process throughputs have been calculated for each of the waste streams. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also provide discussion of specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J. [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Annual collection and storage of solar energy for the heating of buildings. Report No. 2. Annual progress report, May 1976--July 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new system for year-round collection and storage of solar heated water for heating of buildings has been designed and constructed at the University of Virginia. The system is composed of an energy storage sub-system which stores hot water in an underground pool and of a solar collector sub-system which acts not only to collect solar energy throughout the year but also to limit the evaporative and convective heat losses from the storage system. The annual collection and storage system began operation in late February 1977. Data are presented which illustrates the transient heat transfer which occurs during the start-up phase of operation. Thermal performance results are presented illustrating the efficiency of the solar collector and the variation of solar energy input to storage during a typical day's operation in May. Data are also presented which show the transient build-up of energy storage in the earth which surrounds the storage pool. An analog model has been developed to analyze the transient energy phenomena which occur within the earth surrounding the pool. These include transient heat losses from the pool to the earth and energy storage within the earth. Results of the analog model for idealized conditions are confirmed by exact mathematical solutions and by numerical analysis using a digital computer.

Beard, J. T.; Iachetta, F. A.; Lilleleht, L. U.; Dickey, J. W.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Verification survey report of the south waste tank farm training/test tower and hazardous waste storage lockers at the West Valley demonstration project, West Valley, New York  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A team from ORAU's Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program performed verification survey activities on the South Test Tower and four Hazardous Waste Storage Lockers. Scan data collected by ORAU determined that both the alpha and alpha-plus-beta activity was representative of radiological background conditions. The count rate distribution showed no outliers that would be indicative of alpha or alpha-plus-beta count rates in excess of background. It is the opinion of ORAU that independent verification data collected support the site?s conclusions that the South Tower and Lockers sufficiently meet the site criteria for release to recycle and reuse.

Weaver, Phyllis C.

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste storage building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

VERIFICATION SURVEY REPORT OF THE SOUTH WASTE TANK FARM TRAINING/TEST TOWER AND HAZARDOUS WASTE STORAGE LOCKERS AT THE WEST VALLEY DEMONSTRATION PROJECT WEST VALLEY, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect

A team from ORAU’s Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program performed verification survey activities on the South Test Tower and four Hazardous Waste Storage Lockers. Scan data collected by ORAU determined that both the alpha and alpha-plus-beta activity was representative of radiological background conditions. The count rate distribution showed no outliers that would be indicative of alpha or alpha-plus-beta count rates in excess of background. It is the opinion of ORAU that independent verification data collected support the site’s conclusions that the South Tower and Lockers sufficiently meet the site criteria for release to recycle and reuse.

Phyllis C. Weaver

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

262

Optimal design of seasonal storage for 100% solar space heating in buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An analysis is presented of seasonal solar systems that contain water as the sensible heat storage medium. A concise model is developed under the assumption of a fully mixed, uniform temperature, storage tank that permits efficient simulation of long-term (multi-day) system performance over the course of the year. The approach explicitly neglects the effects of short-term (sub-daily) fluctuations in insolation and load, effects that will be extremely small for seasonal solar systems. This approach is useful for examining the major design tradeoffs of concern here. The application considered is winter space heating. The thermal performance of seasonal solar systems that are designed to supply 100% of load without any backup is solved for, under ''reference year'' monthly normal ground temperature and insolation conditions. Unit break-even costs of seasonal storage are estimated by comparing the capital and fuel costs of conventional heating technologies against those of a seasonal solar system. A rough comparison between the alternatives for more severe winters was made by examining statistical variations in winter season conditions over the past several decades. (MHR)

Mueller, R.O.; Asbury, J.G.; Caruso, J.V.; Connor, D.W.; Giese, R.F.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Closure of a unique mixed waste storage canal at the Dept. of Energy`s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) a unique closure was accomplished for a storage canal that contained both hazardous chemical contaminants controlled by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and radioactive contaminants controlled by the Atomic Energy Act (AEA). During 1991 and 1992, after approvals were received from the DOE and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), subcontractors to DOE`s Construction Manager were mobilized and remote controlled equipment was operated on site to remove the RCRA and radioactive contamination (referred to hereafter as mixed wastes) from the 3001 Storage Canal at ORNL. After numerous {open_quotes}surprises{close_quotes} during the removal activities, each requiring problem resolution and approvals from DOE and TDEC, the canal closure was completed in September 1992 and final closure certification was submitted to TDEC in October 1992. The following discussion describes the learning experiences that ORNL and DOE acquired from a RCRA closure project for a mixed waste storage canal containing high radiation levels. The project was successful, especially since worker exposures were minimized, but was lengthy, requiring 30 months from notification of a leak in the canal until final demobilization of the subcontractor, and expensive to complete (total overall cost of $3 million).

Greer, J.K. Jr.; Etheridge, J.T.; Thompson, W.T.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Used Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Extended Storage Collaboration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) convened a workshop of over 40 representatives of the nuclear industry, federal government, national laboratories, and suppliers of used-fuel dry-storage systems to discuss the potential issues associated with extended dry storage of used fuel, that is, storage considerably beyond the term of current and recently proposed U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. The workshop was held November 18-19, 2009, at EPRI's offices in Washington, DC.

2010-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

265

A Comparative Review of Hydrologic Issues Involved in Geologic Storage of CO2 and Injection Disposal of Liquid Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents a comparison of hydrologic issues and technical approaches used in deep-well injection and disposal of liquid wastes, and those issues and approaches associated with injection and storage of CO{sub 2} in deep brine formations. These comparisons have been discussed in nine areas: (1) Injection well integrity; (2) Abandoned well problems; (3) Buoyancy effects; (4) Multiphase flow effects; (5) Heterogeneity and flow channeling; (6) Multilayer isolation effects; (7) Caprock effectiveness and hydrogeomechanics; (8) Site characterization and monitoring; and (9) Effects of CO{sub 2} storage on groundwater resources There are considerable similarities, as well as significant differences. Scientifically and technically, these two fields can learn much from each other. The discussions presented in this paper should help to focus on the key scientific issues facing deep injection of fluids. A substantial but by no means exhaustive reference list has been provided for further studies into the subject.

Tsang, C.-F.; Birkholzer, J.; Rutqvist, J.

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

Seismic design and evaluation guidelines for the Department of Energy high-level waste storage tanks and appurtenances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides guidelines for the design and evaluation of underground high-level waste storage tanks due to seismic loads. Attempts were made to reflect the knowledge acquired in the last two decades in the areas of defining the ground motion and calculating hydrodynamic loads and dynamic soil pressures for underground tank structures. The application of the analysis approach is illustrated with an example. The guidelines are developed for specific design of underground storage tanks, namely double-shell structures. However, the methodology discussed is applicable for other types of tank structures as well. The application of these and of suitably adjusted versions of these concepts to other structural types will be addressed in a future version of this document.

Bandyopadhyay, K.; Cornell, A.; Costantino, C.; Kennedy, R.; Miller, C.; Veletsos, A.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) for concrete-shielded RHTRU waste drum for the 327 postirradiation testing laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This safety evaluation for packaging authorizes onsite transport of Type B quantities of radioactive material in the Concrete- Shielded Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste (RH TRU) Drum per WHC-CM-2-14, Hazardous Material Packaging and Shipping. The drum will be used for transport of 327 Building legacy waste from the 300 Area to the Transuranic Waste Storage and Assay Facility in the 200 West Area and on to a Solid Waste Storage Facility, also in the 200 Area.

Adkins, H.E.

1996-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

268

Analysis of battery storage for commercial buildings. Phase 1 final report  

SciTech Connect

The application of battery storage to load leveling by the utility user represents a new concept in energy management. TRW Energy Management Systems Division has studied the possibility of combining an energy management computer/control system with a lead-acid/power processor system and explored the feasibility of demonstrating power management at a government facility. Candidate sites in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area were evaluated by analyzing demand curves for electricity. One site, the Department of the Treasury's Bureau of Printing and Engraving is recommended as the best of the sites evaluated. Analysis using estimated production system costs of $130/kW for power processors and $80/kWh for lead acid batteries indicates a payback of nine years. However, if the Department of Energy's cost goals for batteries and converters are achieved, a payback in less than four years is possible. Furthermore, coupling battery energy storage with conventional computer based energy management is projected to offer substantial reductions in utility bills. Payback from a production system in less than two years is predicted. System design is based on using present day technolgy where possible for the system components. Capacity for the system has been set at 1.1 MWh with a peak load capability of 600 kW. Preliminary specifications are supplied. Facility modification and system layout are presented, giving alternate placements for the batteries. Floor loading and system safety are two critical design parameters.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Analysis of battery storage for commercial buildings. Phase 1 final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The application of battery storage to load leveling by the utility user represents a new concept in energy management. TRW Energy Management Systems Division has studied the possibility of combining an energy management computer/control system with a lead-acid/power processor system and explored the feasibility of demonstrating power management at a government facility. Candidate sites in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area were evaluated by analyzing demand curves for electricity. One site, the Department of the Treasury's Bureau of Printing and Engraving is recommended as the best of the sites evaluated. Analysis using estimated production system costs of $130/kW for power processors and $80/kWh for lead acid batteries indicates a payback of nine years. However, if the Department of Energy's cost goals for batteries and converters are achieved, a payback in less than four years is possible. Furthermore, coupling battery energy storage with conventional computer based energy management is projected to offer substantial reductions in utility bills. Payback from a production system in less than two years is predicted. System design is based on using present day technolgy where possible for the system components. Capacity for the system has been set at 1.1 MWh with a peak load capability of 600 kW. Preliminary specifications are supplied. Facility modification and system layout are presented, giving alternate placements for the batteries. Floor loading and system safety are two critical design parameters.

Not Available

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Shadow Review of the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Transuranic Storage Area Retrieval Enclosue Restrieval Restart DOE Readiness Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ID-2011-09-22 ID-2011-09-22 Site: Idaho Site - Idaho Cleanup Project Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Shadow Review of the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) Transuranic Storage Area-Retrieval Enclosure (TSA-RE) Retrieval Restart Department of Energy Readiness Assessment Dates of Activity : 09/20/2011 - 09/22/2011 Report Preparer: Aleem Boatright Activity Description/Purpose: A review of nuclear safety implementation verification review (IVR) procedures and processes was conducted at the Idaho Site from September 12-22, 2011. The scope originally included shadowing of the Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) Idaho Cleanup Project IVR for the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project (SBWTP).

271

Measured leak rates of the temporary seals in DWPF canistered waste forms after three years of on site storage  

SciTech Connect

In the summer of 1990 a study was carried out to determine the-internal pressure, relative humidity, and chemical composition of the gas within the free volume of four canistered waste forms produced at TNX in May of 1988. Three of these canistered waste forms were sealed only by temporary seals and subsequently stored in the TNX boneyard' with no protection. The fourth canister was sealed by upset resistance welding. All three canisters with temporary seals were decontaminated by aqueous frit blasting. It was important to remeasure the leak rates of these seals to ensure that leaktightness had not deteriorated during canister handling and storage prior to the time the experiment were performed. This paper details the results of two separate measurements of the leak rates of these seals.

Harbour, J.R.; Miller, T.J.

1992-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

272

Measured leak rates of the temporary seals in DWPF canistered waste forms after three years of on site storage  

SciTech Connect

In the summer of 1990 a study was carried out to determine the-internal pressure, relative humidity, and chemical composition of the gas within the free volume of four canistered waste forms produced at TNX in May of 1988. Three of these canistered waste forms were sealed only by temporary seals and subsequently stored in the TNX `boneyard` with no protection. The fourth canister was sealed by upset resistance welding. All three canisters with temporary seals were decontaminated by aqueous frit blasting. It was important to remeasure the leak rates of these seals to ensure that leaktightness had not deteriorated during canister handling and storage prior to the time the experiment were performed. This paper details the results of two separate measurements of the leak rates of these seals.

Harbour, J.R.; Miller, T.J.

1992-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

273

Tank waste consolidation analysis for transfer of ORNL RH-TRU tank sludges to the Melton Valley Storage Tanks  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is to evaluate the schedule and technical issues associated with consolidation of Remote Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) sludges in the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs). This work supports the DOE Transuranic Waste (TRU) Program plans for private sector treatment of all ORNL TRU sludges for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Transfer of these sludges must be completed in FY 2000 to meet the required schedule for beginning shipment of treated sludges to the WIPP by 2002. This study was performed to (1) evaluate the sludge transfer schedule, (2) evaluate the ability of existing tank systems to contain and manage the sludges and liquids generated during the transfers, and (3) evaluate the costs and schedules of different solid/liquid separation and solids-monitoring methods used during sludge transfer for management of sluice waters.

Kent, T.E.; DePaoli, S.M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Shadow Review of the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Transuranic Storage Area Retrieval Enclosue Restrieval Restart DOE Readiness Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ID-2011-09-22 ID-2011-09-22 Site: Idaho Site - Idaho Cleanup Project Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Shadow Review of the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) Transuranic Storage Area-Retrieval Enclosure (TSA-RE) Retrieval Restart Department of Energy Readiness Assessment Dates of Activity : 09/20/2011 - 09/22/2011 Report Preparer: Aleem Boatright Activity Description/Purpose: A review of nuclear safety implementation verification review (IVR) procedures and processes was conducted at the Idaho Site from September 12-22, 2011. The scope originally included shadowing of the Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) Idaho Cleanup Project IVR for the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project (SBWTP).

275

Underground storage tank integrated demonstration: Evaluation of pretreatment options for Hanford tank wastes  

SciTech Connect

Separation science plays a central role inn the pretreatment and disposal of nuclear wastes. The potential benefits of applying chemical separations in the pretreatment of the radioactive wastes stored at the various US Department of Energy sites cover both economic and environmental incentives. This is especially true at the Hanford Site, where the huge volume (>60 Mgal) of radioactive wastes stored in underground tanks could be partitioned into a very small volume of high-level waste (HLW) and a relatively large volume of low-level waste (LLW). The cost associated with vitrifying and disposing of just the HLW fraction in a geologic repository would be much less than those associated with vitrifying and disposing of all the wastes directly. Futhermore, the quality of the LLW form (e.g., grout) would be improved due to the lower inventory of radionuclides present in the LLW stream. In this report, we present the results of an evaluation of the pretreatment options for sludge taken from two different single-shell tanks at the Hanford Site-Tanks 241-B-110 and 241-U-110 (referred to as B-110 and U-110, respectively). The pretreatment options examined for these wastes included (1) leaching of transuranic (TRU) elements from the sludge, and (2) dissolution of the sludge followed by extraction of TRUs and {sup 90}Sr. In addition, the TRU leaching approach was examined for a third tank waste type, neutralized cladding removal waste.

Lumetta, G.J.; Wagner, M.J.; Colton, N.G.; Jones, E.O.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at waste treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations, Volume 3: Appendixes C-H  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains the Appendices for the Analysis of Accident Sequences and Source Terms at Waste Treatment and Storage Facilities for Waste Generated by the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations. The main report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed as a part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies are assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms are evaluated. A personal computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for calculation of human health risk impacts. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also provide discussion of specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J. [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Technical report for a fluidless directional drilling system demonstrated at Solid Waste Storage Area 6 shallow buried waste sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the research was to demonstrate a fluidless directional drilling and monitoring system (FDD) specifically tailored to address environmental drilling concerns for shallow buried wasted. The major concerns are related to worker exposure, minimizing waste generation, and confining the spread of contamination. The FDD is potentially applicable to Environmental Restoration (ER) activities for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Area Grouping 6 (WAG 6) shallow buried waste disposed in unlined trenches. Major ER activities for directional drilling are to develop a drilling system for leachate collection directly beneath trenches, and to provide localized control over leachate release to the environment. Other ER FDD activities could include vadose zone and groundwater monitoring of contaminant transport. The operational constraints pointed the research in the direction of purchasing a steerable impact hammer, or mole, manufactured by Steer-Rite Ltd. of Racine, Wisconsin. This drill was selected due to the very low cost ($25,000) associated with procuring the drill, steering module, instrumentation and service lines. The impact hammer is a self propelled drill which penetrates the soil by compacting cut material along the sidewalls of the borehole. Essentially, it forces its way through the subsurface. Although the pneumatic hammer exhausts compressed air which must be handled at the borehole collar, it does not generate soil cuttings or liquids. This is the basis for the term fluidless. A stub casing muffler was attached to the entrance hole for controlling exhaust gas and any airborne releases. Other environmental compliance modifications made to the equipment included operating the tool without lubrication, and using water instead of hydraulic fluid to actuate the steering fins on the tool.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Alliance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to power our country's commercial buildings. Unfortunately, much of this energy and money is wasted; a typical commercial building could save 20% on its energy bills simply by...

279

Transuranic waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect

Transuranic waste (TRUW) loads and potential contaminant releases at and en route to treatment, storage, and disposal sites in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex are important considerations in DOE`s Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). Waste loads are determined in part by the level of treatment the waste has undergone and the complex-wide configuration of origination, treatment, storage, and disposal sites selected for TRUW management. Other elements that impact waste loads are treatment volumes, waste characteristics, and the unit operation parameters of the treatment technologies. Treatment levels and site configurations have been combined into six TRUW management alternatives for study in the WM PEIS. This supplemental report to the WM PEIS gives the projected waste loads and contaminant release profiles for DOE treatment sites under each of the six TRUW management alternatives. It gives TRUW characteristics and inventories for current DOE generation and storage sites, describes the treatment technologies for three proposed levels of TRUW treatment, and presents the representative unit operation parameters of the treatment technologies. The data presented are primary inputs to developing the costs, health risks, and socioeconomic and environmental impacts of treating, packaging, and shipping TRUW for disposal.

Hong, K.; Kotek, T.; Folga, S.; Koebnick, B.; Wang, Y.; Kaicher, C.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-Gallon Radioactive Liquid Waste Storage Tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a record of the Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-gal liquid waste storage tanks and associated equipment at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as required by U.S. Department of Energy M 435.1-1, ''Radioactive Waste Management Manual.'' This equipment is known collectively as the Tank Farm Facility. The conclusion of this report is that the Tank Farm Facility tanks, vaults, and transfer systems that remain in service for storage are structurally adequate, and are expected to remain structurally adequate over the remainder of their planned service life through 2012. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Tank Farm Facility.

Bryant, J.W.; Nenni, J.A.; Yoder, T.S.

2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste storage building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Revision to the Record of Decision for the Department of Energy's Waste Management Program: Treatment and Storage of Transuranic Waste 9/6/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

989 989 Federal Register / Vol. 67, No. 173 / Friday, September 6, 2002 / Notices 1 The only exception to this decision was the Sandia National Laboratory in New Mexico, which will ship its TRU waste to the Los Alamos National Laboratory for disposal preparation and storage before disposal at WIPP. SANDEL, E. A. MS. SAUL, E. L. MR. SCHAEFER, J. C. MR. SCHAEFER JR, W. J. MR. SCHNEIDER, P. A. MR. SCHREGARDOUS, D. R. MR. SCHUBERT, D. CAPT SHEA, R. M. MAJGEN SHECK, E. E. MR. SHEPHARD, M. R. MS. SIMON, E. A. MR. SOMOROFF, A. R. DR. STELLOH-GARNER, C. MS. STOREY, R. C. MR. STUSSIE, W. A. MR. SULLIVAN, P. E. RADML TAMBURRINO, P. M. MR. TARRANT, N. J. MS. TESCH, T. G. MR. THOMAS, J. R. BGEN THOMAS, R. O. MR. THOMPSON, R. C. MR. THROCKMORTON JR., E. L. MR. TOWNSEND, D. K. MS.

282

Conventional Storage Water Heaters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Conventional storage water heaters remain the most popular type of water heating system for homes and buildings.

283

Proceedings: 1995 EPRI International Low-Level Waste Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's fourth annual International Low-Level Waste (LLW) Conference featured 72 papers on a variety of topics. Some of the subjects included were interim storage experiences; liquid, wet, and DAW improved processing and technology; mixed waste; decontamination; and building public trust. In addition, a nuclear industry and EPRI LLW projects update was presented.

1995-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

284

C-tank transfers: Transuranic sludge removal from the C-1, C-2, and W-23 waste storage tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

Two fluidic pulse jet mixing systems were used to successfully mobilize remote-handled transuranic sludge for retrieval from three 50,000-gal horizontal waste storage tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The results of this operation indicate that the pulse jet system should be considered for mixing and bulk retrieval of sludges in other vertical and horizontal waste tanks at ORNL and at other U.S. Department of Energy sites.

Dahl, T.L.; Lay, A.C.; Taylor, S.A.; Moore, J.W.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Supplemental analysis of accident sequences and source terms for waste treatment and storage operations and related facilities for the US Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect

This report presents supplemental information for the document Analysis of Accident Sequences and Source Terms at Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities for Waste Generated by US Department of Energy Waste Management Operations. Additional technical support information is supplied concerning treatment of transuranic waste by incineration and considering the Alternative Organic Treatment option for low-level mixed waste. The latest respirable airborne release fraction values published by the US Department of Energy for use in accident analysis have been used and are included as Appendix D, where respirable airborne release fraction is defined as the fraction of material exposed to accident stresses that could become airborne as a result of the accident. A set of dominant waste treatment processes and accident scenarios was selected for a screening-process analysis. A subset of results (release source terms) from this analysis is presented.

Folga, S.; Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Kohout, E.; Mishima, J.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Environmental Management Waste Management Facility Proxy Waste Lot Profile 6.999 for Building K-25 West Wing, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

In 1989, the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), which includes the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), was placed on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) National Priorities List. The Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) (DOE 1992), effective January 1, 1992, now governs environmental restoration activities conducted under CERCLA at the ORR. Following signing of the FFA, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the state of Tennessee signed the Oak Ridge Accelerated Cleanup Plan Agreement on June 18, 2002. The purpose of this agreement is to define a streamlined decision-making process to facilitate the accelerated implementation of cleanup, resolve ORR milestone issues, and establish future actions necessary to complete the accelerated cleanup plan by the end of fiscal year 2008. While the FFA continues to serve as the overall regulatory framework for remediation, the Accelerated Cleanup Plan Agreement supplements existing requirements to streamline the decision-making process. Decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities of Bldg. K-25, the original gaseous diffusion facility, is being conducted by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) on behalf of the DOE. The planned CERCLA action covering disposal of building structure and remaining components from the K-25 building is scheduled as a non-time-critical CERCLA action as part of DOE's continuous risk reduction strategy for ETTP. The K-25 building is proposed for D&D because of its poor physical condition and the expense of surveillance and maintenance activities. The K-25/K-27 D&D Project proposes to dispose of the commingled waste listed below from the K-25 west side building structure and remaining components and process gas equipment and piping at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) under waste disposal proxy lot (WPXL) 6.999: (1) Building structure (e.g. concrete floors [excluding basement slab], roofing, structural steel supports, interior walls, and exterior walls) and support system components including the recirculation cooling water (RCW); electrical; communication; fire protection; ventilation; process coolant; process lube oil; utilities such as steam, water and drain lines; (2) Process Piping; (3) Seal Exhaust Headers; (4) Seal Exhaust Traps; (5) Process Valves; (6) Differential Blind Multipliers (DBM)/Partial Blind Multipliers (PBM); and (7) Aftercoolers (also known as Intercell coolers). Converters and compressors while components of the process gas system, are not included in this commingled waste lot. On January 6, 2009, a meeting was held with EPA, TDEC, DOE and the team for the sole purpose of finalizing the objectives, format, and content of WPXL 6.999. The objective of WPXL 6.999 was to provide a crosswalk to the building structure and the PGE components profiles. This was accomplished by providing tables with references to the specific section of the individual profiles for each of the WLs. There are two building profiles and eight PGE profiles. All of the waste identified in the individual profiles will be commingled, shipped, and disposed exclusively under WPXL 6.999. The individual profiles were provided to the EPA and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) for information purposes only. This summary WPXL 6.999 will be submitted to EPA, TDEC, and DOE for review and approval. The format agreed upon by the regulators and DOE form the basis for WPXL 6.999. The agreed format is found on pages v and vi of the CONTENTS section of this profile. The disposal of this waste will be executed in accordance with the Action Memorandum for the Decontamination and Decommissioning of the K-25 and K-27 Buildings, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2002), Removal Action Work Plan for the K-25 and K-27 Buildings, Process Equipment Removal and Demolition, K-25/K-27 Project, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2008a); Waste Handling Plan for Demolition of the K-25 and K-27 Bui

Rigsby V.P.

2009-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

287

Evaluation and Optimization of Underground Thermal Energy Storage Systems of Energy Efficient Buildings (WKSP)- A Project within the new German R&D- Framework EnBop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Until 2003 the research on buildings in operation in Germany focused mainly on demonstration buildings. Starting with the EVA project managed by IGS the attention is shifting towards performance in operation. The paper gives a general review of these research projects and presents detailed results of project WKSP. The performance of buildings with systems for underground thermal energy storage is analysed in this project. As the analyses show several systems work worse than expected. Within the project most of the systems could be significantly improved in operation. The scientific work on building performance in operation will be broadened within the new R&D framework EnBop. IGS will coordinate the framework funded by the German Ministry of Economics and Technology.

Bockelmann, F.; Kipry, H.; Plesser, S.; Fisch, M. N.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

DOE/EIS-0283-SA-2: Supplement Analysis for Waste Solidification Building - Surplus Plutonium Program EIS (11/08)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

I I ~ ~ I Y I ~ L ' I I I i f l 7 c r [ y S r ~ for (lon~lr~rclion (711d Operal~on of n IVa~tr Solrd~fi~trtron Burlding at the S(rvannn/z I ? I I . ~ I Srte DOEIEIS-0283-SA-2 SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS WASTE SOLIDIFICATION BUILDING I N T R O D U C T I O N A N D PURPOSE The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), a separately organized agency within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is proposing to construct and operate a standalone Waste Solidification E3uilding1 (WSR) in F-Area at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Certain liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and liquid transuranic (TRU) waste expected to be generated in the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) and Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) as part of the U.S. Surplus Plutonium Disposition Program woi~ld be treated and

289

Method for extracting metals from aqueous waste streams for long term storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid-liquid extraction method for removing metals and hydrous metal colloids from waste streams is provided wherein said waste streams are contacted with a solvent system containing a water-in-oil microemulsion wherein the inverted micelles contain the extracted metal. A silicon alkoxide, either alone or in combination with other metal alkoxide compounds is added to the water-in-oil microemulsion, thereby allowing encapsulation of the extracted metal within a silicon oxide network. Lastly, the now-encapsulated metal is precipitated from the water-in-oil microemulsion phase to yield aggregates of metal-silicate particles having average. individual particle sizes of approximately 40 manometers.

Chaiko, D.J.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

DESIGN OF A ROBOTIC WELDING SYSTEM FOR CLOSURE OF WASTE STORAGE CANISTERS  

SciTech Connect

This work reported here was done to provide a conceptual design for a robotic welding and inspection system for the Yucca Mountain Repository waste package closure system. The welding and inspection system is intended to make the various closure welds that seal and/or structurally join the lids to the waste package vessels. The welding and inspection system will also perform surface and volumetric inspections of the various closure welds and has the means to repair closure welds, if required. The system is designed to perform these various activities remotely, without the necessity of having personnel in the closure cell.

H.B. Smartt; A.D. Watkins; D.P. Pace; R.J. Bitsoi; E.D> Larsen T.R. McJunkin; C.R. Tolle

2005-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

291

CORROSION CONTROL MEASURES FOR LIQUID RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site has stored radioactive wastes in large, underground, carbon steel tanks for approximately 60 years. An assessment of potential degradation mechanisms determined that the tanks may be vulnerable to nitrate- induced pitting corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Controls on the solution chemistry and temperature of the wastes are in place to mitigate these mechanisms. These controls are based upon a series of experiments performed using simulated solutions on materials used for construction of the tanks. The technical bases and evolution of these controls is presented in this paper.

Wiersma, B.; Subramanian, K.

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

292

Method for extracting metals from aqueous waste streams for long term storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid-liquid extraction method for removing metals and hydrous metal colloids from waste streams is provided wherein said waste streams are contacted with a solvent system containing a water-in-oil microemulsion wherein the inverted micelles contain the extracted metal. A silicon alkoxide, either alone or in combination with other metal alkoxide compounds is added to the water-in-oil microemulsion, thereby allowing encapsulation of the extracted metal within a silicon oxide network. Lastly, the now-encapsulated metal is precipitated from the water-in-oil microemulsion phase to yield aggregates of metal-silicate particles having average individual particle sizes of approximately 40 nanometers. 2 figs.

Chaiko, D.J.

1995-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

293

HAZWOPER project documents for demolition of the Waste Evaporator Facility, Building 3506, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This document, in support of the Waste Evaporator Facility (WEF) demolition project and contains the Project Work Plan and the Project Health and Safety Plan for demolition and partial remediation actions by ATG at the Waste Evaporator Facility, Building 3506. Various activities will be conducted during the course of demolition, and this plan provides details on the work steps involved, the identification of hazards, and the health and safety practices necessary to mitigate these hazards. The objective of this document is to develop an approach for implementing demolition activities at the WEF. This approach is based on prior site characterization information and takes into account all of the known hazards at this facility. The Project Work Plan provides instructions and requirements for identified work steps that will be utilized during the performance of demolition, while the Health and Safety Plan addresses the radiological, hazardous material exposure, and industrial safety concerns that will be encountered.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Phase 5 storage (Project W-112) Central Waste Complex operational readiness review, final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the final report for the RFSH conducted, Contractor Operational Readiness Review (ORR) for the Central Waste Complex (CWC) Project W-112 and Interim Safety Basis implementation. As appendices, all findings, observations, lines of inquiry and the implementation plan are included.

Wight, R.H.

1997-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

295

GAS-GENERATION EXPERIMENTS FOR LONG-TERM STORAGE OF TRU WASTES AT WIPP  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental investigation was conducted for gas generation in contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) wastes subjected for several years to conditions similar to those expected to occur at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) should the repository eventually become inundated with brine. Various types of actual CH-TRU wastes were placed into 12 corrosion-resistant vessels. The vessels were loosely filled with the wastes, which were submerged in synthetic brine having the same chemical composition as that in the WIPP vicinity. The vessels were also inoculated with microbes found in the Salado Formation at WIPP. The vessels were sealed, purged, and the approximately 750-ml headspace was pressurized with nitrogen gas to approximately 146 atmospheres to create anoxic conditions at the lithostatic pressure expected in the repository were it inundated. The temperature was maintained at the expected 30 C. The test program objective was to measure the quantities and species of gases generate d by metal corrosion, radiolysis, and microbial activity. These data will assist in the specification of the rates at which gases are produced under inundated repository conditions for use in the WIPP Performance Assessment computer models. These experiments were very carefully designed, constructed, instrumented, and performed. Approximately 6-1/2 years of continuous, undisturbed testing were accumulated. Several of the vessels showed significantly elevated levels of generated gases, virtually all of which was hydrogen. One vessel measured over 4.2% hydrogen, by volume. Two other vessels generated well over 1% hydrogen, and another was at nearly 1%. Only small quantities of other gases, principally carbon dioxide, were detected. Gas generation was found to depend strongly on the waste composition. The maximum hydrogen generation occurred in tests containing carbon steel. Average corrosion penetration rates in carbon-steel of up to 2.3 microns per year were deduced. Conversion of carbon to carbon dioxide was calculated to be up to 4.7 {micro}g-mol/yr/g-carbon.

Felicione, F.S.; Carney, K.P.; Dwight, C.C.; Cummings, D.G.; Foulkrod, L.E.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

296

Comparative assessment of status and opportunities for carbon Dioxide Capture and storage and Radioactive Waste Disposal In North America  

SciTech Connect

Aside from the target storage regions being underground, geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) and radioactive waste disposal (RWD) share little in common in North America. The large volume of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) needed to be sequestered along with its relatively benign health effects present a sharp contrast to the limited volumes and hazardous nature of high-level radioactive waste (RW). There is well-documented capacity in North America for 100 years or more of sequestration of CO{sub 2} from coal-fired power plants. Aside from economics, the challenges of GCS include lack of fully established legal and regulatory framework for ownership of injected CO{sub 2}, the need for an expanded pipeline infrastructure, and public acceptance of the technology. As for RW, the USA had proposed the unsaturated tuffs of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as the region's first high-level RWD site before removing it from consideration in early 2009. The Canadian RW program is currently evolving with options that range from geologic disposal to both decentralized and centralized permanent storage in surface facilities. Both the USA and Canada have established legal and regulatory frameworks for RWD. The most challenging technical issue for RWD is the need to predict repository performance on extremely long time scales (10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} years). While attitudes toward nuclear power are rapidly changing as fossil-fuel costs soar and changes in climate occur, public perception remains the most serious challenge to opening RW repositories. Because of the many significant differences between RWD and GCS, there is little that can be shared between them from regulatory, legal, transportation, or economic perspectives. As for public perception, there is currently an opportunity to engage the public on the benefits and risks of both GCS and RWD as they learn more about the urgent energy-climate crisis created by greenhouse gas emissions from current fossil-fuel combustion practices.

Oldenburg, C.; Birkholzer, J.T.

2011-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

297

Annual collection and storage of solar energy for the heating of buildings, report No. 1. Progress report, May--November 1976. [Underground pool of water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new system for the annual collection and storage of solar heated water for heating of buildings is under development at the University of Virginia. The system is composed of an energy storage sub-system which stores hot water in an underground pool and of a solar collector sub-system which acts not only to collect solar energy throughout the year but also to limit the evaporative and convective heat losses from the storage system. During the summer of 1976, a storage sub-system was constructed using the initial design specifications. A structural failure of that storage pool occurred in August resulting from a leak in the pool liner which caused a failure of the pool structure. A revised design of the storage pool sub-system has been implemented and construction was completed in November, 1976. The collector sub-system has been designed and constructed. Collector operation began in February 1977. A vertical reflector on the north edge of the collector was added in March 1977. Future research will include initial total system operation, performance evaluation, and analytical modeling.

Beard, J. T.; Dickey, J. W.; Iachetta, F. A.; Lilleleht, L. U.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Seismic design and evaluation guidelines for the Department of Energy High-Level Waste Storage Tanks and Appurtenances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides seismic design and evaluation guidelines for underground high-level waste storage tanks. The guidelines reflect the knowledge acquired in the last two decades in defining seismic ground motion and calculating hydrodynamic loads, dynamic soil pressures and other loads for underground tank structures, piping and equipment. The application of the guidelines is illustrated with examples. The guidelines are developed for a specific design of underground storage tanks, namely double-shell structures. However, the methodology discussed is applicable for other types of tank structures as well. The application of these and of suitably adjusted versions of these concepts to other structural types will be addressed in a future version of this document. The original version of this document was published in January 1993. Since then, additional studies have been performed in several areas and the results are included in this revision. Comments received from the users are also addressed. Fundamental concepts supporting the basic seismic criteria contained in the original version have since then been incorporated and published in DOE-STD-1020-94 and its technical basis documents. This information has been deleted in the current revision.

Bandyopadhyay, K.; Cornell, A.; Costantino, C.; Kennedy, R.; Miller, C.; Veletsos, A.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

REACTOR FUEL WASTE DISPOSAL PROJECT PRESSURE-TEMPERATURE EFFECT ON SALT CAVITIES AND SURVEY OF LIQUEFIED PETROLEUM GAS STORAGE  

SciTech Connect

It is deemed feasible to store reactor fuel wastes in a salt dome cavity to a depth where the differential in pressure between the soil over-burden pressure and pressure of the fluid inside the cavity does not exceed 3000 psi, and the temperature is less than 400 deg F. Tests at pressure increments of 1000 psi were conducted on a 2" cylindrical cavity contained in a 6-in. long by 6-in. cylindrical salt core. Tests indicate that the cavity exhibited complete stability under pressures to 3000 psi and temperatures to 300 deg F. At temperatures of 100 to 400 deg F and pressures to 5000 psi continuous deformation of the cavity resulted. Initial movement of the salt was observed at all pressures. This was evidenced by vertical deformation and cavity size reduction. It was noted that a point of structural equilibrium was reached at lower temperatures when the pressure did not exceed 5000 psi. A literature study reveals that the most common type of cavity utilized in liquefied petroleum gas storage is either cylindrical or ellipsoidal. A few are pear or inverted cone shaped. There was no indication of leakage for cavities when pressure tested for as long as 72 hr. This indicates that the salt mass is not permeable under conditions of prevailing underground temperature and pressure. Salt specimens tested under atmospheric Pressure and temperature exhibited permeabilities of 0.1 to 0.2 millidarcys. The cost of completing underground storage cavities in salt masses is expected to be approximately 05 per barrel of storage space. (auth)

Brown, K.E.; Jessen, F.W.; Gloyna, E.F.

1959-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

Preliminary evaluation of 30 potential granitic rock sites for a radioactive waste storage facility in southern Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Results of preliminary study are presented which was performed under subtask 2.7 of the NTS Terminal Waste Storage Program Plan for 1978. Subtask 2.7 examines the feasibility of locating a nuclear waste repository in a granitic stock or pluton in southern Nevada near the Nevada Test Site (NTS). It is assumed for the purposes of this study that such a repository cannot be located at NTS. This assumption may or may not be correct. This preliminary report does not identify a particular site as being a suitable location for a repository. Nor does it absolutely eliminate a particular site from further consideration. It does, however, answer the basic question of probable suitability of some of the sites and present a systematic method for site evaluation. Since the findings of this initial study have been favorable, it will be followed by more exhaustive and detailed studies of the original 30 sites and perhaps others. In future studies some of the evaluation criteria used in the preliminary study may be modified or eliminated, and new criteria may be introduced.

Boardman, C.R.; Knutson, C.F.

1978-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste storage building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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301

Waste Confidence Discussion | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Confidence Discussion Waste Confidence Discussion Long-Term Waste Confidence Update. Waste Confidence Discussion More Documents & Publications Status Update: Extended Storage...

302

TWRS Retrieval and Storage Mission and Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) Disposal Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project plan has a twofold purpose. First, it provides a waste stream project plan specific to the River Protection Project (RPP) (formerly the Tank Waste Remediation System [TWRS] Project) Immobilized Low-Activity Waste (LAW) Disposal Subproject for the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) that meets the requirements of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-90-01 (Ecology et al. 1994) and is consistent with the project plan content guidelines found in Section 11.5 of the Tri-Party Agreement action plan (Ecology et al. 1998). Second, it provides an upper tier document that can be used as the basis for future subproject line-item construction management plans. The planning elements for the construction management plans are derived from applicable U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) planning guidance documents (DOE Orders 4700.1 [DOE 1992] and 430.1 [DOE 1995a]). The format and content of this project plan are designed to accommodate the requirements mentioned by the Tri-Party Agreement and the DOE orders. A cross-check matrix is provided in Appendix A to explain where in the plan project planning elements required by Section 11.5 of the Tri-Party Agreement are addressed.

BURBANK, D.A.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Systems engineering management and implementation plan for Project W-464, immobilized high-level waste storage  

SciTech Connect

The Systems Engineering Management and Implementation Plan (SEMIP) for TWRS Project W-46 describes the project implementation of the Tank Waste Remediation System Systems Engineering Management Plan. (TWRS SEMP), Rev. 1. The SEMIP outlines systems engineering (SE) products and processes to be used by the project for technical baseline development. A formal graded approach is used to determine the products necessary for requirements, design, and operational baseline completion. SE management processes are defined, and roles and responsibilities for management processes and major technical baseline elements are documented.

Wecks, M.D.

1998-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations: Exploratory Shaft Facility fluids and materials evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to determine if any fluids or materials used in the Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF) of Yucca Mountain will make the mountain unsuitable for future construction of a nuclear waste repository. Yucca Mountain, an area on and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada, USA, is a candidate site for permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste from commercial nuclear power and defense nuclear activities. To properly characterize Yucca Mountain, it will be necessary to construct an underground test facility, in which in situ site characterization tests can be conducted. The candidate repository horizon at Yucca Mountain, however, could potentially be compromised by fluids and materials used in the site characterization tests. To minimize this possibility, Los Alamos National Laboratory was directed to evaluate the kinds of fluids and materials that will be used and their potential impacts on the site. A secondary objective was to identify fluids and materials, if any, that should be prohibited from, or controlled in, the underground. 56 refs., 19 figs., 11 tabs.

West, K.A.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Review of the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building, Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Selected Aspects of Firre Protection System Design  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building, Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Selected Aspects of Fire Protection System Design January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Independent Oversight Review of the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building, Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Selected Aspects of Fire Protection System Design Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1

306

Review of the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building, Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Selected Aspects of Firre Protection System Design  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building, Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Selected Aspects of Fire Protection System Design January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Independent Oversight Review of the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building, Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Selected Aspects of Fire Protection System Design Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1

307

West Valley Demonstration Project Prepares to Relocate High-Level Waste |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

West Valley Demonstration Project Prepares to Relocate High-Level West Valley Demonstration Project Prepares to Relocate High-Level Waste West Valley Demonstration Project Prepares to Relocate High-Level Waste December 24, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The West Valley Demonstration Project’s high-level waste canisters will be relocated to interim onsite storage. The West Valley Demonstration Project's high-level waste canisters will be relocated to interim onsite storage. The first group of eight concrete storage casks for the West Valley Demonstration Project’s high-level waste. The first group of eight concrete storage casks for the West Valley Demonstration Project's high-level waste. Site subcontractor American DND completed demolition of the contaminated 01-14 Building in 2013. Site subcontractor American DND completed demolition of the contaminated

308

West Valley Demonstration Project Prepares to Relocate High-Level Waste |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

West Valley Demonstration Project Prepares to Relocate High-Level West Valley Demonstration Project Prepares to Relocate High-Level Waste West Valley Demonstration Project Prepares to Relocate High-Level Waste December 24, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The West Valley Demonstration Project’s high-level waste canisters will be relocated to interim onsite storage. The West Valley Demonstration Project's high-level waste canisters will be relocated to interim onsite storage. The first group of eight concrete storage casks for the West Valley Demonstration Project’s high-level waste. The first group of eight concrete storage casks for the West Valley Demonstration Project's high-level waste. Site subcontractor American DND completed demolition of the contaminated 01-14 Building in 2013. Site subcontractor American DND completed demolition of the contaminated

309

Action plan for response to abnormal conditions in Hanford high level radioactive liquid waste storage tanks containing flammable gases. Revision 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Radioactive liquid waste tends to produce hydrogen as a result of the interaction of gamma radiation and water. In tanks containing organic chelating agents, additional hydrogen gas as well as nitrous oxide and ammonia can be produced by thermal and radiolytic decomposition of these organics. Several high-level radioactive liquid waste storage tanks, located underground at the Hanford Site, contain waste that retains the gases produced in them until large quantities are released rapidly to the tank vapor space. Tanks filled to near capacity have relatively little vapor space; therefore, if the waste suddenly releases a large amount of hydrogen and nitrous oxide, a flammable gas mixture may result. The most notable waste tank with a flammable gas problem is tank 241-SY-101. Waste in this tank has occasionally released enough flammable gas to burn if an ignition source had been present inside of the tank. Several other waste tanks exhibit similar behavior to a lesser magnitude. Administrative controls have been developed to assure that these Flammable Gas Watch List tanks are safely maintained. Responses have also been developed for off-normal conditions which might develop in these tanks. In addition, scientific and engineering studies are underway to further understand and mitigate the behavior of the Flammable Gas Watch List tanks.

Sherwood, D.J.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Supplemental design requirements document enhanced radioactive and mixed waste storage: Phase 5, Project W-113  

SciTech Connect

This Supplemental Design Requirements Document (SDRD) is used to communicate Project W-113 specific plant design information from Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the cognizant Architect Engineer (A/E). The SDRD is prepared after the completion of the project Conceptual Design report (CDR) and prior to the initiation of definitive design. Information in the SDRD serves two purposes: to convey design requirements that are too detailed for inclusion in the Functional Design Criteria (FDC) report and to serve as a means of change control for design commitments in the Title I and Title II design. The Solid Waste Retrieval Project (W-113) SDRD has been restructured from the equipment based outline used in previous SDRDs to a functional systems outline. This was done to facilitate identification of deficiencies in the information provided in the initial draft SDRD and aid design confirmation. The format and content of this SDRD adhere as closely as practicable to the requirements of WHC-CM-6-1, Standard Engineering Practices for Functional Design Criteria.

Ocampo, V.P.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-Gallon Radioactive Liquid Waste Storage Tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a record of the Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-gal liquid waste storage tanks and associated equipment at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as required by U.S. Department of Energy M 435.1-1, ''Radioactive Waste Management Manual.'' This equipment is known collectively as the Tank Farm Facility. The conclusion of this report is that the Tank Farm Facility tanks, vaults, and transfer systems that remain in service for storage are structurally adequate, and are expected to remain structurally adequate over the remainder of their planned service life through 2012. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Tank Farm Facility.

Bryant, J.W.; Nenni, J.A.; Yoder, T.S.

2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

312

Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-Gallon Radioactive Liquid Waste Storage Tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a record of the Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-gal liquid waste storage tanks and associated equipment at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as required by U.S. Department of Energy M 435.1-1, “Radioactive Waste Management Manual.” This equipment is known collectively as the Tank Farm Facility. This report is an update, and replaces the previous report by the same title issued April 2003. The conclusion of this report is that the Tank Farm Facility tanks, vaults, and transfer systems that remain in service for storage are structurally adequate, and are expected to remain structurally adequate over the remainder of their planned service life through 2012. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Tank Farm Facility.

Bryant, Jeffrey W.

2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

313

Review of Commercial Grade Dedication Plans for the Safety Instrumented System at the Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Project, August 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Review of Review of Commercial Grade Dedication Plans for the Safety Instrumented System at the Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Project May 2011 August 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 2

314

Review of Electrical System Configuration Management and Design Change Control at the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building Project, July 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Review of Independent Review of Electrical System Configuration Management and Design Change Control at the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building Project July 2011 Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ......................................................................................................................................1 2.0 Scope .........................................................................................................................................1 3.0 Background ...............................................................................................................................2

315

Review of Commercial Grade Dedication Plans for the Safety Instrumented System at the Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Project, August 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Review of Review of Commercial Grade Dedication Plans for the Safety Instrumented System at the Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Project May 2011 August 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 2

316

Review of Electrical System Configuration Management and Design Change Control at the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building Project, July 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Independent Review of Independent Review of Electrical System Configuration Management and Design Change Control at the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building Project July 2011 Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ......................................................................................................................................1 2.0 Scope .........................................................................................................................................1 3.0 Background ...............................................................................................................................2

317

Interim On-Site Storage of Low-Level Waste: Volume 3, Part 2: User's Manual and Lotus Spreadsheet for Estimating LLW Volumes and Act ivities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume of the "Interim On-Site Storage" report series supplements Volume 3, Part 1, "Waste Volume Projections and Data Management." Because that volume includes an extensive methodology and a number of worksheets requiring many calculations, users requested a computer program for easily storing, managing, and manipulating applicable data. Volume 3, Part 2 consists of a user's manual and a Lotus spreadsheet macro to meet this utility need.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Record of Decision for the Solid Waste Program, Hanford Site, Richland, WA: Storage and Treatment of Low-Level Waste and Mixed Low-Level Waste; Disposal of Low-Level Waste and Mixed Low-Level Waste, and Storage, Processing, and Certification of Transuran  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 Federal Register / Vol. 69, No. 125 / Wednesday, June 30, 2004 / Notices mixed low-level waste, and TRU waste shipments using Year 2000 census data and an updated version of the RADTRAN computer code to calculate potential risks associated with shipping. This analysis included the route- specific impacts of transporting the West Jefferson TRU waste to Hanford and subsequent shipment of this waste to WIPP. Due to the additional TRU waste generated and identified at West Jefferson subsequent to DOE's September 6, 2002, decision, DOE's currently estimated total number of 18 shipments (3 completed RH-TRU waste shipments, 14 remaining RH-TRU waste shipments, and 1 remaining CH-TRU waste shipment) exceeds DOE's prior estimate of total shipments by 3. However, the currently estimated

319

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability:A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In past work, Berkeley Lab has developed the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). Given end-use energy details for a facility, a description of its economic environment and a menu of available equipment, DER-CAM finds the optimal investment portfolio and its operating schedule which together minimize the cost of meeting site service, e.g., cooling, heating, requirements. Past studies have considered combined heat and power (CHP) technologies. Methods and software have been developed to solve this problem, finding optimal solutions which take simultaneity into account. This project aims to extend on those prior capabilities in two key dimensions. In this research storage technologies have been added as well as power quality and reliability (PQR) features that provide the ability to value the additional indirect reliability benefit derived from Consortium for Electricity Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Microgrid capability. This project is intended to determine how attractive on-site generation becomes to a medium-sized commercial site if economical storage (both electrical and thermal), CHP opportunities, and PQR benefits are provided in addition to avoiding electricity purchases. On-site electrical storage, generators, and the ability to seamlessly connect and disconnect from utility service would provide the facility with ride-through capability for minor grid disturbances. Three building types in both California and New York are assumed to have a share of their sensitive electrical load separable. Providing enhanced service to this load fraction has an unknown value to the facility, which is estimated analytically. In summary, this project began with 3 major goals: (1) to conduct detailed analysis to find the optimal equipment combination for microgrids at a few promising commercial building hosts in the two favorable markets of California and New York; (2) to extend the analysis capability of DER-CAM to include both heat and electricity storage; and (3) to make an initial effort towards adding consideration of PQR into the capabilities of DER-CAM.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy; Coffey, Brian; Aki, Hirohisa

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste storage building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Accumulated waste characterization work plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) as part of the uranium enrichment complex produces enriched uranium for power generation and defense purposes. Since the beginning of diffusion plant operations in 1953, a variety of waste materials and excess equipment has been generated through both normal operations and as part of major system upgrade programs. However, as a result of the closure of former onsite radioactive management facilities and limited onsite and offsite disposal facilities for mixed (hazardous and radioactive) wastes, PORTS has accumulated large quantities of waste awaiting final disposition. These accumulated wastes were estimated in the Accumulated Waste Plan (AWP) to consist of some 21,700 containers of the radioactive, RCRA hazardous, PCB, mixed and asbestos wastes in various storage areas and process buildings with PORTS. In order to proper manage these wastes onsite and prepare for them for ultimate treatment or disposal, a detailed understanding of the waste contents and characteristics must be developed. The strategy for managing and disposing of these wastes was outlined in the AWP. The purpose of this Accumulated Waste Characterization Work Plan (AWCWP) is to provide a detailed plan for characterizing waste containers from the existing PORTS inventory. The AWCWP documents the process and analytical information currently available and describes statistically-based sampling and analyses required to support proper regulatory classification.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Storage of heat and coolth in hollow-core concrete slabs. Swedish experience, and application to large, American-style buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Folksam office building in Farsta, near Stockholm, has operated since December 1977 with an energy use for direct space heating of only 60 kWh/m/sup 2/ (19,000 Btu/ft/sup 2/), which is only half the Stockholm average for new buildings. To this 60 kWh/m/sup 2/ must be added the typical electric use of another 60 kWh/m/sup 2/ for lights, equipment, fans, etc. Even though Stockholm has 3580 deg-day (C), new Swedish buildings are so well insulated that their temperature floats upwards during most winter working days. In the Folksam building, this surplus heat from 40 full-occupied hours per week is stored in hollow-core concrete slabs, and then is used to compensate for the heat losses during the remaining 128 unoccupied hours. The energy transport/storage system necessary to keep the indoor temperature comfortable, summer and winter, is called Thermodeck, and is described in detail.

Anderson, L.O.; Bernander, K.G.; Isfaelt, E.; Rosenfeld, A.H.

1979-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

323

Applications of thermal energy storage to process heat and waste heat recovery in the primary aluminum industry. Final report, September 1977-September 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a study entitled, Applications of Thermal Energy Storage to Process Heat and Waste Heat Recovery in the Primary Aluminum Industry are presented. In this preliminary study, a system has been identified by which the large amounts of low-grade waste energy in the primary pollution control system gas stream can be utilized for comfort heating in nearby communities. Energy is stored in the form of hot water, contained in conventional, insulated steel tanks, enabling a more efficient utilization of the constant energy source by the cyclical energy demand. Less expensive energy storage means (heated ponds, aquifers), when they become fully characterized, will allow even more cost-competitive systems. Extensive design tradeoff studies have been performed. These tradeoff studies indicate that a heating demand equivalent to 12,000 single-family residences can be supplied by the energy from the Intalco plant. Using a 30-year payback criterion (consistent with utility planning practice), the average cost of energy supplied over the system useful life is predicted at one-third the average cost of fossil fuel. The study clearly shows that the utilization of waste energy from aluminum plants is both technically and economically attractive. The program included a detailed survey of all aluminum plants within the United States, allowing the site specific analyses to be extrapolated to a national basis. Should waste heat recovery systems be implemented by 1985, a national yearly savings of 6.5 million barrels of oil can be realized.

Katter, L.B.; Hoskins, R.L.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Carbon Storage Review 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23,...

325

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Principal Building...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

lit floorspace in commercial buildings. Figure 5. Office, education, and warehouse and storage buildings account for more than half of total lit floorspace in commercial...

326

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 140: Waste Dumps, Burn Pits, and Storage Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, July 2002, Rev. No. 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 140 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 140 consists of nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 05-08-01, Detonation Pits; 05-08-02, Debris Pits; 05-17-01, Hazardous Waste Accumulation Site (Buried); 05-19-01, Waste Disposal Site; 05-23-01, Gravel Gertie; 05-35-01, Burn Pit; 05-99-04, Burn Pit; 22-99-04, Radioactive Waste Dump; 23-17-01, Hazardous Waste Storage Area. All nine of these CASs are located within Areas 5, 22, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nevada, approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas. This CAU is being investigated because disposed waste may be present without appropriate controls (i.e., use restrictions, adequate cover) and hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present or migrating at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. The NTS has been used for various research and development projects including nuclear weapons testing. The CASs in CAU 140 were used for testing, material storage, waste storage, and waste disposal. A two-phase approach has been selected to collect information and generate data to satisfy needed resolution criteria and resolve the decision statements. Phase I will determine if contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) are present in concentrations exceeding preliminary action levels. This data will be evaluated at all CASs. Phase II will determine the extent of the contaminant(s) of concern (COCs). This data will only be evaluated for CASs with a COC identified during Phase I. Based on process knowledge, the COPCs for CAU 140 include volatile organics, semivolatile organics, petroleum hydrocarbons, explosive residues, herbicides, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, metals, and radionuclides. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

NNSA /NV

2002-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

327

Applying the Systems Engineering Process for Establishing Requirements for the Safety and Health Monitoring System of the Waste Solidification Building at the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Safety and Health Monitoring (SHM) System technical basis document for the Waste Solidification Building (WSB) was developed by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company design team. The WSB is being designed and built to support the waste disposal needs of the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) and the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina. The main mission of the WSB is to process the radiological liquid waste streams from the PDCF and the MFFF into a solid waste form. The solid waste form, concrete encased waste, is acceptable for shipment and disposal as transuranic (TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and as Low Level Waste (LLW) at on-site disposal areas. The SHM System will also handle the job control waste from the PDCF, the MFFF, and the WSB. The SHM System will serve the WSB by monitoring personnel radiation exposure and environmental releases. The WSB design used HPT design support in determining the air monitoring equipment required for the WSB. The Systems Engineering (SE) process was applied to define the functions and requirements necessary to design and operate the SHM System. The SE process is a proven disciplined approach that supports management in clearly defining the mission or problem, managing system functions and requirements, identifying and managing risk, establishing bases for informed decision making, and verifying that products and services meet customer needs. This SE process applied to the SHM System was a major effort encompassing requirements analysis and interface control. Use of the SE process combined with HPT design input resulted in well-defined requirements to support the procurement of a safe-mission essential SHM System.

Simpkins, P.J.

2003-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

328

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be acquired. Battery storage costs are roughly consistentlow storage & PV cost (run 3) Battery charging Batterylow storage & PV cost (run 3) Battery discharging kW Utility

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Storage Technologies on Microgrid Viability Siddiqui, A.S. ,of Storage Technologies on Microgrid Viability List ofStorage Technologies on Microgrid Viability List of Figures

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Storage Technologies on Microgrid Viability Figure 41.of Storage Technologies on Microgrid Viability List ofStorage Technologies on Microgrid Viability List of Figures

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Hazardous Waste Management (Oklahoma) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

treatment and storage of such waste. It also mentions the availability of tax credits for waste facilities. Energy recovery from the destruction of a hazardous waste may be...

332

Addendum 1 to CSER 78-001 PWR Core 2 Blanket Fuel Storage Cell 4 221T building  

SciTech Connect

Irradiated pressurized water reactor (PWR) Core 2 (PWR-2) blanket fuel assemblies from the Shippingport PWR have been stored in the 221-T canyon water pool for twenty years. The fuel is in the form of small wafers of UO{sub 2}, which were initially natural enriched uranium (0.72% {sup 235}U). The uranium oxide wafers have a pyrolytic carbon coating, which prevents the fuel from reacting with a zircaloy-4 grid which provides structural strength and holds the wafers in place to form fuel plates. Thirty fuel plates comprise a sub-assembly which are held together by zircaloy-4 end plates. Two identical oxide fuel plate sub-assemblies are welded together to form a square structure with two zircaloy-4 extensions welded to the ends. Seventy-two PWR-2 assemblies are stored in the 221-T canyon water pool. Eight of these assemblies were irradiated in the center of the reactor core to an average burnup of 24,538 Mwd/MTU. The remaining assemblies had a burnup of 16,200 Mwd/MTU. These assemblies were placed in the canyon in 1978 and 1979 (WHC 1996). The original Criticality Safety Analysis Report (CSAR) (WHC 1990) analyzed the criticality safety of their storage and concluded that they were safe from a criticality standpoint. It was also mentioned in this CSAR that the assemblies were scheduled to be stored for twenty years. The Criticality Prevention Specification (CPS) for this storage configuration (RHO 1978), included in (WHC 1990), specifies that the fuel ''will be stored in Cell 4 up to 20 years'', and that ''no special handling or storage requirements for criticality control during interim storage up to 20 years'' were necessary. The purpose of this addendum is to extend the period of coverage for this material. The analysis examines zircaloy-clad fuel degradation and extends the permitted storage time by ten years for Shippingport Core 2 blanket fuel assemblies in the 221-T, Cell 4 storage pool.

GOLDBERG, H.J.

1999-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

333

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 1607-F7, 141-M Building Septic Tank, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-040  

SciTech Connect

The 1607-F7, 141-M Building Septic Tank waste site was a septic tank and drain field that received sanitary sewage from the former 141-M Building. Remedial action was performed in August and November 2005. The results of verification sampling demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations support future unrestricted land uses that can be represented by a rural-residential scenario. These results also show that residual concentrations support unrestricted future use of shallow zone soil and that contaminant levels remaining in the soil are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

L. M. Dittmer

2006-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

334

Evaluation of closure alternatives for the Building 3001 Storage Canal at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bldg. 3001 Storage Canal at ORNL is leaking approximately 400 gal of water per day. This report presents the Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) Team's evaluation of plans and presents recommendations for interim closure alternatives to stop the release of radionuclides and potential release of heavy metals into the environment. This is a conceptual evaluation and does not include detailed engineering of physical mitigation methods. The alternatives address only interim closure measures and not final decommissioning of the canal.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Transforming Commercial Building Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Ron Underhill Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ronald.underhill@pnnl.gov (509)375-9765 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Most buildings are not commissioned (Cx) before occupancy, including HVAC and lighting systems * Buildings often are poorly operated and maintained leading to significant energy waste of 5 to 20%, even when they have building automation systems (BASs)

336

Transforming Commercial Building Operations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Ron Underhill Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ronald.underhill@pnnl.gov (509)375-9765 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Most buildings are not commissioned (Cx) before occupancy, including HVAC and lighting systems * Buildings often are poorly operated and maintained leading to significant energy waste of 5 to 20%, even when they have building automation systems (BASs)

337

Review of private sector and Department of Energy treatment, storage, and disposal capabilities for low-level and mixed low-level waste  

SciTech Connect

Private sector capacity for treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of various categories of radioactive waste has been researched and reviewed for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company, the primary contractor for the INEL. The purpose of this document is to provide assistance to the INEL and other US Department of Energy (DOE) sites in determining if private sector capabilities exist for those waste streams that currently cannot be handled either on site or within the DOE complex. The survey of private sector vendors was limited to vendors currently capable of, or expected within the next five years to be able to perform one or more of the following services: low-level waste (LLW) volume reduction, storage, or disposal; mixed LLW treatment, storage, or disposal; alpha-contaminated mixed LLW treatment; LLW decontamination for recycling, reclamation, or reuse; laundering of radioactively-contaminated laundry and/or respirators; mixed LLW treatability studies; mixed LLW treatment technology development. Section 2.0 of this report will identify the approach used to modify vendor information from previous revisions of this report. It will also illustrate the methodology used to identify any additional companies. Section 3.0 will identify, by service, specific vendor capabilities and capacities. Because this document will be used to identify private sector vendors that may be able to handle DOE LLW and mixed LLW streams, it was decided that current DOE capabilities should also be identified. This would encourage cooperation between DOE sites and the various states and, in some instances, may result in a more cost-effective alternative to privatization. The DOE complex has approximately 35 sites that generate the majority of both LLW and mixed LLW. Section 4.0 will identify these sites by Operations Office, and their associated LLW and mixed LLW TSD units.

Willson, R.A.; Ball, L.W.; Mousseau, J.D.; Piper, R.B.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Regional geological assessment of the Devonian-Mississippian shale sequence of the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan basins relative to potential storage/disposal of radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect

The thick and regionally extensive sequence of shales and associated clastic sedimentary rocks of Late Devonian and Early Mississippian age has been considered among the nonsalt geologies for deep subsurface containment of high-level radioactive wastes. This report examines some of the regional and basin-specific characteristics of the black and associated nonblack shales of this sequence within the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan basins of the north-central and eastern United States. Principal areas where the thickness and depth of this shale sequence are sufficient to warrant further evaluation are identified, but no attempt is made to identify specific storage/disposal sites. Also identified are other areas with less promise for further study because of known potential conflicts such as geologic-hydrologic factors, competing subsurface priorities involving mineral resources and groundwater, or other parameters. Data have been compiled for each basin in an effort to indicate thickness, distribution, and depth relationships for the entire shale sequence as well as individual shale units in the sequence. Included as parts of this geologic assessment are isopach, depth information, structure contour, tectonic elements, and energy-resource maps covering the three basins. Summary evaluations are given for each basin as well as an overall general evaluation of the waste storage/disposal potential of the Devonian-Mississippian shale sequence,including recommendations for future studies to more fully characterize the shale sequence for that purpose. Based on data compiled in this cursory investigation, certain rock units have reasonable promise for radioactive waste storage/disposal and do warrant additional study.

Lomenick, T.F.; Gonzales, S.; Johnson, K.S.; Byerly, D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1334E-2009 1334E-2009 Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States Michael Stadler, Chris Marnay, Afzal Siddiqui, Judy Lai, Brian Coffey, and Hirohisa Aki Environmental Energy Technologies Division Revised March 2009 http://eetd.lbl.gov/EA/EMP/emp-pubs.html The work described in this paper was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Renewable and Distributed Systems Integration Program in the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct

340

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit application for tank storage units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant  

SciTech Connect

In compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), this report discusses information relating to permit applications for three tank storage units at Y-12. The storage units are: Building 9811-1 RCRA Tank Storage Unit (OD-7); Waste Oil/Solvent Storage Unit (OD-9); and Liquid Organic Solvent Storage Unit (OD-10). Numerous sections discuss the following: Facility description; waste characteristics; process information; groundwater monitoring; procedures to prevent hazards; contingency plan; personnel training; closure plan, post closure plan, and financial requirements; record keeping; other federal laws; organic air emissions; solid waste management units; and certification. Sixteen appendices contain such items as maps, waste analyses and forms, inspection logs, equipment identification, etc.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste storage building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Interim storage study report  

SciTech Connect

High-level radioactive waste (HLW) stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) in the form of calcine and liquid and liquid sodium-bearing waste (SBW) will be processed to provide a stable waste form and prepare the waste to be transported to a permanent repository. Because a permanent repository will not be available when the waste is processed, the waste must be stored at ICPP in an Interim Storage Facility (ISF). This report documents consideration of an ISF for each of the waste processing options under consideration.

Rawlins, J.K.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Review of the aquifer seasonal thermal energy storage building HVAC system at the Melville, New York, Mid-Island Mail Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The successful widespread commercialization of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) in the United States will depend on the effectiveness with which the experiences gained from early full-scale systems are used as guides in the design, installation and operation of future projects. One such early system from which both anecdotal and quantitative information is available is the Mid-Island Postal Facility in Melville, New York. At this facility, built in the mid-1980s, an ATES system has been integrated with the building`s central heating and cooling plant. ``Cold`` wells are charged with water that is cooled during the winter by heat pump and closed circuit cooler operation. Water from these cold wells is then used to meet the facility`s cooling load during the summer, before being pumped back into the ground at ``Warm`` wells. Dehumidification during summer operation is accomplished by a liquid desiccant system that uses propane boilers to provide a heat source for desiccant regeneration. This system will also add water to the air during periods of low humidity. This paper provides an overview of the project, and describes the analysis being performed to assess energy and economic merits of this innovative system.

Marseille, T.J.; Wilke, D.A.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Evaluation of concepts for monitored retrievable storage of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect

The primary mission selected by DOE for the monitored retrieval storage (MRS) system is to provide an alternative means of storage in the event that the repository program is delayed. The MRS concepts considered were the eight concepts included in the MRS Research and Development Report to Congress (DOE 1983). These concepts are: metal cask (stationary and transportable); concrete cask (sealed storage cask); concrete cask-in-trench; field drywell; tunnel drywell; open cycle vault; closed cycle vault; and tunnel rack vault. Conceptual design analyses were performed for the candidate concepts using a common set of design requirements specified in consideration of the MRS mission.

Triplett, M.B.; Smith, R.I.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Model Predictive Control for the Operation of Building Cooling Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

predictive control of thermal energy storage in buildingsystems which use thermal energy storage. In particular thepredictive control of thermal energy storage in building

Ma, Yudong

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Model Predictive Control for the Operation of Building Cooling Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the chillers and cooling towers, the thermal storage tankthe chillers and cooling towers, the thermal storage tank,of thermal energy storage in building cooling systems.

Ma, Yudong

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4.8; 3. a low storage and PV price run, with low storageas in the low storage and PV price run 3, but in which6. a low storage price and 60% PV price reduction run, and

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermal storage (kWh) electricity bill (k$) NG bill (k$)thermal storage (kWh) electricity bill (k$) NG bill (k$)thermal storage (kWh) electricity bill (k$) NG bill (k$)

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be acquired. Battery storage costs are roughly consistentlow storage & PV cost (run 3) Battery charging kW Batteryweekday low storage & PV cost (run 3) Battery discharging kW

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Building condition monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The building sector of the United States currently consumes over 40% of the United States primary energy supply. Estimates suggest that between 5 and 30% of any building's annual energy consumption is unknowingly wasted ...

Samouhos, Stephen V. (Stephen Vincent), 1982-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

A Comparative Review of Hydrologic Issues Involved in Geologic Storage of CO2 and Injection Disposal of Liquid Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

loss in class I waste injection wells, in: Apps J.A. andR.F. , An overview of injection well history in the Unitedmeasures for Class I injection wells, in Apps J.A. and Tsang

Tsang, C.-F.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Combined thermal storage pond and dry cooling tower waste heat rejection system for solar-thermal steam-electric power plants. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal performance and economics of the combined thermal storage pond and dry cooling tower waste heat rejection system concept for solar-thermal steam-electric plants have been evaluated. Based on the computer simulation of the operation of southwest-sited solar-thermal plants, it has been determined that the combined pond-tower concept has significant cost and performance advantages over conventional dry cooling systems. Use of a thermal storage pond as a component of the dry cooling system allows a significant reduction in the required dry cooling heat exchange capacity and the associated parasitic power consumption. Importantly, it has been concluded that the combined pond-tower dry cooling system concept can be employed to economically maintain steam condensing temperatures at levels normally achieved with conventional evaporative cooling systems. An evaluation of alternative thermal storage pond design concepts has revealed that a stratified vertical-flow cut-and-fill reservoir with conventional membrane lining and covering would yield the best overall system performance at the least cost.

Guyer, E.C.; Bourne, J.G.; Brownell, D.L.; Rose, R.M.

1979-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

352

Development of biological and chemical methods for environmental monitoring of DOE waste disposal and storage facilities. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Hazardous chemicals in the environment have received ever increasing attention in recent years. In response to ongoing problems with hazardous waste management, Congress enacted the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) in 1976. In 1980, Congress adopted the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), commonly called Superfund to provide for emergency spill response and to clean up closed or inactive hazardous waste sites. Scientists and engineers have begun to respond to the hazardous waste challenge with research and development on treatment of waste streams as well as cleanup of polluted areas. The magnitude of the problem is just now beginning to be understood. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) National Priorities List as of September 13 1985, contained 318 proposed sites and 541 final sites (USEPA, 1985). Estimates of up to 30,000 sites containing hazardous wastes (1,200 to 2,000 of which present a serious threat to public health) have been made (Public Law 96-150). In addition to the large number of sites, the costs of cleanup using available technology are phenomenal. For example, a 10-acre toxic waste site in Ohio is to be cleaned up by removing chemicals from the site and treating the contaminated groundwater. The federal government has already spent more than $7 million to remove the most hazardous wastes and the groundwater decontamination alone is expected to take at least 10 years and cost $12 million. Another example of cleanup costs comes from the State of California Commission for Economic Development which predicts a bright economic future for the state except for the potential outlay of $40 billion for hazardous waste cleanup mandated by federal and state laws.

NONE

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Structural acceptance criteria for the evaulation of existing double-shell waste storage tanks located at the Hanford site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The structural acceptance criteria contained herein for the evaluation of existing underground double-shell waste storage tanks located at the Hanford Site is part of the Life Management/Aging Management Program of the Tank Waste Remediation System. The purpose of the overall life management program is to ensure that confinement of the waste is maintained over the required service life of the tanks. Characterization of the present condition of the tanks, understanding and characterization of potential degradation mechanisms, and development of tank structural acceptance criteria based on previous service and projected use are prerequisites to assessing tank integrity, to projecting the length of tank service, and to developing and applying prudent fixes or repairs. The criteria provided herein summarize the requirements for the analysis and structural qualification of the existing double-shell tanks for continued operation. Code reconciliation issues and material degradation under aging conditions are addressed. Although the criteria were developed for double-shell tanks, many of the provisions are equally applicable to single-shell tanks. However, the criteria do not apply to the evaluation of tank appurtenances and buried piping.

Julyk, L.J.; Day, A.D.; Dyrness, A.D.; Moore, C.J.; Peterson, W.S.; Scott, M.A.; Shrivastava, H.P.; Sholman, J.S.; Watts, T.N.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

B Plant treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) units inspection plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This inspection plan is written to meet the requirements of WAC 173-303 for operations of a TSD facility. Owners/operators of TSD facilities are required to inspection their facility and active waste management units to prevent and/or detect malfunctions, discharges and other conditions potentially hazardous to human health and the environment. A written plan detailing these inspection efforts must be maintained at the facility in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC), Chapter 173-303, ``Dangerous Waste Regulations`` (WAC 173-303), a written inspection plan is required for the operation of a treatment, storage and disposal (TSD) facility and individual TSD units. B Plant is a permitted TSD facility currently operating under interim status with an approved Part A Permit. Various operational systems and locations within or under the control of B Plant have been permitted for waste management activities. Included are the following TSD units: Cell 4 Container Storage Area; B Plant Containment Building; Low Level Waste Tank System; Organic Waste Tank System; Neutralized Current Acid Waste (NCAW) Tank System; Low Level Waste Concentrator Tank System. This inspection plan complies with the requirements of WAC 173-303. It addresses both general TSD facility and TSD unit-specific inspection requirements. Sections on each of the TSD units provide a brief description of the system configuration and the permitted waste management activity, a summary of the inspection requirements, and details on the activities B Plant uses to maintain compliance with those requirements.

Beam, T.G.

1996-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

355

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Berkeley Lab has for several years been developing methods for selection of optimal microgrid systems, especially for commercial building applications, and applying these methods in the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). This project began with 3 major goals: (1) to conduct detailed analysis to find the optimal equipment combination for microgrids at a few promising commercial building hosts in the two favorable markets of California and New York, (2) to extend the analysis capability of DER-CAM to include both heat and electricity storage, and (3) to make an initial effort towards adding consideration of power quality and reliability (PQR) to the capabilities of DER-CAM. All of these objectives have been pursued via analysis of the attractiveness of a Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Microgrid consisting of multiple nameplate 100 kW Tecogen Premium Power Modules (CM-100). This unit consists of an asynchronous inverter-based variable speed internal combustion engine genset with combined heat and power (CHP) and power surge capability. The essence of CERTS Microgrid technology is that smarts added to the on-board power electronics of any microgrid device enables stable and safe islanded operation without the need for complex fast supervisory controls. This approach allows plug and play development of a microgrid that can potentially provide high PQR with a minimum of specialized site-specific engineering. A notable feature of the CM-100 is its time-limited surge rating of 125 kW, and DER-CAM capability to model this feature was also a necessary model enhancement.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy; Coffey, Brian; Aki, Hirohisa

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

356

Review of the aquifer seasonal thermal energy storage building HVAC system at the Melville, New York, Mid-Island Mail Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The successful widespread commercialization of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) in the United States will depend on the effectiveness with which the experiences gained from early full-scale systems are used as guides in the design, installation and operation of future projects. One such early system from which both anecdotal and quantitative information is available is the Mid-Island Postal Facility in Melville, New York. At this facility, built in the mid-1980s, an ATES system has been integrated with the building's central heating and cooling plant. Cold'' wells are charged with water that is cooled during the winter by heat pump and closed circuit cooler operation. Water from these cold wells is then used to meet the facility's cooling load during the summer, before being pumped back into the ground at Warm'' wells. Dehumidification during summer operation is accomplished by a liquid desiccant system that uses propane boilers to provide a heat source for desiccant regeneration. This system will also add water to the air during periods of low humidity. This paper provides an overview of the project, and describes the analysis being performed to assess energy and economic merits of this innovative system.

Marseille, T.J.; Wilke, D.A.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Just-in-time characterization and certification of DOE-generated wastes  

SciTech Connect

Transportation and disposal of wastes generated by Department of Energy (DOE) activities, including weapons production and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of facilities, require that wastes be certified as complying with various regulations and requirements. These certification requirements are typically summarized by disposal sites in their specific waste acceptance criteria. Although a large volume of DOE wastes have been generated by past activities and are presently in storage awaiting disposal, a significant volume of DOE wastes, particularly from D&D projects. have not yet been generated. To prepare DOE-generated wastes for disposal in an efficient manner. it is suggested that a program of just-in-time characterization and certification be adopted. The goal of just-in-time characterization and certification, which is based on the just-in-time manufacturing process, is to streamline the certification process by eliminating redundant layers of oversight and establishing pro-active waste management controls. Just-in-time characterization and certification would rely on a waste management system in which wastes are characterized at the point of generation, precertified as they are generated (i.e., without iterative inspections and tests subsequent to generation and storage), and certified at the point of shipment, ideally the loading dock of the building from which the wastes are generated. Waste storage would be limited to accumulating containers for cost-efficient transportation.

Arrenholz, D.A.; Primozic, F.J. [Benchmark Environmental Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Robinson, M.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

358

Thermal energy storage technical progress report, April 1990--March 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting development of thermal energy storage (TES) as a means of efficiently coupling energy supplies to variable heating or cooling demands. Uses of TES include electrical demand-side management in buildings and industry, extending the utilization of renewable energy resources such as solar, and recovery of waste heat from periodic industrial processes. Technical progress to develop TES for specific diurnal and industrial applications under Oak Ridge National Laboratory's TES program from April 1990 to March 1992 is reported and covers research in the areas of low temperature sorption, direct contact ice making, latent heat storage plasterboard and latent/sensible heat regenerator technology development.

Tomlinson, J.J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Thermal energy storage technical progress report, April 1990--March 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting development of thermal energy storage (TES) as a means of efficiently coupling energy supplies to variable heating or cooling demands. Uses of TES include electrical demand-side management in buildings and industry, extending the utilization of renewable energy resources such as solar, and recovery of waste heat from periodic industrial processes. Technical progress to develop TES for specific diurnal and industrial applications under Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s TES program from April 1990 to March 1992 is reported and covers research in the areas of low temperature sorption, direct contact ice making, latent heat storage plasterboard and latent/sensible heat regenerator technology development.

Tomlinson, J.J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

EA-0981: Solid Waste Retrieval Complex, Enhanced Radioactive...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Retrieval Complex, Enhanced Radioactive and Mixed Waste Storage Facility, Infrastructure Upgrades, and Central Waste Support Complex, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste storage building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Massachusetts Captures...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Massachusetts Captures Home Energy Waste to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Massachusetts Captures Home Energy Waste on Facebook Tweet about Better...

362

Immobilization of Nuclear Wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 20, 2010 ... Glassy and Glass Composite Nuclear Wasteforms: Michael Ojovan1; Bill Lee2; ... wastes which should be solidified for safe storage and disposal. ... has been vitrifying the Department of Energy's High Level Waste (HLW) at ...

363

Solid Waste Permits (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality administers the rules and regulations governing the storage, collection, processing, recovery, and reuse of solid waste protect the air,...

364

Waste Clean Up 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... deployment and clean-up activities of robot arms into a nuclear contaminated pit at the opening of waste storage tank C-106 at Hanford, Washington ...

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

365

ElectricStorageinCaliforniasCommercialBuildings_cover  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

it as EMS emulator and the building can use the mobile storage and stationary storage for tariff-driven demand response. By using EVs connected to the buildings for energy...

366

storage technology barriers. The...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summit Power to build a 400-megawatt (MW) coal-fired power plant with carbon capture and storage (CCS) in Britain. The companies will submit the Caledonia Clean Energy Project to...

367

Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723). DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 1500–1508), and DOE’s NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations: Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOE’s Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

Not Available

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Volume1  

SciTech Connect

Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723).DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 1500–1508), and DOE’s NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations:Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho;Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOE’s Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

Not Available

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This regulation regulates the generation, storage, transportation, treatment, and disposal of hazardous waste, and wherever feasible, reduces or eliminates waste at the source. It is the policy of...

370

On-site cogeneration for office buildings  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to investigate the feasibility of alternative means of enhancing the economic attractiveness of cogeneration for use in office buildings. One course of action designed to achieve this end involves directing the exhaust heat of a cogeneration unit through an absorption chiller to produce cooling energy. Thus, the units could be operated more continuously, particularly if thermal storage is incorporated. A second course of action for improving the economics of cogeneration in office buildings involves the sale of the excess cogenerated waste heat. A potential market for this waste heat is a district heating grid, prevalent in the downtown sections of most urban areas in the US. This project defines a realistic means to guide the integration of cogeneration and district heating. The approach adopted to achieve this end involved researching the issues surrounding the integration of on-site cogeneration in downtown commercial office buildings, and performing an energy and economic feasibility analysis for a representative building. The technical, economic and legal issues involved in this type of application were identified and addressed. The research was also intended as a first step toward implementing a pilot project to demonstrate the feasibility of office building cogeneration in San Francisco. 13 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

Not Available

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Plutonium Finishing Plan (PFP) Treatment and Storage Unit Interim Status Closure Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the planned activities and performance standards for closing the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Treatment and Storage Unit. The PFP Treatment and Storage Unit is located within the 234-52 Building in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility. Although this document is prepared based upon Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 265, Subpart G requirements, closure of the unit will comply with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 regulations pursuant to Section 5.3 of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Action Plan (Ecology et al. 1996). Because the PFP Treatment and Storage Unit manages transuranic mixed (TRUM) waste, there are many controls placed on management of the waste. Based on the many controls placed on management of TRUM waste, releases of TRUM waste are not anticipated to occur in the PFP Treatment and Storage Unit. Because the intention is to clean close the PFP Treatment and Storage Unit, postclosure activities are not applicable to this closure plan. To clean close the unit, it will be demonstrated that dangerous waste has not been left onsite at levels above the closure performance standard for removal and decontamination. If it is determined that clean closure is not possible or is environmentally impractical, the closure plan will be modified to address required postclosure activities. The PFP Treatment and Storage Unit will be operated to immobilize and/or repackage plutonium-bearing waste in a glovebox process. The waste to be processed is in a solid physical state (chunks and coarse powder) and will be sealed into and out of the glovebox in closed containers. The containers of immobilized waste will be stored in the glovebox and in additional permitted storage locations at PFP. The waste will be managed to minimize the potential for spills outside the glovebox, and to preclude spills from reaching soil. Containment surfaces will be maintained to ensure integrity. In the unlikely event that a waste spill does occur outside the glovebox, operating methods and administrative controls will require that waste spills be cleaned up promptly and completely, and a notation will be made in the operating record. Because dangerous waste does not include source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

PRIGNANO, A.L.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Heat storage duration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Both the amount and duration of heat storage in massive elements of a passive building are investigated. Data taken for one full winter in the Balcomb solar home are analyzed with the aid of sub-system simulation models. Heat storage duration is tallied into one-day intervals. Heat storage location is discussed and related to overall energy flows. The results are interpreted and conclusions drawn.

Balcomb, J.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

TRU waste inventory collection and work off plans for the centralization of TRU waste characterization/certification at INL - on your mark - get set - 9410  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) amended the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Waste Management Program: Treatment and Storage of Transuranic Waste to centralize transuranic (TRU) waste characterization/certification from fourteen TRU waste sites. This centralization will allow for treatment, characterization and certification ofTRU waste from the fourteen sites, thirteen of which are sites with small quantities ofTRU waste, at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) prior to shipping the waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. Centralization of this TRU waste will avoid the cost of building treatment, characterization, certification, and shipping capabilities at each of the small quantity sites that currently do not have existing facilities. Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) and Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) will provide centralized shipping facilities, to WIPP, for all of the small quantity sites. Hanford, the one large quantity site identified in the ROD, has a large number of waste in containers that are overpacked into larger containers which are inefficient for shipment to and disposal at WIPP. The AMWTF at the INL will reduce the volume of much of the CH waste and make it much more efficient to ship and dispose of at WIPP. In addition, the INTEC has a certified remote handled (RH) TRU waste characterization/certification program at INL to disposition TRU waste from the sites identified in the ROD.

Mctaggert, Jerri Lynne [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lott, Sheila A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gadbury, Casey [CBFO

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

309 Building transition plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The preparation for decontamination and decommissioning (transition) of the 309 Building is projected to be completed by the end of the fiscal year (FY) 1998. The major stabilization and decontamination efforts include the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR), fuel storage and transfer pits, Transfer Waste (TW) tanks and the Ion Exchange Vaults. In addition to stabilizing contaminated areas, equipment, components, records, waste products, etc., will be dispositioned. All nonessential systems, i.e., heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC), electrical, monitoring, fluids, etc., will be shut down and drained/de-energized. This will allow securing of the process, laboratory, and office areas of the facility. After that, the facility will be operated at a level commensurate with its surveillance needs while awaiting D&D. The implementation costs for FY 1995 through FY 1998 for the transition activities are estimated to be $1,070K, $2,115K, $2,939K, and $4,762K, respectively. Costs include an assumed company overhead of 20% and a 30% out year contingency.

Graves, C.E.

1994-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

375

Guidelines for mixed waste minimization  

SciTech Connect

Currently, there is no commercial mixed waste disposal available in the United States. Storage and treatment for commercial mixed waste is limited. Host States and compacts region officials are encouraging their mixed waste generators to minimize their mixed wastes because of management limitations. This document provides a guide to mixed waste minimization.

Owens, C.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Improvements in Container Management of Transuranic and Low-Level Radioactive Waste Stored at the Central Waste Complex at Hanford  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Central Waste Complex (CWC) is the interim storage facility for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) mixed waste, transuranic waste, transuranic mixed waste, low-level and low-level mixed radioactive waste at the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site. The majority of the waste stored at the facility is retrieved from the low-level burial grounds in the 200 West Area at the Site, with minor quantities of newly generated waste from on-site and offsite waste generators. The CWC comprises 18 storage buildings that house 13,000 containers. Each waste container within the facility is scanned into its location by building, module, tier and position and the information is stored in a site-wide database. As waste is retrieved from the burial grounds, a preliminary non-destructive assay is performed to determine if the waste is transuranic (TRU) or low-level waste (LLW) and subsequently shipped to the CWC. In general, the TRU and LLW waste containers are stored in separate locations within the CWC, but the final disposition of each waste container is not known upon receipt. The final disposition of each waste container is determined by the appropriate program as process knowledge is applied and characterization data becomes available. Waste containers are stored within the CWC based on their physical chemical and radiological hazards. Further segregation within each building is done by container size (55-gallon, 85-gallon, Standard Waste Box) and waste stream. Due to this waste storage scheme, assembling waste containers for shipment out of the CWC has been time consuming and labor intensive. Qualitatively, the ratio of containers moved to containers in the outgoing shipment has been excessively high, which correlates to additional worker exposure, shipment delays, and operational inefficiencies. These inefficiencies impacted the LLW Program's ability to meet commitments established by the Tri-Party Agreement, an agreement between the State of Washington, the Department of Energy, and the Environmental Protection Agency. These commitments require waste containers to be shipped off site for disposal and/or treatment within a certain time frame. Because the program was struggling to meet production demands, the Production and Planning group was tasked with developing a method to assist the LLW Program in fulfilling its requirements. Using existing databases for container management, a single electronic spreadsheet was created to visually map every waste container within the CWC. The file displays the exact location (e.g., building, module, tier, position) of each container in a format that replicates the actual layout in the facility. In addition, each container was placed into a queue defined by the LLW and TRU waste management programs. The queues were developed based on characterization requirements, treatment type and location, and potential final disposition. This visual aid allows the user to select containers from similar queues and view their location within the facility. The user selects containers in a centralized location, rather than random locations, to expedite shipments out of the facility. This increases efficiency for generating the shipments, as well as decreasing worker exposure and container handling time when gathering containers for shipment by reducing movements of waste containers. As the containers are collected for shipment, the remaining containers are segregated by queue, which further reduces future container movements. (authors)

Uytioco, E. [Fluor Government Group, Richland, WA (United States); Baynes, P.A.; Bailey, K.B.; McKenney, D.E. [Fluor Hanford, Inc., Richland WA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design, May 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HIAR SRS-2013-5-07 HIAR SRS-2013-5-07 Site: Savannah River Site Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Savannah River Site (SRS) Waste Solidification Building (WSB) Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design Dates of Activity : 05/07/2013 - 05/09/2013 Report Preparer: Joseph Lenahan Activity Description/Purpose: 1. Review the corrective actions being implemented by the construction contractor to address Findings 1-4, 6, and 9 from a construction quality review performed by the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) (Reference 1). 2. Meet with the SRS WSB project staff and Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) engineers to discuss the

378

Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design, May 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HIAR SRS-2013-5-07 HIAR SRS-2013-5-07 Site: Savannah River Site Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Savannah River Site (SRS) Waste Solidification Building (WSB) Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design Dates of Activity : 05/07/2013 - 05/09/2013 Report Preparer: Joseph Lenahan Activity Description/Purpose: 1. Review the corrective actions being implemented by the construction contractor to address Findings 1-4, 6, and 9 from a construction quality review performed by the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) (Reference 1). 2. Meet with the SRS WSB project staff and Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) engineers to discuss the

379

Automated Continuous Commissioning of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

it is unclear how much wasted energy might be recovered, northe amount of energy and water wasted by building heating,of how much energy is being wasted relative to a physical

Bailey, Trevor

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

WRAP Module 1 waste analysis plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this waste analysis plan is to document the necessary characterization, sampling, screening, analysis, and waste acceptance criteria for waste received at the WRAP Module 1. Waste expected to be received at WRAP Module 1 includes newly generated and retrieved waste. The newly generated waste will undergo verification prior to treatment, storage, or disposal. Retrieved waste from the burial grounds or above ground storage will undergo further characterization (as needed), treatment, supercompaction, and repackaging

Mayancsik, B.A.

1995-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste storage building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Model Predictive Control for Energy Efficient Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Savings”. In: Energy and Buildings 40.7 (2008), pp.Thermal Dynamics”. In: Energy and Buildings 47 (Apr. 2011),Storage Systems”. In: Energy and Buildings 35.2 (2003), pp.

Ma, Yudong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

but solar thermal and absorption cooling are attractive, andby heat activated absorption cooling, direct-fired naturalheat activated absorption cooling (using waste or solar

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Evaluation of the TORE(R)Lance for Radioactive Waste Mobilization and Retrieval from Underground Storage Tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The TORE? Lance is a hand-held hydro transportation device with the ability to convey solids at pre-determined slurry concentrations over great distances. The TORE? Lance head generates a precessing vortex core to mobilize solids. Solids retrieval is accomplished using an eductor. The device contains no parts and requires pressurized fluid to operate the eductor and produce mobilization. Three configurations of TORE? Lance operation were evaluated for mobilization and eduction during these tests: compressed air, water, and an air and water mixture. These tests have shown that the TORE? Lance is a tool that can be used at Hanford for mobilization and retrieval of wastes. The system is versatile and can be configured for many types of applications. These studies showed that the diverse applications require unique solutions so care is recommended for TORE? Lance equipment selection for each application. The two components of the TORE? Lance are the precessing vortex for mobilizing and the eductor for retrieval. The precessing vortex is sensitive to fluid flow rate and pressure. In the hand-held unit these parameters are controlled both internally, by changing shim spacing, and externally by controlling the flow split between the eductor and the head. For in-tank applications out-of-tank control of both these parameters are recommended.

Bamberger, Judith A.; Bates, Cameron J.; Bates, James M.; White, M.

2002-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

384

Hybrid electrical energy storage systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrical energy is a high quality form of energy that can be easily converted to other forms of energy with high efficiency and, even more importantly, it can be used to control lower grades of energy quality with ease. However, building a cost-effective ... Keywords: charge, electrical storage, energy, energy storage, hybrid storage, management

Massoud Pedram; Naehyuck Chang; Younghyun Kim; Yanzhi Wang

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 140: Waste Dumps, Burn Pits, and Storage Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision No. 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 140: Waste Dumps, Burn Pits, and Storage Area, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Areas 5, 22, and 23 of the NTS, CAU 140 consists of nine corrective action sites (CASs). Investigation activities were performed from November 13 through December 11, 2002, with additional sampling to delineate the extent of contaminants of concern (COCs) conducted on February 4 and March 18 and 19, 2003. Results obtained from the investigation activities and sampling indicated that only 3 of the 9 CASs at CAU 140 had COCs identified. Following a review of existing data, future land use, and current operations at the NTS, the following preferred alternatives were developed for consideration: (1) No Further Action - six CASs (05-08-02, 05-17-01, 05-19-01, 05-35-01, 05-99-04, and 22-99-04); (2) Clean Closure - one CAS (05-08-01), and (3) Closure-in-Place - two CASs (05-23-01 and 23-17-01). These alternatives were judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated. Additionally, the alternatives meet all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site and will eliminate potential future exposure pathways to the contaminated media at CAU 140.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2003-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

386

Membrane-Based Absorption Refrigeration Systems: Nanoengineered Membrane-Based Absorption Cooling for Buildings Using Unconcentrated Solar & Waste Heat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BEETIT Project: UFL is improving a refrigeration system that uses low quality heat to provide the energy needed to drive cooling. This system, known as absorption refrigeration system (ARS), typically consists of large coils that transfer heat. Unfortunately, these large heat exchanger coils are responsible for bulkiness and high cost of ARS. UFL is using new materials as well as system design innovations to develop nanoengineered membranes to allow for enhanced heat exchange that reduces bulkiness. UFL’s design allows for compact, cheaper and more reliable use of ARS that use solar or waste heat.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

303-K Storage Facility report on FY98 closure activities  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes and evaluates the decontamination activities, sampling activities, and sample analysis performed in support of the closure of the 303-K Storage Facility. The evaluation is based on the validated data included in the data validation package (98-EAP-346) for the 303-K Storage Facility. The results of this evaluation will be used for assessing contamination for the purpose of closing the 303-K Storage Facility as described in the 303-K Storage Facility Closure Plan, DOE/RL-90-04. The closure strategy for the 303-K Storage Facility is to decontaminate the interior of the north half of the 303-K Building to remove known or suspected dangerous waste contamination, to sample the interior concrete and exterior soils for the constituents of concern, and then to perform data analysis, with an evaluation to determine if the closure activities and data meet the closure criteria. The closure criteria for the 303-K Storage Facility is that the concentrations of constituents of concern are not present above the cleanup levels. Based on the evaluation of the decontamination activities, sampling activities, and sample data, determination has been made that the soils at the 303-K Storage Facility meet the cleanup performance standards (WMH 1997) and can be clean closed. The evaluation determined that the 303-K Building cannot be clean closed without additional closure activities. An additional evaluation will be needed to determine the specific activities required to clean close the 303-K Storage Facility. The radiological contamination at the 303-K Storage Facility is not addressed by the closure strategy.

Adler, J.G.

1998-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

388

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003. Hatziargyriou, N. et al. , “Microgrids, An Overview ofand Operation of Microgrids in Commercial Buildings”, IEEEequipment combination for microgrids at a few promising

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Energy and building envelope  

SciTech Connect

This book presents the papers given at a conference on building thermal insulation, energy efficiency, and solar architecture. Topics considered at the conference include thermal comfort, heating loads, the air change rate in residential buildings, core-insulated external walls, passive solar options, cooling loads, daylighting, solar gain, the energy transmittance of glazings, heat storage units in phase change materials, heat transfer through windows, and rock bed heat storage for solar heating systems.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Principal Building Activities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Principal Building Activities Principal Building Activities Principal Building Activities Three of the four activities that dominated commercial floorspace-office, warehouse and storage, and mercantile-dominated the distribution of buildings (Figure 1). Each of these three activity categories included more than 600,000 buildings, while no other building activity had more than a half-million buildings and only service buildings exceeded 350,000 buildings. Detailed tables Figure 1. Distribution of Buildings by Principal Building Activity, 1999 Figure 1. Distribution of Buildings by Principal Building Activity, 1999. If having trouble viewing this page, please contact the National Energy Information Center at (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey

391

Remaining Sites Verification Package for 132-D-2, 117-D Filter Building, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2005-024  

SciTech Connect

The 132-D-2 site (117-D Filter Building) and associated below-grade ductwork were decommissioned and demolished in two phases in 1985 and 1986, with a portion of the rubble left in situ beneath clean fill at least 1 m (3.3 ft) thick. Decommissioning included removal of contaminated equipment, including filters. Residual concentrations support future land uses that can be represented by a rural-residential scenario and pose no threat to groundwater or the Columbia River based on RESRAD modeling.

R. A. Carlson

2006-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

392

4.5 Meter high level waste canister study  

SciTech Connect

The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Storage and Disposal Project has established the Immobilized High-Level Waste (IBLW) Storage Sub-Project to provide the capability to store Phase I and II BLW products generated by private vendors. A design/construction project, Project W-464, was established under the Sub-Project to provide the Phase I capability. Project W-464 will retrofit the Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB) to accommodate the Phase I I-ILW products. Project W-464 conceptual design is currently being performed to interim store 3.0 m-long BLW stainless steel canisters with a 0.61 in diameter, DOE is considering using a 4.5 in canister of the same diameter to reduce permanent disposal costs. This study was performed to assess the impact of replacing the 3.0 in canister with the 4.5 in canister. The summary cost and schedule impacts are described.

Calmus, R.B., Westinghouse Hanford, Richland, WA

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Beyond Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

without compromising future generations SUSTAINABLE INL Buildings Beyond Buildings Sustainability Beyond Buildings INL is taking sustainability efforts "beyond buildings" by...

394

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capitalcost.htm). EPRI-DOE Handbook of Energy Storage foret al. 1996, 2003, EPRI-DOE Handbook 2003, Goldstein, L. etet al. 2003, EPRI-DOE Handbook 2003 and at the Electricity

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al. 1996, 2003, EPRI-DOE Handbook 2003, Goldstein, L. etet al. 2003, EPRI-DOE Handbook 2003 and at the Electricitycapitalcost.htm). EPRI-DOE Handbook of Energy Storage for

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reliability of storage technologies as well as PV dependingreliability and availability of the different technologies such as ICEs, batteries or PVs is important. For example, PVPV depending on the charge / discharge cycle and solar radiation. The reliability /

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Thermal energy storage technical progress report, April 1992--March 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting development of thermal energy storage (TES) as a means of efficiently coupling energy supplies to variable heating or cooling demands. Uses of TES include electrical demand-side management in buildings and industry, extending the utilization of renewable energy resources such as solar, and recovery of waste heat from periodic industrial processes. Technical progress to develop TES for specific diurnal and industrial applications under the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s TES program from April 1992 to March 1993 is reported and covers research in the areas of low temperature sorption, thermal energy storage water heater, latent heat storage wallboard and latent/sensible heat regenerator technology development.

Olszewski, M.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Summary and Guide for Stakeholders  

SciTech Connect

Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723). DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 1500–1508), and DOE’s NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations: Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOE’s Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

Not Available

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Aquifer thermal energy storage. International symposium: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Aquifers have been used to store large quantities of thermal energy to supply process cooling, space cooling, space heating, and ventilation air preheating, and can be used with or without heat pumps. Aquifers are used as energy sinks and sources when supply and demand for energy do not coincide. Aquifer thermal energy storage may be used on a short-term or long-term basis; as the sole source of energy or as a partial storage; at a temperature useful for direct application or needing upgrade. The sources of energy used for aquifer storage are ambient air, usually cold winter air; waste or by-product energy; and renewable energy such as solar. The present technical, financial and environmental status of ATES is promising. Numerous projects are operating and under development in several countries. These projects are listed and results from Canada and elsewhere are used to illustrate the present status of ATES. Technical obstacles have been addressed and have largely been overcome. Cold storage in aquifers can be seen as a standard design option in the near future as it presently is in some countries. The cost-effectiveness of aquifer thermal energy storage is based on the capital cost avoidance of conventional chilling equipment and energy savings. ATES is one of many developments in energy efficient building technology and its success depends on relating it to important building market and environmental trends. This paper attempts to provide guidance for the future implementation of ATES. Individual projects have been processed separately for entry onto the Department of Energy databases.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

A Look at Principal Building Activities in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Commercial Buildings Home> Special Topics > 1995 Principal Home > Commercial Buildings Home> Special Topics > 1995 Principal Building Activities Office Education Health Care Retail and Service Food Service Food Sales Lodging Religious Worship Public Assembly Public Order and Safety Warehouse and Storage Vacant Other Summary Comparison Table (All Activities) More information on the: Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey A Look at ... Principal Building Activities in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) When you look at a city skyline, most of the buildings you see are commercial buildings. In the CBECS, commercial buildings include office buildings, shopping malls, hospitals, churches, and many other types of buildings. Some of these buildings might not traditionally be considered "commercial," but the CBECS includes all buildings that are not residential, agricultural, or industrial.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste storage building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Evaluation of potential for MSRE spent fuel and flush salt storage and treatment at the INEL  

SciTech Connect

The potential for interim storage as well as for treatment of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment spent fuel at INEL has been evaluated. Provided that some minimal packaging and chemical stabilization prerequisites are satisfied, safe interim storage of the spent fuel at the INEL can be achieved in a number of existing or planned facilities. Treatment by calcination in the New Waste Calcining Facility at the INEL can also be a safe, effective, and economical alternative to treatment that would require the construction of a dedicated facility. If storage at the INEL is chosen for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) spent fuel salts, their transformation to the more stable calcine solid would still be desirable as it would result in a lowering of risks. Treatment in the proposed INEL Remote-Handled Immobilization Facility (RHIF) would result in a waste form that would probably be acceptable for disposal at one of the proposed national repositories. The cost increment imputable to the treatment of the MSRE salts would be a small fraction of the overall capital and operating costs of the facility or the cost of building and operating a dedicated facility. Institutional and legal issues regarding shipments of fuel and waste to the INEL are summarized. The transfer of MSRE spent fuel for interim storage or treatment at the INEL is allowed under existing agreements between the State of idaho and the Department of energy and other agencies of the Federal Government. In contrast, current agreements preclude the transfer into Idaho of any radioactive wastes for storage or disposal within the State of Idaho. This implies that wastes and residues produced from treating the MSRE spent fuel at locations outside Idaho would not be acceptable for storage in Idaho. Present agreements require that all fuel and high-level wastes stored at the INEL, including MSRE spent fuel if received at the INEL, must be moved to a location outside Idaho by the year 2035.

Ougouag, A.M.; Ostby, P.A.; Nebeker, R.L.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

NGLW RCRA Storage Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory contains radioactive liquid waste in underground storage tanks at the INTEC Tank Farm Facility (TFF). INTEC is currently treating the waste by evaporation to reduce the liquid volume for continued storage, and by calcination to reduce and convert the liquid to a dry waste form for long-term storage in calcine bins. Both treatment methods and activities in support of those treatment operations result in Newly Generated Liquid Waste (NGLW) being sent to TFF. The storage tanks in the TFF are underground, contained in concrete vaults with instrumentation, piping, transfer jets, and managed sumps in case of any liquid accumulation in the vault. The configuration of these tanks is such that Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations apply. The TFF tanks were assessed several years ago with respect to the RCRA regulations and they were found to be deficient. This study considers the configuration of the current tanks and the RCRA deficiencies identified for each. The study identifies four potential methods and proposes a means of correcting the deficiencies. The cost estimates included in the study account for construction cost; construction methods to minimize work exposure to chemical hazards, radioactive contamination, and ionizing radiation hazards; project logistics; and project schedule. The study also estimates the tank volumes benefit associated with each corrective action to support TFF liquid waste management planning.

R. J. Waters; R. Ochoa; K. D. Fritz; D. W. Craig

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Waste Management Assistance Act (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section promotes the proper and safe storage, treatment, and disposal of solid, hazardous, and low-level radioactive wastes in Iowa, and calls on Iowans to assume responsibility for waste...

404

Solid Waste Management Act (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act provides for the planning and regulation of solid waste storage, collection, transportation, processing, treatment, and disposal. It requires that municipalities submit plans for municipal...

405

Hydrogen Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 10, 2012 ... Energy Storage: Materials, Systems and Applications: Hydrogen Storage Program Organizers: Zhenguo "Gary" Yang, Pacific Northwest ...

406

Fact Sheet: Grid-Scale Flywheel Energy Storage Plant | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Flywheel Energy Storage Plant Fact Sheet: Grid-Scale Flywheel Energy Storage Plant Beacon Power will design, build, and operate a utility-scale 20 MW flywheel energy storage plant...

407

IMPROVEMENTS IN CONTAINER MANAGEMENT OF TRANSURANIC (TRU) AND LOW LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORED AT THE CENTRAL WASTE COMPLEX (CWC) AT HANFORD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Central Waste Complex (CWC) is the interim storage facility for Resource Conservation & Recovery Act (RCRA) mixed waste, transuranic waste, transuranic mixed waste, low-level and low-level mixed radioactive waste at the Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Hanford Site. The majority of the waste stored at the facility is retrieved from the low-level burial grounds in the 200 West Area at the Site, with minor quantities of newly generated waste from on-site and off-site waste generators. The CWC comprises 18 storage buildings that house 13,000 containers. Each waste container within the facility is scanned into its location by building, module, tier and position and the information is stored in a site-wide database. As waste is retrieved from the burial grounds, a preliminary non-destructive assay is performed to determine if the waste is transuranic (TRU) or low-level waste (LLW) and subsequently shipped to the CWC. In general, the TRU and LLW waste containers are stored in separate locations within the CWC, but the final disposition of each waste container is not known upon receipt. The final disposition of each waste container is determined by the appropriate program as process knowledge is applied and characterization data becomes available. Waste containers are stored within the CWC based on their physical chemical and radiological hazards. Further segregation within each building is done by container size (55-gallon, 85-gallon, Standard Waste Box) and waste stream. Due to this waste storage scheme, assembling waste containers for shipment out of the CWC has been time consuming and labor intensive. Qualitatively, the ratio of containers moved to containers in the outgoing shipment has been excessively high, which correlates to additional worker exposure, shipment delays, and operational inefficiencies. These inefficiencies impacted the LLW Program's ability to meet commitments established by the Tri-Party Agreement, an agreement between the State of Washington, the Department of Energy, and the Environmental Protection Agency. These commitments require waste containers to be shipped off site for disposal and/or treatment within a certain time frame. Because the program was struggling to meet production demands, the Production and Planning group was tasked with developing a method to assist the LLW Program in fulfilling its requirements. Using existing databases for container management, a single electronic spreadsheet was created to visually map every waste container within the CWC. The file displays the exact location (e.g., building, module, tier, position) of each container in a format that replicates the actual layout in the facility. In addition, each container was placed into a queue defined by the LLW and TRU waste management programs. The queues were developed based on characterization requirements, treatment type and location, and potential final disposition. This visual aid allows the user to select containers from similar queues and view their location within the facility. The user selects containers in a centralized location, rather than random locations, to expedite shipments out of the facility. This increases efficiency for generating the shipments, as well as decreasing worker exposure and container handling time when gathering containers for shipment by reducing movements of waste container. As the containers are collected for shipment, the remaining containers are segregated by queue, which further reduces future container movements.

UYTIOCO EM

2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

408

Performance Metrics for Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Commercial building owners and operators have requested a standard set of key performance metrics to provide a systematic way to evaluate the performance of their buildings. The performance metrics included in this document provide standard metrics for the energy, water, operations and maintenance, indoor environmental quality, purchasing, waste and recycling and transportation impact of their building. The metrics can be used for comparative performance analysis between existing buildings and industry standards to clarify the impact of sustainably designed and operated buildings.

Fowler, Kimberly M.; Wang, Na; Romero, Rachel L.; Deru, Michael P.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

409

Storage Viability and Optimization Web Service  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study ofBerkeley Lab, Berkeley, CA, USA Microgrid Symposium. Held atfor a building or microgrid. Definitions of a microgrid can

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Referenced-site environmental document for a Monitored Retrievable Storage facility: backup waste management option for handling 1800 MTU per year  

SciTech Connect

This environmental document includes a discussion of the purpose of a monitored retrievable storage facility, a description of two facility design concepts (sealed storage cask and field drywell), a description of three reference sites (arid, warm-wet, and cold-wet), and a discussion and comparison of the impacts associated with each of the six site/concept combinations. This analysis is based on a 15,000-MTU storage capacity and a throughput rate of up to 1800 MTU per year.

Silviera, D.J.; Aaberg, R.L.; Cushing, C.E.; Marshall, A.; Scott, M.J.; Sewart, G.H.; Strenge, D.L.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

City of Houston Joins Better Buildings Challenge, Partners with...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Houston Joins Better Buildings Challenge, Partners with Energy Department to Reduce Energy Waste and Boost Efficiency City of Houston Joins Better Buildings Challenge,...

412

Understanding radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect

This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

Murray, R.L.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

National waste terminal storage program  

SciTech Connect

An overview is provided of the national geologic disposal program. The portions of the program concerning South Dakota are discussed in detail. (LK)

Zerby, C.D.

1976-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

414

Building Technologies Office: Plug-and-Play Distributed Power...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

demonstration is expected to include the following: Diesel synchronous generator Energy storage device Otis regenerative elevator system representing building critical...

415

Analysis of electric vehicle interconnection with commercial building microgrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Division Building / tariffs electricity and gas loads for afeed-in tariff -ZNEB Storage and DR constraints -electricity

Stadler, Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Development of Energy Management Strategies for Automated Real- Time Pricing: Control System Enhancements for Thermal Energy Storage (TES) and Modulating Building Loads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many prominent electric utilities throughout the United States are currently investigating real-time pricing rate structures (RTP) as a means of giving their large customers an economic incentive to reduce their electricity usage during periods when the utility's cost of providing power is high. This report summarizes the results of an engineering study of the technical approach and potential benefits of optimizing thermal energy storage in response to real-time pricing of electricity. The program is com...

1996-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

417

Y-12 Plant decontamination and decommissioning Technology Logic Diagram for Building 9201-4: Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part B, Decontamination; robotics/automation; waste management  

SciTech Connect

This volume consists of the Technology Logic Diagrams (TLDs) for the decontamination, robotics/automation, and waste management areas.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Building Performance Compass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Performance Compass Building Performance Compass Building Performance Compass logo Building Performance Compass analyzes commercial and multi-family building energy use patterns in a simple, easy-to-use Web-based interface. Using building details and energy data from the buildingÂ’s utility bills, it is unique in its ability to benchmark and compare all buildings, whether residential or commercial. Recent enhancements to Building Performance Compass include new multi-family support, the ability to track non-energy quantities such as water and waste, and features such as its fast-feedback report, which enables reporting energy savings as early as one month after work is completed. Building Performance Compass also provides extensive tracking of building data and usage, as well as the ability to upload and track

419

3001 canal radiological characterization and waste removal report, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An underground steel reinforced concrete transfer and storage canal was built in 1943 and operated as an integral part of the Oak Ridge Graphite Reactor Building (3001) until 1963 when the reactor was shutdown. During operation, the canal was used for under water transfer of irradiated materials and other metals from the reactor in Building 3001 to the Building 3019 hot cell for further processing. After shutdown of the reactor, the canal was used for storage of irradiated materials and fission products until 1990 when the larger materials were removed and stored in the Department of Energy (DOE) approved solid waste management storage facilities. At that time it was discovered that a considerable amount of sludge had accu