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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste solidification building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design [HIAR SRS-2013-5-07

2

SRS Waste Solidification Building Project Peer Review, July 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SRS-2011-07-15 SRS-2011-07-15 Site: Savannah River Site, NA-26 Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Waste Solidification Building Project Peer Review Dates of Activity : 07/12/2011 - 07/15/2011 Report Preparer: James Lockridge Activity Description/Purpose: At the request of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Enterprise Project Management (NA- APM-20), the Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), provided an expert to review the Waste Solidification Building (WSB) startup programs and procedures associated with worker safety and health, environment, and security. Criteria for the review was detailed in the Criteria,

3

WASTE SOLIDIFICATION BUILDING BENCH SCALE HIGH ACTIVITY WASTE SIMULANT VARIABILITY STUDY FY2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this task was to perform a variability study of the high activity waste (HAW) acidic feed to determine the impact of feed variability on the quality of the final grout and on the mixability of the salt solution into the dry powders. The HAW acidic feeds were processed through the neutralization/pH process, targeting a final pH of 12. These fluids were then blended with the dry materials to make the final waste forms. A secondary objective was to determine if elemental substitution for cost prohibitive or toxic elements in the simulant affects the mixing response, thus providing a more economical simulant for use in full scale tests. Though not an objective, the HAW simulant used in the full scale tests was also tested and compared to the results from this task. A statistically designed test matrix was developed based on the maximum molarity inputs used to make the acidic solutions. The maximum molarity inputs were: 7.39 HNO{sub 3}, 0.11618 gallium, 0.5423 silver, and 1.1032 'other' metals based on their NO{sub 3}{sup -} contribution. Substitution of the elements aluminum for gallium and copper for silver was also considered in this test matrix, resulting in a total of 40 tests. During the NaOH addition, the neutralization/pH adjustment process was controlled to a maximum temperature of 60 C. The neutralized/pH adjusted simulants were blended with Portland cement and zircon flour at a water to cement mass ratio of 0.30. The mass ratio of zircon flour to Portland cement was 1/12. The grout was made using a Hobart N-50 mixer running at low speed for two minutes to incorporate and properly wet the dry solids with liquid and at medium speed for five minutes for mixing. The resulting fresh grout was measured for three consecutive yield stress measurements. The cured grout was measured for set, bleed, and density. Given the conditions of preparing the grout in this task, all of the grouts were visually well mixed prior to preparing the grouts for measurements. All of the cured grouts were measured for bleed and set. All of the cured grouts satisfied the bleed and set requirements, where no bleed water was observed on any of the grout samples after one day and all had set within 3 days of curing. This data indicates, for a well mixed product, bleed and set requirement are satisfied for the range of acidic feeds tested in this task. The yield stress measurements provide both an indication on the mixability of the salt solution with dry materials and an indication of how quickly the grout is starting to form structure. The inability to properly mix these two streams into a well mixed grout product will lead to a non-homogeneous mixture that will impact product quality. Product quality issues could be unmixed regions of dry material and hot spots having high concentrations of americium 241. Mixes that were more difficult to incorporate typically resulted in grouts with higher yield stresses. The mixability from these tests will provide Waste Solidification Building (WSB) an indication of which grouts will be more challenging to mix. The first yield stress measurements were statistically compared to a list of variables, specifically the batched chemicals used to make the acidic solutions. The first yield stress was also compared to the physical properties of the acidic solutions, physical and pH properties of the neutralized/pH adjusted solutions, and chemical and physical properties of the grout.

Hansen, E; Timothy Jones, T; Tommy Edwards, T; Alex Cozzi, A

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

4

SRS - Programs - Waste Solidification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Waste Solidification Waste Solidification The two primary facilities operated within the Waste Solidification program are Saltstone and the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Each DWPF canister is 10 feet tall and 2 feet in diameter, and typically takes a little over a day to fill. Each DWPF canister is 10 feet tall and 2 feet in diameter, and typically takes a little over a day to fill. The largest radioactive waste glassification plant in the world, DWPF converts the high-level liquid nuclear waste currently stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) into a solid glass form suitable for long-term storage and disposal. Scientists have long considered this glassification process, called "vitrification," as the preferred option for immobilizing high-level radioactive liquids into a more stable, manageable form until a federal

5

DOE/EIS-0283-SA-2: Supplement Analysis for Waste Solidification Building - Surplus Plutonium Program EIS (11/08)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

I I ~ ~ I Y I ~ L ' I I I i f l 7 c r [ y S r ~ for (lon~lr~rclion (711d Operal~on of n IVa~tr Solrd~fi~trtron Burlding at the S(rvannn/z I ? I I . ~ I Srte DOEIEIS-0283-SA-2 SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS WASTE SOLIDIFICATION BUILDING I N T R O D U C T I O N A N D PURPOSE The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), a separately organized agency within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is proposing to construct and operate a standalone Waste Solidification E3uilding1 (WSR) in F-Area at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Certain liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and liquid transuranic (TRU) waste expected to be generated in the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) and Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) as part of the U.S. Surplus Plutonium Disposition Program woi~ld be treated and

6

Review of the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building, Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Selected Aspects of Firre Protection System Design  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building, Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Selected Aspects of Fire Protection System Design January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Independent Oversight Review of the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building, Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Selected Aspects of Fire Protection System Design Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1

7

Review of the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building, Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Selected Aspects of Firre Protection System Design  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building, Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Selected Aspects of Fire Protection System Design January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Independent Oversight Review of the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building, Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Selected Aspects of Fire Protection System Design Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1

8

Review of Commercial Grade Dedication Plans for the Safety Instrumented System at the Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Project, August 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Review of Review of Commercial Grade Dedication Plans for the Safety Instrumented System at the Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Project May 2011 August 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 2

9

Review of Electrical System Configuration Management and Design Change Control at the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building Project, July 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Independent Review of Independent Review of Electrical System Configuration Management and Design Change Control at the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building Project July 2011 Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ......................................................................................................................................1 2.0 Scope .........................................................................................................................................1 3.0 Background ...............................................................................................................................2

10

Review of Commercial Grade Dedication Plans for the Safety Instrumented System at the Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Project, August 2011  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Review of Review of Commercial Grade Dedication Plans for the Safety Instrumented System at the Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Project May 2011 August 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 2

11

Review of Electrical System Configuration Management and Design Change Control at the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building Project, July 2011  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Independent Review of Independent Review of Electrical System Configuration Management and Design Change Control at the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building Project July 2011 Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ......................................................................................................................................1 2.0 Scope .........................................................................................................................................1 3.0 Background ...............................................................................................................................2

12

Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design, May 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

HIAR SRS-2013-5-07 HIAR SRS-2013-5-07 Site: Savannah River Site Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Savannah River Site (SRS) Waste Solidification Building (WSB) Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design Dates of Activity : 05/07/2013 - 05/09/2013 Report Preparer: Joseph Lenahan Activity Description/Purpose: 1. Review the corrective actions being implemented by the construction contractor to address Findings 1-4, 6, and 9 from a construction quality review performed by the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) (Reference 1). 2. Meet with the SRS WSB project staff and Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) engineers to discuss the

13

Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design, May 2013  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HIAR SRS-2013-5-07 HIAR SRS-2013-5-07 Site: Savannah River Site Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Savannah River Site (SRS) Waste Solidification Building (WSB) Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design Dates of Activity : 05/07/2013 - 05/09/2013 Report Preparer: Joseph Lenahan Activity Description/Purpose: 1. Review the corrective actions being implemented by the construction contractor to address Findings 1-4, 6, and 9 from a construction quality review performed by the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) (Reference 1). 2. Meet with the SRS WSB project staff and Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) engineers to discuss the

14

Microwave solidification development for Rocky Flats waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Microwave Engineering Team at the Rocky Flats Plant has developed a production-scale system for the treatment of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes using microwave energy. The system produces a vitreous final form which meets the acceptance criteria for shipment and disposal. The technology also has potential for application on various other waste streams from the public and private sectors. Technology transfer opportunities are being identified and pursued for commercialization of the microwave solidification technology.

Dixon, D.; Erle, R.; Eschen, V. [and others

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Waste Form Development for the Solidification of PDCF/MOX Liquid Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the Savannah River Site, part of the Department of Energy's nuclear materials complex located in South Carolina, cementation has been selected as the solidification method for high-alpha and low-activity waste streams generated in the planned plutonium disposition facilities. A Waste Solidification Building (WSB) that will be used to treat and solidify three radioactive liquid waste streams generated by the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility) and the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility is in the preliminary design stage. The WSB is expected to treat a transuranic (TRU) waste stream composed primarily of americium and two low-level waste (LLW) streams. The acidic wastes will be concentrated in the WSB evaporator and neutralized in a cement head tank prior to solidification. A series of TRU mixes were prepared to produce waste forms exhibiting a range of processing and cured properties. The LLW mixes were prepared using the premix from the preferred TRU waste form. All of the waste forms tested passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure. After processing in the WSB, current plans are to dispose of the solidified TRU waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico and the solidified LLW waste at an approved low-level waste disposal facility.

COZZI, ALEX

2004-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

16

Solidification of ion exchange resin wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solidification media investigated included portland type I, portland type III and high alumina cements, a proprietary gypsum-based polymer modified cement, and a vinyl ester-styrene thermosetting plastic. Samples formulated with hydraulic cement were analyzed to investigate the effects of resin type, resin loading, waste-to-cement ratio, and water-to-cement ratio. The solidification of cation resin wastes with portland cement was characterized by excessive swelling and cracking of waste forms, both after curing and during immersion testing. Mixed bed resin waste formulations were limited by their cation component. Additives to improve the mechanical properties of portland cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were evaluated. High alumina cement formulations dislayed a resistance to deterioration of mechanical integrity during immersion testing, thus providing a significant advantage over portland cements for the solidification of resin wastes. Properties of cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were examined. An experiment was conducted to study the leachability of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co from resins modified in portland type III and high alumina cements. The cumulative /sup 137/Cs fraction release was at least an order of magnitude greater than that of either /sup 85/Sr or /sup 60/Co. Release rates of /sup 137/Cs in high alumina cement were greater than those in portland III cement by a factor of two.Compressive strength and leach testing were conducted for resin wastes solidified with polymer-modified gypsum based cement. /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co fraction releases were about one, two and three orders of magnitude higher, respectively, than in equivalent portland type III cement formulations. As much as 28.6 wt % dry ion exchange resin was successfully solidified using vinyl ester-styrene compared with a maximum of 25 wt % in both portland and gypsum-based cement.

Not Available

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS FOR NUCLEAR WASTE SOLIDIFICATION CONTAINER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Design Authority is in the design stage of the Waste Solidification Building (WSB) for the treatment and solidification of the radioactive liquid waste streams generated by the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) and Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). The waste streams will be mixed with a cementitious dry mix in a 55-gallon waste container. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been performing the testing and evaluations to support technical decisions for the WSB. Engineering Modeling & Simulation Group was requested to evaluate the thermal performance of the 55-gallon drum containing hydration heat source associated with the current baseline cement waste form. A transient axi-symmetric heat transfer model for the drum partially filled with waste form cement has been developed and heat transfer calculations performed for the baseline design configurations. For this case, 65 percent of the drum volume was assumed to be filled with the waste form, which has transient hydration heat source, as one of the baseline conditions. A series of modeling calculations has been performed using a computational heat transfer approach. The baseline modeling results show that the time to reach the maximum temperature of the 65 percent filled drum is about 32 hours when a 43 C initial cement temperature is assumed to be cooled by natural convection with 27 C external air. In addition, the results computed by the present model were compared with analytical solutions. The modeling results will be benchmarked against the prototypic test results. The verified model will be used for the evaluation of the thermal performance for the WSB drum. Detailed results and the cases considered in the calculations will be discussed here.

Lee, S.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Solidification and Stabilization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Solidification & Stabilization Solidification & Stabilization Fact Sheet - Solidification and Stabilization The cuttings separated from the mud at the shale shakers may be coated with so much mud that they are unsuitable for the next reuse or disposal step or are difficult to handle or transport. Constituents of the cuttings or the mud coating them (e.g., oil, metals) may leach from the waste, making them unsuitable for land application or burial approaches. Various materials can be added to cuttings to solidify and stabilize them. The processes of solidification and stabilization can be defined as follows: Solidification refers to techniques that encapsulate the waste in a monolithic solid of high structural integrity. The encapsulation may be of fine waste particles (microencapsulation) or of a large block or container of wastes (macroencapsulation). Solidification does not necessarily involve a chemical interaction between the wastes and the solidifying reagents but may mechanically bind the waste into the monolith. Contaminant migration is restricted by vastly decreasing the surface area exposed to leaching and/or by isolating the wastes within an impervious capsule.

19

Polymer solidification of mixed wastes at the Rocky Flats Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rocky Flats Plant is pursuing polymer solidification as a viable treatment option for several mixed waste streams that are subject to land disposal restrictions within the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act provisions. Tests completed to date using both surrogate and actual wastes indicate that polyethylene microencapsulation is a viable treatment option for several mixed wastes at the Rocky Flats Plant, including nitrate salts, sludges, and secondary wastes such as ash. Treatability studies conducted on actual salt waste demonstrated that the process is capable of producing waste forms that comply with all applicable regulatory criteria, including the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure. Tests have also been conducted to evaluate the feasibility of macroencapsulating certain debris wastes in polymers. Several methods and plastics have been tested for macroencapsulation, including post-consumer recycle and regrind polyethylene.

Faucette, A.M.; Logsdon, B.W.; Lucerna, J.J.; Yudnich, R.J.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Method for solidification of radioactive and other hazardous waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Solidification of liquid radioactive waste, and other hazardous wastes, is accomplished by the method of the invention by incorporating the waste into a porous glass crystalline molded block. The porous block is first loaded with the liquid waste and then dehydrated and exposed to thermal treatment at 50-1,000.degree. C. The porous glass crystalline molded block consists of glass crystalline hollow microspheres separated from fly ash (cenospheres), resulting from incineration of fossil plant coals. In a preferred embodiment, the porous glass crystalline blocks are formed from perforated cenospheres of grain size -400+50, wherein the selected cenospheres are consolidated into the porous molded block with a binder, such as liquid silicate glass. The porous blocks are then subjected to repeated cycles of saturating with liquid waste, and drying, and after the last cycle the blocks are subjected to calcination to transform the dried salts to more stable oxides. Radioactive liquid waste can be further stabilized in the porous blocks by coating the internal surface of the block with metal oxides prior to adding the liquid waste, and by coating the outside of the block with a low-melting glass or a ceramic after the waste is loaded into the block.

Anshits, Alexander G. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Vereshchagina, Tatiana A. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Voskresenskaya, Elena N. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Kostin, Eduard M. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Pavlov, Vyacheslav F. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Revenko, Yurii A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Tretyakov, Alexander A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Sharonova, Olga M. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Aloy, Albert S. (Saint-Petersburg, RU); Sapozhnikova, Natalia V. (Saint-Petersburg, RU); Knecht, Dieter A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Macheret, Yevgeny (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste solidification building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

MODELING SOLIDIFICATION-INDUCED STRESSES IN CERAMIC WASTE FORMS CONTAINING NUCLEAR WASTES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this work is to produce a ceramic waste form (CWF) that permanently occludes radioactive waste. This is accomplished by absorbing radioactive salts into zeolite, mixing with glass frit, heating to a molten state 915 C to form a sodalite glass matrix, and solidifying for long-term storage. Less long term leaching is expected if the solidifying cooling rate doesn’t cause cracking. In addition to thermal stress, this paper proposes that a stress is formed during solidification which is very large for fast cooling rates during solidification and can cause severe cracking. A solidifying glass or ceramic cylinder forms a dome on the cylinder top end. The temperature distribution at the time of solidification causes the stress and the dome. The dome height, “the length deficit,” produces an axial stress when the solid returns to room temperature with the inherent outer region in compression, the inner in tension. Large tensions will cause cracking of the specimen. The temperature deficit, derived by dividing the length deficit by the coefficient of thermal expansion, allows solidification stress theory to be extended to the circumferential stress. This paper derives the solidification stress theory, gives examples, explains how to induce beneficial stresses, and compares theory to experimental data.

Charles W. Solbrig; Kenneth J. Bateman

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

A novel solidification technique for fluorine-contaminated bassanite using waste materials in ground improvement applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigates the development of solidification technology, based on the formation of ettringite, for fluorine-contaminated bassanite using waste and ... B in varying proportions to obtain the optimal ettringite

Takeshi Kamei; Aly Ahmed; Hideto Horai…

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Comparison of costs for solidification of high-level radioactive waste solutions: glass monoliths vs metal matrices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comparative economic analysis was made of four solidification processes for liquid high-level radioactive waste. Two processes produced borosilicate glass monoliths and two others produced metal matrix composites of lead and borosilicate glass beads and lead and supercalcine pellets. Within the uncertainties of the cost (1979 dollars) estimates, the cost of the four processes was about the same, with the major cost component being the cost of the primary building structure. Equipment costs and operating and maintenance costs formed only a small portion of the building structure costs for all processes.

Jardine, L.J.; Carlton, R.E.; Steindler, M.J.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Survey of agents and techniques applicable to the solidification of low-level radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review of the various solidification agents and techniques that are currently available or potentially applicable for the solidification of low-level radioactive wastes is presented. An overview of the types and quantities of low-level wastes produced is presented. Descriptions of waste form matrix materials, the wastes types for which they have been or may be applied and available information concerning relevant waste form properties and characteristics follow. Also included are descriptions of the processing techniques themselves with an emphasis on those operating parameters which impact upon waste form properties. The solidification agents considered in this survey include: hydraulic cements, thermoplastic materials, thermosetting polymers, glasses, synthetic minerals and composite materials. This survey is part of a program supported by the United States Department of Energy's Low-Level Waste Management Program (LLWMP). This work provides input into LLWMP efforts to develop and compile information relevant to the treatment and processing of low-level wastes and their disposal by shallow land burial.

Fuhrmann, M.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Colombo, P.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Application of microwave solidification technology to radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EPA has declared vitrification to be the Best Available Demonstrated Technology (BDAT) for High Level Radioactive Waste (40 CFR 268.42). Vitrification has been chosen as the method of choice for treating a number of radioactive residues and wastes in the DOE complex. Vitrification offers advantages of waste volume reduction, the ability to handle changing waste forms, and a stable, nonleachable final waste form. Microwave heating is a superior method for vitrification of radioactive wastes. Advantages of microwave heating include: (1) direct waste heating, eliminates need for electrodes, refractories and other consumables; (2) ``in-can`` processing allows for treatment of the material in its final container, (3) a mechanically simple system where the microwaves are generated away from the treatment area and transmitted to the treatment applicator by a wave guide, thus minimizing worker exposure to radiation; (4) easier equipment maintenance; and (5) a high degree of public acceptance.

Harris, M.; Sprenger, G.; Roushey, B.; Fenner, G.; Nieweg, R.

1995-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

26

Laboratory stabilization/solidification of surrogate and actual mixed-waste sludge in glass and grout  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Grouting and vitrification are currently the most likely stabilization/solidification technologies for mixed wastes. Grouting has been used to stabilize and solidify hazardous and low-level waste for decades. Vitrification has long been developed as a high-level-waste alternative and has been under development recently as an alternative treatment technology for low-level mixed waste. Laboratory testing has been performed to develop grout and vitrification formulas for mixed-waste sludges currently stored in underground tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and to compare these waste forms. Envelopes, or operating windows, for both grout and soda-lime-silica glass formulations for a surrogate sludge were developed. One formulation within each envelope was selected for testing the sensitivity of performance to variations ({+-}10 wt%) in the waste form composition and variations in the surrogate sludge composition over the range previously characterized in the sludges. In addition, one sludge sample of an actual mixed-waste tank was obtained, a surrogate was developed for this sludge sample, and grout and glass samples were prepared and tested in the laboratory using both surrogate and the actual sludge. The sensitivity testing of a surrogate tank sludge in selected glass and grout formulations is discussed in this paper, along with the hot-cell testing of an actual tank sludge sample.

Spence, R.D.; Gilliam, T.M.; Mattus, C.H.; Mattus, A.J.

1998-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

27

SULFUR POLYMER STABILIZATION/SOLIDIFICATION (SPSS) TREATABILITY OF LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY MERCURY WASTE.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory's Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification (SPSS) process was used to treat approximately 90kg of elemental mercury mixed waste from Los Alamos National Laboratory. Treatment was carried out in a series of eight batches using a 1 ft{sup 3} pilot-scale mixer, where mercury loading in each batch was 33.3 weight percent. Although leach performance is currently not regulated for amalgamated elemental mercury (Hg) mixed waste, Toxicity Characteristic Leach Procedure (TCLP) testing of SPSS treated elemental mercury waste indicates that leachability is readily reduced to below the TCLP limit of 200 ppb (regulatory requirement following treatment by retort for wastes containing > 260 ppb Hg), and with process optimization, to levels less than the stringent Universal Treatment Standard (UTS) limit of 25 ppb that is applied to waste containing < 260 ppm Hg. In addition, mercury-contaminated debris, consisting of primary glass and plastic containers, as well as assorted mercury thermometers, switches, and labware, was first reacted with SPSS components to stabilize the mercury contamination, then macroencapsulated in the molten SPSS product. This treatment was done by vigorous agitation of the sulfur polymer powder and the comminuted debris. Larger plastic and metal containers were reacted to stabilize internal mercury contamination, and then filled with molten sulfur polymer to encapsulate the treated product.

ADAMS,J.W.; KALB,P.D.

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Treatment Building throughput study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hazardous waste/mixed waste HW/MW Treatment Building (TB) is the specified treatment location for solid hazardous waste/mixed waste at SRS. This report provides throughput information on the facility based on known and projected waste generation rates. The HW/MW TB will have an annual waste input for the first four years of approximately 38,000 ft{sup 3} and have an annual treated waste output of approximately 50,000 ft{sup 3}. After the first four years of operation it will have an annual waste input of approximately 16,000 ft{sup 3} and an annual waste output of approximately 18,000 ft. There are several waste streams that cannot be accurately predicted (e.g. environmental restoration, decommissioning, and decontamination). The equipment and process area sizing for the initial four years should allow excess processing capability for these poorly defined waste streams. A treatment process description and process flow of the waste is included to aid in understanding the computations of the throughput. A description of the treated wastes is also included.

England, J.L.; Kanzleiter, J.P.

1991-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

29

2401-W Waste storage building closure plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan describes the performance standards met and closure activities conducted to achieve clean closure of the 2401-W Waste Storage Building (2401-W) (Figure I). In August 1998, after the last waste container was removed from 2401-W, the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) notified Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) in writing that the 2401-W would no longer receive waste and would be closed as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) unit (98-EAP-475). Pursuant to this notification, closure activities were conducted, as described in this plan, in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 and completed on February 9, 1999. Ecology witnessed the closure activities. Consistent with clean closure, no postclosure activities will be necessary. Because 2401-W is a portion of the Central Waste Complex (CWC), these closure activities become the basis for removing this building from the CWC TSD unit boundary. The 2401-W is a pre-engineered steel building with a sealed concrete floor and a 15.2-centimeter concrete curb around the perimeter of the floor. This building operated from April 1988 until August 1998 storing non-liquid containerized mixed waste. All waste storage occurred indoors. No potential existed for 2401-W operations to have impacted soil. A review of operating records and interviews with cognizant operations personnel indicated that no waste spills occurred in this building (Appendix A). After all waste containers were removed, a radiation survey of the 2401-W floor for radiological release of the building was performed December 17, 1998, which identified no radiological contamination (Appendix B).

LUKE, S.M.

1999-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

30

Preliminary evaluation of alternative waste form solidification processes. Volume II. Evaluation of the processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Volume II presents engineering feasibility evaluations of the eleven processes for solidification of nuclear high-level liquid wastes (HHLW) described in Volume I of this report. Each evaluation was based in a systematic assessment of the process in respect to six principal evaluation criteria: complexity of process; state of development; safety; process requirements; development work required; and facility requirements. The principal criteria were further subdivided into a total of 22 subcriteria, each of which was assigned a weight. Each process was then assigned a figure of merit, on a scale of 1 to 10, for each of the subcriteria. A total rating was obtained for each process by summing the products of the subcriteria ratings and the subcriteria weights. The evaluations were based on the process descriptions presented in Volume I of this report, supplemented by information obtained from the literature, including publications by the originators of the various processes. Waste form properties were, in general, not evaluated. This document describes the approach which was taken, the developent and application of the rating criteria and subcriteria, and the evaluation results. A series of appendices set forth summary descriptions of the processes and the ratings, together with the complete numerical ratings assigned; two appendices present further technical details on the rating process.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

A literature review of mixed waste components: Sensitivities and effects upon solidification/stabilization in cement-based matrices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US DOE Oak Ridge Field Office has signed a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) regarding Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) mixed wastes subject to the land disposal restriction (LDR) provisions of the Resource conservation and Recovery Act. The LDR FFCA establishes an aggressive schedule for conducting treatability studies and developing treatment methods for those ORR mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes listed in Appendix B to the Agreement. A development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation program has been initiated to provide those efforts necessary to identify treatment methods for all of the wastes that meet Appendix B criteria. The program has assembled project teams to address treatment development needs in a variety of areas, including that of final waste forms (i.e., stabilization/solidification processes). A literature research has been performed, with the objective of determining waste characterization needs to support cement-based waste-form development. The goal was to determine which waste species are problematic in terms of consistent production of an acceptable cement-based waste form and at what concentrations these species become intolerable. The report discusses the following: hydration mechanisms of Portland cement; mechanisms of retardation and acceleration of cement set-factors affecting the durability of waste forms; regulatory limits as they apply to mixed wastes; review of inorganic species that interfere with the development of cement-based waste forms; review of radioactive species that can be immobilized in cement-based waste forms; and review of organic species that may interfere with various waste-form properties.

Mattus, C.H.; Gilliam, T.M.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Clean Cities: Waste-to-Wheels: Building for Success Workshop  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Events Events Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Clean Cities: Waste-to-Wheels: Building for Success Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Waste-to-Wheels: Building for Success Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Waste-to-Wheels: Building for Success Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Waste-to-Wheels: Building for Success Workshop on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Waste-to-Wheels: Building for Success Workshop on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Waste-to-Wheels: Building for Success Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Waste-to-Wheels: Building for Success Workshop on AddThis.com... Conferences & Workshops Clean Cities 20th Anniversary Electric Vehicle Community Readiness Stakeholder Summit Waste-to-Wheels

33

WASTE HANDLING BUILDING FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Handling Building Fire Protection System provides the capability to detect, control, and extinguish fires and/or mitigate explosions throughout the Waste Handling Building (WHB). Fire protection includes appropriate water-based and non-water-based suppression, as appropriate, and includes the distribution and delivery systems for the fire suppression agents. The Waste Handling Building Fire Protection System includes fire or explosion detection panel(s) controlling various detectors, system actuation, annunciators, equipment controls, and signal outputs. The system interfaces with the Waste Handling Building System for mounting of fire protection equipment and components, location of fire suppression equipment, suppression agent runoff, and locating fire rated barriers. The system interfaces with the Waste Handling Building System for adequate drainage and removal capabilities of liquid runoff resulting from fire protection discharges. The system interfaces with the Waste Handling Building Electrical Distribution System for power to operate, and with the Site Fire Protection System for fire protection water supply to automatic sprinklers, standpipes, and hose stations. The system interfaces with the Site Fire Protection System for fire signal transmission outside the WHB as needed to respond to a fire emergency, and with the Waste Handling Building Ventilation System to detect smoke and fire in specific areas, to protect building high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, and to control portions of the Waste Handling Building Ventilation System for smoke management and manual override capability. The system interfaces with the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) Operations Monitoring and Control System for annunciation, and condition status.

J. D. Bigbee

2000-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

34

Example of a Risk-Based Disposal Approval: Solidification of Hanford Site Transuranic Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site requested, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 10 approved, a Toxic Substances Control Act of 1976 (TSCA) risk-based disposal approval (RBDA) for solidifying approximately four cubic meters of waste from a specific area of one of the K East Basin: the North Loadout Pit (NLOP). The NLOP waste is a highly radioactive sludge that contained polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) regulated under TSCA. The prescribed disposal method for liquid PCB waste under TSCA regulations is either thermal treatment or decontamination. Due to the radioactive nature of the waste, however, neither thermal treatment nor decontamination was a viable option. As a result, the proposed treatment consisted of solidifying the material to comply with waste acceptance criteria at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico, or possibly the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility at the Hanford Site, depending on the resulting transuranic (TRU) content of the stabilized waste. The RBDA evaluated environmental risks associated with potential airborne PCBs. In addition, the RBDA made use of waste management controls already in place at the treatment unit. The treatment unit, the T Plant Complex, is a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA)-permitted facility used for storing and treating radioactive waste. The EPA found that the proposed activities did not pose an unreasonable risk to human health or the environment. Treatment took place from October 26, 2005 to June 9, 2006, and 332 208-liter (55-gallon) containers of solidified waste were produced. All treated drums assayed to date are TRU and will be disposed at WIPP. (authors)

Barnes, B.M.; Hyatt, J.E.; Martin, P.W.; Prignano, A.L. [Fluor Hanford, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

EA-0820: Construction of Mixed Waste Storage RCRA Facilities, Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0: Construction of Mixed Waste Storage RCRA Facilities, 0: Construction of Mixed Waste Storage RCRA Facilities, Buildings 7668 and 7669, Oak Ridge, Tennessee EA-0820: Construction of Mixed Waste Storage RCRA Facilities, Buildings 7668 and 7669, Oak Ridge, Tennessee SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate two mixed (both radioactive and hazardous) waste storage facilities (Buildings 7668 and 7669) in accordance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requirements. Site preparation and construction activities would take place at the U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 16, 1994 EA-0820: Finding of No Significant Impact

36

Iron-Phosphate Ceramics for Solidification of Mixed Low-Level Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method of immobilizing mixed low-level waste is provided which uses low cost materials and has a relatively long hardening period. The method includes: forming a mixture of iron oxide powders having ratios, in mass %, of FeO: Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}: Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} equal to 25-40: 40-10: 35-50, or weighing a definite amount of magnitite powder. Metallurgical cinder can also be used as the source of iron oxides. A solution of the orthophosphoric acid, or a solution of the orthophosphoric acid and ferric oxide, is formed and a powder phase of low-level waste and the mixture of iron oxide powders or cinder (or magnetite powder) is also formed. The acid solution is mixed with the powder phase to form a slurry with the ratio of components (mass %) of waste: iron oxide powders or magnitite: acid solution = 30-60: 15-10: 55-30. The slurry is blended to form a homogeneous mixture which is cured at room temperature to form the final product.

Aloy, Albert S.; Kovarskaya, Elena N.; Koltsova, Tatiana I.; Macheret, Yevgeny; Medvedev, Pavel G.; Todd, Terry

1998-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

37

Iron-phosphate ceramics for solidification of mixed low-level waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of immobilizing mixed low-level waste is provided which uses low cost materials and has a relatively long hardening period. The method includes: forming a mixture of iron oxide powders having ratios, in mass %, of FeO:Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 :Fe.sub.3 O.sub.4 equal to 25-40:40-10:35-50, or weighing a definite amount of magnetite powder. Metallurgical cinder can also be used as the source of iron oxides. A solution of the orthophosphoric acid, or a solution of the orthophosphoric acid and ferric oxide, is formed and a powder phase of low-level waste and the mixture of iron oxide powders or cinder (or magnetite powder) is also formed. The acid solution is mixed with the powder phase to form a slurry with the ratio of components (mass %) of waste:iron oxide powders or magnetite:acid solution=30-60:15-10:55-30. The slurry is blended to form a homogeneous mixture which is cured at room temperature to form the final product.

Aloy, Albert S. (St. Petersburg, RU); Kovarskaya, Elena N. (St. Petersburg, RU); Koltsova, Tatiana I. (St. Petersburg, RU); Macheret, Yevgeny (Idaho Falls, ID); Medvedev, Pavel G. (Ozersk, RU); Todd, Terry (Aberdeen, ID)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Building 251 Radioactive Waste Characterization by Process Knowledge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Building 251 is the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Heavy Elements Facility. Operations that involved heavy elements with uncontained radioisotopes including transuranic elements took place inside of glove boxes and fume hoods. These operations included process and solution chemistry, dissolutions, titrations, centrifuging, etc., and isotope separation. Operations with radioactive material which presently take place outside of glove boxes include storage, assaying, packing and unpacking and inventory verification. Wastes generated inside glove boxes will generally be considered TRU or Greater Than Class C (GTCC). Wastes generated in the RMA, outside glove boxes, is presumed to be low level waste. This process knowledge quantification method may be applied to waste generated anywhere within or around B251. The method is suitable only for quantification of waste which measures below the MDA of the Blue Alpha meter (i.e. only material which measures as Non-Detect with the blue alpha is to be characterized by this method).

Dominick, J L

2002-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

39

Stamp out energy waste | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stamp out energy waste Stamp out energy waste Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Learn the benefits Get started Use Portfolio Manager Save energy Stamp out energy waste Find cost-effective investments Engage occupants Purchase energy-saving products Put computers to sleep Get help from an expert Take a comprehensive approach Install renewable energy systems

40

Sorbent Testing for the Solidification of Organic Process Waste streams from the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has tasked MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) with evaluating various sorbents to solidify the radioactive liquid organic waste from the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). REDC recovers and purifies heavy elements (berkelium, californium, einsteinium, and fermium) from irradiated targets for research and industrial applications. Both aqueous and organic waste streams are discharged from REDC. Organic waste is generated from the plutonium/uranium extraction (PUREX), Cleanex, and Pubex processes.1 The PUREX waste derives from an organic-aqueous isotope separation process for plutonium and uranium fission products, the Cleanex waste derives from the removal of fission products and other impurities from the americium/curium product, and the Pubex waste is derived from the separation process of plutonium from dissolved targets. An aqueous waste stream is also produced from these separation processes. MSE has been tasked to test a grouting formula for the aqueous waste stream that includes specially formulated radioactive shielding materials developed by Science and Technology Applications, LLC. This paper will focus on the sorbent testing work. Based on work performed at Savannah River Site (SRS) (Refs. 1, 2), ORNL tested and evaluated three sorbents capable of solidifying the PUREX, Pubex, and Cleanex waste streams and a composite of the three organic waste streams: Imbiber Beads{sup R} IMB230301 (Imbiber Beads), Nochar A610 Petro Bond, and Petroset II Granular{sup TM} (Petroset II-G). Surrogates of the PUREX, Pubex, Cleanex, and a composite organic waste were used for the bench-scale testing. Recommendations resulting from the ORNL testing included follow-on testing by MSE for two of the three sorbents: Nochar Petro Bond and Petroset II-G. MSE recommended that another clay sorbent, Organoclay BM-QT-199, be added to the test sequence. The sorbent/surrogate combinations were tested at bench scale, 19-liter (L) [5-gallon (gal)] bucket scale, and 208-L (55-gal) drum scale. The testing performed by MSE will help ORNL select the right solidification materials and wasteform generation methods for the design of a new treatment facility. The results could also be used to help demonstrate that ORNL could meet the waste acceptance criteria for the ultimate disposal site for the waste-forms. The organics will be solidified as transuranic waste for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, and the aqueous waste stream will be grouted and disposed of at the Nevada Test Site as low-level waste if real waste testing indicates similar results to the surrogate testing. The objective of this work was to identify a sorbent capable of solidifying PUREX, Pubex, and Cleanex organic wastes individually and a composite of the three organic waste streams. The sorbent and surrogate combinations must also be compatible with processing equipment and maintain stability under a variety of conditions that could occur during storage/shipment of the solidified wastes. (authors)

Bickford, J.; Foote, M. [MSE Technology Applications, Inc., Montana (United States); Taylor, P. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste solidification building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Savannah River Site Waste  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River Site Waste Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Independent Oversight Activity Report, Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building May 2013 Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design [HIAR SRS-2013-5-07] Activity Description/Purpose: Review the corrective actions being implemented by the construction contractor to address Findings 1-4, 6, and 9 from a construction quality review performed by the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) (Reference 1). Meet with the SRS WSB project staff and Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) engineers to discuss the proposed corrective actions discussed in Reference 2, and clarify additional reviews to be performed by

42

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Savannah River Site Waste  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Savannah River Site Waste Independent Oversight Activity Report, Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Independent Oversight Activity Report, Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building May 2013 Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design [HIAR SRS-2013-5-07] Activity Description/Purpose: Review the corrective actions being implemented by the construction contractor to address Findings 1-4, 6, and 9 from a construction quality review performed by the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) (Reference 1). Meet with the SRS WSB project staff and Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) engineers to discuss the proposed corrective actions

43

Container evaluation for microwave solidification project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document discusses the development and testing of a suitable waste container and packaging arrangement to be used with the Microwave Solidification System (MSS) and Bagless Posting System (BPS). The project involves the Rocky Flats Plant.

Smith, J.A.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

SECONDARY WASTE MANAGEMENT STRATEGY FOR EARLY LOW ACTIVITY WASTE TREATMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study evaluates parameters relevant to River Protection Project secondary waste streams generated during Early Low Activity Waste operations and recommends a strategy for secondary waste management that considers groundwater impact, cost, and programmatic risk. The recommended strategy for managing River Protection Project secondary waste is focused on improvements in the Effiuent Treatment Facility. Baseline plans to build a Solidification Treatment Unit adjacent to Effluent Treatment Facility should be enhanced to improve solid waste performance and mitigate corrosion of tanks and piping supporting the Effiuent Treatment Facility evaporator. This approach provides a life-cycle benefit to solid waste performance and reduction of groundwater contaminants.

CRAWFORD TW

2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

45

Press Release Von Roll Inova to build the UK's largest energy-from-waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and regenerative heat recovery is used to boost the plant's overall energy efficiency. The majority of the wastePress Release Von Roll Inova to build the UK's largest energy-from-waste plant Zürich, September, 1 Roll Inova will build the UK's largest energy-from-waste facility. The contract is worth approximately

Columbia University

46

Building of multilevel stakeholder consensus in radioactive waste repository siting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report considers the problem of multilevel consensus building for siting and construction of shared multinational/regional repositories for radioactive waste (RW) deep disposal. In the siting of a multinational repository there appears an essential innovative component of stakeholder consensus building, namely: to reach consent - political, social, economic, ecological - among international partners, in addition to solving the whole set of intra-national consensus building items. An entire partnering country is considered as a higher-level stakeholder - the national stakeholder, represented by the national government, being faced to simultaneous seeking an upward (international) and a downward (intra-national) consensus in a psychologically stressed environment, possibly being characterized by diverse political, economic and social interests. The following theses as a possible interdisciplinary approach towards building of shared understanding and stakeholder consensus on the international scale of RW disposal are forwarded and developed: a) building of international stakeholder consensus would be promoted by activating and diversifying on the international scale multilateral interactions between intra- and international stakeholders, including web-based networks of the RW disposal site investigations and decision-making, as well as networks for international cooperation among government authorities in nuclear safety, b) gradual progress in intergovernmental consensus and reaching multilateral agreements on shared deep repositories will be the result of democratic dialogue, via observing the whole set of various interests and common resolving of emerged controversies by using advanced synergetic approaches of conflict resolution, c) cross-cultural thinking and world perception, mental flexibility, creativity and knowledge are considered as basic prerogatives for gaining a higher level of mutual understanding and consensus for seeking further consensus, for advancing the preparedness to act together, and ultimately - for achieving desired shared goals. It is proposed that self-organized social learning will make it possible to promote adequate perception of risk and prevent, by diminishing uncertainties and unknown factors, social amplification of an imagined risk, as well as to increase the trust level and facilitate more adequate equity perception. The proposed approach to the multilevel stakeholder consensus building on international scale is extrapolated to the present-day activities of siting of such near-surface RW disposal facilities which supposedly could have non-negligible trans-boundary impact. A multilevel stakeholder interaction process is considered for the case of resolving of emerged problems in site selection for the planned near-surface RW repository in vicinity of the Lithuanian-Latvian border foreseen for disposal of short lived low- and intermediate level waste arising from the decommissioning of the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant. (authors)

Dreimanis, A. [Radiation Safety Centre, Riga LV (Latvia)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Characterization of past and present waste streams from the 325 Radiochemistry Building  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to characterize, as far as possible, the solid waste generated by the 325 Radiochemistry Building since its construction in 1953. Solid waste as defined in this document is any containerized or self-contained material that has been declared waste. This characterization is of particular interest in the planning of transuranic (TRU) waste retrieval operations including the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility. Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) and Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) activities at Building 325 have generated approximately 4.4% and 2.4%, respectively, of the total volume of TRU waste currently stored at the Hanford Site.

Pottmeyer, J.A.; Weyns-Rollosson, M.I.; Dicenso, K.D.; DeLorenzo, D.S. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Kennewick, WA (United States); Duncan, D.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Sorbent Testing For Solidification of Process Waste streams from the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tasked MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) to evaluate sorbents identified by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to solidify the radioactive liquid organic waste from the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at ORNL. REDC recovers and purifies heavy elements (berkelium, californium, einsteinium, and fermium) from irradiated targets for research and industrial applications. Both organic and aqueous waste streams are discharged from REDC. The organic waste is generated from the plutonium/uranium extraction (Purex), Cleanex, and Pubex processes. The Purex waste derives from an organic-aqueous isotope separation process for plutonium and uranium fission products, the Cleanex waste derives from the removal of fission products and other impurities from the americium/curium product, and the Pubex waste is derived from the separation process of plutonium from dissolved targets. MSE had also been tasked to test a grouting formula for the aqueous waste stream that includes radioactive shielding material. The aqueous waste is a mixture of the raffinate streams from the various extraction processes plus the caustic solution that is used to dissolve the aluminum cladding from the irradiated targets. (authors)

Bickford, J. [MSE Technology Applications, Inc., MT (United States); Taylor, P. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

4.0 RISK FROM URANIUM MINING WASTE IN BUILDING In general, building materials contain low levels of radioactivity. For example, the range of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4.0 RISK FROM URANIUM MINING WASTE IN BUILDING MATERIALS In general, building materials contain low, especially in buildings constructed with materials containing uranium TENORM mine wastes. In the Grand the wastes from uranium mines have been removed from mining sites and used in local and nearby communities

50

Multi-point injection demonstration for solidification of shallow buried waste at Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The multi-point injection (MPI) technology is a precision, high-velocity jetting process for the in situ delivery of various agents to treat radiological and/or chemical wastes. A wide variety of waste forms can be treated, varying from heterogeneous waste dumped into shallow burial trenches to contaminated soils consisting of sands/gravels, silts/clays and soft rock. The robustness of the MPI system is linked to its broad range of applications which vary from in situ waste treatment to creation of both vertical and horizontal barriers. The only major constraint on the type of in situ treatment which can be delivered by the NTI system is that agents must be in a slurry form.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Page 1 of 3 Building or Facility Demolition / Waste Hauling Contractor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1 of 3 Building or Facility Demolition / Waste Hauling Contractor Prequalification Procedures member, of a facility together with any related handling operations or the intentional burning held (e.g. PA Residual and Municipal Waste Hauling, etc.). If your company does not haul waste simply

Yener, Aylin

52

SUSTAINABILITY OPPORTUNITY Waste audits from campus buildings reveal that 30% of the trash Stanford sends to the landfill is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

How To... SUSTAINABILITY OPPORTUNITY Waste audits from campus buildings reveal that 30 on campus have active composting programs. Interested buildings and departments can start a voluntary office;MORE INFORMATION SUSTAINABLE STANFORD'S WASTE REDUCTION EFFORTS http://sustainable

Straight, Aaron

53

324 Building special-case waste assessment in support of the 324 Building closure (TPA milestone M-89-05)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-89-05 requires US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office to complete a 324 Building Special Case Waste Assessment in Support of the 324 Building Closure. This document has been prepared with the intent of meeting this regulatory commitment. Alternatives for the Special Case Wastes located in the 324 Building were defined and analyzed. Based on the criteria of safety, environmental, complexity of interfaces, risk, cost, schedule, and long-term operability and maintainability, the best alternative was chosen. Waste packaging and transportation options are also included in the recommendations. The waste disposition recommendations for the B-Cell dispersibles/tank heels and High-Level Vault packaged residuals are to direct them to the Plutonium Uranium Extraction Facility (PUREX) Number 2 storage tunnel.

Hobart, R.L.

1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

54

EA-0874: Low-level Waste Drum Staging Building at Weapons Engineering  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

74: Low-level Waste Drum Staging Building at Weapons 74: Low-level Waste Drum Staging Building at Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility, TA-16 Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico EA-0874: Low-level Waste Drum Staging Building at Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility, TA-16 Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to place a 3 meter (m) by 4.5 m prefabricated storage building (transportainer) adjacent to the existing Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility at Technical Area 16, U.S. Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos, New Mexico, and to use the building as a staging site for sealed 55-gallon drums of noncompactible waste contaminated with low levels of tritium. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES

55

Probing metal solidification nondestructively  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Probing metal solidification nondestructively This is the first time that high-energy protons have been used to nondestructively image a large metal sample during melting and...

56

Probing metal solidification nondestructively  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Probing metal solidification nondestructively This is the first time that high-energy protons have been used to nondestructively image a large metal sample during melting...

57

Solidification of low-volume power plant sludges. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A literature review was conducted to obtain information on the status of hazardous waste solidification technology and application of this technology to low-volume power plant waste sludges. Because of scarcity of sludge composition data, anticipated major components were identified primarily by chemical reactions that are known to occur during treatment of specific wastewaters. Chemical and physical properties of these sludges were critically analyzed for compatibility with several types of commercially available solidification processes. The study pointed out the need for additional information on the nature of these sludges, especially leaching characteristics and the presence of substances that will interfere with solidification processes. Laboratory studies were recommended for evaluation of solidification process which have the greatest potential for converting hazardous low-volume sludges to non-hazardous waste forms.

Bell, N.E.; Halverson, M.A.; Mercer, B.M.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Solidification/stabilization of organics and inorganics. Engineering bulletin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The engineering bulletin on solidification refers to techniques that encapsulate hazardous waste into a solid material of high structural integrity. Encapsulation involves either fine waste particles (microencapsulation) or a large block or container of wastes (macroencapsulation). Stabilization refers to techniques that treat hazardous waste by converting it into a less soluble, mobile, or toxic form. Solidification/Stabilization processes utilize one or both of these techniques. The bulletin provides information on the technology applicability, the technology limitations, a description of the technology, the types of residuals produced, site requirements, the latest performance data, the status of the technology, and sources of further information.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Webinar: Make Your Building Sing!: Building-Retuning to Reduce Energy Waste  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Panelists: Eileen Gohr and Steve Harrison, Parameter Realty Partners; Dennis Bohlayer, Towson University; Benjamin Goldstein, U.S. Department of Energy; Lisa Shulock, Building Owners and Managers...

60

Seismic Vulnerability Assessment Waste Characterization Reduction and Repackaging Building, TA-50-69  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the seismic structural analyses completed on the Waste Characterization Reduction and Repackaging (WCRR) Building in support of ongoing safety analyses. WCRR is designated as TA-50-69 at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. The facility has been evaluated against Department of Energy (DOE) seismic criteria for Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Performance Category II (PC 2). The seismic capacities of two subsystems within the WCRR building, the material handling glove box and the lift rack immediately adjacent to the Glove Box are also documented, and the results are presented.

M.W.Sullivan; J.Ruminer; I.Cuesta

2003-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste solidification building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Feasibility study on the solidification of liquid low-level radioactive mixed waste in the inactive tank system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A literature survey was conducted to help determine the feasibility of solidifying a liquid low-level radioactive mixed waste in the inactive tank system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The goal of this report is to facilitate a decision on the disposition of these wastes by identifying any waste constituents that might (1) compromise the strength or stability of the waste form or (2) be highly leachable. Furthermore, its goal is to identify ways to circumvent interferences and to decrease the leachability of the waste constituents. This study has sought to provide an understanding of inhibition of cement set by identifying the fundamental chemical mechanisms by which this inhibition takes place. From this fundamental information, it is possible to draw some conclusions about the potential effects of waste constituents, even in the absence of particular studies on specific compounds.

Trussell, S. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering); Spence, R.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

A facility design for repackaging ORNL CH-TRU legacy waste in Building 3525  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the last 25 years, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has conducted operations which have generated solid, contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste. At present the CH-TRU waste inventory at ORNL is about 3400 55-gal drums retrievably stored in RCRA-permitted, aboveground facilities. Of the 3400 drums, approximately 2600 drums will need to be repackaged. The current US Department of Energy (DOE) strategy for disposal of these drums is to transport them to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico which only accepts TRU waste that meets a very specific set of criteria documented in the WIPP-WAC (waste acceptance criteria). This report describes activities that were performed from January 1994 to May 1995 associated with the design and preparation of an existing facility for repackaging and certifying some or all of the CH-TRU drums at ORNL to meet the WIPP-WAC. For this study, the Irradiated Fuel Examination Laboratory (IFEL) in Building 3525 was selected as the reference facility for modification. These design activities were terminated in May 1995 as more attractive options for CH-TRU waste repackaging were considered to be available. As a result, this document serves as a final report of those design activities.

Huxford, T.J.; Cooper, R.H. Jr.; Davis, L.E.; Fuller, A.B.; Gabbard, W.A.; Smith, R.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Guay, K.P. [S. M. Stroller Corp. (United States); Smith, L.C. [United Energy Services Corp. (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Envirocon to build plant for bioconversion of forestry wastes to animal feeds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Envirocon Ltd. of Vancouver will build a pilot plant in British Columbia to produce protein supplement for animal feeds, making use of a biotechnological process patented by the University of Waterloo. When commerical viability has been proven, Envirocon will make use of the process in plants which it plans to design, manufacture, and install on a turnkey basis to convert waste from the pulp and paper industry to protein feed supplement.

Not Available

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Decontamination and decommissioning assessment for the Waste Incineration Facility (Building 232-Z) Hanford Site, [Hanford], WA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Building 232-Z is an element of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. From 1961 until 1972, plutonium-bearing combustible materials were incinerated in the building. Between 1972 and 1983, following shutdown of the incinerator, the facility was used for waste segregation activities. The facility was placed in retired inactive status in 1984 and classified as a Limited Control Facility pursuant to DOE Order 5480.5, Safety of Nuclear Facilities, and 6430.1A, General Design Criteria. The current plutonium inventory within the building is estimated to be approximately 848 grams, the majority of which is retained within the process hood ventilation system. As a contaminated retired facility, Building 232-Z is included in the DOE Surplus Facility Management Program. The objective of this Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) assessment is to remove Building 232-Z, thereby elmininating the radiological and environmental hazards associated with the plutonium inventory within the structure. The steps to accomplish the plan objectives are: (1) identifying the locations of the most significant amounts of plutonium, (2) removing residual plutonium, (3) removing and decontaminating remaining building equipment, (4) dismantling the remaining structure, and (5) closing out the project.

Dean, L.N. [Advanced Sciences, Inc., (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Development of Waste Acceptance Criteria at 221-U Building: Initial Flow and Transport Scoping Calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents numerical flow and transport simulations performed that establish initial waste acceptance criteria for the potential waste streams that may be safely sequestered in the 221-U Building and similar canyon structures. Specifically, simulations were executed to identify the maximum loading of contaminant mass (without respect to volume) that can be emplaced within the 221-U Building with no more than 1 pCi/m2 of contaminant migrating outside the structure within a 1,000 year time period. The initial scoping simulations were executed in one dimension to assess important processes, and then two dimensions to establish waste acceptance criteria. Two monolithic conditions were assessed: (1) a grouted canyon monolith; and (2) a canyon monolith filled with sand, both assuming no cracks or fissures were present to cause preferential transport. A three-staged approach was taken to account for different processes that may impact the amount of contaminant that can be safely sequestered in canyon structure. In the first stage, flow and transport simulations established waste acceptance criteria based on a linear (Kd) isotherm approach. In the second stage, impacts on thermal loading were examined and the differences in waste acceptance criteria quantified. In the third stage of modeling, precipitation/dissolution reactions were considered on the release and transport of the contaminants, and the subsequent impact on the maximum contaminant loading. The reactive transport modeling is considered a demonstration of the reactive transport capability, and shows the importance of its use for future performance predictions once site-specific data have been obtained.

Freedman, Vicky L.; Zhang, Z. F.; Keller, Jason M.; Chen, Yousu

2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

66

Evaluation of existing Hanford buildings for the storage of solid wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Existing storage space at the Hanford Site for solid low-level mixed waste (LLMW) will be filled up by 1997. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has initiated the project funding cycle for additional storage space to assure that new facilities are available when needed. In the course of considering the funding request, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has asked WHC to identify and review any existing Hanford Site facilities that could be modified and used as an alternative to constructing the proposed W-112 Project. This report documents the results of that review. In summary, no buildings exist at the Hanford Site that can be utilized for storage of solid LLMW on a cost-effective basis when compared to new construction. The nearest approach to an economically sensible conversion would involve upgrade of 100,000 ft{sup 2} of space in the 2101-M Building in the 200 East Area. Here, modified storage space is estimated to cost about $106 per ft{sup 2} while new construction will cost about $50 per ft{sup 2}. Construction costs for the waste storage portion of the W-112 Project are comparable with W-016 Project actual costs, with escalation considered. Details of the cost evaluation for this building and for other selected candidate facilities are presented in this report. All comparisons presented address the potential decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) cost avoidances realized by using existing facilities.

Carlson, M.C.; Hodgson, R.D.; Sabin, J.C.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Building waste management core indicators through Spatial Material Flow Analysis: Net recovery and transport intensity indexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sustainability and proximity principles have a key role in waste management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Core indicators are needed in order to quantify and evaluate them. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A systematic, step-by-step approach is developed in this study for their development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transport may play a significant role in terms of environmental and economic costs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Policy action is required in order to advance in the consecution of these principles. - Abstract: In this paper, the material and spatial characterization of the flows within a municipal solid waste (MSW) management system are combined through a Network-Based Spatial Material Flow Analysis. Using this information, two core indicators are developed for the bio-waste fraction, the Net Recovery Index (NRI) and the Transport Intensity Index (TII), which are aimed at assessing progress towards policy-related sustainable MSW management strategies and objectives. The NRI approaches the capacity of a MSW management system for converting waste into resources through a systematic metabolic approach, whereas the TII addresses efficiency in terms of the transport requirements to manage a specific waste flow throughout the entire MSW management life cycle. Therefore, both indicators could be useful in assessing key MSW management policy strategies, such as the consecution of higher recycling levels (sustainability principle) or the minimization of transport by locating treatment facilities closer to generation sources (proximity principle). To apply this methodological approach, the bio-waste management system of the region of Catalonia (Spain) has been chosen as a case study. Results show the adequacy of both indicators for identifying those points within the system with higher capacity to compromise its environmental, economic and social performance and therefore establishing clear targets for policy prioritization. Moreover, this methodological approach permits scenario building, which could be useful in assessing the outcomes of hypothetical scenarios, thus proving its adequacy for strategic planning.

Font Vivanco, David, E-mail: font@cml.leidenuniv.nl [Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA), Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Puig Ventosa, Ignasi [ENT Environment and Management, Carrer Sant Joan 39, First Floor, 08800 Vilanova i la Geltru, Barcelona (Spain); Gabarrell Durany, Xavier [Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA), Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

The National Building Competition: Working Off the Waste with ENERGY STAR  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 COMPETITION SUMMARY 0 COMPETITION SUMMARY 2 On April 27, 2010, EPA launched the first-ever Na- tional Building Competition. Teams from fourteen buildings of all shapes and sizes located around the country went head to head to see who could work off the waste with help from EPA's ENERGY STAR pro- gram and reduce their energy use the most. The teams faced numerous challenges, including equipment malfunctions, staff departures, extreme temperatures, and tight budgets. In the face of these challenges, the competitors demonstrated that a strategic approach to energy efficiency can help orga- nizations overcome obstacles and achieve sustained, lasting improvement. Together, the contestants reduced their energy con- sumption by more than 44 million KBtu a year, saved more than $950,000, and reduced greenhouse gas

69

Experimental Verification of Solidification Stress Theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A research program is being conducted to develop a crack-free ceramic waste form (CWF) to be used for long term encasement of fission products and actinides resulting from processing spent nuclear fuel. Cracking usually occurs in the cooldown phase of the glass or ceramic formations. A crack-free formation should have more resistance to leaching than one with many cracks. In the research leading up to producing a CWF, a model was developed that proposes a permanent stress develops when the melt solidifies and that this stress can cause failure as the CWF nears room temperature. This paper reports on how the formation, CWF2, confirms the existence of this stress. The solidification stress is in addition to and of opposite sign of the thermal stress. Its derivation is reported on in Ref. 1. Cracking of the CWF would occur at low temperatures if solidification stress exists but at high temperatures if it doesn’t. If solidification stress occurs, then the cooldown rate during solidification should be reduced. If not, it should be reduced when the thermal stresses are highest. Recording cracking sounds confirm the existence of this solidification stress since cracking occurred during the low temperature phase of the cooldown. As a side purpose of this paper, a cooldown rate is proposed that should eliminate cracking in the next experiment, CWF3. CWF2 is a prototype vertical ceramic waste cylinder formed over a period of 10 days by heating a mixture of 75% zeolite, 25% glass frit in an argon atmosphere furnace through melting to 925 C and then cooling through solidification to room temperature. It is approximately 1 m high, 0.5 m in diameter, weighs about 400 kg, and is formed in a stainless steel can 0.5 cm thick. This cylinder developed many cracks on cooldown. At least 15 loud cracks were recorded over a period of 4 days at the end of cooldown when the temperatures were below 400 C. The CWF2 surface and centerline temperatures at mid height were measured which allowed the stress to be calculated. The timing of the cracks was compared to the time the calculated total stress exceeded the tensile stress limit and verified that the cause of the cracking was solidification stress and not thermal stress. Since the CWF is encased in a can in a furnace, the cracks cannot be easily observed but can be detected with sound measurements. Similarly, the stress cannot be measured but only estimated with analysis. Destructive examination of the CWF after cooldown was used to determine the pattern of the cracking which appeared to be initiated mainly in the inner region which is evidence the cracking is due to solidification stress.

C.W. Solbrig; M.C. Morrison; M.F. SImpson; K.J. Bateman

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

A perspective of hazardous waste and mixed waste treatment technology at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Treatment technologies for the preparation and treatment of heavy metal mixed wastes, contaminated soils, and mixed mercury wastes are being considered at the Savannah River Site (SRS), a DOE nuclear material processing facility operated by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). The proposed treatment technologies to be included at the Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Treatment Building at SRS are based on the regulatory requirements, projected waste volumes, existing technology, cost effectiveness, and project schedule. Waste sorting and size reduction are the initial step in the treatment process. After sorting/size reduction the wastes would go to the next applicable treatment module. For solid heavy metal mixed wastes the proposed treatment is macroencapsulation using a thermoplastic polymer. This process reduces the leachability of hazardous constituents from the waste and allows easy verification of the coating integrity. Stabilization and solidification in a cement matrix will treat a wide variety of wastes (i.e. soils, decontamination water). Some pretreatments may be required (i.e. Ph adjustment) before stabilization. Other pretreatments such as soil washing can reduce the amount of waste to be stabilized. Radioactive contaminated mercury waste at the SRS comes in numerous forms (i.e. process equipment, soils, and lab waste) with the required treatment of high mercury wastes being roasting/retorting and recovery. Any unrecyclable radioactive contaminated elemental mercury would be amalgamated, utilizing a batch system, before disposal.

England, J.L.; Venkatesh, S.; Bailey, L.L.; Langton, C.A.; Hay, M.S.; Stevens, C.B.; Carroll, S.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

A perspective of hazardous waste and mixed waste treatment technology at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Treatment technologies for the preparation and treatment of heavy metal mixed wastes, contaminated soils, and mixed mercury wastes are being considered at the Savannah River Site (SRS), a DOE nuclear material processing facility operated by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). The proposed treatment technologies to be included at the Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Treatment Building at SRS are based on the regulatory requirements, projected waste volumes, existing technology, cost effectiveness, and project schedule. Waste sorting and size reduction are the initial step in the treatment process. After sorting/size reduction the wastes would go to the next applicable treatment module. For solid heavy metal mixed wastes the proposed treatment is macroencapsulation using a thermoplastic polymer. This process reduces the leachability of hazardous constituents from the waste and allows easy verification of the coating integrity. Stabilization and solidification in a cement matrix will treat a wide variety of wastes (i.e. soils, decontamination water). Some pretreatments may be required (i.e. Ph adjustment) before stabilization. Other pretreatments such as soil washing can reduce the amount of waste to be stabilized. Radioactive contaminated mercury waste at the SRS comes in numerous forms (i.e. process equipment, soils, and lab waste) with the required treatment of high mercury wastes being roasting/retorting and recovery. Any unrecyclable radioactive contaminated elemental mercury would be amalgamated, utilizing a batch system, before disposal.

England, J.L.; Venkatesh, S.; Bailey, L.L.; Langton, C.A.; Hay, M.S.; Stevens, C.B.; Carroll, S.J.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

Heating and cooling of municipal buildings with waste heat from ground water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The feasibility of using waste heat from municipal water wells to replace natural gas for heating of the City Hall, Fire Station, and Community Hall in Wilmer, Texas was studied. At present, the 120/sup 0/F well water is cooled by dissipating the excess heat through evaporative cooling towers before entering the distribution system. The objective of the study was to determine the pumping cycle of the well and determine the amount of available heat from the water for a specified period. This data were correlated with the heating and cooling demand of the City's buildings, and a conceptual heat recovery system will be prepared. The system will use part or all of the excess heat from the water to heat the buildings, thereby eliminating the use of natural gas. The proposed geothermal retrofit of the existing natural gas heating system is not economical because the savings in natural gas does not offset the capital cost of the new equipment and the annual operating and maintenance costs. The fuel savings and power costs are a virtual trade-off over the 25-year period. The installation and operation of the system was estimated to cost $105,000 for 25 years which is an unamortized expense. In conclusion, retrofitting the City of Wilmer's municipal buildings is not feasible based on the economic analysis and fiscal projections as presented.

Morgan, D.S.; Hochgraf, J.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Scenario development for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Building confidence in the assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scenario development is part of the iterative performance assessment (PA) process for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Scenario development for the WIPP has been the subject of intense external review and is certain to be the subject of continued scrutiny as the project proceeds toward regulatory compliance. The principal means of increasing confidence in this aspect of the PA will be through the use of the systematic and thorough procedure toward developing the scenarios and conceptual models on which the assessment is to be based. Early and ongoing interaction with project reviewers can assist with confidence building. Quality of argument and clarity of presentation in PA will be of key concern. Appropriate tools are required for documenting and tracking assumptions, through a single assessment phase, and between iterative assessment phases. Risks associated with future human actions are of particular concern to the WIPP project, and international consensus on the principles for incorporation of future human actions in assessments would be valuable.

Galson, D.A.; Swift, P.N.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

APPLICATION OF HIGH TECHNOLOGY POLYMERS FOR THE IMMOBILIZATION AND SOLIDIFICATION OF COMPLEX LIQUID RADWASTE TYPES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cold War era created a massive build-up of nuclear weapon stockpiles in the former Soviet Union and the United States. The primary objective during this period was the development of nuclear technologies for weapons, space and power with lack of attention to the impact of radioactive and hazardous waste products on the environment. Effective technologies for radioactive and hazardous waste treatment and disposal were not well investigated or promoted during the arms build-up; and consequently, environmental contamination has become a major problem. These problems in Russia and the United States are well documented. Significant amounts of liquid radwaste have existed since the 1950's. The current government of the Russian Federation is addressing the issues of land remediation and permanent storage of radwaste resulting from internal and external pressures for safe cleanup and storage. The Russian government seeks new technologies from internal sources and from the West that will provide high performance, long term stability, safe for transport and for long-term storage of liquid radwaste at a reasonable economic cost. With the great diversity of liquid chemical compositions and activity levels, it is important to note that these waste products cannot be processed with commonly used methods. Different techniques and materials can be used for this problem resolution including the use of polymer materials that are capable of forming chemically stable, solidified waste products. In 2001, the V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute (St. Petersburg, Russia) and Pacific World Trade (Indianapolis, Indiana) began an extensive research and test program to determine the effectiveness and performance of high technology polymers for the immobilization and solidification of complex liquid radwaste types generated by the Ministry of Atomic Energy (Minatom), Russia, organization. The high tech polymers used in the tests were provided by Nochar, Inc. (Indianapolis, Indiana).

Kelley, Dennis; Brunkow, Ward; Pokhitonov, Yuri; Starchenko, Vadim

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

75

Decontamination impacts on solidification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The increased occupational exposure resulting from the accumulation of activated corrosion products in the primary system of LWRs has led to the development of chemical methods to remove the contamination. In the past, the problem of enhanced migration of radionuclides away from trenches used to dispose of low-level radioactive waste, has been linked to the presence, at the disposal unit, of chelating or complexing agents such as those used in decontamination processes. These agents have further been found to reduce the normal sorptive capacity of soils for radionuclides. The degree to which these agents inhibit the normal sorptive processes is dependent on the type of complexing agent, the radionuclide of concern, the soil properties and whether the nuclide is present as a complex or is already sorbed to the soil. Since the quantity of reagent employed in a full system decontamination is large (200 to 25,000 kg), the potential for enhanced migration of radionuclides from a site used to dispose of the decontamination wastes should be addressed and guidelines established for the safe disposal of these wastes.

Piciulo, P.L.; Davis, M.S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Using Protons to Peer into Metal Solidification | U.S. DOE Office of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Using Protons to Peer into Metal Solidification Using Protons to Peer into Metal Solidification Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) News & Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: sc.bes@science.doe.gov More Information » June 2013 Using Protons to Peer into Metal Solidification Proton radiography is a new tool for imaging melting and solidification of metals. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo Image courtesy of LANL Protons and x-rays permit direct, nondestructive imaging of melting and

77

Better Buildings Challenge to Cut Energy Waste Grows by 1 Billion Square Feet  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Building on President Obama’s Climate Action Plan and the Administration’s Better Buildings Challenge, the Energy Department announced today that Better Buildings Challenge partners are on track to meet their energy performance goals in their second year, saving approximately $100 million a year.

78

In situ vitrification: application analysis for stabilization of transuranic waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The in situ vitrification process builds upon the electric melter technology previously developed for high-level waste immobilization. In situ vitrification converts buried wastes and contaminated soil to an extremely durable glass and crystalline waste form by melting the materials, in place, using joule heating. Once the waste materials have been solidified, the high integrity waste form should not cause future ground subsidence. Environmental transport of the waste due to water or wind erosion, and plant or animal intrusion, is minimized. Environmental studies are currently being conducted to determine whether additional stabilization is required for certain in-ground transuranic waste sites. An applications analysis has been performed to identify several in situ vitrification process limitations which may exist at transuranic waste sites. Based on the process limit analysis, in situ vitrification is well suited for solidification of most in-ground transuranic wastes. The process is best suited for liquid disposal sites. A site-specific performance analysis, based on safety, health, environmental, and economic assessments, will be required to determine for which sites in situ vitrification is an acceptable disposal technique. Process economics of in situ vitrification compare favorably with other in-situ solidification processes and are an order of magnitude less than the costs for exhumation and disposal in a repository. Leachability of the vitrified product compares closely with that of Pyrex glass and is significantly better than granite, marble, or bottle glass. Total release to the environment from a vitrified waste site is estimated to be less than 10/sup -5/ parts per year. 32 figures, 30 tables.

Oma, K.H.; Farnsworth, R.K.; Rusin, J.M.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Building the institutional capacity for managing commercial high-level radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In July 1981, the Office of Nuclear Waste Management of the Department of Energy contracted with the National Academy of Public Administration for a study of institutional issues associated with the commercial radioactive waste management program. The two major sets of issues which the Academy was asked to investigate were (1) intergovernmental relationships, how federal, state, local and Indian tribal council governments relate to each other in the planning and implementation of a waste management program, and (2) interagency relationships, how the federal agencies with major responsibilities in this public policy arena interact with each other. The objective of the study was to apply the perspectives of public administration to a difficult and controversial question - how to devise and execute an effective waste management program workable within the constraints of the federal system. To carry out this task, the Academy appointed a panel composed of individuals whose background and experience would provide the several types of knowledge essential to the effort. The findings of this panel are presented along with the executive summary. The report consists of a discussion of the search for a radioactive waste management strategy, and an analysis of the two major groups of institutional issues: (1) intergovernmental, the relationship between the three major levels of government; and (2) interagency, the relationships between the major federal agencies having responsibility for the waste management program.

None

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Debate over waste imperils 3-mile cleanup  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...solidification ofthe 560,000 gallons of high level waste left from the commercial fuel reprocessing plant that operated at West Valley, New York, from 1966 to 1972. But any suggestion that the new solidification facility also be used for Three Mile...

LJ Carter

1980-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste solidification building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Waste Prevention in the Ecological Building Project of Delft University of Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A multidisciplinairy workinggroup of 8 departments from 3 faculties of the Delft University of Technology is carrying out a research on energy saving building and environmental technology. The preliminary desi...

ir. Hans Hubers

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Feasibility study on the solidification of liquid low-level radioactive mixed waste in the inactive tank system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A literature survey was conducted to help determine the feasibility of solidifying a liquid low-level radioactive mixed waste in the inactive tank system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The goal of this report is to facilitate a decision on the disposition of these wastes by identifying any waste constituents that might (1) compromise the strength or stability of the waste form or (2) be highly leachable. Furthermore, its goal is to identify ways to circumvent interferences and to decrease the leachability of the waste constituents. This study has sought to provide an understanding of inhibition of cement set by identifying the fundamental chemical mechanisms by which this inhibition takes place. From this fundamental information, it is possible to draw some conclusions about the potential effects of waste constituents, even in the absence of particular studies on specific compounds.

Trussell, S. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Spence, R.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Literature review of stabilization/solidification of volatile organic compounds and the implications for Hanford grouts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A literature review was conducted on the stabilization/solidification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Based on this literature, it is likely that the limestone-containing grout will not permanently immobilize VOCs and that no presently available additives can guarantee permanent immobilization. The Westinghouse hanford company grout may be fairly effective at retarding aqueous leaching of VOCs, and commercial additives can improve this performance. Significant VOC losses do occur during stabilization/solidification, and the high temperatures of the Westinghouse Hanford Company waste and grout should exacerbate this problem. In fact, these high temperatures raise doubts about the presence of VOCs in the double-shell tanks supernates.

Spence, R.D.; Osborne, S.C.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Life Cycle cost Analysis of Waste Heat Operated Absorption Cooling Systems for Building HVAC Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was used to calculate the PWC of the system for annual operating hours of 8760 and the same is compared with the electric based vapour compression chiller (VCRS) of same capacity. The life cycle cost (LCC) of waste heat operated absorption chiller...

Saravanan, R.; Murugavel, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Production-scale LLW and RMW solidification system operational testing at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) has begun production-scale testing of a low-level waste and radioactive mixed waste solidification system. This system will be used to treat low-level and mixed radioactive waste to meet land burial requirements. The system can use any of several types of solidification media, including a chemically bonded phosphate ceramic developed by ANL-E scientists. The final waste product will consist of a solidified mass in a standard 208-liter drum. The system uses commercial equipment and incorporates several unique process control features to ensure proper treatment. This paper will discuss the waste types requiring treatment, the system configuration, and operation results for these waste streams.

Wescott, J.; Wagh, A.; Singh, D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Nelson, R. [Sargent and Lundy, Chicago, IL (United States); No, H. [H and P, Inc., Vienna, VA (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reported are: high-level waste immobilization, alternative waste forms, nuclear waste materials characterization, TRU waste immobilization, TRU waste decontamination, krypton solidification, thermal outgassing, iodine-129 fixation, unsaturated zone transport, well-logging instrumentation development, mobile organic complexes of fission products, waste management system and safety studies, assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems, waste/rock interactions, engineered barriers, criteria for defining waste isolation, and spent fuel and pool component integrity. (DLC)

Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Development of Stable Solidification Method for Insoluble Ferrocyanides-13170  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of stable solidification method of insoluble ferrocyanides sludge is an important subject for the safety decontamination in Fukushima NPP-1. By using the excellent immobilizing properties of zeolites such as gas trapping ability and self-sintering properties, the stable solidification of insoluble ferrocyanides was accomplished. The immobilization ratio of Cs for K{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O saturated with Cs{sup +} ions (Cs{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O) was estimated to be less than 0.1% above 1,000 deg. C; the adsorbed Cs{sup +} ions are completely volatilized. In contrast, the novel stable solid form was produced by the press-sintering of the mixture of Cs{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O and zeolites at higher temperature of 1,000 deg. C and 1,100 deg. C; Cs volatilization and cyanide release were completely depressed. The immobilization ratio of Cs, under the mixing conditions of Cs{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O:CP= 1:1 and calcining temperature: 1,000 deg. C, was estimated to be nearly 100%. As for the kinds of zeolites, natural mordenite (NM), clinoptilolite (CP) and Chabazite tended to have higher immobilization ratio compared to zeolite A. This may be due to the difference in the phase transformation between natural zeolites and synthetic zeolite A. In the case of the composites (K{sub 2-X}Ni{sub X/2}[NiFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O loaded natural mordenite), relatively high immobilization ratio of Cs was also obtained. This method using zeolite matrices can be applied to the stable solidification of the solid wastes of insoluble ferrocyanides sludge. (authors)

Ikarashi, Yuki; Masud, Rana Syed; Mimura, Hitoshi [Dept. of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Aramaki-Aza-Aoba6-6-01-2, Sendai, 980-8579 (Japan)] [Dept. of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Aramaki-Aza-Aoba6-6-01-2, Sendai, 980-8579 (Japan); Ishizaki, Eiji; Matsukura, Minoru [UNION SHOWA K.K. 17-20, Mita 2-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0073 (Japan)] [UNION SHOWA K.K. 17-20, Mita 2-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0073 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress and activities are reported on the following: high-level waste immobilization, alternative waste forms, nuclear waste materials characterization, TRU waste immobilization programs, TRU waste decontamination, krypton solidification, thermal outgassing, iodine-129 fixation, monitoring of unsaturated zone transport, well-logging instrumentation development, mobile organic complexes of fission products, waste management system and safety studies, assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems, waste/rock interactions technology, spent fuel and fuel pool integrity program, and engineered barriers. (DLC)

Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Transforming Commercial Building Operations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Ron Underhill Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ronald.underhill@pnnl.gov (509)375-9765 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Most buildings are not commissioned (Cx) before occupancy, including HVAC and lighting systems * Buildings often are poorly operated and maintained leading to significant energy waste of 5 to 20%, even when they have building automation systems (BASs)

90

Transforming Commercial Building Operations  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Ron Underhill Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ronald.underhill@pnnl.gov (509)375-9765 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Most buildings are not commissioned (Cx) before occupancy, including HVAC and lighting systems * Buildings often are poorly operated and maintained leading to significant energy waste of 5 to 20%, even when they have building automation systems (BASs)

91

SPRU Removes High-Risk Radioactive Waste  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

NISKAYUNA, N.Y. – EM’s Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) Disposition Project completed a significant waste-treatment campaign in February that involved the solidification of approximately 9,700 gallons of contaminated sludge and 14 shipments of the waste off-site for permanent disposal.

92

Utilizing New Binder Materials for Green Building has Zero Waste by Recycling Slag and Sewage Sludge Ash  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

binding material to save energy and to produce new innovative zero materials waste . The current research aims to investigate new binder materials as alternative of Portland cement. Alkali activated slag (AAS) blended with sewage sludge ash (SSA...

Zeedan, S. R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Design/Installation and Structural Integrity Assessment of the Bethel Valley Low-Level Waste Collection and Transfer System Upgrade for Building 3544 (Process Waste Treatment Plant) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes and assesses planned modifications to be made to the Building 3544 Process Waste Treatment Plant of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The modifications are made in response to the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) relating to environmental protection requirements for tank systems. The modifications include the provision of a new double contained LLW line replacing an existing buried line that does not provide double containment. This new above ground, double contained pipeline is provided to permit discharge of treated process waste fluid to an outside truck loading station. The new double contained discharge line is provided with leak detection and provisions to remove accumulated liquid. An existing LLW transfer pump, concentrated waste tank, piping and accessories are being utilized, with the addition of a secondary containment system comprised of a dike, a chemically resistant internal coating on the diked area surfaces and operator surveillance on a daily basis for the diked area leak detection. This assessment concludes that the planned modifications comply with applicable requirements of Federal Facility Agreement, Docket No. 89-04-FF, covering the Oak Ridge Reservation.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Rutherford backscattering for measuring corrosion layers on glasses for long-term storage of radioactive waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The method considered safest for isolation of nuclear waste is vitrification (solidification in a glass or glassceramic matrix) with long-term storage in stable geological repositories. Borosilicate glasses are ....

Hj. Matzke

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Stabilization of high and low solids Consolidated Incinerator Facility (CIF) waste with super cement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details solidification activities using selected Mixed Waste Focus Area technologies with the High and Low Solid waste streams. Ceramicrete and Super Cement technologies were chosen as the best possible replacement solidification candidates for the waste streams generated by the SRS incinerator from a list of several suggested Mixed Waste Focus Area technologies. These technologies were tested, evaluated, and compared to the current Portland cement technology being employed. Recommendation of a technology for replacement depends on waste form performance, process flexibility, process complexity, and cost of equipment and/or raw materials.

Walker, B.W.

2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

96

Stabilization and solidification of chromium-contaminated soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chromium-contaminated soil is a common environmental problem in the United States as a result of numerous industrial processes involving chromium. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is the species of most concern because of its toxicity and mobility in groundwater. One method of diminishing the environmental impact of chromium is to reduce it to a trivalent oxidation state [Cr(III)], in which it is relatively insoluble and nontoxic. This study investigated a stabilization and solidification process to minimize the chromium concentration in the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) extract and to produce a solidified waste form with a compressive strength in the range of 150 to 300 pounds per square inch (psi). To minimize the chromium in the TCLP extract, the chromium had to be reduced to the trivalent oxidation state. The average used in this study was an alluvium contaminated with chromic and sulfuric acid solutions. The chromium concentration in the in the in situ soil was 1212 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) total chromium and 275 mg/kg Cr(VI). The effectiveness of iron, ferrous sulfate to reduce Cr(VI) was tested in batch experiments.

Cherne, C.A.; Thomson, B.M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Civil Engineering Dept.; Conway, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Waste Management | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cleanup » Waste Management Cleanup » Waste Management Waste Management November 12, 2013 U.S. Department of Energy to Host Press Call on Radioactive Waste Shipment and Disposal On Tuesday, November 12, 2013, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will host a press call to discuss Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project (CEUSP) shipment and disposal plans in Nevada. September 24, 2013 Hanford Tank Waste Retrieval, Treatment and Disposition Framework Completing the Office of River Protection (ORP) mission of stabilizing 56 million gallons of chemical and radioactive waste stored in Hanford's 177 tanks is one of the Energy Department's highest priorities. This Framework document outlines a phased approach for beginning tank waste treatment while continuing to resolve technical issues with the Pretreatment and

98

Building a World of Difference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Waste?to?Energy Roadmapping Workshop Building a World of Difference Presentation by Patricia Scanlan, Director of Residuals Treatment Technologies, Black & Veatch

99

Stabilization of compactible waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of series of experiments performed to determine the feasibility of stabilizing compacted or compactible waste with polymers. The need for this work arose from problems encountered at disposal sites attributed to the instability of this waste in disposal. These studies are part of an experimental program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) investigating methods for the improved solidification/stabilization of DOE low-level wastes. The approach taken in this study was to perform a series of survey type experiments using various polymerization systems to find the most economical and practical method for further in-depth studies. Compactible dry bulk waste was stabilized with two different monomer systems: styrene-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and polyester-styrene, in laboratory-scale experiments. Stabilization was accomplished by wetting or soaking compactible waste (before or after compaction) with monomers, which were subsequently polymerized. Three stabilization methods are described. One involves the in-situ treatment of compacted waste with monomers in which a vacuum technique is used to introduce the binder into the waste. The second method involves the alternate placement and compaction of waste and binder into a disposal container. In the third method, the waste is treated before compaction by wetting the waste with the binder using a spraying technique. A series of samples stabilized at various binder-to-waste ratios were evaluated through water immersion and compression testing. Full-scale studies were conducted by stabilizing two 55-gallon drums of real compacted waste. The results of this preliminary study indicate that the integrity of compacted waste forms can be readily improved to ensure their long-term durability in disposal environments. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Waste Calcining Facility remote inspection report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) remote inspections was to evaluate areas in the facility which are difficult to access due to high radiation fields. The areas inspected were the ventilation exhaust duct, waste hold cell, adsorber manifold cell, off-gas cell, calciner cell and calciner vessel. The WCF solidified acidic, high-level mixed waste generated during nuclear fuel reprocessing. Solidification was accomplished through high temperature oxidation and evaporation. Since its shutdown in 1981, the WCFs vessels, piping systems, pumps, off-gas blowers and process cells have remained contaminated. Access to the below-grade areas is limited due to contamination and high radiation fields. Each inspection technique was tested with a mock-up in a radiologically clean area before the equipment was taken to the WCF for the actual inspection. During the inspections, essential information was obtained regarding the cleanliness, structural integrity, in-leakage of ground water, indications of process leaks, indications of corrosion, radiation levels and the general condition of the cells and equipment. In general, the cells contain a great deal of dust and debris, as well as hand tools, piping and miscellaneous equipment. Although the building appears to be structurally sound, the paint is peeling to some degree in all of the cells. Cracking and spalling of the concrete walls is evident in every cell, although the east wall of the off-gas cell is the worst. The results of the completed inspections and lessons learned will be used to plan future activities for stabilization and deactivation of the facility. Remote clean-up of loose piping, hand tools, and miscellaneous debris can start immediately while information from the inspections is factored into the conceptual design for deactivating the facility.

Patterson, M.W.; Ison, W.M.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste solidification building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Waste Management Facilities Cost Information Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Management Facility Cost Information (WMFCI) Report, commissioned by the US Department of Energy (DOE), develops planning life-cycle cost (PLCC) estimates for treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. This report contains PLCC estimates versus capacity for 26 different facility cost modules. A procedure to guide DOE and its contractor personnel in the use of estimating data is also provided. Estimates in the report apply to five distinctive waste streams: low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, alpha contaminated low-level waste, alpha contaminated low-level mixed waste, and transuranic waste. The report addresses five different treatment types: incineration, metal/melting and recovery, shredder/compaction, solidification, and vitrification. Data in this report allows the user to develop PLCC estimates for various waste management options.

Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

University Buildings Landmark Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KEY University Buildings Landmark Buildings The Lanyon Building Roads Footpath Cafe Grass Queen's University Belfast Campus Map The Lanyon Building The Students' Union The David Keir Building School Offices and Sonic Arts Q Nursing and Midwifery R Pharmacy S Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering T Politics

Paxton, Anthony T.

103

University Buildings Landmark Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KEY University Buildings Landmark Buildings The Lanyon Building Roads Footpath Cafe University Accommodation Queen's University Belfast Campus Map The Lanyon Building The Students' Union The David Keir Building School Offices A Biological Sciences B Chemistry and Chemical Engineering C Education D

Müller, Jens-Dominik

104

University Buildings Landmark Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KEY University Buildings Landmark Buildings The Lanyon Building Roads Footpath Cafe University Engineering N Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences P Music and Sonic Arts Q Nursing and Midwifery R and Student Affairs 3 Administration Building 32 Ashby Building 27 Belfast City Hospital 28 Bernard Crossland

Paxton, Anthony T.

105

Farm Buildings Research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE first supplement, 1958-61, of Part 3, Buildings for Poultry, issued by the Agricultural Research Council, has recently been published (Pp. ... . 71. London: Agricultural Research Council, 1963. 4s.). This bibliography of farm buildings research provides important basic information: in the past, much waste has occurred from the ...

1963-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

106

Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 304L stainless steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found. This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GT A W showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

Hochanadel, Patrick W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lienert, Thomas J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Jesse N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Raymond J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Matthew Q [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 204L stainless steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found.This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GTAW showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

Hochanadel, Patrick W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lienert, Thomas J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Jesse N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Matthew Q [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

Stability of eutectic interface during directional solidification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Directional solidification of eutectic alloys shows different types of eutectic morphologies. These include lamellar, rod, oscillating and tilting modes. The growth of these morphologies occurs with a macroscopically planar interface. However, under certain conditions, the planar eutectic front becomes unstable and gives rise to a cellular or a dendritic structure. This instability leads to the cellular/dendritic structure of either a primary phase or a two-phase structure. The objective of this work is to develop a fundamental understanding of the instability of eutectic structure into cellular/dendritic structures of a single phase and of two-phases. Experimental studies have been carried out to examine the transition from a planar to two-phase cellular and dendritic structures in a ceramic system of Alumina-Zirconia (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2}) and in a transparent organic system of carbon tetrabromide and hexachloroethane (CBr{sub 4}-C{sub 2}Cl{sub 6}). Several aspects of eutectic interface stability have been examined.

Han, S.H.

1996-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

109

Y-12 Plant decontamination and decommissioning Technology Logic Diagram for Building 9201-4: Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part B, Decontamination; robotics/automation; waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume consists of the Technology Logic Diagrams (TLDs) for the decontamination, robotics/automation, and waste management areas.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Building 32 35 Building 36  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building 10 Building 13 Building 7 LinHall Drive Lot R10 Lot R12 Lot 207 Lot 209 LotR9 Lot 205 Lot 203 LotBuilding30 Richland Avenue 39 44 Building 32 35 Building 36 34 Building 18 Building 19 11 12 45 29 15 Building 5 8 9 17 Building 16 6 Building 31 Building 2 Ridges Auditorium Building 24 Building 4

Botte, Gerardine G.

111

Directional solidification studies in Ni-Al alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three solid phases are involved in the phase equilibria of the intermetallic compound Ni{sub 3}Al near its melting point, {beta}, {gamma}{prime}(Ni{sub 3}Al), and {gamma}. The generally-accepted phase diagram involves a eutectic reaction between {beta}{prime} and {gamma}, but some recent studies agree with an older diagram due to Schramm, which has a eutectic reaction between the {beta} and {gamma}{prime} phases. The phase equilibria near Ni{sub 3}Al compositions was evaluated using quenched directional solidification experiments, that preserve the microstructures tonned at the solidification front, and using diffusion couple experiments. These experiments show that eutectic forms between {beta} and {gamma}{prime} phases, as in the Schramm diagram. Growth and phase transformations of these three phases are also studied in the directional solidification experiments. Microstructure analysis shows that etching of Ni{sub 3}Al({gamma}{prime}) is very sensitive to small composition variations and crystallographic orientation changes. The eutectic solidification study confirms that the equilibrium eutectic is {gamma}{prime}+{beta}, and that the metastable {gamma}+{beta} eutectic might be also produced in this system according to the impurities, solidification rates, and composition variations.

Lee, Je-hyun

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

E-Print Network 3.0 - alloy rapid solidification Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

solidification process (1-5). One of the most attractive system is the Al-Fe-Si-Transition metal... of Structural Metals by Rapid Solidification, ed. F.H.Froes and S.J....

113

SRS - Programs - Liquid Waste Disposition  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Liquid Waste Disposition Liquid Waste Disposition This includes both the solidification of highly radioactive liquid wastes stored in SRS's tank farms and disposal of liquid low-level waste generated as a by-product of the separations process and tank farm operations. This low-level waste is treated in the Effluent Treatment Facility. High-activity liquid waste is generated at SRS as by-products from the processing of nuclear materials for national defense, research and medical programs. The waste, totaling about 36 million gallons, is currently stored in 49 underground carbon-steel waste tanks grouped into two "tank farms" at SRS. While the waste is stored in the tanks, it separates into two parts: a sludge that settles on the bottom of the tank, and a liquid supernate that resides on top of the sludge. The waste is reduced to about 30 percent of its original volume by evaporation. The condensed evaporator "overheads" are transferred to the Effluent Treatment Project for final cleanup prior to release to the environment. As the concentrate cools a portion of it crystallizes forming solid saltcake. The concentrated supernate and saltcake are less mobile and therefore less likely to escape to the environment in the event of a tank crack or leak.

114

Journal of Crystal Growth 226 (2001) 430435 Steady state detached solidification of water at zero gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Crystal Growth 226 (2001) 430­435 Steady state detached solidification of water at zero April 2001 Communicated by R.S. Feigelson Abstract Steady-state detached solidification of water in microgravity, detached solidification of water is predicted to occur in a sealed ampoule at zero gravity under

Regel, Liya L.

115

Lab obtains approval to begin design on new radioactive waste...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New radioactive waste staging facility Lab obtains approval to begin design on new radioactive waste staging facility The 4-acre complex will include multiple staging buildings...

116

Luminescence dosimetry using building materials and personal objects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......case of a radioactive waste storage facility(38). Since...have some potential for long-term dosimetry, further investigation...release of radioactive wastes into the Techa river...quartz from a radioactive waste storage building. Radiat. Prot......

H. Y. Göksu; I. K. Bailiff

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Building Performance Compass  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Building Performance Compass Building Performance Compass Building Performance Compass logo Building Performance Compass analyzes commercial and multi-family building energy use patterns in a simple, easy-to-use Web-based interface. Using building details and energy data from the buildingÂ’s utility bills, it is unique in its ability to benchmark and compare all buildings, whether residential or commercial. Recent enhancements to Building Performance Compass include new multi-family support, the ability to track non-energy quantities such as water and waste, and features such as its fast-feedback report, which enables reporting energy savings as early as one month after work is completed. Building Performance Compass also provides extensive tracking of building data and usage, as well as the ability to upload and track

118

Multi-discipline Waste Acceptance Process at the Nevada National Security Site - 13573  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada National Security Site low-level radioactive waste disposal facility acceptance process requires multiple disciplines to ensure the protection of workers, the public, and the environment. These disciplines, which include waste acceptance, nuclear criticality, safety, permitting, operations, and performance assessment, combine into the overall waste acceptance process to assess low-level radioactive waste streams for disposal at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site. Four waste streams recently highlighted the integration of these disciplines: the Oak Ridge Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators and Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project material, West Valley Melter, and classified waste. (authors)

Carilli, Jhon T. [US Department Of Energy, Nevada Site Office, P. O. Box 98518, Las Vegas, Nevada 89193-8518 (United States)] [US Department Of Energy, Nevada Site Office, P. O. Box 98518, Las Vegas, Nevada 89193-8518 (United States); Krenzien, Susan K. [Navarro-Intera, LLC, P. O. Box 98952, Las Vegas, Nevada 89193-8952 (United States)] [Navarro-Intera, LLC, P. O. Box 98952, Las Vegas, Nevada 89193-8952 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The status of the following programs is reported: high-level waste immobilization; alternative waste forms; Nuclear Waste Materials Characterization Center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton solidification; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; mobility of organic complexes of fission products in soils; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology; systems study on engineered barriers; criteria for defining waste isolation; spent fuel and fuel pool component integrity program; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; and development of backfill material.

Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Microstructural Development in Al-Si Powder During Rapid Solidification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Powder metallurgy has become an increasingly important form of metal processing because of its ability to produce materials with superior mechanical properties. These properties are due in part to the unique and often desirable microstructures which arise as a result of the extreme levels of undercooling achieved, especially in the finest size powder, and the subsequent rapid solidification which occurs. A better understanding of the fundamental processes of nucleation and growth is required to further exploit the potential of rapid solidification processing. Aluminum-silicon, an alloy of significant industrial importance, was chosen as a model for simple eutectic systems displaying an unfaceted/faceted interface and skewed coupled eutectic growth zone, Al-Si powder produced by high pressure gas atomization was studied to determine the relationship between microstructure and alloy composition as a function of powder size and atomization gas. Critical experimental measurements of hypereutectic (Si-rich) compositions were used to determine undercooling and interface velocity, based on the theoretical models which are available. Solidification conditions were analyzed as a function of particle diameter and distance from nucleation site. A revised microstructural map is proposed which allows the prediction of particle morphology based on temperature and composition. It is hoped that this work, by providing enhanced understanding of the processes which govern the development of the solidification morphology of gas atomized powder, will eventually allow for better control of processing conditions so that particle microstructures can be optimized for specific applications.

Amber Lynn Genau

2004-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste solidification building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Residential Buildings Residential Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Residential Links Success Stories Previous Next Warming Up to Pump Heat. Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Cut Refrigerator Energy Use to Save Money. Tools EnergyPlus Whole Building Simulation Program

122

Solidification at the High and Low Rate Extreme  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The microstructures formed upon solidification are strongly influenced by the imposed growth rates on an alloy system. Depending on the characteristics of the solidification process, a wide range of growth rates is accessible. The prevailing solidification mechanisms, and thus the final microstructure of the alloy, are governed by these imposed growth rates. At the high rate extreme, for instance, one can have access to novel microstructures that are unattainable at low growth rates. While the low growth rates can be utilized for the study of the intrinsic growth behavior of a certain phase growing from the melt. Although the length scales associated with certain processes, such as capillarity, and the diffusion of heat and solute, are different at low and high rate extremes, the phenomena that govern the selection of a certain microstructural length scale or a growth mode are the same. Consequently, one can analyze the solidification phenomena at both high and low rates by using the same governing principles. In this study, we examined the microstructural control at both low and high extremes. For the high rate extreme, the formation of crystalline products and factors that control the microstructure during rapid solidification by free-jet melt spinning are examined in Fe-Si-B system. Particular attention was given to the behavior of the melt pool at different quench-wheel speeds. Since the solidification process takes place within the melt-pool that forms on the rotating quench-wheel, we examined the influence of melt-pool dynamics on nucleation and growth of crystalline solidification products and glass formation. High-speed imaging of the melt-pool, analysis of ribbon microstructure, and measurement of ribbon geometry and surface character all indicate upper and lower limits for melt-spinning rates for which nucleation can be avoided, and fully amorphous ribbons can be achieved. Comparison of the relevant time scales reveals that surface-controlled melt-pool oscillation may be the dominant factor governing the onset of unsteady thermal conditions accompanied by varying amounts of crystalline nucleation observed near the lower limit. At high quench-wheel velocities, the influence of these oscillations is minimal due to very short melt-pool residence times. However, microstructural evidence suggests that the entrapment of gas pockets at the wheel-metal interface plays a critical role in establishing the upper rate limit. An observed transition in wheel-side surface character with increasing melt-spinning rate supports this conclusion.

Halim Meco

2004-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

123

Radioactive Waste Radioactive Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Radioactive Waste at UF Bldg 831 392-8400 #12;Radioactive Waste · Program is designed to;Radioactive Waste · Program requires · Generator support · Proper segregation · Packaging · labeling #12;Radioactive Waste · What is radioactive waste? · Anything that · Contains · or is contaminated

Slatton, Clint

124

Design/installation and structural integrity assessment under the Federal Facility Agreement for Bethel Valley Low-Level Waste Collection and Transfer System upgrade for Building 2026 (High Radiation Level Analytical Laboratory) and Building 2099 (Monitoring and Control Station) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents a Design/Installation and Structural Integrity Assessment for a replacement tank system for portions of the Bethel Valley Low Level Waste (LLW) System, located at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This issue of the assessment covers the design aspects of the replacement tank system, and certifies that the design has sufficient structural integrity and is acceptable for the storing or treating of hazardous and/or radioactive substances. The present issue identifies specific activities that must be completed during the fabrication, installation, and testing of the replacement tank system in order to provide assurance that the final installation complies with governing requirements. Portions of the LLW system are several decades old, or older, and do not comply with current environmental protection regulations. Several subsystems of the LLW system have been designated to receive a state-of-the-art replacement and refurbishment. One such subsystem serves Building 2026, the High Radiation Level Analytical Laboratory. This assessment focuses on the scope of work for the Building 2026 replacement LLW Collection and Transfer System, including the provision of a new Monitoring and Control Station (Building 2099) to receive, store, and treat (adjust pH) low level radioactive waste.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Secondary Waste Form Development and Optimization—Cast Stone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Washington River Protection Services is considering the design and construction of a Solidification Treatment Unit (STU) for the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at Hanford. The ETF is a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act-permitted, multi-waste, treatment and storage unit and can accept dangerous, low-level, and mixed wastewaters for treatment. The STU needs to be operational by 2018 to receive secondary liquid wastes generated during operation of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The STU to ETF will provide the additional capacity needed for ETF to process the increased volume of secondary wastes expected to be produced by WTP.

Sundaram, S. K.; Parker, Kent E.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Pitman, Stan G.; Chun, Jaehun; Chung, Chul-Woo; Kimura, Marcia L.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Um, Wooyong; Westsik, Joseph H.

2011-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

126

Building stability through decentralization : the environmental, economic, and ethical argument for informal sector collection and decentralized waste processing in urban India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rapid population growth, urbanization and increasing affluence have led to increases in consumption and waste generation in all Indian cities. The current system, a mix of informal recyclables collection and centralized ...

Howe, Caroline Louise

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Summary of Laboratory Capabilities Fact Sheets Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility and 222-S Laboratory Complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This summary of laboratory capabilities is provided to assist prospective responders to the CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) Requests for Proposal (RFP) issued or to be issued. The RFPs solicit development of treatment technologies as categorized in the CHG Requests for Information (RFI): Solid-Liquid Separations Technology - SOL: Reference-Number-CHG01; Cesium and Technetium Separations Technology - SOL: Reference-Number-CHG02; Sulfate Removal Technology - SOL: Reference-Number-CHG03; Containerized Grout Technology - SOL: Reference-Number-CHG04; Bulk Vitrification Technology - SOL: Reference-Number-CHG05; and TRU Tank Waste Solidification for Disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - SOL: Reference-Number-CHG06 Hanford Analytical Services, Technology Project Management (TPM), has the capability and directly related experience to provide breakthrough innovations and solutions to the challenges presented in the requests. The 222-S Complex includes the 70,000 sq ft 222-S Laboratory, plus several support buildings. The laboratory has 11 hot cells for handling and analyzing highly radioactive samples, including tank farm waste. Inorganic, organic, and radiochemical analyses are performed on a wide variety of air, liquid, soil, sludge, and biota samples. Capabilities also include development of process technology and analytical methods, and preparation of analytical standards. The TPM staff includes many scientists with advanced degrees in chemistry (or closely related fields), over half of which are PhDs. These scientists have an average 20 years of Hanford experience working with Hanford waste in a hot cell environment. They have hundreds of publications related to Hanford tank waste characterization and process support. These would include, but are not limited to, solid-liquid separations engineering, physical chemistry, particle size analysis, and inorganic chemistry. TPM has had revenues in excess of $1 million per year for the past decade in above technology or similar related work. The abbreviated Bibliography, which follows, is an example of experience for Solicitations 1,2 and 3.

HADLEY, R.M.

2002-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

128

Secondary Waste Forms and Technetium Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Secondary Waste Forms and Secondary Waste Forms and Technetium Management Joseph H. Westsik, Jr. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory EM HLW Corporate Board Meeting November 18, 2010 What are Secondary Wastes? Process condensates and scrubber and/or off-gas treatment liquids from the pretreatment and ILAW melter facilities at the Hanford WTP. Sent from WTP to the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) for treatment and disposal Treated liquid effluents under the ETF State Wastewater Discharge Permit Solidified liquid effluents under the Dangerous Waste Permit for disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) Solidification Treatment Unit to be added to ETF to provide capacity for WTP secondary liquid wastes 2 Evaporator Condensate Solution Evaporator Pretreatment Melter SBS/ WESP Secondary

129

BETTER BUILDINGS ALLIANCE  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Commercial buildings—our offices, schools, hospitals, restaurants, hotels and stores—consume nearly 20% of all energy used in the United States. We spend more than $200 billion each year to power our country's commercial buildings. Unfortunately, much of this energy and money is wasted; a typical commercial building could save 20% on its energy bills simply by commissioning existing systems so they operate as intended. Energy efficiency is a cost-effective way to save money, support job growth, reduce pollution, and improve competitiveness.

130

Building Design | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Design Design Building Design As a researcher at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Dr. Michael Brambley is working to improve the energy efficiency of our nation’s buildings. In this "10 Questions," learn how he is marrying engineering and computer technology to cut energy waste in commercial buildings. As a researcher at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Dr. Michael Brambley is working to improve the energy efficiency of our nation's buildings. In this "10 Questions," learn how he is marrying engineering and computer technology to cut energy waste in commercial buildings. Commercial buildings have high energy needs and can put great strain on the nation's power grids during peak periods. Developing more efficient

131

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures 1.3 Value of Construction and Research 1.4 Environmental Data 1.5 Generic Fuel Quad and Comparison 1.6 Embodied Energy of Building Assemblies 2The Residential Sector 3Commercial Sector 4Federal Sector 5Envelope and Equipment 6Energy Supply 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables Chapter 1 provides an overview of energy use in the U.S. buildings sector, which includes single- and multi-family residences and commercial buildings. Commercial buildings include offices, stores, restaurants, warehouses, other buildings used for commercial purposes, and government buildings. Section 1.1 presents data on primary energy consumption, as well as energy consumption by end use. Section 1.2 focuses on energy and fuel expenditures in U.S. buildings. Section 1.3 provides estimates of construction spending, R&D, and construction industry employment. Section 1.4 covers emissions from energy use in buildings, construction waste, and other environmental impacts. Section 1.5 discusses key measures used throughout the Data Book, such as a quad, primary versus delivered energy, and carbon emissions. Section 1.6 provides estimates of embodied energy for various commercial building assemblies. The main points from this chapter are summarized below:

132

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research and Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research and Development Research and Development Photo of NREL researcher Jeff Tomberlin working on a data acquisition panel at the Building Efficiency Data Acquisition and Control Laboratory at NREL's Thermal Test Facility. The Building Technology Program funds research that can dramatically improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings. Credit: Dennis Schroeder, NREL PIX 20181 The Building Technologies Office (BTO) invests in technology research and development activities that can dramatically reduce energy consumption and energy waste in buildings. Buildings in the United States use nearly 40 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) of energy for space heating and cooling, lighting, and appliances, an amount equivalent to the annual amount of electricity delivered by more than 3,800 500-megawatt coal-fired power plants. The BTO technology portfolio aims to help reduce building energy requirements by 50% through the use of improved appliances; windows, walls, and roofs; space heating and cooling; lighting; and whole building design strategies.

133

Building Technologies Office: Building America: Bringing Building  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

America: Bringing Building Innovations to Market America: Bringing Building Innovations to Market Building America logo The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program has been a source of innovations in residential building energy performance, durability, quality, affordability, and comfort for more than 15 years. This world-class research program partners with industry (including many of the top U.S. home builders) to bring cutting-edge innovations and resources to market. For example, the Solution Center provides expert building science information for building professionals looking to gain a competitive advantage by delivering high performance homes. At Building America meetings, researchers and industry partners can gather to generate new ideas for improving energy efficiency of homes. And, Building America research teams and DOE national laboratories offer the building industry specialized expertise and new insights from the latest research projects.

134

Residential Buildings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Apartment building exterior and interior Apartment building exterior and interior Residential Buildings EETD's research in residential buildings addresses problems associated with whole-building integration involving modeling, measurement, design, and operation. Areas of research include the movement of air and associated penalties involving distribution of pollutants, energy and fresh air. Contacts Max Sherman MHSherman@lbl.gov (510) 486-4022 Iain Walker ISWalker@lbl.gov (510) 486-4692 Links Residential Building Systems Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Systems Lighting Systems Residential Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations

135

A thermomechanical study of the effects of mold topography on the solidification of Aluminum alloys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A thermomechanical study of the effects of mold topography on the solidification of Aluminum-3801, USA A thermomechanical study of the effects of mold topography on the solidification of Aluminum deformation and heat transfer at the mold/solid-shell interface during the early stages of Aluminum

Zabaras, Nicholas J.

136

Solidification of Aluminum Alloys Edited by TMS (The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society), 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solidification of Aluminum Alloys Edited by TMS (The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society), 2004 Modeling the Effects of Mold Topography on Aluminum Cast Surfaces Lijian Tan1 , Nicholas Zabaras1 1 14853, USA Keywords: Aluminum Solidification; Mold topography; Cast Surfaces Abstract The air

Zabaras, Nicholas J.

137

Around Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Around Buildings W h y startw i t h buildings and w o r k o u t wa r d ? For one, buildings are difficult t o a v o i d these

Treib, Marc

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site- January 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Review of the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building, Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Selected Aspects of Fire Protection System Design

139

Assessment Documents | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building, Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Selected Aspects of Fire Protection System Design January...

140

BUILDING NAME HEYDON-LAURENCE BUILDING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'S BUILDING PHYSICS BUILDING BAXTER'S LODGE INSTITUTE BUILDING CONSERVATION WORKS R.D.WATT BUILDING MACLEAYBUILDING NAME HEYDON-LAURENCE BUILDING PHARMACY AND BANK BUILDING JOHN WOOLEY BUILDING OLD TEARCHER BUILDING THE QUARANGLE BADHAM BUILDING J.D. STEWART BUILDING BLACKBURN BUILDING MADSEN BUILDING STORE

Viglas, Anastasios

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste solidification building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

ENERGY STAR Building Upgrade Manual | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR Building Upgrade Manual ENERGY STAR Building Upgrade Manual Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Learn the benefits Get started Use Portfolio Manager Save energy Stamp out energy waste Find cost-effective investments Engage occupants Purchase energy-saving products Put computers to sleep Get help from an expert Take a comprehensive approach

142

Education Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Education Education Characteristics by Activity... Education Education buildings are buildings used for academic or technical classroom instruction, such as elementary, middle, or high schools, and classroom buildings on college or university campuses. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Education Buildings... Seventy percent of education buildings were part of a multibuilding campus. Education buildings in the South and West were smaller, on average, than those in the Northeast and Midwest. Almost two-thirds of education buildings were government owned, and of these, over three-fourths were owned by a local government. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics

143

Lodging Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

buildings. Since they comprised 7 percent of commercial floorspace, this means that their energy intensity was slightly above average. Lodging buildings were one of the few...

144

Chapter 8: Constructing the Building  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

: : Constructing the Building Developing a Construction Plan Writing Effective Construction Documents Safeguarding Design Goals During Construction Protecting the Site Low-Impact Construction Processes Protecting Indoor Air Quality Managing Construction Waste LANL | Chapter 8 Constructing the Building Developing a Construction Plan A high-performance design is a great achievement, but it doesn't mean much if the building isn't then built as intended. Getting from design to a completed project happens in two stages: 1) development of construction documents and 2) actual construction. To successfully implement a sustainable design, the construction docu- ments must accurately convey the specifics that deter- mine building performance, and they have to set up

145

Stabilization of a mixed waste sludge for land disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A solidification and stabilization technique was developed for a chemically complex mixed waste sludge containing nitrate processing wastes, sewage sludge and electroplating wastewaters, among other wastes. The sludge is originally from a solar evaporation pond and has high concentrations of nitrate salts; cadmium, chromium, and nickel concentrations of concern; and low levels of organic constituents and alpha and beta emitters. Sulfide reduction of nitrate and precipitation of metallic species, followed by evaporation to dryness and solidification of the dry sludge in recycled high density polyethylene with added lime was determined to be a satisfactory preparation for land disposal in a mixed waste repository. The application of post-consumer polyethylene has the added benefit of utilizing another problem-causing waste product. A modified Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure was used to determine required treatment chemical dosages and treatment effectiveness. The waste complexity prohibited use of standard chemical equilibrium methods for prediction of reaction products during treatment. Waste characterization followed by determination of thermodynamic feasibility of oxidation and reduction products. These calculations were shown to be accurate in laboratory testing. 13 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Powers, S.E.; Zander, A.K. [Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

146

Software for fault detection in HVAC systems in commercial buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The building sector of the United States currently consumes over 41% of the United States primary energy supply. Estimates suggest that between 5 and 30% of any building's annual energy consumption is unknowingly wasted ...

Deshmukh, Suhrid Avinash

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Transforming the Commercial Building Operations- 2014 BTO Peer Review  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The overall goal of this project is to train building operations staff and service providers in a systematic process for identifying and correcting no-cost building operational problems that lead to energy waste.

148

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the majority of commercial building energy usages. Electricenergy usage inside the building. Fortunately, a commercialcommercial building energy monitoring are insu?cient in identifying waste or guide improvement because they only provide usage

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

BUILDING INSPECTION Building, Infrastructure, Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sacramento, Ca 95814-5514 Re: Green Building Ordinance and the Building Energy Efficiency Standards Per and lower energy usage was reviewed. This factor is contained in the adopted Green Building Code Section 9 for the May 5, 2010 California Energy Commission business meeting. Thank you. John LaTorra Building Inspection

150

Service Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Service Service Characteristics by Activity... Service Service buildings are those in which some type of service is provided, other than food service or retail sales of goods. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Service Buildings... Most service buildings were small, with almost ninety percent between 1,001 and 10,000 square feet. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics Number of Service Buildings by Predominant Building Size Category Figure showing number of service buildings by size. If you need assistance viewing this page, please contact 202-586-8800. Equipment Table: Buildings, Size, and Age Data by Equipment Types Predominant Heating Equipment Types in Service Buildings

151

Mercantile Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mercantile Mercantile Characteristics by Activity... Mercantile Mercantile buildings are those used for the sale and display of goods other than food (buildings used for the sales of food are classified as food sales). This category includes enclosed malls and strip shopping centers. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Mercantile Buildings... Almost half of all mercantile buildings were less than 5,000 square feet. Roughly two-thirds of mercantile buildings housed only one establishment. Another 20 percent housed between two and five establishments, and the remaining 12 percent housed six or more establishments. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics

152

Other Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Other Other Characteristics by Activity... Other Other buildings are those that do not fit into any of the specifically named categories. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Other Buildings... Other buildings include airplane hangars; laboratories; buildings that are industrial or agricultural with some retail space; buildings having several different commercial activities that, together, comprise 50 percent or more of the floorspace, but whose largest single activity is agricultural, industrial/manufacturing, or residential; and all other miscellaneous buildings that do not fit into any other CBECS category. Since these activities are so diverse, the data are probably less meaningful than for other activities; they are provided here to complete

153

Vitrification of F006 plating waste sludge by Reactive Additive Stabilization Process (RASP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solidification into glass of nickel-on-uranium plating wastewater treatment plant sludge (F006 Mixed Waste) has been demonstrated at the Savannah River She (SRS). Vitrification using high surface area additives, the Reactive Additive Stabilization Process (RASP), greatly enhanced the solubility and retention of heavy metals In glass. The bench-scale tests using RASP achieved 76 wt% waste loading In both soda-lime-silica and borosilicate glasses. The RASP has been Independently verified by a commercial waste management company, and a contract awarded to vitrify the approximately 500,000 gallons of stored waste sludge. The waste volume reduction of 89% will greatly reduce the disposal costs, and delisting of the glass waste is anticipated. This will be the world`s first commercial-scale vitrification system used for environmental cleanup of Mixed Waste. Its stabilization and volume reduction abilities are expected to set standards for the future of the waste management Industry.

Martin, H.L.; Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Directional solidification of the alumina-zirconia ceramic eutectic system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is possible to produce alumina-zirconia ceramic samples through existing solidification techniques. The resulting microstructures typically consist of rods of zirconia in an alumina matrix, although a lamellar structure has been noted in some cases. In nearly all cases, colony growth was present which may possibly result from grain size, repeated nucleation events, and lamellar oscillations. In the same vein, it appears that the amount of impurities within the system might be the underlying cause for the colony growth. Colony growth was diminished through impurity control as the higher purity samples exhibited colony free behavior. In addition to colony formations, faceted alumina dendrites or nonfaceted zirconia dendrites may result in the ceramic if the sample is solidified out of the coupled zone. In all cases, for larger-sized Bridgman samples, a lower limit in the eutectic spacing was noted. The solidification model which includes the kinetic effect has been developed, although the effect appears to be negligible under present experimental conditions. A spacing limit might also occur due to the result of heat flow problems. Heat flow out of the ceramic is difficult to control, often causing radial and not axial growth. This behavior is exaggerated in the presence of impurities. Thus, higher purity powders should always be used. Higher purity samples, in addition to yielding a more microstructurally uniform ceramic, also showed increased directionality. In the future, the kinetic model needs to be examined in more detail, and further research needs to be accomplished in the area of molten ceramics. Once better system constants are in place, the kinetic model will give a better indication of the behavior in the alumina-zirconia system.

Boldt, C.

1994-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

155

Buildings*","Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 8. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Space Heating","Primary Space-Heating Energy Source Used a" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3982,1258,1999,282,63 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,2100,699,955,171,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,782,233,409,58,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,659,211,372,32,"Q" "25,001 to 50,000 .............",241,225,63,140,8,9

156

Buildings*","Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Space Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 6. Space Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Space Heating","Space-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Elec- tricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane","Other a" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3982,1766,2165,360,65,372,113 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,2100,888,1013,196,"Q",243,72 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,782,349,450,86,"Q",72,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,659,311,409,46,18,38,"Q"

157

Buildings*","Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 1. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Water Heating","Water-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Elec- tricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3472,1910,1445,94,27,128 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,1715,1020,617,41,"N",66 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,725,386,307,"Q","Q",27 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,607,301,285,16,"Q",27

158

Sustainable Buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The construction and real estate sectors are in a state of change: ... operated differently, i.e. more sustainably. Sustainable building means to build intelligently: the focus ... comprehensive quality concept t...

Christine Lemaitre

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Building technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After growing up on construction sites, Roderick Jackson is now helping to make buildings nationwide far more energy efficient.

Jackson, Roderick

2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

160

Building technologies  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

After growing up on construction sites, Roderick Jackson is now helping to make buildings nationwide far more energy efficient.

Jackson, Roderick

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste solidification building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Reductive dechlorination of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons by Fe(ii) in degradative solidification/stabilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation examines the applicability of the iron-based degradative solidification/stabilization (DS/S-Fe(II)) to various chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) that are common chemicals of concern at contaminated sites. The research...

Jung, Bahng Mi

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

162

Simulation on deposition and solidification processes of 7075 Al alloy droplets in 3D printing technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In order to study the successive deposition and solidification processes of uniform alloy droplets during the drop-on-demand three dimensional (3D) printing method, based on the volume of fluid (VOF) method, a 3D numerical model was employed. In this model, the 7075 alloy with larger temperature range for phase change was used. The simulation results show that the successive deposition and solidification processes of uniform 7075 alloy droplets can be well characterized by this model. Simulated droplets shapes agree well with SEM images under the same condition. The effects of deposition and solidification of droplets result in vertical and L-shaped ridges on the surface of droplets, and tips of dendrites appear near the overlap of droplets due to rapid solidification.

Hai-peng LI; He-jun LI; Le-hua QI; Jun LUO; Han-song ZUO

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Terrestrial magma ocean solidification and formation of a candidate D" layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis we investigate the solidification of early magma oceans on the Earth and the formation of a deep dense layer at the core-mantle boundary. We also study the concentrations and densities of the last layers of ...

Springmann, Alessondra

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Special government etalon of the brightness energy unit at the temperature of tin solidification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The special government etalon of the brightness energy unit at the tin solidification temperature, created in VNIIM, assures the reproduction of the unit and transmission of its dimension in conformity ... scheme...

V. V. Babushkin; I. V. Libova

1974-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

An innovative stabilization/solidification treatment For contaminated soil remediation: demonstration project results  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An innovative stabilization/solidification (S/S) process using high-performance additivated concrete technology was developed for remediating soil contaminated by metals from abandoned industrial sites. In ord...

Petra Scanferla; Giorgio Ferrari; Roberto Pellay…

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Design/installation and structural integrity assessment of Bethel Valley low-level waste collection and transfer system upgrade for Building 3092 (Central Off-Gas Scrubber Facility) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes and assesses planned modifications to be made to the Building 3092 Central Off-Gas Scrubber Facility of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The modifications are made in responsible to the requirements of 40CFR264 Subpart J, relating to environmental protection requirements for buried tank systems. The modifications include the provision of a new scrubber recirculation tank in a new, below ground, lines concrete vault, replacing and existing recirculation sump that does not provide double containment. A new buried, double contained pipeline is provided to permit discharge of spent scrubber recirculation fluid to the Central Waste Collection Header. The new vault, tank, and discharge line are provided with leak detection and provisions to remove accumulated liquid. New scrubber recirculation pumps, piping, and accessories are also provided. This assessment concludes that the planned modifications comply with applicable requirements of 40CFR264 Subpart J, as set forth in Appendix F to the Federal Facility Agreement, Docket No. 89-04-FF, covering the Oak Ridge Reservation.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

The necessity for permanence : making a nuclear waste storage facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The United States Department of Energy is proposing to build a nuclear waste storage facility in southern Nevada. This facility will be designed to last 10,000 years. It must prevent the waste from contaminating the ...

Stupay, Robert Irving

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Waste Treatment Plant Overview  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, was the largest of three defense production sites in the U.S. Over the span of 40 years, it was used to produce 64 metric tons of plutonium, helping end World War II and playing a major role in military defense efforts during the Cold War. As a result, 56 million gallons of radioactive and chemical wastes are now stored in 177 underground tanks on the Hanford Site. To address this challenge, the U.S. Department of Energy contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the "Vit Plant," will use vitrification to immobilize most of Hanford's dangerous tank waste.

169

Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Residential Building Residential Building Activities to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Challenge Home Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals

170

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Search Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Search Search Help Better Buildings Neighborhood Program HOME ABOUT BETTER BUILDINGS PARTNERS INNOVATIONS RUN A PROGRAM TOOLS & RESOURCES NEWS EERE » Building Technologies Office » Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program on Delicious

171

Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Building Energy Codes Building Energy Codes Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on AddThis.com... Popular Links Success Stories Previous Next Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Warming Up to Pump Heat.

172

Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Building America Building America Meetings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance Solution Center Partnerships Meetings Publications Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR

173

Building America Building Science Education Roadmap | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Building Science Education Roadmap Building America Building Science Education Roadmap This roadmap outlines steps that U.S. Department of Energy Building America program must take...

174

Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Building Energy Building Energy Optimization Software to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance

175

Buildings Blog  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

blog Office of Energy Efficiency & blog Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 en EnergyPlus Boosts Building Efficiency with Help from Autodesk http://energy.gov/eere/articles/energyplus-boosts-building-efficiency-help-autodesk building-efficiency-help-autodesk" class="title-link">EnergyPlus Boosts Building Efficiency with Help from Autodesk

176

Building Science  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Science Science The "Enclosure" Joseph Lstiburek, Ph.D., P.Eng, ASHRAE Fellow www.buildingscience.com * Control heat flow * Control airflow * Control water vapor flow * Control rain * Control ground water * Control light and solar radiation * Control noise and vibrations * Control contaminants, environmental hazards and odors * Control insects, rodents and vermin * Control fire * Provide strength and rigidity * Be durable * Be aesthetically pleasing * Be economical Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 2 Water Control Layer Air Control Layer Vapor Control Layer Thermal Control Layer Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 3 Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 4 Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 5 Building Science Corporation

177

Building Name BuildingAbbr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Capture/InstrCam ClassroomCapture/TechAsst SkypeWebcam NOTES for R&R Only Room Detail Building Times Weekend and Evening BldgBuilding Name BuildingAbbr RoomNumber SeatCount DepartmentalPriority SpecialNeedsSeating Special Detail Building Contacts Event Scheduling Detail BI 02010 104 NR Y 52 61 81 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 94

Parker, Matthew D. Brown

178

Nuclear Waste: Knowledge Waste?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...4). Although disposal of HLW remains...for long-term disposal is through deep...successful waste-disposal program has eluded...geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Authorized...Administration withdrew funding for Yucca Mountain...

Eugene A. Rosa; Seth P. Tuler; Baruch Fischhoff; Thomas Webler; Sharon M. Friedman; Richard E. Sclove; Kristin Shrader-Frechette; Mary R. English; Roger E. Kasperson; Robert L. Goble; Thomas M. Leschine; William Freudenburg; Caron Chess; Charles Perrow; Kai Erikson; James F. Short

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

179

Residential Buildings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Exterior and interior of apartment building Exterior and interior of apartment building Residential Buildings The study of ventilation in residential buildings is aimed at understanding the role that air leakage, infiltration, mechanical ventilation, natural ventilation and building use have on providing acceptable indoor air quality so that energy and related costs can be minimized without negatively impacting indoor air quality. Risks to human health and safety caused by inappropriate changes to ventilation and air tightness can be a major barrier to achieving high performance buildings and must be considered.This research area focuses primarily on residential and other small buildings where the interaction of the envelope is important and energy costs are dominated by space conditioning energy rather than air

180

Modeling Building Thermal Response to HVAC Zoning Virginia Smith  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Building Thermal Response to HVAC Zoning Virginia Smith Department of Computer Science HVAC systems account for 38% of building energy usage. Studies have indicated at least 5-15% waste due to unoccu- pied spaces being conditioned. Our goal is to minimize this waste by retrofitting HVAC systems

Whitehouse, Kamin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste solidification building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Healthy Zero Energy Buildings ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, energy consumption from building ventilation could be one of the limiting factors in achieving energy quality or, conversely, overventilation, which wastes energy. To develop the healthbased ventilationHealthy Zero Energy Buildings ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH PIER Environmental Research www.energy

182

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Commercial Reference Commercial Reference Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Buildings Performance Database Data Centers Energy Asset Score

183

Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Buildings to Grid Buildings to Grid Integration to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research Space Heating & Cooling Research Water Heating Research Lighting Research

184

Chemically bonded phosphate ceramics for low-level mixed waste stabilization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Novel chemically bonded phosphate ceramics (CBPCs) are being developed and fabricated for low-temperature stabilization and solidification of mixed waste streams which are amenable to conventional high-temperature stabilization processes due to presence of volatiles such as heavy metal chloride and fluorides and/or pyrophorics in the wastes. Phosphates of Mg, Mg-Na and Zr are being developed as candidate matrix materials. In this paper, we present the fabrication procedures of phosphate waste forms using surrogates compositions of three typical mixed wastes streams -- ash, cement sludges, and salts. The performance of the final waste forms such as compression strength, leachability of the contaminants, durability in aqueous environment were conducted. In addition, parameteric studies have been conducted to establish the optimal waste loading in a particular binder system. Based on the results, we present potential applications in the treatment of various mixed waste streams.

Singh, D.; Wagh, A.S.; Cunnane, J.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Mayberry, J.L. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

WIPP WASTE MINIMIZATION PROGRAM DESCRIPTION  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carlsbad, New Mexico 8822 Carlsbad, New Mexico 8822 1 NOV 2 3 2011 Mr. John Kieling , Acting Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environme nt Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Waste Minimization Report Dear Mr. Kieling: This letter provides the submittal of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Waste Minimization Report. This report is required by and has bee n prepared in accordance with the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Perm it Part 2, Permit Condition 2.4. We certify under penalty of law that this document and all enclosures were prepared under our direction or supervision according to a system designed to assure that qualified personnel properly gather and evaluate the information submitted

186

Buildings Database  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Buildings Database Welcome Guest Log In | Register | Contact Us Home About All Projects...

187

Office Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Since they comprised 18 percent of commercial floorspace, this means that their total energy intensity was just slightly above average. Office buildings predominantly used...

188

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Better Better Buildings Partners to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on AddThis.com... Better Buildings Residential Network Progress Stories Interviews Videos Events Quick Links to Partner Information AL | AZ | CA | CO | CT FL | GA | IL | IN | LA ME | MD | MA | MI | MO NE | NV | NH | NJ | NY

189

Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

National Laboratories National Laboratories Supporting Building America to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building America on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building America on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building America on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building America on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building America on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building America on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America

190

Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Integrated Building Integrated Building Management System Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System Research Project on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE

191

Farm Buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... is intended to guide the American farmer and agricultural student in designing and constructing farm buildings. It is stated that farm ... . It is stated that farm buildings have had their most rapid development in America in the years since 1910. Prior ...

1923-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

192

Portable sensor for hazardous waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objective was to develop a field-portable monitor for sensitive hazardous waste detection using active nitrogen energy transfer (ANET) excitation of atomic and molecular fluorescence (active nitrogen is made in a dielectric-barrier discharge in nitrogen). It should provide rapid field screening of hazardous waste sites to map areas of greatest contamination. Results indicate that ANET is very sensitive for monitoring heavy metals (Hg, Se) and hydrocarbons; furthermore, chlorinated hydrocarbons can be distinguished from nonchlorinated ones. Sensitivity is at ppB levels for sampling in air. ANET appears ideal for on-line monitoring of toxic heavy metal levels at building sites, hazardous waste land fills, in combustor flues, and of chlorinated hydrocarbon levels at building sites and hazardous waste dumps.

Piper, L.G.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

193

Residential Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Residential Residential Buildings Residential buildings-such as single family homes, townhomes, condominiums, and apartment buildings-are all covered by the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). See the RECS home page for further information. However, buildings that offer multiple accomodations such as hotels, motels, inns, dormitories, fraternities, sororities, convents, monasteries, and nursing homes, residential care facilities are considered commercial buildings and are categorized in the CBECS as lodging. Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels joelle.michaels@eia.doe.gov CBECS Manager Release date: January 21, 2003 Page last modified: May 5, 2009 10:18 AM http://www.eia.gov/consumption/commercial/data/archive/cbecs/pba99/residential.html

194

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Better Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on AddThis.com...

195

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Commercial Building Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial

196

Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

About Residential About Residential Building Programs to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Residential Links Success Stories Previous Next Warming Up to Pump Heat.

197

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization |...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Summary Notes from 28 May 2008 Generic Technical Issue...

198

Nuclear Waste: Knowledge Waste?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...06520, USA. Nuclear power is re-emerging...proclaiming a “nuclear renaissance...example, plant safety...liabilities, terrorism at plants and in transport...high-level nuclear wastes (HLW...factor in risk perceptions...supporting nuclear power in the abstract...

Eugene A. Rosa; Seth P. Tuler; Baruch Fischhoff; Thomas Webler; Sharon M. Friedman; Richard E. Sclove; Kristin Shrader-Frechette; Mary R. English; Roger E. Kasperson; Robert L. Goble; Thomas M. Leschine; William Freudenburg; Caron Chess; Charles Perrow; Kai Erikson; James F. Short

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

199

The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF) will provide permanent Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage, treatment, and disposal for hazardous and mixed waste generated at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) that cannot be disposed of in existing or planned SRS facilities. Final design is complete for Phase I of the project, the Disposal Vaults. The Vaults will provide RCRA permitted, above-grade disposal capacity for treated hazardous and mixed waste generated at the SRS. The RCRA Part B Permit application was submitted upon approval of the Permit application, the first Disposal Vault is scheduled to be operational in mid 1994. The technical baseline has been established for Phase II, the Treatment Building, and preliminary design work has been performed. The Treatment Building will provide RCRA permitted treatment processes to handle a variety of hazardous and mixed waste generated at SRS in preparation for disposal. The processes will treat wastes for disposal in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). A RCRA Part B Permit application has not yet been submitted to SCDHEC for this phase of the project. The Treatment Building is currently scheduled to be operational in late 1996.

Bailey, L.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF) will provide permanent Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage, treatment, and disposal for hazardous and mixed waste generated at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) that cannot be disposed of in existing or planned SRS facilities. Final design is complete for Phase I of the project, the Disposal Vaults. The Vaults will provide RCRA permitted, above-grade disposal capacity for treated hazardous and mixed waste generated at the SRS. The RCRA Part B Permit application was submitted upon approval of the Permit application, the first Disposal Vault is scheduled to be operational in mid 1994. The technical baseline has been established for Phase II, the Treatment Building, and preliminary design work has been performed. The Treatment Building will provide RCRA permitted treatment processes to handle a variety of hazardous and mixed waste generated at SRS in preparation for disposal. The processes will treat wastes for disposal in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). A RCRA Part B Permit application has not yet been submitted to SCDHEC for this phase of the project. The Treatment Building is currently scheduled to be operational in late 1996.

Bailey, L.L.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste solidification building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

China's Scientific Investigation for Liquid Waste Treatment Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Post World War II created the nuclear age with several countries developing nuclear technology for power, defense, space and medical applications. China began its nuclear research and development programs in 1950 with the establishment of the China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) located near Beijing. CIAE has been China's leader in nuclear science and technical development with its efforts to create advanced reactor technology and upgrade reprocessing technology. In addition, with China's new emphasis on environmental safety, CIAE is focusing on waste treatment options and new technologies that may provide solutions to legacy waste and newly generated waste from the full nuclear cycle. Radioactive liquid waste can pose significant challenges for clean up with various treatment options including encapsulation (cement), vitrification, solidification and incineration. Most, if not all, nuclear nations have found the treatment of liquids to be difficult, due in large part to the high economic costs associated with treatment and disposal and the failure of some methods to safely contain or eliminate the liquid. With new environmental regulations in place, Chinese nuclear institutes and waste generators are beginning to seek new technologies that can be used to treat the more complex liquid waste streams in a form that is safe for transport and for long-term storage or final disposal. [1] In 2004, CIAE and Pacific Nuclear Solutions, a division of Pacific World Trade, USA, began discussions about absorbent technology and applications for its use. Preliminary tests were conducted at CIAE's Department of Radiochemistry using generic solutions, such as lubricating oil, with absorbent polymers for solidification. Based on further discussions between both parties, it was decided to proceed with a more formal test program in April, 2005, and additional tests in October, 2005. The overall objective of the test program was to apply absorbent polymers to various waste streams to determine leach rates, stability (immobilization), effective bonding ratios, compression capability, waste minimization and effects of irradiation on the solidified samples. (authors)

Liangjin, B.; Meiqiong, L. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275(87), Beijing, 102413 (China); Kelley, D. [Pacific Nuclear Solutions, 450 East 96th Street, Suite 335, Indianapolis, Indiana 46240 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Secondary waste form testing : ceramicrete phosphate bonded ceramics.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cleanup activities of the Hanford tank wastes require stabilization and solidification of the secondary waste streams generated from the processing of the tank wastes. The treatment of these tank wastes to produce glass waste forms will generate secondary wastes, including routine solid wastes and liquid process effluents. Liquid wastes may include process condensates and scrubber/off-gas treatment liquids from the thermal waste treatment. The current baseline for solidification of the secondary wastes is a cement-based waste form. However, alternative secondary waste forms are being considered. In this regard, Ceramicrete technology, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, is being explored as an option to solidify and stabilize the secondary wastes. The Ceramicrete process has been demonstrated on four secondary waste formulations: baseline, cluster 1, cluster 2, and mixed waste streams. Based on the recipes provided by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the four waste simulants were prepared in-house. Waste forms were fabricated with three filler materials: Class C fly ash, CaSiO{sub 3}, and Class C fly ash + slag. Optimum waste loadings were as high as 20 wt.% for the fly ash and CaSiO{sub 3}, and 15 wt.% for fly ash + slag filler. Waste forms for physical characterizations were fabricated with no additives, hazardous contaminants, and radionuclide surrogates. Physical property characterizations (density, compressive strength, and 90-day water immersion test) showed that the waste forms were stable and durable. Compressive strengths were >2,500 psi, and the strengths remained high after the 90-day water immersion test. Fly ash and CaSiO{sub 3} filler waste forms appeared to be superior to the waste forms with fly ash + slag as a filler. Waste form weight loss was {approx}5-14 wt.% over the 90-day immersion test. The majority of the weight loss occurred during the initial phase of the immersion test, indicative of washing off of residual unreacted binder components from the waste form surface. Waste forms for ANS 16.1 leach testing contained appropriate amounts of rhenium and iodine as radionuclide surrogates, along with the additives silver-loaded zeolite and tin chloride. The leachability index for Re was found to range from 7.9 to 9.0 for all the samples evaluated. Iodine was below detection limit (5 ppb) for all the leachate samples. Further, leaching of sodium was low, as indicated by the leachability index ranging from 7.6-10.4, indicative of chemical binding of the various chemical species. Target leachability indices for Re, I, and Na were 9, 11, and 6, respectively. Degradation was observed in some of the samples post 90-day ANS 16.1 tests. Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) results showed that all the hazardous contaminants were contained in the waste, and the hazardous metal concentrations were below the Universal Treatment Standard limits. Preliminary scale-up (2-gal waste forms) was conducted to demonstrate the scalability of the Ceramicrete process. Use of minimal amounts of boric acid as a set retarder was used to control the working time for the slurry. Flexibility in treating waste streams with wide ranging compositional make-ups and ease of process scale-up are attractive attributes of Ceramicrete technology.

Singh, D.; Ganga, R.; Gaviria, J.; Yusufoglu, Y. (Nuclear Engineering Division); ( ES)

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

203

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waste (i.e, mixture of biohazardous and chemical or radioactive waste), call Environment, Health2/2009 Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 200 West Arbor Dr. San Diego, CA 92103 (619

Tsien, Roger Y.

204

Westinghouse Cementation Facility of Solid Waste Treatment System - 13503  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During NPP operation, several waste streams are generated, caused by different technical and physical processes. Besides others, liquid waste represents one of the major types of waste. Depending on national regulation for storage and disposal of radioactive waste, solidification can be one specific requirement. To accommodate the global request for waste treatment systems Westinghouse developed several specific treatment processes for the different types of waste. In the period of 2006 to 2008 Westinghouse awarded several contracts for the design and delivery of waste treatment systems related to the latest CPR-1000 nuclear power plants. One of these contracts contains the delivery of four Cementation Facilities for waste treatment, s.c. 'Follow on Cementations' dedicated to three locations, HongYanHe, NingDe and YangJiang, of new CPR-1000 nuclear power stations in the People's Republic of China. Previously, Westinghouse delivered a similar cementation facility to the CPR-1000 plant LingAo II, in Daya Bay, PR China. This plant already passed the hot functioning tests successfully in June 2012 and is now ready and released for regular operation. The 'Follow on plants' are designed to package three 'typical' kind of radioactive waste: evaporator concentrates, spent resins and filter cartridges. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview on the Westinghouse experience to design and execution of cementation facilities. (authors)

Jacobs, Torsten; Aign, Joerg [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Global Waste Management, Tarpenring 6, D- 22419 Hamburg (Germany)] [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Global Waste Management, Tarpenring 6, D- 22419 Hamburg (Germany)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Building America Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting: July 2010 Building America Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting: July 2010 On this page, you may link to the summary...

206

Building Energy Optimization Analysis Method (BEopt) - Building...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Energy Optimization Analysis Method (BEopt) - Building America Top Innovation Building Energy Optimization Analysis Method (BEopt) - Building America Top Innovation House graphic...

207

Building America Building Science Education Roadmap  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Building America Building America Building Science Education Roadmap April 2013 Contents Introduction ................................................................................................................................ 3 Background ................................................................................................................................. 4 Summit Participants .................................................................................................................... 5 Key Results .................................................................................................................................. 6 Problem ...................................................................................................................................... 7

208

Industrial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Industrial Industrial / Manufacturing Buildings Industrial/manufacturing buildings are not considered commercial, but are covered by the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). See the MECS home page for further information. Commercial buildings found on a manufacturing industrial complex, such as an office building for a manufacturer, are not considered to be commercial if they have the same owner and operator as the industrial complex. However, they would be counted in the CBECS if they were owned and operated independently of the manufacturing industrial complex. Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels joelle.michaels@eia.doe.gov CBECS Manager Release date: January 21, 2003 Page last modified: May 5, 2009 10:18 AM http://www.eia.gov/consumption/commercial/data/archive/cbecs/pba99/industrial.html

209

Green Buildings Project Terms of Reference Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The advancement of green building practices was identified at the Regional District of Nanaimo Saturday, April 3, 2004 Sustainability Workshop 1 as one of the possible ways of making the region a more sustainable place to live. What is a Green Building? Green buildings are buildings that require less energy to operate, contribute fewer emissions to the environment, conserve water, generate less solid waste, and provide more comfortable and productive environments for their inhabitants. The definition of what is a green building is somewhat subjective, but different rating systems have been developed and are becoming more common in their use to assess a building’s greenness. Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) appears to be the most well-known and widely used system to rate the greenness of buildings. It is a voluntary, consensus based self-assessment tool that has been embraced nationally and internationally as ‘the green building design standard 2 ’. LEED establishes a system in which a specified number of points are assigned according to the particular attributes of the building in five performance areas: the sustainability of the building site, water efficiency, energy and atmosphere, materials and resources, and indoor environmental quality. Depending upon the number of points accumulated, and hence the sustainability of the building, buildings are classified as LEED Certified, Silver, Gold or Platinum.

unknown authors

210

Better Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Challenge National leadership Initiative Better Information MOU with the Appraisal Foundation Better Tax Incentives/Credits New :179d eligibility and tool; Announced in March Better Financing With Small Business...: engaging in ESCO financing with low interest bonds) ?Tenant/Employee behaviors at odds with efficiency goals ?Split incentives ?Not enough/qualified workforce Better Buildings strategies to overcome barriers and drive action 4 Better Buildings...

Neukomm, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Phase-field Models for Solidification and Solid/Liquid Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHASE-FIELD MODELS FOR SOLIDIFICATION AND SOLID/LIQUID INTERACTIONS A Dissertation by MIN SOO PARK Submitted to the O?ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful?llment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY... December 2009 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering PHASE-FIELD MODELS FOR SOLIDIFICATION AND SOLID/LIQUID INTERACTIONS A Dissertation by MIN SOO PARK Submitted to the O?ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful...

Park, Min Soo

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

212

Nuclear Waste Repository Plan Approved by Senate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bill calls for selection of permanent repository site by 1989, building of a retrievable waste facility, cash payments states with storage sites ... After considerable debate, the Senate has approved a plan aimed at getting the federal government's effort to find a long-term storage site for spent nuclear fuel and highlevel nuclear wastes off dead center and out of the political crossfire. ...

JANICE LONG

1987-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

213

Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Warehouse  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

214

Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Supermarket  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

215

Energy Department Recognizes Landlords, Tenants Working Together to Save Energy in Commercial Buildings  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Energy Department today honored 14 organizations, naming them as 2014 Green Lease Leaders for their commitment to reducing energy waste and increasing efficiency in commercial buildings.

216

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Existing solutions in commercial building energy monitoring are insufficient in identifying energy waste or for guiding improvement. This is because they only provide usage statistics… (more)

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Process development for remote-handled mixed-waste treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is developing a treatment process for remote-handled (RH) liquid transuranic mixed waste governed by the concept of minimizing the volume of waste requiring disposal. This task is to be accomplished by decontaminating the bulk components so the process effluent can be disposed with less risk and expense. Practical processes have been demonstrated on the laboratory scale for removing cesium 137 and strontium 90 isotopes from the waste, generating a concentrated waste volume, and rendering the bulk of the waste nearly radiation free for downstream processing. The process is projected to give decontamination factors of 10{sup 4} for cesium and 10{sup 3} for strontium. Because of the extent of decontamination, downstream processing will be contact handled. The transuranic, radioactive fraction of the mixed waste stream will be solidified using a thin-film evaporator and/or microwave solidification system. Resultant solidified waste will be disposed at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). 8 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Berry, J.B.; Campbell, D.O.; Lee, D.D.; White, T.L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

System to control contamination during retrieval of buried TRU waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system to control contamination during the retrieval of hazardous waste comprising an outer containment building, an inner containment building, within the outer containment building, an electrostatic radioactive particle recovery unit connected to and in communication with the inner and outer containment buildings, and a contaminate suppression system including a moisture control subsystem, and a rapid monitoring system having the ability to monitor conditions in the inner and outer containment buildings.

Menkhaus, Daniel E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Loomis, Guy G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mullen, Carlan K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Scott, Donald W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Feldman, Edgar M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Meyer, Leroy C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Energy Department's New Buildings Solution Center Shares Proven Strategies for Energy Efficiency Programs  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Energy Department today released a new resource, the Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center, to share proven methods for reducing energy waste and carbon emissions in U.S. buildings.

220

Residential Buildings Integration Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Residential Buildings Integration Program Presentation for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste solidification building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Building Scale DC Microgrids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building TechnologiesEfficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies

Marnay, Chris

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Commercial Buildings Consortium  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Commercial Buildings Integration Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

223

Energy Efficient Buildings Hub  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Energy Efficient Buildings HUB Lunch Presentation for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

224

Study on the melting and solidification in a glass block containing a phase change material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Study on the melting and solidification in a glass block containing a phase change material.virgone@insa-lyon.fr and kevy.johannes@insa-lyon.fr Abstract This paper presents an experimental analysis of a phase change the phenomenon of phase change in an enclosure, focusing the research on the role of natural convection in liquid

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

225

Solidification of polycrystalline silicon ingots : simulation and characterization of the microstructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.90 1. Introduction. The most important development in silicon solar cells is due to the substitution solidification of poly- crystalline silicon (POLYX). The capacity of the initial furnace was about 1 kg and today the silicon in a graphite crucible using induction heating furnace. The crucible is well insulated to reduce

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

226

Waste Acceptance Testing of Secondary Waste Forms: Cast Stone, Ceramicrete and DuraLith  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To support the selection of a waste form for the liquid secondary wastes from WTP, Washington River Protection Solutions has initiated secondary-waste-form testing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In anticipation of a down-selection process for a waste form for the Solidification Treatment Unit to be added to the ETF, PNNL is conducting tests on four candidate waste forms to evaluate their ability to meet potential waste acceptance criteria for immobilized secondary wastes that would be placed in the IDF. All three waste forms demonstrated compressive strengths above the minimum 3.45 MPa (500 psi) set as a target for cement-based waste forms. Further, none of the waste forms showed any significant degradation in compressive strength after undergoing thermal cycling (30 cycles in a 10 day period) between -40 C and 60 C or water immersion for 90 days. The three leach test methods are intended to measure the diffusion rates of contaminants from the waste forms. Results are reported in terms of diffusion coefficients and a leachability index (LI) calculated based on the diffusion coefficients. A smaller diffusion coefficient and a larger LI are desired. The NRC, in its Waste Form Technical Position (NRC 1991), provides recommendations and guidance regarding methods to demonstrate waste stability for land disposal of radioactive waste. Included is a recommendation to conduct leach tests using the ANS 16.1 method. The resulting leachability index (LI) should be greater than 6.0. For Hanford secondary wastes, the LI > 6.0 criterion applies to sodium leached from the waste form. For technetium and iodine, higher targets of LI > 9 for Tc and LI > 11 for iodine have been set based on early waste-disposal risk and performance assessment analyses. The results of these three leach tests conducted for a total time between 11days (ASTM C1308) to 90 days (ANS 16.1) showed: (1) Technetium diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that all the waste forms had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium; (2) Rhenium diffusivity: Cast Stone 2M specimens, when tested using EPA 1315 protocol, had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium based on rhenium as a surrogate for technetium. All other waste forms tested by ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 test methods had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 9 for Tc based on rhenium release. These studies indicated that use of Re(VII) as a surrogate for 99Tc(VII) in low temperature secondary waste forms containing reductants will provide overestimated diffusivity values for 99Tc. Therefore, it is not appropriate to use Re as a surrogate 99Tc in future low temperature waste form studies. (3) Iodine diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that the three waste forms had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 11 for iodine. Therefore, it may be necessary to use a more effective sequestering material than silver zeolite used in two of the waste forms (Ceramicrete and DuraLith); (4) Sodium diffusivity: All the waste form specimens tested by the three leach methods (ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315) exceeded the target LI value of 6; (5) All three leach methods (ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308 and EPA 1315) provided similar 99Tc diffusivity values for both short-time transient diffusivity effects as well as long-term ({approx}90 days) steady diffusivity from each of the three tested waste forms (Cast Stone 2M, Ceramicrete and DuraLith). Therefore, any one of the three methods can be used to determine the contaminant diffusivities from a selected waste form.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Lindberg, Michael J.; Parker, Kent E.

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

227

Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Tools  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tools to someone by E-mail Tools to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Tools on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Tools on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Tools on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Tools on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Tools on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Tools on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance Solution Center Partnerships Meetings Publications Home Energy Score

228

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to someone by E-mail to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Buildings Performance Database Data Centers Energy Asset Score Energy Modeling Software Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership

229

Hidden buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... to charge to research grants a portion of the costs of constructing and financing new buildings. What this means is that institutions confident that their researchers would be well supported ... that institutions confident that their researchers would be well supported have

1991-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

230

Hanford Waste Transfer Planning and Control - 13465  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford tank waste cleanup requires efficient use of double-shell tank space to support single-shell tank retrievals and future waste feed delivery to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Every waste transfer, including single-shell tank retrievals and evaporator campaign, is evaluated via the Waste Transfer Compatibility Program for compliance with safety basis, environmental compliance, operational limits and controls to enhance future waste treatment. Mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes are stored at the Hanford Site on an interim basis until they can be treated, as necessary, for final disposal. Implementation of the Tank Farms Waste Transfer Compatibility Program helps to ensure continued safe and prudent storage and handling of these wastes within the Tank Farms Facility. The Tank Farms Waste Transfer Compatibility Program is a Safety Management Program that is a formal process for evaluating waste transfers and chemical additions through the preparation of documented Waste Compatibility Assessments (WCA). The primary purpose of the program is to ensure that sufficient controls are in place to prevent the formation of incompatible mixtures as the result of waste transfer operations. The program defines a consistent means of evaluating compliance with certain administrative controls, safety, operational, regulatory, and programmatic criteria and specifies considerations necessary to assess waste transfers and chemical additions. Current operations are most limited by staying within compliance with the safety basis controls to prevent flammable gas build up in the tank headspace. The depth of solids, the depth of supernatant, the total waste depth and the waste temperature are monitored and controlled to stay within the Compatibility Program rules. Also, transfer planning includes a preliminary evaluation against the Compatibility Program to assure that operating plans will comply with the Waste Transfer Compatibility Program. (authors)

Kirch, N.W.; Uytioco, E.M.; Jo, J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, Washington (United States)] [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, Washington (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Building Technologies FY'14 Budget At-a-Glance  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Printed with a renewable source ink on paper containing at least 50% wastepaper, including 10% post consumer waste Printed with a renewable source ink on paper containing at least 50% wastepaper, including 10% post consumer waste BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES FY14 BUDGET AT-A-GLANCE Building Technologies leads EERE's RDD&D effort to improve the efficiency of our homes and buildings and save consumers billion on their energy bills. Buildings account for 40 percent of U.S. energy use and greenhouse gas pollution. Building Technologies supports the development and deployment of technologies and systems that can reduce building energy use by 50 percent by 2030. What We Do Building Technologies uses an integrated, three-pronged approach to deliver energy and consumer cost savings:  Research and Development that invests in innovative technologies and techniques that enable energy-

232

Office Buildings - Types of Office Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PDF Office Buildings PDF Office Buildings Types of Office Buildings | Energy Consumption | End-Use Equipment Although no one building type dominates the commercial buildings sector, office buildings are the most common and account for more than 800,000 buildings or 17 percent of total commercial buildings. Offices comprised more than 12 billion square feet of floorspace, 17 percent of total commercial floorspace, the most of any building type. Types of Office Buildings The 2003 CBECS Detailed Tables present data for office buildings along with other principal building activities (see Detailed Tables B13 and B14, for example). Since office buildings comprise a wide range of office-related activities, survey respondents were presented with a follow-up list of specific office types to choose from. Although we have not presented the

233

Building Technologies Program: Building America Publications  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Program Program HOME ABOUT ENERGY EFFICIENT TECHNOLOGIES RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY CODES EERE » Building Technologies Program » Residential Buildings About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance Solution Center Partnerships Meetings Publications Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Challenge Home Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Feature featured product thumbnail Building America Best Practices Series Volume 14 - HVAC: A Guide for Contractors to Share with Homeowners Details Bookmark &

234

NREL: Buildings Research - Events  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Events Events Below are upcoming events related to buildings research. January 2014 Sustainable NREL Walking Campus Tour January 17, 2014, 9:00 - 10:30 Golden, CO Contact: Sarah Barba 303-275-3023 NREL exemplifies environmental sustainability throughout its operations. Visitors learn about renewable energy and energy efficiency research as well as see for themselves how the campus is demonstrating clean energy technologies, reducing waste, and eliminating atmospheric pollution. The Sustainable NREL Walking Campus Tour is a vigorous, outdoor walking tour, so visitors are urged to wear comfortable walking shoes and to dress for the weather. The tours start at the NREL Education Center and include the Research Support Facility, NREL Parking Garage, and Central Detention Pond.

235

Optimization of Waste Disposal - 13338  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From 2009 through 2011, remediation of areas of a former fuel cycle facility used for government contract work was conducted. Remediation efforts were focused on building demolition, underground pipeline removal, contaminated soil removal and removal of contaminated sediments from portions of an on-site stream. Prior to conducting the remediation field effort, planning and preparation for remediation (including strategic planning for waste characterization and disposal) was conducted during the design phase. During the remediation field effort, waste characterization and disposal practices were continuously reviewed and refined to optimize waste disposal practices. This paper discusses strategic planning for waste characterization and disposal that was employed in the design phase, and continuously reviewed and refined to optimize efficiency. (authors)

Shephard, E.; Walter, N.; Downey, H. [AMEC E and I, Inc., 511 Congress Street, Suite 200, Portland, ME 04101 (United States)] [AMEC E and I, Inc., 511 Congress Street, Suite 200, Portland, ME 04101 (United States); Collopy, P. [AMEC E and I, Inc., 9210 Sky Park Court, Suite 200, San Diego, CA 92123 (United States)] [AMEC E and I, Inc., 9210 Sky Park Court, Suite 200, San Diego, CA 92123 (United States); Conant, J. [ABB Inc., 5 Waterside Crossing, Windsor, CT 06095 (United States)] [ABB Inc., 5 Waterside Crossing, Windsor, CT 06095 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Building Performance Simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of  Three  Building  Energy  Modeling  Programs: and D.  Zhu.  Building energy modeling programs comparison: Comparison  of  building  energy  modeling  programs:  HVAC 

Hong, Tianzhen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings Characteristics 1992 Buildings Characteristics Overview Full Report Tables National and Census region estimates of the number of commercial buildings in the U.S. and...

238

Building Performance Simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technologies, integrated design, building operation andperformance,  integrated  building design and operation, Integrated  Design  and  Operation  for  Very  Low  Energy  Buildings

Hong, Tianzhen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Building Energy Modeling  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Building energy simulation—physics-based calculation of building energy consumption—is a multi-use tool for building energy efficiency.

240

Building Performance Simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Y (2008). DeST—An integrated building simulation toolkit,Part ? : Fundamentals. Building Simulation, 1: 95 ? 110.Y (2008). DeST—An integrated building simulation toolkit,

Hong, Tianzhen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste solidification building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Study on Solidification Characteristics of Phase Change Material in Rectangular Capsule for Cold Thermal Energy Storage System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a solidification process model of phase change materials in a flat rectangular capsule for cold ... transfer in the flat rectangular capsule filled with phase change material (PCM) is consider...

Guiyin Fang; Fan Yang; Man Zhang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

309 Building transition plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The preparation for decontamination and decommissioning (transition) of the 309 Building is projected to be completed by the end of the fiscal year (FY) 1998. The major stabilization and decontamination efforts include the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR), fuel storage and transfer pits, Transfer Waste (TW) tanks and the Ion Exchange Vaults. In addition to stabilizing contaminated areas, equipment, components, records, waste products, etc., will be dispositioned. All nonessential systems, i.e., heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC), electrical, monitoring, fluids, etc., will be shut down and drained/de-energized. This will allow securing of the process, laboratory, and office areas of the facility. After that, the facility will be operated at a level commensurate with its surveillance needs while awaiting D&D. The implementation costs for FY 1995 through FY 1998 for the transition activities are estimated to be $1,070K, $2,115K, $2,939K, and $4,762K, respectively. Costs include an assumed company overhead of 20% and a 30% out year contingency.

Graves, C.E.

1994-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

243

Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advancing Building Energy Codes Advancing Building Energy Codes The Building Technologies Office (BTO) supports greater adoption of residential and commercial building energy codes through collaborative efforts with local governments and industry groups, and by providing key tools and assistance for code development, adoption, and implementation. Through advancing building codes, we aim to improve building energy efficiency by 50%, and to help states achieve 90% compliance with their energy codes. 75% of U.S. Buildings will be New or Renovated by 2035, Building Codes will Ensure They Use Energy Wisely. Learn More 75% of U.S. Buildings will be New or Renovated by 2035; Building Codes will Ensure They Use Energy Wisely Learn More Energy Codes Ensure Efficiency in Buildings We offer guidance and technical resources to policy makers, compliance verification professionals, architects, engineers, contractors, and other stakeholders who depend on building energy codes.

244

Sorting and Characterizing Oversized Boxes of Transuranic Waste at the Nevada Test Site  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Characterization activities conducted inside the Visual Examination and Repackaging Building at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex on the Nevada Test Site.

None

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

245

Strip, Bind, and Search: A Method for Identifying Abnormal Energy Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strip, Bind, and Search: A Method for Identifying Abnormal Energy Consumption in Buildings Romain usage that leads to energy waste. The av- erage waste uncovered is as high as 2500 kWh per device; Energy Consumption; Anomaly Detection 1. INTRODUCTION Buildings are one of the prime targets to reduce

California at Berkeley, University of

246

Frederick Albert Sutton Building Quick Green Facts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and wastewater systems. This represents a savings of 67,811 gallons of water saved from going down the drain, plastic and metal will be collected for recycling from the building. · 81.9% of construction waste was diverted from landfills through recycling and reuse. · 17.4% of the cost of materials used in the project

Feschotte, Cedric

247

buildings in Continued on p. 5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems; ground-source and distributed heat pumps; and building-inte- grated, solar, combined heat carbon emissions," said David Sandalow, Department of Energy Assistant Secretary of Energy for Policy for the waste heat recovery system using exhaust from the light-duty diesel engine Exhaust from diesel vehicles

Pennycook, Steve

248

Building Technologies Office: Energy Efficient Buildings Hub  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Efficient Buildings Hub Efficient Buildings Hub This model of a renovated historic building-Building 661-in Philadelphia will house the Energy Efficient Buildings Hub. The facility's renovation will serve as a best practices model for commercial building design, historic adaptive re-use, and energy efficiency innovation through continuous retrofit. The U.S. Department of Energy created the Energy Efficient Buildings Hub in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to promote regional job creation and economic growth while also improving the energy efficiency of commercial buildings. Established in 2011, the Energy Efficient Buildings Hub seeks to demonstrate how innovating technologies can help building owners and operators can save money by adopting energy efficient technologies and techniques. The goal is to enable the nation to cut energy use in the commercial buildings sector by 20% by 2020.

249

Model Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this talk I begin with some general discussion of model building in particle theory, emphasizing the need for motivation and testability. Three illustrative examples are then described. The first is the Left-Right model which provides an explanation for the chirality of quarks and leptons. The second is the 331-model which offers a first step to understanding the three generations of quarks and leptons. Third and last is the SU(15) model which can accommodate the light leptoquarks possibly seen at HERA.

Paul H. Frampton

1997-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

250

Phase-field investigation on the non-equilibrium interface dynamics of rapid alloy solidification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research program reported here is focused on critical issues that represent conspicuous gaps in current understanding of rapid solidification, limiting our ability to predict and control microstructural evolution (i.e. morphological dynamics and microsegregation) at high undercooling, where conditions depart significantly from local equilibrium. More specifically, through careful application of phase-field modeling, using appropriate thin-interface and anti-trapping corrections and addressing important details such as transient effects and a velocity-dependent (i.e. adaptive) numerics, the current analysis provides a reasonable simulation-based picture of non-equilibrium solute partitioning and the corresponding oscillatory dynamics associated with single-phase rapid solidification and show that this method is a suitable means for a self-consistent simulation of transient behavior and operating point selection under rapid growth conditions. Moving beyond the limitations of conventional theoretical/analytical treatments of non-equilibrium solute partitioning, these results serve to substantiate recent experimental findings and analytical treatments for single-phase rapid solidification. The departure from the equilibrium solid concentration at the solid-liquid interface was often observed during rapid solidification, and the energetic associated non-equilibrium solute partitioning has been treated in detail, providing possible ranges of interface concentrations for a given growth condition. Use of these treatments for analytical description of specific single-phase dendritic and cellular operating point selection, however, requires a model for solute partitioning under a given set of growth conditions. Therefore, analytical solute trapping models which describe the chemical partitioning as a function of steady state interface velocities have been developed and widely utilized in most of the theoretical investigations of rapid solidification. However, these solute trapping models are not rigorously verified due to the difficulty in experimentally measuring under rapid growth conditions. Moreover, since these solute trapping models include kinetic parameters which are difficult to directly measure from experiments, application of the solute trapping models or the associated analytic rapid solidification model is limited. These theoretical models for steady state rapid solidification which incorporate the solute trapping models do not describe the interdependency of solute diffusion, interface kinetics, and alloy thermodynamics. The phase-field approach allows calculating, spontaneously, the non-equilibrium growth effects of alloys and the associated time-dependent growth dynamics, without making the assumptions that solute partitioning is an explicit function of velocity, as is the current convention. In the research described here, by utilizing the phase-field model in the thin-interface limit, incorporating the anti-trapping current term, more quantitatively valid interface kinetics and solute diffusion across the interface are calculated. In order to sufficiently resolve the physical length scales (i.e. interface thickness and diffusion boundary length), grid spacings are continually adjusted in calculations. The full trajectories of transient planar growth dynamics under rapid directional solidification conditions with different pulling velocities are described. As a validation of a model, the predicted steady state conditions are consistent with the analytic approach for rapid growth. It was confirmed that rapid interface dynamics exhibits the abrupt acceleration of the planar front when the effect of the non-equilibrium solute partitioning at the interface becomes signi ficant. This is consistent with the previous linear stability analysis for the non-equilibrium interface dynamics. With an appropriate growth condition, the continuous oscillation dynamics was able to be simulated using continually adjusting grid spacings. This oscillatory dynamics including instantaneous jump of interface velocities are consistent

Choi, Jeong

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

An experimental investigation of binary solidification in a vertical channel with thermal and solutal mixed convection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental measurements and photographic observations are presented for the solidification of a binary, aqueous ammonium chloride solution in a vertical channel. Transient liquidus front progressions and temperature measurements are used to characterize the influences of flow rate, superheat, composition, and chill wall temperature on binary phase-change behavior. Experimental results are compared with previously reported model predictions and discrepancies are used to critically assess model assumptions and limitations.

Bennon, W.D. (Aluminum Company of America, Alcoa Center, PA 15069 (USA)); Incropera, F.P. (Heat Transfer Laboratory, School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

EA-1146: Radioactive Waste Storage at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

46: Radioactive Waste Storage at Rocky Flats Environmental 46: Radioactive Waste Storage at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado EA-1146: Radioactive Waste Storage at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to convert buildings at the U.S. Department of Energy Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site from their former uses to interim waste storage facilities in order to increase storage capacity for low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, transuranic waste, and transuranic mixed waste. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 9, 1996 EA-1146: Finding of No Significant Impact Radioactive Waste Storage at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado

253

The effect of chemistry modifications on the solidification behavior and weldability of Alloy 625  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of chemistry variations on the solidification behavior and weldability of Alloy 625. As the effect of several tramp elements (i.e., S, P, etc.) could be predicted a priori, the experimental alloy design excluded these elements as factors. A 3-factor, 2-level, full fractorial experimental design was examined with the elements Nb(0 wt%, 3.5 wt%), C(0.005 wt.%, 0.035 wt.%), and Si(0.01 wt.%, 0.40 wt.%) being chosen to fill the design matrix. Compositions of the alloys studied are listed. These compositions were prepared using VIM/VAR techniques in the Sandia National Laboratories Melting and Solidification Facility. Conventional hot and cold working techniques were used to produce 3 mm thick sheet for Varestraint weldability testing. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) was used to establish significant solidification temperatures and reactions. Greater experimental detail has been given previously. 2 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Cieslak, M.J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

City of Houston Joins Better Buildings Challenge, Partners with Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

City of Houston Joins Better Buildings Challenge, Partners with City of Houston Joins Better Buildings Challenge, Partners with Energy Department to Reduce Energy Waste and Boost Efficiency City of Houston Joins Better Buildings Challenge, Partners with Energy Department to Reduce Energy Waste and Boost Efficiency January 26, 2012 - 2:05pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - Building on President Obama's call in the State of the Union address earlier this week for a new era for American energy, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu joined with Houston Mayor Annise Parker today to announce that Houston, Texas is joining the Better Buildings Challenge. Houston is the latest community to join the Challenge, a public-private partnership that seeks to improve energy efficiency 20 percent by 2020 in commercial, government, and school buildings across the

255

Waste management technology development and demonstration programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two thermoplastic processes for improved treatment of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes have been developed from bench-scale through technology demonstration: polyethylene encapsulation and modified sulfur cement encapsulation. The steps required to bring technologies from the research and development stage through full-scale implementation are described. Both systems result in durable waste forms that meet current Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Environmental Protection Agency regulatory criteria and provide significant improvements over conventional solidification systems such as hydraulic cement. For example, the polyethylene process can encapsulate up to 70 wt % nitrate salt, compared with a maximum of about 20 wt % for the best hydraulic cement formulation. Modified sulfur cement waste forms containing as much as 43 wt % incinerator fly ash have been formulated, whereas the maximum quantity of this waste in hydraulic cement is 16 wt %.

Kalb, P.D.; Colombo, P.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

Waste management technology development and demonstration programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two thermoplastic processes for improved treatment of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes have been developed from bench-scale through technology demonstration: polyethylene encapsulation and modified sulfur cement encapsulation. The steps required to bring technologies from the research and development stage through full-scale implementation are described. Both systems result in durable waste forms that meet current Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Environmental Protection Agency regulatory criteria and provide significant improvements over conventional solidification systems such as hydraulic cement. For example, the polyethylene process can encapsulate up to 70 wt % nitrate salt, compared with a maximum of about 20 wt % for the best hydraulic cement formulation. Modified sulfur cement waste forms containing as much as 43 wt % incinerator fly ash have been formulated, whereas the maximum quantity of this waste in hydraulic cement is 16 wt %.

Kalb, P.D.; Colombo, P.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Building Technologies Office: Webinars  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Webinars Webinars Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Building Technologies Office: Webinars to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Webinars on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Webinars on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Webinars on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Webinars on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Webinars on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Webinars on AddThis.com... Popular Links Success Stories Previous Next Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Warming Up to Pump Heat. Cut Refrigerator Energy Use to Save Money. Tools EnergyPlus Whole Building Simulation Program Building Energy Software Tools Directory High Performance Buildings Database

258

Waste Hoist  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Primary Hoist: 45-ton Rope-Guide Friction Hoist Completely enclosed (for contamination control), the waste hoist at WIPP is a modern friction hoist with rope guides. With a 45-ton...

259

Nuclear Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear waste is radioactive material no longer considered valuable...238U, 235U, and 226Ra (where the latter decays to 222Rn gas by emitting an alpha particle) or formed through fission of fissile radioisotopes ...

Rob P. Rechard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Building and Buildings, Scotland: Draft Building Standards (Scotland) Regulations, 1961   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

These regulations, made under the Building (Scotland) Act, 1959, prescribe standards for buildings for the purposes of Part II of that Act. The matters in relation to which standards have been prescribed are described in ...

Her Majesty's Stationary Office

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste solidification building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP), 2336W Building, on the Hanford Site is designed to receive, confirm, repackage, certify, treat, store, and ship contact-handled transuranic and low-level radioactive waste from past and present U.S. Department of Energy activities. The WRAP facility is comprised of three buildings: 2336W, the main processing facility (also referred to generically as WRAP); 2740W, an administrative support building; and 2620W, a maintenance support building. The support buildings are subject to the normal hazards associated with industrial buildings (no radiological materials are handled) and are not part of this analysis except as they are impacted by operations in the processing building, 2336W. WRAP is designed to provide safer, more efficient methods of handling the waste than currently exist on the Hanford Site and contributes to the achievement of as low as reasonably achievable goals for Hanford Site waste management.

TOMASZEWSKI, T.A.

2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

262

Mr. John E. Kieling, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fe, NM 87508-6303 Subject: Notification of the Use of Surge Storage in the Waste Handling Building Reference: DOE Memorandum CBFO:OESH:GB:MN:14-1427;UFC:5487 from Mr. Jose R....

263

Waste Treatment Plant and Tank Farm Program | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Plant and Tank Farm Program Waste Treatment Plant and Tank Farm Program This photo shows the Pretreatment Facility control room building pad at the Office of River Protection at...

264

Evaluation of interim and final waste forms for the newly generated liquid low-level waste flowsheet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this review is to evaluate the final forms that have been proposed for radioactive-containing solid wastes and to determine their application to the solid wastes that will result from the treatment of newly generated liquid low-level waste (NGLLLW) and Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) supernate at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Since cesium and strontium are the predominant radionuclides in NGLLLW and MVST supernate, this review is focused on the stabilization and solidification of solid wastes containing these radionuclides in cement, glass, and polymeric materials-the principal waste forms that have been tested with these types of wastes. Several studies have shown that both cesium and strontium are leached by distilled water from solidified cement, although the leachabilities of cesium are generally higher than those of strontium under similar conditions. The situation is exacerbated by the presence of sulfates in the solution, as manifested by cracking of the grout. Additives such as bentonite, blast-furnace slag, fly ash, montmorillonite, pottery clay, silica, and zeolites generally decrease the cesium and strontium release rates. Longer cement curing times (>28 d) and high ionic strengths of the leachates, such as those that occur in seawater, also decrease the leach rates of these radionuclides. Lower cesium leach rates are observed from vitrified wastes than from grout waste forms. However, significant quantities of cesium are volatilized due to the elevated temperatures required to vitrify the waste. Hence, vitrification will generally require the use of cleanup systems for the off-gases to prevent their release into the atmosphere.

Abotsi, G.M.K. [Clark Atlanta Univ., GA (United States); Bostick, D.T.; Beck, D.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource! energy forum Case Studies from Estonia, Switzerland, Germany Bossart,· ABB Waste-to-Energy Plants Edmund Fleck,· ESWET Marcel van Berlo,· Afval Energie Bedrijf From Waste to Energy To Energy from Waste #12;9.00-9.30: Registration 9.30-9.40: Chairman Ella Stengler opens

Columbia University

266

Commercial Buildings Integration Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Buildings Buildings Integration Program Arah Schuur Program Manager arah.schuur@ee.doe.gov April 2, 2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Vision Commercial buildings are constructed, operated, renovated and transacted with energy performance in mind and net zero ready commercial buildings are common and cost-effective. Commercial Buildings Integration Program Mission Accelerate voluntary uptake of significant energy performance improvements in existing and new commercial buildings. 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov BTO Goals: BTO supports the development and deployment of technologies and systems to reduce

267

Home | Better Buildings Workforce  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Better Buildings Logo Better Buildings Logo EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Search form Search Search Better Buildings Logo Better Buildings Workforce Home Framework Resources Projects Participate Home Framework Resources Projects Better Buildings Workforce Guidelines Buildings Re-tuning Training ANSI Energy Efficiency Standards Collaborative Energy Performance-Based Acquisition Training Participate For a detailed project overview, download the Better Buildings Workforce Guidelines Fact Sheet Home The Better Buildings Initiative is a broad, multi-strategy initiative to make commercial and industrial buildings 20% more energy efficient over the next 10 years. DOE is currently pursuing strategies across five pillars to catalyze change and accelerate private sector investment in energy

268

Buildings without energy bills  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In European Union member states, by 31 december 2020, all new buildings shall be nearly zero-energy consumption building. For new buildings occupied and owned by public authorities this shall comply by 31 december 2018. The buildings sectors represents ... Keywords: energy efficiency, low energy buildings, passive houses design, sustainable development

Ruxandra Crutescu

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Academic Buildings Student & Admin.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Academic Buildings Student & Admin. Services Residence Public Parking Permit Parking GatheringCampusRoad Shrum Science Centre South Sciences Building Technology & Science Complex 2 Greenhouses Science Research AnnexBee Research BuildingAlcan Aquatic Research Technology & Science Complex 1 C Building B Building P

270

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Building Size  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Size of Buildings Size of Buildings Size of Buildings The 1999 CBECS estimated that 2,348,000 commercial buildings, or just over half (50.4 percent) of total buildings, were found in the smallest building size category (1,001 to 5,000 square feet) (Figure 1). Only 7,000 buildings occupied the largest size category (over 500,000 square feet). Detailed tables Figure 1. Distribution of Buildings by Size of Building, 1999 Figure 1. Distribution of Buildings by Size of Building, 1999. If having trouble viewing this page, please contact the National Energy Information Center at (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey The middle size categories (10,001 to 100,000 square feet) had relatively more floorspace per category than smaller or larger size categories (Figure 2). The greatest amount of floorspace, about 11,153,000 square feet (or 17 percent of total floorspace) was found in the 10,001 to 25,000 square feet category. Figure 2. Distribution of Floorspace by Size of Building, 1999

271

Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building America Updates  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Subscribe to Building Subscribe to Building America Updates to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building America Updates on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building America Updates on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building America Updates on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building America Updates on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building America Updates on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building America Updates on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance

272

Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: Building Loads  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: BuildingComparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: Buildingof comparing three Building Energy Modeling Programs (BEMPs)

Zhu, Dandan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Solid waste recycling programs at Rocky Flats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rocky Flats (RFP) recycling programs for solid waste materials have been in place for over ten years. Within the last three years, the programs were centralized under the direction of the Rocky Flats Waste Minimization department, with the assistance of various plant organizations (e.g., Trucking, Building Services, Regulated Waste Operations, property Utilization and Disposal and Security). Waste Minimization designs collection and transportation systems for recyclable materials and evaluates recycling markets for opportunities to add new commodities to the existing programs. The Waste Minimization department also promotes employee participation in the Rocky Flats Recycling Programs, and collects all recycling data for publication. A description of the program status as of January 1994 is given.

Millette, R.L.; Blackman, T.E.; Shepard, M.D. [EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

274

Office Buildings - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Office Buildings - Full Report Office Buildings - Full Report file:///C|/mydocs/CBECS2003/PBA%20report/office%20report/office_pdf.html[9/24/2010 3:33:25 PM] Although no one building type dominates the commercial buildings sector, office buildings are the most common and account for more than 800,000 buildings or 17 percent of total commercial buildings. Offices comprised more than 12 billion square feet of floorspace, 17 percent of total commercial floorspace, the most of any building type. Types of Office Buildings The 2003 CBECS Detailed Tables present data for office buildings along with other principal building activities (see Detailed Tables B13 and B14, for example). Since office buildings comprise a wide range of office-related activities, survey respondents were presented with a

275

Building Technologies Research and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building Technologies Research and Integration Center Breaking new ground in energy efficiency #12;Building Technologies Research To enjoy a sustainable energy and environmental future, America must these enormous challenges. Today, through the Building Technologies and Research Integration Center (BTRIC

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

276

Building Performance Simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

low  energy  buildings,  with  site  EUI  of  40  or  lower buildings  in  the  US  (EUI  of  90  kBtu/ft²).   This the  bubble  represents  the  EUI.   These  buildings  were 

Hong, Tianzhen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

DWPF waste form compliance plan (Draft Revision)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy currently has over 100 million liters of high-level radioactive waste in storage at the Savannah River Site (SRS). In the late 1970`s, the Department of Energy recognized that there were significant safety and cost advantages associated with immobilizing the high-level waste in a stable solid form. Several alternative waste forms were evaluated in terms of product quality and reliability of fabrication. This evaluation led to a decision to build the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at SRS to convert the easily dispersed liquid waste to borosilicate glass. In accordance with the NEPA (National Environmental Policy Act) process, an Environmental Impact Statement was prepared for the facility, as well as an Environmental Assessment of the alternative waste forms, and issuance of a Record of Decision (in December, 1982) on the waste form. The Department of Energy, recognizing that start-up of the DWPF would considerably precede licensing of a repository, instituted a Waste Acceptance Process to ensure that these canistered waste forms would be acceptable for eventual disposal at a federal repository. This report is a revision of the DWPF compliance plan.

Plodinec, M.J.; Marra, S.L.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

278

DWPF waste form compliance plan (Draft Revision)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy currently has over 100 million liters of high-level radioactive waste in storage at the Savannah River Site (SRS). In the late 1970's, the Department of Energy recognized that there were significant safety and cost advantages associated with immobilizing the high-level waste in a stable solid form. Several alternative waste forms were evaluated in terms of product quality and reliability of fabrication. This evaluation led to a decision to build the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at SRS to convert the easily dispersed liquid waste to borosilicate glass. In accordance with the NEPA (National Environmental Policy Act) process, an Environmental Impact Statement was prepared for the facility, as well as an Environmental Assessment of the alternative waste forms, and issuance of a Record of Decision (in December, 1982) on the waste form. The Department of Energy, recognizing that start-up of the DWPF would considerably precede licensing of a repository, instituted a Waste Acceptance Process to ensure that these canistered waste forms would be acceptable for eventual disposal at a federal repository. This report is a revision of the DWPF compliance plan.

Plodinec, M.J.; Marra, S.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Composites Part B: Engineering, 2011, 42(4): p. 916-925 Analysis of active cooling through nickel coated carbon fibers in the solidification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nickel coated carbon fibers in the solidification processing of aluminum matrix composites Nikhil Gupta1 cooling through reinforcing carbon fibers to obtain better control over the solidification microstructure and Ni represent the aluminum melt, carbon fiber, and nickel coating, respectively. 1 INTRODUCTION

Gupta, Nikhil

280

Building a Molecule Building Structures in Moe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

14 Chapter 3 Building a Molecule #12;15 Building Structures in Moe Dorzolamide Exercise 1 #12;16 Open the Molecule Builder · Open the Molecule Builder panel using MOE | Edit | Build | Molecule, the chiral center will be either R or S, and one of the two will be highlighted in green. The green

Fischer, Wolfgang

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste solidification building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Waste Disposal (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article lays an outline of waste disposal regulations, permits and fees, hazardous waste management and underground storage tank requirements.

282

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Diverting Waste, Conserving Natural Resources: Composting Toilets for the New SUB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..........................................................................................................................................13 Designing for sustainability: green buildingUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Diverting Waste­2008)........................................................................................................35 Appendix C: Maintenance manual for C.K. Choi Building at UBC .....................................41

283

Preparing Class B and C Waste for Long Term Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commercial Nuclear Generating Stations outside of the Atlantic Compact will lose access to the Barnwell Disposal Facility in July of 2008. Many generators have constructed Interim On-Site Storage Buildings (IOSB) in which to store class B and C waste in the future as other permanent disposal options are developed. Until such time it is important for these generators to ensure class B and C waste generation is minimized and waste generated is packaged to facilitate long term storage. (authors)

Snyder, M.W. [Sacramento Municipal Utility District - Rancho Seco (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

LEED for Existing Buildings Operations and Maintenance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, aluminum, plastic and/or other materials in buildings waste stream Includes construction waste and durable goods (computers) Only a policy LEED EB O&M ESL-KT-13-12-54 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16... and Recycling Committee’s AEE Life Member ESL-KT-13-12-54 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 ESL-KT-13-12-54 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 ESL...

Reihl, K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Building Technologies Office Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Roland Risser Roland Risser Director, Building Technologies Office Building Technologies Office Energy Efficiency Starts Here. 2 Building Technologies Office Integrated Approach: Improving Building Performance Research & Development Developing High Impact Technologies Standards & Codes Locking in the Savings Market Stimulation Accelerating Tech-to- Market 3 Building Technologies Office Goal: Reduce building energy use by 50% (compared to a 2010 baseline) 4 Building Technologies Office Working to Overcome Challenges Information Access * Develop building performance tools, techniques, and success stories, such as case studies * Form market partnerships and programs to share best practices * Solution Centers * Certify the workforce to ensure quality work

286

Building Technologies Office: Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources to someone by Resources to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Resources on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Resources on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Resources on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Resources on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Resources on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Resources on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Challenge Home Partner Log In Become a Partner Criteria Partner Locator Resources Housing Innovation Awards Events Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals Technology Research, Standards, & Codes

287

Building Performance Simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LEED­NC Certified Buildings                                              (courtesy New Building Institute)  Figure 3 – Measured Energy Use Intensities of Big?Box Retails in US and Canada (

Hong, Tianzhen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

GSA Building Energy Strategy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Rapid Building Assessments Green Button 12 Remote Building Analytics Platform First Fuel Dashboard 13 Data Center Ronald Reagan Detail Summary First Fuel Analysis 14...

289

Solar buildings. Overview: The Solar Buildings Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Buildings account for more than one third of the energy used in the United States each year, consuming vast amounts of electricity, natural gas, and fuel oil. Given this level of consumption, the buildings sector is rife with opportunity for alternative energy technologies. The US Department of Energy`s Solar Buildings Program was established to take advantage of this opportunity. The Solar Buildings Program is engaged in research, development, and deployment on solar thermal technologies, which use solar energy to produce heat. The Program focuses on technologies that have the potential to produce economically competitive energy for the buildings sector.

Not Available

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Integrated Whole Building Energy Diagnostics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Whole Building Energy Whole Building Energy Diagnostics Integrated Whole Building Energy Diagnostics The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently conducting research into integrated whole-building energy diagnostics. Energy and operational fault detection and diagnostics (FDD) systems are currently not broadly understood and deployed in buildings. An integrated whole-building energy FDD system that is applicable to the systems in big-box retail stores and supermarkets does not exist at present. Major building subsystems are independently controlled with limited, add-on FDD capability. Neither controls nor FDD systems now available adequately capture the functional and behavioral interactions between subsystems that result in wasted energy and increased false alarm rates.

291

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Commercial Building Commercial Building Codes and Standards to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities Partner with DOE Commercial Buildings Resource Database Research & Development Codes & Standards Popular Commercial Links

292

Building Technologies Office: Building America 2013 Technical Update  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Building America 2013 Building America 2013 Technical Update Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Building America 2013 Technical Update Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Building America 2013 Technical Update Meeting on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America 2013 Technical Update Meeting on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America 2013 Technical Update Meeting on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Building America 2013 Technical Update Meeting on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Building America 2013 Technical Update Meeting on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research

293

SWAMI: An Autonomous Mobile Robot for Inspection of Nuclear Waste Storage Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SWAMI: An Autonomous Mobile Robot for Inspection of Nuclear Waste Storage Facilities Ron Fulbright Inspector (SWAMI) is a prototype mobile robot designed to perform autonomous inspection of nuclear waste user interface building tool called UIM/X. Introduction Safe disposal of nuclear waste is a difficult

Stephens, Larry M.

294

Building Green in Greensburg: City Hall Building  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

City Hall Building City Hall Building Destroyed in the tornado, City Hall was completed in October 2009 and built to achieve the U.S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED ® ) Platinum designation. The 4,700-square-foot building serves as a symbol of Greensburg's vitality and leadership in becoming a sustainable community where social, environmental, and economic concerns are held in balance. It houses the City's administrative offices and council chambers, and serves as a gathering place for town meetings and municipal court sessions. According to energy analysis modeling results, the new City Hall building is 38% more energy efficient than an ASHRAE-compliant building of the same size and shape. ENERGY EFFICIENCY FEATURES * A well-insulated building envelope with an

295

Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Meetings Meetings Photo of people watching a presentation on a screen; the foreground shows a person's hands taking notes on a notepad. The Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program hosts open meetings and webinars for industry partners and stakeholders that provide a forum to exchange information about various aspects of residential building research. Upcoming Meetings Past Technical and Stakeholder Meetings Webinars Expert Meetings Upcoming Meetings There are no Building America meetings scheduled at this time. Please subscribe to Building America news and updates to receive notification of future meetings. Past Technical and Stakeholder Meetings Building America 2013 Technical Update Meeting: April 2013 This meeting showcased world-class building science research for high performance homes in a dynamic new format. Researchers from Building America teams and national laboratories presented on key issues that must be resolved to deliver homes that reduce whole house energy use by 30%-50%. View the presentations.

296

Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program logo. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program logo. The Better Buildings Neighborhood Program is helping over 40 competitively selected state and local governments develop sustainable programs to upgrade the energy efficiency of more than 100,000 buildings. These leading communities are using innovation and investment in energy efficiency to expand the building improvement industry, test program delivery business models, and create jobs. New Materials and Resources January 2014 Read the January issue of the Better Buildings Network View See the new story about Austin Energy Read the new Focus Series with Chicago's EI2 See the new webcast Read the latest DOE blog posts Get Inspired! Hear why Better Buildings partners are excited to bring the benefits of energy upgrades to their neighborhoods.

297

Building Green in Greensburg: Business Incubator Building  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Business Incubator Building Business Incubator Building Completed in May 2009, the SunChips ® Business Incubator building not only achieved the U.S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED ® ) Platinum status with greater than 50% energy savings-it became the first LEED Platinum certified municipal building in Kansas. The 9,580-square-foot building features five street-level retail shops and nine second-level professional service offices. It provides an affordable, temporary home where businesses can grow over a period of several years before moving out on their own to make way for new start-up businesses. The building was funded by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Frito-Lay SunChips division, and actor Leonardo DiCaprio.

298

Office Buildings - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PDF PDF Office Buildings Although no one building type dominates the commercial buildings sector, office buildings are the most common and account for more than 800,000 buildings or 17 percent of total commercial buildings. Offices comprised more than 12 billion square feet of floorspace, 17 percent of total commercial floorspace, the most of any building type. Types of Office Buildings The 2003 CBECS Detailed Tables present data for office buildings along with other principal building activities (see Detailed Tables B13 and B14, for example). Since office buildings comprise a wide range of office-related activities, survey respondents were presented with a follow-up list of specific office types to choose from. Although we have not presented the office sub-category information in the detailed tables we make information

299

building | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

building building Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (7 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (5 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

300

Office Buildings - Energy Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Energy Consumption Office buildings consumed more than 17 percent of the total energy used by the commercial buildings sector (Table 4). At least half of total energy, electricity, and natural gas consumed by office buildings was consumed by administrative or professional office buildings (Figure 2). Table 4. Energy Consumed by Office Buildings for Major Fuels, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million sq. ft.) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings 4,859 71,658 6,523 3,559 2,100 228 636 All Non-Mall Buildings 4,645 64,783 5,820 3,037 1,928 222 634 All Office Buildings 824 12,208 1,134 719 269 18 128 Type of Office Building

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste solidification building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Vitrification of M-Area Mixed (Hazardous and Radioactive) F006 Wastes: I. Sludge and Supernate Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technologies are being developed by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Facility sites to convert low-level and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) wastes to a solid stabilized waste form for permanent disposal. One of the alternative technologies is vitrification into a borosilicate glass waste form. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has declared vitrification the Best Demonstrated Available Technology (BDAT) for high-level radioactive mixed waste and produced a Handbook of Vitrification Technologies for Treatment of Hazardous and Radioactive Waste. The DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) has taken the position that mixed waste needs to be stabilized to the highest level reasonably possible to ensure that the resulting waste forms will meet both current and future regulatory specifications. Stabilization of low level and hazardous wastes in glass are in accord with the 1988 Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), then the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL), Professional Planning Committee (PPC) recommendation that high nitrate containing (low-level) wastes be incorporated into a low temperature glass (via a sol-gel technology). The investigation into this new technology was considered timely because of the potential for large waste volume reduction compared to solidification into cement.

Jantzen, C.M.

2001-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

302

Material Recycling and Waste Disposal Document Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of pollution, compliance with legislative requirements and continual improvement. The list of parties involved managers. Legislation referenced by this document. Environmental protection Act 1990 (EPA 1990). Waste. The clear bag bin liners are removed by the O&G Cleaners, tied closed, and taken to the building

Guillas, Serge

303

U.S. Department of Energy to Host Press Call on Radioactive Waste Shipment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy to Host Press Call on Radioactive Waste U.S. Department of Energy to Host Press Call on Radioactive Waste Shipment and Disposal U.S. Department of Energy to Host Press Call on Radioactive Waste Shipment and Disposal November 12, 2013 - 10:26am Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 LAS VEGAS, NV - On Tuesday, November 12, 2013, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will host a press call to discuss Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project (CEUSP) shipment and disposal plans in Nevada. Energy Chief of Staff Kevin Knobloch will host the call and will be joined by issue experts to address any questions. This press call is taking place the day before DOE starts public meetings on this issue in Las Vegas (Nov. 13 at Cashman Center) and Pahrump (Nov. 14 at NV Treasure RV Resort). More details on those meetings can be found

304

High-level waste canister storage final design, installation, and testing. Topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a description of the West Valley Demonstration Project`s radioactive waste storage facility, the Chemical Process Cell (CPC). This facility is currently being used to temporarily store vitrified waste in stainless steel canisters. These canisters are stacked two-high in a seismically designed rack system within the cell. Approximately 300 canisters will be produced during the Project`s vitrification campaign which began in June 1996. Following the completion of waste vitrification and solidification, these canisters will be transferred via rail or truck to a federal repository (when available) for permanent storage. All operations in the CPC are conducted remotely using various handling systems and equipment. Areas adjacent to or surrounding the cell provide capabilities for viewing, ventilation, and equipment/component access.

Connors, B.J.; Meigs, R.A.; Pezzimenti, D.M.; Vlad, P.M.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Carbon capture and storage—Solidification and storage of carbon dioxide captured on ships  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract To meet the International Maritime Organization (IMO) target of 20% reduction of CO2 emissions from marine activities by 2020, application of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) on ships is considered as an effective way to mitigate CO2 emissions while other low carbon shipping technologies are being developed. Literature reviews on CCS methods for onshore applications indicate that the current CCS technologies could not be implemented on boards directly due to various limitations on ships. A novel chemical CO2 absorption and solidification method for CO2 storage on-board is proposed, presented and analyzed. Technical feasibility with explanation of principles and cost assessment are carried out for a case ship with a comparison to a conventional CCS method. The paper also presents results obtained from laboratory experiment including factors that affect the absorption. Theoretical study and laboratory experiment illustrate the proposed CO2 solidification method is a promising, cost effective and feasible method for CO2 emissions reduction on ships.

Peilin Zhou; Haibin Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility Full Document and Summary Versions...

307

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE January 2010 Prepared for the Interagency left intentionally blank.] #12;Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy PNNL-SA-69994 under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Waste Disposal Workshops: Anthrax-Contaminated Waste AM Lesperance JF Upton SL

308

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Business Models Guide, October 27, 2011.

309

Building Technology MSc Programme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of this programme is on the design of innovative and sustainable building components and their integration

Langendoen, Koen

310

Building Technologies Office: Building America Climate-Specific Guidance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

America America Climate-Specific Guidance to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Building America Climate-Specific Guidance on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Building America Climate-Specific Guidance on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America Climate-Specific Guidance on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America Climate-Specific Guidance on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Building America Climate-Specific Guidance on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Building America Climate-Specific Guidance on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education

311

Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Alliance Laboratory Fume  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Better Buildings Better Buildings Alliance Laboratory Fume Hood Specification to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Alliance Laboratory Fume Hood Specification on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Alliance Laboratory Fume Hood Specification on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Alliance Laboratory Fume Hood Specification on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Alliance Laboratory Fume Hood Specification on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Alliance Laboratory Fume Hood Specification on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Alliance Laboratory Fume Hood Specification on AddThis.com...

312

Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database Analysis Tools  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Buildings Performance Buildings Performance Database Analysis Tools to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database Analysis Tools on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database Analysis Tools on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database Analysis Tools on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database Analysis Tools on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database Analysis Tools on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database Analysis Tools on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides

313

Building Technologies Office: About the Commercial Buildings Integration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

About the Commercial About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities Partner with DOE Commercial Buildings Resource Database

314

Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Building Energy Data Building Energy Data Exchange Specification to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides

315

Commercial Buildings Consortium  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Commercial Buildings Consortium Commercial Buildings Consortium Sandy Fazeli National Association of State Energy Officials sfazeli@naseo.org; 703-299-8800 ext. 17 April 2, 2013 Supporting Consortium for the U.S. Department of Energy Net-Zero Energy Commercial Buildings Initiative 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: * Many energy savings opportunities in commercial buildings remain untapped, underserved by the conventional "invest-design-build- operate" approach * The commercial buildings sector is siloed, with limited coordination

316

Residential Buildings Integration Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

David Lee David Lee Program Manager David.Lee@ee.doe.gov 202-287-1785 April 2, 2013 Residential Buildings Integration Program Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Sub-Programs for Review Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Building America Challenge Home Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Solar Decathlon 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov How Residential Buildings Fits into BTO Research & Development * Develop technology roadmaps * Prioritize opportunities * Solicit and select innovative technology solutions * Collaborate with researchers

317

Residential Buildings Integration Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

David Lee David Lee Program Manager David.Lee@ee.doe.gov 202-287-1785 April 2, 2013 Residential Buildings Integration Program Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Sub-Programs for Review Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Building America Challenge Home Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Solar Decathlon 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov How Residential Buildings Fits into BTO Research & Development * Develop technology roadmaps * Prioritize opportunities * Solicit and select innovative technology solutions * Collaborate with researchers

318

Building Technologies Office: News  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

News to someone by News to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: News on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: News on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: News on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: News on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: News on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: News on AddThis.com... Popular Links Success Stories Previous Next Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Warming Up to Pump Heat. Cut Refrigerator Energy Use to Save Money. Tools EnergyPlus Whole Building Simulation Program Building Energy Software Tools Directory High Performance Buildings Database Financial Opportunities Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Funding Opportunities Tax Incentives for Residential Buildings

319

Buildings | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buildings Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Building Energy Technologies NREL's New Energy-Efficient "RSF" Building Buildings provide shelter for nearly everything we do-we work, live, learn, govern, heal, worship, and play in buildings-and they require enormous energy resources. According to the U.S. Energy Information Agency, homes and commercial buildings use nearly three quarters of the electricity in the United States. Opportunities abound for reducing the huge amount of energy consumed by buildings, but discovering those opportunities requires compiling substantial amounts of data and information. The Buildings Energy Technologies gateway is your single source of freely accessible information on energy usage in the building industry as well as tools to improve

320

DOE - Better Building  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

U.S. Department of Energy | Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy logo U.S. Department of Energy | Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy logo EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Better Buildings Logo Better Buildings Update July 2013 Inside this edition: Highlights from the 2013 Efficiency Forum Recap: Better Buildings Summit for State & Local Communities Launching the Better Buildings Webinar Series Better Buildings Challenge Implementation Models and Showcase Projects Updated Better Buildings Websites New Members Highlights from the 2013 Efficiency Forum More than 170 people attended the second annual Better Buildings Efficiency Forum for commercial and higher education Partners in May at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado-the nation's largest net-zero energy office building. DOE thanks all Better Buildings Alliance Members and Better Buildings Challenge Partners that participated in the Efficiency Forum.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste solidification building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Food Service Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Service Service Characteristics by Activity... Food Service Food service buildings are those used for preparation and sale of food and beverages for consumption. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Food Service Buildings... An overwhelming majority (72 percent) of food service buildings were small buildings (1,001 to 5,000 square feet). Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics Number of Food Service Buildings by Predominant Building Size Categories Figure showing number of food service buildings by size. If you need assistance viewing this page, please contact 202-586-8800. Equipment Table: Buildings, Size, and Age Data by Equipment Types Predominant Heating Equipment Types in Food Service Buildings

322

Comparison of modified sulfur cement and hydraulic cement for encapsulation of radioactive and mixed wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The majority of solidification/stabilization systems for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed waste, both in the commercial sector and at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, utilize hydraulic cement (such as portland cement) to encapsulate waste materials and yield a monolithic solid waste form for disposal. A new and innovative process utilizing modified sulfur cement developed by the US Bureau of Mines has been applied at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the encapsulation of many of these problem'' wastes. Modified sulfur cement is a thermoplastic material, and as such, it can be heated above it's melting point (120{degree}C), combined with dry waste products to form a homogeneous mixture, and cooled to form a monolithic solid product. Under sponsorship of the DOE, research and development efforts at BNL have successfully applied the modified sulfur cement process for treatment of a range of LLWs including sodium sulfate salts, boric acid salts, and incinerator bottom ash and for mixed waste contaminated incinerator fly ash. Process development studies were conducted to determine optimal waste loadings for each waste type. Property evaluation studies were conducted to test waste form behavior under disposal conditions by applying relevant performance testing criteria established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (for LLW) and the Environmental Protection Agency (for hazardous wastes). Based on both processing and performance considerations, significantly greater waste loadings were achieved using modified sulfur cement when compared with hydraulic cement. Technology demonstration of the modified sulfur cement encapsulation system using production-scale equipment is scheduled for FY 1991. 12 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Regulatory requirements affecting disposal of asbestos-containing waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities are undergoing decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities. The performance of these activities may generate asbestos-containing waste because asbestos was formerly used in many building materials, including floor tile, sealants, plastics, cement pipe, cement sheets, insulating boards, and insulating cements. The regulatory requirements governing the disposal of these wastes depend on: (1) the percentage of asbestos in the waste and whether the waste is friable (easily crumbled or pulverized); (2) other physical and chemical characteristics of the waste; and (3) the State in which the waste is generated. This Information Brief provides an overview of the environment regulatory requirements affecting disposal of asbestos-containing waste. It does not address regulatory requirements applicable to worker protection promulgated under the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHAct), the Mining Safety and Health Act (MSHA), or the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA).

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Fact Sheet- Better Buildings Residential  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Fact Sheet - Better Buildings Residential, from U.S. Department of Energy, Better Buildings Neighborhood Program.

325

John Anderson Campus UNIVERSITY BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

John Anderson Campus UNIVERSITY BUILDINGS 1 McCance Building 2 Collins Building 3 Livingstone Tower 4 Accommodation Office 5 Graham Hills Building 6 Turnbull Building 7 Royal College Building 8 Students' Union 9 Centre for Sport & Recreation 10 St Paul's Building/Chaplaincy 11 Thomas Graham Building

Mottram, Nigel

326

Building America System Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Building America System Building America System Research Eric Werling, DOE Ren Anderson, NREL eric.werling@ee.doe.gov, 202-586-0410 ren.anderson@nrel.gov, 303-384-7443 April 2, 2013 Building America System Innovations: Accelerating Innovation in Home Energy Savings 2 | Program Name or Ancillary Text eere.energy.gov Project Relevance 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Building America Fills Market Need for a High-Performance Homes HUB of Innovation

327

Building Technologies Office: Building Science Education  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science Education Science Education Photo of students investigating building enclosure moisture problems at a field testing facility in British Columbia. Students study moisture building enclosure issues at the Coquitlam Field Test facility in Vancouver, British Columbia. Credit: John Straube The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program recognizes that the education of future design/construction industry professionals in solid building science principles is critical to widespread development of high performance homes that are energy efficient, healthy, and durable. In November 2012, DOE met with leaders in the building science community to develop a strategic Building Science Education Roadmap that will chart a path for training skilled professionals who apply proven innovations and recognize the value of high performance homes. The roadmap aims to:

328

Waste Processing | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Processing Waste Processing Workers process and repackage waste at the Transuranic Waste Processing Centers Cask Processing Enclosure. Workers process and repackage waste at...

329

Honest Buildings | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Honest Buildings Honest Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Honest Buildings Agency/Company /Organization: Honest Buildings Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: www.honestbuildings.com/ Web Application Link: www.honestbuildings.com/ Cost: Free Honest Buildings Screenshot References: Honest Buildings[1] Logo: Honest Buildings Honest Buildings is a software platform focused on buildings. It brings together building service providers, occupants, owners, and other stakeholders onto a single portal to exchange information, offerings, and needs. It provides a voice for everyone who occupies buildings, works with buildings, and owns buildings globally to comment, display projects, and

330

Haiti: Feasibility of Waste-to-Energy Options at the Trutier Waste Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides further analysis of the feasibility of a waste-to-energy (WTE) facility in the area near Port-au-Prince, Haiti. NREL's previous analysis and reports identified anaerobic digestion (AD) as the optimal WTE technology at the facility. Building on the prior analyses, this report evaluates the conceptual financial and technical viability of implementing a combined waste management and electrical power production strategy by constructing a WTE facility at the existing Trutier waste site north of Port-au-Prince.

Conrad, M. D.; Hunsberger, R.; Ness, J. E.; Harris, T.; Raibley, T.; Ursillo, P.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Waste Hoist  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Primary Hoist: 45-ton Rope-Guide Friction Hoist Largest friction hoist in the world when it was built in 1985 Completely enclosed (for contamination control), the waste hoist at WIPP is a modern friction hoist with rope guides (uses a balanced counterweight and tail ropes). With a 45-ton capacity, it was the largest friction hoist in the world when it was built in 1986. Hoist deck footprint: 2.87m wide x 4.67m long Hoist deck height: 2.87m wide x 7.46m high Access height to the waste hoist deck is limited by a high-bay door at 4.14m high Nominal configuration is 2-cage (over/under), with bottom (equipment) cage interior height of 4.52m The photo, at left, shows the 4.14m high-bay doors at the top collar of the waste hoist shaft. The perpendicular cross section of the opening is 3.5m x 4.14m, but the bottom cage cross section is 2.87m x 4.5m (and 4.67m into the plane of the photo).

332

Building Green in Greensburg: City Hall Building  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

This poster highlights energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable features of the high-performing City Hall building in Greensburg, Kansas.

333

Building America Webinar: High Performance Building Enclosures...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

used to improve energy performance of building envelopes while dealing with issues like ice damming during exterior "overcoat" insulation retrofits? How can deep energy retrofits...

334

3612--VOLUME 27A, NOVEMBER 1996 METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS TRANSACTIONS A Solidification of an Alloy 625 Weld Overlay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

steel by gas metal arc welding was investigated by light and electron optical microscopy, electron to that produced in dissimilar welds between Alloy 625 and Cr- Mo steels in weld overlay applications of an Alloy 625 Weld Overlay J.N. DuPONT The solidification behavior (microsegregation, secondary phase

DuPont, John N.

335

Reference Alloy Waste Form Fabrication and Initiation of Reducing Atmosphere and Reductive Additives Study on Alloy Waste Form Fabrication  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the fabrication of two reference alloy waste forms, RAW-1(Re) and RAW-(Tc) using an optimized loading and heating method. The composition of the alloy materials was based on a generalized formulation to process various proposed feed streams resulting from the processing of used fuel. Waste elements are introduced into molten steel during alloy fabrication and, upon solidification, become incorporated into durable iron-based intermetallic phases of the alloy waste form. The first alloy ingot contained surrogate (non-radioactive), transition-metal fission products with rhenium acting as a surrogate for technetium. The second alloy ingot contained the same components as the first ingot, but included radioactive Tc-99 instead of rhenium. Understanding technetium behavior in the waste form is of particular importance due the longevity of Tc-99 and its mobility in the biosphere in the oxide form. RAW-1(Re) and RAW-1(Tc) are currently being used as test specimens in the comprehensive testing program investigating the corrosion and radionuclide release mechanisms of the representative alloy waste form. Also described in this report is the experimental plan to study the effects of reducing atmospheres and reducing additives to the alloy material during fabrication in an attempt to maximize the oxide content of waste streams that can be accommodated in the alloy waste form. Activities described in the experimental plan will be performed in FY12. The first aspect of the experimental plan is to study oxide formation on the alloy by introducing O2 impurities in the melt cover gas or from added oxide impurities in the feed materials. Reducing atmospheres will then be introduced to the melt cover gas in an attempt to minimize oxide formation during alloy fabrication. The second phase of the experimental plan is to investigate melting parameters associated with alloy fabrication to allow the separation of slag and alloy components of the melt.

S.M. Frank; T.P. O'Holleran; P.A. Hahn

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Waste management policy revisions: lessons learned from the Katrina disaster  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main objective of this paper is to identify debris and waste management policies that need to be changed based on the lessons learned from Hurricane Katrina. Policy issues addressed include fragmented jurisdictional problems, issues related to types of debris, burning of house hold debris, wood infestation with Formosan termites and banning of yard wastes from landfills. Current practices and trends in the building material waste management following disasters are examined from a building life cycle standpoint or cradle to cradle concept. Completing the proper planning before the disaster is critical. Having a plan in place can allow for maximum, integrated recycling, resource optimisation, waste reduction and deconstruction. Examination of the waste management hierarchy and life cycle management of material is used to improve the understanding of reuse and recycle opportunities. Based on the lessons learnt from Hurricane Katrina proposed changes in debris management policy following natural disasters.

William E. Roper

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Decommissioning of TA-21-153, a /sup 227/Ac contaminated old filter building  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An exhaust air filter building contaminated with /sup 227/Ac was decommissioned at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, in 1978. The building was constructed in the late 1940s to clean exhaust air from several buildings at TA-21, DP Site. It was in service until March 1970. The project involved preliminary decontamination, dismantling the building, and burying the debris at an on-site waste disposal/storage area. This report presents the details on the decommissioning procedures, health physics, waste management, environmental surveillance, and costs for the operation.

Harper, J.R.; Garde, R.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Partner With DOE and Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Residential Links

339

Building Technologies Office: Integrated Whole-Building Energy Diagnostics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Integrated Integrated Whole-Building Energy Diagnostics Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Whole-Building Energy Diagnostics Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Integrated Whole-Building Energy Diagnostics Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Whole-Building Energy Diagnostics Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Whole-Building Energy Diagnostics Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Integrated Whole-Building Energy Diagnostics Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Whole-Building Energy Diagnostics Research Project on AddThis.com...

340

Re-Assessing Green Building Performance: A Post Occupancy Evaluation of 22 GSA Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

2nd report on the performance of GSA's sustainably designed buildings. The purpose of this study was to provide an overview of measured whole building performance as it compares to GSA and industry baselines. The PNNL research team found the data analysis illuminated strengths and weaknesses of individual buildings as well as the portfolio of buildings. This section includes summary data, observations that cross multiple performance metrics, discussion of lessons learned from this research, and opportunities for future research. The summary of annual data for each of the performance metrics is provided in Table 25. The data represent 1 year of measurements and are not associated with any specific design features or strategies. Where available, multiple years of data were examined and there were minimal significant differences between the years. Individually focused post occupancy evaluation (POEs) would allow for more detailed analysis of the buildings. Examining building performance over multiple years could potentially offer a useful diagnostic tool for identifying building operations that are in need of operational changes. Investigating what the connection is between the building performance and the design intent would offer potential design guidance and possible insight into building operation strategies. The 'aggregate operating cost' metric used in this study represents the costs that were available for developing a comparative industry baseline for office buildings. The costs include water utilities, energy utilities, general maintenance, grounds maintenance, waste and recycling, and janitorial costs. Three of the buildings that cost more than the baseline in Figure 45 have higher maintenance costs than the baseline, and one has higher energy costs. Given the volume of data collected and analyzed for this study, the inevitable request is for a simple answer with respect to sustainably designed building performance. As previously stated, compiling the individual building values into single metrics is not statistically valid given the small number of buildings, but it has been done to provide a cursory view of this portfolio of sustainably designed buildings. For all metrics except recycling cost per rentable square foot and CBE survey response rate, the averaged building performance was better than the baseline for the GSA buildings in this study.

Fowler, Kimberly M.; Rauch, Emily M.; Henderson, Jordan W.; Kora, Angela R.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste solidification building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Radionuclide Retention Mechanisms in Secondary Waste-Form Testing: Phase II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate candidate stabilization technologies that have the potential to successfully treat liquid secondary waste stream effluents produced by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). WRPS is considering the design and construction of a Solidification Treatment Unit (STU) for the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at Hanford. The ETF, a multi-waste, treatment-and-storage unit that has been permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), can accept dangerous, low-level, and mixed wastewaters for treatment. The STU needs to be operational by 2018 to receive secondary liquid waste generated during operation of the WTP. The STU will provide the additional capacity needed for ETF to process the increased volume of secondary waste expected to be produced by WTP. This report on radionuclide retention mechanisms describes the testing and characterization results that improve understanding of radionuclide retention mechanisms, especially for pertechnetate, {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} in four different waste forms: Cast Stone, DuraLith alkali aluminosilicate geopolymer, encapsulated fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) product, and Ceramicrete phosphate bonded ceramic. These data and results will be used to fill existing data gaps on the candidate technologies to support a decision-making process that will identify a subset of the candidate waste forms that are most promising and should undergo further performance testing.

Um, Wooyong; Valenta, Michelle M.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Yang, Jungseok; Engelhard, Mark H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Parker, Kent E.; Wang, Guohui; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Westsik, Joseph H.

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

342

Religious Worship Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Religious Worship Religious Worship Characteristics by Activity... Religious Worship Religious worship buildings are those in which people gather for religious activities. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Religious Worship Buildings... 93 percent of religious worship buildings were less than 25,000 square feet. The oldest religious worship buildings were found in the Northeast, where the median age was over two and half times older than those in South, where religious worship buildings were the newest. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics Top Number of Religious Worship Buildings by Predominant Building Size Categories Figure showing number of worship buildings by size. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800.

343

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4.1 Federal Buildings Energy Consumption 4.1 Federal Buildings Energy Consumption 4.2 Federal Buildings and Facilities Characteristics 4.3 Federal Buildings and Facilities Expenditures 4.4 Legislation Affecting Energy Consumption of Federal Buildings and Facilities 5Envelope and Equipment 6Energy Supply 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables This chapter provides information on Federal building energy consumption, characteristics, and expenditures, as well as information on legislation affecting said consumption. The main points from this chapter are summarized below: In FY 2007, Federal buildings accounted for 2.2% of all building energy consumption and 0.9% of total U.S. energy consumption.

344

Eco-efficient waste glass recycling: Integrated waste management and green product development through LCA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new eco-efficient recycling route for post-consumer waste glass was implemented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrated waste management and industrial production are crucial to green products. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most of the waste glass rejects are sent back to the glass industry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recovered co-products give more environmental gains than does avoided landfill. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy intensive recycling must be limited to waste that cannot be closed-loop recycled. - Abstract: As part of the EU Life + NOVEDI project, a new eco-efficient recycling route has been implemented to maximise resources and energy recovery from post-consumer waste glass, through integrated waste management and industrial production. Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been used to identify engineering solutions to sustainability during the development of green building products. The new process and the related LCA are framed within a meaningful case of industrial symbiosis, where multiple waste streams are utilised in a multi-output industrial process. The input is a mix of rejected waste glass from conventional container glass recycling and waste special glass such as monitor glass, bulbs and glass fibres. The green building product is a recycled foam glass (RFG) to be used in high efficiency thermally insulating and lightweight concrete. The environmental gains have been contrasted against induced impacts and improvements have been proposed. Recovered co-products, such as glass fragments/powders, plastics and metals, correspond to environmental gains that are higher than those related to landfill avoidance, whereas the latter is cancelled due to increased transportation distances. In accordance to an eco-efficiency principle, it has been highlighted that recourse to highly energy intensive recycling should be limited to waste that cannot be closed-loop recycled.

Blengini, Gian Andrea, E-mail: blengini@polito.it [DISPEA - Department of Production Systems and Business Economics, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); CNR-IGAG, Institute of Environmental Geology and Geo-Engineering, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Busto, Mirko, E-mail: mirko.busto@polito.it [DISPEA - Department of Production Systems and Business Economics, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Fantoni, Moris, E-mail: moris.fantoni@polito.it [DITAG - Department of Land, Environment and Geo-Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Fino, Debora, E-mail: debora.fino@polito.it [DISMIC - Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

King County - Green Building Initiative (Washington) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

King County - Green Building Initiative (Washington) King County - Green Building Initiative (Washington) King County - Green Building Initiative (Washington) < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider King County Solid Waste Division The King County Green Building Initiative started in 2001, and was included in the King Code Code with the Green Building and Sustainable Development Ordinance in 2008. The ordinance requires that all county-owned facilities and financial capital projects be built to LEED Gold standards, including new construction, major renovations, and projects using alternative funding. Major renovations are defined in the statutes as work that affects

346

Commercial Building Research and Development | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Research and Research and Development Commercial Building Research and Development Photo of NREL researcher Jeff Tomberlin working on a data acquisition panel at the Building Efficiency Data Acquisition and Control Laboratory at NREL's Thermal Test Facility. The Building Technologies Office (BTO) invests in technology research and development activities that can dramatically reduce energy consumption and energy waste in buildings. Buildings in the United States use nearly 40 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) of energy for space heating and cooling, lighting, and appliances, an amount equivalent to the annual amount of electricity delivered by more than 3,800 500-megawatt coal-fired power plants. The BTO technology portfolio aims to help reduce building energy requirements by 50% through the use of improved appliances; windows,

347

Modification and expansion of X-7725A Waste Accountability Facility for storage of polychlorinated biphenyl wastes at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) must manage wastes containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in accordance with Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) requirements and as prescribed in a Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement (FFCA) between DOE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). PCB-containing wastes are currently stored in the PORTS process buildings where they are generated. DOE proposes to modify and expand the Waste Accountability facility (X-7725A) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Piketon, Ohio, to provide a central storage location for these wastes. The proposed action is needed to eliminate the fire and safety hazards presented by the wastes. In this EA, DOE considers four alternatives: (1) no action, which requires storing wastes in limited storage areas in existing facilities; (2) modifying and expanding the X-7725A waste accountability facility; (3) constructing a new PCB waste storage building; and (4) shipping PCB wastes to the K-25 TSCA incinerator. If no action is taken, PCB-contaminated would continue to be stored in Bldgs X-326, X-330, and X-333. As TSCA cleanup activities continue, the quantity of stored waste would increase, which would subsequently cause congestion in the three process buildings and increase fire and safety hazards. The preferred alternative is to modify and expand Bldg. X-7725A to store wastes generated by TSCA compliance activities. Construction, which could begin as early as April 1996, would last approximately five to seven months, with a total peak work force of 70.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Small- and Medium-Sized Commercial Building Monitoring and Controls Needs: A Scoping Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Buildings consume over 40% of the total energy consumption in the U.S. A significant portion of the energy consumed in buildings is wasted because of the lack of controls or the inability to use existing building automation systems (BASs) properly. Much of the waste occurs because of our inability to manage and controls buildings efficiently. Over 90% of the buildings are either small-size (<5,000 sf) or medium-size (between 5,000 sf and 50,000 sf); these buildings currently do not use BASs to monitor and control their building systems from a central location. According to Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), about 10% of the buildings in the U.S. use BASs or central controls to manage their building system operations. Buildings that use BASs are typically large (>100,000 sf). Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) were asked by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Technologies Program (BTP) to identify monitoring and control needs for small- and medium-sized commercial buildings and recommend possible solutions. This study documents the needs and solutions for small- and medium-sized buildings.

Katipamula, Srinivas; Underhill, Ronald M.; Goddard, James K.; Taasevigen, Danny J.; Piette, M. A.; Granderson, J.; Brown, Rich E.; Lanzisera, Steven M.; Kuruganti, T.

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

349

Energy Efficient Buildings Hub  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Henry C. Foley Henry C. Foley April 3, 2013 Presentation at the U.S. DOE Building Technologies Office Peer Review Meeting Purpose and Objectives * Problem Statement - Building energy efficiency has not increased in recent decades compared to other sectors especially transportation - Building component technologies have become more energy efficient but buildings as a whole have not * Impact of Project - A 20% reduction in commercial building energy use could save the nation four quads of energy annually * Project Focus - This is more than a technological challenge; the technology needed to achieve a 10% reduction in building energy use exists - The Hub approach is to comprehensively and systematically address

350

Public Assembly Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Assembly Assembly Characteristics by Activity... Public Assembly Public assembly buildings are those in which people gather for social or recreational activities, whether in private or non-private meeting halls. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Public Assembly Buildings... Most public assembly buildings were not large convention centers or entertainment arenas; about two-fifths fell into the smallest size category. About one-fifth of public assembly buildings were government-owned, mostly by local governments; examples of these types of public assembly buildings are libraries and community recreational facilities. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics

351

DOE Building Technologies Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Overview Overview September 2013 Buildings.energy.gov/BPD BuildingsPerformanceDatabase@ee.doe.gov 2 * The BPD statistically analyzes trends in the energy performance and physical & operational characteristics of real commercial and residential buildings. The Buildings Performance Database 3 Design Principles * The BPD contains actual data on existing buildings - not modeled data or anecdotal evidence. * The BPD enables statistical analysis without revealing information about individual buildings. * The BPD cleanses and validates data from many sources and translates it into a standard format. * In addition to the BPD's analysis tools, third parties will be able to create applications using the

352

FOREST CENTRE STORAGE BUILDING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FOREST CENTRE STORAGE BUILDING 3 4 5 6 7 8 UniversityDr. 2 1 G r e n f e l l D r i v e MULTI BUILDING STORAGE BUILDING LIBRARY & COMPUTING FINE ARTS FOREST CENTRE ARTS &SCIENCE BUILDING ARTS &SCIENCE BUILDING A&S BUILDING EXTENSIO N P7 P5.1 P5 P2 P3.1 P3.2 P6 P8 P4 P2 P2 P4 P8 P2.4 PARKING MAP GRENFELL

deYoung, Brad

353

Design/installation and structural integrity assessment under the Federal Facility Agreement for Bethel Valley low-level waste collection and transfer system upgrade for Building 2026 (High Radiation Level Analytical Laboratory) and Building 2099 (Monitoring and Control Station) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents a Design/Installation and Structural Integrity Assessment for a replacement tank system for portions of the Bethel Valley Low-Level Waste (LLW) System, located at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This issue of the assessment covers the design aspects of the replacement tank system, and certifies that the design has sufficient structural integrity and is acceptable for the storing or treating of hazardous and/or radioactive substances. This document will be reissued at a future date and will then include the assessment of the installation of the replacement tank system. The present issue identifies specific activities that must be completed during the fabrication, installation, and testing of the replacement tank system in order to provide assurance that the final installation complies with governing requirements.

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile Abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fiberous and other waste materials from textile production. The use of recyclable materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, fiber waste, glass fiber wastes, and waste dusts for use in textile products, insulation, paneling and other building supplies, yarns, roping, and pavement materials are considered. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are referenced in related bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

EECBG Success Story: A Former "Most Wanted" Building Gets a Reprieve...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

March 16, 2011 - 9:12am Addthis A former "Most Wanted" building in Texas is now reducing energy waste and generating serious energy savings thanks to the Energy Efficiency and...

356

Energy Department Recognizes City of Roanoke, VA for Leadership in Better Buildings Challenge  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

As part of the Obama Administration’s effort to cut energy waste in the nation’s buildings, the Energy Department today recognized the city of Roanoke, Virginia for its leadership.

357

Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the 'Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities' (DSA) (LLNL 2008). The analysis presented therein determined that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., size reduction and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are located in two portions of the LLNL main site. A625 is located in the southeast quadrant of LLNL. The A625 fenceline is approximately 225 m west of Greenville Road. The DWTF Storage Area, which includes Building 693 (B693), Building 696 Radioactive Waste Storage Area (B696R), and associated yard areas and storage areas within the yard, is located in the northeast quadrant of LLNL in the DWTF complex. The DWTF Storage Area fenceline is approximately 90 m west of Greenville Road. A625 and the DWTF Storage Area are subdivided into various facilities and storage areas, consisting of buildings, tents, other structures, and open areas as described in Chapter 2 of the DSA. Section 2.4 of the DSA provides an overview of the buildings, structures, and areas in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, including construction details such as basic floor plans, equipment layout, construction materials, controlling dimensions, and dimensions significant to the hazard and accident analysis. Chapter 5 of the DSA documents the derivation of the TSRs and develops the operational limits that protect the safety envelope defined for the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. This TSR document is applicable to the handling, storage, and treatment of hazardous waste, TRU WASTE, LLW, mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste received or generated in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Section 5, Administrative Controls, contains those Administrative Controls necessary to ensure safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Programmatic Administrative Controls are in Section 5.6.

Laycak, D T

2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

358

NREL: Buildings Research - Residential Buildings Research Staff  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Residential Buildings Research Staff Residential Buildings Research Staff Members of the Residential Buildings research staff have backgrounds in architectural, civil, electrical, environmental, and mechanical engineering, as well as environmental design and physics. Ren Anderson Dennis Barley Chuck Booten Jay Burch Sean Casey Craig Christensen Dane Christensen Lieko Earle Cheryn Engebrecht Mike Gestwick Mike Heaney Scott Horowitz Kate Hudon Xin Jin Noel Merket Tim Merrigan David Roberts Joseph Robertson Stacey Rothgeb Bethany Sparn Paulo Cesar Tabares-Velasco Jeff Tomerlin Jon Winkler Jason Woods Support Staff Marcia Fratello Kristy Usnick Photo of Ren Anderson Ren Anderson, Ph.D., Manager, Residential Research Group ren.anderson@nrel.gov Research Focus: Evaluating the whole building benefits of emerging building energy

359

Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Teams  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Teams Teams Building America research projects are completed by industry consortia (teams) comprised of leading experts from across the country. The research teams design, test, upgrade and build high performance homes using strategies that significantly cut energy use. Building America research teams are selected through a competitive process initiated by a request for proposals. Team members are experts in the field of residential building science, and have access to world-class research facilities, partners, and key personnel, ensuring successful progress toward U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goals. This page provides a brief description of the teams, areas of focus, and key team members. Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Alliance for Residential Building Innovation

360

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy Working with industry representatives and partners is critical to achieving significant improvements in the energy efficiency of new and existing commercial buildings. Here you will learn more about the government-industry partnerships that move us toward that goal. Key alliances and partnerships include: Photo of downtown Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, a municipal Better Buildings Challenge partner, at dusk. Credit: iStockphoto Better Buildings Challenge This national leadership initiative calls on corporate officers, university presidents, and local leaders to progess towards the goal of making American buildings 20 percent more energy-efficient by 2020. Photo of Jim McClendon of Walmart speaking during the CBEA Executive Exchange with Commercial Building Stakeholders forum at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado, on May 24, 2012.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste solidification building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Building Activities Building Activities The Department of Energy (DOE) is leading several different activities to develop, demonstrate, and deploy cost-effective solutions to reduce energy consumption across the residential building sector by at least 50%. The U.S. DOE Solar Decathlon is a biennial contest which challenges college teams to design and build energy efficient houses powered by the sun. Each team competes in 10 contests designed to gauge the performance, livability and affordability of their house. The Building America program develops market-ready energy solutions that improve the efficiency of new and existing homes while increasing comfort, safety, and durability. Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals foster the growth of a high quality residential energy upgrade industry and a skilled and credentialed workforce.

362

Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

ELLEFSON, M.D.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Savannah River Tank Waste Residuals  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah Savannah River Savannah River Tank Waste Residuals HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 1 November 6, 2008 Presentation By Sherri R. Ross Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office The Issue * How clean is clean? * Ultimate Challenge - Justify highly radioactive radionuclides have been removed to the maximum extent practical? 2 removed to the maximum extent practical? - Building compelling regulatory documentation that will withstand intense scrutiny §3116 Requirements 1. Does not require disposal in deep geological repository 2. Highly radioactive radionuclides removed to the maximum extent practical 3. Meet the performance objectives in 10 CFR Part 3 3. Meet the performance objectives in 10 CFR Part 61, Subpart C 4. Waste disposed pursuant to a State-approved closure plan or permit Note: If it is anticipated that Class C disposal limits will be exceeded, additional

364

Radioactive Waste Management (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section regulates the transportation and disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Minnesota, and establishes a Nuclear Waste Council to monitor the federal high-level radioactive waste...

365

Investigation on the solidification of several pure cyclic and aromatic hydrocarbons at pressures to 300 MPa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of pressure on the solidification of several saturated cyclic hydrocarbons and three xylene isomers are experimentally determined with a variable-volume view cell at pressures to 300 MPa and temperatures starting at 293.15 K. Solid–liquid transitions are observed for cyclooctane, cis-1,2-dimethylcyclohexane, trans-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane, p-xylene, o-xylene, and 2-methylnaphthalene. However, methylcyclohexane, ethylcyclohexane, cis-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane, and m-xylene remained liquid over the same operating pressure and temperature ranges. The experimental solid–liquid transition data are well represented with two empirical equations, the Simon equation and a 2nd-order polynomial equation. Data obtained in this study agree with literature data within ±0.4% for 2-methylnaphthalene and ±0.2% for p-xylene.

Wu, Yue; Liu, Kun; Bamgbade, Babatunde A.; McHugh, Mark A.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Cellular interface morphologies in directional solidification. IV. The formation of deep cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Steadily growing, spatially periodic, two-dimensional cellular interfaces with groves up to 15 times longer than their wavelength are calculated by a novel finite-element method applied to the solutal model for solidification that includes diffusion in the solid. The deep cells are formed by either continuously decreasing the temperature gradient or increasing the growth velocity from the values for a marginally unstable planar interface. As predicted by previous finite-element calculations [L. Ungar and R. Brown, Phys. Rev. B. 29, 1367 (1984)], large-amplitude cells are found at half the spatial wavelength of the small-amplitude instability to the planar shape. Steady-state growth is predicted to end when droplets of the melt are detached from the bottom of the grooves between the cells. The influence of the ratio of solid to liquid diffusivities on the cell shape and the adjacent concentration field is examined.

Lyle H. Ungar and Robert A. Brown

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Influence of Alloy and Solidification Parameters on Grain Refinement in Aluminum Weld Metal due to Inoculation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals are: (1) Establish how much Ti/B grain refiner is need to completely refine aluminum weld metal for different alloys and different welding conditions; (2) Characterize how alloy composition and solidification parameters affect weld metal grain refinement; and (3) Apply relevant theory to understand observed behavior. Conclusions are: (1) additions of Ti/B grain refiner to weld metal in Alloys 1050, 5083, and 6082 resulted in significant grain refinement; (2) grain refinement was more effective in GTAW than LBW, resulting in finer grains at lower Ti content - reason is limited time available for equiaxed grain growth in LBW (inability to occlude columnar grain growth); (3) welding travel speed did not markedly affect grain size within GTAW and LBW clusters; and (4) application of Hunt CET analysis showed experimental G to be on the order of the critical G{sub CET}; G{sub CET} was consistently higher for GTAW than for LBW.

Schempp, Philipp [BAM, Germany; Tang, Z. [BIAS, Germany; Cross, Carl E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Seefeld, T. [BIAS, Germany; Pittner, A. [BAM, Germany; Rethmeier, M. [BAM, Germany

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

368

Building Technologies Office: Building America's Top Innovations Advance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

America's Top America's Top Innovations Advance High Performance Homes to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Building America's Top Innovations Advance High Performance Homes on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Building America's Top Innovations Advance High Performance Homes on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America's Top Innovations Advance High Performance Homes on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America's Top Innovations Advance High Performance Homes on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Building America's Top Innovations Advance High Performance Homes on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Building America's Top Innovations Advance High Performance Homes on AddThis.com...

369

Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building Technologies Office  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Webinars Webinars Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building Technologies Office Events and Webinars Updates to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building Technologies Office Events and Webinars Updates on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building Technologies Office Events and Webinars Updates on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building Technologies Office Events and Webinars Updates on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building Technologies Office Events and Webinars Updates on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building Technologies Office Events and Webinars Updates on Digg

370

Reference Buildings by Building Type: Strip mall | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Strip mall Reference Buildings by Building Type: Strip mall In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes...

371

Reference Buildings by Building Type: Large Hotel | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hotel Reference Buildings by Building Type: Large Hotel In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the...

372

DOE ZERH Webinar: Going Green and Building Strong: Building FORTIFIED...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Strong: Building FORTIFIED Homes Part II DOE ZERH Webinar: Going Green and Building Strong: Building FORTIFIED Homes Part II Watch the video or view the presentation slides below...

373

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Buildings and Floorspace  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

activity. Number of Commercial Buildings In 1979, the Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey estimated that there were 3.8 million commercial buildings in the...

374

Building Green in Greensburg: Business Incubator Building | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Business Incubator Building Building Green in Greensburg: Business Incubator Building This poster highlights energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable features of the...

375

Apply: Funding Opportunity- Buildings University Innovators and Leaders Development (BUILD)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Building Technologies Office (BTO)’s Emerging Technologies Program has announced the availability of up to $1 million for the Buildings University Innovators and Leaders Development (BUILD)...

376

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Development to someone by E-mail Program Development to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Program Development on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Program Development on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Program Development on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Program Development on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Program Development on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Program Development on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator

377

Building operating systems services: An architecture for programmable buildings.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

7.3.2 Building Performance Analysis . . . . . . 7.4 RelatedWork 2.1 Building Physical Design . . . . . . . . . .3.2.6 Building Applications . . . . . . . . . . .

Dawson-Haggerty, Stephen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey—Commercial Buildings Characteristics Released: May 2002 Topics: Energy Sources and End Uses | End-Use Equipment | Conservation Features and Practices Additional Information on: Survey methods, data limitations, and other information supporting the data The 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) was the seventh in the series begun in 1979. The 1999 CBECS estimated that 4.7 million commercial buildings (± 0.4 million buildings, at the 95% confidence level) were present in the United States in that year. Those buildings comprised a total of 67.3 (± 4.6) billion square feet of floorspace. Additional information on 1979 to 1999 trends

379

Model Building Energy Code  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more...

380

Macallen Building Condominiums  

High Performance Buildings Database

Boston, MA The Macallen Building, a 140-unit condominium building in South Boston, was designed to incorporate green design as a way of marketing a green lifestyle while at the same time increasing revenue from the project.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste solidification building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Building Energy Code  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

''Note: Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For...

382

Lockheed Building 157  

High Performance Buildings Database

Sunnyvale, CA In 1983, Lockheed Missiles and Space Company, Inc. (now Lockheed Martin) moved 2,700 engineers and support staff from an older office building on the Lockheed campus into the new Building 157.

383

Better Buildings Federal Award  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Better Buildings Federal Award recognizes the Federal Government's highest-performing buildings through a competition to reduce annual energy use intensity (Btu per square foot of facility space) on a year-over-year basis.

384

Building Energy Code  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more...

385

Building Energy Standards  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more...

386

Special Building Renovations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A number of building types have specific energy uses and needs, and as such the renewable opportunities may be different from a typical office building. This section briefly discusses the following...

387

Grid-Responsive Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S.-India Joint Center for Building Energy Research and Development (CBERD) conducts energy efficiency research and development with a focus on integrating information technology with building controls and physical systems for commercial/high-rise residential units.

388

Sustainable Building Contacts | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Sustainable Building Contacts Sustainable Building Contacts For more information about sustainable buildings and campuses, contact: Sarah Jensen...

389

Radioactive Waste Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish policies and guidelines by which the Department of Energy (DOE) manages tis radioactive waste, waste byproducts, and radioactively contaminated surplus facilities.

1984-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

390

Transuranic Waste Requirements  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The guide provides criteria for determining if a waste is to be managed in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter III, Transuranic Waste Requirements.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

391

Waste?to?Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Waste?to?Energy Roadmapping Workshop Waste?to?Energy Presentation by Jonathan Male, Director of the Bioenery Technolgies Office, Department of Energy

392

Buildings Performance Database  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Buildings Performance DOE Buildings Performance Database Paul Mathew Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory pamathew@lbl.gov (510) 486 5116 April 3, 2013 Standard Data Spec API 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: * Large-scale high-quality empirical data on building energy performance is critical to support decision- making and increase confidence in energy efficiency investments. * While there are a many potential sources for such data,

393

Buildings Performance Database Overview  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Buildings Performance Database Overview, from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

394

Kiowa County Commons Building  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This poster describes the energy efficiency features and sustainable materials used in the Kiowa County Commons Building in Greensburg, Kansas.

395

Buildings Sector Working Group  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

heating, cooking, lighting, and refrigeration * Hurdle rates - Update using latest Johnson Controls reports regarding commercial investment decisions * ENERGY STAR buildings -...

396

WASTE PACKAGE REMEDIATION SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Package Remediation System remediates waste packages (WPs) and disposal containers (DCs) in one of two ways: preparation of rejected DC closure welds for repair or opening of the DC/WP. DCs are brought to the Waste Package Remediation System for preparation of rejected closure welds if testing of the closure weld by the Disposal Container Handling System indicates an unacceptable, but repairable, welding flaw. DC preparation of rejected closure welds will require removal of the weld in such a way that the Disposal Container Handling System may resume and complete the closure welding process. DCs/WPs are brought to the Waste Package Remediation System for opening if the Disposal Container Handling System testing of the DC closure weld indicates an unrepairable welding flaw, or if a WP is recovered from the subsurface repository because suspected damage to the WP or failure of the WP has occurred. DC/WP opening will require cutting of the DC/WP such that a temporary seal may be installed and the waste inside the DC/WP removed by another system. The system operates in a Waste Package Remediation System hot cell located in the Waste Handling Building that has direct access to the Disposal Container Handling System. One DC/WP at a time can be handled in the hot cell. The DC/WP arrives on a transfer cart, is positioned within the cell for system operations, and exits the cell without being removed from the cart. The system includes a wide variety of remotely operated components including a manipulator with hoist and/or jib crane, viewing systems, machine tools for opening WPs, and equipment used to perform pressure and gas composition sampling. Remotely operated equipment is designed to facilitate DC/WP decontamination and hot cell equipment maintenance, and interchangeable components are provided where appropriate. The Waste Package Remediation System interfaces with the Disposal Container Handling System for the receipt and transport of WPs and DCs. The Waste Handling Building System houses the system, and provides the facility, safety, and auxiliary systems required to support operations. The system receives power from the Waste Handling Building Electrical System. The system also interfaces with the various DC systems.

N.D. Sudan

2000-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

397

Nuclear Waste Disposal: Amounts of Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The term nuclear waste...embraces all residues from the use of radioactive materials, including uses in medicine and industry. The most highly radioactive of these are the spent fuel or reprocessed wastes from co...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

HEEP CENTER Building # 1502  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 HEEP CENTER Building # 1502 EMERGENCY EVACUATION PLAN Prepared by: Harry Cralle and Mark Wright a building. Examples of such occasions include: smoke/fire, gas leak, bomb threat. Pre-planning and rehearsal are effective ways to ensure that building occupants recognize the evacuation alarm and know how to respond

Tomberlin, Jeff

399

Digital Planetaria: Building Bridges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Digital Planetaria: Building Bridges Building Bridges Between Institutions, Universities Group Goals & Objectives: The goal of the Building Bridges focus group was to create a framework applications and dreaming about their potential in the digital dome environment. #12;L to R, Back to front

Collar, Juan I.

400

Link Building Martin Olsen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Link Building Martin Olsen PhD Dissertation Department of Computer Science Aarhus University Denmark #12;#12;Link Building A Dissertation Presented to the Faculty of Science of Aarhus University The Computational Complexity of Link Building Proc. Computing and Combinatorics, 14th Annual International

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste solidification building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

BROOKHAVENNATIONAL LABORATORY Building 510  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BROOKHAVENNATIONAL LABORATORY Building 510 P.O. Box 5000 Upton, NY 11973-5000 Phone 631 344 in C-AD buildings. Work Planning and Control for Experiments The intent of this agreement is to ensure or modification work on experiments performed by Physics personnel or guests in C-AD buildings. The Collider

Homes, Christopher C.

402

Bioengineering/ Engineering Building,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BioE/ChemE Building Bioengineering/ Chemical Engineering Building, Under Construction Roble Hall 'CO NNO R LN Skilling HEPL South Green Earth Sciences Mitchell Earth Sciences Moore Materials Rsrch. Durand David Packard Elect. Eng. Paul G. Allen Building Godzilla Thornton Center Bambi Roble Gym e

Bogyo, Matthew

403

Bioengineering/ Engineering Building,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BioE/ChemE Building Bioengineering/ Chemical Engineering Building, Under Construction HFD HFD HFD GALVEZST CAPISTRANOW BOWDOIN LN L VIAORTEGA VIAPALOU O 'CO NNO R LN Skilling HEPL South Green Earth Building Godzilla Thornton Center Bambi Roble Gym e Cypress Hall Cedar Hall Cogen Facility Tresidder Union

Bogyo, Matthew

404

The Economics of Green Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environment Quality in Green Buildings: A Review," Nationalof Popular Attention to Green Building Notes: Sources:2007 - 2009 panel of green buildings and nearby control

Eichholtz, Piet; Kok, Nils; Quigley, John M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey 1993  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

mobile homes and trailers, even if they housed commercial activity; and oil storage tanks. (See Commercial Building and Nonresidential Building.) Building Envelope or Shell...

406

PROGRESS IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

made in the energy efficiency of buildings. Better cost dataimproving energy efficiency of buildings is being addressedimprovement of energy efficiency in buildings are briefly

Wall, L.W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Westinghouse Waste Simulation and Optimization Software Tool - 13493  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive waste is produced during NPP operation and NPP D and D. Different kinds of waste with different volumes and properties have to be treated. Finding a technically and commercially optimized waste treatment concept is a difficult and time consuming process. The Westinghouse waste simulation and optimization software tool is an approach to study the total life cycle cost of any waste management facility. The tool enables the user of the simulation and optimization software to plan processes and storage buildings and to identify bottlenecks in the overall waste management design before starting detailed planning activities. Furthermore, application of the software enables the user to optimize the number of treatment systems, to determine the minimum design capacity for onsite storage facilities, to identify bottlenecks in the overall design and to identify the most cost-effective treatment paths by maintaining optimal waste treatment technologies. In combination with proven waste treatment equipment and integrated waste management solutions, the waste simulation and optimization software provides reliable qualitative results that lead to an effective planning and minimization of the total project planning risk of any waste management activity. (authors)

Mennicken, Kim [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Global Waste Management, Dudenstrasse 44, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany)] [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Global Waste Management, Dudenstrasse 44, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Aign, Joerg [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Global Waste Management, Tarpenring 6, D-22419 Hamburg (Germany)] [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Global Waste Management, Tarpenring 6, D-22419 Hamburg (Germany)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Debate over waste imperils 3-Mile cleanup  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cleanup is a task of extraordinary proportions. Every step in the cleanup must be taken in a highly sensitive political and regulatory environment. A demineralizer or ion exchange filtration unit was installed in order that the fission products could be removed from the water spilled in the auxiliary and fuel handling buildings. GPU later vented krypton gas. Twice now engineers have made cautions entries into the containment building as part of the effort to size up the job. Cleanup will be costly, requiring many workers. Some wastes will require special packaging in hundreds of containers with shielded overpacks, plus bulky items of hardware and equipment that cannot be easily packaged. There will be the damaged fuel assemblies from the reactor core. Removing the fuel from the reactor may be difficult. A troublesome waste disposal question has to do with the material to be generated in cleaning up the containment building's sump water. GPU's man in charge of clean-up strategy is to collect the wastes in a form that permits maximum flexibility with respect to their stage, packaging, transport, and ultimate disposal. If plans for disposal of all the wastes from the cleanup are to be completed, an early commitment by Pennsylvania and other northeastern states to establish a burial ground for low level waste generated within the region is needed. Also a speedy commitment by NRC, DOE, and Congress to a plan for disposal of the first-stage zeolites is needed. Should there be a failure to cope with the wastes that Three Mile Island cleanup generates, the whole nuclear enterprise may suffer.

Carter, L.J.

1980-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

409

WasteTraining Booklet Waste & Recycling Impacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WasteTraining Booklet #12;Waste & Recycling Impacts Environment: The majority of our municipal jobs while recycling 10,000 tons of waste creates 36 jobs. Environment: Recycling conserves resources. It takes 95% less energy to make aluminum from recycled aluminum than from virgin materials, 60% less

Saldin, Dilano

410

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into the Viability of a Waste Heat Powered Greenhouse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into the Viability of a Waste Heat Powered Greenhouse Do Youl Bae, Calvin Ng, Joseph Pateman University of British Investigation into the Viability of a Waste Heat Powered Greenhouse Do Youl Bae Calvin Ng Joseph Pateman March. This investigation deals with the viability of building a waste heat powered greenhouse on the roof of the new SUB

411

Energy Department Invests $10 Million to Cut Energy Waste in Small  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

$10 Million to Cut Energy Waste in Small $10 Million to Cut Energy Waste in Small Commercial Buildings Energy Department Invests $10 Million to Cut Energy Waste in Small Commercial Buildings July 17, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Building on President Obama's Climate Action Plan, which calls for steady, responsible steps to reduce carbon pollution and reduce energy bills for U.S. businesses, the Energy Department today announced an award of $10 million for six projects to help small commercial buildings save money by saving energy. These small commercial buildings are less than 50,000 square feet in size and include schools, churches, strip malls, restaurants, and grocery stores. The six projects are aimed at developing user-friendly tools and resources that can be easily deployed at any small building. The Energy

412

Energy Department Invests $10 Million to Cut Energy Waste in Small  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Department Invests $10 Million to Cut Energy Waste in Small Energy Department Invests $10 Million to Cut Energy Waste in Small Commercial Buildings Energy Department Invests $10 Million to Cut Energy Waste in Small Commercial Buildings July 17, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Building on President Obama's Climate Action Plan, which calls for steady, responsible steps to reduce carbon pollution and reduce energy bills for U.S. businesses, the Energy Department today announced an award of $10 million for six projects to help small commercial buildings save money by saving energy. These small commercial buildings are less than 50,000 square feet in size and include schools, churches, strip malls, restaurants, and grocery stores. The six projects are aimed at developing user-friendly tools and resources that can be easily deployed at any small building. The Energy

413

Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Stand-alone retail  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

414

Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Strip mall  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

415

Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Secondary school  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

416

Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Small office  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

417

Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Fast food  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

418

Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Primary school  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

419

Property-close source separation of hazardous waste and waste electrical and electronic equipment - A Swedish case study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through an agreement with EEE producers, Swedish municipalities are responsible for collection of hazardous waste and waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE). In most Swedish municipalities, collection of these waste fractions is concentrated to waste recycling centres where households can source-separate and deposit hazardous waste and WEEE free of charge. However, the centres are often located on the outskirts of city centres and cars are needed in order to use the facilities in most cases. A full-scale experiment was performed in a residential area in southern Sweden to evaluate effects of a system for property-close source separation of hazardous waste and WEEE. After the system was introduced, results show a clear reduction in the amount of hazardous waste and WEEE disposed of incorrectly amongst residual waste or dry recyclables. The systems resulted in a source separation ratio of 70 wt% for hazardous waste and 76 wt% in the case of WEEE. Results show that households in the study area were willing to increase source separation of hazardous waste and WEEE when accessibility was improved and that this and similar collection systems can play an important role in building up increasingly sustainable solid waste management systems.

Bernstad, Anna, E-mail: anna.bernstad@chemeng.lth.se [Dep. of Chem. Eng., Faculty of Eng., Lund University, Lund (Sweden); Cour Jansen, Jes la [Dep. of Chem. Eng., Faculty of Eng., Lund University, Lund (Sweden); Aspegren, Henrik [VA SYD, City of Malmoe (Sweden)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

Building Technologies Office: Sensor Suitcase for Small Commercial Building  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sensor Suitcase for Sensor Suitcase for Small Commercial Building Retro-Commissioning Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Sensor Suitcase for Small Commercial Building Retro-Commissioning Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Sensor Suitcase for Small Commercial Building Retro-Commissioning Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Sensor Suitcase for Small Commercial Building Retro-Commissioning Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Sensor Suitcase for Small Commercial Building Retro-Commissioning Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Sensor Suitcase for Small Commercial Building Retro-Commissioning Research Project on Digg

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste solidification building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Chapter 3: Building Siting  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

: Building Siting : Building Siting Site Issues at LANL Site Inventory and Analysis Site Design Transportation and Parking LANL | Chapter 3 Site Issues at LANL Definitions and related documents Building Siting Laboratory site-wide issues include transportation and travel distances for building occupants, impacts on wildlife corridors and hydrology, and energy supply and distribution limitations. Decisions made during site selec- tion and planning impact the surrounding natural habitat, architectural design integration, building energy con- sumption, occupant comfort, and occupant productivity. Significant opportunities for creating greener facilities arise during the site selection and site planning stages of design. Because LANL development zones are pre- determined, identify the various factors affecting devel-

422

NREL: Buildings Research - Publications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Publications Publications NREL publishes a variety of documents related to its research, including technical reports, brochures, and presentations. Read the information below to find out how to find a publication about buildings research at NREL. Accessing Research Papers Buildings Technical Highlights Research Papers - Commercial Research Papers - Residential Accessing Buildings Research Documents Documents produced by NREL related to buildings technologies may be accessed online in several different ways. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Publications Database The NREL Publications Database covers building technology documents written or edited by NREL staff and subcontractors from 1977 to the present. The database includes technical reports as well as outreach publications such

423

NREL: Buildings Research - Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities NREL provides industry, government, and university researchers with access to state-of-the-art and unique equipment for analyzing a wide spectrum of building energy efficiency technologies and innovations. NREL engineers and researchers work closely with industry partners to research and develop advanced technologies. NREL's existing facilities have been used to test and develop many award-winning building technologies and innovations that deliver significant energy savings in buildings, and the new facilities further extend those capabilities. In addition, the NREL campus includes living laboratories, buildings that researchers and other NREL staff use every day. Researchers monitor real-time building performance data in these facilities to study energy use

424

Better Buildings Alliance  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Kristen Taddonio DOE/EERE/BTO/Commercial Program Kristen.Taddonio@ee.doe.gov April 2, 2013 Better Buildings Alliance BTO Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov BTO Goals: BTO supports the development and deployment of technologies and systems to reduce building energy use by 50 percent, saving ~$2.2 trillion in energy-related costs. CBI Program Goals: New Buildings - Demonstrate 50% cost-effective savings at a convincing scale by 2020 (EISA 2007) - Demonstrate 100% cost-effective savings at a convincing scale by 2030 (EISA 2007) Existing Buildings

425

ORISE: Capacity Building  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capacity Building Capacity Building Because public health agencies must maintain the resources to respond to public health challenges, critical situations and emergencies, the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) helps government agencies and organizations develop a solid infrastructure through capacity building. Capacity building refers to activities that improve an organization's ability to achieve its mission or a person's ability do his or her job more effectively. For organizations, capacity building may relate to almost any aspect of its work-from leadership and administration to program development and implementation. Strengthening an organizational infrastructure can help agencies and community-based organizations more quickly identify targeted audiences for

426

Autotune Building Energy Models  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Autotune Building Energy Models Autotune Building Energy Models Joshua New Oak Ridge National Laboratory newjr@ornl.gov, 865-241-8783 April 2, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: * "All (building energy) models are wrong, but some are useful" - 22%-97% different from utility data for 3,349 buildings * More accurate models are more useful - Error from inputs and algorithms for practical reasons - Useful for cost-effective energy efficiency (EE) at speed and scale

427

Green Building Codes | Building Energy Codes Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Green Building Codes Green Building Codes Green building codes go beyond minimum code requirements, raising the bar for energy efficiency. They can serve as a proving ground for future standards, and incorporate elements beyond the scope of the model energy codes, such as water and resource efficiency. As regional and national green building codes and programs become more available, they provide jurisdictions with another tool for guiding construction and development in an overall less impactful, more sustainable manner. ICC ASHRAE Beyond Codes International Green Construction Code (IgCC) The International Code Council's (ICC's) International Green Construction code (IgCC) is an overlay code, meaning it is written in a manner to be used with all the other ICC codes. The IgCC contains provisions for site

428

Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Challenge  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Challenge Challenge Photo of the Atlanta skyline on a sunny day, including the gold dome of the state capitol. The City of Atlanta has committed 16 million square feet of public and private space to substantive upgrades as part of the Better Buildings Challenge. Credit: iStockphoto The Better Buildings Challenge is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Better Buildings Initiative, which aims to make U.S. commercial and industrial buildings at least 20% more efficient during the next decade. To achieve this aggressive target, DOE is working with public and private sector partners that commit to being leaders in energy efficiency. These partners will implement energy savings practices that improve energy efficiency and save money, and will showcase effective strategies and the results of their efforts.

429

Building America FY14 Projects by Building Type  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This table lists U.S. Department of Energy Building America FY14 research projects by building type.

430

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

431

Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

, 2011 , 2011 Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings Welcome to the Webinar! We will start at 2:00 PM Eastern Time Be sure that you are also dialed into the telephone conference call: Dial-in number: 888-324-9601; Pass code: 5551971 Download the presentation at: www.buildingamerica.gov/meetings.html Building Technologies Program eere.energy.gov Building America: Introduction November 1, 2011 Cheryn Engebrecht Cheryn.engebrecht@nrel.gov Building Technologies Program Building Technologies Program eere.energy.gov * Reduce energy use in new and existing residential buildings * Promote building science and systems engineering / integration approach * "Do no harm": Ensure safety, health and durability are maintained or improved * Accelerate adoption of high performance technologies

432

Building Data Visualization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 Building Data Visualization contour plot Figure 1: Contour plot showing the various operating stages of occupancy sensors described in the case study. Data visualization for buildings is the display of a rich set of variables and parameters that managers can use to verify the energy savings of energy- efficient technology and identify malfunctions in building equipment or problems with operating strategies. Effective data visualization depends on having graphic presentation formats that reveal the phenomena relevant to the building's performance. A research project at the Center for Building Science is aimed at developing data visualization techniques for improved building management. Buildings with energy management control systems as well as dedicated monitoring equipment in the

433

Health Care Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Health Care Health Care Characteristics by Activity... Health Care Health care buildings are those used as diagnostic and treatment facilities for both inpatient and outpatient care. Doctor's and dentist's offices are considered health care if they use any type of diagnostic medical equipment and office if they do not. Skilled nursing or other residential care buildings are categorized as lodging. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Health Care Buildings... Health care buildings in the South tended to be smaller and were more numerous than those in other regions of the country. Buildings on health care complexes tended to be newer than those not on multibuilding facilities. The median age for buildings on health care complexes was 9.5 years, compared to 29.5 years for health care buildings not on a multibuilding facility.

434

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Building Type Definition Includes These Sub-Categories from 2003 CBECS Questionnaire Building Type Definition Includes These Sub-Categories from 2003 CBECS Questionnaire Education Buildings used for academic or technical classroom instruction, such as elementary, middle, or high schools, and classroom buildings on college or university campuses. Buildings on education campuses for which the main use is not classroom are included in the category relating to their use. For example, administration buildings are part of "Office", dormitories are "Lodging", and libraries are "Public Assembly". elementary or middle school high school college or university preschool or daycare adult education career or vocational training religious education Food Sales Buildings used for retail or wholesale of food. grocery store or food market

435

2008 Building Energy2008 Building Energyg gy Efficiency Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Buildings p , p g , Luminaire Power, etc. for Nonresidential Buildings 4 #12;What is New for 2008? R d l B ld What is New for 2008? R d l B ldResidential BuildingsResidential Buildings Mandatory Measures2008 Building Energy2008 Building Energyg gy Efficiency Standards g gy Efficiency Standardsfficie

436

Audit Report U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River Site's Waste Savannah River Site's Waste Solidification Building DOE/IG-IG-0618 September 2003 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 4, 2003 MEMORANDUM FOR FROM: Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Savannah River Site's Waste Solidification Building" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) plans to spend about $58 million to design and construct a facility at the Savannah River Site which will treat radioactive liquid wastes. The proposed facility, commonly referred to as the Waste Solidification Building (WSB), will produce several waste forms acceptable for disposal at existing sites around the complex. This effort is a part of the Department's Plutonium Disposition Program. NNSA approved the conceptual design for the WSB in

437

Property:Building/Boundaries | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Boundaries Boundaries Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Boundaries Pages using the property "Building/Boundaries" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + Several buildings + Sweden Building 05K0002 + Part of a building + Sweden Building 05K0003 + One building + Sweden Building 05K0004 + One building + Sweden Building 05K0005 + One building + Sweden Building 05K0006 + Several buildings + Sweden Building 05K0007 + One building + Sweden Building 05K0008 + One building + Sweden Building 05K0009 + One building + Sweden Building 05K0010 + One building + Sweden Building 05K0011 + One building + Sweden Building 05K0012 + One building + Sweden Building 05K0013 + One building + Sweden Building 05K0014 + One building +

438

Recycling of sodium waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recycling of sodium waste ... Methods for handling and recycling a dangerous and costly chemical. ...

Bettina Hubler-Blank; Michael Witt; Herbert W. Roesky

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source special nuclear and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this document. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge. This document has been revised to meet the interim status waste analysis plan requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173 303-300(5). When the final status permit is issued, permit conditions will be incorporated and this document will be revised accordingly.

ELLEFSON, M.D.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

440

Commercial Building Asset Rating Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Slides from a Commercial Building Initiative webinar outlining the Commercial Building Asset Rating Program on August 23, 2011.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste solidification building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Saving Energy in Multifamily Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation is for the Building Technologies program webinar titled Saving Energy in Multifamily Buildings delivered on July 25, 2011.

442

Infectious waste feed system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An infectious waste feed system for comminuting infectious waste and feeding the comminuted waste to a combustor automatically without the need for human intervention. The system includes a receptacle for accepting waste materials. Preferably, the receptacle includes a first and second compartment and a means for sealing the first and second compartments from the atmosphere. A shredder is disposed to comminute waste materials accepted in the receptacle to a predetermined size. A trough is disposed to receive the comminuted waste materials from the shredder. A feeding means is disposed within the trough and is movable in a first and second direction for feeding the comminuted waste materials to a combustor.

Coulthard, E. James (York, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

High Performance Home Cost Performance Trade-Offs: Production Builders- Building America Top Innovation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Building America Innovations profile describes Building America research showing how some energy-efficiency measure cost increases can balance again measures that reduce up-front costs: Advanced framing cuts lumber costs, right sizing can mean downsizing the HVAC, moving HVAC into conditioned space cuts installation costs, designing on a 2-foot grid reduces materials waste, etc.

444

Making Buildings Better: Indie Energy & the Geothermal Breakthrough |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Making Buildings Better: Indie Energy & the Geothermal Breakthrough Making Buildings Better: Indie Energy & the Geothermal Breakthrough Making Buildings Better: Indie Energy & the Geothermal Breakthrough March 24, 2011 - 4:26pm Addthis April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs How does it work? By combining innovative drilling methods and the cost-effective, user-friendly Smart Geothermal Network, Indie Energy is reducing energy waste in buildings to save consumers money. Indie Energy Smart Geothermal(tm) for Buildings from Indie Energy on Vimeo For the last few weeks, we've told you about the launch of an "Entrepreneurial Mentor Corps," a one-year pilot program to connect clean energy startups with mentors who can help support these companies through early-stage challenges and increase their chance for success. The

445

Biofuels Company Builds New Facility in Nebraska | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Biofuels Company Builds New Facility in Nebraska Biofuels Company Builds New Facility in Nebraska Biofuels Company Builds New Facility in Nebraska March 24, 2010 - 2:54pm Addthis Novozymes was awarded a $28.4 million tax credit to build an enzyme facility in Blair, Neb. | Photo courtesy of Novozymes Novozymes was awarded a $28.4 million tax credit to build an enzyme facility in Blair, Neb. | Photo courtesy of Novozymes Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE The biofuels company Novozymes received a $28.4 million tax credit under the Recovery Act for the construction of a new facility in Blair, Neb., that produces enzymes to turn waste into fuel. The project, sparked by the increasing demand for cellulosic fuel, will create 100 green jobs and reduce the company's transportation costs and carbon footprint.

446

Overheating in Hot Water- and Steam-Heated Multifamily Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Apartment temperature data have been collected from the archives of companies that provide energy management systems (EMS) to multifamily buildings in the Northeast U.S. The data have been analyzed from more than 100 apartments in eighteen buildings where EMS systems were already installed to quantify the degree of overheating. This research attempts to answer the question, 'What is the magnitude of apartment overheating in multifamily buildings with central hot water or steam heat?' This report provides valuable information to researchers, utility program managers and building owners interested in controlling heating energy waste and improving resident comfort. Apartment temperature data were analyzed for deviation from a 70 degrees F desired setpoint and for variation by heating system type, apartment floor level and ambient conditions. The data shows that overheating is significant in these multifamily buildings with both hot water and steam heating systems.

Dentz, J.; Varshney, K.; Henderson, H.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

448

SECONDARY WASTE/ETF (EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY) PRELIMINARY PRE-CONCEPTUAL ENGINEERING STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This pre-conceptual engineering study is intended to assist in supporting the critical decision (CD) 0 milestone by providing a basis for the justification of mission need (JMN) for the handling and disposal of liquid effluents. The ETF baseline strategy, to accommodate (WTP) requirements, calls for a solidification treatment unit (STU) to be added to the ETF to provide the needed additional processing capability. This STU is to process the ETF evaporator concentrate into a cement-based waste form. The cementitious waste will be cast into blocks for curing, storage, and disposal. Tis pre-conceptual engineering study explores this baseline strategy, in addition to other potential alternatives, for meeting the ETF future mission needs. Within each reviewed case study, a technical and facility description is outlined, along with a preliminary cost analysis and the associated risks and benefits.

MAY TH; GEHNER PD; STEGEN GARY; HYMAS JAY; PAJUNEN AL; SEXTON RICH; RAMSEY AMY

2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

449

New York City - Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings New York City - Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Bioenergy Solar Windows, Doors, & Skylights Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State New York Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Mayor's Office of Operations In 2005 New York City passed a law (Local Law No. 86) making a variety of green building and energy efficiency requirements for municipal buildings and other projects funded with money from the city treasury. The building

450

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Research Photo of NREL senior engineer Eric Kozubal examining a prototype airflow channel of the desiccant enhanced evaporative (DEVap) air conditioner with a graph superimposed on the photo that shows how hot humid air, in red, changes to cool dry air, in blue, as the air passes through the DEVap core. National Renewable Energy Laboratory senior engineer Eric Kozubal examines a prototype airflow channel of the desiccant enhanced evaporative (DEVap) air conditioner, an example of the advanced technology research the Building Technologies Office supports. The superimposed graph shows hot humid air (red) changing to cool dry air (blue) as the air passes through the DEVap core. Credit: Pat Corkery, NREL PIX 17437 The Building Technologies Office (BTO) researches advanced technologies, systems, tools, and strategies to improve the energy performance of commercial buildings. Industry partners and national laboratories help identify market needs and solutions that accelerate the development of highly energy-efficient buildings. This page outlines some of BTO's principal research projects. For more BTO research results, visit the Commercial Buildings Resource Database.

451

Transport processes in directional solidification and their effects on microstructure development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The processing of materials with unique electronic, mechanical, optical and thermal properties plays a crucial role in modern technology. The quality of these materials depend strongly on the microstructure and the solute/dopant fields in the solid product, that are strongly influenced by the intricate coupling of heat and mass transfer and melt flow in the growth systems. An integrated research program is developed that include precisely characterized experiments and detailed physical and numerical modeling of the complex transport and dynamical processes. Direct numerical simulation of the solidification process is carried out that takes into account the unsteady thermo-solutal convection in the vertical Bridgman crystal growth system, and accurately models the thermal interaction between the furnace and the ampoule by appropriately using experimentally measured thermal profiles. The flow instabilities and transitions and the nonlinear evolution following the transitions are investigated by time series and flow pattern analysis. A range of complex dynamical behavior is predicted with increasing thermal Rayleigh number. The route to chaos appears as: steady convection {r_arrow} transient mono-periodic {r_arrow} transient bi-periodic {r_arrow} transient quasi-periodic {r_arrow} transient intermittent oscillation-relaxation {r_arrow} stable intermittent oscillation-relaxation attractor. The spatio-temporal dynamics of the melt flow is found to be directly related to the spatial patterns observed experimentally in the solidified crystals. The application of the model to two phase Sn-Cd peritectic alloys showed that a new class of tree-like oscillating microstructure develops in the solid phase due to unsteady thermo-solutal convection in the liquid melt. These oscillating layered structures can give the illusion of band structures on a plane of polish. The model is applied to single phase solidification in the Al-Cu and Pb-Sn systems to characterize the effect of convection on the macroscopic shape and disorder in the primary arm spacing of the cellular/dendritic freezing front. The apparently puzzling experimental observation of higher disorder in the weakly convective Al-Cu system than that in the highly convective Pb-Sn system is explained by the numerical calculations.

Mazumder, Prantik

1999-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

452

Building Technologies Office: News  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

News to someone by News to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: News on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: News on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: News on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: News on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: News on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: News on AddThis.com... About Standards & Test Procedures Implementation, Certification & Enforcement Rulemakings & Notices Further Guidance ENERGY STAR® Popular Links Success Stories Previous Next Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Learn More. Warming Up to Pump Heat. Learn More. Cut Refrigerator Energy Use to Save Money. Learn More. News DOE Publishes Petition of CSA Group for Classification as a Nationally

453

Building Technologies Office: News  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

News News Keep Up To Date Read the Better Buildings Network View newsletter. The Network View is an e-newsletter that provides information on the newly launched Better Buildings Residential Network. The Residential Network connects energy efficiency programs and partners to share best practices and learn from one another to build upon the many successes of the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. Read the latest issue. Through the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program, communities across the country are improving neighborhoods, creating jobs, and increasing access to energy savings in homes and businesses. Following are some of the news-making innovations and results that Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partners are achieving. Latest DOE News and Blog Posts

454

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Current and Past EditionsGlossaryPopular TablesQuery Tools Contact Us Current and Past EditionsGlossaryPopular TablesQuery Tools Contact Us Search What Is the Buildings Energy Data Book? The Data Book includes statistics on residential and commercial building energy consumption. Data tables contain statistics related to construction, building technologies, energy consumption, and building characteristics. The Building Technologies Program within the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy developed this resource to provide a current and accurate set of comprehensive buildings- and energy-related data. The Data Book is an evolving document and is updated periodically. Each data table is presented in HTML, Microsoft Excel, and PDF formats. Download Excel Viewer Download Adobe Reader

455

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

The Energy Index for Commercial Buildings The Energy Index for Commercial Buildings Welcome to the Energy Index for Commercial Buildings. Data for this tool comes from the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). Select categories from the CBECS micro data allow users to search on common building characteristics that impact energy use. Users may select multiple criteria, however if the resulting sample size is too small, the data will be unreliable. If nothing is selected results yield national totals for commercial buildings. For more information on CBECS, visit EIA's website. Location Census Division View Map New England West North Central West South Central Middle Atlantic South Atlantic Mountain East North Central East South Central Pacific

456

Building Science - Ventilation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ventilation Ventilation Joseph Lstiburek, Ph.D., P.Eng, ASHRAE Fellow www.buildingscience.com Build Tight - Ventilate Right Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 2 Build Tight - Ventilate Right How Tight? What's Right? Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 3 Air Barrier Metrics Material 0.02 l/(s-m2) @ 75 Pa Assembly 0.20 l/(s-m2) @ 75 Pa Enclosure 2.00 l/(s-m2) @ 75 Pa 0.35 cfm/ft2 @ 50 Pa 0.25 cfm/ft2 @ 50 Pa 0.15 cfm/ft2 @ 50 Pa Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 4 Getting rid of big holes 3 ach@50 Getting rid of smaller holes 1.5 ach@50 Getting German 0.6 ach@50 Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 5 Best As Tight as Possible - with - Balanced Ventilation Energy Recovery Distribution Source Control - Spot exhaust ventilation Filtration

457

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Principal Building Activities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Principal Building Activities Principal Building Activities Principal Building Activities Three of the four activities that dominated commercial floorspace-office, warehouse and storage, and mercantile-dominated the distribution of buildings (Figure 1). Each of these three activity categories included more than 600,000 buildings, while no other building activity had more than a half-million buildings and only service buildings exceeded 350,000 buildings. Detailed tables Figure 1. Distribution of Buildings by Principal Building Activity, 1999 Figure 1. Distribution of Buildings by Principal Building Activity, 1999. If having trouble viewing this page, please contact the National Energy Information Center at (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey

458

Building Technologies Office: Building-Level Energy Management Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Building-Level Energy Building-Level Energy Management Systems Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Building-Level Energy Management Systems Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Building-Level Energy Management Systems Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building-Level Energy Management Systems Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building-Level Energy Management Systems Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Building-Level Energy Management Systems Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Building-Level Energy Management Systems Research Project on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy

459

Commercial Building Partnership  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Building Partnership Building Partnership (CBP) Adam Hirsch National Renewable Energy Laboratory Email: Adam.Hirsch@nrel.gov Phone: (303) 384-7874 Wednesday, April 3 2013 BTO Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * 2008: NREL + PNNL selected partner companies and technical consultants and won joint solicitation - Collaborators selected based on commitment to hitting project goals and likelihood of success * Projects began in 2009 with aim of 3-5 year completion

460

Commercial Building Partnership  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Building Partnership Building Partnership (CBP) Adam Hirsch National Renewable Energy Laboratory Email: Adam.Hirsch@nrel.gov Phone: (303) 384-7874 Wednesday, April 3 2013 BTO Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * 2008: NREL + PNNL selected partner companies and technical consultants and won joint solicitation - Collaborators selected based on commitment to hitting project goals and likelihood of success * Projects began in 2009 with aim of 3-5 year completion

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste solidification building" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Midwest Building Energy Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Midwest Building Energy Program Midwest Building Energy Program Stacey Paradis Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance sparadis@mwalliance.org 312-784-7267 April 2, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Purpose * Reduce Energy Use in New Construction (Energy Codes) * Reduce Energy Use in Existing Construction (Benchmarking) Objectives * Technical Assistance to States In Midwest Adopt Latest Model Energy Codes * Foster Maximum Compliance with Current Energy Codes

462

Kiowa County Commons Building  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

South- and west-facing windows allow more South- and west-facing windows allow more natural light into the building and reduce electricity use * Extensive awnings and overhangs control the light and heat entering the building during the day to reduce cooling loads * Rooftop light monitors in the garden area provide controllable natural light from above to save on electricity consumption * Insulating concrete form block construction with an R-22 insulation value helps control the temperature of the building and maximize

463

The Lovejoy Building  

High Performance Buildings Database

Portland, OR Originally built in 1910 as the stables for the Marshall-Wells Hardware Company, the Lovejoy Building is the home of Opsis Architects. The owner/architects purchased and renovated the historic building to house their growing business and to provide ground-floor office lease space and second-floor offices for their firm. Opsis wanted to use the building to experience and demonstrate the technologies and practices it promotes with clients.

464

Building South Weyburn Avenue  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

36 P32 PCHS P9 P1 P8 P6 P2 P3 P5 17 P4 P7 PRO 11 15 10 Kinross Building Kinross Building South Road Charles E. Young Drive North R oyce D rive CharlesE.YoungDriveNorth Manning Avenue Manning Avenue/Engineering and Mathematical Sciences 8270 Boelter Hall SEL/Geology-Geophysics 4697 Geology Building Music Library 1102

Williams, Gary A.

465

Midwest Building Energy Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Midwest Building Energy Program Midwest Building Energy Program Stacey Paradis Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance sparadis@mwalliance.org 312-784-7267 April 2, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Purpose * Reduce Energy Use in New Construction (Energy Codes) * Reduce Energy Use in Existing Construction (Benchmarking) Objectives * Technical Assistance to States In Midwest Adopt Latest Model Energy Codes * Foster Maximum Compliance with Current Energy Codes

466

Conversion of Waste CO2 and Shale Gas to High-Value Chemicals  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The project aims to develop, build, operate, and validate a laboratory-scale continuous process that converts waste CO2 from industrial sources from shale gas into commodity chemical intermediates.

467

Establishing and Implementing a Waste Minimization Program in the Chemical and Oil Industries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The incentives for establishing and the expertise for implementing successful waste minimization programs can be found in every company. The “in-house” expertise that discovers, designs, builds and manages manufacturing processes understand...

Hollod, G. J.; Marton, R. J.

468

Grout and Glass Performance in Support of Stabilization/Solidification of the MVST Tank Sludges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wastewater at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is collected, evaporated, and stored in the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) pending treatment for disposal. The waste separates into two phases: sludge and supematant. Some of the supematant from these tanks has been decanted, solidified into a grout, and stored for disposal as a solid low-level waste. The sludges in the tank bottoms have been accumulating ,for several years. Some of the sludges contain a high amount of gamma activity (e.g., `37CS concentration range of 0.01 3-11 MBq/g) and contain enough transuranic (TRU) radioisotopes to be classified as TRU wastes. Some Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metal concentrations are high enough in the available total constituent analysis for the MVST sludge to be classified as RCRA hazardous; therefore, these sludges are presumed to be mixed TRU waste.

Gilliam, T.M.; Spence, R.D.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

NREL: Buildings Research - Commercial Buildings Research Staff  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Commercial Buildings Research Staff Commercial Buildings Research Staff Members of the Commercial Buildings research staff have backgrounds in architectural, civil, electrical, environmental, and mechanical engin