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Sample records for waste solidification building

  1. Waste Solidification Building Project Lessons Learned Report...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Solidification Building Project Lessons Learned Report Waste Solidification Building Project Lessons Learned Report This report addresses lessons learned from the Waste ...

  2. Waste Solidification Building Project Lessons Learned Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This report addresses lessons learned from the Waste Solidification Building project at the Savannah River Site relative to design, procurement, construction, startup, and commissioning.  The...

  3. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design [HIAR SRS-2013-5-07

  4. Nuclear waste solidification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bjorklund, William J.

    1977-01-01

    High level liquid waste solidification is achieved on a continuous basis by atomizing the liquid waste and introducing the atomized liquid waste into a reaction chamber including a fluidized, heated inert bed to effect calcination of the atomized waste and removal of the calcined waste by overflow removal and by attrition and elutriation from the reaction chamber, and feeding additional inert bed particles to the fluidized bed to maintain the inert bed composition.

  5. Microwave solidification development for Rocky Flats waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, D.; Erle, R.; Eschen, V.

    1994-04-01

    The Microwave Engineering Team at the Rocky Flats Plant has developed a production-scale system for the treatment of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes using microwave energy. The system produces a vitreous final form which meets the acceptance criteria for shipment and disposal. The technology also has potential for application on various other waste streams from the public and private sectors. Technology transfer opportunities are being identified and pursued for commercialization of the microwave solidification technology.

  6. Aqueous Zinc Bromide Waste Solidification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.A.

    2002-07-23

    The goal of this study was to select one or more commercially available aqueous sorbents to solidify the zinc bromide solution stored in C-Area, identify the polymer to zinc bromide solution ratio (waste loading) for the selected sorbents, and identify processing issues that require further testing in pilot-scale testing.

  7. Properties and solidification of decontamination wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M.S.; Piciulo, P.L.; Bowerman, B.S.; Adams, J.W.; Milian, L.

    1983-01-01

    LWRs will require one or more chemical decontaminations to achieve their designed lifetimes. Primary system decontamination is designed to lower radiation fields in areas where plant maintenance personnel must work. Chemical decontamination methods are either hard (concentrated chemicals, approximately 5 to 25 weight percent) or soft (dilute chemicals less than 1 percent by weight). These methods may have different chemical reagents, some tailor-made to the crud composition and many methods are and will be proprietary. One factor common to most commercially available processes is the presence of organic acids and chelates. These types of organic reagents are known to enhance the migration of radionuclides after disposal in a shallow land burial site. The NRC sponsors two programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory that are concerned with the management of decontamination wastes which will be generated by the full system decontamination of LWRs. These two programs focus on potential methods for degrading or converting decontamination wastes to more acceptable forms prior to disposal and the impact of disposing of solidified decontamination wastes. The results of the solidification of simulated decontamination resin wastes will be presented. Recent results on combustion of simulated decontamintion wastes will be described and procedures for evaluating the release of decontamination reagents from solidified wastes will be summarized.

  8. HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS FOR NUCLEAR WASTE SOLIDIFICATION CONTAINER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.

    2009-06-01

    The Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Design Authority is in the design stage of the Waste Solidification Building (WSB) for the treatment and solidification of the radioactive liquid waste streams generated by the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) and Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). The waste streams will be mixed with a cementitious dry mix in a 55-gallon waste container. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been performing the testing and evaluations to support technical decisions for the WSB. Engineering Modeling & Simulation Group was requested to evaluate the thermal performance of the 55-gallon drum containing hydration heat source associated with the current baseline cement waste form. A transient axi-symmetric heat transfer model for the drum partially filled with waste form cement has been developed and heat transfer calculations performed for the baseline design configurations. For this case, 65 percent of the drum volume was assumed to be filled with the waste form, which has transient hydration heat source, as one of the baseline conditions. A series of modeling calculations has been performed using a computational heat transfer approach. The baseline modeling results show that the time to reach the maximum temperature of the 65 percent filled drum is about 32 hours when a 43 C initial cement temperature is assumed to be cooled by natural convection with 27 C external air. In addition, the results computed by the present model were compared with analytical solutions. The modeling results will be benchmarked against the prototypic test results. The verified model will be used for the evaluation of the thermal performance for the WSB drum. Detailed results and the cases considered in the calculations will be discussed here.

  9. Polymer solidification of mixed wastes at the Rocky Flats Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faucette, A.M.; Logsdon, B.W.; Lucerna, J.J.; Yudnich, R.J.

    1994-02-01

    The Rocky Flats Plant is pursuing polymer solidification as a viable treatment option for several mixed waste streams that are subject to land disposal restrictions within the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act provisions. Tests completed to date using both surrogate and actual wastes indicate that polyethylene microencapsulation is a viable treatment option for several mixed wastes at the Rocky Flats Plant, including nitrate salts, sludges, and secondary wastes such as ash. Treatability studies conducted on actual salt waste demonstrated that the process is capable of producing waste forms that comply with all applicable regulatory criteria, including the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure. Tests have also been conducted to evaluate the feasibility of macroencapsulating certain debris wastes in polymers. Several methods and plastics have been tested for macroencapsulation, including post-consumer recycle and regrind polyethylene.

  10. Decontamination impacts on solidification and waste disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kempf, C.R.; Soo, P.

    1988-01-01

    Research to determine chemical and physical conditions which could lead to thermal excursions, gas generation, and/or general degradation of decontamination-reagent-loaded resins has shown that IRN-78, IONAC A-365, and IRN-77 organic ion exchange resin moisture contents vary significantly depending on the counter ion loading.'' The extent/vigor of the reaction is very highly dependent on the degree of dewatering of the resins and on the method of solution addition. The heat generation may be due, in part, to the heat of neutralization. In studies of the long-term compatibility effects of decontamination waste resins in contact with waste package container materials in the presence of decontamination reagents, radiolysis products and gamma irradiation, it has been found that the corrosion of carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel in mixed bed resins is enhanced by gamma irradiation. However, cracking in high density polyethylene is essentially eliminated because of the rapid removal of oxygen from the environment by gamma-induced oxidation of the large resin mass. 13 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Method for solidification of radioactive and other hazardous waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anshits, Alexander G.; Vereshchagina, Tatiana A.; Voskresenskaya, Elena N.; Kostin, Eduard M.; Pavlov, Vyacheslav F.; Revenko, Yurii A.; Tretyakov, Alexander A.; Sharonova, Olga M.; Aloy, Albert S.; Sapozhnikova, Natalia V.; Knecht, Dieter A.; Tranter, Troy J.; Macheret, Yevgeny

    2002-01-01

    Solidification of liquid radioactive waste, and other hazardous wastes, is accomplished by the method of the invention by incorporating the waste into a porous glass crystalline molded block. The porous block is first loaded with the liquid waste and then dehydrated and exposed to thermal treatment at 50-1,000.degree. C. The porous glass crystalline molded block consists of glass crystalline hollow microspheres separated from fly ash (cenospheres), resulting from incineration of fossil plant coals. In a preferred embodiment, the porous glass crystalline blocks are formed from perforated cenospheres of grain size -400+50, wherein the selected cenospheres are consolidated into the porous molded block with a binder, such as liquid silicate glass. The porous blocks are then subjected to repeated cycles of saturating with liquid waste, and drying, and after the last cycle the blocks are subjected to calcination to transform the dried salts to more stable oxides. Radioactive liquid waste can be further stabilized in the porous blocks by coating the internal surface of the block with metal oxides prior to adding the liquid waste, and by coating the outside of the block with a low-melting glass or a ceramic after the waste is loaded into the block.

  12. Choosing solidification or vitrification for low-level radioactive and mixed waste treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gimpel, R.F.

    1992-02-14

    Solidification (making concrete) and vitrification (making glass) are frequently the treatment methods recommended for treating inorganic or radioactive wastes. Solidification is generally perceived as the most economical treatment method. Whereas, vitrification is considered (by many) as the most effective of all treatment methods. Unfortunately, vitrification has acquired the stigma that it is too expensive to receive further consideration as an alternative to solidification in high volume treatment applications. Ironically, economic studies, as presented in this paper, show that vitrification may be more competitive in some high volume applications. Ex-situ solidification and vitrification are the competing methods for treating in excess of 450 000m{sup 3} of low-level radioactive and mixed waste at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP or simply, Fernald) located near Cincinnati, Ohio. This paper summarizes how Fernald is choosing between solidification and vitrification as the primary waste treatment method.

  13. Comparison of costs for solidification of high-level radioactive waste solutions: glass monoliths vs metal matrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jardine, L.J.; Carlton, R.E.; Steindler, M.J.

    1981-05-01

    A comparative economic analysis was made of four solidification processes for liquid high-level radioactive waste. Two processes produced borosilicate glass monoliths and two others produced metal matrix composites of lead and borosilicate glass beads and lead and supercalcine pellets. Within the uncertainties of the cost (1979 dollars) estimates, the cost of the four processes was about the same, with the major cost component being the cost of the primary building structure. Equipment costs and operating and maintenance costs formed only a small portion of the building structure costs for all processes.

  14. Solidification of Acidic, High Nitrate Nuclear Wastes by Grouting or Absorption on Silica Gel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. K. Herbst; S. V. Raman; R. J. Kirkham

    2004-01-01

    The use of grout and silica gel were explored for the solidification of four types of acidic, high nitrate radioactive wastes. Two methods of grouting were tested: direct grouting and pre-neutralization. Two methods of absorption on silica gel were also tested: direct absorption and rotary spray drying. The waste simulant acidity varied between 1 N and 12 N. The waste simulant was neutralized by pre-blending calcium hydroxide with Portland cement and blast furnace slag powders prior to mixing with the simulant for grout solidification. Liquid sodium hydroxide was used to partially neutralize the simulant to a pH above 2 and then it was absorbed for silica gel solidification. Formulations for each of these methods are presented along with waste form characteristics and properties. Compositional variation maps for grout formulations are presented which help determine the optimum "recipe" for a particular waste stream. These maps provide a method to determine the proportions of waste, calcium hydroxide, Portland cement, and blast furnace slag that provide a waste form that meets the disposal acceptance criteria. The maps guide researchers in selecting areas to study and provide an operational envelop that produces acceptable waste forms. The grouts both solidify and stabilize the wastes, while absorption on silica gel produces a solid waste that will not pass standard leaching procedures (TCLP) if required. Silica gel wastes can be made to pass most leach tests if heated to 600C.

  15. Solidification of radioactive waste resins using cement mixed with organic material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laili, Zalina; Yasir, Muhamad Samudi; Wahab, Mohd Abdul

    2015-04-29

    Solidification of radioactive waste resins using cement mixed with organic material i.e. biochar is described in this paper. Different percentage of biochar (0%, 5%, 8%, 11%, 14% and 18%) was investigated in this study. The characteristics such as compressive strength and leaching behavior were examined in order to evaluate the performance of solidified radioactive waste resins. The results showed that the amount of biochar affect the compressive strength of the solidified resins. Based on the data obtained for the leaching experiments performed, only one formulation showed the leached of Cs-134 from the solidified radioactive waste resins.

  16. Cryolite process for the solidification of radioactive wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wielang, Joseph A.; Taylor, Larry L.

    1976-01-01

    An improved method is provided for solidifying liquid wastes containing significant quantities of sodium or sodium compounds by calcining in a fluidized-bed calciner. The formation of sodium nitrate which will cause agglomeration of the fluidized-bed particles is retarded by adding aluminum and a fluoride to the waste in order to produce cryolite during calcination. The off-gas of the calciner is scrubbed with a solution containing aluminum in order to complex any fluoride which may be liberated by subsequent dissolution of cryolite and prevent corrosion in the off-gas cleanup system.

  17. Waste Handeling Building Conceptual Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.W. Rowe

    2000-11-06

    The objective of the ''Waste Handling Building Conceptual Study'' is to develop proposed design requirements for the repository Waste Handling System in sufficient detail to allow the surface facility design to proceed to the License Application effort if the proposed requirements are approved by DOE. Proposed requirements were developed to further refine waste handling facility performance characteristics and design constraints with an emphasis on supporting modular construction, minimizing fuel inventory, and optimizing facility maintainability and dry handling operations. To meet this objective, this study attempts to provide an alternative design to the Site Recommendation design that is flexible, simple, reliable, and can be constructed in phases. The design concept will be input to the ''Modular Design/Construction and Operation Options Report'', which will address the overall program objectives and direction, including options and issues associated with transportation, the subsurface facility, and Total System Life Cycle Cost. This study (herein) is limited to the Waste Handling System and associated fuel staging system.

  18. Solidification of low-level radioactive waste at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    Aqueous-based process waste and other small volume wastes including basin sludge and incinerator ash will be solidified in cement-based wasteforms at SRS. A variety of inorganic solidifying agents are used depending on the chemistry, contaminants, and processing characteristics of the waste. In some cases, pre-treatment of the waste is used to reduce the activity of the waste and/or to remove the hazardous characteristics of the waste. In the case of DWPF saltstone, pretreatment is used to reduce 137 Cs and 90 Sr concentration to Class A levels and in-situ treatment (chemical reactions between the cementitious solids and waste) is used to remove the toxic metal characteristic of the waste. Chemical reduction of the Cr/sup +6/ to Cr/sup +3/ and subsequent precipitation of Cr(OH)/sub 3/, (low solubility) occurs as the result of reactions between the cementitious raw materials and the waste liquid. In summary waste treatment and solidification used at SRS is designed to meet both South Carolina and Federal requirements for maintaining the quality of the groundwater at the disposal site boundary. 2 refs.

  19. Preliminary evaluation of alternative waste form solidification processes. Volume I. Identification of the processes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Treat, R.L.; Nesbitt, J.F.; Blair, H.T.; Carter, J.G.; Gorton, P.S.; Partain, W.L.; Timmerman, C.L.

    1980-04-01

    This document contains preconceptual design data on 11 processes for the solidification and isolation of nuclear high-level liquid wastes (HLLW). The processes are: in-can glass melting (ICGM) process, joule-heated glass melting (JHGM) process, glass-ceramic (GC) process, marbles-in-lead (MIL) matrix process, supercalcine pellets-in-metal (SCPIM) matrix process, pyrolytic-carbon coated pellets-in-metal (PCCPIM) matrix process, supercalcine hot-isostatic-pressing (SCHIP) process, SYNROC hot-isostatic-pressing (SYNROC HIP) process, titanate process, concrete process, and cermet process. For the purposes of this study, it was assumed that each of the solidification processes is capable of handling similar amounts of HLLW generated in a production-sized fuel reprocessing plant. It was also assumed that each of the processes would be enclosed in a shielded canyon or cells within a waste facility located at the fuel reprocessing plant. Finally, it was assumed that all of the processes would be subject to the same set of regulations, codes and standards. Each of the solidification processes converts waste into forms that may be acceptable for geological disposal. Each process begins with the receipt of HLLW from the fuel reprocessing plant. In this study, it was assumed that the original composition of the HLLW would be the same for each process. The process ends when the different waste forms are enclosed in canisters or containers that are acceptable for interim storage. Overviews of each of the 11 processes and the bases used for their identification are presented in the first part of this report. Each process, including its equipment and its requirements, is covered in more detail in Appendices A through K. Pertinent information on the current state of the art and the research and development required for the implementation of each process are also noted in the appendices.

  20. Performance testing of grout-based waste forms for the solidification of anion exchange resins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, I.L.; Bostick, W.D.

    1990-10-01

    The solidification of spent ion exchanges resins in a grout matrix as a means of disposing of spent organic resins produced in the nuclear fuel cycle has many advantages in terms of process simplicity and economy, but associated with the process is the potential for water/cement/resins to interact and degrade the integrity of the waste form solidified. Described in this paper is one possible solution to preserving the integrity of these solidified waste forms: the encapsulation of beaded anion exchange resins in grout formulations containing ground granulated blast furnace slag, Type I-II (mixed) portland cement, and additives (clays, amorphous silica, silica fume, and fly ash). The results of the study reported herein show the cured waste form tested has a low leach rate for nitrate ion from the resin (and a low leach rate is inferred for Tc-99) and acceptable durability as assessed by the water immersion and freezing/thawing test protocols. The results also suggest a tested surrogate waste form prepared in vinyl ester styrene binder performs satisfactorily against the wetting/drying criterion, and it should offer additional insight into future work on the solidification of spent organic resins. 26 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. A comparison of solidification media for the stabilization of low- level radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowgill, M.G.

    1991-10-01

    When requirements exist to stabilize low-level radioactive waste (LLW) prior to disposal, efforts to achieve this stability often center on the mixing of the waste with a solidification medium. Although historically the medium of choice has been based on the use of portland cement as the binder material, several other options have been developed and subsequently implemented. These include thermoplastic polymers, thermosetting polymers and gypsum. No one medium has thus far been successful in providing stability to all forms of LLW. The characteristics and attributes of these different binder materials are reviewed and compared. The aspects examined include availability of information, limitations to use, sensitivity to process or waste chemistry changes, radionuclide retention ability, modeling of radionuclide release processes, ease and safety of use, and relative costs.

  2. Study Builds Knowledge of Nuclear Waste Glass, Provides Insight...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Study Builds Knowledge of Nuclear Waste Glass, Provides Insight to Facility Design Study Builds Knowledge of Nuclear Waste Glass, Provides Insight to Facility Design April 14, 2016 ...

  3. A literature review of mixed waste components: Sensitivities and effects upon solidification/stabilization in cement-based matrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattus, C.H.; Gilliam, T.M.

    1994-03-01

    The US DOE Oak Ridge Field Office has signed a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) regarding Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) mixed wastes subject to the land disposal restriction (LDR) provisions of the Resource conservation and Recovery Act. The LDR FFCA establishes an aggressive schedule for conducting treatability studies and developing treatment methods for those ORR mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes listed in Appendix B to the Agreement. A development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation program has been initiated to provide those efforts necessary to identify treatment methods for all of the wastes that meet Appendix B criteria. The program has assembled project teams to address treatment development needs in a variety of areas, including that of final waste forms (i.e., stabilization/solidification processes). A literature research has been performed, with the objective of determining waste characterization needs to support cement-based waste-form development. The goal was to determine which waste species are problematic in terms of consistent production of an acceptable cement-based waste form and at what concentrations these species become intolerable. The report discusses the following: hydration mechanisms of Portland cement; mechanisms of retardation and acceleration of cement set-factors affecting the durability of waste forms; regulatory limits as they apply to mixed wastes; review of inorganic species that interfere with the development of cement-based waste forms; review of radioactive species that can be immobilized in cement-based waste forms; and review of organic species that may interfere with various waste-form properties.

  4. Microwave solidification project overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprenger, G.

    1993-01-01

    The Rocky Flats Plant Microwave Solidification Project has application potential to the Mixed Waste Treatment Project and the The Mixed Waste Integrated Program. The technical areas being addressed include (1) waste destruction and stabilization; (2) final waste form; and (3) front-end waste handling and feed preparation. This document covers need for such a program; technology description; significance; regulatory requirements; and accomplishments to date. A list of significant reports published under this project is included.

  5. U.S. Department of Energy's initiatives for proliferation prevention program: solidification technologies for radioactive waste treatment in Russia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pokhitonov, Y.; Kelley, D.

    2008-07-01

    Large amounts of liquid radioactive waste have existed in the U.S. and Russia since the 1950's as a result of the Cold War. Comprehensive action to treat and dispose of waste products has been lacking due to insufficient funding, ineffective technologies or no proven technologies, low priority by governments among others. Today the U.S. and Russian governments seek new, more reliable methods to treat liquid waste, in particular the legacy waste streams. A primary objective of waste generators and regulators is to find economical and proven technologies that can provide long-term stability for repository storage. In 2001, the V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute (Khlopin), St. Petersburg, Russia, and Pacific Nuclear Solutions (PNS), Indianapolis, Indiana, began extensive research and test programs to determine the validity of polymer technology for the absorption and immobilization of standard and complex waste streams. Over 60 liquid compositions have been tested including extensive irradiation tests to verify polymer stability and possible degradation. With conclusive scientific evidence of the polymer's effectiveness in treating liquid waste, both parties have decided to enter the Russian market and offer the solidification technology to nuclear sites for waste treatment and disposal. In conjunction with these efforts, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will join Khlopin and PNS to explore opportunities for direct application of the polymers at predetermined sites and to conduct research for new product development. Under DOE's 'Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention'(IPP) program, funding will be provided to the Russian participants over a three year period to implement the program plan. This paper will present details of U.S. DOE's IPP program, the project structure and its objectives both short and long-term, training programs for scientists, polymer tests and applications for LLW, ILW and HLW, and new product development initiatives. (authors)

  6. Principles and use of solidification/stabilization treatment for organic hazardous constituents in soil, sediment, and waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilk, C.M.

    2007-07-01

    Solidification/stabilization (S/S) treatment involves mixing a binding reagent into contaminated media or waste. S/S treatment protects human health and the environment by immobilizing hazardous constituents within the treated material. S/S has been effective in treating a large variety of hazardous constituents in many different forms of waste and contaminated media. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has identified S/S as Best Demonstrated Available Treatment Technology (BDAT) for at least 50 commonly produced industrial hazardous wastes. EPA has selected S/S treatment for over 20% of its Superfund site source control remediation projects. Much of the published literature and actual treatment project experience has to do with treatment of inorganic hazardous constituents including radioactive materials. Radioactive wastes and environmental contaminants are often mixtures of inorganic and organic hazardous constituents. In recent years S/S is increasingly being used to address soil and sediment contaminated with organic hazardous constituents. Many of these remediation projects include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) or polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB). The paper and presentation will discuss the chemical and physical mechanisms that can immobilize inorganic and organic hazardous constituents within S/S-treated material. The paper will also discuss examples of recent full-scale projects where S/S has been used to successfully treat organic hazardous constituent contaminated soil and sediment both in-situ and on excavated material. (authors)

  7. Cementation and solidification of miscellaneous mixed wastes at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, J.A.; Semones, G.B.

    1995-02-01

    The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site produces a variety of wastes which are amenable to micro-encapsulation in cement Portland cement is an inexpensive and readily available material for this application. The Waste Projects (WP) group at Rocky Flats evaluated cementation to determine its effectiveness in encapsulating several wastes. These included waste analytical laboratory solutions, incinerator ash, hydroxide precipitation sludge, and an acidic solution from the Delphi process (a chemical oxidation technology being evaluated as an alternative to incineration). WP prepared surrogate wastes and conducted designed experiments to optimize the cement formulation for the waste streams. These experiments used a Taguchi or factorial experimental design, interactions between the variables were also considered in the testing. Surrogate waste samples were spiked with various levels of each of six Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) listed metals (Cd, Cr, Ba, Pb, Ni, and Ag), cemented using the optimized formulation, and analyzed for leach resistance using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). The metal spike levels chosen were based on characterization data, and also based on an estimate of the highest levels of contaminants suspected in the waste. This paper includes laboratory test results for each waste studied. These include qualitative observations as well as quantitative data from TCLP analyses and environmental cycling studies. The results from these experiments show that cement stabilization of the different wastes can produce final waste forms which meet the current RCRA Land Disposal Restriction (LDR) requirements. Formulations that resulted in LDR compliant waste forms are provided. The volume increases associated with cementation are also lower than anticipated. Future work will include verification studies with actual mixed radioactive waste as well as additional formulation development studies on other waste streams.

  8. WASTE HANDLING BUILDING FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. D. Bigbee

    2000-06-21

    The Waste Handling Building Fire Protection System provides the capability to detect, control, and extinguish fires and/or mitigate explosions throughout the Waste Handling Building (WHB). Fire protection includes appropriate water-based and non-water-based suppression, as appropriate, and includes the distribution and delivery systems for the fire suppression agents. The Waste Handling Building Fire Protection System includes fire or explosion detection panel(s) controlling various detectors, system actuation, annunciators, equipment controls, and signal outputs. The system interfaces with the Waste Handling Building System for mounting of fire protection equipment and components, location of fire suppression equipment, suppression agent runoff, and locating fire rated barriers. The system interfaces with the Waste Handling Building System for adequate drainage and removal capabilities of liquid runoff resulting from fire protection discharges. The system interfaces with the Waste Handling Building Electrical Distribution System for power to operate, and with the Site Fire Protection System for fire protection water supply to automatic sprinklers, standpipes, and hose stations. The system interfaces with the Site Fire Protection System for fire signal transmission outside the WHB as needed to respond to a fire emergency, and with the Waste Handling Building Ventilation System to detect smoke and fire in specific areas, to protect building high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, and to control portions of the Waste Handling Building Ventilation System for smoke management and manual override capability. The system interfaces with the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) Operations Monitoring and Control System for annunciation, and condition status.

  9. Example of a Risk-Based Disposal Approval: Solidification of Hanford Site Transuranic Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, B.M.; Hyatt, J.E.; Martin, P.W.; Prignano, A.L.

    2008-07-01

    The Hanford Site requested, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 10 approved, a Toxic Substances Control Act of 1976 (TSCA) risk-based disposal approval (RBDA) for solidifying approximately four cubic meters of waste from a specific area of one of the K East Basin: the North Loadout Pit (NLOP). The NLOP waste is a highly radioactive sludge that contained polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) regulated under TSCA. The prescribed disposal method for liquid PCB waste under TSCA regulations is either thermal treatment or decontamination. Due to the radioactive nature of the waste, however, neither thermal treatment nor decontamination was a viable option. As a result, the proposed treatment consisted of solidifying the material to comply with waste acceptance criteria at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico, or possibly the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility at the Hanford Site, depending on the resulting transuranic (TRU) content of the stabilized waste. The RBDA evaluated environmental risks associated with potential airborne PCBs. In addition, the RBDA made use of waste management controls already in place at the treatment unit. The treatment unit, the T Plant Complex, is a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA)-permitted facility used for storing and treating radioactive waste. The EPA found that the proposed activities did not pose an unreasonable risk to human health or the environment. Treatment took place from October 26, 2005 to June 9, 2006, and 332 208-liter (55-gallon) containers of solidified waste were produced. All treated drums assayed to date are TRU and will be disposed at WIPP. (authors)

  10. EXAMPLE OF A RISK BASED DISPOSAL APPROVAL SOLIDIFICATION OF HANFORD SITE TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PRIGNANO AL

    2007-11-14

    The Hanford Site requested, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 10 approved, a Toxic Substances Control Act of 1976 (TSCA) risk-based disposal approval (RBDA) for solidifying approximately four cubic meters of waste from a specific area of one of the K East Basin: the North Loadout Pit (NLOP). The NLOP waste is a highly radioactive sludge that contained polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) regulated under TSCA. The prescribed disposal method for liquid PCB waste under TSCA regulations is either thermal treatment or decontamination. Due to the radioactive nature of the waste, however, neither thermal treatment nor decontamination was a viable option. As a result, the proposed treatment consisted of solidifying the material to comply with waste acceptance criteria at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico, or possibly the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility at the Hanford Site, depending on the resulting transuranic (TRU) content of the stabilized waste. The RBDA evaluated environmental risks associated with potential airborne PCBs. In addition, the RBDA made use of waste management controls already in place at the treatment unit. The treatment unit, the T Plant Complex, is a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA)-permitted facility used for storing and treating radioactive waste. The EPA found that the proposed activities did not pose an unreasonable risk to human health or the environment. Treatment took place from October 26,2005 to June 9,2006, and 332 208-liter (55-gallon) containers of solidified waste were produced. All treated drums assayed to date are TRU and will be disposed at WIPP.

  11. Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter high-level waste solidification technical manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, D.E.

    1980-09-01

    This technical manual summarizes process and equipment technology developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory over the last 20 years for vitrification of high-level liquid waste by the Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter process. Pacific Northwest Laboratory experience includes process development and demonstration in laboratory-, pilot-, and full-scale equipment using nonradioactive synthetic wastes. Also, laboratory- and pilot-scale process demonstrations have been conducted using actual high-level radioactive wastes. In the course of process development, more than 26 tonnes of borosilicate glass have been produced in 75 canisters. Four of these canisters contained radioactive waste glass. The associated process and glass chemistry is discussed. Technology areas described include calciner feed treatment and techniques, calcination, vitrification, off-gas treatment, glass containment (the canister), and waste glass chemistry. Areas of optimization and site-specific development that would be needed to adapt this base technology for specific plant application are indicated. A conceptual Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter system design and analyses are provided in the manual to assist prospective users in evaluating the process for plant application, to provide equipment design information, and to supply information for safety analyses and environmental reports. The base (generic) technology for the Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter process has been developed to a point at which it is ready for plant application.

  12. Iron-phosphate ceramics for solidification of mixed low-level waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aloy, Albert S.; Kovarskaya, Elena N.; Koltsova, Tatiana I.; Macheret, Yevgeny; Medvedev, Pavel G.; Todd, Terry

    2000-01-01

    A method of immobilizing mixed low-level waste is provided which uses low cost materials and has a relatively long hardening period. The method includes: forming a mixture of iron oxide powders having ratios, in mass %, of FeO:Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 :Fe.sub.3 O.sub.4 equal to 25-40:40-10:35-50, or weighing a definite amount of magnetite powder. Metallurgical cinder can also be used as the source of iron oxides. A solution of the orthophosphoric acid, or a solution of the orthophosphoric acid and ferric oxide, is formed and a powder phase of low-level waste and the mixture of iron oxide powders or cinder (or magnetite powder) is also formed. The acid solution is mixed with the powder phase to form a slurry with the ratio of components (mass %) of waste:iron oxide powders or magnetite:acid solution=30-60:15-10:55-30. The slurry is blended to form a homogeneous mixture which is cured at room temperature to form the final product.

  13. Toxicity mitigation and solidification of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash using alkaline activated coal ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivan Diaz-Loya, E.; Allouche, Erez N.; Eklund, Sven; Joshi, Anupam R.; Kupwade-Patil, Kunal

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incinerator fly ash (IFA) is added to an alkali activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Means of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in construction applications. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was chemically characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmentally friendly solution to IFA disposal by reducing its toxicity levels. - Abstract: Municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration is a common and effective practice to reduce the volume of solid waste in urban areas. However, the byproduct of this process is a fly ash (IFA), which contains large quantities of toxic contaminants. The purpose of this research study was to analyze the chemical, physical and mechanical behaviors resulting from the gradual introduction of IFA to an alkaline activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix, as a mean of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in industrial construction applications, where human exposure potential is limited. IFA and CFA were analyzed via X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Inductive coupled plasma (ICP) to obtain a full chemical analysis of the samples, its crystallographic characteristics and a detailed count of the eight heavy metals contemplated in US Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR). The particle size distribution of IFA and CFA was also recorded. EPA's Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) was followed to monitor the leachability of the contaminants before and after the activation. Also images obtained via Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), before and after the activation, are presented. Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was subjected to a full mechanical characterization; tests include compressive strength, flexural strength, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio and setting time. The leachable heavy metal contents (except for Se) were below the maximum allowable limits and in many cases

  14. Solidification of Simulated Liquid Effluents Originating From Sodium-Bearing Waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, FY-03 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. V. Raman; A. K. Herbst; B. A. Scholes; S. H. Hinckley; R. D. Colby

    2003-09-01

    In this report, the mechanism and methods of fixation of acidic waste effluents in grout form are explored. From the variations in the pH as a function of total solids addition to acidic waste effluent solutions, the stages of gellation, liquefaction, slurry formation and grout development are quantitatively revealed. Experimental results indicate the completion of these reaction steps to be significant for elimination of bleed liquid and for setting of the grout to a dimensionally stable and hardened solid within a reasonable period of about twenty eight days that is often observed in the cement and concrete industry. The reactions also suggest increases in the waste loading in the direction of decreasing acid molarity. Consequently, 1.0 molar SBW-180 waste is contained in higher quantity than the 2.8 molar SBW-189, given the same grout formulation for both effluents. The variations in the formulations involving components of slag, cement, waste and neutralizing agent are represented in the form of a ternary formulation map. The map in turn graphically reveals the relations among the various formulations and grout properties, and is useful in predicting the potential directions of waste loading in grouts with suitable properties such as slurry viscosity, Vicat hardness, and mechanical strength. A uniform formulation for the fixation of both SBW-180 and SBW-189 has emerged from the development of the formulation map. The boundaries for the processing regime on this map are 100 wt% cement to 50 wt% cement / 50 wt% slag, with waste loadings ranging from 55 wt% to 68 wt%. Within these compositional bounds all the three waste streams SBW-180, SBW-189 and Scrub solution are amenable to solidification. A large cost advantage is envisaged to stem from savings in labor, processing time, and processing methodology by adopting a uniform formulation concept for fixation of compositionally diverse waste streams. The experimental efforts contained in this report constitute the

  15. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for Building 922 solid office waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, N.M.

    1995-01-01

    Building 922 houses all of SNL/California`s ES and H Departments: Health Protection, Environmental Protection, Safety, and Environmental Operations. It covers approximately 10,000 square feet and houses about 80 people. The office personnel generate nonhazardous solid office wastes in their daily activities. To determine the types and amounts of waste generated, a special PPOA sorting team sorted all of the trash collected from the building for a period of one-week (including paper and aluminum cans in the recycling bins). The team sorted the trash into major categories: paper, plastic, metals, glass, wet garbage, rest room waste, and miscellaneous materials. They then sorted it into subcategories within each major category. Rest room waste was collected but not sorted. The waste in each category was weighed separately. The total amount of trash collected during the week was approximately 168.8 kg (371.4 lbs). The results of this PPOA indicate that SNL/California is minimizing most nonhazardous office waste and reductions planned for the near future will add significantly to the minimization efforts.

  16. Waste Technology Engineering Laboratory (324 building)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kammenzind, D.E.

    1997-05-27

    The 324 Facility Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is comprised of twenty functional areas. Two of the twenty functional areas (Decontamination and Decommissioning and Environmental Restoration) were determined as nonapplicable functional areas and one functional area (Research and Development and Experimental Activities) was determined applicable, however, requirements are found in other functional areas and will not be duplicated. Each functional area follows as a separate chapter, either containing the S/RID or a justification for nonapplicability. The twenty functional areas listed below follow as chapters: 1. Management Systems; 2. Quality Assurance; 3. Configuration Management; 4. Training and Qualification; 5. Emergency Management; 6. Safeguards and Security; 7. Engineering Program; 8. Construction; 9. Operations; 10. Maintenance; 11. Radiation Protection; 12. Fire Protection; 13. Packaging and Transportation; 14. Environmental Restoration; 15. Decontamination and Decommissioning; 16. Waste Management; 17. Research and Development and Experimental Activities; 18. Nuclear Safety; 19. Occupational Safety and Health; 20. Environmental Protection.

  17. Container evaluation for microwave solidification project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, J.A.

    1994-08-01

    This document discusses the development and testing of a suitable waste container and packaging arrangement to be used with the Microwave Solidification System (MSS) and Bagless Posting System (BPS). The project involves the Rocky Flats Plant.

  18. Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Treatment Building Safety Information Document (SID)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fatell, L.B.; Woolsey, G.B.

    1993-04-15

    This Safety Information Document (SID) provides a description and analysis of operations for the Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility Treatment Building (the Treatment Building). The Treatment Building has been classified as a moderate hazard facility, and the level of analysis performed and the methodology used are based on that classification. Preliminary design of the Treatment Building has identified the need for two separate buildings for waste treatment processes. The term Treatment Building applies to all these facilities. The evaluation of safety for the Treatment Building is accomplished in part by the identification of hazards associated with the facility and the analysis of the facility`s response to postulated events involving those hazards. The events are analyzed in terms of the facility features that minimize the causes of such events, the quantitative determination of the consequences, and the ability of the facility to cope with each event should it occur. The SID presents the methodology, assumptions, and results of the systematic evaluation of hazards associated with operation of the Treatment Building. The SID also addresses the spectrum of postulated credible events, involving those hazards, that could occur. Facility features important to safety are identified and discussed in the SID. The SID identifies hazards and reports the analysis of the spectrum of credible postulated events that can result in the following consequences: Personnel exposure to radiation; Radioactive material release to the environment; Personnel exposure to hazardous chemicals; Hazardous chemical release to the environment; Events leading to an onsite/offsite fatality; and Significant damage to government property. The SID addresses the consequences to the onsite and offsite populations resulting from postulated credible events and the safety features in place to control and mitigate the consequences.

  19. SECONDARY WASTE MANAGEMENT STRATEGY FOR EARLY LOW ACTIVITY WASTE TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TW, CRAWFORD

    2008-07-17

    This study evaluates parameters relevant to River Protection Project secondary waste streams generated during Early Low Activity Waste operations and recommends a strategy for secondary waste management that considers groundwater impact, cost, and programmatic risk. The recommended strategy for managing River Protection Project secondary waste is focused on improvements in the Effiuent Treatment Facility. Baseline plans to build a Solidification Treatment Unit adjacent to Effluent Treatment Facility should be enhanced to improve solid waste performance and mitigate corrosion of tanks and piping supporting the Effiuent Treatment Facility evaporator. This approach provides a life-cycle benefit to solid waste performance and reduction of groundwater contaminants.

  20. Solidification Tests Conducted on Transuranic Mixed Oil Waste (TRUM) at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunkow, W. G.; Campbell, D.; Geimer, R.; Gilbreath, C.; Rivera, M.

    2002-02-25

    Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) near Golden, Colorado is the first major nuclear weapons site within the DOE complex that has been declared a full closure site. RFETS has been given the challenge of closing the site by 2006. Key to meeting this challenge is the removal of all waste from the site followed by site restoration. Crucial to meeting this challenge is Kaiser-Hill's (RFETS Operating Contractor) ability to dispose of significant quantities of ''orphan'' wastes. Orphan wastes are those with no current disposition for treatment or disposal. Once such waste stream, generically referred to as Transuranic oils, poses a significant threat to meeting the closure schedule. Historically, this waste stream, which consist of a variety of oil contaminated with a range of organic solvents were treated by simply mixing with Environstone. This treatment method rendered a solidified waste form, but unfortunately not a TRUPACT-II transportable waste. So for the last ten years, RFETS has been accumulating these TRU oils while searching for a non-controversial treatment option.

  1. Sorbent Testing for the Solidification of Unidentified Rocky Flats Laboratory Waste Stored at the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bickford, J.; Kimmitt, R.

    2007-07-01

    At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) evaluated various commercially available sorbents to solidify unidentified laboratory liquids from Rocky Flats that are stored at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The liquids are a collection of laboratory wastes that were generated from various experiments and routine analytical laboratory activities carried out at Rocky Flats. The liquids are in bottles discovered inside of buried waste drums being exhumed from the subsurface disposal area at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) by the contractor, CH2M Hill Washington International (CWI). Free liquids are unacceptable at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), and some of these liquids cannot be returned to the retrieval pit. Stabilization of the liquids into a solid mass will allow these materials to be sent to an appropriate disposal location. The selected sorbent or sorbent combinations should produce a stabilized mass that is capable of withstanding conditions similar to those experienced during storage, shipping, and burial. The final wasteform should release less than 1% liquid by volume per the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). The absence or presence of free liquid in the solidified waste-forms was detected when tested by SW-846, Method 9095B, Paint Filter Free Liquids, and the amount of liquid released from the wasteform was determined by SW-846, Method 9096, Liquid Release Test. Reactivity testing was also conducted on the solidified laboratory liquids. (authors)

  2. Canister storage building evaluation of nuclear safety for solidified high-level waste transfer and storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kidder, R.J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-09-17

    This document is issued to evaluate the safety impacts to the Canister Storage Building from transfer and storage of solidified high-level waste.

  3. THE NOCHAR{reg_sign} TECHNOLOGY DEPLOYMENT PROGRAM, PROVIDING A PROVEN METHOD WORLDWIDE FOR WASTE SOLIDIFICATION AND STABILIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunkow, W. G.; Govers, R.; Pietsch, C.; Kelley, D.; Krause, D.

    2002-02-25

    With the recent fall of the Soviet government and the decommissioning of defense plants in the U.S. DOE Complex, and the increasing worldwide emphasis on environmental restoration and controls, a critical need has developed for a proven ''off the shelf'' technology to deal with these enormous hazardous waste issues. While many new technologies are on the horizon and under development to handle complex waste streams, few of these offer immediate solutions. High technology polymers are an answer to present day needs that will allow immediate burial site disposal, above ground depository use for ''safe store'' applications, and stabilization and immobilization plans for safe transport or incineration at a later date.

  4. Better Buildings Challenge to Cut Energy Waste Grows by 1 Billion Square

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Feet | Department of Energy to Cut Energy Waste Grows by 1 Billion Square Feet Better Buildings Challenge to Cut Energy Waste Grows by 1 Billion Square Feet May 9, 2014 - 11:01am Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - Building on President Obama's Climate Action Plan and the Administration's Better Buildings Challenge, the Energy Department announced today that Better Buildings Challenge partners are on track to meet their energy performance goals in their second year, saving

  5. The Polymers for Liquid Radioactive Waste Solidification: a Lost Chapter in the History of Engineering or a Step Forward? - 13529

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pokhitonov, Yury [V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)] [V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Kelley, Dennis [Pacific Nuclear Solutions, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States)] [Pacific Nuclear Solutions, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Ideas on the application of polymers for the liquid radioactive waste immobilization go a way back, and the first studies in the area were published 30-40 years ago. One should admit that regardless of the fairly large number of publications appeared in the past years currently the interest in this work came down greatly. It was the successful assimilation and worldwide implementation of the LRW cementation technology caused a slump in the interest in polymers. But today it's safe to say that the situation slowly changes, particularly due to the market appearance of the high-tech polymers manufactured by Nochar Company, and unique properties of these polymers gradually raise the demand in various countries. The results of multiple experiments performed with the simulated solutions have passed the comprehensive tests with actual waste. The economic effect from the implementation of the new technology is defined by the volume reduction of waste coming onto the repository, by the decline in the cost of transportation and of the repository construction on account of cutting down the construction volume. Interesting results have been obtained during the search for the technical decisions that would allow using the polymer materials in the processing technology of the industrial toxic waste. One more promising area of the possible application of polymers should be pointed out. It is the application of polymer materials as the assets for the emergency damage control when the advantages of the polymers become obvious. (authors)

  6. 324 Building special-case waste assessment in support of the 324 Building closure (TPA milestone M-89-05)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobart, R.L.

    1998-05-12

    Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-89-05 requires US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office to complete a 324 Building Special Case Waste Assessment in Support of the 324 Building Closure. This document has been prepared with the intent of meeting this regulatory commitment. Alternatives for the Special Case Wastes located in the 324 Building were defined and analyzed. Based on the criteria of safety, environmental, complexity of interfaces, risk, cost, schedule, and long-term operability and maintainability, the best alternative was chosen. Waste packaging and transportation options are also included in the recommendations. The waste disposition recommendations for the B-Cell dispersibles/tank heels and High-Level Vault packaged residuals are to direct them to the Plutonium Uranium Extraction Facility (PUREX) Number 2 storage tunnel.

  7. 327 Building liquid waste handling options modification project plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ham, J.E.

    1998-03-28

    This report evaluates the modification options for handling radiological liquid waste (RLW) generated during decontamination and cleanout of the 327 Building. The overall objective of the 327 Facility Stabilization Project is to establish a passively safe and environmentally secure configuration of the 327 Facility. The issue of handling of RLW from the 327 Facility (assuming the 34O Facility is not available to accept the RLW) has been conceptually examined in at least two earlier engineering studies (Parsons 1997a and Hobart l997). Each study identified a similar preferred alternative that included modifying the 327 Facility RLWS handling systems to provide a truck load-out station, either within the confines of the facility or exterior to the facility. The alternatives also maximized the use of existing piping, tanks, instrumentation, controls and other features to minimize costs and physical changes. An issue discussed in each study involved the anticipated volume of the RLW stream. Estimates ranged between 113,550 and 387,500 liters in the earlier studies. During the development of the 324/327 Building Stabilization/Deactivation Project Management Plan, the lower estimate of approximately 113,550 liters was confirmed and has been adopted as the baseline for the 327 Facility RLW stream. The goal of this engineering study is to reevaluate the existing preferred alternative and select a new preferred alternative, if appropriate. Based on the new or confirmed preferred alternative, this study will also provide a conceptual design and cost estimate for required modifications to the 327 Facility to allow removal of RLWS and treatment of the RLW generated during deactivation.

  8. Final environmental assessment: TRU waste drum staging building, Technical Area 55, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-09

    Much of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) research on plutonium metallurgy and plutonium processing is performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), in Los Alamos, New Mexico. LANL`s main facility for plutonium research is the Plutonium Facility, also referred to as Technical Area 55 (TA-55). The main laboratory building for plutonium work within the Plutonium Facility (TA-55) is the Plutonium Facility Building 4, or PF-4. This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes the potential environmental effects that would be expected to occur if DOE were to stage sealed containers of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste in a support building at the Plutonium Facility (TA-55) that is adjacent to PF-4. At present, the waste containers are staged in the basement of PF-4. The proposed project is to convert an existing support structure (Building 185), a prefabricated metal building on a concrete foundation, and operate it as a temporary staging facility for sealed containers of solid TRU and TRU mixed waste. The TRU and TRU mixed wastes would be contained in sealed 55-gallon drums and standard waste boxes as they await approval to be transported to TA-54. The containers would then be transported to a longer term TRU waste storage area at TA-54. The TRU wastes are generated from plutonium operations carried out in PF-4. The drum staging building would also be used to store and prepare for use new, empty TRU waste containers.

  9. Probing metal solidification nondestructively

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    thick aluminum-14 atomic percent copper alloy during directional solidification, ... An x-ray image of a 200 micron thick aluminum-14 atomic percent copperalloy during ...

  10. Study Builds Knowledge of Nuclear Waste Glass, Provides Insight to Facility

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design | Department of Energy Study Builds Knowledge of Nuclear Waste Glass, Provides Insight to Facility Design Study Builds Knowledge of Nuclear Waste Glass, Provides Insight to Facility Design April 14, 2016 - 12:40pm Addthis Simulated low-activity waste is cooled in a prototypic steel container as part of ORP-sponsored testing at a Columbia, Md., facility in September 2003. Simulated low-activity waste is cooled in a prototypic steel container as part of ORP-sponsored testing at a

  11. Special Analysis for the Disposal of the Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project Waste Stream at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2013-01-31

    The purpose of this Special Analysis (SA) is to determine if the Oak Ridge (OR) Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project (CEUSP) uranium-233 (233U) waste stream (DRTK000000050, Revision 0) is acceptable for shallow land burial (SLB) at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The CEUSP 233U waste stream requires a special analysis because the concentrations of thorium-229 (229Th), 230Th, 232U, 233U, and 234U exceeded their NNSS Waste Acceptance Criteria action levels. The acceptability of the waste stream is evaluated by determining if performance assessment (PA) modeling provides a reasonable expectation that SLB disposal is protective of human health and the environment. The CEUSP 233U waste stream is a long-lived waste with unique radiological hazards. The SA evaluates the long-term acceptability of the CEUSP 233U waste stream for near-surface disposal as a two tier process. The first tier, which is the usual SA process, uses the approved probabilistic PA model to determine if there is a reasonable expectation that disposal of the CEUSP 233U waste stream can meet the performance objectives of U.S. Department of Energy Manual DOE M 435.1-1, “Radioactive Waste Management,” for a period of 1,000 years (y) after closure. The second tier addresses the acceptability of the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream for near-surface disposal by evaluating long-term site stability and security, by performing extended (i.e., 10,000 and 60,000 y) modeling analyses, and by evaluating the effect of containers and the depth of burial on performance. Tier I results indicate that there is a reasonable expectation of compliance with all performance objectives if the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream is disposed in the Area 5 RWMS SLB disposal units. The maximum mean and 95th percentile PA results are all less than the performance objective for 1,000 y. Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis indicates that there is a high likelihood of

  12. EA-0820: Construction of Mixed Waste Storage RCRA Facilities, Buildings 7668 and 7669, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate two mixed (both radioactive and hazardous) waste storage facilities (Buildings 7668 and 7669) in accordance with...

  13. Solidification of low-volume power plant sludges. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, N.E.; Halverson, M.A.; Mercer, B.M.

    1981-12-01

    A literature review was conducted to obtain information on the status of hazardous waste solidification technology and application of this technology to low-volume power plant waste sludges. Because of scarcity of sludge composition data, anticipated major components were identified primarily by chemical reactions that are known to occur during treatment of specific wastewaters. Chemical and physical properties of these sludges were critically analyzed for compatibility with several types of commercially available solidification processes. The study pointed out the need for additional information on the nature of these sludges, especially leaching characteristics and the presence of substances that will interfere with solidification processes. Laboratory studies were recommended for evaluation of solidification process which have the greatest potential for converting hazardous low-volume sludges to non-hazardous waste forms.

  14. Production patterns of packaging waste categories generated at typical Mediterranean residential building worksites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    González Pericot, N.; Villoria Sáez, P.; Del Río Merino, M.; Liébana Carrasco, O.

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • On-site segregation level: 1.80%; training and motivation strategies were not effective. • 70% Cardboard waste: from switches and sockets during the building services stage. • 40% Plastic waste: generated during structures and partition works due to palletizing. • >50% Wood packaging waste, basically pallets, generated during the envelope works. - Abstract: The construction sector is responsible for around 28% of the total waste volume generated in Europe, which exceeds the amount of household waste. This has led to an increase of different research studies focusing on construction waste quantification. However, within the research studies made, packaging waste has been analyzed to a limited extent. This article focuses on the packaging waste stream generated in the construction sector. To this purpose current on-site waste packaging management has been assessed by monitoring ten Mediterranean residential building works. The findings of the experimental data collection revealed that the incentive measures implemented by the construction company to improve on-site waste sorting failed to achieve the intended purpose, showing low segregation ratios. Subsequently, through an analytical study the generation patterns for packaging waste are established, leading to the identification of the prevailing kinds of packaging and the products responsible for their generation. Results indicate that plastic waste generation maintains a constant trend throughout the whole construction process, while cardboard becomes predominant towards the end of the construction works with switches and sockets from the electricity stage. Understanding the production patterns of packaging waste will be beneficial for adapting waste management strategies to the identified patterns for the specific nature of packaging waste within the context of construction worksites.

  15. Expert System for Building TRU Waste Payloads - 13554

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruemmer, Heather; Slater, Bryant

    2013-07-01

    The process for grouping TRU waste drums into payloads for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal is a very complex process. Transportation and regulatory requirements must be met, along with striving for the goals of shipment efficiency: maximize the number of waste drums in a shipment and minimize the use of empty drums which take up precious underground storage space. The restrictions on payloads range from weight restrictions, to limitations on flammable gas in the headspace, to minimum TRU alpha activity concentration requirements. The Overpack and Payload Assistant Tool (OPAT) has been developed as a mixed-initiative intelligent system within the WIPP Waste Data System (WDS) to guide the construction of multiple acceptable payloads. OPAT saves the user time while at the same time maximizes the efficiency of shipments for the given drum population. The tool provides the user with the flexibility to tune critical factors that guide OPAT's operation based on real-time feedback concerning the results of the execution. This feedback complements the user's external knowledge of the drum population (such as location of drums, known challenges, internal shipment goals). This work demonstrates how software can be utilized to complement the unique domain knowledge of the users. The mixed-initiative approach combines the insight and intuition of the human expert with the proficiency of automated computational algorithms. The result is the ability to thoroughly and efficiently explore the search space of possible solutions and derive the best waste management decision. (authors)

  16. Method for treating materials for solidification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Martin, Hollis L.

    1995-01-01

    A method for treating materials such as wastes for solidification to form a solid, substantially nonleachable product. Addition of reactive silica rather than ordinary silica to the material when bringing the initial molar ratio of its silica constituent to a desired ratio within a preselected range increases the solubility and retention of the materials in the solidified matrix. Materials include hazardous, radioactive, mixed, and heavy metal species. Amounts of other constituents of the material, in addition to its silica content are also added so that the molar ratio of each of these constituents is within the preselected ranges for the final solidified product. The mixture is then solidified by cement solidification or vitrification. The method can be used to treat a variety of wastes, including but not limited to spent filter aids from waste water treatment, waste sludges, combinations of spent filter aids and waste sludges, combinations of supernate and waste sludges, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, combinations of incinerator ash and offgas blowdown, cementitious wastes and contaminated soils.

  17. DQO Summary Report for 324 and 327 Building Hot Cells D4 Project Waste Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.A. Lee

    2006-02-06

    This data quality objective (DQO) summary report provides the results of the DQO process conducted for waste characterization activities for the 324 and 327 Building hot cells decommission, deactivate, decontaminate, and demolish activities. This DQO summary report addresses the systems and processes related to the hot cells, air locks, vaults, tanks, piping, basins, air plenums, air ducts, filters, an adjacent elements that have high dose rates, high contamination levels, and/or suspect transuranic waste, which will require nonstandard D4 techniques.

  18. Webinar: Make Your Building Sing!: Building-Retuning to Reduce Energy Waste

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Panelists: Eileen Gohr and Steve Harrison, Parameter Realty Partners; Dennis Bohlayer, Towson University; Benjamin Goldstein, U.S. Department of Energy; Lisa Shulock, Building Owners and Managers...

  19. SOLIDIFICATION OF THE HANFORD LAW WASTE STREAM PRODUCED AS A RESULT OF NEAR-TANK CONTINUOUS SLUDGE LEACHING AND SODIUM HYDROXIDE RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.; Johnson, F.; Crawford, C.; Jantzen, C.

    2011-09-20

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP), is responsible for the remediation and stabilization of the Hanford Site tank farms, including 53 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wasted waste contained in 177 underground tanks. The plan calls for all waste retrieved from the tanks to be transferred to the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The WTP will consist of three primary facilities including pretreatment facilities for Low Activity Waste (LAW) to remove aluminum, chromium and other solids and radioisotopes that are undesirable in the High Level Waste (HLW) stream. Removal of aluminum from HLW sludge can be accomplished through continuous sludge leaching of the aluminum from the HLW sludge as sodium aluminate; however, this process will introduce a significant amount of sodium hydroxide into the waste stream and consequently will increase the volume of waste to be dispositioned. A sodium recovery process is needed to remove the sodium hydroxide and recycle it back to the aluminum dissolution process. The resulting LAW waste stream has a high concentration of aluminum and sodium and will require alternative immobilization methods. Five waste forms were evaluated for immobilization of LAW at Hanford after the sodium recovery process. The waste forms considered for these two waste streams include low temperature processes (Saltstone/Cast stone and geopolymers), intermediate temperature processes (steam reforming and phosphate glasses) and high temperature processes (vitrification). These immobilization methods and the waste forms produced were evaluated for (1) compliance with the Performance Assessment (PA) requirements for disposal at the IDF, (2) waste form volume (waste loading), and (3) compatibility with the tank farms and systems. The iron phosphate glasses tested using the product consistency test had normalized release rates lower than the waste form requirements although the CCC glasses had higher release rates than the

  20. 324 Building Compliance Project: Selection and evaluation of alternatives for the removal of solid remote-handled mixed wastes from the 324 Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, W.A.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Dukelow, J.S. Jr.

    1995-06-01

    Six alternatives for the interim storage of remote-handled mixed wastes from the 324 Building on the Hanford Site have been identified and evaluated. The alternatives focus on the interim storage facility and include use of existing facilities in the 200 Area, the construction of new facilities, and the vitrification of the wastes within the 324 Building to remove the majority of the wastes from under RCRA regulations. The six alternatives are summarized in Table S.1, which identifies the primary facilities to be utilized, the anticipated schedule for removal of the wastes, the costs of the transfer from 324 Building to the interim storage facility (including any capital costs), and an initial risk comparison of the alternatives. A recently negotiated Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) change requires the last of the mixed wastes to be removed by May 1999. The ability to use an existing facility reduces the costs since it eliminates the need for new capital construction. The basic regulatory approvals for the storage of mixed wastes are in place for the PUREX facility, but the Form HI permit will need some minor modifications since the 324 Building wastes have some additional characteristic waste codes and the current permit limits storage of wastes to those from the facility itself. Regulatory reviews have indicated that it will be best to use the tunnels to store the wastes. The PUREX alternatives will only provide storage for about 65% of the wastes. This results from the current schedule of the B-Cell Clean Out Project, which projects that dispersible debris will continue to be collected in small quantities until the year 2000. The remaining fraction of the wastes will then be stored in another facility. Central Waste Complex (CWC) is currently proposed for that residual waste storage; however, other options may also be available.

  1. Vitrification and solidification remedial treatment and disposal costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gimpel, R.F.

    1992-03-12

    Solidification (making concrete) and vitrification (making glass) are frequently the treatment methods recommended for treating inorganic or radioactive wastes. Solidification is generally perceived as the most economical treatment method. Whereas, vitrification is considered (by many) as the most effective of all treatment methods. Unfortunately, vitrification has acquired the stigma that it is too expensive to receive further consideration as an alternative to solidification in high volume treatment applications. Ironically, economic studies, as presented in this paper, show that vitrification may be more competitive in some high volume applications. Ex-situ solidification and vitrification are the competing methods for treating in excess of 450,000 m{sup 3} of low-level radioactive and mixed waste at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP or simply, Fernald) located near Cincinnati, Ohio. This paper summarizes a detailed study done to: compare the economics of the solidification and vitrification processes, determine if the stigma assigned to vitrification is warranted and, determine if investing millions of dollars into vitrification development, along with solidification development, at the Fernald is warranted.

  2. Sets of Reports and Articles Regarding Cement Wastes Forms Containing Alpha Emitters that are Potentially Useful for Development of Russian Federation Waste Treatment Processes for Solidification of Weapons Plutonium MOX Fuel Fabrication Wastes for

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jardine, L J

    2003-06-12

    This is a set of nine reports and articles that were kindly provided by Dr. Christine A. Langton from the Savannah River Site (SRS) to L. J. Jardine LLNL in June 2003. The reports discuss cement waste forms and primarily focus on gas generation in cement waste forms from alpha particle decays. However other items such as various cement compositions, cement product performance test results and some cement process parameters are also included. This set of documents was put into this Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) releasable report for the sole purpose to provide a set of documents to Russian technical experts now beginning to study cement waste treatment processes for wastes from an excess weapons plutonium MOX fuel fabrication facility. The intent is to provide these reports for use at a US RF Experts Technical Meeting on: the Management of Wastes from MOX Fuel Fabrication Facilities, in Moscow July 9-11, 2003. The Russian experts should find these reports to be very useful for their technical and economic feasibility studies and the supporting R&D activities required to develop acceptable waste treatment processes for use in Russia as part of the ongoing Joint US RF Plutonium Disposition Activities.

  3. Polymer solidification national program. Letter report on FY 1992 activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalb, P.D.; Colombo, P.

    1993-04-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed several new and innovative polymer processes for the solidification of low-level radioactive, hazardous and mixed wastes streams. Polyethylene and modified sulfur cement solidification technologies have undergone steady, gradual development at BNL over the past nine years. During this time they have progressed through each of the stages necessary for logical technology maturation: from process conception, parameter optimization, waste form testing, evaluation of long-term durability, economic analysis, and scale-up feasibility. This technology development represents a significant investment which can potentially provide DOE with both short- and long-term savings.

  4. Seismic Vulnerability Assessment Waste Characterization Reduction and Repackaging Building, TA-50-69

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.W.Sullivan; J.Ruminer; I.Cuesta

    2003-02-02

    This report presents the results of the seismic structural analyses completed on the Waste Characterization Reduction and Repackaging (WCRR) Building in support of ongoing safety analyses. WCRR is designated as TA-50-69 at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. The facility has been evaluated against Department of Energy (DOE) seismic criteria for Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Performance Category II (PC 2). The seismic capacities of two subsystems within the WCRR building, the material handling glove box and the lift rack immediately adjacent to the Glove Box are also documented, and the results are presented.

  5. SOLIDIFICATION TESTING FOR A HIGH ACTIVITY WASTESTREAM FROM THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE USING GROUT AND GAMMA RADIATION SHEILDING MATERIALS - 10017

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, H.

    2009-11-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tasked MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) with evaluating grouts that include gamma radiation shielding materials to solidify surrogates of liquid aqueous radioactive wastes from across the DOE Complex. The Savannah River Site (SRS) identified a High Activity Waste (HAW) that will be treated and solidified at the Waste Solidification Building (WSB) for surrogate grout testing. The HAW, which is produced at the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF), is an acidic aqueous wastestream generated by the alkaline treatment process and the aqueous purification process. The HAW surrogate was solidified using Portland cement with and without the inclusion of different gamma radiation shielding materials to determine the shielding material that is the most effective to attenuate gamma radiation for this application.

  6. Solidification process for sludge residue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearce, K.L.

    1998-09-10

    This report investigates the solidification process used at 100-N Basin to solidify the N Basin sediment and assesses the N Basin process for application to the K Basin sludge residue material. This report also includes a discussion of a solidification process for stabilizing filters. The solidified matrix must be compatible with the Environmental Remediation Disposal Facility acceptance criteria.

  7. Buildings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Historically, only Industrial Facilities (ISO 50003 Industry - light to medium and ... is allowing Commercial Buildings (ISO 50003 - Buildings and Building Complexes) ...

  8. Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project CEUSP Inventory_11-6-13_Final_print-ready.pdf (4.03 MB) CEUSP_timeline_final_print-ready.pdf (3.99 MB) NNSS Overview by the Numbers 11-06-13_Final_Print-ready.pdf (4.11 MB) NNSS Waste Acceptance 11-6-13_final_print-ready.pdf (4.03 MB) RadEducationPosterPieChart_11-6-13_final_print-ready.pdf (4.02 MB) RadEducationPosterTrucks_11-7-13_final_print-ready.pdf (4.03 MB) Secure

  9. Preliminary Dynamic Siol-Structure-Interaction Analysis for the Waste Handling Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Wagenblast

    2000-05-01

    The objective of this analysis package is to document a preliminary dynamic seismic evaluation of a simplified design concept of the Wade Handling Building (WHB). Preliminary seismic ground motions and soil data will be used. Loading criteria of the WHB System Design Description will be used. Detail design of structural members will not be performed.. The results of the analysis will be used to determine preliminary sizes of structural concrete and steel members and to determine whether the seismic response of the structure is within an acceptable level for future License Application design of safety related facilities. In order to complete this preliminary dynamic evaluation to meet the Site Recommendation (SR) schedule, the building configuration was ''frozen in time'' as the conceptual design existed in October 1999. Modular design features and dry or wet waste storage features were intentionally excluded from this preliminary dynamic seismic evaluation. The document was prepared in accordance with the Development Plan for the ''Preliminary/Dynamic Soil Structure Interaction Analysis for the Waste Handling Building'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b), which was completed, in accordance with AP-2.13Q, ''Technical Product Development Planning''.

  10. Building waste management core indicators through Spatial Material Flow Analysis: Net recovery and transport intensity indexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Font Vivanco, David; Puig Ventosa, Ignasi; Gabarrell Durany, Xavier

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sustainability and proximity principles have a key role in waste management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Core indicators are needed in order to quantify and evaluate them. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A systematic, step-by-step approach is developed in this study for their development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transport may play a significant role in terms of environmental and economic costs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Policy action is required in order to advance in the consecution of these principles. - Abstract: In this paper, the material and spatial characterization of the flows within a municipal solid waste (MSW) management system are combined through a Network-Based Spatial Material Flow Analysis. Using this information, two core indicators are developed for the bio-waste fraction, the Net Recovery Index (NRI) and the Transport Intensity Index (TII), which are aimed at assessing progress towards policy-related sustainable MSW management strategies and objectives. The NRI approaches the capacity of a MSW management system for converting waste into resources through a systematic metabolic approach, whereas the TII addresses efficiency in terms of the transport requirements to manage a specific waste flow throughout the entire MSW management life cycle. Therefore, both indicators could be useful in assessing key MSW management policy strategies, such as the consecution of higher recycling levels (sustainability principle) or the minimization of transport by locating treatment facilities closer to generation sources (proximity principle). To apply this methodological approach, the bio-waste management system of the region of Catalonia (Spain) has been chosen as a case study. Results show the adequacy of both indicators for identifying those points within the system with higher capacity to compromise its environmental, economic and social performance and therefore establishing clear targets for policy

  11. A perspective of hazardous waste and mixed waste treatment technology at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    England, J.L.; Venkatesh, S.; Bailey, L.L.; Langton, C.A.; Hay, M.S.; Stevens, C.B.; Carroll, S.J.

    1991-12-31

    Treatment technologies for the preparation and treatment of heavy metal mixed wastes, contaminated soils, and mixed mercury wastes are being considered at the Savannah River Site (SRS), a DOE nuclear material processing facility operated by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). The proposed treatment technologies to be included at the Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Treatment Building at SRS are based on the regulatory requirements, projected waste volumes, existing technology, cost effectiveness, and project schedule. Waste sorting and size reduction are the initial step in the treatment process. After sorting/size reduction the wastes would go to the next applicable treatment module. For solid heavy metal mixed wastes the proposed treatment is macroencapsulation using a thermoplastic polymer. This process reduces the leachability of hazardous constituents from the waste and allows easy verification of the coating integrity. Stabilization and solidification in a cement matrix will treat a wide variety of wastes (i.e. soils, decontamination water). Some pretreatments may be required (i.e. Ph adjustment) before stabilization. Other pretreatments such as soil washing can reduce the amount of waste to be stabilized. Radioactive contaminated mercury waste at the SRS comes in numerous forms (i.e. process equipment, soils, and lab waste) with the required treatment of high mercury wastes being roasting/retorting and recovery. Any unrecyclable radioactive contaminated elemental mercury would be amalgamated, utilizing a batch system, before disposal.

  12. A perspective of hazardous waste and mixed waste treatment technology at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    England, J.L.; Venkatesh, S.; Bailey, L.L.; Langton, C.A.; Hay, M.S.; Stevens, C.B.; Carroll, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    Treatment technologies for the preparation and treatment of heavy metal mixed wastes, contaminated soils, and mixed mercury wastes are being considered at the Savannah River Site (SRS), a DOE nuclear material processing facility operated by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). The proposed treatment technologies to be included at the Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Treatment Building at SRS are based on the regulatory requirements, projected waste volumes, existing technology, cost effectiveness, and project schedule. Waste sorting and size reduction are the initial step in the treatment process. After sorting/size reduction the wastes would go to the next applicable treatment module. For solid heavy metal mixed wastes the proposed treatment is macroencapsulation using a thermoplastic polymer. This process reduces the leachability of hazardous constituents from the waste and allows easy verification of the coating integrity. Stabilization and solidification in a cement matrix will treat a wide variety of wastes (i.e. soils, decontamination water). Some pretreatments may be required (i.e. Ph adjustment) before stabilization. Other pretreatments such as soil washing can reduce the amount of waste to be stabilized. Radioactive contaminated mercury waste at the SRS comes in numerous forms (i.e. process equipment, soils, and lab waste) with the required treatment of high mercury wastes being roasting/retorting and recovery. Any unrecyclable radioactive contaminated elemental mercury would be amalgamated, utilizing a batch system, before disposal.

  13. Analysis of weld metal solidification and microstructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    Solidification is a critical phase change occurring during welding that controls weld metal microstructure, properties, and ultimately weldability of alloys. In recent years, significant advances have been made in the solidification theories that relate to castings and rapidly solidified materials. A critical need exists to understand weld pool solidification in the light of these new theories. This paper will describe the solidification behavior of weld pools, incorporating some recent advances in solidification theories. Basic principles from ingot, single crystal, and rapid solidification processes will be used to understand and explain observed weld-metal microstructures. 62 refs., 12 figs.

  14. Decontamination impacts on solidification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piciulo, P.L.; Davis, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    The increased occupational exposure resulting from the accumulation of activated corrosion products in the primary system of LWRs has led to the development of chemical methods to remove the contamination. In the past, the problem of enhanced migration of radionuclides away from trenches used to dispose of low-level radioactive waste, has been linked to the presence, at the disposal unit, of chelating or complexing agents such as those used in decontamination processes. These agents have further been found to reduce the normal sorptive capacity of soils for radionuclides. The degree to which these agents inhibit the normal sorptive processes is dependent on the type of complexing agent, the radionuclide of concern, the soil properties and whether the nuclide is present as a complex or is already sorbed to the soil. Since the quantity of reagent employed in a full system decontamination is large (200 to 25,000 kg), the potential for enhanced migration of radionuclides from a site used to dispose of the decontamination wastes should be addressed and guidelines established for the safe disposal of these wastes.

  15. Building

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    DIV. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities by Census Division, 1999" ,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"per Building (thousand kWh)","per...

  16. Building.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plant in ITER refers to plant systems located outside the Tokamak Building. A thick wall ... The cooling water system provides for the rejection of heat from a variety of ITER systems ...

  17. Nuclear wastes: as they build up, so does the dispute over storing them

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuziak, S.M.; Havemann, J.

    1980-12-20

    Congress has been unable to resolve the policy issues of high-level radioactive wastes sought by both the environmentalists and the nuclear industry. Defense programs continue to generate these wastes, which are stored at sites in South Carolina, Idaho, and Washington and at a former commercial reprocessing site in New York. Neither the House bill (HR 8378) which sought to include defense wastes in public policy nor the Senate bill (S 2189) which authorized Federally-built away from reactor vaults for commercial wastes proved acceptable. The accumulation of spent fuel is the major commercial disposal problem. States may form regional agreements to handle the disposal of low-level wastes. (DCK)

  18. Environmental Management Waste Management Facility Proxy Waste Lot Profile 6.999 for Building K-25 West Wing, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rigsby V.P.

    2009-02-12

    In 1989, the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), which includes the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), was placed on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) National Priorities List. The Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) (DOE 1992), effective January 1, 1992, now governs environmental restoration activities conducted under CERCLA at the ORR. Following signing of the FFA, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the state of Tennessee signed the Oak Ridge Accelerated Cleanup Plan Agreement on June 18, 2002. The purpose of this agreement is to define a streamlined decision-making process to facilitate the accelerated implementation of cleanup, resolve ORR milestone issues, and establish future actions necessary to complete the accelerated cleanup plan by the end of fiscal year 2008. While the FFA continues to serve as the overall regulatory framework for remediation, the Accelerated Cleanup Plan Agreement supplements existing requirements to streamline the decision-making process. Decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities of Bldg. K-25, the original gaseous diffusion facility, is being conducted by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) on behalf of the DOE. The planned CERCLA action covering disposal of building structure and remaining components from the K-25 building is scheduled as a non-time-critical CERCLA action as part of DOE's continuous risk reduction strategy for ETTP. The K-25 building is proposed for D&D because of its poor physical condition and the expense of surveillance and maintenance activities. The K-25/K-27 D&D Project proposes to dispose of the commingled waste listed below from the K-25 west side building structure and remaining components and process gas equipment and piping at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) under waste disposal proxy lot (WPXL) 6.999: (1) Building structure (e.g. concrete floors [excluding basement slab

  19. Laboratory equipment and data interpretation method for predicting volatile emissions during solidification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, H.J.J.; Jensen, R.H.; Hinsenveld, M.

    1996-12-31

    Volatilization is a valid concern in the solidification of wastes containing organics. In the presence of strongly adsorbing substances, however, even volatile compounds may not rule out solidification. In order to distinguish between wastes having negligible emissions and those from which emissions may be problematic, a definition of a volatilization potential and a method of determining this potential is needed. The assessment method can be based on the emission rate measured in a standardized laboratory setup. This paper begins to develop a laboratory setup and a reference framework for the interpretation of the measured emissions from sludges. A volatilization quality index is derived, which can be used to evaluate and rank the potential of volatilization from sludges during mixing operations. This quality index is related to the measured emissions from an organic sludge taken from a waste site. The implications of the experimental results are related to practice.

  20. Evolution of solidification texture during additive manufacturing

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wei, H. L.; Mazumder, J.; DebRoy, T.

    2015-11-10

    Striking differences in the solidification textures of a nickel based alloy owing to changes in laser scanning pattern during additive manufacturing are examined based on theory and experimental data. Understanding and controlling texture are important because it affects mechanical and chemical properties. Solidification texture depends on the local heat flow directions and competitive grain growth in one of the six <100> preferred growth directions in face centered cubic alloys. Furthermore, the heat flow directions are examined for various laser beam scanning patterns based on numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in three dimensions. Here we show that numericalmore » modeling can not only provide a deeper understanding of the solidification growth patterns during the additive manufacturing, it also serves as a basis for customizing solidification textures which are important for properties and performance of components.« less

  1. Evolution of solidification texture during additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, H. L.; Mazumder, J.; DebRoy, T.

    2015-11-10

    Striking differences in the solidification textures of a nickel based alloy owing to changes in laser scanning pattern during additive manufacturing are examined based on theory and experimental data. Understanding and controlling texture are important because it affects mechanical and chemical properties. Solidification texture depends on the local heat flow directions and competitive grain growth in one of the six <100> preferred growth directions in face centered cubic alloys. Furthermore, the heat flow directions are examined for various laser beam scanning patterns based on numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in three dimensions. Here we show that numerical modeling can not only provide a deeper understanding of the solidification growth patterns during the additive manufacturing, it also serves as a basis for customizing solidification textures which are important for properties and performance of components.

  2. Costs of Building Waste Facilities; Price Per Shipment to Recoup Costs

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-05-14

    The Automated Pricing Schedule is a computer model for evaluating the economics of developing, operating, and closing a low-level radioactive waste disposal site. It provides pricing for individual shipments based on the characteristics of the shipment, and calculates a disposal fee to be charged for each shipment to recover the costs of the facility. It includes a sensitivity analysis module to evaluate the effect of varying the parameters of the model.

  3. Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification Treatability Study of Mercury Contaminated Soil from the Y-12 Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalb P.; Milian, L.; Yim, S. P.

    2012-11-30

    As a result of past operations, the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Plant) has extensive mercury-contamination in building structures, soils, storm sewer sediments, and stream sediments, which are a source of pollution to the local ecosystem. Because of mercury’s toxicity and potential impacts on human health and the environment, DOE continues to investigate and implement projects to support the remediation of the Y-12 site.URS and #9122;CH2M Oak Ridge LLC (UCOR) under its prime contract with DOE has cleanup responsibilities on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation and is investigating potential mercury-contaminated soil treatment technologies through an agreement with Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) Y-12, the Y-12 operating contractor to DOE. As part of its investigations, UCOR has subcontracted with Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to conduct laboratory-scale studies evaluating the applicability of the Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification (SPSS) process using surrogate and actual mixed waste Y-12 soils containing mercury (Hg) at 135, 2,000, and 10,000 ppm.SPSS uses a thermoplastic sulfur binder to convert Hg to stable mercury sulfide (HgS) and solidifies the chemically stable product in a monolithic solid final waste form to reduce dispersion and permeability. Formulations containing 40 – 60 dry wt% Y-12 soil were fabricated and samples were prepared in triplicate for Environmental Protection Agency Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) testing by an independent laboratory. Those containing 50 and 60 wt% soil easily met the study criteria for maximum allowable Hg concentrations (47 and 1 ppb, respectively compared with the TCLP limit of 200 ppb Hg). The lowest waste loading of 40 wt% yielded TCLP Hg concentrations slightly higher (240 ppb) than the allowable limit. Since the Y-12 soil tended to form clumps, the improved leaching at higher waste loadings was probably due to reduction in particle size

  4. Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A.

    1980-06-01

    Reported are: high-level waste immobilization, alternative waste forms, nuclear waste materials characterization, TRU waste immobilization, TRU waste decontamination, krypton solidification, thermal outgassing, iodine-129 fixation, unsaturated zone transport, well-logging instrumentation development, mobile organic complexes of fission products, waste management system and safety studies, assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems, waste/rock interactions, engineered barriers, criteria for defining waste isolation, and spent fuel and pool component integrity. (DLC)

  5. Application of microwave energy for in-drum solidification of simulated precipitation sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen, R.D.; Johnson, A.J.; Swanson, S.D.; Thomas, R.L.

    1987-08-17

    The application of microwave energy for in-container solidification of simulated transuranic contaminated precipitation sludges has been tested. Results indicate volume reductions to 83% are achievable by the continuous feeding of pre-dried sludge into a waste container while applying microwave energy. An economic evaluation was completed showing achievable volume and weight reductions to 87% compared with a current immobilization process for wet sludge. 7 refs., 15 figs., 16 tabs.

  6. Using Protons to Peer into Metal Solidification | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Science (SC) Using Protons to Peer into Metal Solidification Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) Community Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: Email Us More Information » 06.01.13 Using Protons to Peer into

  7. Seven NNSS buildings achieve High Performance Sustainable Building...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Sustainable Building (HPSB) plaques to the NNSS team for seven "green" buildings. ... in the areas of energy, water and waste reduction, as well as tenant health and comfort. ...

  8. Casting Process Simulator 3D Mold Fill an Solidification

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-03-06

    The CAPS software is a tool used to setup, simulate, and examine the results from three-dimensional filling and solidification of a sand casting.

  9. Solidification and weldability of Nb-bearing superalloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dupont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.; Robino, C.V.

    1998-10-01

    The solidification and weldability of experimental superalloys containing systematic variations in Fe, Nb, Si and C were studied using differential thermal analysis (DTA), microstructural characterization techniques and Varestraint testing. Microstructural evolution during solidification of DTA samples and gas tungsten arc welds generally occurred by a three-step solidification process. Solidification initiated by a primary L {yields} {gamma} reaction, which enriches the interdendritic liquid in Nb and C until a eutectic-type L {yields} ({gamma} + NbC) reaction occurs over a rather broad temperature range. Solidification terminated by a second eutectic-type reaction, L {yields} ({gamma} + Lave), which occurred over a narrow temperature range. Carbon additions increased the start temperature of the L {yields} ({gamma} + NbC) reaction and induced a concomitant decrease in the temperature interval of the primary L {yields} {gamma} stage of solidification. As a result, carbon additions often promoted a significant improvement in solidification cracking resistance. The results from solidification studies are combined with detailed examinations of microstructural morphologies in fusion zone solidification cracks to propose a microstructure morphology classification scheme.

  10. Casting Process Simulator 2D Mold Fill and Solidification

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-05-06

    The CaPS software is a tool used to setup, simulate, and examine the results from two-dimensional filling and solidification of a sand casting.

  11. Method for solidifying liquid radioactive wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berreth, Julius R.

    1976-01-01

    The quantity of nitrous oxides produced during the solidification of liquid radioactive wastes containing nitrates and nitrites can be substantially reduced by the addition to the wastes of a stoichiometric amount of urea which, upon heating, destroys the nitrates and nitrites, liberating nontoxic N.sub.2, CO.sub.2 and NH.sub.3.

  12. Buildings*","Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Water-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Water Heating","Water-Heating ...

  13. Stabilization and solidification of chromium-contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cherne, C.A.; Thomson, B.M.; Conway, R.

    1997-11-01

    Chromium-contaminated soil is a common environmental problem in the United States as a result of numerous industrial processes involving chromium. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is the species of most concern because of its toxicity and mobility in groundwater. One method of diminishing the environmental impact of chromium is to reduce it to a trivalent oxidation state [Cr(III)], in which it is relatively insoluble and nontoxic. This study investigated a stabilization and solidification process to minimize the chromium concentration in the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) extract and to produce a solidified waste form with a compressive strength in the range of 150 to 300 pounds per square inch (psi). To minimize the chromium in the TCLP extract, the chromium had to be reduced to the trivalent oxidation state. The average used in this study was an alluvium contaminated with chromic and sulfuric acid solutions. The chromium concentration in the in the in situ soil was 1212 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) total chromium and 275 mg/kg Cr(VI). The effectiveness of iron, ferrous sulfate to reduce Cr(VI) was tested in batch experiments.

  14. Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, July-September 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chikalla, T.D.

    1980-11-01

    Research is reported on: high-level waste immobilization, alternative waste forms, TRU waste immobilization and decontamination, krypton solidification, thermal outgassing, /sup 129/I fixation, unsaturated zone transport, well-logging instrumentation, waste management system and safety studies, effectiveness of geologic isolation systems, waste/rock interactions, engineered barriers, backfill material, spent fuel storage (criticality), barrier sealing and liners for U mill tailings, and revegetation of inactive U tailings sites. (DLC)

  15. Atomistic to continuum modeling of solidification microstructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karma, Alain; Tourret, Damien

    2015-09-26

    We summarize recent advances in modeling of solidification microstructures using computational methods that bridge atomistic to continuum scales. We first discuss progress in atomistic modeling of equilibrium and non-equilibrium solid–liquid interface properties influencing microstructure formation, as well as interface coalescence phenomena influencing the late stages of solidification. The latter is relevant in the context of hot tearing reviewed in the article by M. Rappaz in this issue. We then discuss progress to model microstructures on a continuum scale using phase-field methods. We focus on selected examples in which modeling of 3D cellular and dendritic microstructures has been directly linked to experimental observations. Finally, we discuss a recently introduced coarse-grained dendritic needle network approach to simulate the formation of well-developed dendritic microstructures. The approach reliably bridges the well-separated scales traditionally simulated by phase-field and grain structure models, hence opening new avenues for quantitative modeling of complex intra- and inter-grain dynamical interactions on a grain scale.

  16. Atomistic to continuum modeling of solidification microstructures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Karma, Alain; Tourret, Damien

    2015-09-26

    We summarize recent advances in modeling of solidification microstructures using computational methods that bridge atomistic to continuum scales. We first discuss progress in atomistic modeling of equilibrium and non-equilibrium solid–liquid interface properties influencing microstructure formation, as well as interface coalescence phenomena influencing the late stages of solidification. The latter is relevant in the context of hot tearing reviewed in the article by M. Rappaz in this issue. We then discuss progress to model microstructures on a continuum scale using phase-field methods. We focus on selected examples in which modeling of 3D cellular and dendritic microstructures has been directly linked tomore » experimental observations. Finally, we discuss a recently introduced coarse-grained dendritic needle network approach to simulate the formation of well-developed dendritic microstructures. The approach reliably bridges the well-separated scales traditionally simulated by phase-field and grain structure models, hence opening new avenues for quantitative modeling of complex intra- and inter-grain dynamical interactions on a grain scale.« less

  17. Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site- August 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Review of Commercial Grade Dedication Plans for the Safety Instrumented System at the Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Project

  18. Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site- July 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Review of Electrical System Configuration Management and Design Change Control at the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building Project

  19. Secondary Waste Cast Stone Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2012-09-26

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Cast Stone – a cementitious waste form, has been selected for solidification of this secondary waste stream after treatment in the ETF. The secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. This secondary waste Cast Stone waste form qualification testing plan outlines the testing of the waste form and immobilization process to demonstrate that the Cast Stone waste form can comply with the disposal requirements. Specifications for the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form have not been established. For this testing plan, Cast Stone specifications are derived from specifications for the immobilized LAW glass in the WTP contract, the waste acceptance criteria for the IDF, and the waste acceptance criteria in the IDF Permit issued by the State of Washington. This testing plan outlines the testing needed to demonstrate that the waste form can comply with these waste form specifications and acceptance criteria. The testing program must also demonstrate that the immobilization process can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. This testing plan also outlines the testing needed to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support performance assessment analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form in the IDF

  20. EM’s SPRU Celebrates Waste Removal Success, Safety Milestone

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NISKAYUNA, N.Y. – EM’s Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) Disposition Project completed a significant waste-treatment campaign today that involved the solidification of approximately 9,700 gallons of contaminated sludge and 14 shipments of the waste off-site for permanent disposal.

  1. Membrane-Based Absorption Refrigeration Systems: Nanoengineered Membrane-Based Absorption Cooling for Buildings Using Unconcentrated Solar & Waste Heat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-09-01

    BEETIT Project: UFL is improving a refrigeration system that uses low quality heat to provide the energy needed to drive cooling. This system, known as absorption refrigeration system (ARS), typically consists of large coils that transfer heat. Unfortunately, these large heat exchanger coils are responsible for bulkiness and high cost of ARS. UFL is using new materials as well as system design innovations to develop nanoengineered membranes to allow for enhanced heat exchange that reduces bulkiness. UFL’s design allows for compact, cheaper and more reliable use of ARS that use solar or waste heat.

  2. Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 304L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hochanadel, Patrick W; Lienert, Thomas J; Martinez, Jesse N; Martinez, Raymond J; Johnson, Matthew Q

    2010-01-01

    A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found. This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GT A W showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

  3. Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 204L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hochanadel, Patrick W; Lienert, Thomas J; Martinez, Jesse N; Johnson, Matthew Q

    2010-09-15

    A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found.This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GTAW showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

  4. Small businesses selected for nuclear waste services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    buildings, and chemical or other hazardous wastes. Some of these materials may include trace or low levels of radioactive material. They also include transuranic waste generated...

  5. Treatment studies of paint stripping waste from plastic media blasting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spence, R.D.

    1995-12-31

    Blasting with plastic media is used to strip paint and decontaminate surfaces. For disposal the plastic media is pulverized into a plastic dust. About 10 wt % of the waste from plastic media blasting is pulverized paint, which makes the waste a characteristically hazardous waste because of the presence of barium, cadmium, chromium and lead in the paint pigments. Four separate treatments of this hazardous waste were studied: (1) density separation to remove the paint, (2) self-encapsulation of the mix of plastic and paint dust into plastic pellets, (3) solidification/stabilization (S/S) into cementitious waste forms, and (4) low-temperature ashing to destroy the large mass of nonhazardous polymer. Two types of plast blasting wastes were studied: a urea formaldehyde thermoset polymer and an acrylic thermoplastic polymer (polymethylmethacrylate). Toxicity Characteristic Leach Procedure (TCLP) extraction concentrations for the treated and untreated wastes are listed. Density separation failed to adequately separate the paint with an aqueous carbonate solution. Self-encapsulation reduced the waste volume by about 50%, but did not meet TCLP criteria. Cementitious solidification gave the lowest TCLP concentrations, but increased the waste volume by about 50%. Low-temperature ashing at 600 C resulted in a mass decrease of 93 to 98% for the wastes; the metals remaining in the ash could be stabilized with cementitious solidification and still result in a volume decrease of 75 to 95 volume percent.

  6. X-ray imaging and controlled solidification of Al-Cu alloys toward microstructures by design

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Clarke, Amy J.; Tourret, Damien; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Fezzaa, Kamel; Cooley, Jason C.; Lee, Wah -Keat; Deriy, Alex; Patterson, Brian M.; Papin, Pallas A.; et al

    2015-01-30

    X-ray imaging, which permits the microscopic visualization of metal alloy solidification dynamics, can be coupled with controlled solidification to create microstructures by design. This x-ray image shows a process-derived composite microstructure being made from a eutectic Al-17.1 at.%Cu alloy by successive solidification and remelting steps.

  7. Notification of Concurrence - K-25/K-27 D&D Project, ETTP - Change Number of EMWMF Waste Lots in the Waste Handling Plan for Demolition of the K-25 and K-27 Building Structures and Remaining Components Located at the ETTP, Oak Ridge, TN From Two to Three

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trice K.D.

    2009-02-11

    Section 5.1 of the approved Waste Handling Plan for Demolition ofthe K-25 and K-2 7 Building Structures and Remaining Components Located at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (WHP) includes two Environmental Management Waste Management (EMWMF) waste lots: (1) Asbestos-contaminated roofing/transite; and (2) Construction debris, such as nonasbestos roofing, structural steel/miscellaneous metal/equipment, nonradiological piping, wood, and miscellaneous small quantities of concrete. This concurrence form adds an additional EMWMF waste lot 6.47 for lavatory sink drains. Based on an analysis of the building structure characterization data, the only individual building structure with either an analytic carcinogenic or Hazard Index (HI) sum-of-fractions (SOF) greater than 1 is the lavatory sink drains (Table 1). The HI SOF for the lavatory sink drains is 1.34 (Table 2). When all media are combined with the material of construction calculations, the HI SOF is 1.22 (Table 3). However, when the lavatory sink drains are segregated from all other media, the HI SOF is only 0.256, which is well below the EMWMF waste acceptance criteria SOF limit of 1 (Table 4). Given the large volume (124, 625 cubic yards) of other building structure media with a small HI SOF of 0.256 and the small volume (one cubic yard) of lavatory sink drains with a large HI SOF of 1.34, a separate waste lot for lavatory sink drains is recommended. Lead is the primary contributor to the large HI SOF in the lavatory sink drains. Lead in the lavatory sink drains was shown using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test statistically to have higher concentrations than all other building structure media combined. Other analytes having statistically different median concentrations in the lavatory sink drains compared to all other media are antimony, arsenic, boron, cadmium, selenium, solver, vanadium, zinc, mercury, strontium, and Uranium-233/234 (Table 5). A separate waste lot for the lavatory sink drains

  8. Solidification and weldability of thermo-span{trademark} alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robino, C.V.; Michael, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    Thermo-Span is a low coefficient of thermal expansion precipitation hardenable superalloy with high tensile and rupture strengths. The alloy is based on the Fe-Co-Ni system and utilizes chromium additions for improved environmental resistance. The solidification behavior and fusion zone hot cracking tendency of this alloy has been evaluated using differential thermal analysis, Varestraint testing, and through comparison with Inconel 718 and Incoloy 909. Solidification microstructures were characterized by optical and electron microscopy, and the solidification phases identified. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) at heating and cooling rates of 20{degrees}C/min indicated that melting of the wrought allow initiates at temperatures near 1280{degrees}C and continues to approximately 1441{degrees}C. During cooling, the alloy solidifies with two solidification events. These events are the formation of primary austenite and the formation of a terminal eutectic-like constituent at approximately 1220{degrees}C. The implications of the electron microscopy results, in terms of the hot cracking behavior, will be discussed. In summary, the weldability of Thermo-Span was found to be similar to Inconel 718 and Incoloy 909 and therefore, the alloy is likely to be amenable to similar weld processing. This was work performed at Sandia National Laboratories supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract Number DE-AC04-76DP00789.

  9. Microstructural Development in Al-Si Powder During Rapid Solidification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amber Lynn Genau

    2004-12-19

    Powder metallurgy has become an increasingly important form of metal processing because of its ability to produce materials with superior mechanical properties. These properties are due in part to the unique and often desirable microstructures which arise as a result of the extreme levels of undercooling achieved, especially in the finest size powder, and the subsequent rapid solidification which occurs. A better understanding of the fundamental processes of nucleation and growth is required to further exploit the potential of rapid solidification processing. Aluminum-silicon, an alloy of significant industrial importance, was chosen as a model for simple eutectic systems displaying an unfaceted/faceted interface and skewed coupled eutectic growth zone, Al-Si powder produced by high pressure gas atomization was studied to determine the relationship between microstructure and alloy composition as a function of powder size and atomization gas. Critical experimental measurements of hypereutectic (Si-rich) compositions were used to determine undercooling and interface velocity, based on the theoretical models which are available. Solidification conditions were analyzed as a function of particle diameter and distance from nucleation site. A revised microstructural map is proposed which allows the prediction of particle morphology based on temperature and composition. It is hoped that this work, by providing enhanced understanding of the processes which govern the development of the solidification morphology of gas atomized powder, will eventually allow for better control of processing conditions so that particle microstructures can be optimized for specific applications.

  10. Solidification at the High and Low Rate Extreme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halim Meco

    2004-12-19

    The microstructures formed upon solidification are strongly influenced by the imposed growth rates on an alloy system. Depending on the characteristics of the solidification process, a wide range of growth rates is accessible. The prevailing solidification mechanisms, and thus the final microstructure of the alloy, are governed by these imposed growth rates. At the high rate extreme, for instance, one can have access to novel microstructures that are unattainable at low growth rates. While the low growth rates can be utilized for the study of the intrinsic growth behavior of a certain phase growing from the melt. Although the length scales associated with certain processes, such as capillarity, and the diffusion of heat and solute, are different at low and high rate extremes, the phenomena that govern the selection of a certain microstructural length scale or a growth mode are the same. Consequently, one can analyze the solidification phenomena at both high and low rates by using the same governing principles. In this study, we examined the microstructural control at both low and high extremes. For the high rate extreme, the formation of crystalline products and factors that control the microstructure during rapid solidification by free-jet melt spinning are examined in Fe-Si-B system. Particular attention was given to the behavior of the melt pool at different quench-wheel speeds. Since the solidification process takes place within the melt-pool that forms on the rotating quench-wheel, we examined the influence of melt-pool dynamics on nucleation and growth of crystalline solidification products and glass formation. High-speed imaging of the melt-pool, analysis of ribbon microstructure, and measurement of ribbon geometry and surface character all indicate upper and lower limits for melt-spinning rates for which nucleation can be avoided, and fully amorphous ribbons can be achieved. Comparison of the relevant time scales reveals that surface-controlled melt

  11. Y-12 Plant decontamination and decommissioning Technology Logic Diagram for Building 9201-4: Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part B, Decontamination; robotics/automation; waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-09-01

    This volume consists of the Technology Logic Diagrams (TLDs) for the decontamination, robotics/automation, and waste management areas.

  12. Statement of work for conceptual design of solidified high-level waste interim storage system project (phase I)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calmus, R.B., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-12-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has embarked upon a course to acquire Hanford Site tank waste treatment and immobilization services using privatized facilities. This plan contains a two phased approach. Phase I is a ``proof-of-principle/commercial demonstration- scale`` effort and Phase II is a full-scale production effort. In accordance with the planned approach, interim storage (IS) and disposal of various products from privatized facilities are to be DOE furnished. The path forward adopted for Phase I solidification HLW IS entails use of Vaults 2 and 3 in the Spent Nuclear Fuel Canister Storage Building, to be located in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. This Statement of Work describes the work scope to be performed by the Architect-Engineer to prepare a conceptual design for the solidified HLW IS System.

  13. Treatability study of absorbent polymer waste form for mixed waste treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrmann, S. D.; Lehto, M. A.; Stewart, N. A.; Croft, A. D.; Kern, P. W.

    2000-02-10

    A treatability study was performed to develop and characterize an absorbent polymer waste form for application to low level (LLW) and mixed low level (MLLW) aqueous wastes at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W). In this study absorbent polymers proved effective at immobilizing aqueous liquid wastes in order to meet Land Disposal Restrictions for subsurface waste disposal. Treatment of aqueous waste with absorbent polymers provides an alternative to liquid waste solidification via high-shear mixing with clays and cements. Significant advantages of absorbent polymer use over clays and cements include ease of operations and waste volume minimization. Absorbent polymers do not require high-shear mixing as do clays and cements. Granulated absorbent polymer is poured into aqueous solutions and forms a gel which passes the paint filter test as a non-liquid. Pouring versus mixing of a solidification agent not only eliminates the need for a mixing station, but also lessens exposure to personnel and the potential for spread of contamination from treatment of radioactive wastes. Waste minimization is achieved as significantly less mass addition and volume increase is required of and results from absorbent polymer use than that of clays and cements. Operational ease and waste minimization translate into overall cost savings for LLW and MLLW treatment.

  14. Buildings | Buildings | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Index for Commercial Buildings Welcome to the Energy Index for Commercial Buildings. Data for this tool comes from the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). Select categories from the CBECS micro data allow users to search on common building characteristics that impact energy use. Users may select multiple criteria, however if the resulting sample size is too small, the data will be unreliable. If nothing is selected results

  15. Prediction of non-equilibrium solidification modes in austenitic stainless steel laser welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitek, J.M.; David, S.A.

    1993-08-01

    A primary austenitic, non-equilibrium mode of solidification can be induced in many 300 series austenitic stainless steels by laser welding and other rapid solidification techniques. The change in solidification mode can often result in a fully austenitic microstructure compared to the two phase ferrite plus austenite microstructure that is commonly found after primary ferrite solidification. A predictive capability for the solidification mode under rapid solidification conditions such as laser welding is needed since the microstructure and properties are closely related to solidification behavior. Conventional constitutional diagrams do not predict with any reliability the change to non-equilibrium austenitic solidification mode. Several means that have been attempted to predict the solidification behavior under extreme conditions are reviewed. The Cr{sub EQ}/Ni{sub EQ} ratio is shown to be unreliable, at least with the equivalence factors commonly used. Theoretical calculations of growth rate competition between ferrite and austenite solidification show promise, but some ambiguity results from inaccuracy in thermophysical material parameters. Use of calculated thermodynamic parameters such as equilibrium and non-equilibrium liquidus and solidus temperatures also shows some promise. However, this approach is not completely satisfactory and reliable either. It is concluded that a reliable and accurate method for predicting the tendency of austenitic stainless steels to solidify in the non-equilibrium mode is not yet available.

  16. Filling and solidification with coupled heat transfer and stress analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruiz, D.J.; Khandhia, Y.

    1995-12-31

    A full filling and solidification simulation of the MCWASP 7 casting has been carried out using the commercial finite element (FE) analysis codes LS-DYNA3D and FIDAP. The two codes were used to carry out back-to-back analysis of the mould filling. Both codes track the free surface and predict filling times. LS-DYNA3D has been used both for the filling simulation and to carry out a coupled thermal and stress analysis of the casting during solidification, predicting cooling rates, residual stresses and as-cast shape. The methodology used and details of the FE models are summarized. Results are presented for comparison with the casting trial data (x-rays of filling and thermocouple data).

  17. Building a World of Difference | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building a World of Difference Building a World of Difference Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop Building a World of Difference Presentation by Patricia Scanlan, Director of Residuals Treatment Technologies, Black & Veatch scanlan_waste_to_energy_2014.pdf (1.34 MB) More Documents & Publications Waste-to-Energy Workshop Summary Report Biogas Opportunities Roadmap Biogas Opportunities Roadmap Progress Report

  18. Multi-discipline Waste Acceptance Process at the Nevada National Security Site - 13573

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carilli, Jhon T.; Krenzien, Susan K.

    2013-07-01

    The Nevada National Security Site low-level radioactive waste disposal facility acceptance process requires multiple disciplines to ensure the protection of workers, the public, and the environment. These disciplines, which include waste acceptance, nuclear criticality, safety, permitting, operations, and performance assessment, combine into the overall waste acceptance process to assess low-level radioactive waste streams for disposal at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site. Four waste streams recently highlighted the integration of these disciplines: the Oak Ridge Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators and Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project material, West Valley Melter, and classified waste. (authors)

  19. Hanford Site Secondary Waste Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westsik, Joseph H.

    2009-01-29

    Summary The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is making plans to dispose of 54 million gallons of radioactive tank wastes at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The high-level wastes and low-activity wastes will be vitrified and placed in permanent disposal sites. Processing of the tank wastes will generate secondary wastes, including routine solid wastes and liquid process effluents, and these need to be processed and disposed of also. The Department of Energy Office of Waste Processing sponsored a meeting to develop a roadmap to outline the steps necessary to design the secondary waste forms. Representatives from DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Washington State Department of Ecology, the Oregon Department of Energy, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, technical experts from the DOE national laboratories, academia, and private consultants convened in Richland, Washington, during the week of July 21-23, 2008, to participate in a workshop to identify the risks and uncertainties associated with the treatment and disposal of the secondary wastes and to develop a roadmap for addressing those risks and uncertainties. This report describes the results of the roadmap meeting in Richland. Processing of the tank wastes will generate secondary wastes, including routine solid wastes and liquid process effluents. The secondary waste roadmap workshop focused on the waste streams that contained the largest fractions of the 129I and 99Tc that the Integrated Disposal Facility risk assessment analyses were showing to have the largest contribution to the estimated IDF disposal impacts to groundwater. Thus, the roadmapping effort was to focus on the scrubber/off-gas treatment liquids with 99Tc to be sent to the Effluent Treatment Facility for treatment and solidification and the silver mordenite and carbon beds with the captured 129I to be packaged and sent to the IDF. At the highest level, the secondary waste roadmap includes elements addressing regulatory and

  20. Operating data to In-Tank Solidification (ITS)-2 for January 1 to October 10, 1974

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reich, F.R., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-02

    Data sheets containing date, time, feet above bottom,temperature, comments. Operating data to In-Tank Solidification (ITS)-2 for January 1 to October 10, 1974.

  1. WIPP WASTE MINIMIZATION PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NOV 2 3 2015 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transm ittal of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Project 2015 Waste Minimization Report, Permit Number NM4890139088-TSDF Dear Mr. Kieling: The purpose of this letter is to provide you with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project 2015 Waste Minimization Report. This report, required by and prepared in accordance with the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Part 2,

  2. WIPP WASTE MINIMIZATION PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carlsbad, New Mexico 8822 1 NOV 2 3 2011 Mr. John Kieling , Acting Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environme nt Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Waste Minimization Report Dear Mr. Kieling: This letter provides the submittal of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Waste Minimization Report. This report is required by and has bee n prepared in accordance with the WIPP

  3. Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, October through December 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chikalla, T.D.; Powell, J.A.

    1981-03-01

    Progress reports and summaries are presented under the following headings: high-level waste process development; alternative waste forms; nuclear waste materials characterization center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton solidification; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; mobility of organic complexes of radionuclides in soils; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology; high level waste form preparation; development of backfill material; development of structural engineered barriers; ONWI disposal charge analysis; spent fuel and fuel component integrity program; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; analysis of postulated criticality events in a storage array of spent LWR fuel; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium tailings; liner evaluation for uranium mill tailings; multilayer barriers for sealing of uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; revegetation of inactive uranium tailing sites; verification instrument development.

  4. Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A.

    1980-09-01

    The status of the following programs is reported: high-level waste immobilization; alternative waste forms; Nuclear Waste Materials Characterization Center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton solidification; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; mobility of organic complexes of fission products in soils; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology; systems study on engineered barriers; criteria for defining waste isolation; spent fuel and fuel pool component integrity program; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; and development of backfill material.

  5. Seven NNSS buildings achieve High Performance Sustainable Building...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    The buildings earned the HPSB status by meeting 28 distinct performance requirements in the areas of energy, water and waste reduction, as well as tenant health and comfort. This ...

  6. West Valley demonstration project: alternative processes for solidifying the high-level wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holton, L.K.; Larson, D.E.; Partain, W.L.; Treat, R.L.

    1981-10-01

    In 1980, the US Department of Energy (DOE) established the West Valley Solidification Project as the result of legislation passed by the US Congress. The purpose of this project was to carry out a high level nuclear waste management demonstration project at the Western New York Nuclear Service Center in West Valley, New York. The DOE authorized the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), which is operated by Battelle Memorial Institute, to assess alternative processes for treatment and solidification of the WNYNSC high-level wastes. The Process Alternatives Study is the suject of this report. Two pretreatment approaches and several waste form processes were selected for evaluation in this study. The two waste treatment approaches were the salt/sludge separation process and the combined waste process. Both terminal and interim waste form processes were studied.

  7. Secondary Waste Form Development and Optimization—Cast Stone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sundaram, S. K.; Parker, Kent E.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Pitman, Stan G.; Chun, Jaehun; Chung, Chul-Woo; Kimura, Marcia L.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Um, Wooyong; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2011-07-14

    Washington River Protection Services is considering the design and construction of a Solidification Treatment Unit (STU) for the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at Hanford. The ETF is a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act-permitted, multi-waste, treatment and storage unit and can accept dangerous, low-level, and mixed wastewaters for treatment. The STU needs to be operational by 2018 to receive secondary liquid wastes generated during operation of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The STU to ETF will provide the additional capacity needed for ETF to process the increased volume of secondary wastes expected to be produced by WTP.

  8. Alpha low-level stored waste systems design study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feizollahi, F.; Teheranian, B.; Quapp, W.J.

    1992-08-01

    The Stored Waste System Design Study (SWSDS), commissioned by the Waste Technology Development Department at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), examines relative life-cycle costs associated with three system concepts for processing the alpha low-level waste (alpha-LLW) stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex`s Transuranic Storage Area at the INEL. The three system concepts are incineration/melting; thermal treatment/solidification; and sort, treat, and repackage. The SWSDS identifies system functional and operational requirements and assesses implementability; effectiveness; cost; and demonstration, testing, and evaluation (DT&E) requirements for each of the three concepts.

  9. Alpha low-level stored waste systems design study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feizollahi, F.; Teheranian, B. . Environmental Services Div.); Quapp, W.J. )

    1992-08-01

    The Stored Waste System Design Study (SWSDS), commissioned by the Waste Technology Development Department at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), examines relative life-cycle costs associated with three system concepts for processing the alpha low-level waste (alpha-LLW) stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex's Transuranic Storage Area at the INEL. The three system concepts are incineration/melting; thermal treatment/solidification; and sort, treat, and repackage. The SWSDS identifies system functional and operational requirements and assesses implementability; effectiveness; cost; and demonstration, testing, and evaluation (DT E) requirements for each of the three concepts.

  10. Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dangerous Waste Permit Suzanne Dahl and Jeff Lyon Nuclear Waste Program April 17, 2012 Tank-Related Units Why have permits? * To regulate dangerous waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities: - Thermal treatment units - Landfills - Tank systems - Container storage - Containment buildings * To protect humans and the environment Parts of the Unit Permit * Fact Sheet * Unit description * Operations and processes * Permit conditions * Requirements or limitations to maintain safe operating

  11. Industrial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Industrial Manufacturing Buildings Industrialmanufacturing buildings are not considered commercial, but are covered by the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey...

  12. Secondary Waste Simulant Development for Cast Stone Formulation Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Renee L.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Swanberg, David J.; Mahoney, J.

    2015-04-01

    Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) funded Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to conduct a waste form testing program to implement aspects of the Secondary Liquid Waste Treatment Cast Stone Technology Development Plan (Ashley 2012) and the Hanford Site Secondary Waste Roadmap (PNNL 2009) related to the development and qualification of Cast Stone as a potential waste form for the solidification of aqueous wastes from the Hanford Site after the aqueous wastes are treated at the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). The current baseline is that the resultant Cast Stone (or grout) solid waste forms would be disposed at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Data and results of this testing program will be used in the upcoming performance assessment of the IDF and in the design and operation of a solidification treatment unit planned to be added to the ETF. The purpose of the work described in this report is to 1) develop simulants for the waste streams that are currently being fed and future WTP secondary waste streams also to be fed into the ETF and 2) prepare simulants to use for preparation of grout or Cast Stone solid waste forms for testing.

  13. Test procedures for polyester immobilized salt-containing surrogate mixed wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biyani, R.K.; Hendrickson, D.W.

    1997-07-18

    These test procedures are written to meet the procedural needs of the Test Plan for immobilization of salt containing surrogate mixed waste using polymer resins, HNF-SD-RE-TP-026 and to ensure adequacy of conduct and collection of samples and data. This testing will demonstrate the use of four different polyester vinyl ester resins in the solidification of surrogate liquid and dry wastes, similar to some mixed wastes generated by DOE operations.

  14. EA-0874: Low-level Waste Drum Staging Building at Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility, TA-16 Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to place a 3 meter (m) by 4.5 m prefabricated storage building (transportainer) adjacent to the existing Weapons Engineering Tritium...

  15. Buildings*","Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane","Other a" "All Buildings* ... Water ......",33,32,6,8,"Q",24,"Q","N" "Propane ......",502,489,179,40,59...

  16. Solidification analysis of a centrifugal atomizer using the Al-32.7wt.% Cu alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborne, M.G.

    1998-02-23

    A centrifugal atomizer (spinning disk variety) was designed and constructed for the production of spherical metal powders, 100--1,000 microns in diameter in an inert atmosphere. Initial atomization experiments revealed the need for a better understanding of how the liquid metal was atomized and how the liquid droplets solidified. To investigate particle atomization, Ag was atomized in air and the process recorded on high-speed film. To investigate particle solidification, Al-32.7 wt.% Cu was atomized under inert atmosphere and the subsequent particles were examined microscopically to determine solidification structure and rate. This dissertation details the experimental procedures used in producing the Al-Cu eutectic alloy particles, examination of the particle microstructures, and determination of the solidification characteristics (e.g., solidification rate) of various phases. Finally, correlations are proposed between the operation of the centrifugal atomizer and the observed solidification spacings.

  17. Porous Alumina Silicate Matrix Gubka for Solidification of {sup 137}Cs Strip Product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aloy, Albert; Strelnikov, Alexander; Essimantovskiy, Vyacheslav

    2007-07-01

    Separated liquid high-level radioactive waste (HLW) fractions, in particular, about 100 liters of a {sup 137}Cs strip product with activity up to {approx} 100 Ci/l (3.7 TBq/l) have been produced during the development and testing of partitioning technology and temporarily stored at V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI) (Saint-Petersburg, Russia). The bench-scale experimental unit designed for operation in the hot cell was developed for {sup 137}Cs strip product solidification using an alumina silicate porous inorganic material (PIM) called Gubka. Conditions of saturation, drying, and calcinations of the salts into Gubka pores were optimized, and the operations under a remote control regime were executed during tests using a simulated strip product doped with {sup 137}Cs. The volume reduction coefficients were equal by a factor of 3.2-3.9 and a {sup 137}Cs discharge into an off-gas system was not detected. {sup 137}Cs leach rates from Gubka blocks after calcination at 800 deg. C were 1.0-1.5.10{sup -3} g/m{sup 2}.per day. (authors)

  18. High-Level Waste Melter Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahearne, J.; Gentilucci, J.; Pye, L. D.; Weber, T.; Woolley, F.; Machara, N. P.; Gerdes, K.; Cooley, C.

    2002-02-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is faced with a massive cleanup task in resolving the legacy of environmental problems from years of manufacturing nuclear weapons. One of the major activities within this task is the treatment and disposal of the extremely large amount of high-level radioactive (HLW) waste stored at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The current planning for the method of choice for accomplishing this task is to vitrify (glassify) this waste for disposal in a geologic repository. This paper describes the results of the DOE-chartered independent review of alternatives for solidification of Hanford HLW that could achieve major cost reductions with reasonable long-term risks, including recommendations on a path forward for advanced melter and waste form material research and development. The potential for improved cost performance was considered to depend largely on increased waste loading (fewer high-level waste canisters for disposal), higher throughput, or decreased vitrification facility size.

  19. Modeling and Simulation of Microstructural Development During Weld Solidification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitek, J.M.; David, S.A.

    1999-10-04

    Techniques for numerical calculations of phase transformation kinetics have recently become available. These methods are integrated with computational thermodynamics to allow for the description of diffusion-controlled transformations as a function of time. Such calculations have been applied to the modeling of solidification behavior in the current study. Three examples are considered which relate to the prediction of microstructure development and solute redistribution during conditions corresponding to welding conditions. The examples evaluate dendritic growth, planar growth, and competition between alternate solidification modes. It is shown that these techniques are particularly powerful when dealing with multi-component (>2) alloy systems. For such multi-component alloys, new considerations must be taken into account to describe the solute redistribution and the conditions leading to planar front growth. Finally, when studying global behavior covering a wide range of alloy compositions and thermal conditions, individual computations become impractical. For such calculations, neural network analysis may be beneficial and an example is given where such an analysis is shown to be suitable in describing a complex series of phase transformations.

  20. Cementation and solidification of Rocky Flats Plant incinerator ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, J.A.; Semones, G.B.

    1994-04-01

    Cementation studies on various aqueous waste streams at Rocky Flats have shown this technology to be effective for immobilizing the RCRA constituents in the waste. Cementation is also being evaluated for encapsulation of incinerator ash. Experiments will initially evaluate a surrogate ash waste using a Taguchi experimental design to optimize the cement formulation and waste loading levels for this application. Variables of waste loading, fly ash additions, water/cement ratio, and cement type will be tested at three levels each during the course of this work. Tests will finally be conducted on actual waste using the optimized cement formulation developed from this testing. This progression of tests will evaluate the effectiveness of cement encapsulation for this waste stream without generating any additional wastes.

  1. Utilization of fly ash for stabilization/solidification of heavy metal contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dermatas, D.; Meng, X.

    1995-12-01

    Pozzolanic-based stabilization/solidification (S/S) is an effective, yet economic technological alternative to immobilize heavy metals in contaminated soils and sludges. Fly ash waste materials were used along with quicklime (CaO) to immobilize lead, trivalent and hexavalent chromium present in contaminated clayey sand soils. The degree of heavy metal immobilization was evaluated using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) as well as controlled extraction experiments. These leaching test results along with X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray (SEM-EDX) analyses were also implemented to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for immobilization of the heavy metals under study. Finally, the reusability of the stabilized waste forms in construction applications was also investigated by performing unconfined compressive strength and swell tests. Results suggest that the controlling mechanism for both lead and hexavalent chromium immobilization is surface adsorption, whereas for trivalent chromium it is hydroxide precipitation. Addition of fly ash to the contaminated soils effectively reduced heavy metal leachability well below the non-hazardous regulatory limits. However, quicklime addition was necessary in order to attain satisfactory immobilization levels. Overall, fly ash addition increases the immobilization pH region for all heavy metals tested, and significantly improves the stress-strain properties of the treated solids, thus allowing their reuse as readily available construction materials. The only potential problem associated with this quicklime/fly ash treatment is the excessive formation of the pozzolanic product ettringite in the presence of sulfates. Ettringite, when brought in contact with water, may cause significant swelling and subsequent deterioration of the stabilized matrix. Addition of minimum amounts of barium hydroxide was shown to effectively eliminate ettringite formation.

  2. Secondary Waste Form Down-Selection Data Package—Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Waste Form

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Westsik, Joseph H.; Strachan, Denis M.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Pires, Richard P.

    2011-09-12

    The Hanford Site in southeast Washington State has 56 million gallons of radioactive and chemically hazardous wastes stored in 177 underground tanks (ORP 2010). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP), through its contractors, is constructing the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to convert the radioactive and hazardous wastes into stable glass waste forms for disposal. Within the WTP, the pretreatment facility will receive the retrieved waste from the tank farms and separate it into two treated process streams. These waste streams will be vitrified, and the resulting waste canisters will be sent to offsite (high-level waste [HLW]) and onsite (immobilized low-activity waste [ILAW]) repositories. As part of the pretreatment and ILAW processing, liquid secondary wastes will be generated that will be transferred to the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) on the Hanford Site for further treatment. These liquid secondary wastes will be converted to stable solid waste forms that will be disposed of in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). To support the selection of a waste form for the liquid secondary wastes from WTP, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) has initiated secondary waste form testing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In anticipation of a down-selection process for a waste form for the Solidification Treatment Unit to be added to the ETF, PNNL is developing data packages to support that down-selection. The objective of the data packages is to identify, evaluate, and summarize the existing information on the four waste forms being considered for stabilizing and solidifying the liquid secondary wastes. At the Hanford Site, the FBSR process is being evaluated as a supplemental technology for treating and immobilizing Hanford LAW radioactive tank waste and for treating secondary wastes from the WTP pretreatment and LAW vitrification processes.

  3. Waste Form Evaluation Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franz, E.M.; Colombo, P.

    1985-09-01

    This report presents data that can be used to assess the acceptability of polyethylene and modified sulfur cement waste forms to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 61. The waste streams selected for this study include dry evaporator concentrate salts and incinerator ash as representative wastes which result from advanced volume reduction technologies and ion exchange resins which remain problematic for solidification using commercially available matrix materials. Property evaluation tests such as compressive strength, water immersion, thermal cycling, irradiation, biodegradation and leachability were conducted for polyethylene and sulfur cement waste forms over a range of waste-to-binder ratios. Based on the results of the tests, optimal waste loadings of 70 wt % sodium sulfate, 50 wt % boric acid, 40 wt % incinerator ash and 30 wt % ion exchange resins were established for polyethylene, although maximum loadings were considerably higher. For modified sulfur cement, optimal loadings of 40 wt % sodium sulfate, 40 wt % boric acid and 40 wt % incinerator ash are reported. Ion exchange resins are not recommended for incorporation into modified sulfur cement because of poor waste form performance even at very low waste concentrations. The results indicate that all waste forms tested within the range of optimal waste concentrations satisifed the requirements of the NRC Technical Position Paper on Waste Form.

  4. House Simulation Protocols (Building America Benchmark) - Building...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    House Simulation Protocols (Building America Benchmark) - Building America Top Innovation House Simulation Protocols (Building America Benchmark) - Building America Top Innovation ...

  5. Mercantile Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mercantile Characteristics by Activity... Mercantile Mercantile buildings are those used for the sale and display of goods other than food (buildings used for the sales of food are...

  6. Education Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Education Characteristics by Activity... Education Education buildings are buildings used for academic or technical classroom instruction, such as elementary, middle, or high...

  7. Better Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Better Buildings Initiative aims to make commercial and industrial buildings 20% more energy efficient by 2020 and accelerate private sector investment in energy efficiency.

  8. Prediction of dendritic spacings in a directional-solidification experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, J.A. ); Langer, J.S. )

    1993-04-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the formation of a dendritic array in a directional-solidification experiment. Our calculation contains three sequential ingredients: acceleration of an initially flat interface and the concomitant buildup of a solutal boundary layer in front of it; onset of a morphological instability, triggered by thermal fluctuations, producing a relatively finely spaced array of dendritic tips; coarsening of this array and final selection of a steady-state primary spacing. For sufficiently large growth speeds, where the resulting dendrites interact with each other weakly, we find--with no adjustable parameters--good agreement with the experiments of Trivedi and Somboonsuk [Acta Metall. 33, 1061 (1985)] and Somboonsuk, Mason, and Trivedi [Metall. Trans A 15A, 967 (1984)].

  9. Solidification behavior and structure of Al-Cu alloy welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, J.A.; Li, M.; Yang, N.C.Y.

    1997-09-01

    The microsegregation behavior of electron beam (EB) and gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds of Al-Cu alloys covering a range from 0.19 to 7.74 wt% Cu were characterized for dendrite core concentrations and fraction eutectic solidification. Although a single weld speed of 12.7 mm/sec was used, some differences were observed in the segregation behavior of the two weld types. The microsegregation behavior was also modeled using a finite differences technique considering dendrite tip and eutectic undercooling and solid state diffusion. Fairly good agreement was observed between measured and calculated segregation behavior although differences between the two weld types could not be completely accounted for. The concept of dendrite tip undercooling was used to explain the formation of a single through thickness centerline grain in the higher alloy content GTA welds.

  10. High-Level Waste Melter Study Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez Jr, Joseph M; Bickford, Dennis F; Day, Delbert E; Kim, Dong-Sang; Lambert, Steven L; Marra, Sharon L; Peeler, David K; Strachan, Denis M; Triplett, Mark B; Vienna, John D; Wittman, Richard S

    2001-07-13

    At the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, the path to site cleanup involves vitrification of the majority of the wastes that currently reside in large underground tanks. A Joule-heated glass melter is the equipment of choice for vitrifying the high-level fraction of these wastes. Even though this technology has general national and international acceptance, opportunities may exist to improve or change the technology to reduce the enormous cost of accomplishing the mission of site cleanup. Consequently, the U.S. Department of Energy requested the staff of the Tanks Focus Area to review immobilization technologies, waste forms, and modifications to requirements for solidification of the high-level waste fraction at Hanford to determine what aspects could affect cost reductions with reasonable long-term risk. The results of this study are summarized in this report.

  11. Assessment Documents | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Savannah River Site - July 2011 Review of Electrical System Configuration Management and Design Change Control at the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building Project...

  12. EIS-0283-SA-02: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    SA-02: Supplement Analysis EIS-0283-SA-02: Supplement Analysis Surplus Plutonium Dispostion Program: Waste Solidification Building The National Nuclear Security Administration ...

  13. Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site- June 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Review of Electrical System Configuration Management, Safety Instrumented System Commercial Grade Dedication, Setpoint Calculations, and Software Testing at the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building Project

  14. EIS-0283: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Disposition: Waste Solidification Building The National Nuclear Security Administration (NSSA), a separately organized agency within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is...

  15. Audit Report: IG-0618 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8 Audit Report: IG-0618 September 4, 2003 Savannah River Site's Waste Solidification Building The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) plans to...

  16. EIS-0283: Surplus Plutonium Disposition Environmental Impact...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    10, 2008 EIS-0283: Amended Record of Decision Surplus Plutonium Disposition: Waste Solidification Building November 26, 2008 EIS-0283-SA-02: Supplement Analysis Surplus Plutonium...

  17. A pseudo binary y-Gd solidification diagram for Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloys...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: A pseudo binary y-Gd solidification diagram for Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloys. No abstract prepared. Authors: Dupont, John Neuman 1 ; Minicozzi, Michael J. 1 ; Robino, Charles ...

  18. The Influence of Gd and B on the Solidification and Weldability...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: The Influence of Gd and B on the Solidification and Weldability of a Ni-Cr-Mo Alloy. Abstract not provided. Authors: Robino, Charles V ; DuPont, John N ; Anderson, Timothy ...

  19. BETTER BUILDINGS ALLIANCE

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Commercial buildings—our offices, schools, hospitals, restaurants, hotels and stores—consume nearly 20% of all energy used in the United States. We spend more than $200 billion each year to power our country's commercial buildings. Unfortunately, much of this energy and money is wasted; a typical commercial building could save 20% on its energy bills simply by commissioning existing systems so they operate as intended. Energy efficiency is a cost-effective way to save money, support job growth, reduce pollution, and improve competitiveness.

  20. Better Buildings Challenge Saves $840 Million in Energy Costs, Adds New Water Savings Goal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Better Buildings Challenge partners have cut energy waste by 94 trillion British thermal units since the challenge launched in 2011.

  1. Berkeley Lab to Help Build Straw Bale Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worsham, S.A.; Van Mechelen, G.

    1998-12-01

    The Shorebird Environmental Learning Center (SELC) is a new straw bale building that will showcase current and future technologies and techniques that will reduce the environmental impacts of building construction and operations. The building will also serve as a living laboratory to test systems and monitor their performance. The project will be the model for a building process that stops using our precious resources and reduces waste pollution. The rice straw that will be used for the bale construction is generally waste material that is typically burned--millions of tons of it a year--especially in California's San Joaquin Valley. Buildings have significant impacts on the overall environment. Building operations, including lighting, heating, and cooling, consume about 30% of the energy used in the United States. Building construction and the processes into making building materials consume an additional 8% of total energy. Construction also accounts for 39% of wood consumed in the U S, while 25% of solid waste volume is construction and demolition (C &D) debris. The SELC will incorporate a variety of materials and techniques that will address these and other issues, while providing a model of environmentally considered design for Bay Area residents and builders. Environmental considerations include energy use in construction and operations, selection of materials, waste minimization, and indoor air quality. We have developed five major environmental goals for this project: (1) Minimize energy use in construction and operations; (2) Employ material sources that are renewable, salvaged, recycled, and/or recyclable; (3) Increase building lifespan with durable materials and designs that permit flexibility and modification with minimal demolition; (4) Reduce and strive to eliminate construction debris; and (5) Avoid products that create toxic pollutants and make a healthy indoor environment.

  2. Real time synchrotron X-ray observations of solidification in hypoeutectic AlSi alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nogita, Kazuhiro [Nihon Superior Centre for the Manufacture of Electronic Materials, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); Yasuda, Hideyuki [Department of Adaptive Machine Systems, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Prasad, Arvind [School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); McDonald, Stuart D., E-mail: s.mcdonald1@uq.edu.au [Nihon Superior Centre for the Manufacture of Electronic Materials, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); Nagira, Tomoya; Nakatsuka, Noriaki [Department of Adaptive Machine Systems, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Uesugi, Kentaro [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, Sayo, Hyogo, 679-5198 (Japan); StJohn, David H. [School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia)

    2013-11-15

    This paper demonstrates how recent advances in synchrotron technology have allowed for the real-time X-ray imaging of solidification in AlSi alloys, despite the small difference in atomic number of these elements. The experiments performed at the SPring-8 synchrotron, involved imaging the solidification of Al1wt.%Si and Al4wt.%Si alloys under a low-temperature gradient and a cooling rate of around 0.3 C/s. The nucleation and growth of the primary aluminum grains as well as the onset of eutectic solidification were clearly observed. In the alloys containing Al4wt.%Si, contrast was sufficient to characterize the nucleation rate and growth velocity of the aluminum grains. The importance of improving observation of solidification in the AlSi system by increasing the time resolution during critical events is discussed. - Highlights: A synchrotron technique was used to observe solidification of Al-Si alloys. Nucleation, coarsening, and the onset of eutectic solidification were observed. Images captured are suitable for quantitative analysis. The resolution that was obtained should be possible for most aluminum alloys.

  3. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-44:2, Discovery Pipeline Near 108-F Building, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2007-006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. M. Capron

    2008-05-30

    The 100-F-44:2 waste site is a steel pipeline that was discovered in a junction box during confirmatory sampling of the 100-F-26:4 pipeline from December 2004 through January 2005. The 100-F-44:2 pipeline feeds into the 100-F-26:4 subsite vitrified clay pipe (VCP) process sewer pipeline from the 108-F Biology Laboratory at the junction box. In accordance with this evaluation, the confirmatory sampling results support a reclassification of this site to No Action. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives and the corresponding remedial action goals established in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of confirmatory sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  4. Buildings*","Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Space Heating","Primary Space-Heating Energy Source Used a" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3982,1258,1999,282,63 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)"

  5. EERE Success Story-Software Platform Offers Underserved Smaller Buildings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sector an Innovative Solution for Cutting Energy Costs and Waste | Department of Energy Software Platform Offers Underserved Smaller Buildings Sector an Innovative Solution for Cutting Energy Costs and Waste EERE Success Story-Software Platform Offers Underserved Smaller Buildings Sector an Innovative Solution for Cutting Energy Costs and Waste August 4, 2016 - 11:34am Addthis BEMOSS deployment in Equipment Bureau building in Arlington, VA, for control of lighting circuits. Photo Courtesy:

  6. City of Houston Joins Better Buildings Challenge, Partners with Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department to Reduce Energy Waste and Boost Efficiency | Department of Energy City of Houston Joins Better Buildings Challenge, Partners with Energy Department to Reduce Energy Waste and Boost Efficiency City of Houston Joins Better Buildings Challenge, Partners with Energy Department to Reduce Energy Waste and Boost Efficiency January 26, 2012 - 2:05pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - Building on President Obama's call in the State of the Union address earlier this week for a new era for American

  7. WIPP WASTE MINIMIZATION PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Mexico 8822 1 NOV 2 3 2011 Mr. John Kieling , Acting Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environme nt Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa...

  8. Oscillatory cellular patterns in three-dimensional directional solidification

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tourret, D.; Debierre, J. -M.; Song, Y.; Mota, F. L.; Bergeon, N.; Guerin, R.; Trivedi, R.; Billia, B.; Karma, A.

    2015-09-11

    We present a phase-field study of oscillatory breathing modes observed during the solidification of three-dimensional cellular arrays in micro-gravity. Directional solidification experiments conducted onboard the International Space Station have allowed for the first time to observe spatially extended homogeneous arrays of cells and dendrites while minimizing the amount of gravity-induced convection in the liquid. In situ observations of transparent alloys have revealed the existence, over a narrow range of control parameters, of oscillations in cellular arrays with a period ranging from about 25 to 125 minutes. Cellular patterns are spatially disordered, and the oscillations of individual cells are spatiotemporally uncorrelatedmore » at long distance. However, in regions displaying short-range spatial ordering, groups of cells can synchronize into oscillatory breathing modes. Quantitative phase-field simulations show that the oscillatory behavior of cells in this regime is linked to a stability limit of the spacing in hexagonal cellular array structures. For relatively high cellular front undercooling (\\ie low growth velocity or high thermal gradient), a gap appears in the otherwise continuous range of stable array spacings. Close to this gap, a sustained oscillatory regime appears with a period that compares quantitatively well with experiment. For control parameters where this gap exist, oscillations typically occur for spacings at the edge of the gap. However, after a change of growth conditions, oscillations can also occur for nearby values of control parameters where this gap just closes and a continuous range of spacings exists. In addition, sustained oscillations at to the opening of this stable gap exhibit a slow periodic modulation of the phase-shift among cells with a slower period of several hours. While long-range coherence of breathing modes can be achieved in simulations for a perfect spatial arrangement of cells as initial condition, global

  9. Oscillatory cellular patterns in three-dimensional directional solidification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tourret, D.; Debierre, J. -M.; Song, Y.; Mota, F. L.; Bergeon, N.; Guerin, R.; Trivedi, R.; Billia, B.; Karma, A.

    2015-09-11

    We present a phase-field study of oscillatory breathing modes observed during the solidification of three-dimensional cellular arrays in micro-gravity. Directional solidification experiments conducted onboard the International Space Station have allowed for the first time to observe spatially extended homogeneous arrays of cells and dendrites while minimizing the amount of gravity-induced convection in the liquid. In situ observations of transparent alloys have revealed the existence, over a narrow range of control parameters, of oscillations in cellular arrays with a period ranging from about 25 to 125 minutes. Cellular patterns are spatially disordered, and the oscillations of individual cells are spatiotemporally uncorrelated at long distance. However, in regions displaying short-range spatial ordering, groups of cells can synchronize into oscillatory breathing modes. Quantitative phase-field simulations show that the oscillatory behavior of cells in this regime is linked to a stability limit of the spacing in hexagonal cellular array structures. For relatively high cellular front undercooling (\\ie low growth velocity or high thermal gradient), a gap appears in the otherwise continuous range of stable array spacings. Close to this gap, a sustained oscillatory regime appears with a period that compares quantitatively well with experiment. For control parameters where this gap exist, oscillations typically occur for spacings at the edge of the gap. However, after a change of growth conditions, oscillations can also occur for nearby values of control parameters where this gap just closes and a continuous range of spacings exists. In addition, sustained oscillations at to the opening of this stable gap exhibit a slow periodic modulation of the phase-shift among cells with a slower period of several hours. While long-range coherence of breathing modes can be achieved in simulations for a perfect spatial arrangement of cells as initial condition, global disorder is

  10. Melting, Solidification, Remelting, and Separation of Glass and Metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. A. Ebadian; R. C.Xin; Z. F. Dong

    1998-11-02

    Several kinds of radioactive waste exist in mixed forms at DOE sites throughout the United States. These Wastes consist of radionuclides and some usefil bme materials. One purpose of waste treatment technologies is to vitrify the radionuclides into durable, stable glass-like materials to reduce the size of the waste form requiring final disposal. The other purpose is to recycle and reuse most of the usefi.d base materials. Thus, improved techniques for the separation of molten metal and glass are essential. Several high temperature vitrification technologies have been developed for the treatment of a wide range of mixed waste types in both the low-level waste and transuranic (TRU) mixed waste categories currently in storage at DOE sites throughout the nation. These processes include the plasma hearth process, which is being developed by Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), and the arc melter vitrification process, which is being developed at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The products of these processes are an oxide slag phase and a reduced metal phase. The metal phase has the potential to be recycled within the DOE Complex. Enhanced slag/metal separation methods are needed to suppoti these process. A separation method is also needed for the radioactively contaminated scrap metal recycling processe; in order to obtain highly refined recycled metals.

  11. Research Support Facility (RSF): Leadership in Building Performance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The RSF data center is highly efficient with many unique features, including: * Hot aisle containment * Reuse of data\tcenter waste heat to preheat building ventilation * Hybrid ...

  12. 4 Questions for a Better Buildings Case Competition Judge: Marc...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Register for Better Buildings Challenge webinars on multifamily housing, the public sector, and K-12 and higher education Infographic: Leaders Cutting Energy Waste in the U.S. ...

  13. Students Develop Innovative Solutions for Energy Efficient Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of the second annual Better Buildings Case Competition, some of the country's brightest young minds presented their ideas on ways to cut energy waste and improve commercial building efficiency.

  14. Process Waste Assessment - Paint Shop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, N.M.

    1993-06-01

    This Process Waste Assessment was conducted to evaluate hazardous wastes generated in the Paint Shop, Building 913, Room 130. Special attention is given to waste streams generated by the spray painting process because it requires a number of steps for preparing, priming, and painting an object. Also, the spray paint booth covers the largest area in R-130. The largest and most costly waste stream to dispose of is {open_quote}Paint Shop waste{close_quotes} -- a combination of paint cans, rags, sticks, filters, and paper containers. These items are compacted in 55-gallon drums and disposed of as solid hazardous waste. Recommendations are made for minimizing waste in the Paint Shop. Paint Shop personnel are very aware of the need to minimize hazardous wastes and are continuously looking for opportunities to do so.

  15. Building America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brad Oberg

    2010-12-31

    IBACOS researched the constructability and viability issues of using high performance windows as one component of a larger approach to building houses that achieve the Building America 70% energy savings target.

  16. Building technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Roderick

    2014-07-14

    After growing up on construction sites, Roderick Jackson is now helping to make buildings nationwide far more energy efficient.

  17. Building technologies

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jackson, Roderick

    2014-07-15

    After growing up on construction sites, Roderick Jackson is now helping to make buildings nationwide far more energy efficient.

  18. Buildings | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures 1.3 Value of Construction and Research 1.4 Environmental Data 1.5 Generic Fuel Quad and Comparison 1.6 Embodied Energy of Building Assemblies 2The Residential Sector 3Commercial Sector 4Federal Sector 5Envelope and Equipment 6Energy Supply 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy

  19. Beardmore Building

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Priest River, ID Originally built in 1922 by Charles Beardmore, the building housed offices, mercantile shops, a ballroom and a theater. After decades of neglect under outside ownership, Brian Runberg, an architect and great-grandson of Charles Beardmore, purchased the building in 2006 and began an extensive whole building historic restoration.

  20. Transforming the Commercial Building Operations - 2014 BTO Peer Review |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy the Commercial Building Operations - 2014 BTO Peer Review Transforming the Commercial Building Operations - 2014 BTO Peer Review Project Objective The overall goal of this project is to train building operations staff and service providers in a systematic process for identifying and correcting no-cost building operational problems that lead to energy waste. Such a training program gives building operators the "how to" on operating buildings efficiently with

  1. Review of Potential Candidate Stabilization Technologies for Liquid and Solid Secondary Waste Streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, Eric M.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Scheele, Randall D.; Um, Wooyong; Qafoku, Nikolla

    2010-01-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has initiated a waste form testing program to support the long-term durability evaluation of a waste form for secondary wastes generated from the treatment and immobilization of Hanford radioactive tank wastes. The purpose of the work discussed in this report is to identify candidate stabilization technologies and getters that have the potential to successfully treat the secondary waste stream liquid effluent, mainly from off-gas scrubbers and spent solids, produced by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Down-selection to the most promising stabilization processes/waste forms is needed to support the design of a solidification treatment unit (STU) to be added to the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). To support key decision processes, an initial screening of the secondary liquid waste forms must be completed by February 2010.

  2. Design/installation and structural integrity assessment of Bethel Valley low-level waste collection and transfer system upgrade for Building 3092 (Central Off-Gas Scrubber Facility) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-01-01

    This document describes and assesses planned modifications to be made to the Building 3092 Central Off-Gas Scrubber Facility of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The modifications are made in responsible to the requirements of 40CFR264 Subpart J, relating to environmental protection requirements for buried tank systems. The modifications include the provision of a new scrubber recirculation tank in a new, below ground, lines concrete vault, replacing and existing recirculation sump that does not provide double containment. A new buried, double contained pipeline is provided to permit discharge of spent scrubber recirculation fluid to the Central Waste Collection Header. The new vault, tank, and discharge line are provided with leak detection and provisions to remove accumulated liquid. New scrubber recirculation pumps, piping, and accessories are also provided. This assessment concludes that the planned modifications comply with applicable requirements of 40CFR264 Subpart J, as set forth in Appendix F to the Federal Facility Agreement, Docket No. 89-04-FF, covering the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  3. Building America Expert Meeting Report. Hydronic Heating in Multifamily Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dentz, Jordan

    2011-10-01

    This expert meeting was presented by the ARIES Collaborative, and discussed cost-effective controls and distribution retrofit options for hot water and steam space heating systems in multi-family buildings with the goals of reducing energy waste and improving occupant comfort.

  4. Building America Expert Meeting Report: Hydronic Heating in Multifamily Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dentz, J.

    2011-10-01

    The topic of this expert meeting was cost-effective controls and distribution retrofit options for hot water and steam space heating systems in multi-family buildings with the goals of reducing energy waste and improving occupant comfort. The U.S. Department of Energy's Building America program develops technologies with the goal of reducing energy use by 30% to 50% in residential buildings. Toward this goal, the program sponsors 'Expert Meetings' focused on specific building technology topics. The meetings are intended to sharpen Building America research priorities, create a forum for sharing information among industry leaders and build partnerships with professionals and others that can help support the program's research needs and objectives. The topic of this expert meeting was cost-effective controls and distribution retrofit options for hot water and steam space heating systems in multifamily buildings with the goals of reducing energy waste and improving occupant comfort. The objectives of the meeting were to: (1) Share knowledge and experience on new and existing solutions: what works, what doesn't and why, and what's new; (2) Understand the market barriers to currently offered solutions: what disconnects exist in the market and what is needed to overcome or bridge these gaps; and (3) Identify research needs.

  5. Critical operating parameters for microwave solidification of hydroxide sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprenger, G.S.; Eschen, V.G.

    1993-08-01

    Engineers at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) have developed an innovative technology for the treatment of homogeneous wet or dry solids which are contaminated with hazardous and/or radioactive materials. The process uses microwave energy to heat and melt the waste into a vitreous final form that is suitable for land disposal. The advantages include a high density, leach resistant, robust waste form; volume and toxicity reduction; favorable economics; in-container treatment; favorable public acceptance; isolated equipment; and instantaneous energy control. Regulatory certification of the final form is accomplished by meeting the limitation specified in EPA`s Toxicity Characteristic Leach Procedure (TCLP). This paper presents the results from a series of TCLP tests performed on a surrogate hydroxide coprecipitation sludge spiked with heavy metals at elevated concentrations. The results are very encouraging and support RFP`s commitment to the use of microwave technology for treatment of various mixed waste streams.

  6. Weld solidification cracking in cast Ni[sub 3]Al alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santella, M.L. )

    1993-06-01

    Most of the cast Ni[sub 3]Al alloys currently under study have marginal resistance to solidification cracking, and therefore, they have poor weldability. Crack-free welds can be made on the alloys only with difficulty, and with poor reproducibility. Based on metallographic analysis of solidification cracks in welds of one such alloy, identified as IC221M, modest composition modifications were made to the base alloy to improve solidification-cracking resistance. The tensile properties and fabricability of the modified alloy, IC221W to denote improved weldability, were evaluated and found to be comparable to those of the base alloy and used to weld plates of cast IC221M. A crack-free weldment was obtained, which had good tensile properties up to 900 C.

  7. BUILDING STRONG

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WHITE RIVER BASIN COMPREHENSIVE STUDY BUILDING STRONG ® * The Cache River Basin portion of the Watershed Management Plan will be completed in FY15. * Next step will be a watershed assessment for the entire White River Basin and move forward in developing a Comprehensive Watershed Management Plan. CURRENT STATUS BUILDING STRONG ® WATER SUPPLY STORAGE REALLOCATIONS BUILDING STRONG ® M&I Water Supply Reallocation Studies Greers Ferry Lake * Current Study * Request from MAWA for 15.25 mgd

  8. Laboratory Building.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrera, Joshua M.

    2015-03-01

    This report is an analysis of the means of egress and life safety requirements for the laboratory building. The building is located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The report includes a prescriptive-based analysis as well as a performance-based analysis. Following the analysis are appendices which contain maps of the laboratory building used throughout the analysis. The top of all the maps is assumed to be north.

  9. BUILDING STRONG

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BUILDING STRONG ® WATER SUPPLY STORAGE REALLOCATION STUDIES BUILDING STRONG ® Beaver Lake Project Area BUILDING STRONG ® M&I Water Supply Reallocation - Beaver Lake * Current Study - Total Request for 22 mgd (41,960 ac-ft)  Benton Washington in 2000 for 12.0 mgd (22,887.11 ac-ft)  Carroll Boone in 2001 for 6.0 mgd (11,443.66 ac-ft)  Madison County in 2006 for 4.0 mgd (7,629.04 ac-ft) BUILDING STRONG ® M&I Water Supply Reallocation - Beaver Lake Continued. . . * Current Tasks

  10. Vacant Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vacant Characteristics by Activity... Vacant Vacant buildings are those in which more floorspace was vacant than was used for any single commercial activity at the time of the...

  11. Service Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Service Characteristics by Activity... Service Service buildings are those in which some type of service is provided, other than food service or retail sales of goods. Basic...

  12. Other Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Other Characteristics by Activity... Other Other buildings are those that do not fit into any of the specifically named categories. Basic Characteristics See also: Equipment |...

  13. Buildings Database

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Buildings Database Welcome Guest Log In | Register | Contact Us Home About All Projects...

  14. Data Package for Secondary Waste Form Down-Selection—Cast Stone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2011-09-05

    Available literature on Cast Stone and Saltstone was reviewed with an emphasis on determining how Cast Stone and related grout waste forms performed in relationship to various criteria that will be used to decide whether a specific type of waste form meets acceptance criteria for disposal in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at Hanford. After the critical review of the Cast Stone/Saltstone literature, we conclude that Cast Stone is a good candidate waste form for further consideration. Cast stone meets the target IDF acceptance criteria for compressive strength, no free liquids, TCLP leachate are below the UTS permissible concentrations and leach rates for Na and Tc-99 are suiteably low. The cost of starting ingredients and equipment necessary to generate Cast Stone waste forms with secondary waste streams are low and the Cast Stone dry blend formulation can be tailored to accommodate variations in liquid waste stream compositions. The database for Cast Stone short-term performance is quite extensive compared to the other three candidate waste solidification processes. The solidification of liquid wastes in Cast Stone is a mature process in comparison to the other three candidates. Successful production of Cast Stone or Saltstone has been demonstrated from lab-scale monoliths with volumes of cm3 through m3 sized blocks to 210-liter sized drums all the way to the large pours into vaults at Savannah River. To date over 9 million gallons of low activity liquid waste has been solidified and disposed in concrete vaults at Savannah River.

  15. Encapsulation of hazardous wastes into agglomerates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guloy, A.

    1992-01-28

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using the cementitious properties and agglomeration characteristics of coal conversion byproducts to encapsulate and immobilize hazardous waste materials. The intention was to establish an economical way of co-utilization and co-disposal of wastes. In addition, it may aid in the eradication of air pollution problems associated with the fine-powdery nature of fly ash. Encapsulation into agglomerates is a novel approach of treating toxic waste. Although encapsulation itself is not a new concept, existing methods employ high-cost resins that render them economically unfeasible. In this investigation, the toxic waste was contained in a concrete-like matrix whereby fly ash and other cementitious waste materials were utilized. The method incorporates the principles of solidification, stabilization and agglomeration. Another aspect of the study is the evaluation of the agglomeration as possible lightweight aggregates. Since fly ash is commercially used as an aggregate, it would be interesting to study the effect of incorporating toxic wastes in the strength development of the granules. In the investigation, the fly ash self-cementation process was applied to electroplating sludges as the toxic waste. The process hoped to provide a basis for delisting of the waste as hazardous and, thereby greatly minimize the cost of its disposal. Owing to the stringent regulatory requirements for hauling and disposal of hazardous waste, the cost of disposal is significant. The current practice for disposal is solidifying the waste with portland cement and dumping the hardened material in the landfill where the cost varies between $700--950/ton. Partially replacing portland cement with fly ash in concrete has proven beneficial, therefore applying the same principles in the treatment of toxic waste looked very promising.

  16. Waste management units: Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molen, G.

    1991-09-01

    This report indexes every waste management unit of the Savannah River Site. They are indexed by building number and name. The waste units are also tabulated by solid waste units receiving hazardous materials with a known release or no known release to the environment. It also contains information on the sites which has received no hazardous waste, and units which have received source, nuclear, or byproduct material only. (MB)

  17. Portsmouth Proposed Plan for the Site-wide Waste Disposition...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE has evaluated alternatives for managing waste that would be created by decomtamination and decommissioning of the buildings at the Portsmouth Site. Three remedial alternatives ...

  18. Intelligent Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brambley, Michael R.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Pratt, Robert G.; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2001-01-01

    The topic of "intelligent buildings" (IBs) emerged in the early 1980s. Since, the term has been used to represent a variety of related, yet differing topics, each with a slightly different focus and purpose. Wiring and networking-infrastructure companies emphasize the cabling requirements for communication in intelligent buildings and the need to accommodate future needs for higher-speed broadband. Lucent (Lucent 2000) for example, defines an IB as "...one with a completely integrated wiring architecture. A single cabling system that handles all information traffic - voice, data, video, even the big building management systems."

  19. Time-Resolved In Situ Measurements During Rapid Alloy Solidification: Experimental Insight for Additive Manufacturing

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Zweiacker, Kai; Liu, Can; Coughlin, Daniel R.; Clarke, Amy J.; Baldwin, J. Kevin; Gibbs, John W.; Roehling, John D.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; et al

    2016-01-27

    In research and industrial environments, additive manufacturing (AM) of metals and alloys is becoming a pervasive technology, though significant challenges remain before widespread implementation of AM can be realized. In situ investigations of rapid alloy solidification with high spatial and temporal resolutions can provide unique experimental insight into microstructure evolution and kinetics that are relevant for AM processing. Hypoeutectic thin-film Al–Cu and Al–Si alloys were investigated using dynamic transmission electron microscopy to monitor pulsed-laser-induced rapid solidification across microsecond timescales. Solid–liquid interface velocities measured from time-resolved images revealed accelerating solidification fronts in both alloys. We observed microstructure evolution, solidification product, andmore » presence of a morphological instability at the solid–liquid interface in the Al–4 at.%Cu alloy are related to the measured interface velocities and small differences in composition that affect the thermophysical properties of the alloys. These time-resolved in situ measurements can inform and validate predictive modeling efforts for AM.« less

  20. Heat of Hydration of Low Activity Cementitious Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasol, D.

    2015-07-23

    During the curing of secondary waste grout, the hydraulic materials in the dry mix react exothermally with the water in the secondary low-activity waste (LAW). The heat released, called the heat of hydration, can be measured using a TAM Air Isothermal Calorimeter. By holding temperature constant in the instrument, the heat of hydration during the curing process can be determined. This will provide information that can be used in the design of a waste solidification facility. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), the heat of hydration and other physical properties are being collected on grout prepared using three simulants of liquid secondary waste generated at the Hanford Site. From this study it was found that both the simulant and dry mix each had an effect on the heat of hydration. It was also concluded that the higher the cement content in the dry materials mix, the greater the heat of hydration during the curing of grout.

  1. Office Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    page, please call 202-586-8800. There were enough buildings in the responding sample to report statistics for all of these types except for research and development, which has...

  2. Lodging Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    were then asked to place the building into the following more specific categories: a hotel a motel, inn, or resort a retirement home a shelter, orphanage, or children's home a...

  3. Building America Expert Meeting: Transforming Existing Buildings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transforming Existing Buildings through New Media--An Idea Exchange Building America Expert Meeting: Transforming Existing Buildings through New Media--An Idea Exchange This report ...

  4. Building America Webinar: Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings Building America Webinar: Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings This webinar was presented by research team Consortium for Advanced Residential ...

  5. Building America Webinar: High Performance Building Enclosures...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building America Webinar: High Performance Building Enclosures: Part I, Existing Homes The webinar, presented on May 21, 2014, focused on specific Building America projects that ...

  6. Building America Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting: July 2010 Building America Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting: July 2010 On this page, you may link to the summary report and ...

  7. BUILDING STRONG

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BUILDER NNSA Achieves Major Milestone in BUILDER Implementation WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) achieved a major milestone in improving the management of the Nuclear Security Enterprise's infrastructure through the successful migration of all current information on building

    BUILDING STRONG ® Communications * Division and District Command level strategic involvement * Increased communication * Refined business processes *

  8. Building Technologies Office Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roland Risser Director, Building Technologies Office Building Technologies Office Energy Efficiency Starts Here. 2 Building Technologies Office Integrated Approach: Improving ...

  9. Solidification process in melt spun Nd-Fe-B type magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, C.

    1998-02-23

    A generalized solidification model has been developed based on a systematic investigation on the microstructure of melt spun Nd-Fe-B alloys. Melt spinning was conducted on initial stoichiometric and TiC added Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B (2-14-1) compositions to produce under, optimally and over quenched microstructures. Microstructural characterization was carried out by TEM, SEM, Optical microscopy, XRD, DTA, VSM and DC SQUID techniques. By taking the dendritic breakup during recalescence into consideration, this generalized model has successfully explained the solidification process of the melt spun Nd-Fe-B alloys. Challenging the conventional homogeneous nucleation models, the new model explains the fine and uniform equiaxed 2-14-1 microstructure in optimally quenched ribbons as a result of the breakup of the 2-14-1 dendrites which nucleate heterogeneously from the wheel surface and grow dendritically across the ribbon thickness due to the recalescence. Besides this dendritic breakup feature, the under quenched microstructure is further featured with another growth front starting with the primary solidification of Fe phase near the free side, which results in a coarsely grained microstructure with Fe dendritic inclusions and overall variation in microstructure across the ribbon thickness. In addition, because a epitaxy exists between the Fe phase and the 2-14-1, the so-formed coarse 2-14-1 grains may be textured. C-axis texturing was observed in under quenched ribbons. As a constraint to solidification models in this system, the cause and characteristics of this phenomenon has been studied in detail to test the authors proposed model, and agreement has been found. An extension has also been made to understand the solidification process when TiC is added, which suggests that Ti and C slow down the growth front of both Fe and 2-14-1 phase.

  10. Colloidal agglomerates in tank sludge: Impact on waste processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunker, B.C.; Martin, J.E.

    1998-06-01

    'Insoluble colloidal sludges in hazardous waste streams such as tank wastes can pose serious problems for waste processing, interfering with retrieval, transport, separation, and solidification procedures. Properties of sediment layers and sludge suspensions such as slurry viscosities, sedimentation rates, and final sediment densities can vary by orders of magnitude depending on the particle types present, the degree to which the particles agglomerate or stick to each other, and on a wide range of processing parameters such as solution shear rates, pH, salt content, and temperature. The objectives of this work are to: (1) understand the factors controlling the nature and extent of colloidal agglomeration under expected waste processing conditions; (2) determine how agglomeration phenomena influence physical properties relevant to waste processing including rheology, sedimentation, and filtration; and (3) develop strategies for optimizing processing conditions via control of agglomeration phenomena. Insoluble colloidal sludges in hazardous waste streams such as tank wastes can pose serious problems for waste processing, interfering with retrieval, transport, separation, and solidification procedures. Properties of sediment layers and sludge suspensions such as slurry viscosities, sedimentation rates, and final sediment densities can vary by orders of magnitude depending on the particle types present, the degree to which the particles agglomerate or stick to each other, and on a wide range of processing parameters such as solution shear rates, pH, salt content, and temperature. The objectives of this work are to: (1) understand the factors controlling the nature and extent of colloidal agglomeration under expected waste processing conditions; (2) determine how agglomeration phenomena influence physical properties relevant to waste processing including rheology, sedimentation, and filtration; and (3) develop strategies for optimizing processing conditions via control

  11. Waste Guide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Disposal Waste Disposal Trucks transport debris from Oak Ridge’s cleanup sites to the onsite CERCLA disposal area, the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility. Trucks transport debris from Oak Ridge's cleanup sites to the onsite CERCLA disposal area, the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility. The low-level radiological and hazardous wastes generated from Oak Ridge's cleanup projects are disposed in the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF). The

  12. INL High Performance Building Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennifer D. Morton

    2010-02-01

    High performance buildings, also known as sustainable buildings and green buildings, are resource efficient structures that minimize the impact on the environment by using less energy and water, reduce solid waste and pollutants, and limit the depletion of natural resources while also providing a thermally and visually comfortable working environment that increases productivity for building occupants. As Idaho National Laboratory (INL) becomes the nation’s premier nuclear energy research laboratory, the physical infrastructure will be established to help accomplish this mission. This infrastructure, particularly the buildings, should incorporate high performance sustainable design features in order to be environmentally responsible and reflect an image of progressiveness and innovation to the public and prospective employees. Additionally, INL is a large consumer of energy that contributes to both carbon emissions and resource inefficiency. In the current climate of rising energy prices and political pressure for carbon reduction, this guide will help new construction project teams to design facilities that are sustainable and reduce energy costs, thereby reducing carbon emissions. With these concerns in mind, the recommendations described in the INL High Performance Building Strategy (previously called the INL Green Building Strategy) are intended to form the INL foundation for high performance building standards. This revised strategy incorporates the latest federal and DOE orders (Executive Order [EO] 13514, “Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance” [2009], EO 13423, “Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management” [2007], and DOE Order 430.2B, “Departmental Energy, Renewable Energy, and Transportation Management” [2008]), the latest guidelines, trends, and observations in high performance building construction, and the latest changes to the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design

  13. Secondary waste form testing : ceramicrete phosphate bonded ceramics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, D.; Ganga, R.; Gaviria, J.; Yusufoglu, Y.

    2011-06-21

    The cleanup activities of the Hanford tank wastes require stabilization and solidification of the secondary waste streams generated from the processing of the tank wastes. The treatment of these tank wastes to produce glass waste forms will generate secondary wastes, including routine solid wastes and liquid process effluents. Liquid wastes may include process condensates and scrubber/off-gas treatment liquids from the thermal waste treatment. The current baseline for solidification of the secondary wastes is a cement-based waste form. However, alternative secondary waste forms are being considered. In this regard, Ceramicrete technology, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, is being explored as an option to solidify and stabilize the secondary wastes. The Ceramicrete process has been demonstrated on four secondary waste formulations: baseline, cluster 1, cluster 2, and mixed waste streams. Based on the recipes provided by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the four waste simulants were prepared in-house. Waste forms were fabricated with three filler materials: Class C fly ash, CaSiO{sub 3}, and Class C fly ash + slag. Optimum waste loadings were as high as 20 wt.% for the fly ash and CaSiO{sub 3}, and 15 wt.% for fly ash + slag filler. Waste forms for physical characterizations were fabricated with no additives, hazardous contaminants, and radionuclide surrogates. Physical property characterizations (density, compressive strength, and 90-day water immersion test) showed that the waste forms were stable and durable. Compressive strengths were >2,500 psi, and the strengths remained high after the 90-day water immersion test. Fly ash and CaSiO{sub 3} filler waste forms appeared to be superior to the waste forms with fly ash + slag as a filler. Waste form weight loss was {approx}5-14 wt.% over the 90-day immersion test. The majority of the weight loss occurred during the initial phase of the immersion test, indicative of washing off of residual unreacted

  14. Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Warehouse

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

  15. Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, January-March, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chikalla, T.D.; Powell, J.A.

    1981-06-01

    Reports and summaries are provided for the following programs: high-level waste process development; alternative waste forms; nuclear waste materials characterization center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton solidification; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; NWVP off-gas analysis; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; verification instrument development; mobility of organic complexes of radionuclide in soils; low-level waste generation reduction handbook; waste management system studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology program; high-level waste form preparation; development of backfill materials; development of structural engineered barriers; disposal charge analysis; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; spent fuel and pool component integrity program; analysis of postulated criticality events in a storage array of spent LWR fuel; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium mill tailings; liner evaluation for uranium mill tailings; multilayer barriers for sealing of uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; and revegetation of inactive uranium tailings sites.

  16. Westinghouse Cementation Facility of Solid Waste Treatment System - 13503

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, Torsten; Aign, Joerg

    2013-07-01

    During NPP operation, several waste streams are generated, caused by different technical and physical processes. Besides others, liquid waste represents one of the major types of waste. Depending on national regulation for storage and disposal of radioactive waste, solidification can be one specific requirement. To accommodate the global request for waste treatment systems Westinghouse developed several specific treatment processes for the different types of waste. In the period of 2006 to 2008 Westinghouse awarded several contracts for the design and delivery of waste treatment systems related to the latest CPR-1000 nuclear power plants. One of these contracts contains the delivery of four Cementation Facilities for waste treatment, s.c. 'Follow on Cementations' dedicated to three locations, HongYanHe, NingDe and YangJiang, of new CPR-1000 nuclear power stations in the People's Republic of China. Previously, Westinghouse delivered a similar cementation facility to the CPR-1000 plant LingAo II, in Daya Bay, PR China. This plant already passed the hot functioning tests successfully in June 2012 and is now ready and released for regular operation. The 'Follow on plants' are designed to package three 'typical' kind of radioactive waste: evaporator concentrates, spent resins and filter cartridges. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview on the Westinghouse experience to design and execution of cementation facilities. (authors)

  17. Deactivation of Building 7602

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yook, H.R.; Barnett, J.R.; Collins, T.L.

    1995-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has sponsored research and development programs in Building 7602 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1984. This work focused on development of advanced technology for processing nuclear fuels. Building 7602 was used for engineering-scale tests using depleted and natural uranium to simulate the nuclear fuel. In April 1994 the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) sent supplemental FY 1994 guidance to ORNL stating that in FY 1995 and beyond, Building 7602 is considered surplus to NE programs and missions and shall be shut down (deactivated) and maintained in a radiologically and industrially safe condition with minimal surveillance and maintenance (S&M). DOE-NE subsequently provided FY 1995 funding to support the deactivation activities. Deactivation of Building 7602 was initiated on October 1, 1994. The principal activity during the first quarter of FY 1995 was removal of process materials (chemicals and uranium) from the systems. The process systems were operated to achieve chemical solution concentrations needed for reuse or disposal of the solutions prior to removal of the materials from the systems. During this phase of deactivation the process materials processed and removed were: (1) Uranyl nitrate solution 30,178 L containing 4490 kg of uranium; (2) Nitric acid (neutralized) 9850 L containing less than 0.013 kg of uranium; (3) Organic solution 3346 L containing 265 kg of uranium; (4) Uranium oxide powder 95 kg; and (5) Miscellaneous chemicals. At the end of December 1994, the process systems and control systems were shut down and deactivated. Disposition of the process materials removed from the process systems in Building 7602 proved to be the most difficult part of the deactivation. An operational stand down and funding reductions at Y-12 prevented planned conversion of the uranyl nitrate solution to depleted uranium oxide powder. This led to disposal of the uranyl nitrate solution as waste.

  18. Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization |...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Summary Notes from 28 May 2008 Generic Technical Issue ...

  19. The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, L.L.

    1991-01-01

    The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF) will provide permanent Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage, treatment, and disposal for hazardous and mixed waste generated at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) that cannot be disposed of in existing or planned SRS facilities. Final design is complete for Phase I of the project, the Disposal Vaults. The Vaults will provide RCRA permitted, above-grade disposal capacity for treated hazardous and mixed waste generated at the SRS. The RCRA Part B Permit application was submitted upon approval of the Permit application, the first Disposal Vault is scheduled to be operational in mid 1994. The technical baseline has been established for Phase II, the Treatment Building, and preliminary design work has been performed. The Treatment Building will provide RCRA permitted treatment processes to handle a variety of hazardous and mixed waste generated at SRS in preparation for disposal. The processes will treat wastes for disposal in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). A RCRA Part B Permit application has not yet been submitted to SCDHEC for this phase of the project. The Treatment Building is currently scheduled to be operational in late 1996.

  20. The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, L.L.

    1991-12-31

    The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF) will provide permanent Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage, treatment, and disposal for hazardous and mixed waste generated at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) that cannot be disposed of in existing or planned SRS facilities. Final design is complete for Phase I of the project, the Disposal Vaults. The Vaults will provide RCRA permitted, above-grade disposal capacity for treated hazardous and mixed waste generated at the SRS. The RCRA Part B Permit application was submitted upon approval of the Permit application, the first Disposal Vault is scheduled to be operational in mid 1994. The technical baseline has been established for Phase II, the Treatment Building, and preliminary design work has been performed. The Treatment Building will provide RCRA permitted treatment processes to handle a variety of hazardous and mixed waste generated at SRS in preparation for disposal. The processes will treat wastes for disposal in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). A RCRA Part B Permit application has not yet been submitted to SCDHEC for this phase of the project. The Treatment Building is currently scheduled to be operational in late 1996.

  1. Leaching mechanisms of solidified low-level waste. The literature survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dougherty, D.; Colombo, P.

    1985-06-01

    A literature survey on leaching mechanisms, available mathematical models and factors that affect leaching from solidified low-level radioactive waste (LLW) was compiled. Physicochemical mechanisms identified include diffusion, dissolution, ion exchange, corrosion and surface effects. Diffusion was generally considered to be the predominant mechanism in LLW leachability. However, this hierarchy of importance has been strongly questioned for waste forms containing soluble salts and has been shown to be invalid for waste forms incorporating sorbents which control the release of radionuclides by ion exchange. Leaching behavior was modeled both mathematically for curve fitting to leaching data and by consideration of physical and chemical interactions within and between solidification agents, waste materials and additives, if any. Physicochemical analyses of bitumen and polymer solidification agents have considered them to be inert encapsulants with limited water permeability. All of the mathematical models are derived from solutions to the diffusion equation. Other mechanistic processes are included as additional terms in the equation. No comprehensive evaluations of mathematical models for LLW based on curve fitting to data were found in the literature. Factors that affect leaching have been categorized as system factors, leachant factors and waste form factors. System factors include temperature, pressure, radiation, time and the ratio of waste form area to leachant volume. Leachant factors include pH, Eh, flow or replacement frequency and composition while waste form factors include composition, surface condition, porosity and surface area to volume ratio. Information from the literature is reported for each of these factors. 75 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Mr. John E. Kieling, Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SEP 3 0 2014 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, NM 87508-6303 Subject: Information Regarding the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Nitrate Salt Bearing Waste Container Isolation Plan Dear Mr. Kieling: The purpose of this letter is to provide the information requested in your August 5, 2014 letter regarding the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Nitrate Salt Bearing Waste Container Isolation Plan. The following are enclosed with the letter: * Waste Isolation

  3. Mr. John E. Kieling, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 2014 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Project 2014 Waste Minimization Report, Permit Number NM4890139088-TSDF Dear Mr. Kieling: The purpose of this letter is to provide you with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant {WIPP) Project 2014 Waste Minimization Report. This report, required by and prepared in accordance with the W IPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Part 2,

  4. Mr. James Bearzi, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    28, 2010 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Notification of Sampling Line Loss, Waste Isolation Pilot...

  5. BUILDING STRONG

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BUILDING STRONG ® Progress  Engaged with Customers in January 2016  Reached out to USBR on Customer Funding of O&M for Sacramento Projects  Reached out to NWD for the Metrics and gathering of the data  Data Mining 5 years of labor data  Gathered information on past and current staffing of plats 5 BUILDING STRONG ® Delivery dates  Late August 2016- Labor Data and manpower  DRAFT metrics to SWPA- October 2016  Meet with Customer Team- November- December 2016 6

  6. Tank Waste and Waste Processing | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing The Defense Waste Processing Facility set a record by producing 267 canisters filled ...

  7. Polyethylene encapsulatin of nitrate salt wastes: Waste form stability, process scale-up, and economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1991-07-01

    A polyethylene encapsulation system for treatment of low-level radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes has been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Polyethylene has several advantages compared with conventional solidification/stabilization materials such as hydraulic cements. Waste can be encapsulated with greater efficiency and with better waste form performance than is possible with hydraulic cement. The properties of polyethylene relevant to its long-term durability in storage and disposal environments are reviewed. Response to specific potential failure mechanisms including biodegradation, radiation, chemical attack, flammability, environmental stress cracking, and photodegradation are examined. These data are supported by results from extensive waste form performance testing including compressive yield strength, water immersion, thermal cycling, leachability of radioactive and hazardous species, irradiation, biodegradation, and flammability. The bench-scale process has been successfully tested for application with a number of specific problem'' waste streams. Quality assurance and performance testing of the resulting waste form confirmed scale-up feasibility. Use of this system at Rocky Flats Plant can result in over 70% fewer drums processed and shipped for disposal, compared with optimal cement formulations. Based on the current Rocky Flats production of nitrate salt per year, polyethylene encapsulation can yield an estimated annual savings between $1.5 million and $2.7 million, compared with conventional hydraulic cement systems. 72 refs., 23 figs., 16 tabs.

  8. Tank waste remediation system dangerous waste training plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    POHTO, R.E.

    1999-05-13

    This document outlines the dangerous waste training program developed and implemented for all Treatment, Storage, and Disposal (TSD) Units operated by Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation (LMHC) Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) in the Hanford 200 East, 200 West and 600 Areas and the <90 Day Accumulation Area at 209E. Operating TSD Units operated by TWRS are: the Double-Shell Tank (DST) System (including 204-AR Waste Transfer Building), the 600 Area Purgewater Storage and the Effluent Treatment Facility. TSD Units undergoing closure are: the Single-Shell Tank (SST) System, 207-A South Retention Basin, and the 216-B-63 Trench.

  9. Energy Efficient Buildings Hub

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Energy Efficient Buildings HUB Lunch Presentation for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

  10. Building Technologies Office Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-01

    Building Technologies Office Overview Presentation for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

  11. Energy Efficient Buildings Hub

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-01

    Energy Efficient Buildings HUB Lunch Presentation for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

  12. Building America System Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-01

    Residential Buildings Integration Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

  13. WITS - WASTE DATA COLLECTION WITH OUR PALMS AT OUR FINGERTIPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. MARTINEZ

    2000-11-01

    The waste management and environmental compliance group (NMT-7) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has initiated a project to build a computer-based system for tracking inventory, storage and disposal information for hazardous and radioactive waste and contaminated byproducts. This project, the Waste Inventory Tracking System (WITS), will initially be used in TA-55 (which includes the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility) and the Chemical and Metallurgy Research (CMR) building where wastes are generated. The system handles numerous waste types with variation in size, disposal method, and hazard classification including: low level waste such as room trash (compactable waste), SEG waste (non-compactable), and over-sized waste, mixed waste, hazardous and chemical waste, universal waste, and waste containing asbestos and PCB's. WITS is designed to provide up-to-date location, status, content information, radioactivity analyses, and other inventory information for every waste item and container managed by NMT-7. The system will support comprehensive reporting capabilities and cradle-to-grave audit trails. WITS is intended to facilitate handling of waste by NMT-7 staff to help minimize waste disposal costs, ensure compliance with applicable regulations, and standardize waste management methodologies and practices. This paper compares current management practices with revised methodologies supported by WITS. It shows how automating inventory tracking helps achieve these goals.

  14. The role of particle pushing in solidification synthesis of composites with different types of matrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohatgi, P.K.; Narendranath, C.S.; Asthana, R.; Tewari, S.N.

    1994-12-31

    The pushing or engulfment of inclusions by a solidification front is a phenomenon common to solidification processing of a variety of multiphase materials. The theoretical models of particle pushing based on surface energies, thermal properties and solute screening have been reviewed and the commonality of the interaction phenomena has been highlighted using examples from widely different types of matrices such as metals, organics, biological cells, and oxides. Special emphasis has been placed on microstructures of discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites, such as Al-fly ash, Al-SiC and Al-C where the need for a critical understanding of the particle pushing phenomenon is essential to design and obtain the requisite composite microstructure. Results of the experiments on Al-SiC composites have been examined using these models, and the need for future work is discussed.

  15. Three-dimensional multiscale modeling of dendritic spacing selection during Al-Si directional solidification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tourret, Damien; Clarke, Amy J.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Gibbs, John W.; Karma, Alain

    2015-05-27

    We present a three-dimensional extension of the multiscale dendritic needle network (DNN) model. This approach enables quantitative simulations of the unsteady dynamics of complex hierarchical networks in spatially extended dendritic arrays. We apply the model to directional solidification of Al-9.8 wt.%Si alloy and directly compare the model predictions with measurements from experiments with in situ x-ray imaging. The focus is on the dynamical selection of primary spacings over a range of growth velocities, and the influence of sample geometry on the selection of spacings. Simulation results show good agreement with experiments. The computationally efficient DNN model opens new avenues for investigating the dynamics of large dendritic arrays at scales relevant to solidification experiments and processes.

  16. Three-dimensional multiscale modeling of dendritic spacing selection during Al-Si directional solidification

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tourret, Damien; Clarke, Amy J.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Gibbs, John W.; Karma, Alain

    2015-05-27

    We present a three-dimensional extension of the multiscale dendritic needle network (DNN) model. This approach enables quantitative simulations of the unsteady dynamics of complex hierarchical networks in spatially extended dendritic arrays. We apply the model to directional solidification of Al-9.8 wt.%Si alloy and directly compare the model predictions with measurements from experiments with in situ x-ray imaging. The focus is on the dynamical selection of primary spacings over a range of growth velocities, and the influence of sample geometry on the selection of spacings. Simulation results show good agreement with experiments. The computationally efficient DNN model opens new avenues formore » investigating the dynamics of large dendritic arrays at scales relevant to solidification experiments and processes.« less

  17. Phase-field investigation on the non-equilibrium interface dynamics of rapid alloy solidification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Jeong

    2011-08-15

    The research program reported here is focused on critical issues that represent conspicuous gaps in current understanding of rapid solidification, limiting our ability to predict and control microstructural evolution (i.e. morphological dynamics and microsegregation) at high undercooling, where conditions depart significantly from local equilibrium. More specifically, through careful application of phase-field modeling, using appropriate thin-interface and anti-trapping corrections and addressing important details such as transient effects and a velocity-dependent (i.e. adaptive) numerics, the current analysis provides a reasonable simulation-based picture of non-equilibrium solute partitioning and the corresponding oscillatory dynamics associated with single-phase rapid solidification and show that this method is a suitable means for a self-consistent simulation of transient behavior and operating point selection under rapid growth conditions. Moving beyond the limitations of conventional theoretical/analytical treatments of non-equilibrium solute partitioning, these results serve to substantiate recent experimental findings and analytical treatments for single-phase rapid solidification. The departure from the equilibrium solid concentration at the solid-liquid interface was often observed during rapid solidification, and the energetic associated non-equilibrium solute partitioning has been treated in detail, providing possible ranges of interface concentrations for a given growth condition. Use of these treatments for analytical description of specific single-phase dendritic and cellular operating point selection, however, requires a model for solute partitioning under a given set of growth conditions. Therefore, analytical solute trapping models which describe the chemical partitioning as a function of steady state interface velocities have been developed and widely utilized in most of the theoretical investigations of rapid solidification. However, these

  18. In-situ Monitoring of Dynamic Phenomena during Solidification and Phase Transformation Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarke, Amy J.; Cooley, Jason C.; Morris, Christopher; Merrill, Frank E.; Hollander, Brian J.; Mariam, Fesseha G.; Patterson, Brian M.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Lee, Wah Keat; Fezzaa, Kamel; Deriy, Alex; Tucker, Tim J.; Clarke, Kester D.; Field, Robert D.; Thoma, Dan J.; Teter, David F.; Beard, Timothy V.; Hudson, Richard W.; Freibert, Franz J.; Korzekwa, Deniece R.; Farrow, Adam M.; Cross, Carl E.; Mihaila, Bogdan; Lookman, Turab; Hunter, Abigail; Choudhury, Samrat; Karma, Alain; Ott, Thomas J. Jr.; Barker, Martha R.; O'Neill, Finian; Hill, Joshua; Emigh, Megan G.

    2012-07-30

    The purpose of this project is to: (1) Directly observe phase transformations and microstructure evolution using proton (and synchrotron x-ray) radiography and tomography; (2) Constrain phase-field models for microstructure evolution; (3) Experimentally control microstructure evolution during processing to enable co-design; and (4) Advance toward the MaRIE vision. Understand microstructure evolution and chemical segregation during solidification {yields} solid-state transformations in Pu-Ga.

  19. Energy Department Recognizes Landlords, Tenants Working Together to Save Energy in Commercial Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department today honored 14 organizations, naming them as 2014 Green Lease Leaders for their commitment to reducing energy waste and increasing efficiency in commercial buildings.

  20. The effect of chemistry modifications on the solidification behavior and weldability of Alloy 625

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cieslak, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of chemistry variations on the solidification behavior and weldability of Alloy 625. As the effect of several tramp elements (i.e., S, P, etc.) could be predicted a priori, the experimental alloy design excluded these elements as factors. A 3-factor, 2-level, full fractorial experimental design was examined with the elements Nb(0 wt%, 3.5 wt%), C(0.005 wt.%, 0.035 wt.%), and Si(0.01 wt.%, 0.40 wt.%) being chosen to fill the design matrix. Compositions of the alloys studied are listed. These compositions were prepared using VIM/VAR techniques in the Sandia National Laboratories Melting and Solidification Facility. Conventional hot and cold working techniques were used to produce 3 mm thick sheet for Varestraint weldability testing. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) was used to establish significant solidification temperatures and reactions. Greater experimental detail has been given previously. 2 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Energy Department's New Buildings Solution Center Shares Proven Strategies for Energy Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department today released a new resource, the Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center, to share proven methods for reducing energy waste and carbon emissions in U.S. buildings.

  2. BUILDING STRONG

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interior Least Tern Operations and Habitat Creation Arkansas River Corridor Lake Eufaula Advisory Committee Tenkiller Downstream Fishery Issues DO / Minimum Flows Broken Bow Seasonal Pool Update Cultural Resources Impacts Arkansas River Navigation Improvement BUILDING STRONG ® Interior Least Tern Operations and Habitat Creation A new biological opinion is underway and expected to be available in the coming weeks. We expect no change in the Least Tern program resulting from the opinion. The

  3. System to control contamination during retrieval of buried TRU waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Menkhaus, D.E.; Loomis, G.G.; Mullen, C.K.; Scott, D.W.; Feldman, E.M.; Meyer, L.C.

    1993-04-20

    A system is described to control contamination during the retrieval of hazardous waste comprising an outer containment building, an inner containment building, within the outer containment building, an electrostatic radioactive particle recovery unit connected to and in communication with the inner and outer containment buildings, and a contaminate suppression system including a moisture control subsystem, and a rapid monitoring system having the ability to monitor conditions in the inner and outer containment buildings.

  4. System to control contamination during retrieval of buried TRU waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Menkhaus, Daniel E.; Loomis, Guy G.; Mullen, Carlan K.; Scott, Donald W.; Feldman, Edgar M.; Meyer, Leroy C.

    1993-01-01

    A system to control contamination during the retrieval of hazardous waste comprising an outer containment building, an inner containment building, within the outer containment building, an electrostatic radioactive particle recovery unit connected to and in communication with the inner and outer containment buildings, and a contaminate suppression system including a moisture control subsystem, and a rapid monitoring system having the ability to monitor conditions in the inner and outer containment buildings.

  5. Mr. John E. Kieling, Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 N O V 2 4 2015 Ms. Kathryn Roberts, Director Resource Protection Division New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, NM 87508-6303 New Mexico Environment Department Harold Runnels Building 1190 Saint Francis Drive, PO Box 5469 Santa Fe, NM 87502-5469 Subject: Written Notice Regarding Application of Environmental Protection Agency Hazardous Waste Number 0001 to Waste Containers Disposed at the Waste Isolation Pilot

  6. Waste Acceptance Testing of Secondary Waste Forms: Cast Stone, Ceramicrete and DuraLith

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Lindberg, Michael J.; Parker, Kent E.

    2011-08-12

    To support the selection of a waste form for the liquid secondary wastes from WTP, Washington River Protection Solutions has initiated secondary-waste-form testing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In anticipation of a down-selection process for a waste form for the Solidification Treatment Unit to be added to the ETF, PNNL is conducting tests on four candidate waste forms to evaluate their ability to meet potential waste acceptance criteria for immobilized secondary wastes that would be placed in the IDF. All three waste forms demonstrated compressive strengths above the minimum 3.45 MPa (500 psi) set as a target for cement-based waste forms. Further, none of the waste forms showed any significant degradation in compressive strength after undergoing thermal cycling (30 cycles in a 10 day period) between -40 C and 60 C or water immersion for 90 days. The three leach test methods are intended to measure the diffusion rates of contaminants from the waste forms. Results are reported in terms of diffusion coefficients and a leachability index (LI) calculated based on the diffusion coefficients. A smaller diffusion coefficient and a larger LI are desired. The NRC, in its Waste Form Technical Position (NRC 1991), provides recommendations and guidance regarding methods to demonstrate waste stability for land disposal of radioactive waste. Included is a recommendation to conduct leach tests using the ANS 16.1 method. The resulting leachability index (LI) should be greater than 6.0. For Hanford secondary wastes, the LI > 6.0 criterion applies to sodium leached from the waste form. For technetium and iodine, higher targets of LI > 9 for Tc and LI > 11 for iodine have been set based on early waste-disposal risk and performance assessment analyses. The results of these three leach tests conducted for a total time between 11days (ASTM C1308) to 90 days (ANS 16.1) showed: (1) Technetium diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that

  7. A phenomenological finite element model of part building in the stereolithography process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chambers, R.S.; Guess, T.R.; Hinnerichs, T.D.

    1995-03-01

    The finite element method has been used to develop the framework for a tool that can be used to model the structural deformation arising from the stereolithography build process. Such a tool when fully developed can facilitate numerical studies aimed at evaluating build parameters and build styles. Although the current software makes no attempt to capture all the physics of the process, provisions for three important build features have been made: (1) laser path history including scanning rate and depth of cure, (2) structural linkage, and (3) time varying material behavior. For demonstration purposes, a three dimensional finite element code was modified to include a phenomenological material model of solidification. The model was based on cure shrinkage and stress relaxation data collected from in-situ tests on individual strands drawn using 3D Systems` stereolithography apparatus (SLA-250). To depict the directed path of solidification within layers, a finite element birthing scheme was conceived to activate elements along the predetermined coordinate path of the laser. Structural linkage was enforced by joining element strands of layers when laser paths connect or overlap, respectively. A limited number of analyses have been performed to contrast simple build styles.

  8. 1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption SurveyCommercial Buildings Characteristics Released: May 2002 Topics: Energy...

  9. Btu)","per Building

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)","Floorspace (million square feet)","Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet)","Total (trillion Btu)","per Building (million Btu)","per...

  10. Building Energy Code

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Rhode Island Building Code Standards Committee adopts, promulgates and administers the state building code. Compliance is determined through the building permit and inspection process by local...