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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste resource pack" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators Agency/Company /Organization: International Solid Waste Association (ISWA), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) Sector: Energy, Land, Water Focus Area: Renewable Energy, - Waste to Energy Phase: Evaluate Options Topics: Adaptation, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type: Guide/manual, Training materials Website: www.trp-training.info/ Cost: Paid Language: English References: Training Resource Pack[1] "The new TRP+ provides a structured package of notes, technical summaries, visual aids and other training material concerning the (hazardous) waste

2

Students & Mental Health Resource Pack  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Students & Mental Health Resource Pack Produced by - www.rethink.org/at-ease/ SHEFFIELD EARLY://clik.to/eis NORTH EAST SHEFFIELD Northlands Community Health Centre, Southey Hill, Sheffield S5 8BE Tel: 0114 is severe mental illness? 1.4 Treatment and prognosis What is mental health awareness? 2.1 Introduction 2

Stevenson, Mark

3

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource! energy forum Case Studies from Estonia, Switzerland, Germany Bossart,· ABB Waste-to-Energy Plants Edmund Fleck,· ESWET Marcel van Berlo,· Afval Energie Bedrijf From Waste to Energy To Energy from Waste #12;9.00-9.30: Registration 9.30-9.40: Chairman Ella Stengler opens

Columbia University

4

Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This page provides a brief overview of municipal solid waste energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply waste to energy within the Federal sector.

5

Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law (Louisiana) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law (Louisiana) Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality manages solid waste for the state of Louisiana under the authority of the Solid Waste Management and Resource Recover Law. The Department makes rules and regulations that establish standards governing the storage, collection, processing, recovery and reuse, and disposal of solid waste; implement a management program that

6

Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:28am Addthis Black and white photo of a bulldozer pushing a large mound of trash in a landfill. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's high-solids digester converts wastes to biogas and compost for energy production. This page provides a brief overview of municipal solid waste energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply waste to energy within the Federal sector. Overview Municipal solid waste, also known as waste to energy, generates electricity by burning solid waste as fuel. This generates renewable electricity while also incinerating landfill and other municipal waste products such as trash, yard clippings and debris, furniture, food scraps, and other

7

Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:28am Addthis Black and white photo of a bulldozer pushing a large mound of trash in a landfill. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's high-solids digester converts wastes to biogas and compost for energy production. This page provides a brief overview of municipal solid waste energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply waste to energy within the Federal sector. Overview Municipal solid waste, also known as waste to energy, generates electricity by burning solid waste as fuel. This generates renewable electricity while also incinerating landfill and other municipal waste products such as trash, yard clippings and debris, furniture, food scraps, and other

8

Assessment of the resource associated with biomethane from food waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper assesses the resource of biomethane produced from food waste at a state level in the EU. The resource is dependent on the quantity of food waste available for anaerobic digestion and the specific methane yield from food waste. The specific method of undertaking biomethane potential (BMP) tests was shown to be crucial. BMP tests were carried out at different scales (5L and 0.5L) with different sources of inoculum, for both wet and dried substrate samples. The upper bound BMP results for source segregated canteen food waste gave specific methane yields of between 467 and 529L CH4 per kg volatile solids added. The higher results were associated with acclimatised inoculum and wet samples of food waste. The potential renewable resource of biomethane from food waste is shown to be equivalent to 2.8% of energy in transport in Ireland; this is significant as it surpasses the resource associated with electrifying 10% of the private car fleet in Ireland, which is currently the preferred option for renewable energy in transport in the country. However for this resource to be realised within the EU, source segregation of food waste must be effected. According to the Animal By-Products Regulations, digestate from source segregated food waste may be applied to agricultural land post anaerobic digestion. Digestate from food waste derived from a mixed waste source may not be applied to agricultural land. Thus biomethane from food waste is predicated on source segregation of food waste.

James D. Browne; Jerry D. Murphy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Economic Analysis of a Waste Water Resource Heat Pump Air-Conditioning System in North China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes the situation of waste water resource in north China and the characteristics and styles of a waste water resource heat pump system, and analyzes the economic feasibility of a waste water resource heat pump air...

Chen, H.; Li, D.; Dai, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Resin Liner Recovery and Over-Packing at Ontario Power Generation's Western Waste Management Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spent resins generated from Ontario Power Generation (OPG)'s and Bruce Power's Candu reactor operations are stored at OPG's Western Waste Management Facility in Kincardine, Ontario, Canada. The older resins are contained in 3 m{sup 3} epoxy-coated cylindrical carbon steel containers known as resin liners. The liners are stored in a stacked configuration within cylindrical in-ground containers. Previous studies indicated evidence of unacceptable liner wall corrosion and the potential for eventual leakage of resin from the liners. Based on this, OPG elected to re-package the majority of the resin liners into stainless steel over-packs. A contract for this work was awarded to a project team consisting of Duratek of Canada, Kinectrics, Inc. and E.S. Fox. This paper provides an overall summary of project activities focusing on the effectiveness of the equipment utilized and the soundness of the developed programs, plans and procedures. Specific information is provided on key aspects of the project and the overall achievement of project goals. (authors)

Pearson, S.D. [EnergySolutions, Columbia, SC (Colombia); Husain, A. [Kinectrics, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Typifies Optimizing Resources to Maximize  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Plant Typifies Optimizing Resources to Plant Typifies Optimizing Resources to Maximize Results Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Typifies Optimizing Resources to Maximize Results March 5, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis EM Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Manager Joe Franco, right, presents a memento to EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga EM Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Manager Joe Franco, right, presents a memento to EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga Three HalfPACT transportation packages on a Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) truck are parked inside the exhibit hall at the 2013 Waste Management Conference. WIPP featured the exhibit as part of outreach to visitors at the annual gathering in Phoenix. Three HalfPACT transportation packages on a Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) truck are parked inside the exhibit hall at the 2013 Waste

12

State Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Plan (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The State supports the "good management of solid waste and the conservation of natural resources through the promotion or development of systems to collect, separate, reclaim, recycle, and dispose...

13

Resource recovery waste heat boiler upgrade  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The waste heat boilers installed in a 360 TPD waste to energy plant were identified as the bottle neck for an effort to increase plant capacity. These boilers were successfully modified to accommodate the increase of plant capacity to 408 TPD, improve steam cycle performance and reduce boiler tube failures. The project demonstrated how engineering and operation can work together to identify problems and develop solutions that satisfy engineering, operation, and financial objectives. Plant checking and testing, design review and specification development, installation and operation results are presented.

Kuten, P.; McClanahan, D.E. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Gehring, P.R.; Toto, M.L. [SRRI, Springfield, MA (United States); Davis, J.J. [Deltak, Minon, MN (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Landfill Disamenities And Better Utilization of Waste Resources Presented to the Wisconsin Governor's Task Force on Waste Materials Recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Landfill Disamenities And Better Utilization of Waste Resources Presented to the Wisconsin on Waste Materials Recovery and Disposal who have invited me to address you today on landfill disamenities in New York State in the 1960's. We had many problems with polluting solid waste dumps, landfill fires

Columbia University

15

Economic Analysis and Comparison of Waste Water Resource Heat Pump Heating and Air-Conditioning System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Renewable Energy Resources and a Greener Future, Vol.VIII-8-1 Economic Analysis and Comparison of Waste Water Resource Heat Pump Heating and Air-conditioning System Chunlei Zhang Suilin Wang Hongbing Chen...

Zhang, C.; Wang, S.; Chen, H.; Shi, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

A New, Entropy Based Method To Support Waste and Resource Management Decisions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A New, Entropy Based Method To Support Waste and Resource Management Decisions ... Case studies demonstrate that the new tool is well suited to support and complement existing methods for decision making in waste and resource management such as LCA. ... To calculate X and Y, a mathematical function from the field of Information Theory is used (8). ...

Helmut Rechberger; Paul H. Brunner

2001-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

17

NNSS Waste Disposal Proves Vital Resource for DOE Complex | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NNSS Waste Disposal Proves Vital Resource for DOE Complex NNSS Waste Disposal Proves Vital Resource for DOE Complex NNSS Waste Disposal Proves Vital Resource for DOE Complex March 20, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Like most LLW, RTGs disposed of at the NNSS were handled without any special equipment or clothing because of the relatively low dose rate levels. Like most LLW, RTGs disposed of at the NNSS were handled without any special equipment or clothing because of the relatively low dose rate levels. An irradiator from Sandia National Laboratory was disposed of at the RWMS in September 2012. An irradiator from Sandia National Laboratory was disposed of at the RWMS in September 2012. The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Like most LLW, RTGs disposed of at the NNSS were handled without any special equipment or clothing because of the relatively low dose rate levels.

18

Evaluation of packed-bed and fluidized-bed cell technology for the destruction and removal of contaminants in alkaline waste solutions. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disposing of the large quantity of nuclear waste that has been produced within the DOE complex is an area of active research and development. Electrochemical processes have been reported for the treatment of alkaline wastes including the destruction of nitrate and nitrite and the removal of metals such as Tc and Ru. Electrolytic recovery of metals from dilute solution has been reported using conventional porous electrodes such as felt electrode and reticulated electrode, but use of such electrodes is limited. The pores of such electrodes become blocked as a consequence of metal deposition. If an attempt is made to regenerate these electrodes by dissolution of the deposited metals, oxygen evolution on the matrix competes with dissolution of metals deposited within the pores. On the other hand, the use of three dimensional packed-bed and fluidized-bed electrodes having large surface area per unit volume would offer an improvement on felt or reticulated system because of the greater ease of regeneration.

Hobbs, D.T. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Bockris, J.O.M.; Kim, Jinseong [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Surface Electrochemistry Laboratory

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

19

A Green Approach to Femtocells Capacity Improvement by Recycling Wasted Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Green Approach to Femtocells Capacity Improvement by Recycling Wasted Resources Leonardo S and transmit power. The proposed technique recycles redundant resources of OFDM transmissions (e.g., guard, a better average link quality, more efficient usage of spectrum resources and higher spatial reuse (co

Boyer, Edmond

20

Effect of air flow rate and fuel moisture on the burning behaviours of biomass and simulated municipal solid wastes in packed beds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Combustion of biomass and municipal solid wastes is one of the key areas in the global cleaner energy strategy. But there is still a lack of detailed and systematically theoretical study on the packed bed burning of biomass and municipal solid wastes. The advantage of theoretical study lies in its ability to reveal features of the detailed structure of the burning process inside a solid bed, such as reaction zone thickness, combustion staging, rates of individual sub-processes, gas emission and char burning characteristics. These characteristics are hard to measure by conventional experimental techniques. In this paper, mathematical simulations as well as experiments have been carried out for the combustion of wood chips and the incineration of simulated municipal solid wastes in a bench-top stationary bed and the effects of primary air flow rate and moisture level in the fuel have been assessed over wide ranges. It is found that volatile release as well as char burning intensifies with an increase in the primary air flow until a critical point is reached where a further increase in the primary air results in slowing down of the combustion process; a higher primary airflow also reduces the char fraction burned in the final char-burning-only stage, shifts combustion in the bed to a more fuel-lean environment and reduces CO emission at the bed top; an increase in the moisture level in the fuel produces a higher flame front temperature in the bed at low primary air flow rates.

Y.B Yang; V.N Sharifi; J Swithenbank

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste resource pack" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The effect of changing waste compositions on the incineration process of Municipal Solid Wastes in packed-bed systems: a CFD approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the recent changes in waste management policy across many EU countries, more and more efforts are now being made on wastes recycling and minimisation. In this paper, the effects of the changing compositions of wastes on the operation of incineration plants are addressed. CFD technique is used to simulate the incineration processes in grate systems and advanced mathematical models are employed. The incineration characteristics have been expressed as functions of the percentage of combustible materials in wastes taken away for recycling. To offset the deteriorated performance of incineration in some cases, alternative operation modes have been suggested and simulated.

Yao Bin Yang; Vida N. Sharifi; Jim Swithenbank

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Resource recovery - a byproduct of hazardous waste incineration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three principal areas of a chlorinated hydrocarbon waste disposal system for a typical vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) facility are described: the incinerator, the energy-recovery system, and the byproduct-recovery system. The overall efficiency of the energy- and *byproduct-recovery systems is dependent on the optimization of the primary combustor. An example is presented in table form which lists typical waste quantities for the plant and operating costs, including utility requirements for the incinerator system, the quench, absorber and scrubber. Savings that can result by the addition of the energy- and acid-recovery systems can pay for the waste disposal system and return money to the plant.

Santoleri, J.J.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Syngas Production by Thermochemical Gasification of Carbonaceous Waste Materials in a 150 kWth Packed-Bed Solar Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The carbonaceous feedstocks experimentally investigated included coal,(9-11) petcoke,(12, 13) cellulose,(14, 15) biochar,(11, 16) and waste materials such as scrap tire chips and powders, dried sewage sludge, industrial sludges, and fluff. ... reactor for the steam-gasification of petcoke, carried out in a high-flux solar furnace. ... A petcoke-water slurry was continuously injected into a solar cavity-receiver to create a vortex flow directly exposed to concd. ...

Christian Wieckert; Albert Obrist; Peter von Zedtwitz; Gilles Maag; Aldo Steinfeld

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

24

The Economics of Resource Recovery from Municipal Solid Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Eq. 2 when the unrecovered fraction is disposed of by incineration...worth of resource recovery in light of other demands such as those...Utilization of the Organic Fraction Figure 4 shows that 47 percent...that the value of the organic fraction as a fuel exactly offsets the...

James G. Abert; Harvey Alter; J. Frank Bernheisel

1974-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

25

Coal waste seen as valuable resource Published: March. 29, 2011 at 8:09 PM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coal waste seen as valuable resource Published: March. 29, 2011 at 8:09 PM ANAHEIM, Calif., March 29 (UPI) -- Fly ash, a byproduct of coal-burning electric power plants, could save billions. More than 450 coal-burning electric power plants in the United States produce about 130 million tons

Belogay, Eugene A.

26

Appropriate Technologies and Systems to respond to Climate Change, Improved Water Resources Management, Waste Management and Sanitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resources Management, Waste Management and Sanitation A Review of Water Information Systems in the English to adequately manage the resource and institute measures to equitably allocate water among the various competing in the management of the resource. This paper examines the water information systems of St. Lucia, Jamaica

Barthelat, Francois

27

January 2007 (text up-dated January 2008) Don't waste waste it is a resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.g. composting and anaerobic digestion), and Waste-to-Energy. Modern Waste to Energy technology deserves to dispel the myths surrounding Waste to Energy by attempting to present factual answers to the concerns management priorities and practices. Waste-to-Energy goes hand in hand with Recycling In order to achieve

Columbia University

28

Comprehensive Municipal Solid Waste Management, Resource Recovery, and Conservation Act (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act encourages the establishment of regional waste management facilities and the cooperation of local waste management entities in order to streamline the management of municipal solid waste...

29

Reconsidering Municipal Solid Waste as a Renewable Energy Feedstock For many years, opposition to the use of municipal solid waste (MSW) as an energy resource has been nearly universal among  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reconsidering Municipal Solid Waste as a Renewable Energy Feedstock July 2009 For many years, opposition to the use of municipal solid waste (MSW) as an energy resource has been nearly universal among of technologies can be used to create energy from MSW: · Landfill Gas Capture -- Waste in landfills naturally

Columbia University

30

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure Plan Summary for Interim reasctive Waste Treatment Area (IRWTA)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This closure plan has been prepared for the interim Reactive Waste Treatment Area (IRWT'A) located at the Y-12 Pkmt in oak Ridge, Tennessee (Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] Identification TN 389-009-0001). The actions required to achieve closure of the IRWTA are outlined in this plan, which is being submitted in accordance with Tennessee Ruie 1200- 1-1 1-.0S(7) and Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 265, Subpart G. The IRWTA was used to treat waste sodium and potassium (NaK) that are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The location of the IRWT'A is shown in Figures 1 and 2, and a diagram is shown in Figure 3. This pkm details all steps that wdi be petiormed to close the IRWTA. Note that this is a fmai ciosure.and a diagram is shown in Figure 3. This pkm details all steps that wdi be petiormed to close the IRWTA. Note that this is a fmai ciosure.

Collins, E.T.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

E-Print Network 3.0 - assisted packed bed Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

WASTES Summary: consolidation of the solid refuse bed took place as a result of gasification. The bulk density of the hand-packed... involving acidic bio leachate production...

32

Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources / Related Web Sites Resources / Related Web Sites Buildings-Related Resources Windows & Glazing Resources Energy-Related Resources International Resources Telephone Directories Buildings-Related Resources California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE) Center for Building Science (CBS) at LBNL Department of Energy (DOE) DOE Energy Efficiency home page Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Clearinghouse Fact sheets in both HTML for standard web browsers and PDF format using Adobe Acrobat Reader (free). National Fenestration Rating Council home page Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EREN) back to top... Windows & Glazing Resources National Glass Association (NGA) LBNL Building Technologies Fenestration R&D news LBNL Center for Building Science (CBS) Newsletter

33

Cow2Joules: Distributed Conversion of Organic Waste to Energy Resources Background to the project THEY are undertaking at ESF DLJohnson, Feb. 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cow2Joules: Distributed Conversion of Organic Waste to Energy Resources Background to the project of anaerobic digestion (AD) techniques for the conversion of biomass-related organic waste materials to useful energy products. This approach to industrial ecology, or sustainability, is well advanced in Europe where

Chatterjee, Avik P.

34

Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Case studies and additional resources on implementing renewable energy in Federal new construction and major renovations are available.

35

Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources News & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Smart Grid Demand Response Agricultural Residential Demand Response Commercial & Industrial Demand Response...

36

Professional Training Information Pack  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intending Professional Training Students Year 2 Information Pack #12;- 1 - Applying for a Professional Training Placement To be allowed to do the Professional Training you must have enrolled on one must talk to Dr J. M. Thompson immediately. General introduction to professional training Students

Davies, Christopher

37

Resource recovery potential from secondary components of segregated municipal solid wastes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(MSW) such as fruit and vegetable wastes (FVW), leaf litter, paddy straw, cane bagasse, cane trash for decentralized biogas plants to be operated in the vicinity. We characterized the fermen- tation potential of six of the above MSW fractions for their suitability to be converted to biogas and anaerobic compost using

Columbia University

38

Ball Packings with Periodic Constraints  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We call a periodic ball packing in $$d$$d-dimensional Euclidean space periodically (resp. strictly) jammed with respect to a period lattice $$\\varLambda $$ if there are no nontrivial motions of the balls that preserve $$\\varLambda $$ (resp. that maintain ... Keywords: 52C17, Ball packings, Jamming, Periodic packings, Rigidity, Tensegrities

Robert Connelly, Jeffrey D. Shen, Alexander D. Smith

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Packed Bed Combustion: An Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Packed Bed Combustion - University of Ottawa - CICS 2005 fuel fuel feed air products air fuel Retort) products Underfeed Combustion fuel feed air #12;Packed Bed Combustion - University of Ottawa - CICS 2005 required #12;Packed Bed Combustion - University of Ottawa - CICS 2005 Overfeed Bed fuel motion products air

Hallett, William L.H.

40

Environmental impacts of different food waste resource technologies and the effects of energy mix  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The environmental impacts of food waste management strategies and the effects of energy mix were evaluated using a life cycle assessment model, EASEWASTE. Three different strategies involving landfill, composting and combined digestion and composting as core technologies were investigated. The results indicate that the landfilling of food waste has an obvious impact on global warming, although the power recovery from landfill gas counteracts some of this. Food waste composting causes serious acidification (68.0PE) and nutrient enrichment (76.9PE) because of NH3 and SO2 emissions during decomposition. Using compost on farmland, which can marginally reduce global warming (?1.7PE), acidification (?0.8PE), and ecotoxicity and human toxicity through fertilizer substitution, also leads to nutrient enrichment as neutralization of emissions from N loss (27.6PE) and substitution (?12.8PE). A combined digestion and composting technology lessens the effects of acidification (?12.2PE), nutrient enrichment (?5.7PE), and global warming (?7.9PE) mainly because energy is recovered efficiently, which decreases emissions including SO2, Hg, NOx, and fossil CO2 during normal energy production. The change of energy mix by introducing more clean energy, which has marginal effects on the performance of composting strategy, results in apparently more loading to acidification and nutrient enrichment in the other two strategies. These are mainly because the recovered energy can avoid fewer emissions than before due to the lower background values in power generation. These results provide quantitative evidence for technical selection and pollution control in food waste management.

Yan Zhao; Wenjing Deng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste resource pack" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Hillslope erosion at the Maxey Flats radioactive waste disposal site, northeastern Kentucky. Water Resources Investigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Maxey Flats, a disposal site for low-level radioactive waste, is on a plateau that rises 300 to 400 feet above the surrounding valleys in northeastern Kentucky. Hillslope gradients average 30 to 40 percent on three sides of the plateau. The shortest distance from a hillslope to a burial trench is 140 feet on the west side of the site. The report presents the results of a 2-year study of slope erosion processes at the Maxey Flats disposal site, and comments on the long-term integrity of the burial trenches with respect to slope retreat. Thus, the report is of much broader scope in terms of earth-surface processes than the period of data collection would suggest. As such, the discussion and emphasis is placed on infrequent, large-magnitude events that are known to occur over the time scale of interest but have not been specifically documented at the site.

Carey, W.P.; Lyverse, M.A.; Hupp, C.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site May 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A product drum of mixed low-level waste is lowered into a high-density polyethylene macro-pack. A product drum of mixed low-level waste is lowered into a high-density polyethylene macro-pack. Macro-packs from the Idaho site are shown here safely and compliantly disposed. Macro-packs from the Idaho site are shown here safely and compliantly disposed. A product drum of mixed low-level waste is lowered into a high-density polyethylene macro-pack. Macro-packs from the Idaho site are shown here safely and compliantly disposed. IDAHO FALLS, Idaho - An innovative treatment and disposal technique is enabling the Idaho site to accelerate shipments of legacy nuclear waste for

43

Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site May 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A product drum of mixed low-level waste is lowered into a high-density polyethylene macro-pack. A product drum of mixed low-level waste is lowered into a high-density polyethylene macro-pack. Macro-packs from the Idaho site are shown here safely and compliantly disposed. Macro-packs from the Idaho site are shown here safely and compliantly disposed. A product drum of mixed low-level waste is lowered into a high-density polyethylene macro-pack. Macro-packs from the Idaho site are shown here safely and compliantly disposed. IDAHO FALLS, Idaho - An innovative treatment and disposal technique is enabling the Idaho site to accelerate shipments of legacy nuclear waste for

44

What to Pack for Mars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

De Weck, O.L. What to Pack for Mars. Spectrum, IEEE 46.6 (2009): 39. 2009 Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers

De Weck, Olivier L.

45

The purpose of this pack This pack presents the Forestry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

staff, so that they are able to communicate the Forestry Commission's key climate change messages questions about climate change, and the answers identified clear areas that required more communication in tackling climate change. Who is this pack aimed at? The pack is primarily aimed at Forestry Commission

46

Convex Optimization Course Welcome Pack  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 NATCOR Convex Optimization Course 23rd ­ 27th June 2014 Welcome Pack This pack contains. ABSTRACT Convex optimization is the fundamental process of optimal decision-making. Although mathematically restrictive, many practical problems may be modelled directly as convex optimization problems. Convex

Hall, Julian

47

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 1, Revision 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume includes the following chapters: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant RCRA A permit application; facility description; waste analysis plan; groundwater monitoring; procedures to prevent hazards; RCRA contingency plan; personnel training; corrective action for solid waste management units; and other Federal laws.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Valve stem and packing assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A valve stem and packing assembly is provided in which a rotatable valve stem includes a first tractrix surface for sliding contact with a stem packing and also includes a second tractrix surface for sliding contact with a bonnet. Force is applied by means of a spring, gland flange, and gland on the stem packing so the stem packing seals to the valve stem and bonnet. This configuration serves to create and maintain a reliable seal between the stem packing and the valve stem. The bonnet includes a second complementary tractrix surface for contacting the second sliding tractrix surface, the combination serving as a journal bearing for the entire valve stem and packing assembly. The journal bearing so configured is known as a Schiele's pivot. The Schiele's pivot also serves to maintain proper alignment of the valve stem with respect to the bonnet. Vertical wear between the surfaces of the Schiele's pivot is uniform at all points of contact between the second sliding tractrix surface and the second complementary tractrix surface of a bonnet. The valve stem is connected to a valve plug by means of a slip joint. The valve is opened and closed by rotating the valve stem. The slip joint compensates for wear on the Schiele's pivot and on the valve plug. A ledge is provided on the valve bonnet for the retaining nut to bear against. The ledge prevents over tightening of the retaining nut and the resulting excessive friction between stem and stem packing. 2 figures.

Wordin, J.J.

1991-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

49

Valve stem and packing assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A valve stem and packing assembly is provided in which a rotatable valve stem includes a first tractrix surface for sliding contact with a stem packing and also includes a second tractrix surface for sliding contact with a bonnet. Force is applied by means of a spring, gland flange, and gland on the stem packing so the stem packing seals to the valve stem and bonnet. This configuration serves to create and maintain a reliable seal between the stem packing and the valve stem. The bonnet includes a second complementary tractrix surface for contacting the second sliding tractrix surface, the combination serving as a journal bearing for the entire valve stem and packing assembly. The journal bearing so configured is known as a Schiele's pivot. The Schiele's pivot also serves to maintain proper alignment of the valve stem with respect to the bonnet. Vertical wear between the surfaces of the Schiele's pivot is uniform at all points of contact between the second sliding tractrix surface and the second complementary tractrix surface of a bonnet. The valve stem is connected to a valve plug by means of a slip joint. The valve is opened and closed by rotating the valve stem. The slip joint compensates for wear on the Schiele's pivot and on the valve plug. A ledge is provided on the valve bonnet for the retaining nut to bear against. The ledge prevents overtightening of the retaining nut and the resulting excessive friction between stem and stem packing.

Wordin, John J. (Bingham County, ID)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Ball Packings with Periodic Constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We call a periodic ball packing in d-dimensional Euclidean space periodically (strictly) jammed with respect to a period lattice if there are no nontrivial motions of the balls that preserve the period (that maintain some period with smaller or equal volume). In particular, we call a packing consistently periodically (strictly) jammed if it is periodically (strictly) jammed on every one of its periods. After extending a well-known bar framework and stress condition to strict jamming, we prove that a packing with period Lambda is consistently strictly jammed if and only if it is strictly jammed with respect to Lambda and consistently periodically jammed. We next extend a result about rigid unit mode spectra in crystallography to characterize periodic jamming on sublattices. After that, we prove that there are finitely many strictly jammed packings of m unit balls and other similar results. An interesting example shows that the size of the first sublattice on which a packing is first periodically unjammed is not bounded. Finally, we find an example of a consistently periodically jammed packing of low density \\delta = \\frac{4 \\pi}{6 \\sqrt{3} + 11} + \\epsilon ~ 0.59, where \\epsilon is an arbitrarily small positive number. Throughout the paper, the statements for the closely related notions of periodic infinitesimal rigidity and affine infinitesimal rigidity for tensegrity frameworks are also given.

Robert Connelly; Jeffrey D. Shen; Alexander D. Smith

2013-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

51

Resource-Limited Multiattribute Value Analysis of Alternatives for Immobilizing Radioactive Liquid Process Waste Stored in Saluggia, Italy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This large Italian public works project started with the development of engineering data to support the evaluation of three alternatives for processing nuclear waste. After an analysis of the alternatives' performance from an engineering perspective ... Keywords: EUREX, Sogin, alternatives, applications, decision analysis, decision making, decision theory, energy, environment, multiattribute value analysis, nuclear waste

Alan J. Brothers; Shas V. Mattigod; Denis M. Strachan; Gordon H. Beeman; Paul K. Kearns; Angelo Papa; Carlo Monti

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Idaho's Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Details 2013Accomplish...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Articles A product drum of mixed low-level waste is lowered into a high-density polyethylene macro-pack. Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site Only the...

53

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Diverting Waste, Conserving Natural Resources: Composting Toilets for the New SUB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..........................................................................................................................................13 Designing for sustainability: green buildingUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Diverting Waste­2008)........................................................................................................35 Appendix C: Maintenance manual for C.K. Choi Building at UBC .....................................41

54

Municipal solid waste degradation and landfill gas resources characteristics in self-recirculating sequencing batch bioreactor landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on the degradation characteristics of municipal solid waste (MSW) in China, the traditional anaerobic sequencing batch bioreactor landfill (ASBRL) was optimized, and an improved anaerobic sequencing batch b...

Xiao-zhi Zhou ???; Shu-xun Sang ???; Li-wen Cao ???

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Cylinder valve packing nut studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design, manufacture, and use of cylinder valve packing nuts have been studied to improve their resistance to failure from stress corrosion cracking. Stress frozen photoelastic models have been analyzed to measure the stress concentrations at observed points of failure. The load effects induced by assembly torque and thermal expansion of stem packing were observed by strain gaging nuts. The effects of finishing operations and heat treatment were studied by the strain gage hole boring and X-ray methods. Modifications of manufacturing and operation practices are reducing the frequency of stress corrosion failures.

Blue, S.C. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Paducah, KY (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

56

WasteTraining Booklet Waste & Recycling Impacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WasteTraining Booklet #12;Waste & Recycling Impacts Environment: The majority of our municipal jobs while recycling 10,000 tons of waste creates 36 jobs. Environment: Recycling conserves resources. It takes 95% less energy to make aluminum from recycled aluminum than from virgin materials, 60% less

Saldin, Dilano

57

Ion exchange separation of plutonium and gallium (1) resource and inventory requirements, (2) waste, emissions, and effluent, and (3) facility size  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following report summarizes an effort intended to estimate within an order-of-magnitude the (1) resource and inventory requirements, (2) waste, emissions, and effluent amounts, and (3) facility size, for ion exchange (IX) separation of plutonium and gallium. This analysis is based upon processing 3.5 MT-Pu/yr. The technical basis for this summary is detailed in a separate document, {open_quotes}Preconceptual Design for Separation of Plutonium and Gallium by Ion Exchange{close_quotes}. The material balances of this separate document are based strictly on stoichiometric amounts rather than details of actual operating experience, in order to avoid classification as Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information. This approximation neglets the thermodynamics and kinetics which can significantly impact the amount of reagents required. Consequently, the material resource requirements and waste amounts presented here would normally be considered minimums for processing 3.5 MT-Pu/yr; however, the author has compared the inventory estimates presented with that of an actual operating facility and found them similar. Additionally, the facility floor space presented here is based upon actual plutonium processing systems and can be considered a nominal estimate.

DeMuth, S.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

58

Missouri Hazardous Waste Management Law (Missouri)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Hazardous Waste Program, administered by the Hazardous Waste Management Commission in the Department of Natural Resources, regulates the processing, transportation, and disposal of hazardous...

59

Summary of Natural Resources that Potentially Influence Human Intrusion at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1993, Raytheon Services Nevada completed a review of natural resource literature and other sources to identify potentially exploitable resources and potential future land uses near the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada, that could lead to future inadvertent human intrusion and subsequent release of radionuclides to the accessible environment. National Security Technologies, LLC, revised the original limited-distribution document to conform to current editorial standards and U.S. Department of Energy requirements for public release. The researchers examined the potential for future development of sand, gravel, mineral, petroleum, water resources, and rural land uses, such as agriculture, grazing, and hunting. The study was part of the performance assessment for Greater Confinement Disposal boreholes. Sand and gravel are not considered exploitable site resources because the materials are common throughout the area and the quality at the Area 5 RWMS is not ideal for typical commercial uses. Site information also indicates a very low mineral potential for the area. None of the 23 mining districts in southern Nye County report occurrences of economic mineral deposits in unconsolidated alluvium. The potential for oil and natural gas is low for southern Nye County. No occurrences of coal, tar sand, or oil shale on the NTS are reported in available literature. Several potential future uses of water were considered. Agricultural irrigation is impractical due to poor soils and existing water supply regulations. Use of water for geothermal energy development is unlikely because temperatures are too low for typical commercial applications using current technology. Human consumption of water has the most potential for cause of intrusion. The economics of future water needs may create a demand for the development of deep carbonate aquifers in the region. However, the Area 5 RWMS is not an optimal location for extraction of groundwater from the deep carbonate aquifer. Grazing and hunting are unlikely to be potential causes for inadvertent human intrusion into waste areas because of vegetation characteristics and lack of significant game animal populations.

NSTec Environmental Management

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Tunable, self-powered integrated arc plasma-melter vitrification system for waste treatment and resource recovery  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a relatively compact self-powered, tunable waste conversion system and apparatus which has the advantage of highly robust operation which provides complete or substantially complete conversion of a wide range of waste streams into useful gas and a stable, nonleachable solid product at a single location with greatly reduced air pollution to meet air quality standards. The system provides the capability for highly efficient conversion of waste into high quality combustible gas and for high efficiency conversion of the gas into electricity by utilizing a high efficiency gas turbine or by an internal combustion engine. The solid product can be suitable for various commercial applications. Alternatively, the solid product stream, which is a safe, stable material, may be disposed of without special considerations as hazardous material. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, the arc plasma furnace and joule heated melter are formed as a fully integrated unit with a common melt pool having circuit arrangements for the simultaneous independently controllable operation of both the arc plasma and the joule heated portions of the unit without interference with one another. The preferred configuration of this embodiment of the invention utilizes two arc plasma electrodes with an elongated chamber for the molten pool such that the molten pool is capable of providing conducting paths between electrodes. The apparatus may additionally be employed with reduced or without further use of the gases generated by the conversion process. The apparatus may be employed as a self-powered or net electricity producing unit where use of an auxiliary fuel provides the required level of electricity production.

Titus, Charles H. (Newtown Square, PA); Cohn, Daniel R. (Chestnuthill, MA); Surma, Jeffrey E. (Kennewick, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste resource pack" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Leaching behavior and possible resource recovery from air pollution control residues of fluidized bed combustion of municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ash residues are generated at several points during combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW), i.e., in cyclones, electrostatic precipitators and fabric filters. Such residues are of a complex physical and chemical nature and are often enriched in soluble salts and heavy metals such as Pb, Cd and Zn. Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) of MSW is a relatively new technique and very little information is available about the leaching behavior of its residues. In this study, the total elemental composition, mineralogy and leaching behavior of cyclone and bag-house filter ashes from a bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) boiler fired with municipal solid waste have been investigated. In addition, the possibilities of recovery heavy metals from these ashes were studied. The long-term leaching behavior of the ash constituents was evaluated using a two-step batch leaching test known as the CEN-test, whereas short and medium term leaching behavior was evaluated using a Column test. The extraction of elements from cyclone and filter ashes with various acidic solutions was also investigated. The leaching behavior of acid washed ashes was evaluated using the CEN test. The cyclone ash was mainly composed of aluminosilicate minerals, whereas the filter ash consisted of chlorides and hydroxides of alkali and alkaline earth metals. The concentration of heavy metals such as Zn, Cu, Cd and Pb was higher in the filter ash than in the cyclone ash. The leached amounts of sulfates and Pb from the cyclone ash decreased with leaching test contact time, indicating the formation of secondary mineral phases. Large amounts of chlorides, sulfates, Ca, Cu and Pb were leached from the filter ash. Acid extraction removed large amounts ({gt}50%) of Zn, Pb and Cu from the filter ash and approximately 56% of the total amount of Zn present in the cyclone ash. An efficient removal of heavy metal species from these types of ashes can probably be achieved by application of a recycling or multi-step process.

Abbas, Z.; Andersson, B.A.; Steenari, B.M.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Combustion of textile residues in a packed bed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Textile is one of the main components in the municipal waste which is to be diverted from landfill for material and energy recovery. As an initial investigation for energy recovery from textile residues, the combustion of cotton fabrics with a minor fraction of polyester was investigated in a packed bed combustor for air flow rates ranging from 117 to 1638 kg/m{sup 2} h (0.027-0.371 m/s). Tests were also carried out in order to evaluate the co-combustion of textile residues with two segregated waste materials: waste wood and cardboard. Textile residues showed different combustion characteristics when compared to typical waste materials at low air flow rates below 819 kg/m{sup 2} h (0.186 m/s). The ignition front propagated fast along the air channels randomly formed between packed textile particles while leaving a large amount of unignited material above. This resulted in irregular behaviour of the temperature profile, ignition rate and the percentage of weight loss in the ignition propagation stage. A slow smouldering burn-out stage followed the ignition propagation stage. At air flow rates of 1200-1600 kg/m{sup 2} h (0.272-0.363 m/s), the bed had a maximum burning rate of about 240 kg/m{sup 2} h consuming most of the combustibles in the ignition propagation stage. More uniform combustion with an increased burning rate was achieved when textile residues were co-burned with cardboard that had a similar bulk density. (author)

Ryu, Changkook; Phan, Anh N.; Sharifi, Vida N.; Swithenbank, Jim [Sheffield University Waste Incineration Centre (SUWIC), Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) In 1965 the Solid Waste Disposal Act [Public Law (Pub. L.) 89-72] was enacted to improve solid waste disposal methods. It was amended in 1970 by the Resource Recovery Act (Pub. L. 91-512), which provided the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) with funding for resource recovery programs. However, that Act had little impact on the management and ultimate disposal of hazardous waste. In 1976 Congress enacted the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA, Pub. L. 94-580). RCRA established a system for managing non-hazardous and hazardous solid wastes in an environmentally sound manner. Specifically, it provides for the management of hazardous wastes from the point of origin to the point of final disposal (i.e., "cradle to grave"). RCRA also promotes resource recovery and waste minimization.

64

Virginia Resources Authority Act (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Virginia Resources Authority provides financing options to support community investment in a number of areas, including wastewater, flood prevention and dam safety, solid waste, water, land...

65

Enhanced EP halftones with hexagonal dot packing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enhanced EP halftones with hexagonal dot packing Tomasz J. Cholewo, Steve Weed, Brian Cooper advantages for electropho- tographic (EP) printing over conventional dot placement on a square grid [1] reported that hexagonal dot packing could have some unique benefits for EP printing. These were

Cholewo, Tomasz

66

Radioactive Waste Radioactive Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Radioactive Waste at UF Bldg 831 392-8400 #12;Radioactive Waste · Program is designed to;Radioactive Waste · Program requires · Generator support · Proper segregation · Packaging · labeling #12;Radioactive Waste · What is radioactive waste? · Anything that · Contains · or is contaminated

Slatton, Clint

67

South Carolina Solid Waste Policy and Management Act (South Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The state of South Carolina supports a regional approach to solid waste management and encourages the development and implementation of alternative waste management practices and resource recovery....

68

Electrochemical Studies of Packed Iron Powder Electrodes: Effects...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Packed Iron Powder Electrodes: Effects of Common Constituents of Natural Waters on Corrosion Electrochemical Studies of Packed Iron Powder Electrodes: Effects of Common...

69

EV Everywhere Batteries Workshop - Pack Design and Optimization...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pack Design and Optimization Breakout Session Report EV Everywhere Batteries Workshop - Pack Design and Optimization Breakout Session Report Breakout session presentation for the...

70

Groundwater well with reactive filter pack  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques.

Gilmore, Tyler J. (Pasco, WA); Holdren, Jr., George R. (Kennewick, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Groundwater well with reactive filter pack  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are disclosed for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques. 3 figs.

Gilmore, T.J.; Holdren, G.R. Jr.; Kaplan, D.I.

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

72

A High-Performance PHEV Battery Pack  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

cooling system we have developed in our previous program with respect to mass, volume, cost and power demand. Deliver cells and battery packs to USABC for testing. Tasks OEM...

73

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix I: Generating Resources -Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...................................................................................... 10 Transmission to access remote resources.................................................................................................................... 51 Waste Heat Energy Recovery Cogeneration

74

Sorption-capacity limited retardation of radionuclides transport in water-saturated packing materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radionuclides breakthrough times as calculated through constant retardation factors obtained in dilute solutions are non-conservative. The constant retardation approach regards the solid as having infinite sorption capacity throughout the solid. However, as the solid becomes locally saturated, such as in the proximity of the waste form-packing materials interface, it will exhibit no retardation properties, and transport will take place as if the radionuclides were locally non-reactive. The magnitude of the effect of finite sorption capacity of the packing materials on radionuclide transport is discussed with reference to high-level waste package performance. An example based on literature sorption data indicates that the breakthrough time may be overpredicted by orders of magnitude using a constant retardation factor as compared to using the entire sorption isotherm to obtain a concentration-dependent retardation factor. 8 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

Pescatore, C.; Sullivan, T.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 4, Revision 1.0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is currently constructing the Waste Isolation Pilot near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The full-scale pilot plant will demonstrate the feasibility of the safe disposal of defense-related nuclear waste in a bedded salt formation at a depth of 2160 feet below the surface. WIPP will provide for the permanent storage of 25,000 cu ft of remote-handled (RH) transuranic waste and 6,000,000 cu ft of contact-handled (CH) transuranic waste. This paper covers the major mechanical/structural design considerations for the waste hoist and its hoist tower structure. The design of the hoist system and safety features incorporates state-of-the-art technology developed in the hoist and mining industry to ensure safe operation for transporting nuclear waste underground. Also included are design specifications for VOC-10 monitoring system.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

Method of gravel packing a subterranean well  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a method of gravel packing a well bore penetrating a subterranean formation. It comprises blocking a first group of apertures in a liner with an immobile gel; positioning the liner within the well bore thereby defining a first annulus between the liner and the well bore; transporting a slurry comprised of gravel suspended in a fluid into the first annulus, the fluid flowing through a second group of apertures in the liner while the gravel is deposited within the first annulus to form a gravel pack; and thereafter removing substantially all of the gel from the first group of apertures.

Not Available

1991-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

77

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act: Part B, Permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 1, Revison 1.0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains information related to the permit application for the WIPP facility. Information is presented on solid waste management; personnel safety; emergency plans; site characterization; applicable regulations; decommissioning; and ground water monitoring requirements.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 7: Revision 1.0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This permit application (Vol. 7) for the WIPP facility contains appendices related to the following information: Ground water protection; personnel; solid waste management; and memorandums concerning environmental protection standards.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Solid Waste Regulations (Nova Scotia, Canada)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Nova Scotia Environment administers waste management for the province. Regulations include specific rules and standards for landfills, establish a Resource Recovery Fund, and guidelines for...

80

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B Permit Application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 2, Chapter C, Appendix C1--Chapter C, Appendix C3 (beginning), Revision 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains appendices for the following: Rocky Flats Plant and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory waste process information; TRUPACT-II content codes (TRUCON); TRUPACT-II chemical list; chemical compatibility analysis for Rocky Flats Plant waste forms; chemical compatibility analysis for waste forms across all sites; TRU mixed waste characterization database; hazardous constituents of Rocky Flats Transuranic waste; summary of waste components in TRU waste sampling program at INEL; TRU waste sampling program; and waste analysis data.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste resource pack" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

An algorithm for packing connectors J. Keijsper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(a set of edges covering all vertices). An S--T connector is a common spanning set of two graphic maAn algorithm for packing connectors J. Keijsper University of Amsterdam Department of MathematicsS; Tg of V , an S--T connector is a set of edges F ` E such that every component of the subgraph (V; F

Keijsper, Judith

82

Packing frustration in dense confined fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Packing frustration for confined fluids, i.e., the incompatibility between the preferred packing of the fluid particles and the packing constraints imposed by the confining surfaces, is studied for a dense hard-sphere fluid confined between planar hard surfaces at short separations. The detailed mechanism for the frustration is investigated via an analysis of the anisotropic pair distributions of the confined fluid, as obtained from integral equation theory for inhomogeneous fluids at pair correlation level within the anisotropic Percus-Yevick approximation. By examining the mean forces that arise from interparticle collisions around the periphery of each particle in the slit, we calculate the principal components of the mean force for the density profile - each component being the sum of collisional forces on a particle's hemisphere facing either surface. The variations of these components with the slit width give rise to rather intricate changes in the layer structure between the surfaces, but, as shown in this paper, the basis of these variations can be easily understood qualitatively and often also semi-quantitatively. It is found that the ordering of the fluid is in essence governed locally by the packing constraints at each single solid-fluid interface. A simple superposition of forces due to the presence of each surface gives surprisingly good estimates of the density profiles, but there remain nontrivial confinement effects that cannot be explained by superposition, most notably the magnitude of the excess adsorption of particles in the slit relative to bulk.

Kim Nygrd; Sten Sarman; Roland Kjellander

2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

83

Introduction The AdenoPACK 100 adenovirus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an excellent performance in small scale virus purification. However, they are also scalable and confirm to cIntroduction The AdenoPACK 100 adenovirus purification and concentration kit is intended-vitro transfections. The kit includes all reagents and devices necessary for clarification, purification

Lebendiker, Mario

84

Final evaluation of characterizing pipe-over-pack containers using high efficiency neutron counters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements of Transuranic (TRU) waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) packed in Pipe-over-Pack Containers (POC) contain a number of complexities. The POC is highly attenuating to both gamma rays and neutrons which presents a difficult waste matrix for correct quantification of material in the container. Currently there are a number ofPOC containers at LANL that require evaluation for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, NM. Updated data has been evaluated that finalizes the evaluation of characterizing Pipe-Over-Pack Containers. Currently at LANL, a single instrument has been used to explore the appropriateness of both passive neutron and quantitative gamma ray methods for measuring POC's. The passive neutron approach uses the Reals coincidence count rate to establish plutonium mass and other parameters of interest for TRU waste. The quantitative gamma ray method assumes a homogeneous distribution of radioactive source material with the surrounding material throughout the drum volume. Drums are assayed with a calibration based on the known density of the matrix. Both methods are supplemented by a simultaneous isotopic measurement using Multi-Group Analysis (MGA) to determine the plutonium isotopic composition. If MGA fails to provide a viable isotopic result Fixed Energy Response function Analysis with Multiple efficiencies (FRAM) has been used to replace the MGA results. Acceptable Knowledge (AK) may also be used in certain instances. This report will discuss the two methods in detail. Included in the discussion will be descriptions of the setup parameters and calibration techniques for the instrument. A number of test measurements have been performed to compare HENC data with certified historical data. Empty POCs loaded with known sources have also been measured to determine the viability of the technique. A comparison between calorimetry data, historical measurements and HENC data will also be performed. The conclusion will show that the current calibration on the HENC units is viable for analysis of POCs.

Carson, Pete [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stanfield, Sean B [AFS; Wachter, Joe [CANBERRA; Cramer, Doug [CANBERRA; Harvill, Joe [WTS

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Computer resources Computer resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computer resources 1 Computer resources available to the LEAD group Cédric David 30 September 2009 #12;Ouline · UT computer resources and services · JSG computer resources and services · LEAD computers· LEAD computers 2 #12;UT Austin services UT EID and Password 3 https://utdirect.utexas.edu #12;UT Austin

Yang, Zong-Liang

86

Energy Saving in Distillation Using Structured Packing and Vapor Recompression  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% of the world's styrene capac ty is now processed through columns filled with Flex pac? or Mellapak structured packings. In conventio al column operation, energy savings of 20 to 30% re obtained by replacing trays or dumped packings Other benefits...% of the world's styrene capac ty is now processed through columns filled with Flex pac? or Mellapak structured packings. In conventio al column operation, energy savings of 20 to 30% re obtained by replacing trays or dumped packings Other benefits...

Hill, J.H.

87

Mixed waste characterization reference document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste characterization and monitoring are major activities in the management of waste from generation through storage and treatment to disposal. Adequate waste characterization is necessary to ensure safe storage, selection of appropriate and effective treatment, and adherence to disposal standards. For some wastes characterization objectives can be difficult and costly to achieve. The purpose of this document is to evaluate costs of characterizing one such waste type, mixed (hazardous and radioactive) waste. For the purpose of this document, waste characterization includes treatment system monitoring, where monitoring is a supplement or substitute for waste characterization. This document establishes a cost baseline for mixed waste characterization and treatment system monitoring requirements from which to evaluate alternatives. The cost baseline established as part of this work includes costs for a thermal treatment technology (i.e., a rotary kiln incinerator), a nonthermal treatment process (i.e., waste sorting, macronencapsulation, and catalytic wet oxidation), and no treatment (i.e., disposal of waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)). The analysis of improvement over the baseline includes assessment of promising areas for technology development in front-end waste characterization, process equipment, off gas controls, and monitoring. Based on this assessment, an ideal characterization and monitoring configuration is described that minimizes costs and optimizes resources required for waste characterization.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Waste minimization assessment procedure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Perry Nuclear Power Plant began developing a waste minimization plan early in 1991. In March of 1991 the plan was documented following a similar format to that described in the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual. Initial implementation involved obtaining management's commitment to support a waste minimization effort. The primary assessment goal was to identify all hazardous waste streams and to evaluate those streams for minimization opportunities. As implementation of the plan proceeded, non-hazardous waste streams routinely generated in large volumes were also evaluated for minimization opportunities. The next step included collection of process and facility data which would be useful in helping the facility accomplish its assessment goals. This paper describes the resources that were used and which were most valuable in identifying both the hazardous and non-hazardous waste streams that existed on site. For each material identified as a waste stream, additional information regarding the materials use, manufacturer, EPA hazardous waste number and DOT hazard class was also gathered. Once waste streams were evaluated for potential source reduction, recycling, re-use, re-sale, or burning for heat recovery, with disposal as the last viable alternative.

Kellythorne, L.L. (Centerior Energy, Cleveland, OH (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Avoidable waste management costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the activity based costing method used to acquire variable (volume dependent or avoidable) waste management cost data for routine operations at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Waste volumes from environmental restoration, facility stabilization activities, and legacy waste were specifically excluded from this effort. A core team consisting of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, and Oak Ridge Reservation developed and piloted the methodology, which can be used to determine avoidable waste management costs. The method developed to gather information was based on activity based costing, which is a common industrial engineering technique. Sites submitted separate flow diagrams that showed the progression of work from activity to activity for each waste type or treatability group. Each activity on a flow diagram was described in a narrative, which detailed the scope of the activity. Labor and material costs based on a unit quantity of waste being processed were then summed to generate a total cost for that flow diagram. Cross-complex values were calculated by determining a weighted average for each waste type or treatability group based on the volume generated. This study will provide DOE and contractors with a better understanding of waste management processes and their associated costs. Other potential benefits include providing cost data for sites to perform consistent cost/benefit analysis of waste minimization and pollution prevention (WMIN/PP) options identified during pollution prevention opportunity assessments and providing a means for prioritizing and allocating limited resources for WMIN/PP.

Hsu, K.; Burns, M.; Priebe, S.; Robinson, P.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Resource Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Resource Analysis determines the quantity and location of resources needed to produce hydrogen. Additionally, resource analysis quantifies the cost of the resources, as a function of the amount...

91

Environ. Sci. Techno/. 1995, 29, 1059-1068 Behavior of Biofilters for Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for waste air biotreatment is presented. The model, applied to the aerobic biodegradation of methylethyl with Bioton, a commercially available biofilter packing (ClairTech,Utrecht, The Neth- erlands), comprising

92

Waste generator services implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recurring waste management noncompliance problems have spurred a fundamental site-wide process revision to characterize and disposition wastes at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The reengineered method, termed Waste Generator Services, will streamline the waste acceptance process and provide waste generators comprehensive waste management services through a single, accountable organization to manage and disposition wastes in a timely, cost-effective, and compliant manner. This report outlines the strategy for implementing Waste Generator Services across the INEEL. It documents the culmination of efforts worked by the LMITCO Environmental Management Compliance Reengineering project team since October 1997. These efforts have included defining problems associated with the INEEL waste management process; identifying commercial best management practices; completing a review of DOE Complex-wide waste management training requirements; and involving others through an Integrated Process Team approach to provide recommendations on process flow, funding/charging mechanisms, and WGS organization. The report defines the work that will be performed by Waste Generator Services, the organization and resources, the waste acceptance process flow, the funding approach, methods for measuring performance, and the implementation schedule and approach. Field deployment will occur first at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant in June 1998. Beginning in Fiscal Year 1999, Waste Generator Services will be deployed at the other major INEEL facilities in a phased approach, with implementation completed by March 1999.

Mousseau, J.; Magleby, M.; Litus, M.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Selected Blog Sites Related to Water Resources and Environmental Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Selected Blog Sites Related to Water Resources and Environmental Resources Water News: Circle of Michael Campana, water scientist - http://aquadoc.typepad.com/waterwired/ Integrated Water Management.g., `water') Environmental Appeals Court - http://environmentalappealscourt.blogspot.com/ Reviewed by: Waste

James, L. Allan

94

Nuclear Waste: Knowledge Waste?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...4). Although disposal of HLW remains...for long-term disposal is through deep...successful waste-disposal program has eluded...geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Authorized...Administration withdrew funding for Yucca Mountain...

Eugene A. Rosa; Seth P. Tuler; Baruch Fischhoff; Thomas Webler; Sharon M. Friedman; Richard E. Sclove; Kristin Shrader-Frechette; Mary R. English; Roger E. Kasperson; Robert L. Goble; Thomas M. Leschine; William Freudenburg; Caron Chess; Charles Perrow; Kai Erikson; James F. Short

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

95

Surrogate formulations for thermal treatment of low-level mixed waste, Part II: Selected mixed waste treatment project waste streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the formulation of surrogate waste packages, representing the major bulk constituent compositions for 12 waste stream classifications selected by the US DOE Mixed Waste Treatment Program. These waste groupings include: neutral aqueous wastes; aqueous halogenated organic liquids; ash; high organic content sludges; adsorbed aqueous and organic liquids; cement sludges, ashes, and solids; chloride; sulfate, and nitrate salts; organic matrix solids; heterogeneous debris; bulk combustibles; lab packs; and lead shapes. Insofar as possible, formulation of surrogate waste packages are referenced to authentic wastes in inventory within the DOE; however, the surrogate waste packages are intended to represent generic treatability group compositions. The intent is to specify a nonradiological synthetic mixture, with a minimal number of readily available components, that can be used to represent the significant challenges anticipated for treatment of the specified waste class. Performance testing and evaluation with use of a consistent series of surrogate wastes will provide a means for the initial assessment (and intercomparability) of candidate treatment technology applicability and performance. Originally the surrogate wastes were intended for use with emerging thermal treatment systems, but use may be extended to select nonthermal systems as well.

Bostick, W.D.; Hoffmann, D.P.; Chiang, J.M.; Hermes, W.H.; Gibson, L.V. Jr.; Richmond, A.A. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)] [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mayberry, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Frazier, G. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)] [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Mixed Waste Working Group report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The treatment of mixed waste remains one of this country`s most vexing environmental problems. Mixed waste is the combination of radioactive waste and hazardous waste, as defined by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The Department of Energy (DOE), as the country`s largest mixed waste generator, responsible for 95 percent of the Nation`s mixed waste volume, is now required to address a strict set of milestones under the Federal Facility Compliance Act of 1992. DOE`s earlier failure to adequately address the storage and treatment issues associated with mixed waste has led to a significant backlog of temporarily stored waste, significant quantities of buried waste, limited permanent disposal options, and inadequate treatment solutions. Between May and November of 1993, the Mixed Waste Working Group brought together stakeholders from around the Nation. Scientists, citizens, entrepreneurs, and bureaucrats convened in a series of forums to chart a course for accelerated testing of innovative mixed waste technologies. For the first time, a wide range of stakeholders were asked to examine new technologies that, if given the chance to be tested and evaluated, offer the prospect for better, safer, cheaper, and faster solutions to the mixed waste problem. In a matter of months, the Working Group has managed to bridge a gap between science and perception, engineer and citizen, and has developed a shared program for testing new technologies.

Not Available

1993-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

97

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 3, Chapter C, Appendix C3 (conclusion)--Chapter C, Appendix C9: Revision 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains appendices for the following: results of extraction procedure (EP) toxicity data analyses; summary of headspace gas analysis in Rocky Flats Plant sampling program-FY 1988; waste drum gas generation sampling program at Rocky Flats Plant during FY 1988; TRU waste sampling program waste characterization; summary of headspace gas analyses in TRU waste sampling program; summary of volatile organic compounds analyses in TRU waste sampling program; totals analysis versus toxicity characteristic leaching procedure; Waste Isolation Pilot Plant waste characterization sampling and analysis methods; Waste Isolation Pilot Plant waste characterization analytical methods; data reduction, validation and reporting; examples of waste screening checklists; and Waste Isolation Pilot Plant generator/storage site waste screening and acceptance audit program.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Scanned Treatment of Mixed Incin. Waste  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Treatment of Mixed Incinerable Treatment of Mixed Incinerable Waste DOE/IG-0588 March 2003 Page 17 Page 18 Use of Treatment Resources Details of Finding ........................................................................1 Recommendations and Comments ............................................6 Appendices Prior Reports ...............................................................................8 Objective, Scope, and Methodology ...........................................9 Management Comments ...........................................................11 TREATMENT OF MIXED INCINERABLE WASTE TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1 Waste Stored Rather Than Treated We found the Department of Energy (Department) was not treating its mixed incinerable solid waste expeditiously or cost-effectively.

99

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B Permit Application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 5, Chapter D, Appendix D1 (conclusion), Revision 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reference design for the underground facilities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant was developed using the best criteria available at initiation of the detailed design effort. These design criteria are contained in the US Department of Energy document titled Design Criteria, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Revised Mission Concept-IIA (RMC-IIA), Rev. 4, dated February 1984. The validation process described in the Design Validation Final Report has resulted in validation of the reference design of the underground openings based on these criteria. Future changes may necessitate modification of the Design Criteria document and/or the reference design. Validation of the reference design as presented in this report permits the consideration of future design or design criteria modifications necessitated by these changes or by experience gained at the WIPP. Any future modifications to the design criteria and/or the reference design will be governed by a DOE Standard Operation Procedure (SOP) covering underground design changes. This procedure will explain the process to be followed in describing, evaluating and approving the change.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Packed bed carburization of tantalum and tantalum alloy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Packed bed carburization of a tantalum or tantalum alloy object. A method for producing corrosion-resistant tantalum or tantalum alloy objects is described. The method includes the steps of placing the object in contact with a carburizing pack, heating the packed object in vacuum furnace to a temperature whereby carbon from the pack diffuses into the object forming grains with tantalum carbide along the grain boundaries, and etching the surface of the carburized object. This latter step removes tantalum carbides from the surface of the carburized tantalum object while leaving the tantalum carbide along the grain boundaries.

Lopez, Peter C. (Espanola, NM); Rodriguez, Patrick J. (Espanola, NM); Pereyra, Ramiro A. (Medanales, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste resource pack" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

New ORNL electric vehicle technology packs more punch in smaller...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ORNL electric vehicle technology packs more punch in smaller package ORNL's 30-kilowatt power inverter offers greater reliability and power in a compact package. ORNL's 30-kilowatt...

102

Packed bed carburization of tantalum and tantalum alloy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Packed bed carburization of a tantalum or tantalum alloy object is disclosed. A method for producing corrosion-resistant tantalum or tantalum alloy objects is described. The method includes the steps of placing the object in contact with a carburizing pack, heating the packed object in vacuum furnace to a temperature whereby carbon from the pack diffuses into the object forming grains with tantalum carbide along the grain boundaries, and etching the surface of the carburized object. This latter step removes tantalum carbides from the surface of the carburized tantalum object while leaving the tantalum carbide along the grain boundaries. 4 figs.

Lopez, P.C.; Rodriguez, P.J.; Pereyra, R.A.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

103

Radioactive waste management and decommissioning of accelerator facilities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the removed radioactive waste shall be treated and processed for either long-term storage or disposal. delayed...facility itself becomes a long-term storage that shall be...dismantling resources, waste storage space or development......

Luisa Ulrici; Matteo Magistris

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B Permit Application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 4, Chapter D, Appendix D1 (beginning), Revision 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which is designed for receipt, handling, storage, and permanent isolation of defense-generated transuranic wastes, is being excavated at a depth of approximately 655 m in bedded halites of the Permian Salado Formation of southeastern New Mexico. Site-characterization activities at the present WIPP site began in 1976. Full construction of the facility began in 1983, after completion of ``Site and Preliminary Design Validation`` (SPDV) activities and reporting. Site-characterization activities since 1983 have had the objectives of updating or refining the overall conceptual model of the geologic, hydrologic, and structural behavior of the WIPP site and providing data adequate for use in WIPP performance assessment. This report has four main objectives: 1. Summarize the results of WIPP site-characterization studies carried out since the spring of 1983 as a result of specific agreements between the US Department of Energy and the State of New Mexico. 2. Summarize the results and status of site-characterization and facility-characterization studies carried out since 1983, but not specifically included in mandated agreements. 3. Compile the results of WIPP site-characterization studies into an internally consistent conceptual model for the geologic, hydrologic, geochemical, and structural behavior of the WIPP site. This model includes some consideration of the effects of the WIPP facility and shafts on the local characteristics of the Salado and Rustler Formations. 4. Discuss the present limitations and/or uncertainties in the conceptual geologic model of the WIPP site and facility. The objectives of this report are limited in scope, and do not include determination of whether or not the WIPP Project will comply with repository-performance criteria developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (40CFR191).

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Volatile Components from Packing Matrials, Rev. 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An outgassing study was conducted on five packing materials, comprising two experiments. These materials comprised 277-4 borated concrete, Borobond4 concrete, polyethylene bags, silica-filled silicone rubber seals, and silicone foam padding. The purpose was measure the volume of gases which diffuse from packaging materials when sealed in containers. Two heating profiles were used to study the offgassing quantities in a set of accelerated aging tests. It was determined that the concretes contain a large quantity of water. The plastic materials hold much less moisture, with the silicone materials even consuming water, possibly due to the presence of silica filler. Polyethylene tends to degrade as the temperature is elevated and the foam stiffens.

Smith, R. A.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

NREL-Biomass Resource Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL-Biomass Resource Assessment NREL-Biomass Resource Assessment (Redirected from Biomass Resource Assessment Presentation) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Biomass Resource Assessment Presentation Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, Transportation Topics: Resource assessment Resource Type: Maps Website: www.nrel.gov/international/biomass_resource.html References: Biomass Resource Assessment at NREL (Int'l)[1] Logo: Biomass Resource Assessment Presentation Overview "Biomass resource assessments quantify the existing or potential biomass material in a given area. Biomass resources include agricultural crops and residues; dedicated energy crops; forestry products and residues; animal wastes; residues and byproducts from food, feed, fiber, wood, and materials

107

Marketing Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Expand Utility Resources News & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Marketing Resources Reports, Publications, and Research Utility Toolkit Informational...

108

Design of a European agrochemical plastic packaging waste management schemePilot implementation in Greece  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Mismanagement of Agrochemicals Plastic Packaging Waste (APPW) constitutes a major environmental problem, resulting in the pollution of soil, air and water resources and compromising the agricultural products safety, the protection of the environment and the public health. Systems for the management of APPW have been established in some European countries and they are operational for several years now. However, these schemes are incompatible while their operational conditions and technical criteria could be improved. In many countries no schemes exist yet for the management of APPW with serious negative consequences for the environment and public health. In response to these problems the European project AgroChePack has developed an environmental friendly, economically viable European APPW management scheme by transferring know-how from existing schemes, designing a new integrated APPW management scheme and testing it through pilot trials in five countries. This work presents the basic design principles established by AgroChePack by identifying problems and bottlenecks faced by existing schemes in Europe, by developing an integrated APPW scheme and by implementing, evaluating and optimising this scheme through pilot trials in Greece.

D. Briassoulis; M. Hiskakis; H. Karasali; C. Briassoulis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

CONCRETE OPTIMISATION WITH REGARD TO PACKING DENSITY AND RHEOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/organizers): .............. Keywords: packing density, rheology, grading curve, optimisation, self-compacting concrete, roller-compactedCONCRETE OPTIMISATION WITH REGARD TO PACKING DENSITY AND RHEOLOGY François de Larrard LCPC Centre concrete. Author contacts Authors E-Mail Fax Postal address LCPC Centre de Nantes François de Larrard

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

110

Relating protein conformational changes to packing efficiency and disorder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Relating protein conformational changes to packing efficiency and disorder Nitin Bhardwaj1 and Mark are most likely to change packing. Finally, by relating protein disorder to motions, we show 2009 proteinscience.org Abstract: Changes in protein conformation play key roles in facilitating

Gerstein, Mark

111

Procedure for Packing Weather Files for DOE-2e  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ESL-TR-10-09-03 Procedure for Packing Weather Files for DOE-2e Kee Han Kim Juan-Carlos Baltazar-Cervantes, Ph.D. September 2010 ESL-TR-10-09-03 TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER 1... ................................................................................................................................................. 7 1. OVERVIEW ..................................................................................................................................... 7 2. PROCESS OF PACKING WEATHER DATA FOR DOE-2e SIMULATION ............................... 8 2...

Kim, K. H.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.

112

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization |...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Summary Notes from 28 May 2008 Generic Technical Issue...

113

Nuclear Waste: Knowledge Waste?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...06520, USA. Nuclear power is re-emerging...proclaiming a nuclear renaissance...example, plant safety...liabilities, terrorism at plants and in transport...high-level nuclear wastes (HLW...factor in risk perceptions...supporting nuclear power in the abstract...

Eugene A. Rosa; Seth P. Tuler; Baruch Fischhoff; Thomas Webler; Sharon M. Friedman; Richard E. Sclove; Kristin Shrader-Frechette; Mary R. English; Roger E. Kasperson; Robert L. Goble; Thomas M. Leschine; William Freudenburg; Caron Chess; Charles Perrow; Kai Erikson; James F. Short

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

114

Evolving Design Rules for the Inverse Granular Packing Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If a collection of identical particles is poured into a container, different shapes will fill to different densities. But what is the shape that fills a container as close as possible to a pre-specified, desired density? We demonstrate a solution to this inverse-packing problem by framing it in the context of artificial evolution. By representing shapes as bonded spheres, we show how shapes may be mutated, simulated, and selected to produce particularly dense or loose packing aggregates, both with and without friction. Moreover, we show how motifs emerge linking these shapes together. The result is a set of design rules that function as an effective solution to the inverse packing problem for given packing procedures and boundary conditions. Finally, we show that these results are verified by experiments on 3D-printed prototypes used to make packings in the real world.

Marc Z. Miskin; Heinrich M. Jaeger

2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

115

Production of Biofuels from High-Acid-Value Waste Oils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Production of Biofuels from High-Acid-Value Waste Oils ... (1) Biofuel is derived from a renewable, domestic resource, thereby relieving reliance on petroleum fuel imports. ...

Junming Xu; Guomin Xiao; Yonghong Zhou; Jianchun Jiang

2011-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

116

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waste (i.e, mixture of biohazardous and chemical or radioactive waste), call Environment, Health2/2009 Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 200 West Arbor Dr. San Diego, CA 92103 (619

Tsien, Roger Y.

117

Solid Waste Policies (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Policies (Iowa) Policies (Iowa) Solid Waste Policies (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources This statute establishes the support of the state for alternative waste management practices that reduce the reliance upon land disposal and incorporate resource recovery. Cities and counties are required to establish and operate a comprehensive solid waste reduction program. These regulations discuss land application of processed wastes as well as requirements for sanitary landfills and for groundwater monitoring near land disposal sites

118

Universitt Bern, Chemikalienammelstelle, November 2012 dm where to put the waste?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the U1, at the bunker, on the waste rack aluminium dispose of at the public collecting point chemicals from the lab pack it to prevent breakage (into the blue boxes!) label it and put it in U1 at the bunker in the cart beside the ,,Ausgabe" empty tin canisters in U1, at the bunker, on the waste rack needles

Mühlemann, Oliver

119

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume 1: Availability of Feedstock and Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Municipal solid waste (MSW) is a domestic energy resource with the potential to provide a significant amount of energy to meet US liquid fuel requirements. MSW is defined as household waste, commercial solid waste, nonhazardous sludge, conditionally exempt, small quantity hazardous waste, and industrial solid waste. It includes food waste, residential rubbish, commercial and industrial wastes, and construction and demolition debris. It has an average higher heating value (HHV) of approximately 5100 btu/lb (as arrived basis).

120

NREL-Biomass Resource Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL-Biomass Resource Assessment NREL-Biomass Resource Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Biomass Resource Assessment Presentation Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, Transportation Topics: Resource assessment Resource Type: Maps Website: www.nrel.gov/international/biomass_resource.html References: Biomass Resource Assessment at NREL (Int'l)[1] Logo: Biomass Resource Assessment Presentation Overview "Biomass resource assessments quantify the existing or potential biomass material in a given area. Biomass resources include agricultural crops and residues; dedicated energy crops; forestry products and residues; animal wastes; residues and byproducts from food, feed, fiber, wood, and materials

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste resource pack" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Online Resources | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Online Resources Online Resources Online Resources ... Legislative Documents - US Code - Public and Private Laws - Congressional Bills - Congressional Record - Congressional Hearings - Appropriations Legislation Regulatory Documents - Code of Federal Regulations - Federal Register - Safety and Employee Protection Authorities Compilation of Laws - Communications Law - Consumer Protectxion Law - Environmental Law Volume 1 - Environmental Law Volume 2 - Food, Drug, And Related Law - Health Law - Nuclear Energy And Radioactive Waste - Selected Energy-Related Legislation: Electricity - Selected Energy-Related Legislation: Organization And Miscellaneous - Selected Energy-Related Legislation: Oil, Gas, And Nonnuclear Fuels Presidential Documents - Executive Orders Judicial Resources

122

The hierarchical properties of contact networks in granular packings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The topological structure resulting from the network of contacts between grains (contact network) is studied for very large samples of disorderly-packed monosized spheres with densities ranging from 0.58 to 0.64. The hierarchical organization of such a structure is studied by means of a topological map which starts from a given sphere and moves outwards in concentric shells through the contact network. We find that the topological density of disordered sphere packing is larger than the topological density of equivalent lattice sphere packings.

T. Aste; T. J. Senden

2005-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

123

Reliability analysis of common hazardous waste treatment processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Five hazardous waste treatment processes are analyzed probabilistically using Monte Carlo simulation to elucidate the relationships between process safety factors and reliability levels. The treatment processes evaluated are packed tower aeration, reverse osmosis, activated sludge, upflow anaerobic sludge blanket, and activated carbon adsorption.

Waters, R.D. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Teacher Resource Center: Curricular Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Curricular Resources Curricular Resources TRC Home TRC Fact Sheet Library Curricular Resources Science Fair Resources Bibliographies sciencelines The Best of sciencelines Archives Annotated List of URLs Catalog Teacher's Lounge Full Workshop Catalog Customized Workshops Scheduled Workshops Special Opportunities Teacher Networks Science Lab Fermilab Science Materials Samplers Order Form Science Safety Issues Tech Room Fermilab Web Resources The Teacher Resource Center provides workshops and consultations on Mathematics and Science Curriculum development. Here are a list of resources for educators. See the 'Customized Workshops" link in the "Teacher's Lounge" for information about more workshops available through the TRC. Key Science Resources for Curriculum Planning Key Science Resources for Curriculum Planning

125

Geothermal Direct-Use Minimizing Solid Waste  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Aquaculture and horticulture businesses, and other industries that use geothermal direct-use systems typically don't generate any more solid waste than those that use other energy resources.

126

Biomass Resources Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

extraction of both the fruit and the waste product of the plant itself. References: Biomass Resources Corporation1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it....

127

Resource conservation and allocation via process integration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Throughout the process industry, the conservation and allocation of mass and energy resources plays a pivotal role in the site wide optimization of a plant. Typically, raw materials are transformed into products, byproducts and wastes through...

Harell, Dustin Ashley

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

128

Leaders of the Fuel Cell Pack | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Leaders of the Fuel Cell Pack Leaders of the Fuel Cell Pack Leaders of the Fuel Cell Pack February 17, 2012 - 10:32am Addthis Fuel cell forklifts like the one shown here are used by leading companies across the U.S. as part of their daily business operations. | Energy Department file photo. Fuel cell forklifts like the one shown here are used by leading companies across the U.S. as part of their daily business operations. | Energy Department file photo. Sunita Satyapal Program Manager, Hydrogen & Fuel Cell Technology Program What does the report show? The 34 companies profiled used more than 250 fuel cells totaling 30+ MW of stationary power -- enough to supply electricity for over 21,000 households. What do WalMart, Coca-Cola, Sysco, and Whole Foods have in common? They're leading the pack when it comes to hydrogen and fuel cells.

129

Leaders of the Fuel Cell Pack | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Leaders of the Fuel Cell Pack Leaders of the Fuel Cell Pack Leaders of the Fuel Cell Pack February 17, 2012 - 10:32am Addthis Fuel cell forklifts like the one shown here are used by leading companies across the U.S. as part of their daily business operations. | Energy Department file photo. Fuel cell forklifts like the one shown here are used by leading companies across the U.S. as part of their daily business operations. | Energy Department file photo. Sunita Satyapal Program Manager, Hydrogen & Fuel Cell Technology Program What does the report show? The 34 companies profiled used more than 250 fuel cells totaling 30+ MW of stationary power -- enough to supply electricity for over 21,000 households. What do WalMart, Coca-Cola, Sysco, and Whole Foods have in common? They're leading the pack when it comes to hydrogen and fuel cells.

130

LEDS Collaboration in Action Workshop Participant Pack | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » LEDS Collaboration in Action Workshop Participant Pack Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP Logo.png Advancing climate-resilient low emission development around the world Home About Tools Expert Assistance Events Publications Join Us ACDS Workshop Participant Pack Agenda Accommodations Participants Location Arrival Form Open Space Sessions Speakers Presentations Links Contact Us Participant Pack Pack.pdf Powered by OpenEI ledsgp.org is built on the same platform as the popular Wikipedia site. Like Wikipedia, it is a "wiki" or website developed collaboratively by a community of users. Thanks to our unique relationship with OpenEI.org, you

131

A hybrid bin-packing heuristic to multiprocessor scheduling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A hybrid bin-packing heuristic to multiprocessor scheduling. Adriana Alvim (alvim ***at*** inf.puc-rio.br) Celso Ribeiro (celso ***at*** inf.puc-rio.br). Abstract: The...

Adriana Alvim

132

Lawrence Pack, train conductor, and Y-12s uranium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lawrence Pack, train conductor, and Y-12's uranium? Trains were the primary means of long haul transportation in the 1940's. Many trains brought building materials to Y-12 and...

133

Efficient Lithium-Ion Battery Pack Electro-Thermal Simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A methodology to derive a computational efficient electro-thermal battery pack model is showed. It is taken ... up of three orders of magnitude for the thermal part. The electrical battery model is implemented an...

L. Kostetzer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Performance characterization of a packed bed electro-filter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERIZATION OF A PACKED BED ELECTRO-FILTER A Thesis by A JAY NARAYANAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1990 Major Subject: Safety Engineering PERFORMANCE CHARACTERIZATION OF A PACKED BED ELECTRO-FILTER A Thesis by AJAY NARAYANAN Approved as to style and content by: John P. Wagn (Ch ' of the Com ittee) Aydin Akgerman (Member) Ri ard B...

Narayanan, Ajay

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

135

Random packing of lines in a lattice cube  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study is made of the random sequential packing of complete lines in a cube of integer lattice points, with side N. For N?15 exact packing fractions are computed. It is found that if line occupation attempts arrive as a spatial Poisson process the packing has two distinct phases; initially where large numbers of potential adsorption sites are blocked, and subsequently where no further blocking occurs so that filling is exponential in time. It is shown that the ratio of the durations of the blocking to the nonblocking phases falls to zero as N??. In this limit, the packing fraction at time t is ?(t)=34(1?e?t). The rapid switch between phases in large systems creates a dramatic fall in the packing rate at the start of the process. This becomes a discontinuity as N?? and is a consequence of the high aspect ratio of the packing objects. It provides a physical explanation for the diverging coefficients in expansions of ?(t) about t=0 for objects with diverging aspect ratio. After considering the three-dimensional case, the analysis is extended to d-dimensional cubes, for which it is conjectured that ?=d/2d?1 in the limit N??.

D. J. Burridge

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

136

Solid waste education in children's museums  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

before it is generated. The concept behind this strategy is that if we can eliminate the waste, we can decrease disposal problems, Similarly, recycling and composting are solutions to extending the life of resources by reusing them instead of throwing... waste management. This strategy involves a hierarchy of solutions, with source reduction as the best solution, followed by recycling, to include composting, as the second best option, and waste combustion and landfllling as the last two means...

King, Jennifer Campbell

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Managing America`s solid waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an historical overview of the federal role in municipal solid waste management from 1965 to approximately 1995. Attention is focuses on the federal role in safeguarding public health, protecting the environment, and wisely using material and energy resources. It is hoped that this report will provide important background for future municipal solid waste research and development initiatives.

Not Available

1998-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

138

Maximum and minimum stable random packings of Platonic solids Jessica Baker and Arshad Kudrolli  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of steel ball bearings 3 . In fact, work in the last decade has shown that random packing itself of the tetrahedrons 8,9 . In the case of tetrahedrons, disordered wagon-wheel packings were initially found to pack were said to be 0.76 .02 if the observed packings were extrapolated to infinite systems, but the pro

Kudrolli, Arshad

139

On Optimizing Sensor Placement for Spatio-Temporal Temperature Estimation in Large Battery Packs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of battery pack thermal dynamics. Monitoring and controlling battery pack temperature dy- namics. One important challenge with such battery packs is that an individual cell may become thermally management systems [2], [3], [4]. CFD modeling, model reduction, and analysis of battery pack thermal

Krstic, Miroslav

140

IP Easy-pass: A Light-weight Network-edge Resource Access Haining Wang Abhijit Bose Mohamed El-Gendy Kang G. Shin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-based Internet ac- cess often requires that sufficient network resources be re- served for real-time traffic. However, the reserved network resource is susceptible to resource theft and abuse. Without a resource pack- ets, the traffic conditioning and policing enforced at ISP (Internet Service Provider) edge

Wang, Haining

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste resource pack" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Solid Waste Reduction, Recovery, and Recycling | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reduction, Recovery, and Recycling Reduction, Recovery, and Recycling Solid Waste Reduction, Recovery, and Recycling < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Natural Resources This statute expresses the strong support of the State of Wisconsin for the reduction of the amount of solid waste generated, the reuse, recycling and composting of solid waste, and resource recovery from solid waste. The statute also notes that research, development and innovation in the design, management and operation of solid waste reduction, reuse, recycling,

142

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B permit application [of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 11, Chapter D, Appendix D4--Chapter D, Appendix D17: Revision 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains appendices D4 through D17 which cover the following: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site environmental report; ecological monitoring program at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant; site characterization; regional and site geology and hydrology; general geology; dissolution features; ground water hydrology; typical carbon sorption bed efficiency; VOC monitoring plan for bin-room tests; chemical compatibility analysis of waste forms and container materials; probable maximum precipitation; WHIP supplementary roof support system room 1, panel 1; and corrosion risk assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant ``humid`` test bins.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Waste-to-Energy 25 Years Later: Technology with a Past, Present  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solution Quite a Ride: UpsQuite a Ride: Ups MacArthur Resource Recovery Facility Islip, New York #12; Waste-to-energy Falls, New York #12; European Union: waste-to- energy preferable to landfills European Union directives and Consulting Federation of New York Solid Waste Associations Solid Waste/Recycling Conference Federation of New

Columbia University

144

Depleted uranium hexafluoride: Waste or resource?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

the US Department of Energy is evaluating technologies for the storage, disposal, or re-use of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}). This paper discusses the following options, and provides a technology assessment for each one: (1) conversion to UO{sub 2} for use as mixed oxide duel, (2) conversion to UO{sub 2} to make DUCRETE for a multi-purpose storage container, (3) conversion to depleted uranium metal for use as shielding, (4) conversion to uranium carbide for use as high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel. In addition, conversion to U{sub 3}O{sub 8} as an option for long-term storage is discussed.

Schwertz, N.; Zoller, J.; Rosen, R.; Patton, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Bradley, C. [USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, Technology, Washington, DC (United States); Murray, A. [SAIC (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Tapping Resources in Municipal Solid Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...operation: ferrous losses in the light fraction resulting from air classifica-tion...by air classifica-tion into light and heavy fractions, and the 20 FEBRUARY 1976 MINOR...screening after fracture in a shredder. It lends itself well to gravity...

S. L. Blum

1976-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

146

Waste Management Improvement Initiatives at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited - 13091  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL) Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) has been in operation for over 60 years. Radioactive, mixed, hazardous and non-hazardous wastes have been and continue to be generated at CRL as a result of research and development, radioisotope production, reactor operation and facility decommissioning activities. AECL has implemented several improvement initiatives at CRL to simplify the interface between waste generators and waste receivers: - Introduction of trained Waste Officers representing their facilities or activities at CRL; - Establishment of a Waste Management Customer Support Service as a Single-Point of Contact to provide guidance to waste generators for all waste management processes; and - Implementation of a streamlined approach for waste identification with emphasis on early identification of waste types and potential disposition paths. As a result of implementing these improvement initiatives, improvements in waste management and waste transfer efficiencies have been realized at CRL. These included: 1) waste generators contacting the Customer Support Service for information or guidance instead of various waste receivers; 2) more clear and consistent guidance provided to waste generators for waste management through the Customer Support Service; 3) more consistent and correct waste information provided to waste receivers through Waste Officers, resulting in reduced time and resources required for waste management (i.e., overall cost); 4) improved waste minimization and segregation approaches, as identified by in-house Waste Officers; and 5) enhanced communication between waste generators and waste management groups. (authors)

Chan, Nicholas; Adams, Lynne; Wong, Pierre [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)] [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Resources & Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Project Western Interconnection Synchrophasor Project Resources & Links Demand Response Energy Efficiency Emerging Technologies Smart grid fact sheet Department of...

148

Water Resources (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Resources (Montana) Resources (Montana) Water Resources (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Montana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation The state policy of Montana requires that water resources of the state be put to optimum beneficial use and not wasted. The state must promote the

149

A study of a cooling tower with variable packing heights  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I, tower of eight feet by ei, . ht feet section. . W. W. Smith (18) reported in 1&56, his results and con- clusions for mass transfer and resistance to air flow for three redwood packihg styles having essent1ally the same vert1cal projected area, made... the time to ~efinitel. ?; sta. e that the redwood packing of re tangulor section (width-hei~ht ratio '). g(~) is the best packin? typo. 'Ihe field is till open for experimentation with packings of other avail, ble mat- erials and packins f...

Khan, A. M. M. Farid

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

150

Mixed Waste Management Options: 1995 Update. National Low-Level Waste Management Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the original mixed Waste Management Options (DOE/LLW-134) issued in December 1991, the question was posed, ``Can mixed waste be managed out of existence?`` That study found that most, but not all, of the Nation`s mixed waste can theoretically be managed out of existence. Four years later, the Nation is still faced with a lack of disposal options for commercially generated mixed waste. However, since publication of the original Mixed Waste Management Options report in 1991, limited disposal capacity and new technologies to treat mixed waste have become available. A more detailed estimate of the Nation`s mixed waste also became available when the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published their comprehensive assessment, titled National Profile on Commercially Generated Low-Level Radioactive Mixed Waste (National Profile). These advancements in our knowledge about mixed waste inventories and generation, coupled with greater treatment and disposal options, lead to a more applied question posed for this updated report: ``Which mixed waste has no treatment option?`` Beyond estimating the volume of mixed waste requiring jointly regulated disposal, this report also provides a general background on the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). It also presents a methodical approach for generators to use when deciding how to manage their mixed waste. The volume of mixed waste that may require land disposal in a jointly regulated facility each year was estimated through the application of this methodology.

Kirner, N.; Kelly, J.; Faison, G.; Johnson, D. [Foster Wheeler Environmental Corp. (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant No-migration variance petition. Addendum: Volume 7, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes various aspects of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) including design data, waste characterization, dissolution features, ground water hydrology, natural resources, monitoring, general geology, and the gas generation/test program.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Building 251 Radioactive Waste Characterization by Process Knowledge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Building 251 is the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Heavy Elements Facility. Operations that involved heavy elements with uncontained radioisotopes including transuranic elements took place inside of glove boxes and fume hoods. These operations included process and solution chemistry, dissolutions, titrations, centrifuging, etc., and isotope separation. Operations with radioactive material which presently take place outside of glove boxes include storage, assaying, packing and unpacking and inventory verification. Wastes generated inside glove boxes will generally be considered TRU or Greater Than Class C (GTCC). Wastes generated in the RMA, outside glove boxes, is presumed to be low level waste. This process knowledge quantification method may be applied to waste generated anywhere within or around B251. The method is suitable only for quantification of waste which measures below the MDA of the Blue Alpha meter (i.e. only material which measures as Non-Detect with the blue alpha is to be characterized by this method).

Dominick, J L

2002-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

153

Energy Efficiency Resource Standards Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Energy efficiency resource standards mandate a quantified energy efficiency goal for an energy provider or jurisdiction within a predetermined timeframe.

154

Power Consumption Prediction and Power-Aware Packing in Consolidated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Consumption Prediction and Power-Aware Packing in Consolidated Environments Jeonghwan Choi the power consumption of groups of colocated applications. Such characterization is crucial for effective prediction and enforcement of appropriate limits on power consumption--power budgets--within the data center

Urgaonkar, Bhuvan

155

Packing Hamilton Cycles in Random and Pseudo-Random Hypergraphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Packing Hamilton Cycles in Random and Pseudo-Random Hypergraphs Alan Frieze Michael Krivelevich February 16, 2011 Abstract We say that a k-uniform hypergraph C is a Hamilton cycle of type , for some 1 Hamilton cycles. A slightly weaker result is given for = k/2. We also provide sufficient conditions

Krivelevich, Michael

156

Packing tight Hamilton cycles in 3-uniform hypergraphs Alan Frieze  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Packing tight Hamilton cycles in 3-uniform hypergraphs Alan Frieze Michael Krivelevich Po-Shen Loh Abstract Let H be a 3-uniform hypergraph with n vertices. A tight Hamilton cycle C H of H can be covered by edge-disjoint tight Hamilton cycles, for n divisible by 4. Consequently, we

Frieze, Alan

157

Packing tight Hamilton cycles in 3-uniform hypergraphs Alan Frieze  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Packing tight Hamilton cycles in 3-uniform hypergraphs Alan Frieze Carnegie Mellon University alan ploh@cmu.edu Abstract Consider a 3-uniform hypergraph H with n vertices. A tight Hamilton cycle C H by edge- disjoint tight Hamilton cycles, for n divisible by 4. Consequently, random 3-uniform hypergraphs

Krivelevich, Michael

158

Hydrogen Bonding Increases Packing Density in the Protein Interior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Bonding Increases Packing Density in the Protein Interior David Schell,1,2 Jerry Tsai,1 J System Health Science Center, College Station, Texas 77843-1114 ABSTRACT The contribution of hydrogen to the stability, but experimental studies show that bury- ing polar groups, especially those that are hydrogen

159

Moisture Transport in Silica Gel Packed Beds: II. Experimental Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments have been performed to obtain the transient response of a thin adiabatic packed bed of silica gel after a step change in inlet air conditions, comparisons are made with predictions using a solid-side resistance model and a pseudo-gas-side controlled model and better agreement obtained with the former model.

Pesaran, A. A.; Mills, A. F.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas) Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas) Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Transportation Utility Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Sales Tax Incentive Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Hazardous Waste Program is carried out by the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality which administers its' program under the Hazardous Waste management Act (Arkansas Code Annotated 8-7-202.) The Hazardous Waste Program is based off of the Federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act set forth in 40 CFR parts 260-279. Due to the great similarity to the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste resource pack" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Waste Hoist  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Primary Hoist: 45-ton Rope-Guide Friction Hoist Completely enclosed (for contamination control), the waste hoist at WIPP is a modern friction hoist with rope guides. With a 45-ton...

162

Nuclear Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear waste is radioactive material no longer considered valuable...238U, 235U, and 226Ra (where the latter decays to 222Rn gas by emitting an alpha particle) or formed through fission of fissile radioisotopes ...

Rob P. Rechard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) Agency/Company /Organization: Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Waste to Energy Phase: Create a Vision Resource Type: Dataset, Publications, Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.wte.org/ Cost: Free The Energy Recovery Council is a national trade organization representing the waste-to-energy industry and communities that own waste-to-energy facilities. Overview The Energy Recovery Council is a national trade organization representing the waste-to-energy industry and communities that own waste-to-energy facilities. The website includes information on waste-to-energy basics

164

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B Permit Application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 6, Chapter D, Appendices D4--D13: Revision 1.0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report (Vol. 6) for the WIPP facility contains appendices on the following information: Site characterization; general geology; ecological monitoring; and chemical compatibility of waste forms and container materials.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

165

Resource Recovery Opportunities at Americas Water Resource Recovery Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 3AConversion Technologies III: Energy from Our WasteWill we Be Rich in Fuel or Knee Deep in Trash by 2025? Resource Recovery Opportunities at Americas Water Resource Recovery Facilities Todd Williams, Deputy Leader for Wastewater Infrastructure Practice, CH2M HILL

166

The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF) will provide permanent Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage, treatment, and disposal for hazardous and mixed waste generated at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) that cannot be disposed of in existing or planned SRS facilities. Final design is complete for Phase I of the project, the Disposal Vaults. The Vaults will provide RCRA permitted, above-grade disposal capacity for treated hazardous and mixed waste generated at the SRS. The RCRA Part B Permit application was submitted upon approval of the Permit application, the first Disposal Vault is scheduled to be operational in mid 1994. The technical baseline has been established for Phase II, the Treatment Building, and preliminary design work has been performed. The Treatment Building will provide RCRA permitted treatment processes to handle a variety of hazardous and mixed waste generated at SRS in preparation for disposal. The processes will treat wastes for disposal in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). A RCRA Part B Permit application has not yet been submitted to SCDHEC for this phase of the project. The Treatment Building is currently scheduled to be operational in late 1996.

Bailey, L.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF) will provide permanent Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage, treatment, and disposal for hazardous and mixed waste generated at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) that cannot be disposed of in existing or planned SRS facilities. Final design is complete for Phase I of the project, the Disposal Vaults. The Vaults will provide RCRA permitted, above-grade disposal capacity for treated hazardous and mixed waste generated at the SRS. The RCRA Part B Permit application was submitted upon approval of the Permit application, the first Disposal Vault is scheduled to be operational in mid 1994. The technical baseline has been established for Phase II, the Treatment Building, and preliminary design work has been performed. The Treatment Building will provide RCRA permitted treatment processes to handle a variety of hazardous and mixed waste generated at SRS in preparation for disposal. The processes will treat wastes for disposal in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). A RCRA Part B Permit application has not yet been submitted to SCDHEC for this phase of the project. The Treatment Building is currently scheduled to be operational in late 1996.

Bailey, L.L.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

168

Modeling the lubrication of the piston ring pack in internal combustion engines using the deterministic method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Piston ring packs are used in internal combustion engines to seal both the high pressure gas in the combustion chamber and the lubricant oil in the crank case. The interaction between the piston ring pack and the cylinder ...

Chen, Haijie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Development of Cell/Pack Level Models for Automotive Li-Ion Batteries...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

CellPack Level Models for Automotive Li-Ion Batteries with Experimental Validation Development of CellPack Level Models for Automotive Li-Ion Batteries with Experimental...

170

Determinants of Backbone Packing in Globular Proteins: an Analysis of Spatial Neighbours  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The pattern and variability of backbone packing density in protein structures are examined. An interesting correlation between the average percentage composition of amino acids and the percentage composition in regions corresponding to different levels of packing density has been observed.

Panjikar, S.K.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Effects of lubricant viscosity and surface texturing on ring-pack performance in internal combustion engines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The piston ring-pack contributes approximately 25% of the mechanical losses in an internal combustion engine. Both lubricant viscosity and surface texturing were investigated in an effort to reduce this ring-pack friction ...

Takata, Rosalind (Rosalind Kazuko), 1978-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

The effect of surface finish on piston ring-pack performance in advanced reciprocating engine systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Frictional losses in the piston ring-pack of an engine account for approximately 20% of the total frictional losses within an engine. Methods of surface texture optimization were investigated to reduce piston ring-pack ...

Jocsak, Jeffrey (Jeffrey Alan)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Additional Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The following resources are focused on Federal new construction and major renovation projects, sustainable construction, and the role of renewable energy technologies in such facilities. These...

174

New packing in absorption systems for trapping benzene from coke-oven gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The efficiency of benzene removal from coke-oven gas in absorption units OAO Alchevskkoks with new packing is assessed.

V.V. Grabko; V.M. Li; T.A. Shevchenko; M.A. Solov'ev [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

Mobile Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mobile Resources Mobile Resources Mobile Resources Have a mobile device? Find tips and information here. Questions? 505-667-5809 Email For information call the Service Desk at (505) 667-5809 or email mobilelibrary@lanl.gov The following resources are optimized for mobile devices or have mobile apps available for download. Resource Available App Mobile Website Available off Yellow Network with Pairing or Login Additional Information AACR Journals Apple Yes, the Journals are optimized for mobile viewing. Not the whole AACR site. Instructional pdf on pairing with voucher ACS Apple Android No American Institute of Physics Apple No American Mathematical Society No Yes Instructions for pairing mobile devices, tablets, laptops, etc. American Physical Society No Annual Reviews No Yes Instructions for pairing with mobile device available on website.

176

Waste Disposal (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article lays an outline of waste disposal regulations, permits and fees, hazardous waste management and underground storage tank requirements.

177

A study of a cooling tower with variable packing geometries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Meohanioal Engineering Department~ for giving generously of his time, advioey and experi ense. STMKRY Three redwood packing styles -- rectangular~ square and triangular, having the same projected, area ? were tested under the same controlled conditions... of this wozk is to study the influence of the paoking geometries on water cooling tower performance oh raoteristics. To fulfill the purpose, thz ee different redwood paoking , . eometz'ies were tested and oompared. These ere z ectangular, square...

Azad, Abul Kalam

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

178

Savannah River Site offsite hazardous waste shipment data validation report. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this data validation is to verify that waste shipments reported in response to the US Department of Energy Headquarters data request are properly categorized according to DOE-HQ definitions. This report documents all findings and actions resulting from the independent review of the Savannah River Site data submittal, and provides a summary of the SRS data submittal and data validation strategy. The overall hazardous waste management and offsite release process from 1987--1991 is documented, along with an identification and description of the hazardous waste generation facilities. SRS did not ship any hazardous waste offsite before 1987. Sampling and analysis and surface surveying procedures and techniques used in determining offsite releasability of the shipments are also described in this report. SRS reported 150 manifested waste shipments from 1984 to 1991 that included 4,755 drums or lab packs and 13 tankers. Of these waste items, this report categorizes 4,251 as clean (including 12 tankers), 326 as likely clean, 138 as likely radioactive, and 55 as radioactive (including one tanker). Although outside the original scope of this report, 14 manifests from 1992 and 1993 are included, covering 393 drums or lab packs and seven tankers. From the 1992--1993 shipments, 58 drums or lab packs are categorized as radioactive and 16 drums are categorized as likely radioactive. The remainder are categorized as clean.

Casey, C.; Kudera, D.E.; Page, L.A.; Rohe, M.J.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Correlate the flooding of packed columns a new way  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Packed-column pressure-drop and flooding-point prediction has received new attention recently. These publications, like most earlier ones, focus on gas-flow-induced pressure drop, and flooding due to liquid entrainment in the packing. A few years ago, some problems occurred when packing was applied in high-pressure distillation service, such as ethylene and propylene superfractionators. Apparently, the maximum liquid-through-put capacity was lower than predicted from the gas-flow-induced flooding correlations. Such situation exists when predicting the performance of valve trays in similar service: liquid downflow can be limiting before entrainment flooding occurs. The reason for this behavior is the relatively low liquid and high vapor density of these high-pressure services. The liquid/vapor density ratios are typically 10--15:1 for such hydrocarbon systems. In contrast, for low-pressure water/air systems, this ratio is in the range 300--800:1. A large amount of experimental data for low-pressure systems has been used to correlate pressure drop and flooding, but it doesn't cover the technically important region of low liquid and high vapor density. This Article suggests an approach for understanding such liquid-limited systems.

Kaiser, V.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Two-stage thermal/nonthermal waste treatment process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An innovative waste treatment technology is being developed in Los Alamos to address the destruction of hazardous organic wastes. The technology described in this report uses two stages: a packed bed reactor (PBR) in the first stage to volatilize and/or combust liquid organics and a silent discharge plasma (SDP) reactor to remove entrained hazardous compounds in the off-gas to even lower levels. We have constructed pre-pilot-scale PBR-SDP apparatus and tested the two stages separately and in combined modes. These tests are described in the report.

Rosocha, L.A.; Anderson, G.K.; Coogan, J.J.; Kang, M.; Tennant, R.A.; Wantuck, P.J.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste resource pack" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Hazardous Waste Management (North Carolina) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

(North Carolina) (North Carolina) Hazardous Waste Management (North Carolina) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Construction Fuel Distributor Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environment and Natural Resources These rules identify and list hazardous waste and set standards for the generators and operators of such waste as well as owners or operators of waste facilities. They also stats standards for surface impoundments and location standards for facilities. An applicant applying for a permit for a hazardous waste facility shall

182

Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Dakota) Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Dakota) Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Fuel Distributor Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources It is the public policy of the state of South Dakota to regulate the control and generation, transportation, treatment, storage, and disposal of hazardous wastes. The state operates a comprehensive regulatory program of hazardous waste management, and the South Dakota Department of Environment

183

Georgia Waste Control Law (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Waste Control Law (Georgia) Waste Control Law (Georgia) Georgia Waste Control Law (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Waste Control Law makes it unlawful to dump waste in any lakes, streams

184

Coal/waste cofiring: International survey of combustion practices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal is an abundant fuel resource worldwide with an historically stable price. The use of coal is expected to increase, particularly in developing countries; and, as industrialization increases, so will the amount of various waste materials and the environmental problems associated with their disposal. Therefore, coal/waste cofiring can offer an environmentally sound, economic approach to both waste remediation and energy production. This paper highlights the results of an international survey of coal/waste cofiring by describing the principal wastes used and the combustion technologies employed. Also provided are examples of cofiring and areas where cofired fuel parameters will have an effect on boiler performance.

Harding, N.S.; Smouse, S.M.; Ekmann, J.M.; Winslow, J.S. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center; Ramezan, M. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

Waste and Materials Disposition Information | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Waste and Materials Disposition Waste and Materials Disposition Information Waste and Materials Disposition Information Waste and Materials Disposition Information As the Office of Environmental Management (EM) fulfills its mission, waste and materials disposition plays a vital role in the cleanup of radioactive waste and the environmental legacy of nuclear weapons production and nuclear energy research. Disposal of waste frequently falls on the critical path of cleanup projects. Significant planning resources are spent to identify alternatives and find a path that is cost-effective and in the best interest of the Federal government. In many instances, waste disposition, (processing, treatment and disposal) is part of cleanup agreements and is of interest to stakeholders and requires the oversight of regulators.

186

Clean Cities: Waste-to-Wheels: Building for Success Workshop  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Events Events Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Clean Cities: Waste-to-Wheels: Building for Success Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Waste-to-Wheels: Building for Success Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Waste-to-Wheels: Building for Success Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Waste-to-Wheels: Building for Success Workshop on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Waste-to-Wheels: Building for Success Workshop on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Waste-to-Wheels: Building for Success Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Waste-to-Wheels: Building for Success Workshop on AddThis.com... Conferences & Workshops Clean Cities 20th Anniversary Electric Vehicle Community Readiness Stakeholder Summit Waste-to-Wheels

187

Online Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Online Resources Online Resources       General Information Discovering New Physics - Fermilab: where physicists unravel the mysteries of the universe Electromagnetic Simulation: Charged Particle Motion in E/M Field (by Fu-Kwun Hwang, National Taiwan Normal University) Fermilabyrinth - Online versions of exhibits at the Lederman Science Center Fermilab Virtual Tour - Photos of accelerators and detectors with figure captions International Particle Physics Outreach Group (from CERN) Fermilab Homepage - Links to general information, experiments and projects (Fermilab at Work), particle physics (inquiring minds), resources for students (education) and more High-Energy Physics Acronyms - (from Fermilab) Particle Physics - a list of links from the American Physical Society)

188

Trends and Opportunities in Industrial Hazardous Waste Minimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes trends and opportunities in Resource Conservation and Recovery Act hazardous waste minimization. It uses U.S. Environmental Protection Agency data gathered since 1989 from over 20,000 facilities that account for almost all...

Atlas, M.

189

GREEN IPTV: a resource and energy efficient network for IPTV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technique to increase the resource and energy efficiency of IPTV networks. This technique is based on a simple paradigm: avoiding waste. To reduce the inefficiencies of current static multicast distribution schemes, I propose a semi-dynamic scheme where only...

Ramos, Fernando M. V.

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

190

Center Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources for Planning Center Activities Resources for Planning Center Activities       QuarkNet at Work - Resources Home QuarkNet is a teacher professional development effort funded by the National Science Foundation and the US Department of Energy. Teachers work on particle physics experiments during a summer and join a cadre of scientists and teachers working to introduce some aspects of their research into their classrooms. This allows tomorrow's particle physicists to peek over the shoulder of today's experimenters. These resources are available for lead teachers and mentors at Quartnet Centers as they design activities for associate teacher workshops and follow-on activities. Important Findings from Previous Years Mentor Tips Associate Teacher Institute Toolkit

191

Biomass Resource Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Biomass Resource Basics Biomass Resource Basics Biomass Resource Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:22pm Addthis Biomass resources include any plant-derived organic matter that is available on a renewable basis. These materials are commonly referred to as feedstocks. Biomass Feedstocks Biomass feedstocks include dedicated energy crops, agricultural crops, forestry residues, aquatic crops, biomass processing residues, municipal waste, and animal waste. Dedicated energy crops Herbaceous energy crops are perennials that are harvested annually after taking 2 to 3 years to reach full productivity. These include such grasses as switchgrass, miscanthus (also known as elephant grass or e-grass), bamboo, sweet sorghum, tall fescue, kochia, wheatgrass, and others. Short-rotation woody crops are fast-growing hardwood trees that are

192

Biomass Resource Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Biomass Resource Basics Biomass Resource Basics Biomass Resource Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:22pm Addthis Biomass resources include any plant-derived organic matter that is available on a renewable basis. These materials are commonly referred to as feedstocks. Biomass Feedstocks Biomass feedstocks include dedicated energy crops, agricultural crops, forestry residues, aquatic crops, biomass processing residues, municipal waste, and animal waste. Dedicated energy crops Herbaceous energy crops are perennials that are harvested annually after taking 2 to 3 years to reach full productivity. These include such grasses as switchgrass, miscanthus (also known as elephant grass or e-grass), bamboo, sweet sorghum, tall fescue, kochia, wheatgrass, and others. Short-rotation woody crops are fast-growing hardwood trees that are

193

Tools & Resources: Resource Directory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resource Directory Resource Directory The guidance documents and reports below have been used by Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partners to build their programs and guide them to early successes. The tools and calculators can be used by homeowners, business owners, and program designers to help determine energy savings and other benefits associated with energy efficiency upgrades. Guidance Documents and Reports Background Program Evaluation Program Updates and Lessons Learned Program Design Marketing and Driving Demand Financing and Incentives Workforce Development Partnering with Utilities Technical Resources Tools and Calculators For Homes For Commercial Buildings Emissions and Equivalency Calculators Guidance Documents and Reports Background Recovery Through Retrofit Report

194

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility Full Document and Summary Versions...

195

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE January 2010 Prepared for the Interagency left intentionally blank.] #12;Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy PNNL-SA-69994 under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Waste Disposal Workshops: Anthrax-Contaminated Waste AM Lesperance JF Upton SL

196

Virginia Geothermal Resources Conservation Act (Virginia) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Virginia Geothermal Resources Conservation Act (Virginia) Virginia Geothermal Resources Conservation Act (Virginia) Virginia Geothermal Resources Conservation Act (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Virginia Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals, and Energy It is the policy of the Commonwealth of Virginia to foster the development, production, and utilization of geothermal resources, prevent waste of geothermal resources, protect correlative rights to the resource, protect existing high quality state waters and safeguard potable waters from pollution, safeguard the natural environment, and promote geothermal and

197

RDS and Recycling Waste Diversion in Food Prep  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RDS and Recycling Waste Diversion in Food Prep Setting #12;Why Recycle? Recycling saves resources Recycling one ton of paper saves 17 trees! Recycling saves energy Recycling one aluminum can saves enough energy to power a television for 3 hours! Recycling is easy There are 4 waste categories here at UM

Awtar, Shorya

198

Pollution prevention opportunity assessments, a training and resource guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The intention of the ''Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment Training and Resource Guide'' is to help Hanford waste generators identify ways to reduce waste through the Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (P20A) process. This document presents pollution prevention tools and provides a step-by-step approach for conducting assessments.

VALERO, O.J.

1998-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

199

Waste Processing | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Processing Waste Processing Workers process and repackage waste at the Transuranic Waste Processing Centers Cask Processing Enclosure. Workers process and repackage waste at...

200

Waste Hoist  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Primary Hoist: 45-ton Rope-Guide Friction Hoist Largest friction hoist in the world when it was built in 1985 Completely enclosed (for contamination control), the waste hoist at WIPP is a modern friction hoist with rope guides (uses a balanced counterweight and tail ropes). With a 45-ton capacity, it was the largest friction hoist in the world when it was built in 1986. Hoist deck footprint: 2.87m wide x 4.67m long Hoist deck height: 2.87m wide x 7.46m high Access height to the waste hoist deck is limited by a high-bay door at 4.14m high Nominal configuration is 2-cage (over/under), with bottom (equipment) cage interior height of 4.52m The photo, at left, shows the 4.14m high-bay doors at the top collar of the waste hoist shaft. The perpendicular cross section of the opening is 3.5m x 4.14m, but the bottom cage cross section is 2.87m x 4.5m (and 4.67m into the plane of the photo).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste resource pack" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Liner surface improvements for low friction piston ring packs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development of engine components in the automotive industry is governed by several constraints such as environmental legislation and customer expectations. About a half of the frictional losses in an internal combustion engine come from the interactions between the piston assembly and cylinder liner surface. The tribological considerations in the contact between the piston ring and cylinder liner have attracted much attention over the past few decades. Many non-conventional cylinder liner finishes have been, and are being, developed with the aim to reduce friction losses and oil consumption, but the effects of the surface finish on piston ring pack performance is not well understood. One way of reducing friction in the cylinder system is to reduce the tangential load from the piston ring pack, focusing on the oil control ring. However, the side-effect of this is a disappointingly increased oil consumption. Inthis study a number of different cylinder liner surface specifications were developed and implemented in test engines with the aim of maintaining the level for oil consumption when decreasing the tangential load for the piston ring pack. To improve our understanding of the result, the same surfaces were evaluated in elastic and elasto-plastic rough contact and hydrodynamic flow simulation models. It is shown that oil consumption is strongly related to surface texture on the cylinder liners and at lower speeds (9001200rpm), a 'rougher surface' with a high core (e.g. Sk) and valley roughness (e.g. Svk) results in higher oil consumption. Atthe medium speed range (12003600rpm), oil consumption continues to dominate for the 'rough' surfaces but with a visible influence of a lower oil consumption for a decreased roughness within the 'rough' surface group. 'Smooth' surfaces with a 'smooth' core (Sk), irrespective of the valley component (Svk), show similar oil consumption. For engine speeds above 3600rpms, an increase in plateau roughness results in higher oil consumption. Throughout the study, standard roughness parameters were computed to compare with the results from engine testing and simulation. Future work will be directed to continuous optimization between oil consumption and friction. Improving the understanding of the functional cylinder system surfaces' ability to form oil films in the cylinder system opens up opportunities, not only in reducing the tangential load of piston ring packs but also in optimizing oil viscosity in order to reduce friction.

C Anderberg; Z Dimkovski; B-G Rosn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Hydraulically refueled battery employing a packed bed metal particle electrode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A secondary zinc air cell, or another selected metal air cell, employing a spouted/packed metal particle bed and an air electrode. More specifically, two embodiments of a cell, one that is capable of being hydraulically recharged, and a second that is capable of being either hydraulically or electrically recharged. Additionally, each cell includes a sloped bottom portion to cause stirring of the electrolyte/metal particulate slurry when the cell is being hydraulically emptied and refilled during hydraulically recharging of the cell.

Siu, Stanley C. (Castro Valley, CA); Evans, James W. (Piedmont, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Flooding Capacity in Packed Towers:? Database, Correlations, and Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To provide more insight into the exact influence of operating variables on flooding, several ANN simulations were performed by attributing different values for one studied variable while all of the others were held constant. ... The gas superficial velocity at flooding for the CMR simulation is greater by 1 m/s across the whole liquid velocity range. ... Because of the broadness and diversity of the databases, the proposed correlation has the capability of simulating the flooding capacity in randomly dumped packed beds for any purposes such as absorption and distillation. ...

Simon Pich; Faal Larachi; Bernard P. A. Grandjean

2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

204

Hydraulically refueled battery employing a packed bed metal particle electrode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A secondary zinc air cell, or another selected metal air cell, employing a spouted/packed metal particle bed and an air electrode is described. More specifically, two embodiments of a cell, one that is capable of being hydraulically recharged, and a second that is capable of being either hydraulically or electrically recharged. Additionally, each cell includes a sloped bottom portion to cause stirring of the electrolyte/metal particulate slurry when the cell is being hydraulically emptied and refilled during hydraulically recharging of the cell. 15 figs.

Siu, S.C.; Evans, J.W.

1998-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

Power-law friction in closely-packed granular materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to understand the nature of friction in closely-packed granular materials, a discrete element simulation on granular layers subjected to isobaric plain shear is performed. It is found that the friction coefficient increases as the power of the shear rate, the exponent of which does not depend on the material constants. Using a nondimensional parameter that is known as the inertial number, the power-law can be cast in a generalized form so that the friction coefficients at different confining pressures collapse on the same curve. We show that the volume fraction also obeys a power-law.

Takahiro Hatano

2006-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

206

Effective thermal conductivity of packed beds of spheres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of N are known only for certain types of regular packing, however, an empirical relation for m ) 0. 3 is given as N = 11. 6(l ? m) (22) When a load is applied to a bed of spheres, the contact area between spheres is determined using the Hertz... the authors compared their analytical solutions to has consistently dealt with beds of materials which have a very low thermal conductivity compared to that of the brass and aluminum spheres. These materials have been solid and hollow glass spheres, ceramic...

Duncan, Allen Buchanan

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Zero Waste Program 2011 Recycling Benefits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rutgers Zero Waste Program 2011 Recycling Benefits Through WM's Recycling Program, our company saved energy and reduced Greenhouse Gases through recycling. Recycling uses less energy, preserves from recycled material than from virgin, raw material. RESOURCE SAVINGS 4203 Metric Tons (MTCO2E

Delgado, Mauricio

208

Huizenga Kicks Off Waste Management Conference | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Huizenga Kicks Off Waste Management Conference Huizenga Kicks Off Waste Management Conference Huizenga Kicks Off Waste Management Conference February 25, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga speaks during the plenary session of the Waste Management Conference in Phoenix today. EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga speaks during the plenary session of the Waste Management Conference in Phoenix today. WM Symposia Board Chairman James Gallagher, left to right, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Member William Ostendorff, Natural Resources Canada Uranium & Radioactive Waste Division Director Dave McCauley, EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga and WM Symposia Board Member Fred Sheil gather for a photo at the Waste Management Conference. WM Symposia Board Chairman James Gallagher, left to right, U.S. Nuclear

209

Technologies for environmental cleanup: Toxic and hazardous waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the second in a series of EUROCOURSES conducted under the title, ``Technologies for Environmental Cleanup.`` To date, the series consist of the following courses: 1992, soils and groundwater; 1993, Toxic and Hazardous Waste Management. The 1993 course focuses on recent technological developments in the United States and Europe in the areas of waste management policies and regulations, characterization and monitoring of waste, waste minimization and recycling strategies, thermal treatment technologies, photolytic degradation processes, bioremediation processes, medical waste treatment, waste stabilization processes, catalytic organic destruction technologies, risk analyses, and data bases and information networks. It is intended that this course ill serve as a resource of state-of-the-art technologies and methodologies for the environmental protection manager involved in decisions concerning the management of toxic and hazardous waste.

Ragaini, R.C.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Polymer solidification of mixed wastes at the Rocky Flats Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rocky Flats Plant is pursuing polymer solidification as a viable treatment option for several mixed waste streams that are subject to land disposal restrictions within the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act provisions. Tests completed to date using both surrogate and actual wastes indicate that polyethylene microencapsulation is a viable treatment option for several mixed wastes at the Rocky Flats Plant, including nitrate salts, sludges, and secondary wastes such as ash. Treatability studies conducted on actual salt waste demonstrated that the process is capable of producing waste forms that comply with all applicable regulatory criteria, including the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure. Tests have also been conducted to evaluate the feasibility of macroencapsulating certain debris wastes in polymers. Several methods and plastics have been tested for macroencapsulation, including post-consumer recycle and regrind polyethylene.

Faucette, A.M.; Logsdon, B.W.; Lucerna, J.J.; Yudnich, R.J.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Method for immobilizing particulate materials in a packed bed  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention pertains generally to immobilizing particulate matter contained in a "packed" bed reactor so as to prevent powder migration, compaction, coalescence, or the like. More specifically, this invention relates to a technique for immobilizing particulate materials using a microporous foam-like polymer such that a) the particulate retains its essential chemical nature, b) the local movement of the particulate particles is not unduly restricted, c) bulk powder migration and is prevented, d) physical and chemical access to the particulate is unchanged over time, and e) very high particulate densities are achieved. The immobilized bed of the present invention comprises a vessel for holding particulate matter, inlet and an outlet ports or fittings, a loosely packed bed of particulate material contained within the vessel, and a three dimensional porous matrix for surrounding and confining the particles thereby fixing the movement of individual particle to a limited local position. The established matrix is composed of a series of cells or chambers comprising walls surrounding void space, each wall forming the wall of an adjacent cell; each wall containing many holes penetrating through the wall yielding an overall porous structure and allowing useful levels of gas transport.

Even, Jr., William R. (Livermore, CA); Guthrie, Stephen E. (Livermore, CA); Raber, Thomas N. (Livermore, CA); Wally, Karl (Lafayette, CA); Whinnery, LeRoy L. (Livermore, CA); Zifer, Thomas (Manteca, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Local origin of global contact numbers in frictional ellipsoid packings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In particulate soft matter systems the average number of contacts $Z$ of a particle is an important predictor of the mechanical properties of the system. Using X-ray tomography, we analyze packings of frictional, oblate ellipsoids of various aspect ratios $\\alpha$, prepared at different global volume fractions $\\phi_g$. We find that $Z$ is a monotonously increasing function of $\\phi_g$ for all $\\alpha$. We demonstrate that this functional dependence can be explained by a local analysis where each particle is described by its local volume fraction $\\phi_l$ computed from a Voronoi tessellation. $Z$ can be expressed as an integral over all values of $\\phi_l$: $Z(\\phi_g, \\alpha, X) = \\int Z_l (\\phi_l, \\alpha, X) \\; P(\\phi_l | \\phi_g) \\; d\\phi_l$. The local contact number function $ Z_l (\\phi_l, \\alpha, X)$ describes the relevant physics in term of locally defined variables only, including possible higher order corrections $X$. The conditional probability $P(\\phi_l | \\phi_g)$ to find a specific value of $\\phi_l$ given a global packing fraction $\\phi_g$ is independent of $\\alpha$ and $X$. An important step in defining $ Z_l (\\phi_l, \\alpha, X)$ is the determination of the local surface area fraction $\\psi_l$.

Fabian M. Schaller; Max Neudecker; Mohammad Saadatfar; Gary Delaney; Gerd E. Schrder-Turk; Matthias Schrter

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

213

New Jersey Clean Energy Resource Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Jersey Clean Energy Resource Network njcern.rutgers.edu Environment Solid Waste Management / Clean Energy Technology Development, Demonstration and Verification ·Anaerobic digestion ·Gasification Collaboration ·Supply Chain ManagementNew Jersey Clean Energy Innovation Council #12;

Garfunkel, Eric

214

Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

ELLEFSON, M.D.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Distillation: Energy Savings and Other Benefits From the Use of High Efficiency Packings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that competes with distillation for the separation of fluid mixtures. Packed contactors are used in extraction processes where only a few theoretical stages are required.' They are more efficient than empty spray towers because the packing minimizes... efficiency of the various packings as a function of system properties and column geometry [IOJ Nemunaitis, R. R., Eckert, J. S., Forte, E. H., for industrial-scale contactors. and Rollison, L. R., Chern. Eng. Progr., 67 (11), 60 (1971). ~ CONCLUSIONS...

Bravo, J. L.; Fair, J. R.; Humphrey, J. L.

216

Radioactive Waste Management (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section regulates the transportation and disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Minnesota, and establishes a Nuclear Waste Council to monitor the federal high-level radioactive waste...

217

Design of battery pack and internal combustion engine thermal models for hybrid electric vehicles.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This thesis focuses on the design of computational models, capable of simulating the thermal behaviour of a battery pack and internal combustion engine equipping (more)

Catacchio, Gabriele

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Teacher Resource Center: Fermilab Web Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fermilab Web Resources Fermilab Web Resources TRC Home TRC Fact Sheet Library Curricular Resources Science Fair Resources Bibliographies sciencelines The Best of sciencelines Archives Annotated List of URLs Catalog Teacher's Lounge Full Workshop Catalog Customized Workshops Scheduled Workshops Special Opportunities Teacher Networks Science Lab Fermilab Science Materials Samplers Order Form Science Safety Issues Tech Room Fermilab Web Resources The following materials are on the webserver. Fermilab Resources for Students - You might bookmark some of these resources to give your students easy access to information. Fermilab Resources for Students - You might bookmark some of these resources to give your students easy access to information. Photographs and video clips from Fermilab's Visual Media Services

219

Radioactive Waste Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish policies and guidelines by which the Department of Energy (DOE) manages tis radioactive waste, waste byproducts, and radioactively contaminated surplus facilities.

1984-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

220

Transuranic Waste Requirements  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The guide provides criteria for determining if a waste is to be managed in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter III, Transuranic Waste Requirements.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste resource pack" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Waste?to?Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Waste?to?Energy Roadmapping Workshop Waste?to?Energy Presentation by Jonathan Male, Director of the Bioenery Technolgies Office, Department of Energy

222

Nuclear Waste Disposal: Amounts of Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The term nuclear waste...embraces all residues from the use of radioactive materials, including uses in medicine and industry. The most highly radioactive of these are the spent fuel or reprocessed wastes from co...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:27am Addthis Photo of a bulldozer on top of a large trash mound in a landfill with a cloudy sky in the backdrop. Methane and other gases produced from landfill decomposition can be leveraged for energy. This page provides a brief overview of landfill gas energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply landfill gas energy within the Federal sector. Overview Landfill gases are a viable energy resource created during waste decomposition. Landfills are present in most communities. These resources can be tapped to generate heat and electricity. As organic waste decomposes, bio-gas is produced made up of roughly half methane, half carbon dioxide, and small amounts of non-methane organic

224

Integrated Solid Waste Management Act (Nebraska) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

You are here You are here Home » Integrated Solid Waste Management Act (Nebraska) Integrated Solid Waste Management Act (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Environmental Quality This act affirms the state's support for alternative waste management practices, including waste reduction and resource recovery. Each county and

225

Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hazardous Waste Management Act Hazardous Waste Management Act Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act (HWMA) describes a

226

Secondary Waste Form Development and OptimizationCast Stone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Washington River Protection Services is considering the design and construction of a Solidification Treatment Unit (STU) for the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at Hanford. The ETF is a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act-permitted, multi-waste, treatment and storage unit and can accept dangerous, low-level, and mixed wastewaters for treatment. The STU needs to be operational by 2018 to receive secondary liquid wastes generated during operation of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The STU to ETF will provide the additional capacity needed for ETF to process the increased volume of secondary wastes expected to be produced by WTP.

Sundaram, S. K.; Parker, Kent E.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Pitman, Stan G.; Chun, Jaehun; Chung, Chul-Woo; Kimura, Marcia L.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Um, Wooyong; Westsik, Joseph H.

2011-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

227

Journey to the Nevada Test Site Radioactive Waste Management Complex  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Journey to the Nevada Test Site Radioactive Waste Management Complex begins with a global to regional perspective regarding the location of low-level and mixed low-level waste disposal at the Nevada Test Site. For decades, the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) has served as a vital disposal resource in the nation-wide cleanup of former nuclear research and testing facilities. State-of-the-art waste management sites at the NNSS offer a safe, permanent disposal option for U.S. Department of Energy/U.S. Department of Defense facilities generating cleanup-related radioactive waste.

None

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

228

Image Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mosaic of earth and sky images Mosaic of earth and sky images Image Resources Free image resources covering energy, environment, and general science. Here are some links to energy- and environment-related photographic databases. Berkeley Lab Photo Archive Berkeley Lab's online digital image collection. National Science Digital Library (NSDL) NSDL is the Nation's online library for education and research in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. The World Bank Group Photo Library A distinctive collection of over 11,000 images that illustrate development through topics such as Agriculture, Education, Environment, Health, Trade and more. Calisphere Compiles the digital collections of libraries, museums, and cultural heritage organizations across California, and organizes them by theme, such

229

Teacher Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources Resources Teacher Programs JLab Science Activities for Teachers - An afternoon science program for 5th, 6th and 8th grade teachers. [Program Dates: September 2013 - May 2014] Teacher Night at Jefferson Lab - Teacher Night will be held on April 2nd, 2014. Please sign-up by March 19th, 2014! Education Events Physics Fest - Cryogenics, electricity and more! Reserve your space today! Science Series - Science lectures for high school and middle school students! [Video Archive] Education Events Mailing List - An electronic mailing list to keep you informed of Jefferson Lab's public education events! Workshops and Local Groups The Virginia Section of the American Nuclear Society - Single and multi-day workshops on the science of nuclear energy and radiation.

230

Geothermal Resources Act (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Geothermal Resources Act (Texas) Geothermal Resources Act (Texas) Geothermal Resources Act (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Texas Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Railroad Commission of Texas The policy of the state of Texas is to encourage the rapid and orderly development of geothermal energy and associated resources. The primary consideration of the development process is to provide a dependable supply of energy in an efficient manner that avoids waste of the energy resources. Secondary considerations will be afforded to the protection of the environment, the protection of correlative rights, and the conservation of

231

Penetration depth scaling for impact into wet granular packings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present experimental measurements of penetration depths for the impact of spheres into wetted granular media. We observe that the penetration depth in the liquid saturated case scales with projectile density, size, and drop height in a fashion consistent with the scaling observed in the dry case, but that penetration depths into saturated packings tend to be smaller. This result suggests that, for the range of impact energies observed, the stopping force is set by static contact forces between grains within the bed, and that the presence of liquid serves, primarily, to enhance these contact forces. The enhancement to the stopping force has a complicated dependence on liquid fraction, accompanied by a change in the drop-height dependence, that must be the consequence of accompanying changes in the conformation of the liquid phase in the interstices.

Theodore A. Brzinski III; Jorin Schug; Kelly Mao; Douglas J. Durian

2015-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

232

METHOD TO TEST ISOTOPIC SEPARATION EFFICIENCY OF PALLADIUM PACKED COLUMNS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The isotopic effect of palladium has been applied in different ways to separate hydrogen isotopes for many years. At Savannah River Site palladium deposited on kieselguhr (Pd/k) is used in a thermal cycling absorption process (TCAP) to purify tritium for over ten years. The need to design columns for different throughputs and the desire to advance the performance of TCAP created the need to evaluate different column designs and packing materials for their separation efficiency. In this work, columns with variations in length, diameter and metal foam use, were tested using an isotope displacement method. A simple computer model was also developed to calculate the number of theoretical separation stages using the test results. The effects of column diameter, metal foam and gas flow rate were identified.

Heung, L; Gregory Staack, G; James Klein, J; William Jacobs, W

2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

233

Transuranic waste: long-term planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Societal concerns for the safe handling and disposal of toxic waste are behind many of the regulations and the control measures in effect today. Transuranic waste, a specific category of toxic (radioactive) waste, serves as a good example of how regulations and controls impact changes in waste processing - and vice versa. As problems would arise with waste processing, changes would be instituted. These changes improved techniques for handling and disposal of transuranic waste, reduced the risk of breached containment, and were usually linked with regulatory changes. Today, however, we face a greater public awareness of and concern for toxic waste control; thus, we must anticipate potential problems and work on resolving them before they can become real problems. System safety analyses are valuable aids in long-term planning for operations involving transuranic as well as other toxic materials. Examples of specific system safety analytical methods demonstrate how problems can be anticipated and resolution initiated in a timely manner having minimal impacts upon allocation of resource and operational goals. 7 refs., 1 fig.

Young, K.C.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Resource descriptions, ontology, and resource discovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Resource discovery systems may assist scientists in the selection of bioinformatics resources suitable to implement scientific workflows. In this paper we address several problems related to resource discovery. They include resource publication formats, resource registration, and syntactic vs. semantic discovery. We analyse the BioMoby registry and present an algorithm that curates the BioMoby hierarchy into an ontology for use in semantic-driven resource discovery.

Zoe Lacroix; Maliha Aziz

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

236

ResourceResource AdequacyAdequacy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resources (diesel generators, etc.) Standby Resources Type 2 Buyback provisions on load Modeled in Post Review final assessment Council Power Review final Power Council Approval 7 #12;

237

Energy Consumption Tools Pack Leandro Fontoura Cupertino, Georges DaCosta,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Consumption Tools Pack Leandro Fontoura Cupertino, Georges DaCosta, Amal Sayah, Jean Consumption Tools Pack 1 / 23 #12;Outline 1 Introduction Motivation Our proposal 2 Energy Consumption Tools Energy Consumption Library Data Acquisition Tool Data Monitoring Tool Energy Profiler 3 Conclusions

Lefèvre, Laurent

238

The Climate Change Action Pack An interactive teaching supplement designed to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;The Climate Change Action Pack An interactive teaching supplement designed to: · Increase the understanding among young Nova Scotians and educators of the science and issues of climate change · Equip Nova at home and in their future workplaces. #12;Climate Change Action Pack printed Mar. 2002 TABLE OF CONTENTS

Gunawardena, Arunika

239

Fast Kinetics of Fe2+ Oxidation in Packed-Bed Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...protein/ml liquid vol of reactor YPlS Yield of product...material was also used for analysis of the total protein...of the packed-bed reactors. Several experimen...effect. The system reliability was evalu- ated with...ion-exchange resin packed-bed reactor by switching the inlet...

Sergei I. Grishin; Olli H. Tuovinen

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

A Novel Cross-Flow Cascade Packed Column Design and Simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Novel Cross-Flow Cascade Packed Column Design and Simulation ... Thus the abundant area for gas flow will decrease gas-phase pressure drop, and it can allow operation at gas velocities above the flooding points of countercurrent packed columns. ...

Fengrong Chen; Rongqi Zhou; Zhanting Duan; Yumei Liu

1999-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste resource pack" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Titanium-Coated Silica Spheres Prepared by Self-Assembly Technique for Use as HPLC Packing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......for Use as HPLC Packing Jin Ge 1 2 Liang Zhao 1 Li-Ren Chen 1 Yan-Ping Shi 1 * * Author to whom...for Use as HPLC Packing Jin Ge1,2, Liang Zhao1, Li-Ren Chen1, and Yan-Ping Shi1,* 1Key Laboratory...dodecyl sulfate (SDS) from Xi'an Chemical Reagent Co......

Jin Ge; Liang Zhao; Li-Ren Chen; Yan-Ping Shi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Monitoring of a RCRA Mixed Waste Management Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since startup of the Savannah River Site (SRS) in 1953, solid radioactive waste materials have been disposed of in a centrally located facility known as the Radioactive Waste Burial Grounds. These burial grounds comprise three distinct disposal sites which include the original set of burial trenches for solid low level radioactive wastes (643-G), the currently operating Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility (643-7G), and the Mixed Waste Management Facility (643-28G) located within 643-7G. The Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) has been used to dispose of various low level radioactive waste materials just as the other portions of the Radioactive Waste Burial Grounds. Some of the waste materials in the MWMF have been classified as mixed waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Because the MWMF contains mixed wastes, a closure plan for the facility was developed and submitted to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) to comply with RCRA requirements. This paper discusses the various aspects of the groundwater monitoring program developed to satisfy regulatory requirements for post-closure care and provides some initial results on groundwater quality.

Gordon, D.E.; Stevens, C.B.; Tuckfield, R.C.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Monitoring of a RCRA Mixed Waste Management Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since startup of the Savannah River Site (SRS) in 1953, solid radioactive waste materials have been disposed of in a centrally located facility known as the Radioactive Waste Burial Grounds. These burial grounds comprise three distinct disposal sites which include the original set of burial trenches for solid low level radioactive wastes (643-G), the currently operating Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility (643-7G), and the Mixed Waste Management Facility (643-28G) located within 643-7G. The Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) has been used to dispose of various low level radioactive waste materials just as the other portions of the Radioactive Waste Burial Grounds. Some of the waste materials in the MWMF have been classified as mixed waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Because the MWMF contains mixed wastes, a closure plan for the facility was developed and submitted to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) to comply with RCRA requirements. This paper discusses the various aspects of the groundwater monitoring program developed to satisfy regulatory requirements for post-closure care and provides some initial results on groundwater quality.

Gordon, D.E.; Stevens, C.B.; Tuckfield, R.C.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

244

Hazardous and Radioactive Mixed Waste  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish hazardous waste management procedures for facilities operated under authority of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (AEA). The procedures will follow. to the extent practicable, regulations issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). Although Department of Energy (DOE) operations conducted under authority other than the AEA are subject to EPA or State regulations conforming with RCRA, facilities administered under the authority of the AEA are not bound by such requirements.

1982-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

245

Recycling of sodium waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recycling of sodium waste ... Methods for handling and recycling a dangerous and costly chemical. ...

Bettina Hubler-Blank; Michael Witt; Herbert W. Roesky

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source special nuclear and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this document. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge. This document has been revised to meet the interim status waste analysis plan requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173 303-300(5). When the final status permit is issued, permit conditions will be incorporated and this document will be revised accordingly.

ELLEFSON, M.D.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

247

Identification of permit and waste acceptance criteria provisions requiring modification for acceptance of commercial mixed waste. National Low-Level Waste Management Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In October 1990, representatives of States and compact regions requested that the US Department of Energy (DOE) explore an agreement with host States and compact regions under which DOE would accept commercial mixed low-level radioactive waste (LLW) at DOE`s own treatment and disposal facilities. A program for DOE management of commercial mixed waste is made potentially more attractive in light of the low commercial mixed waste volumes, high regulatory burdens, public opposition to new disposal sites, and relatively high cost of constructing commercial disposal facilities. Several studies were identified as essential in determining the feasibility of DOE accepting commercial mixed waste for disposal. The purpose of this report is to identify any current or proposed waste acceptance criteria (WAC) or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) provisions that would have to be modified for commercial mixed waste acceptance at specified DOE facilities. Following the introduction, Section 2 of this report (a) provides a background summary of existing and proposed mixed waste disposal facilities at each DOE site, and (b) summarizes the status of any RCRA Part B permit and WAC provisions relating to the disposal of mixed waste, including provisions relating to acceptance of offsite waste. Section 3 provides overall conclusions regarding the current status and permit modifications that must be implemented in order to grant DOE sites authority under their permits to accept commercial mixed waste for disposal. Section 4 contains a list of references.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Resources to reserves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The resource bases and resources of the various energy forms of natural resources have been discussed. It is now opportune to consider the transformation of resources to reserves. This is effected by explorati...

D. C. Ion

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Infectious waste feed system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An infectious waste feed system for comminuting infectious waste and feeding the comminuted waste to a combustor automatically without the need for human intervention. The system includes a receptacle for accepting waste materials. Preferably, the receptacle includes a first and second compartment and a means for sealing the first and second compartments from the atmosphere. A shredder is disposed to comminute waste materials accepted in the receptacle to a predetermined size. A trough is disposed to receive the comminuted waste materials from the shredder. A feeding means is disposed within the trough and is movable in a first and second direction for feeding the comminuted waste materials to a combustor.

Coulthard, E. James (York, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Shortcut computation for the thermal management of a large air-cooled battery pack  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Thermal management is crucial to maintain the performance of large battery packs in electric vehicles. To this end, we present herein a shortcut computational method to rapidly estimate the flow and temperature profiles in a parallel airflow-cooled large battery pack with wedge-shaped plenums for airflow distribution. The method couples a flow resistance network model with a transient heat transfer model to calculate the temperature distribution in a battery pack as influenced by the airflows within and among battery modules in the pack. The effects of the plate angle of the plenums, the minimal plenum width and the battery unit spacing on the airflow and temperature distributions are presented. Additionally, an example of collective parameter adjustment for acceptable temperature uniformity of a battery pack subjected to total volume constraint is given.

Zhongming Liu; Yuxin Wang; Jun Zhang; Zhibin Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Thermodynamics of resource recycling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermodynamics of resource recycling ... The author applies principles of thermodynamics to analyze the efficiency of resource recycling. ...

W. B. Hauserman

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Coolside waste management research. Quarterly report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Twenty-two laboratory columns packed with flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastes from tests of the Coolside Technology were constructed and are being monitored for leaching characteristics at the UK-CAER for approximately 8 months. FGD materials from the four pilot plant runs conducted by Consol in Library PA as well as two composite samples from demonstration-plant runs 1 and 3 conducted by Ohio Edison in the Edgewater Power Plant near Loraine Ohio were included in the investigation. Details of the packing procedure and test matrix have been described in a previous report. Variables investigated in the test matrix include solids packing density (49 and 65 lb/ft{sup 3}), contact with a variable CO{sub 2} atmosphere (0, 2.5, and 5 vol%), the rate and method of water addition (fixed-47 and 94 mL/wk; rain simulation), and prehydration (0, 15, 30, and 45 wt% prehydration water-dry basis).

NONE

1995-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

253

Photovoltaic waste assessment in Italy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract At present, photovoltaics is, after hydro and wind power, the third most important renewable energy source in terms of its capacity to be globally installed; furthermore, for two years in a row, it was the number one new source of electricity generation installed in the European Union. Italy became the second country in the European Union concerning the cumulative installed power of PV (in 2013, the Italian PV cumulative power reached over 17,620MW), which was also the result of the very attractive support policy. In connection with this development, the issue has emerged about the treatment and disposal of photovoltaic waste when the operative time (approximately twenty-thirty years) of the photovoltaic systems ended. The European Union, to address this environmental impact, passed the Directive 2012/19/EU to increase the amount of waste of electrical and electronic equipment in the form of photovoltaic panels that have been appropriately collected and treated to reduce the volume that become disposed. This paper aims to provide an assessment of the potential waste arising in Italy from the use and end-of-life phases of these renewable energy systems in the coming years and their disposal and/or recycling. Based on the lifetime of 25 years of photovoltaic panels, the estimate has been referred to two periods of waste generation (20122038 and 20392050). The importance of managing this flow of waste to enhance the correct disposal of the hazardous substances as well as the importance of the recovery and recycling of valuable resources has also been underlined.

Annarita Paiano

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

255

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and energy are inextricably bound. Energy is consumed and sometimes produced by every form of water resourcesWATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, water resources professionals squarely faced the fact that water

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

256

Fact #823: June 2, 2014 Hybrid Vehicles use more Battery Packs but Plug-in Vehicles use More Battery Capacity  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Of the battery packs used for electrified vehicle powertrains in model year 2013, the greatest number went into conventional hybrid vehicles which use battery packs that average about 1.3 kilowatt...

257

21.04.01.Q0.01 Reporting Fraud, Waste, and Abuse Page 1 of 2 STANDARD ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

21.04.01.Q0.01 Reporting Fraud, Waste, and Abuse Page 1 of 2 STANDARD ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE 21.04.01.Q0.01 Reporting of Fraud, Waste and Abuse Approved January 31, 2012 Next scheduled review: January at Qatar employees who discover fraud, waste or abuse related to University or System resources should

258

Comment on Solid Recovered Fuel: Materials Flow Analysis and Fuel Property Development during the Mechanical Processing of Biodried Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Comment on Solid Recovered Fuel: Materials Flow Analysis and Fuel Property Development during the Mechanical Processing of Biodried Waste ... Validated material flow models of waste treatment systems form a sound basis to evaluate system performance in view of environmental pollution as well as with respect to resource recovery. ... characteristics of refuse-derived fuels (RDF) that are processed from residual household waste by mech. ...

David Laner; Oliver Cencic

2013-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

259

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Hazardous wastes, mixed wastes, and non-hazardous solid wastes are generated, handled, and managed at facilities throughout the DOE complex. DOE Headquarters provides technical assistance and...

260

HIGH-POWER RF DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMFOR THE 8-PACK PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 8-Pack Project at SLAC is a prototype rf system whose goal is to demonstrate the high-power X-band technology developed in the NLC/GLC (Next/Global Linear Collider) program. In its first phase, it has reliably produced a 400 ns rf pulse of over 500 MW using a solidstate modulator, four 11.424 GHz klystrons and a dualmoded SLED-II pulse compressor. In Phase 2, the output power of the system has been delivered into the bunker of the NLCTA (Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator) and divided between several accelerator structures for beam acceleration. The authors describe here the design, cold-test measurements, and processing of this power distribution system. Due to the high power levels and the need for efficiency, overmoded waveguide and components are used. For power transport, the TE{sub 01} mode is used in 7.44 cm and 4.064 cm diameter circular waveguide. Only near the structures is standard WR90 rectangular waveguide employed. Components used to manipulate the rf power include transitional tapers, mode converters, overmoded bends, fractional directional couplers, and hybrids.

Nantista, C

2004-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste resource pack" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities July 24, 2014 9:00AM to 3:30PM EDT U.S....

262

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. - Allentown, PA A microbial reverse electrodialysis...

263

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

(ex: organic Rankine cycle) High installed KW capital Low temperature waste heat (<100C) is not practicable Further efficiency loss in electrolytic conversion to...

264

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. The purpose of the Manual is to catalog those procedural requirements and existing practices that ensure that all DOE elements and contractors continue to manage DOE's radioactive waste in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety, and the environment. Does not cancel other directives.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

265

Online Legal Resources | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Online Legal Resources Online Legal Resources Online Legal Resources Legislative Documents US Code Public and Private Laws Congressional Bills Congressional Record Congressional Hearings Appropriations Legislation Regulatory Documents Code of Federal Regulations Federal Register DOE Safety and Employee Protection Authorities Presidential Documents Executive Orders More Legal Research Resources Energy Law Net Legal Citation Style Guide Nuclear Regulatory Legislation Open CRS Public Library of Law Treaties U.S. Code Classification Tables U.S. Congressional Documents and Debates 1774-1875 Compilation of Laws Communications Law Consumer Protection Law Environmental Law Volume 1 Environmental Law Volume 2 Food, Drug, And Related Law Health Law Nuclear Energy And Radioactive Waste Selected Energy-Related Legislation: Electricity

266

Similar Energetic Contributions of Packing in the Core of Membrane and Water-Soluble Proteins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major driving force for water-soluble protein folding is the hydrophobic effect, but membrane proteins cannot make use of this stabilizing contribution in the apolar core of the bilayer. It has been proposed that membrane proteins compensate by packing more efficiently. We therefore investigated packing contributions experimentally by observing the energetic and structural consequences of cavity creating mutations in the core of a membrane protein. We observed little difference in the packing energetics of water and membrane soluble proteins. Our results imply that other mechanisms are employed to stabilize the structure of membrane proteins.

Joh, Nathan H.; Oberai, Amit; Yang, Duan; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Bowie, James U.; (UCLA)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

Eco-efficient waste glass recycling: Integrated waste management and green product development through LCA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new eco-efficient recycling route for post-consumer waste glass was implemented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrated waste management and industrial production are crucial to green products. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most of the waste glass rejects are sent back to the glass industry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recovered co-products give more environmental gains than does avoided landfill. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy intensive recycling must be limited to waste that cannot be closed-loop recycled. - Abstract: As part of the EU Life + NOVEDI project, a new eco-efficient recycling route has been implemented to maximise resources and energy recovery from post-consumer waste glass, through integrated waste management and industrial production. Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been used to identify engineering solutions to sustainability during the development of green building products. The new process and the related LCA are framed within a meaningful case of industrial symbiosis, where multiple waste streams are utilised in a multi-output industrial process. The input is a mix of rejected waste glass from conventional container glass recycling and waste special glass such as monitor glass, bulbs and glass fibres. The green building product is a recycled foam glass (RFG) to be used in high efficiency thermally insulating and lightweight concrete. The environmental gains have been contrasted against induced impacts and improvements have been proposed. Recovered co-products, such as glass fragments/powders, plastics and metals, correspond to environmental gains that are higher than those related to landfill avoidance, whereas the latter is cancelled due to increased transportation distances. In accordance to an eco-efficiency principle, it has been highlighted that recourse to highly energy intensive recycling should be limited to waste that cannot be closed-loop recycled.

Blengini, Gian Andrea, E-mail: blengini@polito.it [DISPEA - Department of Production Systems and Business Economics, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); CNR-IGAG, Institute of Environmental Geology and Geo-Engineering, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Busto, Mirko, E-mail: mirko.busto@polito.it [DISPEA - Department of Production Systems and Business Economics, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Fantoni, Moris, E-mail: moris.fantoni@polito.it [DITAG - Department of Land, Environment and Geo-Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Fino, Debora, E-mail: debora.fino@polito.it [DISMIC - Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

268

Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Support Task Order Modified | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Waste Treatment Plant Support Task Order Modified Waste Treatment Plant Support Task Order Modified Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Support Task Order Modified March 11, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Lynette Chafin, 513-246-0461 Lynette.Chafin@emcbc.doe.gov Cincinnati - The Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a modification to a task order to Aspen Resources Limited, Inc. of Boulder, Colorado for support of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at the Hanford Site. The modification increased the value of the task order to $1.6 million from $833,499. The task order modification has a one-year performance period and two one-year option periods. The Task Order was awarded under an Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity (ID/IQ) master Contract. Aspen Resources Limited, Inc. is a small-disadvantaged business under the Small Business Administration's

269

A model for a national low level waste program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A national program for the management of low level waste is essential to the success of environmental clean-up, decontamination and decommissioning, current operations and future missions. The value of a national program is recognized through procedural consistency and a shared set of resources. A national program requires a clear waste definition and an understanding of waste characteristics matched against available and proposed disposal options. A national program requires the development and implementation of standards and procedures for implementing the waste hierarchy, with a specitic emphasis on waste avoidance, minimization and recycling. It requires a common set of objectives for waste characterization based on the disposal facility's waste acceptance criteria, regulatory and license requirements and performance assessments. Finally, a national waste certification program is required to ensure compliance. To facilitate and enhance the national program, a centralized generator services organization, tasked with providing technical services to the generators on behalf of the national program, is necessary. These subject matter experts are the interface between the generating sites and the disposal facility(s). They provide an invaluable service to the generating organizations through their involvement in waste planning prior to waste generation and through championing implementation of the waste hierarchy. Through their interface, national treatment and transportation services are optimized and new business opportunities are identified. This national model is based on extensive experience in the development and on-going management of a national transuranic waste program and management of the national repository, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The Low Level Program at the Savannah River Site also successfully developed and implemented the waste hierarchy, waste certification and waste generator services concepts presented below. The Savannah River Site services over forty generators and has historically managed over 12,000 cubic meters of low level waste annually. The results of the waste minimization program at the site resulted in over 900 initiatives, avoiding over 220,000 cubic meters of waste for a life cycle cost savings of $275 million. At the Los Alamos National Laboratory, the low level waste program services over 20 major generators and several hundred smaller generators that produce over 4,000 cubic meters of low level waste annually. The Los Alamos National Laboratory low level waste program utilizes both on-site and off-site disposal capabilities. Off-site disposal requires the implementation of certification requirements to utilize both federal and commercial options. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is the US Department of Energy's first deep geological repository for the permanent disposal of Transuanic waste. Transuranic waste was generated and retrievably stored at 39 sites across the US. Transuranic waste is defined as waste with a radionuclide concentration equal to or greater than 100 nCi/g consisting of radionuclides with half-lives greater than 20 years and with an atomic mass greater than uranium. Combining the lessons learned from the national transuranic waste program, the successful low level waste program at Savannah River Site and the experience of off-site disposal options at Los Alamos National Laboratory provides the framework and basis for developing a viable national strategy for managing low level waste.

Blankenhorn, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Waste minimization for commercial radioactive materials users generating low-level radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this document is to provide a resource for all states and compact regions interested in promoting the minimization of low-level radioactive waste (LLW). This project was initiated by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and Massachusetts waste streams have been used as examples; however, the methods of analysis presented here are applicable to similar waste streams generated elsewhere. This document is a guide for states/compact regions to use in developing a system to evaluate and prioritize various waste minimization techniques in order to encourage individual radioactive materials users (LLW generators) to consider these techniques in their own independent evaluations. This review discusses the application of specific waste minimization techniques to waste streams characteristic of three categories of radioactive materials users: (1) industrial operations using radioactive materials in the manufacture of commercial products, (2) health care institutions, including hospitals and clinics, and (3) educational and research institutions. Massachusetts waste stream characterization data from key radioactive materials users in each category are used to illustrate the applicability of various minimization techniques. The utility group is not included because extensive information specific to this category of LLW generators is available in the literature.

Fischer, D.K.; Gitt, M.; Williams, G.A.; Branch, S. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Otis, M.D.; McKenzie-Carter, M.A.; Schurman, D.L. (Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Waste minimization for commercial radioactive materials users generating low-level radioactive waste. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this document is to provide a resource for all states and compact regions interested in promoting the minimization of low-level radioactive waste (LLW). This project was initiated by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and Massachusetts waste streams have been used as examples; however, the methods of analysis presented here are applicable to similar waste streams generated elsewhere. This document is a guide for states/compact regions to use in developing a system to evaluate and prioritize various waste minimization techniques in order to encourage individual radioactive materials users (LLW generators) to consider these techniques in their own independent evaluations. This review discusses the application of specific waste minimization techniques to waste streams characteristic of three categories of radioactive materials users: (1) industrial operations using radioactive materials in the manufacture of commercial products, (2) health care institutions, including hospitals and clinics, and (3) educational and research institutions. Massachusetts waste stream characterization data from key radioactive materials users in each category are used to illustrate the applicability of various minimization techniques. The utility group is not included because extensive information specific to this category of LLW generators is available in the literature.

Fischer, D.K.; Gitt, M.; Williams, G.A.; Branch, S. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Otis, M.D.; McKenzie-Carter, M.A.; Schurman, D.L. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is collected by the RSO. 2. Dry radioactive waste must be segregated by isotope. 3. Liquid radioactive waste must be separated by isotope. 4. Liquid frequently and change them if contaminated. 5. Use radioactive waste container to collect the waste. 6. Check

Jia, Songtao

273

Intrepid Technology and Resources Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Intrepid Technology and Resources Inc Intrepid Technology and Resources Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Intrepid Technology and Resources Inc Place Idaho Falls, Idaho Zip 83402 Sector Biomass Product The company specialises in development of biomass/biofuel plants, primarily biogas projects(methane from processing animal waste). References Intrepid Technology and Resources Inc[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Intrepid Technology and Resources Inc is a company located in Idaho Falls, Idaho . References ↑ "Intrepid Technology and Resources Inc" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Intrepid_Technology_and_Resources_Inc&oldid=347071" Categories:

274

An Embarrassment Of Riches- Canada'S Energy Supply Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Embarrassment Of Riches- Canada'S Energy Supply Resources Embarrassment Of Riches- Canada'S Energy Supply Resources Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Embarrassment Of Riches- Canada'S Energy Supply Resources Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: We review the size and availability of Canada's energy supply resources, both non-renewable and renewable. Following a brief discussion of the energy fuel-mix in Canada from 1870 to 1984, and the current provincial breakdown of energy production and use, we provide a source-by-source review of energy supply resources, including oil, natural gas, coal, uranium, peat, wood, agricultural and municipal waste, and also hydro-electric, tidal, geothermal, wind and solar energy. An attempt is made to assess these resources in terms of resource base (the physical

275

Building Technologies Office: Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources to someone by Resources to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Resources on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Resources on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Resources on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Resources on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Resources on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Resources on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Challenge Home Partner Log In Become a Partner Criteria Partner Locator Resources Housing Innovation Awards Events Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals Technology Research, Standards, & Codes

276

Hanford site waste minimization and pollution prevention awareness program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan documents the requirements of the Hanford Site Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention (WMin/P2) Program. The plan specifies requirements for Hanford contractors to prevent pollution from entering the environment, to conserve resources and energy, and to reduce the quantity and toxicity of hazardous, radioactive, mixed, and sanitary waste generated at Hanford. The Pollution Prevention Awareness Program required by DOE 5400.1 (DOE 1988A) is included in the Hanford WMin/P2 Program.

Kirkendall, J.R.

1996-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

277

2401-W Waste storage building closure plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan describes the performance standards met and closure activities conducted to achieve clean closure of the 2401-W Waste Storage Building (2401-W) (Figure I). In August 1998, after the last waste container was removed from 2401-W, the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) notified Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) in writing that the 2401-W would no longer receive waste and would be closed as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) unit (98-EAP-475). Pursuant to this notification, closure activities were conducted, as described in this plan, in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 and completed on February 9, 1999. Ecology witnessed the closure activities. Consistent with clean closure, no postclosure activities will be necessary. Because 2401-W is a portion of the Central Waste Complex (CWC), these closure activities become the basis for removing this building from the CWC TSD unit boundary. The 2401-W is a pre-engineered steel building with a sealed concrete floor and a 15.2-centimeter concrete curb around the perimeter of the floor. This building operated from April 1988 until August 1998 storing non-liquid containerized mixed waste. All waste storage occurred indoors. No potential existed for 2401-W operations to have impacted soil. A review of operating records and interviews with cognizant operations personnel indicated that no waste spills occurred in this building (Appendix A). After all waste containers were removed, a radiation survey of the 2401-W floor for radiological release of the building was performed December 17, 1998, which identified no radiological contamination (Appendix B).

LUKE, S.M.

1999-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from tank waste. * Decreases the volume of water to create room in double-shell tanks, allowing them to accept waste from noncompliant single- shell tanks. * Treats up to 1...

279

Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

trucks for scale. The DSTs have limited capacity and are aging. Maintaining these tanks is important to ensure that waste is ready to supply the Waste Treatment Plant. The...

280

Hazardous Waste Management (Oklahoma)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article states regulations for the disposal of hazardous waste. It also provides information about permit requirements for the transport, treatment and storage of such waste. It also mentions...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste resource pack" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Nuclear waste solids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Glass and polycrystalline materials for high-level radioactive waste immobilization are discussed. Borosilicate glass has been selected as the waste form for defence high-level radwaste in the US. Since releas...

L. L. Hench; D. E. Clark; A. B. Harker

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Data collection and analysis in support of the US Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement waste management alternatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is a report on work in progress in support of the US Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has been providing technical support in the areas of waste characterization; waste treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facility descriptions (developed jointly with EG&G, Idaho); analysis of potential accidents at TSD facilities; and waste transportation risk assessment. Support efforts encompass the following six waste types: high-level waste; transuranic waste; low-level waste; greater-than Class-C low-level waste; low-level mixed waste; and hazardous waste. Treatment, storage, and disposal facility descriptions cover the following parameters: resource requirements, cost, staffing, capacity, by-products, and effluents. The variations in these parameters effected by the proposed alternatives are estimated. Selection of proposed initiating events, characterization of source terms, and descriptions of scenarios are covered in the accident analysis portion of the ANL work. The transportation risk assessment portion includes both off-site and on-site transportation of both radioactive and hazardous wastes for all waste management alternatives under consideration in the EM PEIS.

Coley, R.F.; Avci, H.I.; Habegger, L.J.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

TRU Waste Management Program cost/schedule optimization analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cost/schedule optimization task is a necessary function to insure that program goals and plans are optimized from a cost and schedule aspect. Results of this study will offer DOE information with which it can establish, within institutional constraints, the most efficient program for the long-term management and disposal of contact handled transuranic waste (CH-TRU). To this end, a comprehensive review of program cost/schedule tradeoffs has been made, to identify any major cost saving opportunities that may be realized by modification of current program plans. It was decided that all promising scenarios would be explored, and institutional limitations to implementation would be described. Since a virtually limitless number of possible scenarios can be envisioned, it was necessary to distill these possibilities into a manageable number of alternatives. The resultant scenarios were described in the cost/schedule strategy and work plan document. Each scenario was compared with the base case: waste processing at the originating site; transport of CH-TRU wastes in TRUPACT; shipment of drums in 6-Packs; 25 year stored waste workoff; WIPP operational 10/88, with all sites shipping to WIPP beginning 10/88; and no processing at WIPP. Major savings were identified in two alternate scenarios: centralize waste processing at INEL and eliminate rail shipment of TRUPACT. No attempt was made to calculate savings due to combination of scenarios. 1 ref., 5 figs., 1 tab. (MHB)

Detamore, J.A. (Rockwell International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Joint Integration Office); Raudenbush, M.H.; Wolaver, R.W.; Hastings, G.A. (Stoller (S.M.) Corp., Boulder, CO (United States))

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Modular Approach for Continuous Cell-Level Balancing to Improve Performance of Large Battery Packs: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy storage systems require battery cell balancing circuits to avoid divergence of cell state of charge (SOC). A modular approach based on distributed continuous cell-level control is presented that extends the balancing function to higher level pack performance objectives such as improving power capability and increasing pack lifetime. This is achieved by adding DC-DC converters in parallel with cells and using state estimation and control to autonomously bias individual cell SOC and SOC range, forcing healthier cells to be cycled deeper than weaker cells. The result is a pack with improved degradation characteristics and extended lifetime. The modular architecture and control concepts are developed and hardware results are demonstrated for a 91.2-Wh battery pack consisting of four series Li-ion battery cells and four dual active bridge (DAB) bypass DC-DC converters.

Muneed ur Rehman, M.; Evzelman, M.; Hathaway, K.; Zane, R.; Plett, G. L.; Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Maksimovic, D.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Mixed Convection in a Driven Cavity Packed with Porous Medium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The problem of mixed convection in a driven cavity packed with porous medium is studied with lattice Boltzmann method. A lattice Boltzmann model for incompressible flow in porous media and another thermal lattice

Zhenhua Chai; Zhaoli Guo; Baochang Shi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Experimental Investigation of Chemical-Looping Combustion in Packed Beds: A Parametric Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently a novel reactor concept for chemical-looping combustion (CLC) has been proposed exploiting dynamically operated packed beds. In this work, an experimental parametric study on this reactor concept has been carried out. The effects of operating ...

S. Noorman; F. Gallucci; M. van Sint Annaland; J. A. M. Kuipers

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

287

Electrostatics and packing in biomolecules : accounting for conformational change in protein folding and binding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The role of electrostatics and packing in protein folding and molecular association was assessed in different biomolecular systems. A continuum electrostatic model was applied to long-range electrostatic effects in the ...

Caravella, Justin Andrew, 1974-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Measuring Frac-pack Conductivity at Reservoir Temperature and High Closure Stress  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fractures packed with high proppant concentrations. Understanding the behavior of the fracture fluid and proppant is critical to pump such a job successfully and to ensure long term productivity from the fracture. A series of laboratory experiments have been...

Fernandes, Preston X.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

289

NREL: Renewable Resource Data Center - Biomass Resource Data  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Data The following biomass resource data collections can be found in the Renewable Resource Data Center (RReDC). Current Biomass Resource Supply An estimate of biomass resources...

290

Environmental Protection and Natural Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

implications (the burning of solid waste, and as breedingeroding areas, the burning of solid waste, aggregate mining

Snchez-Rodrguez, Roberto; Mumme, Stephen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Waste disposal package  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This is a claim for a waste disposal package including an inner or primary canister for containing hazardous and/or radioactive wastes. The primary canister is encapsulated by an outer or secondary barrier formed of a porous ceramic material to control ingress of water to the canister and the release rate of wastes upon breach on the canister. 4 figs.

Smith, M.J.

1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

292

Process Knowledge Summary Report for Materials and Fuels Complex Contact-Handled Transuranic Debris Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Process Knowledge Summary Report summarizes the information collected to satisfy the transportation and waste acceptance requirements for the transfer of transuranic (TRU) waste between the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP). The information collected includes documentation that addresses the requirements for AMWTP and the applicable portion of their Resource Conservation and Recovery Act permits for receipt and treatment of TRU debris waste in AMWTP. This report has been prepared for contact-handled TRU debris waste generated by the Idaho National Laboratory at MFC. The TRU debris waste will be shipped to AMWTP for purposes of supercompaction. This Process Knowledge Summary Report includes information regarding, but not limited to, the generation process, the physical form, radiological characteristics, and chemical contaminants of the TRU debris waste, prohibited items, and packaging configuration. This report, along with the referenced supporting documents, will create a defensible and auditable record for waste originating from MFC.

R. P. Grant; P. J. Crane; S. Butler; M. A. Henry

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Storage characteristics of fresh fish packed in modified gas atmospheres containing carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STORAGE CHARACTERISTICS OF FRESH FISH PACKED IN MODIFIED GAS ATMOSPHERES CONTAINING CARBON DIOXIDE A Thesis by MICHEL LANNELONGUE FAVRE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1980 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology STORAGE CHARACTERISTICS OF FRESH FISH PACKED IN MODIFIED GAS ATMOSPHERES CONTAINING CARBON DIOXIDE A Thesis by MICHEL LANNELONGUE FAVRE Approved as to style...

Lannelongue-Favre, Michel

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

294

The Scaleup of Structured Packing from Distillation Pilot Plant Testing to Commercial Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

design bases for a distillation train. The actual pilot plant testing involved a different structured packing type and blocked out operations to simulate a large number of theoretical stages. The pilot plant results verified the thermodynamic data... high efficiency per unit height of this structured packing and its excellent sc~leup characteristics. To pilot the large number of theoretical stages, it was decided to divide the column into two sections and run each section in a blocked out...

Berven, O. J.; Ulowetz, M. A.

295

Investigation of the thermal conductivity of unconsolidated sand packs containing oil, water, and gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVESTIGATION OF THE THERNAL CONDUCTIVITY OF UNCONSOLIDATED SAND PACKS CONTAINING OIL, WATER, AND GAS A Thesis David E. Gore Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Nechanical College oi' Texas in Partial fulfillment.... EXPERIMENTAL EQUIPMENT AND PROCEDURE All tests were performed on unconsolidated sand packs containing either one, two, or three saturating fluids, Phys- ical properties of the sand and saturating fluids are shown in Tables I and II in the Appendix...

Gore, David Eugene

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

296

Clean Cities: Information Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Information Resources Information Resources Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Clean Cities: Information Resources to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Information Resources on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Information Resources on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Information Resources on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Information Resources on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Information Resources on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Information Resources on AddThis.com... Publications Technical Assistance Information Resources Learn about Clean Cities by exploring these information resources. Publications View Clean Cities-branded publications or search for publications about alternative fuels and vehicles. Technical Assistance Learn about technical assistance available to help organizations overcome

297

Hanford Site Hazardous waste determination report for transuranic debris waste streams NPFPDL1A, NPFPDL1B, NPFPDL1C and NPFPDL1D  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Hazardous Waste Determination Report is intended to satisfy the terms of a Memorandum of Agreement (Agreement signed on June 16, 1999) between the U.S. Department of Energy and the New Mexico Environment Department. The Agreement pertains to the exchange of information before a final decision is made on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant application for a permit under the ''New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act''. The Agreement will terminate upon the effective date of a final ''New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act'' permit for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. In keeping with the principles and terms of the Agreement, this report describes the waste stream data and information compilation process, and the physical and chemical analyses that the U.S. Department of Energy has performed on selected containers of transuranic debris waste to confirm that the waste is nonhazardous (non-mixed). This also summarizes the testing and analytical results that support the conclusion that the selected transuranic debris waste is not hazardous and thus, not subject to regulation under the ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' or the ''New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act''. This report will be submitted to the New Mexico Environment Department no later than 45 days before the first shipment of waste from the Hanford Site to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, unless the parties mutually agree in writing to a shorter time. The 52 containers of transuranic debris waste addressed in this report were generated, packaged, and placed into storage between 1995 and 1997. Based on reviews of administrative documents, operating procedures, waste records, generator certifications, and personnel interviews, this transuranic debris waste was determined to be nonhazardous. This determination is supported by the data derived from nondestructive examination, confirmatory visual examination, and the results of container headspace gas sampling and analysis. Therefore, it is concluded that this transuranic debris waste, which consists of 52 containers from waste streams NPFPDLIA, NPFPDLIB, NPFPDLIC, and NPFPDLID, is not hazardous waste, and no hazardous waste numbers specified in Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 261, have been assigned. Accordingly, the 52 containers of transuranic debris waste addressed in this report meet the requirements for transuranic waste as defined by the Department of Energy Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The 52 containers are acceptable for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as nonhazardous transuranic waste.

WINTERHALDER, J.A.

1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

298

Taking the Waste Out of Wastewater for Human Water Security and Ecosystem Sustainability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...than finding infrastructure solutions to water scarcity...freshwater resources: Soft-path solutions for the 21st century . Science...Horvath A. , Energy and air emission effects of water...Waste Disposal, Fluid Water Pollution Water Purification Water Quality...

Stanley B. Grant; Jean-Daniel Saphores; David L. Feldman; Andrew J. Hamilton; Tim D. Fletcher; Perran L. M. Cook; Michael Stewardson; Brett F. Sanders; Lisa A. Levin; Richard F. Ambrose; Ana Deletic; Rebekah Brown; Sunny C. Jiang; Diego Rosso; William J. Cooper; Ivan Marusic

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

299

Packing-Based Approximation Algorithm for the k-Set Cover Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a packing-based approximation algorithm for the $k$-Set Cover problem. We introduce a new local search-based $k$-set packing heuristic, and call it Restricted $k$-Set Packing. We analyze its tight approximation ratio via a complicated combinatorial argument. Equipped with the Restricted $k$-Set Packing algorithm, our $k$-Set Cover algorithm is composed of the $k$-Set Packing heuristic \\cite{schrijver} for $k\\geq 7$, Restricted $k$-Set Packing for $k=6,5,4$ and the semi-local $(2,1)$-improvement \\cite{furer} for 3-Set Cover. We show that our algorithm obtains a tight approximation ratio of $H_k-0.6402+\\Theta(\\frac{1}{k})$, where $H_k$ is the $k$-th harmonic number. For small $k$, our results are 1.8667 for $k=6$, 1.7333 for $k=5$ and 1.5208 for $k=4$. Our algorithm improves the currently best approximation ratio for the $k$-Set Cover problem of any $k\\geq 4$.

Furer, Martin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Effect of packing material on methane activation in a dielectric barrier discharge reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conversion of methane is measured in a planar-type dielectric barrier discharge reactor using ?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (sphere), ?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (sphere), and ?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (1620 mesh). Investigations on the surface properties and shape of the three packing materials clearly indicate that methane activation is considerably affected by the material used. Capacitances inside the discharge gap are estimated from chargevoltage plots, and a comparison of the generated and transferred charges for different packing conditions show that the difference in surface properties between ?- and ?-phase Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} affects the discharge characteristics. Moreover, all packing conditions show different charge characteristics that are related to the electron density. Finally, the packing material's shape affects the local electron temperature, which is strongly related to methane conversion. The combined results indicate that both microscale and macroscale variations in a packing material affect the discharge characteristics, and a packing material should be considered carefully for effective methane activation.

Jo, Sungkwon; Hoon Lee, Dae; Seok Kang, Woo; Song, Young-Hoon [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, 156 Gajeongbuk-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, 156 Gajeongbuk-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste resource pack" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Solid Waste Management (South Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

South Dakota) South Dakota) Solid Waste Management (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources This statute contains provisions for solid waste management systems, groundwater monitoring, liability for pollution, permitting, inspections, and provisions for waste reduction and recycling programs

302

Overcoming mixed waste management obstacles - A company wide approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dual regulation of mixed waste by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Environmental Protection Agency has significantly complicated the treatment, storage and disposal of this waste. Because of the limited treatment and disposal options available, facilities generating mixed waste are also being forced to acquire storage permits to meet requirements associated with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Due to the burdens imposed by the regulatory climate, Entergy Operations has undertaken a proactive approach to managing its mixed waste. Their approach is company wide and simplistic in nature. Utilizing the peer groups to develop strategies and a company wide procedure for guidance on mixed waste activities, they have focused on areas where they have the most control and can achieve the greatest benefits from their efforts. A key aspect of the program includes training and employee awareness regarding mixed waste minimization practices. In addition, Entergy Operations is optimizing the implementation of regulatory provisions that facilitate more flexible management practices for mixed waste. This presentation focuses on the team approach to developing mixed waste managements programs and the utilization of innovative thinking and planning to minimize the regulatory burdens. It will also describe management practices and philosophies that have provided more flexibility in implementing a safe and effective company wide mixed waste management program.

Buckley, R.N. [Entergy Operations, Inc., Jackson, MS (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Identifying Mixed Chemical and Radioactive Waste Mixed waste is: any waste material containing both radioactive materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identifying Mixed Chemical and Radioactive Waste Mixed waste is: any waste material containing both as noted on the list, you do not have a mixed waste and it may be managed as a normal radioactive waste radioactive waste after initially dating the container, the hold for decay time is extended, but you cannot

Straight, Aaron

304

Information Resources - EERE Commercialization Office  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Information Resources Site Map Printable Version Share this resource National Laboratories Information Resources Here you will find various informational resources related to the...

305

Georgia Comprehensive Solid Waste Management Act of 1990 (Georgia) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Georgia Comprehensive Solid Waste Management Act of 1990 (Georgia) Georgia Comprehensive Solid Waste Management Act of 1990 (Georgia) Georgia Comprehensive Solid Waste Management Act of 1990 (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Georgia Comprehensive Solid Waste Management Act (SWMA) of 1990 was implemented in order to improve solid waste management procedures,

306

Waste management policy revisions: lessons learned from the Katrina disaster  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main objective of this paper is to identify debris and waste management policies that need to be changed based on the lessons learned from Hurricane Katrina. Policy issues addressed include fragmented jurisdictional problems, issues related to types of debris, burning of house hold debris, wood infestation with Formosan termites and banning of yard wastes from landfills. Current practices and trends in the building material waste management following disasters are examined from a building life cycle standpoint or cradle to cradle concept. Completing the proper planning before the disaster is critical. Having a plan in place can allow for maximum, integrated recycling, resource optimisation, waste reduction and deconstruction. Examination of the waste management hierarchy and life cycle management of material is used to improve the understanding of reuse and recycle opportunities. Based on the lessons learnt from Hurricane Katrina proposed changes in debris management policy following natural disasters.

William E. Roper

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Management of radioactive waste from nuclear power plants: An overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nuclear power industry, which accounts for about 20% of the total electricity supply, is a vital part of the nation`s energy resource. While it generates approximately one-third of the commercial low-level radioactive waste produced in the country, it has achieved one of the most successful examples in waste minimization. On the other hand, progress on development of new disposal facilities by the state compacts is currently stalled. The milestones have been repeatedly postponed, and the various Acts passed by Congress on nuclear waste disposal have not accomplished what they were intended to do. With dwindling access to waste disposal sites and with escalating disposal costs, the power plant utilities are forced to store wastes onsite as an interim measure. However, such temporary measures are not a permanent solution. A national will is sorely needed to break out of the current impasse.

Devgun, J.S.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Resources | Jefferson Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources Resources Machine Control Center Display Jefferson Lab's accelerator is operated from the Machine Control Center. The MCC features a full-wall display that allows...

309

Ombuds Self Help Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Self Help Resources Ombuds Self Help Resources Committed to the fair and equitable treatment of all employees, contractors, and persons doing business with the Laboratory. Contact...

310

Resources | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Filter by Audience Filter by Resource Type Solar Powering America supports solar energy use for a variety of stakeholders in the United States. Here you will find resources...

311

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07. Admin Chg 2, dated 6-8-11, cancels DOE M 435.1-1 Chg 1.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

312

Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:25am Addthis Photo of two hands cupping wood chips pouring from a green dispenser. Biomass uses agriculture and forest residues to create energy. This page provides a brief overview of biomass energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply biomass within the Federal sector. Overview Biomass energy is fuel, heat, or electricity produced from organic materials such as plants, residues, and waste. These organic materials span several sources, including agriculture, forestry, primary and secondary mill residues, urban waste, landfill gases, wastewater treatment plants, and dedicated energy crops. Biomass energy takes many forms and can have a wide variety of applications

313

It Just Keeps Getting Better-Tru Waste Inventory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) opened on March 26, 1999, becoming the nation's first deep geologic repository for the permanent disposal of defense-generated transuranic (TRU) waste. In May 1998, the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) certified WIPP and re-certified WIPP in March 2006. The knowledge of TRU waste inventory is fundamental to packaging, transportation, disposal strategies, resource allocation, and is also imperative when working in a regulatory framework. TRU waste inventory data are used to define the waste that will fill the WIPP repository in terms of volume, radionuclides, waste material parameters, other chemical components, and to model the impact of the waste on the performance of the WIPP over a 10,000-year evolution. The data that pertain to TRU waste is defined in the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA), as '..waste containing more that 100 nanocuries of alpha-emitting transuranic isotopes per gram of waste, with half-lives greater than 20 years..' Defining TRU waste further, the wastes are classified as either contact-handled (CH) or remote-handled (RH) TRU waste, depending on the dose rate at the surface of the waste container. CH TRU wastes are packaged with an external surface dose rate not greater than 200 milli-rem (mrem) per hour, while RH TRU wastes are packaged with an external surface dose rate of 200 mrem per hour or greater. The Los Alamos National Laboratory-Carlsbad Operations (LANL-CO) Inventory Team has developed a powerful new database, the Comprehensive Inventory Database (CID), to maintain the TRU waste inventory information. The CID is intended to replace the Transuranic Waste Baseline Inventory Database (TWBID), Revision 2.1, as the central inventory information repository for tracking all existing and potential (TRU) waste generated across the Department of Energy (DOE) TRU waste complex. It is also the source for information submitted for the Annual TRU Waste Inventory Reports some of which will be used in future Compliance Re-certification Applications (CRAs) for the WIPP. Currently, the DOE is preparing for the second re-certification, CRA-2009. The CID contains comprehensive TRU waste inventory that is consistent, relevant, and easily accessible to support DOE needs, not only the CRAs and performance assessments, but also waste management planning activities and other regulatory needs (e.g., National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) analyses). The comprehensive inventory contains information obtained via inventory updates and approved acceptable knowledge (AK) characterization information to ensure inventory data integrity is maintained and the inventory is current. The TRU waste inventory is maintained in the CID under configuration management as defined in the LANL-CO Quality Assurance Program. The CID was developed using Microsoft{sup TM} Access Data Project{sup TM} (ADP) technology with a Microsoft SQL Server{sup TM} back end. The CID is user friendly, contains more fields, provides for easy upload of data, and has the capability to generate fully qualified data reports. To go along with the new database, the LANL-CO Inventory Team has developed an improved data collection/screening process and has excellent communications with the TRU waste site personnel. WIPP has now received over 6,000 shipments, emplaced over 50,000 cubic meters of CH waste, and successfully completed one re-certification. With a new robust qualified database, the CID, to maintain the inventory information, the TRU waste inventory information is continuously improving in quality, accuracy, and usability (better). (authors)

Lott, S.; Crawford, B.; McInroy, W.; Van Soest, G.; McTaggart, J.; Guerin, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory-Carlsbad Operations, Carlsbad, NM (United States); Patterson, R. [U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad, Field Office, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) fact sheet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pursuant to the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as amended (42 USC 6901, et seq.), and the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act (Section 74-4-1 et seq., NMSA 1978), Permit is issued to the owner and operator of the US DOE, WIPP site (hereafter called the Permittee(s)) to operate a hazardous waste storage facility consisting of a container storage unit (Waste Handling Building) and two Subpart X miscellaneous below-ground storage units (Bin Scale Test Rooms 1 and 3), all are located at the above location. The Permittee must comply with all terms and conditions of this Permit. This Permit consists of the conditions contained herein, including the attachments. Applicable regulations cited are the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Management Regulations, as amended 1992 (HWMR-7), the regulations that are in effect on the date of permit issuance. This Permit shall become effective upon issuance by the Secretary of the New Mexico Environment Department and shall be in effect for a period of ten (10) years from issuance. This Permit is also based on the assumption that all information contained in the Permit application and the administrative record is accurate and that the activity will be conducted as specified in the application and the administrative record. The Permit application consists of Revision 3, as well as associated attachments and clarifying information submitted on January 25, 1993, and May 17, 1993.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda More Documents &...

316

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security More Documents &...

317

Tank Waste and Waste Processing | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing The Defense Waste Processing Facility set a record by producing 267 canisters filled with glassified waste in a year. New bubbler technology and other enhancements will increase canister production in the future. The Defense Waste Processing Facility set a record by producing 267 canisters filled with glassified waste in a year. New bubbler technology and other enhancements will increase canister production in the future. A Savannah River Remediation employee uses a manipulator located inside a shielded enclosure at the Defense Waste Processing Facility where the melter is pouring molten glass inside a canister. A Savannah River Remediation employee uses a manipulator located inside a

318

An Alternative to Performing Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Container Headspace Gas Sampling and Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is operating under a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) for contact-handled (CH) transuranic (TRU) waste. The HWFP contains limitations on allowable emissions from waste disposed in the underground. This environmental performance standard imposed on the WIPP consists of limiting volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from emplaced waste to ensure protection of human health and the environment. The standard is currently met by tracking individual waste container headspace gas concentrations, which are determined by headspace gas sampling and analysis of CH TRU waste containers. The WIPP is seeking a HWFP modification to allow the disposal of remote-handled (RH) TRU waste. Because RH TRU waste is limited to approximately 5% of the waste volume and is emplaced in the disposal room walls, it is possible to bound the potential RH TRU waste contribution to VOC emissions using conservative upper bounds. These conservative upper bounds were developed as an alternative to RH TRU waste canister headspace gas sampling and analysis. The methodology used to perform the calculations used to evaluate VOC emissions from emplaced RH TRU waste canisters applied the same equations as those used to evaluate VOC emissions in the original HWFP application.

Spangler, L. R.; Djordjevic, S. M.; Kehrman, R. F.; Most, W. A.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

319

Shear thickening and jamming in densely packed suspensions of different particle shapes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigated the effects of particle shape on shear thickening in densely packed suspensions. Rods of different aspect ratios and non-convex hooked rods were fabricated. Viscosity curves and normal stresses were measured using a rheometer for a wide range of packing fractions for each shape. Suspensions of each shape exhibit qualitatively similar Discontinuous Shear Thickening. The logarithmic slope of the stress/shear-rate relation increases dramatically with packing fraction and diverges at a critical packing fraction phi_c which depends on particle shape. The packing fraction dependence of the viscosity curves for different convex shapes can be collapsed when the packing fraction is normalized by phi_c. Intriguingly, viscosity curves for non-convex particles do not collapse on the same set as convex particles, showing strong shear thickening over a wider range of packing fraction. The value of phi_c is found to coincide with the onset of a yield stress at the jamming transition, suggesting the jamming transition also controls shear thickening. The yield stress is found to correspond with trapped air in the suspensions, and the scale of the stress can be attributed to interfacial tension forces which dramatically increase above phi_c due to the geometric constraints of jamming. The relationship between shear and normal stresses is found to be linear in both the shear thickening and jammed regimes, indicating that the shear stresses come from friction. In the limit of zero shear rate, normal stresses pull the rheometer plates together due to the surface tension of the liquid below phi_c, but push the rheometer plates apart due to jamming above phi_c.

Eric Brown; Hanjun Zhang; Nicole A. Forman; Benjamin W. Maynor; Douglas E. Betts; Joseph M. DeSimone; Heinrich M. Jaeger

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

320

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

electrolytic cell, designed to integrate waste heat recovery (i.e a microbial heat recovery cell or MHRC), can operate as a fuel cell and convert effluent streams into...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste resource pack" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the issues of conducting debris treatment in the New Waste Calcine Facility (NWCF) decontamination area and the methods currently being used to decontaminate material at the NWCF.

K. E. Archibald

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Solid Waste Management Plan. Revision 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The waste types discussed in this Solid Waste Management Plan are Municipal Solid Waste, Hazardous Waste, Low-Level Mixed Waste, Low-Level Radioactive Waste, and Transuranic Waste. The plan describes for each type of solid waste, the existing waste management facilities, the issues, and the assumptions used to develop the current management plan.

NONE

1995-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

323

Waste Confidence Discussion | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Confidence Discussion Waste Confidence Discussion Long-Term Waste Confidence Update. Waste Confidence Discussion More Documents & Publications Status Update: Extended Storage...

324

EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation DOE's Radioactive Waste Management Priorities: Continue to manage waste...

325

Transuranic (TRU) Waste | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Defined by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act as "waste containing more than 100 nanocuries of alpha-emitting...

326

Natural Resources and Energy Act of 1973 (Louisiana) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Natural Resources and Energy Act of 1973 (Louisiana) Natural Resources and Energy Act of 1973 (Louisiana) Natural Resources and Energy Act of 1973 (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Generating Facility Rate-Making This law is designed to protect and conserve the natural energy resources of the state, and prevent the physical and economic waste, wasteful use and wasteful utilization of those resources through the development and implementation of a comprehensive energy policy for the state of Louisiana

327

Household solid waste characteristics and management in Chittagong, Bangladesh  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid waste management (SWM) is a multidimensional challenge faced by urban authorities, especially in developing countries like Bangladesh. We investigated per capita waste generation by residents, its composition, and the households' attitudes towards waste management at Rahman Nagar Residential Area, Chittagong, Bangladesh. The study involved a structured questionnaire and encompassed 75 households from five different socioeconomic groups (SEGs): low (LSEG), lower middle (LMSEG), middle (MSEG), upper middle (UMSEG) and high (HSEG). Wastes, collected from all of the groups of households, were segregated and weighed. Waste generation was 1.3 kg/household/day and 0.25 kg/person/day. Household solid waste (HSW) was comprised of nine categories of wastes with vegetable/food waste being the largest component (62%). Vegetable/food waste generation increased from the HSEG (47%) to the LSEG (88%). By weight, 66% of the waste was compostable in nature. The generation of HSW was positively correlated with family size (r{sub xy} = 0.236, p < 0.05), education level (r{sub xy} = 0.244, p < 0.05) and monthly income (r{sub xy} = 0.671, p < 0.01) of the households. Municipal authorities are usually the responsible agencies for solid waste collection and disposal, but the magnitude of the problem is well beyond the ability of any municipal government to tackle. Hence dwellers were found to take the service from the local waste management initiative. Of the respondents, an impressive 44% were willing to pay US$0.3 to US$0.4 per month to waste collectors and it is recommended that service charge be based on the volume of waste generated by households. Almost a quarter (22.7%) of the respondents preferred 12-1 pm as the time period for their waste to be collected. This study adequately shows that household solid waste can be converted from burden to resource through segregation at the source, since people are aware of their role in this direction provided a mechanism to assist them in this pursuit exists and the burden is distributed according to the amount of waste generated.

Sujauddin, Mohammad [Institute of Forestry and Environmental Sciences, Chittagong University, Chittagong-4331 (Bangladesh)], E-mail: mohammad.sujauddin@gmail.com; Huda, S.M.S. [Institute of Forestry and Environmental Sciences, Chittagong University, Chittagong-4331 (Bangladesh); Hoque, A.T.M. Rafiqul [Institute of Forestry and Environmental Sciences, Chittagong University, Chittagong-4331 (Bangladesh); Laboratory of Ecology and Systematics (Plant Ecophysiology Section), Faculty of Science, Biology Division, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Career Map: Resource Scientist  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Wind Program's Career Map provides job description information for Resource Scientist positions.

329

Ferrocyanide tank waste stability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ferrocyanide wastes were generated at the Hanford Site during the mid to late 1950s as a result of efforts to create more tank space for the storage of high-level nuclear waste. The ferrocyanide process was developed to remove [sup 137]CS from existing waste and newly generated waste that resulted from the recovery of valuable uranium in Hanford Site waste tanks. During the course of research associated with the ferrocyanide process, it was recognized that ferrocyanide materials, when mixed with sodium nitrate and/or sodium nitrite, were capable of violent exothermic reaction. This chemical reactivity became an issue in the 1980s, when safety issues associated with the storage of ferrocyanide wastes in Hanford Site tanks became prominent. These safety issues heightened in the late 1980s and led to the current scrutiny of the safety issues associated with these wastes, as well as current research and waste management programs. Testing to provide information on the nature of possible tank reactions is ongoing. This document supplements the information presented in Summary of Single-Shell Tank Waste Stability, WHC-EP-0347, March 1991 (Borsheim and Kirch 1991), which evaluated several issues. This supplement only considers information particular to ferrocyanide wastes.

Fowler, K.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

6 - Nuclear Waste Regulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The most influential national and international bodies providing recommendations on radiation protection are described, including the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Protection philosophies and the ICRP general principles of radiation protection are discussed. Radioactive material regulations and sources of radiation are explained. Criteria of exemption from regulatory control are discussed with examples of exemption levels for naturally occurring and radioactive waste radionuclides. Clearance of both moderate and bulk amounts of materials from regulatory control is also explained, including examples of EU and the UK regulations. Dose limits recommended by the ICRP are given, as well as the main principles of control of radiation hazards. Nuclear waste classification schemes are outlined, including the IAEA classification scheme. A brief explanation of nuclear waste classes including exempt waste, very short-lived waste, very low-level waste, low-level waste, intermediate-level waste and high-level waste is given. Examples of waste classification schemes are given, including that of the UK.

M.I. Ojovan; W.E. Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Hanford Tank Waste Information Enclosure 1 Hanford Tank Waste Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hanford Tank Waste Information Enclosure 1 1 Hanford Tank Waste Information 1.0 Summary This information demonstrates the wastes in the twelve Hanford Site tanks meet the definition of transuranic (TRU. The wastes in these twelve (12) tanks are not high-level waste (HLW), and contain more than 100 nanocuries

332

Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste Read more overleaf Introduction Energy from waste provides us with an opportunity for a waste solution and a local source of energy rolled,itcan onlyaddressaportionofthewastestream andisnotsufficientonitsown. Energy obtained from the combustion of residual waste (Energy from

333

Stabilization of compactible waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of series of experiments performed to determine the feasibility of stabilizing compacted or compactible waste with polymers. The need for this work arose from problems encountered at disposal sites attributed to the instability of this waste in disposal. These studies are part of an experimental program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) investigating methods for the improved solidification/stabilization of DOE low-level wastes. The approach taken in this study was to perform a series of survey type experiments using various polymerization systems to find the most economical and practical method for further in-depth studies. Compactible dry bulk waste was stabilized with two different monomer systems: styrene-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and polyester-styrene, in laboratory-scale experiments. Stabilization was accomplished by wetting or soaking compactible waste (before or after compaction) with monomers, which were subsequently polymerized. Three stabilization methods are described. One involves the in-situ treatment of compacted waste with monomers in which a vacuum technique is used to introduce the binder into the waste. The second method involves the alternate placement and compaction of waste and binder into a disposal container. In the third method, the waste is treated before compaction by wetting the waste with the binder using a spraying technique. A series of samples stabilized at various binder-to-waste ratios were evaluated through water immersion and compression testing. Full-scale studies were conducted by stabilizing two 55-gallon drums of real compacted waste. The results of this preliminary study indicate that the integrity of compacted waste forms can be readily improved to ensure their long-term durability in disposal environments. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Waste Inspection Tomography (WIT)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste Inspection Tomography (WIT) provides mobile semi-trailer mounted nondestructive examination (NDE) and assay (NDA) for nuclear waste drum characterization. WIT uses various computed tomography (CT) methods for both NDE and NDA of nuclear waste drums. Low level waste (LLW), transuranic (TRU), and mixed radioactive waste can be inspected and characterized without opening the drums. With externally transmitted x-ray NDE techniques, WIT has the ability to identify high density waste materials like heavy metals, define drum contents in two- and three-dimensional space, quantify free liquid volumes through density and x-ray attenuation coefficient discrimination, and measure drum wall thickness. With waste emitting gamma-ray NDA techniques, WIT can locate gamma emitting radioactive sources in two- and three-dimensional space, identify gamma emitting isotopic species, identify the external activity levels of emitting gamma-ray sources, correct for waste matrix attenuation, provide internal activity approximations, and provide the data needed for waste classification as LLW or TRU. The mobile feature of WIT allows inspection technologies to be brought to the nuclear waste drum storage site without the need to relocate drums for safe, rapid, and cost-effective characterization of regulated nuclear waste. The combination of these WIT characterization modalities provides the inspector with an unprecedented ability to non-invasively characterize the regulated contents of waste drums as large as 110 gallons, weighing up to 1,600 pounds. Any objects that fit within these size and weight restrictions can also be inspected on WIT, such as smaller waste bags and drums that are five and thirty-five gallons.

Bernardi, R.T.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

EA-437; Environmental Assessment Process Equipment Waste and Process Waste Liquid Collection Systems Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

437; Environmental Assessment Process Equipment Waste and 437; Environmental Assessment Process Equipment Waste and Process Waste Liquid Collection Systems Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Idaho National Engineering Laboratory TABLE OF CONTENTS Environmental Assessment Process Equipment Waste and Process Waste Liquid Collection Systems Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Idaho National Engineering Laboratory 1. INTRODUCTION 2. DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 2.1 Purpose and Need of the Proposed Action 2.2 Description of the Affected Facilities 2.3 Description of Proposed Action 2.4 Alternatives to the Proposed Action 2.5 Separate But Related Actions 3. AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT 3.1 Introduction 3.2 Physical Environment 3.3 Biological Resources 3.4 Cultural Resources 3.5 Environmental Quality and Monitoring Programs

336

Human Resources Reports | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Human Resources Reports Human Resources Reports Human Resources Reports August 21, 2013 Inspection Report: INS-L-13-06 Allegations of Irregular Hiring Practices and Preferential Treatment in the Loan Programs Office July 16, 2013 MANAGEMENT ALERT: DOE/IG-0891 Allegations Regarding Prohibited Personnel Practices at the Bonneville Power Administration June 6, 2013 Inspection Report: DOE/IG-0888 Alleged Nepotism and Wasteful Spending in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy March 22, 2013 Inspection Report: DOE-IG-0882 Approval of Contractor Executive Salaries by Department of Energy Personnel June 22, 2012 Inspection Report: INS-L-12-04 Alleged Procurement and Hiring Practice Irregularities within the Office of Policy and International Affairs June 18, 2012 Audit Report: IG-0867

337

Feed Resource Recovery | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feed Resource Recovery Feed Resource Recovery Jump to: navigation, search Name Feed Resource Recovery Place Wellesley, Massachusetts Product Start-up planning to convert waste to fertilizer and biomethane gas. Coordinates 42.29776°, -71.289744° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.29776,"lon":-71.289744,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

338

"Zombie" Servers and Inefficiency Drive Energy Waste at Data Centers1 U.S. server facilities are riddled with underused machines, report says.2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

progress in this area, some using upgraded systems that can generate power from waste heat or use outside"Zombie" Servers and Inefficiency Drive Energy Waste at Data Centers1 U.S. server facilities waste documented in a report about U.S. data centers released Tuesday by the Natural8 Resources Defense

South Bohemia, University of

339

Teacher Resource Center: Science Fair Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science Fair Resources Science Fair Resources TRC Home TRC Fact Sheet Library Curricular Resources Science Fair Resources Bibliographies sciencelines The Best of sciencelines Archives Annotated List of URLs Catalog Teacher's Lounge Full Workshop Catalog Customized Workshops Scheduled Workshops Special Opportunities Teacher Networks Science Lab Fermilab Science Materials Samplers Order Form Science Safety Issues Tech Room Fermilab Web Resources The Teacher Resource Center collection is available for use onsite. The TRC is a member of the DuPage Library System. This list was prepared for a presentation to several regional library systems. The Science Fair and Beyond, was presented by Susan Dahl, sdahl@fnal.gov, 630-840-3094. (links checked October 27, 2009) See the 'Customized Workshops" link in the "Teacher's Lounge" for information about more workshops available through the TRC. Explore the Education Office website for other opportunities and services.

340

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

18 18 19 T he WIPP's first waste receipt, 11 years later than originally planned, was a monumental step forward in the safe management of nuclear waste. Far from ending, however, the WIPP story has really just begun. For the next 35 years, the DOE will face many challenges as it manages a complex shipment schedule from transuranic waste sites across the United States and continues to ensure that the repository complies with all regulatory requirements. The DOE will work to maintain the highest level of safety in waste handling and trans- portation. Coordination with sites Disposal operations require coordination with sites that will ship transuranic waste to the WIPP and include periodic certification of waste characterization and handling practices at those facilities. During the WIPP's

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste resource pack" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

SRS - Programs - Waste Solidification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Waste Solidification Waste Solidification The two primary facilities operated within the Waste Solidification program are Saltstone and the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Each DWPF canister is 10 feet tall and 2 feet in diameter, and typically takes a little over a day to fill. Each DWPF canister is 10 feet tall and 2 feet in diameter, and typically takes a little over a day to fill. The largest radioactive waste glassification plant in the world, DWPF converts the high-level liquid nuclear waste currently stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) into a solid glass form suitable for long-term storage and disposal. Scientists have long considered this glassification process, called "vitrification," as the preferred option for immobilizing high-level radioactive liquids into a more stable, manageable form until a federal

342

High level nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE Division of Waste Products through a lead office at Savannah River is developing a program to immobilize all US high-level nuclear waste for terminal disposal. DOE high-level wastes include those at the Hanford Plant, the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, and the Savannah River Plant. Commercial high-level wastes, for which DOE is also developing immobilization technology, include those at the Nuclear Fuel Services Plant and any future commercial fuels reprocessing plants. The first immobilization plant is to be the Defense Waste Processing Facility at Savannah River, scheduled for 1983 project submission to Congress and 1989 operation. Waste forms are still being selected for this plant. Borosilicate glass is currently the reference form, but alternate candidates include concretes, calcines, other glasses, ceramics, and matrix forms.

Crandall, J L

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Underground waste barrier structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is an underground waste barrier structure that consists of waste material, a first container formed of activated carbonaceous material enclosing the waste material, a second container formed of zeolite enclosing the first container, and clay covering the second container. The underground waste barrier structure is constructed by forming a recessed area within the earth, lining the recessed area with a layer of clay, lining the clay with a layer of zeolite, lining the zeolite with a layer of activated carbonaceous material, placing the waste material within the lined recessed area, forming a ceiling over the waste material of a layer of activated carbonaceous material, a layer of zeolite, and a layer of clay, the layers in the ceiling cojoining with the respective layers forming the walls of the structure, and finally, covering the ceiling with earth.

Saha, Anuj J. (Hamburg, NY); Grant, David C. (Gibsonia, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Close packing density and fracture strength of adsorbed polydisperse particle layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The close packing density of log-normal and bimodal distributed, surface-adsorbed particles or discs in 2D is studied by numerical simulation. For small spread in particle size, the system orders in a polycrystalline structure of hexagonal domains. The domain size and the packing density both decrease as the spread in particle size is increased up to 10.5+/-0.5%. From this point onwards the system becomes amorphous, and the close packing density increases again with spread in particle size. We argue that the polycrystalline and amorphous regions are separated by a Kosterlitz-Thouless-type phase transition. In the amorphous region we find the close packing density to vary proportional to the logarithm of the friction factor, or cooling rate. We also studied the fracture behaviour of surface layers of sintered particles. Fracture strength increases with spread in particle size, but the brittleness of the layers shows a minimum at the polycrystalline-amorphous transition. We further show that mixing distributions of big and small particles generally leads to weaker and more brittle layers, even though the close packing density is higher than for either of the particle types. We point out applications to foam stability by the Pickering mechanism.

Robert D. Groot; Simeon D. Stoyanov

2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

345

TI-59 helps predict IPRs for gravel-packed gas wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The inflow performance relationship (IPR) is an important tool for reservoir and production engineers. It helps optimize completion, tubing, gas lift, and storm choke design. It facilitates accurate rate predictions that can be used to evaluate field development decisions. The IPR is the first step of the systems analysis that translates reservoir rock and fluid parameters into predictable flow rates. Use of gravel packing for sand control complicates the calculation that predicts a well's IPR curve, particularly in gas wells where high velocities in the formation and through gravel-filled perforation tunnels can cause turbulent flow. The program presented in this article calculates the pressure drop and the flowing bottomhole pressures at varying flow rates for gravel-packed gas wells. The program was written for a Texas Instruments TI-59 programmable calculator with a PC-100 printer. Program features include: Calculations for in-casing gravel packs, open-hole gravel packs, or ungravel packed wells. Program prompts for the required data variables. Easy change of data values to run new cases. Calculates pressures for an unlimited number of flow rates. Results show the total pressure drop and the relative magnitude of its components.

Capdevielle, W.C.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Fluctuations, structure factor and polytetrahedra in random packings of sticky hard spheres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sequentially-built random sphere-packings have been numerically studied in the packing fraction interval $0.329 designed in order to build about 300 aggregates, containing $10^6$ spheres each one, which allowed a careful study of the local fluctuations and an improved accuracy in the calculations of the pair distribution $P(r)$ and structure factors $S(Q)$ of the aggregates. Among various parameters (Voronoi tessellation, contact coordination number distribution,...), fluctuations were quantitatively evaluated by the direct evaluation of the fluctuations of the local sphere number density, which appears to follow a power law. The FWHM of the Voronoi cells volume shows a regular variation over the whole packing fraction range. Dirac peaks appear on the pair correlation function as the packing fraction of the aggregates decreases, indicating the growth of larger and larger polytetrahedra, which manifest in two ways on the structure factor, at low and large $Q$values. These low PF aggregates have a composite structure made of regular polytetrahedra embedded in a more disordered matrix. Incidentally, the irregularity index of the building tetrahedron appears as a better parameter than the packing fraction to describe various features of the aggregates structure.

Marc Bletry; Jean Bletry

2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

347

Ship-pack optimization in a two-echelon distribution system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In large distribution systems, distribution centers (DC) deliver some merchandize to their retail stores in size-specific packages, also called ship-packs. These ship-packs include cases (e.g., cartons containing 24 or 48units), inners (packages of 6 or 8units) or eaches (individual units). For each Stock Keeping Unit (SKU), a retailer can decide which of these ship-pack options to use when replenishing its retail stores. Working with a major US retailer, we have developed a cost model that balances DC handling costs, store handling costs and inventory-related costs at both the DC and the stores, and therefore can help to determine the optimum warehouse ship-pack for each SKU. We implement our model for a sample of 529 SKUs, and show that by changing ship-pack size for about 30 SKUs, the retailer can reduce its total cost by 0.3% - 0.4%. Interestingly, we find that most of the cost savings occurs at the DC level.

Naijun Wen; Stephen C. Graves; Z. Justin Ren

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Hazardous Waste Compliance Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hazardous Waste Compliance Program Plan (HWCPP) describes how the Rocky Flats Plant institutes a more effective waste management program designed to achieve and maintain strict adherence to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. Emphasis is given to improve integration of line operations with programmatic and functional support activities necessary to achieve physical compliance to RCRA regulated equipment, facilities and operations at the floor level. This program focuses on specific activities occurring or which need to occur within buildings containing RCRA regulated units and activities. The plan describes a new approach to achieving and maintaining compliance. This approach concentrates authority and accountability for compliance with the line operating personnel, with support provided from the programmatic functions. This approach requires a higher degree of integration and coordination between operating and program support organizations. The principal changes in emphases are; (1) increased line operations involvement, knowledge and accountability in compliance activities, (2) improved management systems to identify, correct and/or avoid deficiencies and (3) enhanced management attention and employee awareness of compliance related matters.

Potter, G.L.; Holstein, K.A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Synthesizing Optimal Waste Blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vitrification of tank wastes to form glass is a technique that will be used for the disposal of high-level waste at Hanford. ... Durability restrictions ensure that the resultant glass meets the quantitative criteria for disposal/long-term storage in a repository. ... If glasses are formulated to minimize the volume of glass that would be produced, then the cost of processing the waste and storing the resultant glass would be greatly reduced. ...

Venkatesh Narayan; Urmila M. Diwekar; Mark Hoza

1996-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

350

Terminating Safeguards on Excess Special Nuclear Material: Defense TRU Waste Clean-up and Nonproliferation - 12426  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) manages defense nuclear material that has been determined to be excess to programmatic needs and declared waste. When these wastes contain plutonium, they almost always meet the definition of defense transuranic (TRU) waste and are thus eligible for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The DOE operates the WIPP in a manner that physical protections for attractiveness level D or higher special nuclear material (SNM) are not the normal operating condition. Therefore, there is currently a requirement to terminate safeguards before disposal of these wastes at the WIPP. Presented are the processes used to terminate safeguards, lessons learned during the termination process, and how these approaches might be useful for future defense TRU waste needing safeguards termination prior to shipment and disposal at the WIPP. Also described is a new criticality control container, which will increase the amount of fissile material that can be loaded per container, and how it will save significant taxpayer dollars. Retrieval, compliant packaging and shipment of retrievably stored legacy TRU waste has dominated disposal operations at WIPP since it began operations 12 years ago. But because most of this legacy waste has successfully been emplaced in WIPP, the TRU waste clean-up focus is turning to newly-generated TRU materials. A major component will be transuranic SNM, currently managed in safeguards-protected vaults around the weapons complex. As DOE and NNSA continue to consolidate and shrink the weapons complex footprint, it is expected that significant quantities of transuranic SNM will be declared surplus to the nation's needs. Safeguards termination of SNM varies due to the wide range of attractiveness level of the potential material that may be directly discarded as waste. To enhance the efficiency of shipping waste with high TRU fissile content to WIPP, DOE designed an over-pack container, similar to the pipe component, called the criticality control over-pack, which will significantly enhance the efficiency of disposal. Hundreds of shipments of transuranic SNM, suitably packaged to meet WIPP waste acceptance criteria and with safeguards terminated have been successfully emplaced at WIPP (primarily from the Rocky Flats site clean-up) since WIPP opened. DOE expects that thousands more may eventually result from SNM consolidation efforts throughout the weapons complex. (authors)

Hayes, Timothy [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Carlsbad Operations Group (United States); Nelson, Roger [Department Of Energy, Carlsbad Operations Office (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to summarize the waste acceptance criteria applicable to the transportation, storage, and disposal of contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These criteria serve as the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) primary directive for ensuring that CH-TRU waste is managed and disposed of in a manner that protects human health and safety and the environment.The authorization basis of WIPP for the disposal of CH-TRU waste includes the U.S.Department of Energy National Security and Military Applications of Nuclear EnergyAuthorization Act of 1980 (reference 1) and the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA;reference 2). Included in this document are the requirements and associated criteriaimposed by these acts and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA,reference 3), as amended, on the CH-TRU waste destined for disposal at WIPP.|The DOE TRU waste sites must certify CH-TRU waste payload containers to thecontact-handled waste acceptance criteria (CH-WAC) identified in this document. Asshown in figure 1.0, the flow-down of applicable requirements to the CH-WAC istraceable to several higher-tier documents, including the WIPP operational safetyrequirements derived from the WIPP CH Documented Safety Analysis (CH-DSA;reference 4), the transportation requirements for CH-TRU wastes derived from theTransuranic Package Transporter-Model II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT Certificates ofCompliance (references 5 and 5a), the WIPP LWA (reference 2), the WIPP HazardousWaste Facility Permit (reference 6), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency(EPA) Compliance Certification Decision and approval for PCB disposal (references 7,34, 35, 36, and 37). The solid arrows shown in figure 1.0 represent the flow-down of allapplicable payload container-based requirements. The two dotted arrows shown infigure 1.0 represent the flow-down of summary level requirements only; i.e., the sitesmust reference the regulatory source documents from the U.S. Nuclear RegulatoryCommission (NRC) and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) for acomprehensive and detailed listing of the requirements.This CH-WAC does not address the subject of waste characterization relating to adetermination of whether the waste is hazardous; rather, the sites are referred to theWaste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit fordetails of the sampling and analysis protocols to be used in determining compliance withthe required physical and chemical properties of the waste. Requirements andassociated criteria pertaining to a determination of the radiological properties of thewaste, however, are addressed in appendix A of this document. The collectiveinformation obtained from waste characterization records and acceptable knowledge(AK) serves as the basis for sites to certify that their CH-TRU waste satisfies the WIPPwaste acceptance criteria listed herein.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

352

Senate poised to act on nuclear waste bills  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

On Nov. 30 the Senate committees on Energy & Natural Resources and Environment & Public Works issued a joint report on legislation dealing with the long-term disposal of nuclear waste. But, although the report carries the names of both committees, there ...

1981-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

353

Municipal solid waste characteristics and management in Allahabad, India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by political, legal, socio-cultural, environmental and economic factors, as well as available resources on a suitable management plan (Shimura et al., 2001). More than 90% of MSW in India is directly disposedMunicipal solid waste characteristics and management in Allahabad, India Mufeed Sharholy a , Kafeel

Columbia University

354

User Guide for Disposal of Unwanted Items and Electronic Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the Recycle department at 502-6808 o For more information on the UCSF Sustainability program visit: http://sustainability.ucsf.edu/stay_informed/recycling_resources consulting support Ensuring proper reuse, recycle, or disposal Maintaining regulatory and policy compliance metal and wood o Waste/trash management o Recycle, reuse or disposal of materials D&S does not process o

Mullins, Dyche

355

Waste Confidence Discussion  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Long-Term Long-Term Waste Confidence Update Christine Pineda Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission National Transportation Stakeholders Forum May 2012 ♦ Knoxville, Tennessee Long-Term Update Draft Report, "Background and Preliminary Assumptions for an Environmental Impact Statement- Long-Term Waste Confidence Update" Elements of the Long-Term Update - Draft environmental impact statement - Draft Waste Confidence Decision - Proposed Waste Confidence Rule based on the EIS and Decision, if applicable 2 Overview of Draft Report Background and assumptions report is first step in process. Basic topics in the report are:

356

Norcal Waste Systems, Inc.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fact sheet describes the LNG long-haul heavy-duty trucks at Norcal Waste Systems Inc.'s Sanitary Fill Company.

Not Available

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Section 24: Waste Characterization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy (DOE). 1995b. Transuranic Waste Baseline Inventory Report (Revision 2, December). DOECAO-95-1121. ERMS 531643. Carlsbad Area Office, Carlsbad, NM. PDF Author U.S....

358

Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

training, security) * Closure plan Tank-Related Permit Units New * 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) * 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs) Existing * 242-A Evaporator * Waste Treatment...

359

Waste Heat Recovery  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

DRAFT - PRE-DECISIONAL - DRAFT 1 Waste Heat Recovery 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the TechnologySystem ......

360

Electronic Waste Transformation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electronic Waste Transformation ... Instead, entrepreneurial individuals and small businesses recover valuable metals such as copper from obsolete equipment through activities such as burning. ...

CHERYL HOGUE

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste resource pack" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300 C to 800 C to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100 C to 1400 C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, G.G.

1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

362

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

September 19, 2014 - No second release at WIPP September 12, 2014 - Waste hoist transformer replacement September 09, 2014 - Additional areas cleared in WIPP underground...

363

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300.degree. C. to 800.degree. C. to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100.degree. C. to 1400.degree. C. at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Summary - Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at Oak Ridge, TN  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oak Ridge, TN Oak Ridge, TN EM Project: EM Waste Management Facility ETR Report Date: February 2008 ETR-11 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at Oak Ridge, TN Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) is a land disposal facility for wastes generated by environmental restoration activities being conducted at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation. Low-level radioactive wastes, hazardous wastes (Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act), and wastes defined by the Toxic Substances Control Act are approved for disposal in the EMWMF. All of the cells are lined with a

365

Integrating Total Quality Management (TQM) and hazardous waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and its subsequent amendments have had a dramatic impact on hazardous waste management for business and industry. The complexity of this law and the penalties for noncompliance have made it one of the most challenging regulatory programs undertaken by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The fundamentals of RCRA include ``cradle to grave`` management of hazardous waste, covering generators, transporters, and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. The regulations also address extensive definitions and listing/identification mechanisms for hazardous waste along with a tracking system. Treatment is favored over disposal and emphasis is on ``front-end`` treatment such as waste minimization and pollution prevention. A study of large corporations such as Xerox, 3M, and Dow Chemical, as well as the public sector, has shown that well known and successful hazardous waste management programs emphasize pollution prevention and employment of techniques such as proactive environmental management, environmentally conscious manufacturing, and source reduction. Nearly all successful hazardous waste programs include some aspects of Total Quality Management, which begins with a strong commitment from top management. Hazardous waste management at the Rocky Flats Plant is further complicated by the dominance of ``mixed waste`` at the facility. The mixed waste stems from the original mission of the facility, which was production of nuclear weapons components for the Department of Energy (DOE). A Quality Assurance Program based on the criterion in DOE Order 5700.6C has been implemented at Rocky Flats. All of the elements of the Quality Assurance Program play a role in hazardous waste management. Perhaps one of the biggest waste management problems facing the Rocky Flats Plant is cleaning up contamination from a forty year mission which focused on production of nuclear weapon components.

Kirk, N. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Technological options for management of hazardous wastes from US Department of Energy facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides comprehensive information on the technological options for management of hazardous wastes generated at facilities owned or operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE). These facilities annually generate a large quantity of wastes that could be deemed hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Included in these wastes are liquids or solids containing polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, heavy metals, waste oils, spent solvents, acids, bases, carcinogens, and numerous other pollutants. Some of these wastes consist of nonnuclear hazardous chemicals; others are mixed wastes containing radioactive materials and hazardous chemicals. Nearly 20 unit processes and disposal methods are presented in this report. They were selected on the basis of their proven utility in waste management and potential applicability at DOE sites. These technological options fall into five categories: physical processes, chemical processes, waste exchange, fixation, and ultimate disposal. The options can be employed for either resource recovery, waste detoxification, volume reduction, or perpetual storage. Detailed descriptions of each technological option are presented, including information on process performance, cost, energy and environmental considerations, waste management of applications, and potential applications at DOE sites. 131 references, 25 figures, 23 tables.

Chiu, S.; Newsom, D.; Barisas, S.; Humphrey, J.; Fradkin, L.; Surles, T.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Development and Analysis of a Gravity-Simulated Particle-Packing Algorithm for Modeling Optimized Rocket Propellants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

homogeneous distributions of spherical particles. Both the Radial Distribution Function (RDF) and the packing fraction were used to evaluate the validity of the invented algorithm....

Stockmyer, Mark

2007-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

368

Internal Heat Transfer Coefficient Determination in a Packed Bed From the Transient Response Due to Solid Phase Induction Heating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

equations governing fluid flow and heat transfer in porousParticle-to-Fluid Heat and Mass Transfer in Packed Beds,Systems, Experimental Heat Transfer, Fluid Mechanics and

Geb, David; Zhou, Feng; Catton, Ivan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Design and Simulation of Passive Thermal Management System for Lithium-ion Battery Packs on an Unmanned Ground Vehicle.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The transient thermal response of a 15-cell, 48 volt, lithium-ion battery pack for an unmanned ground vehicle was simulated with ANSYS Fluent. Heat generation (more)

Parsons, Kevin Kenneth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Inferring planar disorder in close-packed structures via -machine spectral reconstruction theory: examples from simulated diffraction patterns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

-Machine spectral reconstruction theory, a method for finding planar disorder in close-packed structures, is applied to four simulated diffraction patterns.

Varn, D.P.

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

371

Bioenergy Review Mapping Work Resource efficiency science programme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bioenergy Review ­ Mapping Work Resource efficiency science programme Science report: SC070001/SR2 #12;ii Science Report ­ Bioenergy Review ­ Mapping Work The Environment Agency is the leading public, biomass, bioenergy, waste, wood-fuel, land, land-take, mapping, 2010, GIS Research Contractor: Forest

372

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports Conservation Education, Other Public Initiatives Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports Conservation Education, Other Public Initiatives November 14, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Approximately 1.8 million tons of salt have been mined out of the underground at WIPP. Approximately 1.8 million tons of salt have been mined out of the underground at WIPP. Proceeds from the WIPP salt allowed hundreds of southeast New Mexico students to learn about resource conservation. Proceeds from the WIPP salt allowed hundreds of southeast New Mexico students to learn about resource conservation. The crushed salt is used as a supplement in cattle feed. Since the salt from WIPP has been mined from the middle of a large salt formation, its quality is high, according to Magnum Minerals.

373

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports Conservation Education, Other Public Initiatives Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports Conservation Education, Other Public Initiatives November 14, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Approximately 1.8 million tons of salt have been mined out of the underground at WIPP. Approximately 1.8 million tons of salt have been mined out of the underground at WIPP. Proceeds from the WIPP salt allowed hundreds of southeast New Mexico students to learn about resource conservation. Proceeds from the WIPP salt allowed hundreds of southeast New Mexico students to learn about resource conservation. The crushed salt is used as a supplement in cattle feed. Since the salt from WIPP has been mined from the middle of a large salt formation, its quality is high, according to Magnum Minerals.

374

Pull-Chain "Polymer" Solves Puzzle of Complex Molecular Packing |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Discovering New Talents for Diamond Discovering New Talents for Diamond Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Pull-Chain "Polymer" Solves Puzzle of Complex Molecular Packing MARCH 4, 2010 Bookmark and Share Partial three-dimensional reconstruction, from x-ray tomographic data, of the packing of 2.1-mm ball chains, projected onto a plane. When tightly packed, the chains form nearly circular rigid loops, like the one in the lower right of the image. This behavior may form the basis of a model for better predictions of the rigidity of polymers. (Image courtesy of Ling-Nan Zou and Mark L. Rivers, The University of Chicago) Sometimes the simplest things hold the key to understanding complex

375

Packed bed thermal energy storage model Generalized approach and experimental validation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Packed beds serve as thermal energy storages (TES) and heat exchangers (HEX) in different technological applications. In this paper, a general heterogeneous model of heat transfer in packed beds is developed. It is implemented by lumped element formulation in object-oriented modeling language Modelica and is successful validated with data sets taken from two different experiments reported in literature. The main advantages of the introduced model are the general, theory-based approach and the lumped element formulation in Modelica. The first point mentioned above should allow to simulate a packed bed TES/HEX without the necessity applying measured data for model calibration or to apply specific heat transfer correlations with restricted application. The second point establishes the possibility to integrate the TES/HEX model within plant models of larger scale without increasing the simulation time drastically.

Florian Opitz; Peter Treffinger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Waste Loading Enhancements for Hanford Low-Activity Waste Glasses  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

WASTE LOADING ENHANCEMENTS FOR HANFORD LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE GLASSES Albert A. Kruger, Glass Scientist DOE-WTP Project Office Engineering Division US Department of Energy Richland,...

377

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Involved in the Selection of Alternatives.. 7 Gasification/liquefaction with Subsequent Transportation. 7 of the Slurry Waste- water as a Function of Residence T

Soerens, Thomas

378

Tank Waste Committee Page 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of a PA is to examine the final waste disposition at Hanford, such as waste in the tanks at C-Farm. Vince said the quest is to model waste movement over 10,000 years,...

379

Teacher Resource Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Teacher Resource Center: Putting It All Together Teacher Resource Center: Putting It All Together TRC Home TRC Fact Sheet Library Curricular Resources Science Fair Resources Bibliographies sciencelines The Best of sciencelines Archives Annotated List of URLs Catalog Teacher's Lounge Full Workshop Catalog Customized Workshops Scheduled Workshops Special Opportunities Teacher Networks Science Lab Fermilab Science Materials Samplers Order Form Science Safety Issues Tech Room Fermilab Web Resources The Teacher Resource Center provides a preview collection of K-12 instructional materials. TRC services include professional development workshops, consultation assistance, bibliographies and reference assistance. Educators have access to curriculum materials, books, multimedia, educational supply catalogs, periodicals and newsletters. The collection

380

Because people with limited resources are often challenged to find food that is healthy, safe and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Because people with limited resources are often challenged to find food that is healthy, safe and affordable. People with limited resources often run short of food at the end of the month. university and employer. Printed on recycled and recyclable paper with at least 10 percent postconsumer waste material

Netoff, Theoden

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste resource pack" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Student Resources and Services 433 Student Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Student Resources and Services 433 Student Resources and Services The University of North Carolina at Charlotte provides a comfortable and enjoyable environment for students that is conducive to studying. The services, facilities, and programs of the University promote individual student development and foster

Xie,Jiang (Linda)

382

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Treating Transuranic (TRU)/Alpha Low-level Waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE proposes to construct, operate, and decontaminate/decommission a TRU Waste Treatment Facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The four waste types that would be treated at the proposed facility would be remote-handled TRU mixed waste sludge, liquid low-level waste associated with the sludge, contact-handled TRU/alpha low-level waste solids, and remote-handled TRU/alpha low-level waste solids. The mixed waste sludge and some of the solid waste contain metals regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and may be classified as mixed waste. This document analyzes the potential environmental impacts associated with five alternatives--No Action, the Low-Temperature Drying Alternative (Preferred Alternative), the Vitrification Alternative, the Cementation Alternative, and the Treatment and Waste Storage at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Alternative.

N /A

2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

383

High temperature packing test program. First quarterly technical progress report, October 1-December 26, 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The program was undertaken to improve the technical understanding of the performance of plunger packings in coal liquefaction pilot plant feed pumps. During the first quarter of FY 1982, visits were made to the H-Coal, EDS and SRC-I pilot plants, where technical discussions were held with maintenance and engineering personnel, and the maintenance records and work orders for the plunger pumps were reviewed. Technical discussions were held with engineering personnel at the manufacturing facilities of three plunger pump manufacturers' companies. Contracts and technical discussions with packing vendors were initiated. Design of the laboratory tests was started.

Not Available

1982-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

384

Sand pack residual oil saturations as affected by extraction with various solvents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

invalidate the conclusions of Jennings, as his natural cores were obtained using oQ-base muds, Data presented by Shneerson an4 VasOieva sho? that reservoir 7 mineral surfaces made preferentially oil-wst with crude oils could not be altered in wettability..., and air pressure was main tained on the supply reservoirs for a minimum time. Tbe fluids used to saturate the sand packs were tap water, kerosene, Sradford crude and topped East Texas crude oil, Organic solvents used to extract the sand packs were...

Murray, Clarence

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DESCRIPTION DETAILS * Radioactive Waste Source Reduction 1,500 Radioactive Waste $6,000 $2,500 $6,000 Waste Yard Sorting Table surveying to sort clean waste from radioactive waste Radioactive Emissions Emission lives. Radioactive Waste generated through wet chemistry Waste Minimization 30 Mixed waste / Liquid

386

Transmission/Resource Library/Enviromental Resources and Mitigation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Enviromental Resources and Mitigation < Transmission | Resource Library(Redirected from TransmissionResource LibraryMitigation) Redirect page Jump to: navigation, search...

387

Chapter 19 - Nuclear Waste Fund  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nuclear Waste Fund 19-1 Nuclear Waste Fund 19-1 CHAPTER 19 NUCLEAR WASTE FUND 1. INTRODUCTION. a. Purpose. This chapter establishes the financial, accounting, and budget policies and procedures for civilian and defense nuclear waste activities, as authorized in Public Law 97-425, the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended, referred to hereafter as the Act. b. Applicability. This chapter applies to all Departmental elements, including the National Nuclear Security Administration, and activities that are funded by the Nuclear Waste Fund (NWF) or the Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal appropriation. c. Background. The Act established the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) and assigned it responsibility for the management

388

Solid Waste Rules (New Hampshire)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The solid waste statute applies to construction and demolition debris, appliances, recyclables, and the facilities that collect, process, and dispose of solid waste. DES oversees the management of...

389

Solid Waste Management (North Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Solid Waste Program regulates safe management of solid waste through guidance, technical assistance, regulations, permitting, environmental monitoring, compliance evaluation and enforcement....

390

Waste Management | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Management Waste Management Oak Ridge has an onsite CERCLA disposal facility, the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility, that reduces cleanup and transportation costs....

391

Municipal Waste Combustion (New Mexico)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This rule establishes requirements for emissions from, and design and operation of, municipal waste combustion units. "Municipal waste"means all materials and substances discarded from residential...

392

Waste Disposal | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Disposal Waste Disposal Trucks transport debris from Oak Ridges cleanup sites to the onsite CERCLA disposal area, the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility....

393

22 - Radioactive waste disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter discusses the disposal of radioactive wastes that arise from a great variety of sources, including the nuclear fuel cycle, beneficial uses of isotopes, and radiation by institutions. Spent fuel contains uranium, plutonium, and highly radioactive fission products. The spent fuel is accumulating, awaiting the development of a high-level waste repository. It is anticipated that a multi-barrier system involving packaging and geologic media will provide protection of the public over the centuries. The favored method of disposal is in a mined cavity deep underground. In some countries, reprocessing the fuel assemblies permits recycling of materials and disposal of smaller volumes of solidified waste. Transportation of wastes is done by casks and containers designed to withstand severe accidents. Low-level wastes come from research and medical procedures and from a variety of activation and fission sources at a reactor site. They generally can be given near-surface burial. Isotopes of special interest are cobalt-60 and cesium-137. Transuranic wastes are being disposed of in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Decommissioning of reactors in the future will contribute a great deal of low-level radioactive waste.

Raymond L. Murray

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Radioactive waste disposal package  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

Lampe, Robert F. (Bethel Park, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Nuclear waste solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

High efficiency removal of technetium values from a nuclear waste stream is achieved by addition to the waste stream of a precipitant contributing tetraphenylphosphonium cation, such that a substantial portion of the technetium values are precipitated as an insoluble pertechnetate salt.

Walker, Darrel D. (1684 Partridge Dr., Aiken, SC 29801); Ebra, Martha A. (129 Hasty Rd., Aiken, SC 29801)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Radioactive waste storage issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state`s boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected.

Kunz, D.E.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Assessment of opportunities to increase the recovery and recycling rates of waste oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste oil represents an important energy resource that, if properly managed and reused, would reduce US dependence on imported fuels. Literature and current practice regarding waste oil generation, regulations, collection, and reuse were reviewed to identify research needs and approaches to increase the recovery and recycling of this resource. The review revealed the need for research to address the following three waste oil challenges: (1) recover and recycle waste oil that is currently disposed of or misused; (2) identify and implement lubricating oil source and loss reduction opportunities; and (3) develop and foster an effective waste oil recycling infrastructure that is based on energy savings, reduced environment at impacts, and competitive economics. The United States could save an estimated 140 {times} 1012 Btu/yr in energy by meeting these challenges.

Graziano, D.J.; Daniels, E.J.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

GRR/Section 14-CA-e - Waste Discharge Requirements | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-CA-e - Waste Discharge Requirements GRR/Section 14-CA-e - Waste Discharge Requirements < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-CA-e - Waste Discharge Requirements 14CAEWasteDischargeRequirements.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies California Environmental Protection Agency Water Resources Control Board Regulations & Policies Title 27 CCR, Division 2 - Environmental Protection - Solid Waste SWRCB Exemptions Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14CAEWasteDischargeRequirements.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) may require Waste discharge

399

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

T h e W a s t e I s o l a t i o n P i l o t P l a n t DOE 1980. Final Environmental Impact Statement, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. DOE/EIS-0026, Washington, DC, Office of Environmental Management, U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1981. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP): Record of Decision. Federal Register, Vol. 46, No. 18, p. 9162, (46 Federal Register 9162), January 28, 1981. U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1990. Final Supplement Environmental Impact Statement, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. DOE/EIS-0026-FS, Washington, DC, Office of Environmental Management, U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1990. Record of Decision: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Federal Register, Vol. 55, No. 121, 25689-25692, U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1994. Comparative Study of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Transportation Alternatives.

400

Salt Waste Processing Initiatives  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Patricia Suggs Patricia Suggs Salt Processing Team Lead Assistant Manager for Waste Disposition Project Office of Environmental Management Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Initiatives 2 Overview * Current SRS Liquid Waste System status * Opportunity to accelerate salt processing - transformational technologies - Rotary Microfiltration (RMF) and Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) - Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (ARP/MCU) extension with next generation extractant - Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) performance enhancement - Saltstone enhancements * Life-cycle impacts and benefits 3 SRS Liquid Waste Total Volume >37 Million Gallons (Mgal) Total Curies 183 MCi (51% ) 175 MCi (49% ) >358 Million Curies (MCi) Sludge 34.3 Mgal (92% ) 3.0 Mgal (8%)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste resource pack" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

HLW Glass Waste Loadings  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

HLW HLW Glass Waste Loadings Ian L. Pegg Vitreous State Laboratory The Catholic University of America Washington, DC Overview Overview  Vitrification - general background  Joule heated ceramic melter (JHCM) technology  Factors affecting waste loadings  Waste loading requirements and projections  WTP DWPF  DWPF  Yucca Mountain License Application requirements on waste loading  Summary Vitrification  Immobilization of waste by conversion into a glass  Internationally accepted treatment for HLW  Why glass?  Amorphous material - able to incorporate a wide spectrum of elements over wide ranges of composition; resistant to radiation damage  Long-term durability - natural analogs Relatively simple process - amenable to nuclearization at large  Relatively simple process - amenable to nuclearization at large scale  There

402

Energy Secretary Bodman Statement on Hanford Solid Waste Settlement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Secretary Bodman Statement on Hanford Solid Waste Settlement Energy Secretary Bodman Statement on Hanford Solid Waste Settlement Agreement Energy Secretary Bodman Statement on Hanford Solid Waste Settlement Agreement January 9, 2006 - 9:43am Addthis Richland, WA - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Washington have entered into a settlement agreement that will lead to a final order and the dismissal of the challenge to Hanford's Solid Waste Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) in the lawsuit Washington v. Bodman. DOE, with Washington State as a cooperating agency, will prepare a new EIS that will include updated, site-wide groundwater analysis. "With this agreement, both parties will be able to shift their focus and resources away from litigation and toward partnership and our shared

403

EA-0820: Construction of Mixed Waste Storage RCRA Facilities, Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0: Construction of Mixed Waste Storage RCRA Facilities, 0: Construction of Mixed Waste Storage RCRA Facilities, Buildings 7668 and 7669, Oak Ridge, Tennessee EA-0820: Construction of Mixed Waste Storage RCRA Facilities, Buildings 7668 and 7669, Oak Ridge, Tennessee SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate two mixed (both radioactive and hazardous) waste storage facilities (Buildings 7668 and 7669) in accordance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requirements. Site preparation and construction activities would take place at the U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 16, 1994 EA-0820: Finding of No Significant Impact

404

Energy Secretary Bodman Statement on Hanford Solid Waste Settlement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Statement on Hanford Solid Waste Settlement Statement on Hanford Solid Waste Settlement Agreement Energy Secretary Bodman Statement on Hanford Solid Waste Settlement Agreement January 9, 2006 - 9:43am Addthis Richland, WA - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Washington have entered into a settlement agreement that will lead to a final order and the dismissal of the challenge to Hanford's Solid Waste Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) in the lawsuit Washington v. Bodman. DOE, with Washington State as a cooperating agency, will prepare a new EIS that will include updated, site-wide groundwater analysis. "With this agreement, both parties will be able to shift their focus and resources away from litigation and toward partnership and our shared

405

Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Regional Facility Act (Pennsylvania) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Regional Facility Act Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Regional Facility Act (Pennsylvania) Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Regional Facility Act (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Utility Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations Fees This act establishes a low-level radioactive waste disposal regional facility siting fund that requires nuclear power reactor constructors and operators to pay to the Department of Environmental Resources funds to be utilized for disposal facilities. This act ensures that nuclear facilities and the Department comply with the Low-Level Radioactive Disposal Act. The regional facility siting fund is used for reimbursement of expenses

406

Solar Resource Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the solar resource assessment aspects of the Renewable Systems Interconnection study. The status of solar resource assessment in the United States is described, and summaries of the availability of modeled data sets are provided.

Renne, D.; George, R.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.; Myers, D.; Heimiller, D.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Reserves and Resources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Assessments of resources belong to the realm of educated guesses. Conceptually distinct from resources and occupying a higher ranking in regard to precision, certainty and accuracy in mineral resou...

Ooi Jin Bee

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Financial Planning Resource Allocation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Financial Planning Resource Allocation Human Resources Administrative Services Recruitment Management Leadership Studies Minor Admissions Information Desk & Game Center Fraternity/Sorority Life & Cross-Cultural Support Board Dining Medical Services Liaison for Faculty, Staff & Scholarships Retail

Barrash, Warren

409

Energy Efficient Radio Resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Efficient Radio Resource Management in a Coordinated Multi-Cell Distributed Antenna System Omer HALILOGLU Introduction System Model Performance Evaluation Conclusion References Energy Efficient Hacettepe University 5 September 2014 Omer HALILOGLU (Hacettepe University) Energy Efficient Radio Resource

Yanikomeroglu, Halim

410

OpenMP Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

some useful OpenMP resources and tutorials: Official OpenMP Web Site: OpenMP standards, API specifications, tutorials, forums, and a lot more other information and resources. Tim...

411

Essays on Environmental and Resource Economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environmental offices, water, waste, environmental managementspaces, water treatment, environmental management, wastespaces, water treatment, environmental management, waste

Toledo, Chantal Nathalie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Typifies Optimizing Resources to...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Field Office (CBFO) Manager Joe Franco, right, presents a memento to EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga EM Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Manager Joe Franco, right, presents a...

413

Madaffald som en ressource; Food waste as a resource.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Projekttitel: Madaffald som en ressource Dette projekt analyserer, hvordan madaffald kan anvendes effektivt og bredygtigt til energiproduktion i Danmark. Analysen tager udgangspunkt i ekspertinterviews, teorier (more)

Spanggaard, Mira Juhl

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Federal Energy Management Program: Biomass Energy Resources and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies Photo of two hands cupping wood chips pouring from a green dispenser. Biomass uses agriculture and forest residues to create energy. Photo of two men standing in front of large sugar cane plants. Sugar cane is used in Hawaii and other locations to produce energy and ethanol for alternative fuels. This page provides a brief overview of biomass energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply biomass within the Federal sector. Overview Biomass energy is fuel, heat, or electricity produced from organic materials such as plants, residues, and waste. These organic materials span several sources, including agriculture, forestry, primary and secondary mill residues, urban waste, landfill gases, wastewater treatment plants, and dedicated energy crops.

415

Outdoor Lighting Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE offers a variety of resources to guide municipalities, utilities, and others in their evaluation of LED street lighting products.

416

World Energy Resources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

World Energy Resources ... Coal reserves are by far the largest proved energy sources we have, said Parker. ...

1954-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

417

Identification of solid wastes in geothermal operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regulations governing the disposal of hazardous wastes led to an assessment for geothermal solid wastes for potentially hazardous characteristics. Samples were collected from three active geothermal sites in the western United States: The Geysers, Imperial Valley, and northwestern Nevada. Approximately 20 samples were analyzed for corrosivity, EP toxicity, radioactivity, and bioaccumulation potential. The samples were further characterized by analysis for cations, anions, moisture content, priority pollutants, and additional trace metals in the leachate. In addition, an aqueous extraction was conducted at ambient pH. None of the samples collected at The Geysers or northwestern Nevada could be classified as hazardous as defined by the RCRA regulations published May 19, 1980 in the Federal Register. However, several samples from the Imperial Valley could be classified as hazardous. These hazardous characteristics appear to be related to the high salinity of geothermal fluids in that order. This study characterized samples from a limited geographical area and results cannot be extrapolated to other geothermal resource areas.

Hagmann, E.L.; Minicucci, D.D.; Wolbach, C.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Standard guide for sampling radioactive tank waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This guide addresses techniques used to obtain grab samples from tanks containing high-level radioactive waste created during the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels. Guidance on selecting appropriate sampling devices for waste covered by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) is also provided by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (1). Vapor sampling of the head-space is not included in this guide because it does not significantly affect slurry retrieval, pipeline transport, plugging, or mixing. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

PACENow Resources | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

PACENow Resources PACENow Resources Provides a broad range of property assessed clean energy resources. Author: PACENow PACENow Website More Documents & Publications Financing...

420

Fisheries Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fisheries Resources Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleFisheriesResources&oldid612306" Category: NEPA Resources...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste resource pack" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

SPACE RESOURCES ROUNDTABLE IX  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in developing the resources of space, including the Moon, Mars, asteroids, comets, and other bodies organizations. The ninth Space Resources Roundtable solicits presentations about: · Orbital or landed measurements of the Moon, Mars, and/or asteroids and comets to identify and characterize potential resources

Rathbun, Julie A.

422

Wood Resources International  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood Resources International Wood Raw Material Consumption on the Rise Despite Weak Global Economy UNECE Timber Committee Meeting October 7-8, 2003 Geneva, Switzerland Håkan Ekström Wood Resources International #12;Wood Resources International Outline · Roundwood Removals · Roundwood Consumption · Raw

423

Waste to energy status in India: A short review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract India is one of the most rapidly developing countries in the world. It is witnessing growing industrialization and thus development. Such rapid development needs energy to progress, which further makes India an energy hungry nation. Currently India depends mainly upon fossil fuels and thus has to pay a huge bill at the end of every contractual period. These bills can be shortened and the expenditures brought down by using and exploiting non-conventional sources of energy. India holds a huge potential for such non-conventional sources of energy. The rapid development of India is not just pressing hard upon its resources but forcing expenditures on the same. There are also some neglected side effects of this development process like, generation of waste. A population of 1.2 billion is generating 0.5kg per person every day. This, sums up to a huge pile of waste, which is mostly landfilled in the most unhygienic manner possible. Such unmanaged waste not only eats up resources but demands expenditure as well. This can lead to the downfall of an economy and degradation of the nation. Thus, the paper presents waste to energy as a solution to both the problems stated above, using which not only can we reduce the amount of waste, but also produce energy from the same, thus achieving our goal of waste management as well as energy security. The paper presents the current status, major achievements and future aspects of waste to energy in India which will help decision makers, planners and bodies involved in the management of municipal solid waste understand the current status challenges and barriers of MSWM in India for further better planning and management.

Khanjan Ajaybhai Kalyani; Krishan K. Pandey

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention Crosscut Plan, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan establishes a Department-wide goal to reduce total releases of toxic chemicals to the environment and off-site transfers of such toxic chemicals by 50 percent by December 31, 1999, in compliance with Executive Order 12856. Each site that meets the threshold quantities of toxic chemicals established in the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) will participate in this goal. In addition, each DOE site will establish site-specific goals to reduce generation of hazardous, radioactive, radioactive mixed, and sanitary wastes and pollutants, as applicable. Implementation of this plan will represent a major step toward the environmental risks and costs associated with DOE operations and increasing the Department`s use of preventive environmental management practices. Investing in Waste Minimization Pollution Prevention (WMin/PP) steadily reduce hazardous and radioactive waste generation and will reduce the need for waste management and unnecessary expenditures for waste treatment, storage, and disposal. A preventive approach to waste management will help solve current environmental and regulatory issues and reduce the need for costly future corrective actions. The purpose of this plan is to establish the strategic framework for integrating WMin/PP into all DOE internal activities. This program includes setting DOE policy and goals for reducing the generation of wastes and pollutants, increasing recycling activities, and establishing an infrastructure to achieve and measure the goals throughout the DOE complex. Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Plans, submitted to Headquarters by DOE field sites, will incorporate the WMin/PP activities and goals outlined in this plan. Success of the DOE WMin/PP program is dependent upon each field operation becoming accountable for resources used, wastes and pollutants generated, and wastes recycled.

Not Available

1994-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

425

How green was my electricity? : designing incentives to co-optimize waste management and energy development in New England  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste management is a complex issue, often out of sight and mind, but with the potential for significant negative environmental, social, and economic impacts. Electricity resource planning is equally complex and can ...

Larsen, Walker (Walker Andrew)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Timothy D. Stark, F.ASCE1 landfills may contain aluminum from residential and commercial solid waste, industrial waste, and aluminum, may react with liquid in a landfill and cause uncontrolled temperature increases, significant changes

427

Hanford land disposal restrictions plan for mixed wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the early 1940s, the Hanford Site has been involved in the production and purification of nuclear defense materials. These production activities have resulted in the generation of large quantities of liquid and solid radioactive mixed waste. This waste is subject to regulation under authority of both the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) and the Atomic Energy Act. The State of Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the US Department of Energy (DOE) have entered into an agreement, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) to bring Hanford Site Operations into compliance with dangerous waste regulations. The Tri-Party Agreement was amended to require development of the Hanford Land Disposal Restrictions Plan for Mixed Wastes (this plan) to comply with land disposal restrictions requirements for radioactive mixed waste. The Tri-Party Agreement requires, and the this plan provides, the following sections: Waste Characterization Plan, Storage Report, Treatment Report, Treatment Plan, Waste Minimization Plan, a schedule, depicting the events necessary to achieve full compliance with land disposal restriction requirements, and a process for establishing interim milestones. 34 refs., 28 figs., 35 tabs.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

The Mixed Waste Focus Area: Status and accomplishments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mixed Waste Focus Area began operations in February of 1995. Its mission is to provide acceptable technologies that enable implementation of mixed waste treatment systems developed in partnership with end-users, stakeholders, tribal governments, and regulators. The MWFA will develop, demonstrate, and deliver implementable technologies for treatment of mixed waste within the DOE complex. Treatment refers to all post waste-generation activities including sampling and analysis, characterization, storage, processing, packaging, transportation, and disposal. The MWFA`s mission arises from the Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as amended by the Federal Facility Compliance Act. Each DOE site facility that generates or stores mixed waste prepared a plan, the Site Treatment Plan, for developing treatment capacities and treating that waste. Agreements for each site were concluded with state regulators, resulting in Consent Orders providing enforceable milestones for achieving treatment of the waste. The paper discusses the implementation of the program, its status, accomplishments and goals for FY1996, and plans for 1997.

Conner, J.E. [Dept. of Energy, Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho Operations Office; Williams, R.E. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2013: A High-Performance PHEV Battery Pack  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by LG Chem at 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about a high-performance battery pack the company is researching for plug-in electric vehicles.

430

Energetics and packing of fullerenes in nanotube peapods Mina Yoon,* Savas Berber,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and packing of fullerenes upon their encapsulation in nanotubes. We find a net energy gain associated strain in the nanotube wall. Our results indicate that the encapsulation energy of fullerenes depends identify the optimum nanotube radius that maximizes the encapsulation energy. The encap- sulation energy

431

Airborne release fraction -ARF- and respirable fraction -RF- for foot pack cans in fires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to provide the airborne release fraction (ARF), respirable fraction (RF) and respirable release as a fraction of initial mass for Food Pack Cans (FPCs) containing plutonium powders (e.g., oxide) that become pressurized to the point of bursting in a fire.

CARSON, D.M.

2002-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

432

MBB Safety Induction Pack TO MAKE SURE THAT ALL NEW MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& Safety Policy and can work within its requirements. It can be accessed on the Safety Services web page ............................................. Registration for Genetic Manipulation Work If required email safety@shef.ac.uk - check with Academic Supervisor .......................MBB Safety Induction Pack TO MAKE SURE THAT ALL NEW MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT ATTEND THE REQUIRED

Williamson, Mike P.

433

Experimental Investigation into a Packed Bed Thermal Storage Solution for Solar Gas Turbine Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract High temperature thermal storage in randomly packed beds of ceramic particles is proposed as an effective storage solution for Solar Gas Turbine (SGT) cycles in the near term. Numerical modelling of these systems allows for optimised thermal storage designs, but such models must be validated against experimental data. In this work an experimental test programme was conducted to generate high temperature heat transfer data for a packed bed operating over the temperature ranges 350-900C and 600-900C. These are representative of two potential SGT cycles. Flue gas from a 45kW LPG burner was used to heat a packed bed of Denstone ceramic pebbles and the testing procedure involved preheating the system to achieve the desired temperature ranges. The fluid and solid temperature profiles in the packed bed were measured in the axial and radial dimensions and are compared to a numerical model with reasonable agreement. Potential modifications to the test facility are described and future testing plans outlined.

P. Klein; T.H. Roos; T.J. Sheer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Phyllotaxis or the properties of spiral lattices. II. Packing of circles along logarithmic spirals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1603 Phyllotaxis or the properties of spiral lattices. II. Packing of circles along logarithmic of singular transitions. J. Phys. France 50 (1989) 1603-1621 1er JUILLET 1989, Classification Physics:0198900500130160300 #12;1604 among physicists. We therefore gave an introduction to it in I. Next section summarizes

Boyer, Edmond

435

Supporting Information Power generation by packed-bed air-cathode microbial fuel cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Supporting Information Power generation by packed-bed air-cathode microbial fuel cells Xiaoyuan b a State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, THU­ VEOLIA Informatics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116, PR China * Corresponding author: E

436

Distinctive features arising in maximally random jammed packings of superballs F. H. Stillinger,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, New Jersey 08540, USA Received 2 January 2010. Stillinger,2 and S. Torquato1,2,3,4,5 1 Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton has been done for random jammed packings of spheres and it is only recently that corresponding

Torquato, Salvatore

437

Rapid Protein Side-Chain Packing via Tree Decomposition Jinbo Xu1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is taken into consideration, then our tree-decomposition based energy minimization algorithm is more thanRapid Protein Side-Chain Packing via Tree Decomposition Jinbo Xu1,2 1 School of Computer Science 02139. j3xu@theory.csail.mit.edu Abstract. This paper proposes a novel tree decomposition based side

Xu, Jinbo

438

Frac and pack stimulation: Application and field experience from Hylia Gabon, West Africa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a two-step frac/gravel pack completion procedure conducted from a jack-up rig offshore Gabon in 1993 and 1994. After an in-depth, sand production study, seven wells were completed using hydraulic fracturing and cased-hole gravel packs. Because the Anguille formation spreads over a large gross interval, production screens of 50 to 100 m in length were used. Single-stage internal gravel packs (IGPs) on such large intervals were considered impossible to achieve with reasonable skin values. The frac-pack technique was an attractive way to achieve good proppant placement, considering that the formation being fractured would have a more homogeneous conductivity across the whole zone and a uniform proppant placement would be achieved in the perforations as well as in the annulus. High-efficiency frac gel using cross-linked HPG and a low damage one using HEC were compared to determine the best fluid to be used for these completions. Bottom hole pressures during treatment operations, as well as post-treatment pressure build-ups from each well, were analyzed in order to make general recommendations on this hydraulic fracture design.

Petit, G.; Leschi, P.; Dusterhoft, R.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

439

The GridPACK toolkit for developing power grid simulations on high performance computing platforms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the GridPACK framework, which is designed to help power grid engineers develop modeling software capable of running on high performance computers. The framework contains modules for setting up distributed power grid networks, ... Keywords: electric power grid, high performance computing, software frameworks

Bruce Palmer; William Perkins; Kevin Glass; Yousu Chen; Shuangshuang Jin; David Callahan

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

29.01.03.M1.09 Information Resources Incident Management Page 1 of 3 STANDARD ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, internet/intranet procedures, and acceptable use procedures. Definitions Information Resources (IR follow System Regulation 10.02.01, Control of Fraud, Waste and Abuse. 2.6 If there is a substantial

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste resource pack" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 360: Solid Waste Management Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0: Solid Waste Management 0: Solid Waste Management Facilities (New York) Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 360: Solid Waste Management Facilities (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations apply to all solid wastes with the exception of hazardous or radioactive waste. Proposed solid waste processing facilities are required to obtain permits prior to construction, and the regulations provide details about permitting, construction, registration, and operation requirements. The regulations contain specific guidance for land

442

TRU Waste Sampling Program: Volume I. Waste characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume I of the TRU Waste Sampling Program report presents the waste characterization information obtained from sampling and characterizing various aged transuranic waste retrieved from storage at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The data contained in this report include the results of gas sampling and gas generation, radiographic examinations, waste visual examination results, and waste compliance with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant-Waste Acceptance Criteria (WIPP-WAC). A separate report, Volume II, contains data from the gas generation studies.

Clements, T.L. Jr.; Kudera, D.E.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Future perspectives of using hollow fibers as structured packings in light hydrocarbon distillation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Olefin and paraffin are the largest chemical commodities. Furthermore, they are major building blocks for the petrochemical industry. Each year, petroleum refining, consumes 4,500 TBtu/yr in separation energy, making it one of the most energy-intensive industries in the United States). Just considering liquefied petroleum gas (ethane/propane/butane) and olefins (ethylene and propylene) alone, the distillation energy consumption is about 400 TBtu/yr in the US. Since petroleum distillation is a mature technology, incremental improvements in column/tray design will only provide a few percent improvements in the performance. However, each percent saving in net energy use amounts to savings of 10 TBtu/yr and reduces CO{sub 2} emissions by 0.2 MTon/yr. In practice, distillation columns require 100 to 200 trays to achieve the desired separation. The height of a transfer unit (HTU) of conventional packings is typical in the range of 36-60 inch. Since 2006, we had explored using several non-selective membranes as the structured packings to replace the conventional packing materials used in propane and propylene distillation. We obtained the lowest HTU of < 8 inch for the hollow fiber column, which was >5 times shorter than that of the conventional packing materials. In 2008, we also investigated this type of packing materials in iso-/n-butane distillation. Because of a slightly larger relative volatility of iso-/n-butane than that of propane/propylene, a wider and a more stable operational range was obtained for the iso-/n-butane pair. However, all of the experiments were conducted on a small scale with flowrate of < 25 gram/min. Recently, we demonstrated this technology on a larger scale (<250 gram/min). Within the loading range of F-factor < 2.2 Pa{sup 0.5}, a pressure drop on the vapor side is below 50 mbar/m, which suggests that the pressure drop of hollow fibers packings is not an engineering barrier for the applications in distillations. The thermal stability study suggests that polypropylene hollow fibers are stable after a long time exposure to C{sub 2} - C{sub 4} mixtures. The effects of packing density on the separation efficiency will be discussed.

Yang, Dali [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Orler, Bruce [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tornga, Stephanie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Welch, Cindy [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

444

Hanford Tank Waste Residuals  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hanford Hanford Tank Waste Residuals DOE HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 Chris Kemp, DOE ORP Bill Hewitt, YAHSGS LLC Hanford Tanks & Tank Waste * Single-Shell Tanks (SSTs) - ~27 million gallons of waste* - 149 SSTs located in 12 SST Farms - Grouped into 7 Waste Management Areas (WMAs) for RCRA closure purposes: 200 West Area S/SX T TX/TY U 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) - ~26 million gallons of waste* - 28 DSTs located in 6 DST Farms (1 West/5 East) * 17 Misc Underground Storage Tanks (MUST) * 43 Inactive MUST (IMUST) 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Volumes fluctuate as SST retrievals and 242-A Evaporator runs occur. Major Regulatory Drivers * Radioactive Tank Waste Materials - Atomic Energy Act - DOE M 435.1-1, Ch II, HLW - Other DOE Orders * Hazardous/Dangerous Tank Wastes - Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (TPA) - Retrieval/Closure under State's implementation

445

Waste inspection tomography (WIT)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The WIT program will provide an inspection system that offers the nuclear waste evaluator a unique combination of tools for regulatory-driven characterization of low-level waste (LLW), transuranic waste (TRU), and mixed waste drums. WIT provides nondestructive, noninvasive, and environmentally safe inspections using X-ray and gamma ray technologies, with reasonable cost and throughput. Two emission imaging techniques will be employed for characterizing materials in waste containers. The first of these is gamma emission tomography, commonly called single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Rather than using an external radiation source, SPECT uses the emission of radioactive materials within the object of interest for imaging. In this case, emission from actual nuclear waste within a container will provide a three-dimensional image of the radioactive substances in the container. The second emission technique will use high-purity germanium detectors for gamma ray spectroscopy. This technique, called nondestructive assay (NDA), can identify the emitting isotopic species and strength. Work in emission tomography and assay of nuclear waste has been undertaken at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory using a technique called Passive Tomography. Results from a process development unit are presented.

Bernardi, R.T.; Han, K.S.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

446

Conservation Conservation ResourcesConservation Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an inventory of readyMaintain an inventory of ready--toto--constructconstruct coal & wind generation for postConfirm cost & availability of promising resources ­­ Oil sandsOil sands cogencogen, coal gasification, carbon

447

A novel reactor configuration for packed bed chemical-looping combustion of syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study reports on the application of chemical looping combustion (CLC) in pressurized packed bed reactors using syngas as a fuel. High pressure operation of CLC in packed bed has a different set of challenges in terms of material properties, cycle and reactor design compared to fluidized bed operation. However, high pressure operation allows the use of inherently more efficient power cycles than low pressure fluidized bed solutions. This paper quantifies the challenges in high pressure operation and introduces a novel reactor concept with which those challenges can be addressed. Continuous cyclic operation of a packed bed CLC system is simulated in a 1D numerical reactor model. Importantly, it is demonstrated that the temperature profiles that can occur in a packed bed reactor as a result of the different process steps do not accumulate, and have a negligible effect on the overall performance of the system. Moreover, it has been shown that an even higher energy efficiency can be achieved by feeding the syngas from the opposite direction during the reduction step (i.e. countercurrent operation). Unfortunately, in this configuration mode, more severe temperature fluctuations occur in the reactor exhaust, which is disadvantageous for the operation of a downstream gas turbine. Finally, a novel reactor configuration is introduced in which the desired temperature rise for obtained hot pressured air suitable for a gas turbine is obtained by carrying out the process with two packed bed reactor in series (two-stage CLC). This is shown to be a good alternative to the single bed configuration, and has the added advantage of decreasing the demands on both the oxygen carrier and the reactor materials and design specification.

H.P. Hamers; F. Gallucci; P.D. Cobden; E. Kimball; M. van Sint Annaland

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide. 3 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

449

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide.

Forsberg, Charles W. (155 Newport Dr., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Beahm, Edward C. (106 Cooper Cir., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Parker, George W. (321 Dominion Cir., Knoxville, TN 37922)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Hazardous Waste Disposal Sites (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These sections contain information on fees and monitoring relevant to operators of hazardous waste disposal sites.

451

Generating power with waste wood  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Among the biomass renewables, waste wood has great potential with environmental and economic benefits highlighting its resume. The topics of this article include alternate waste wood fuel streams; combustion benefits; waste wood comparisons; waste wood ash; pilot scale tests; full-scale test data; permitting difficulties; and future needs.

Atkins, R.S.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Methane generation from waste materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An organic solid waste digester for producing methane from solid waste, the digester comprising a reactor vessel for holding solid waste, a sprinkler system for distributing water, bacteria, and nutrients over and through the solid waste, and a drainage system for capturing leachate that is then recirculated through the sprinkler system.

Samani, Zohrab A. (Las Cruces, NM); Hanson, Adrian T. (Las Cruces, NM); Macias-Corral, Maritza (Las Cruces, NM)

2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

453

Certification Plan, low-level waste Hazardous Waste Handling Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan also incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end-product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; an executive summary of the Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP) for the HWHF and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification. This plan provides guidance from the HWHF to waste generators, waste handlers, and the Waste Certification Specialist to enable them to conduct their activities and carry out their responsibilities in a manner that complies with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Waste generators have the primary responsibility for the proper characterization of LLW. The Waste Certification Specialist verifies and certifies that LBL LLW is characterized, handled, and shipped in accordance with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Certification is the governing process in which LBL personnel conduct their waste generating and waste handling activities in such a manner that the Waste Certification Specialist can verify that the requirements of WHC-WAC are met.

Albert, R.

1992-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

454

Technical Safety Requirements for the B695 Segment of the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) Division's B695 Segment of the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the B695 Segment of the DWTF. The TSRs are derived from the Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) for the B695 Segment of the DWTF (LLNL 2004). The analysis presented there determined that the B695 Segment of the DWTF is a low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 3, nonreactor nuclear facility. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits as well as controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard analyses. Furthermore, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls section of the TSRs. The B695 Segment of the DWTF (B695 and the west portion of B696) is a waste treatment and storage facility located in the northeast quadrant of the LLNL main site. The approximate area and boundary of the B695 Segment of the DWTF are shown in the B695 Segment of the DWTF DSA. Activities typically conducted in the B695 Segment of the DWTF include container storage, lab-packing, repacking, overpacking, bulking, sampling, waste transfer, and waste treatment. B695 is used to store and treat radioactive, mixed, and hazardous waste, and it also contains equipment used in conjunction with waste processing operations to treat various liquid and solid wastes. The portion of the building called Building 696 Solid Waste Processing Area (SWPA), also referred to as B696S in this report, is used primarily to manage solid radioactive waste. Operations specific to the SWPA include sorting and segregating low-level waste (LLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste, lab-packing, sampling, and crushing empty drums that previously contained LLW. A permit modification for B696S was submitted to DTSC in January 2004 to store and treat hazardous and mixed waste. Upon approval of the permit modification, B696S rooms 1007, 1008, and 1009 will be able to store hazardous and mixed waste for up to 1 year. Furthermore, an additional drum crusher and a Waste Packaging Unit will be permitted to treat hazardous and mixed waste. RHWM generally processes LLW with no, or extremely low, concentrations of transuranics (i.e., much less than 100 nCi/g). Wastes processed often contain only depleted uranium and beta- and gamma-emitting nuclides, e.g., {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 3}H. Chapter 5 of the DSA documents the derivation of TSRs and develops the operational limits that protect the safety envelope defined for this facility. The DSA is applicable to the handling of radioactive waste stored and treated in the B695 Segment of the DWTF. Section 5 of the TSR, Administrative Controls, contains those Administrative Controls necessary to ensure safe operation of the B695 Segment of the DWTF. A basis explanation follows each of the requirements described in Section 5.5, Specific Administrative Controls. The basis explanation does not constitute an additional requirement, but is intended as an expansion of the logic and reasoning behind development of the requirement. Programmatic Administrative Controls are addressed in Section 5.6.

Larson, H L

2007-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

455

Mixed Waste Focus Area: Department of Energy complex needs report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) at the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a new approach in August of 1993 to environmental research and technology development. A key feature of this new approach included establishment of the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (MWFA). The mission of the MWFA is to identify, develop, and implement needed technologies such that the major environmental management problems related to meeting DOE`s commitments for treatment of mixed wastes under the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCA), and in accordance with the Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), can be addressed, while cost-effectively expending the funding resources. To define the deficiencies or needs of the EM customers, the MWFA analyzed Proposed Site Treatment Plans (PSTPs), as well as other applicable documents, and conducted site visits throughout the summer of 1995. Representatives from the Office of Waste Management (EM-30), the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and the Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60) at each site visited were requested to consult with the Focus Area to collaboratively define their technology needs. This report documents the needs, deficiencies, technology gaps, and opportunities for expedited treatment activities that were identified during the site visit process. The defined deficiencies and needs are categorized by waste type, namely Wastewaters, Combustible Organics, Sludges/Soils, Debris/Solids, and Unique Wastes, and will be prioritized based on the relative affect the deficiency has on the DOE Complex.

Roach, J.A.

1995-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

456

RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Annual Progress Report for 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the progress during 1989 of 16 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects covering 25 hazardous waste facilities and 1 nonhazardous waste facility. Each of the projects is being conducted according to federal regulations based on the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 and the State of Washington Administrative Code. 40 refs., 75 figs., 6 tabs.

Smith, R.M.; Gorst, W.R. (eds.)

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

GRR/Section 18-OR-b - Hazardous Waste Permit Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OR-b - Hazardous Waste Permit Process OR-b - Hazardous Waste Permit Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-OR-b - Hazardous Waste Permit Process 18ORBHazardousWastePermitProcess (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies United States Environmental Protection Agency Oregon Department of Environmental Quality Oregon Public Health Division Oregon Public Utility Commission Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Oregon Water Resources Department Regulations & Policies OAR 340-105: Management Facility Permits OAR 340-120: Hazardous Waste Management ORS 466: Storage, Treatment, and Disposal Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18ORBHazardousWastePermitProcess (1).pdf

458

Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Wast-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Agency/Company /Organization: Wast-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Sector: Energy, Land, Climate Focus Area: Biomass, - Waste to Energy, Greenhouse Gas Phase: Create a Vision Resource Type: Dataset, Maps, Presentation, Publications, Guide/manual, Training materials, Case studies/examples User Interface: Website Website: www.seas.columbia.edu/earth/wtert Cost: Free The Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) brings together engineers, scientists and managers from universities and industry. The mission of WTERT is to identify and advance the best available

459

Tank Waste Strategy Update  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tank Waste Subcommittee www.em.doe.gov safety performance cleanup closure E M Environmental Management 1 Tank Waste Subcommittee Ken Picha Office of Environmental Management December 5, 2011 Background Tank Waste Subcommittee (TWS)originally chartered, in response to Secretary's request to perform a technical review of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) in May 2010. Three tasks: o Verification of closure of WTP External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issues. o WTP Technical Design Review o WTP potential improvements Report completed and briefed to DOE in September 2010 www.em.doe.gov safety performance cleanup closure E M Environmental Management 2 Report completed and briefed to DOE in September 2010 Follow-on scope for TWS identified immediately after briefing to DOE and

460

Waste Treatment Plant Overview  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, was the largest of three defense production sites in the U.S. Over the span of 40 years, it was used to produce 64 metric tons of plutonium, helping end World War II and playing a major role in military defense efforts during the Cold War. As a result, 56 million gallons of radioactive and chemical wastes are now stored in 177 underground tanks on the Hanford Site. To address this challenge, the U.S. Department of Energy contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the "Vit Plant," will use vitrification to immobilize most of Hanford's dangerous tank waste.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste resource pack" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Waste Steam Recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An examination has been made of the recovery of waste steam by three techniques: direct heat exchange to process, mechanical compression, and thermocompression. Near atmospheric steam sources were considered, but the techniques developed are equally...

Kleinfeld, J. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Waste and Recycling  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Nuclear engineer Dr. Kathy McCarthy talks about nuclear energy, the challenge of nuclear waste and the research aimed at solutions. For more information about nuclear energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

McCarthy, Kathy

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

463

A literature review of mixed waste components: Sensitivities and effects upon solidification/stabilization in cement-based matrices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US DOE Oak Ridge Field Office has signed a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) regarding Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) mixed wastes subject to the land disposal restriction (LDR) provisions of the Resource conservation and Recovery Act. The LDR FFCA establishes an aggressive schedule for conducting treatability studies and developing treatment methods for those ORR mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes listed in Appendix B to the Agreement. A development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation program has been initiated to provide those efforts necessary to identify treatment methods for all of the wastes that meet Appendix B criteria. The program has assembled project teams to address treatment development needs in a variety of areas, including that of final waste forms (i.e., stabilization/solidification processes). A literature research has been performed, with the objective of determining waste characterization needs to support cement-based waste-form development. The goal was to determine which waste species are problematic in terms of consistent production of an acceptable cement-based waste form and at what concentrations these species become intolerable. The report discusses the following: hydration mechanisms of Portland cement; mechanisms of retardation and acceleration of cement set-factors affecting the durability of waste forms; regulatory limits as they apply to mixed wastes; review of inorganic species that interfere with the development of cement-based waste forms; review of radioactive species that can be immobilized in cement-based waste forms; and review of organic species that may interfere with various waste-form properties.

Mattus, C.H.; Gilliam, T.M.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Citrus Waste Biomass Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Renewable Spirits is developing an innovative pilot plant bio-refinery to establish the commercial viability of ehtanol production utilizing a processing waste from citrus juice production. A novel process based on enzymatic hydrolysis of citrus processing waste and fermentation of resulting sugars to ethanol by yeasts was successfully developed in collaboration with a CRADA partner, USDA/ARS Citrus and Subtropical Products Laboratory. The process was also successfully scaled up from laboratory scale to 10,000 gal fermentor level.

Karel Grohman; Scott Stevenson

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

465

Balancing act creating the right regulation for coal combustion waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The December 2008 collapse of a coal ash pond in Tennessee threw safe management of coal combustion waste (CCW) into the spotlight. Millions of tons of CCW are produced in the United States each year, and a large percentage of that is recycled. The US Environmental Protection Agency is pursuing a host of initiatives that could directly or indirectly affect the disposition of CCW. States, too, are taking a look at how they regulate CCW. Among the options is the possibility of regulating CCW under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, a move that could have far-reaching implications for both the recycling and the disposal of this waste.

Manuel, J.

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

466

Development and status of the AL Mixed Waste Treatment Plan or I love that mobile unit of mine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nine Department of Energy (DOE) sites reporting to the Albuquerque Office (AL) have mixed waste that is chemically hazardous and radioactive. The hazardous waste regulations require the chemical portion of mixed waste to be to be treated to certain standards. The total volume of low-level mixed waste at the nine sites is equivalent to 7,000 drums, with individual site volumes ranging from 1 gallon of waste at the Pinellas Plant to 4,500 drums at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Nearly all the sites have a diversity of wastes requiring a diversity of treatment processes. Treatment capacity does not exist for much of this waste, and it would be expensive for each site to build the diversity of treatment processes needed to treat its own wastes. DOE-AL assembled a team that developed the AL Mixed Waste Treatment Plan that uses the resources of the nine sites to treat the waste at the sites. Work on the plan started in October 1993, and the plan was finalized in March 1994. The plan uses commercial treatment, treatability studies, and mobile treatment units. The plan specifies treatment technologies that will be built as mobile treatment units to be moved from site to site. Mobile units include bench-top units for very small volumes and treatability studies, drum-size units that treat one drum per day, and skid-size units that handle multiple drum volumes. After the tools needed to treat the wastes were determined, the sites were assigned to provide part of the treatment capacity using their own resources and expertise. The sites are making progress on treatability studies, commercial treatment, and mobile treatment design and fabrication. To date, this is the only plan for treating waste that brings the resources of several DOE sites together to treat mixed waste. It is the only program actively planning to use mobile treatment coordinated between DOE sites.

Bounini, L. [USDOE Grand Junction Project Office, CO (United States); Williams, M. [USDOE Albuquerque Operations Office, NM (United States); Zygmunt, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Office of Resource Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resource Management Resource Management Home Sub Offices › Business Operations › Information Management › Human Resources and Administration Mission and Functions HSS Standard Operating Practices (For Internal Users Only) HSS Subject Matter Experts and Functional Points of Contacts Contact Us HSS Logo Office of Resource Management Direct Report to the Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer Mission and Functions Mission The Office of Resource Management supports the infrastructure of the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) by providing balanced, unbiased, technically competent, and customer focused services in the areas of: (1) Financial Management, including budget formulation and execution; (2) Procurement Management, including contract and credit card programs; (3) Information Management, including technology-based solutions and programs; (4) Quality Assurance; (5) Human Resources, including recruitment and retention programs; (6) Administrative Services, including property management, travel, and work space management; and; (7) Strategic and Program Planning including performance and efficiency measures.

468

Contact List, Human Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Human Resources & Occupational Medicine Division Human Resources & Occupational Medicine Division Contact List Human Resources Guest, User, Visitor (GUV) Center Occupational Medicine Training and Qualifications Office Note: All listed phone extensions are in the format of (631) 344-xxxx. Human Resources Robert Lincoln, Chief Human Resources Officer x7435 rlincoln@bnl.gov Margaret Hughes x2108 hughes@bnl.gov Elizabeth Gilbert x2315 gilbert@bnl.gov Human Resources Generalists Christel Colon, HR Manager - BES, GARS & ELS x8469 ccolon@bnl.gov Joann Williams, HR Manager - Support Operations x8356 williamsj@bnl.gov Joanna Hall, HR Manager - Photon Sciences x4410 jhall@bnl.gov Donna Dowling, HR Manager - Nuclear & Particle Physics x2754 dowling@bnl.gov Terrence Buck x8715 tbuck@bnl.gov

469

CMPC Marking Resource  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

June 2012 June 2012 CMPC Marking Resource: Examples of Acceptably Marked Classified Matter June 2012 CMPC Marking Resource Examples of Acceptably Marked Classified Matter June 2012 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Health, Safety and Security Office of Security Policy CMPC Marking Resource: Examples of Acceptably Marked Classified Matter June 2012 i FOREWORD A strong and cohesive information security program is integral to national security. The

470

Japanese resource dependence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This thesis is an examination of Japan's strategic resource dependence and her reliance of the three raw materials-rich regions of Southeast Asia (ASEAN), the Persian Gulf, and Southern Africa. A discussion of the Japanese formula for securing resources in the less developed countries of the 'South' is included along with a brief overview of her onshore resource utilization in business/industry. The roles of direct foreign investment, official development assistance, energy conservation, and Japanese multinationalization are discussed.

Sim, R.W.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Arctic energy resources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Arctic is a vulnerable region with immense resources. These range from the replenishable (tidal energy, hydroelectricity, wood, biomass, fish, game, and geothermal energy) to the non-replenishable (coal, minerals, natural gas, hydrocarbon deposits). But the problems of exploiting such resources without damaging the environment of the Arctic are formidable. In this book all aspects are considered: occurrence of energy resources; the technological and economic aspects of exploration and exploitation; the environmental and social impact of technological development.

Rey, L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment Plant -...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Waste Treatment Plant - February 2011 Independent Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment Plant - February 2011 February 2011 Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Construction Quality...

473

Rhenium solubility in borosilicate nuclear waste glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glasses Developed for Nuclear Waste Immobilization," 91[12],solubility in borosilicate nuclear waste glass Ashutoshfor the researchers in nuclear waste community around the

McCloy, John S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record, Waste Treatment...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Observation of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant High Level Waste Facility Radioactive Liquid Waste Disposal System Hazards Analysis Activities (EA-WTP-HLW-2014-08-18(a))...

475

Municipal Solid Waste | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Municipal Solid Waste Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleMunicipalSolidWaste&oldid...

476

Waste Processing Annual Technology Development Report 2007 |...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Processing Annual Technology Development Report 2007 Waste Processing Annual Technology Development Report 2007 Waste Processing Annual Technology Development Report 2007...

477

Pollution Prevention, Waste Reduction, and Recycling | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Pollution Prevention, Waste Reduction, and Recycling Pollution Prevention, Waste Reduction, and Recycling The Pollution Prevention, Waste Reduction and Recycling Program was...

478

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Operators prepare drums of contact-handled transuranic waste for loading into transportation containers Operators prepare...

479

Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on February 13, 2013. EZFeed Policy Place Pennsylvania Name Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) Policy Category Other Policy Policy Type Environmental Regulations Affected Technologies Biomass/Biogas, Coal with CCS, Concentrating Solar Power, Energy Storage, Fuel Cells, Geothermal Electric, Hydroelectric, Hydroelectric (Small), Natural Gas, Nuclear, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind energy Active Policy Yes Implementing Sector State/Province Program Administrator Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection

480

Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste resource pack" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

SECONDARY WASTE MANAGEMENT STRATEGY FOR EARLY LOW ACTIVITY WASTE TREATMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study evaluates parameters relevant to River Protection Project secondary waste streams generated during Early Low Activity Waste operations and recommends a strategy for secondary waste management that considers groundwater impact, cost, and programmatic risk. The recommended strategy for managing River Protection Project secondary waste is focused on improvements in the Effiuent Treatment Facility. Baseline plans to build a Solidification Treatment Unit adjacent to Effluent Treatment Facility should be enhanced to improve solid waste performance and mitigate corrosion of tanks and piping supporting the Effiuent Treatment Facility evaporator. This approach provides a life-cycle benefit to solid waste performance and reduction of groundwater contaminants.

CRAWFORD TW

2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

482

Energy from waste via coal/waste co-firing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper reviews the feasibility of waste-to-energy plants using the cocombustion of coal with refuse-derived fuels. The paper discusses the types of wastes available: municipal solid wastes, plastics, tires, biomass, and specialized industrial wastes, such as waste oils, post-consumer carpet, auto shredder residues, and petroleum coke. The five most common combustion systems used in co-firing are briefly described. They are the stoker boiler, suspension-fired boilers, cyclone furnaces, fluidized bed boilers, and cement kilns. The paper also discusses the economic incentives for generating electricity from waste.

Winslow, J.; Ekmann, J.; Smouse, S. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center; Ramezan, M. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Harding, S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

483

Solid Waste and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) Solid Waste and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter of the law that establishes the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency establishes the rules and regulations regarding solid waste. The chapter establishes specific regulations for biomass facilities, which includes permitting, siting, operation, safety guidelines, and closing requirements. Siting regulations include setbacks from waste handling areas for state facilities (1000 feet from jails, schools), requirements for not siting

484

Post-2014 Resource Allocations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Post-2014 Resource Allocations Post-2014 Resource Allocations On December 17, 2010, Western Area Power Administration's Rocky Mountain Region published its Post-2014 Resource Pool-Loveland Area Projects (LAP), Allocation Procedures and Call for Applications (75 FR 78988). Through the Post-2014 Resource Pool (Resource Pool), Western will allocate up to 1 percent of the LAP long-term firm hydroelectric resource available as of October 1, 2014, that is estimated to be approximately 6.9 megawatts for the summer season and 6.1 megawatts for the winter season. The Resource Pool will be created by reducing existing customers' allocations by up to 1 percent. A public information forum was held on February 2, 2011, prior to the application deadline, which was March 4, 2011. Of the seven applications received, Western determined that six of the applicants met the Resource Pool General Eligibility Criteria. Western published the Resource Pool proposed power allocation and initiated a public comment period in the Federal Register (76 FR 45551, July 29, 2011). A public comment forum on the proposed power allocation was held August 25, 2011, and public comments were due to Western by September 12, 2011. There were no comments received during the public comment period.

485

Geothermal Resources and Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This page provides a brief overview of geothermal energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply geothermal systems within the Federal sector.

486

Resources | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Learned: Peer Exchange Calls Cost-Effectiveness Tool (Beta Version) Home Energy Advisor Publications Additional Resources DOE Residential Programs Home Energy Pros Online...

487

Environmental Resource Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental Resource Management This division delivers science-based engineering solutions to meet regional and national energy, water and other critical environmental...

488

INL Research Library Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and licensed subscriptions to provide the scientific and technical resources needed by INL researchers. Because of license restrictions, many of our subscriptions cannot be...

489

Chapter 13 Cultural Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

proposed routes for the action alternatives and the extensive area covered by the APE, BPA developed a predictive analysis to assess the potential for cultural resources along...

490

Resources | Jefferson Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources Machine Control Center Display Jefferson Lab's accelerator is operated from the Machine Control Center. The MCC features a full-wall display that allows operators to...

491
492

LANSCE | Lujan Center | Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

User Resources The links below describe equipment, laboratories, capabilities, and sample environments that are available to users. Users must plan ahead and specify their needs...

493

Manhattan Project: Resources  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

web site, a number of additional resources are also provided: Reference Materials Maps Photo Gallery To Learn More Library Suggested Readings Background on this Site About this...

494

ARM - Other Science Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SitesOther Science Resources Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About...

495

Central American resource studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory has been working with five Central American countries to assist in the development of their energy and mineral resources. Since 1985, mineral resources in Costa Rica, peat resources in Costa Rica and Panama, geothermal energy resources in Honduras and Guatemala, and geothermal field development in El Salvador and Costa Rica have been topics of study. This paper presents an overview of this work -- within these proceedings are papers that deal with specific aspects of each topic, and these will be duly noted. 15 refs., 4 figs.

Van Eeckhout, E.; Laughlin, A.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

NETL: Natural Gas Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources Significant volumes of natural gas can also be produced from tight (low permeability) sandstone reservoirs and coal seams, both unconventional reservoir rocks. NETL...

497

Energy Resource Potential  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resource Potential Resource Potential of Methane Hydrate Energy Resource Potential An introduction to the science and energy potential of a unique resource Disclaimer Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights.

498

LANL reaches waste shipment milestone  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LANL reaches waste shipment milestone LANL reaches waste shipment milestone LANL reaches waste shipment milestone The Lab surpassed 100,000 plutonium-equivalent curies of TRU waste shipped to WIPP, about one-third of the Lab's total. May 31, 2011 A shipment of transuranic waste on its way to the WIPP repository A shipment of transuranic waste on its way to the WIPP repository. Contact Fred deSousa Communicatons Office (505) 665-3430 Email LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, May 31, 2011 - Los Alamos National Laboratory has reached an important milestone in its campaign to ship transuranic (TRU) waste from Cold War-era nuclear operations to the U.S. Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. This month, the Lab surpassed 100,000 plutonium-equivalent curies of TRU waste shipped to WIPP, about one-third of the Lab's total.

499

The largest radioactive waste glassification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

largest radioactive waste glassification largest radioactive waste glassification plant in the nation, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) converts the liquid nuclear waste currently stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) into a solid glass form suitable for long-term storage and disposal. Scientists have long considered this glassification process, called "vitrification," as the preferred option for treating liquid nuclear waste. By immobilizing the radioactivity in glass, the DWPF reduces the risks associated with the continued storage of liquid nuclear waste at SRS and prepares the waste for final disposal in a federal repository. About 38 million gallons of liquid nuclear wastes are now stored in 49 underground carbon-steel tanks at SRS. This waste has about 300 million curies of radioactivity, of which the vast majority

500

Waste Treatment Plant - 12508  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will immobilize millions of gallons of Hanford's tank waste into solid glass using a proven technology called vitrification. The vitrification process will turn the waste into a stable glass form that is safe for long-term storage. Our discussion of the WTP will include a description of the ongoing design and construction of this large, complex, first-of-a-kind project. The concept for the operation of the WTP is to separate high-level and low-activity waste fractions, and immobilize those fractions in glass using vitrification. The WTP includes four major nuclear facilities and various support facilities. Waste from the Tank Farms is first pumped to the Pretreatment Facility at the WTP through an underground pipe-in-pipe system. When construction is complete, the Pretreatment Facility will be 12 stories high, 540 feet long and 215 feet wide, making it the largest of the four major nuclear facilities that compose the WTP. The total size of this facility will be more than 490,000 square feet. More than 8.2 million craft hours are required to construct this facility. Currently, the Pretreatment Facility is 51 percent complete. At the Pretreatment Facility the waste is pumped to the interior waste feed receipt vessels. Each of these four vessels is 55-feet tall and has a 375,000 gallon capacity, which makes them the largest vessels inside the Pretreatment Facility. These vessels contain a series of internal pulse-jet mixers to keep incoming waste properly mixed. The vessels are inside the black-cell areas, completely enclosed behind thick steel-laced, high strength concrete walls. The black cells are designed to be maintenance free with no moving parts. Once hot operations commence the black-cell area will be inaccessible. Surrounded by black cells, is the 'hot cell canyon'. The hot cell contains all the moving and replaceable components to remove solids and extract liquids. In this area, there is ultrafiltration equipment, cesium-ion exchange columns, evaporator boilers and recirculation pumps, and various mechanical process pumps for transferring process fluids. During the first phase of pretreatment, the waste will be concentrated using an evaporation process. Solids will be filtered out, and the remaining soluble, highly radioactive isotopes will be removed using an ion-exchange process. The high-level solids will be sent to the High-Level Waste (HLW) Vitrification Facility, and the low activity liquids will be sent to the Low-Activity Waste (LAW) Vitrification Facility for further processing. The high-level waste will be transferred via underground pipes to the HLW Facility from the Pretreatment Facility. The waste first arrives at the wet cell, which rests inside a black-cell area. The pretreated waste is transferred through shielded pipes into a series of melter preparation and feed vessels before reaching the melters. Liquids from various facility processes also return to the wet cell for interim storage before recycling back to the Pretreatment Facility. (authors)

Harp, Benton; Olds, Erik [US DOE (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z