Sample records for waste resource pack

  1. Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | Open Energy Information HanergyHarneysource HistoryInformation

  2. Students & Mental Health Resource Pack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Mark

    Students & Mental Health Resource Pack Produced by - www.rethink.org/at-ease/ SHEFFIELD EARLY://clik.to/eis NORTH EAST SHEFFIELD Northlands Community Health Centre, Southey Hill, Sheffield S5 8BE Tel: 0114 is severe mental illness? 1.4 Treatment and prognosis What is mental health awareness? 2.1 Introduction 2

  3. Packing TRU Waste Containers Design | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - T en YMedicine - Assistant PIAEnergyPacking TRU Waste

  4. WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    to Climate protection in light of the· Waste Framework Directive. The "energy package", e.g. the RenewablesWASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource! energy forum Case Studies from Estonia, Switzerland, Germany Bossart,· ABB Waste-to-Energy Plants Edmund Fleck,· ESWET Marcel van Berlo,· Afval Energie Bedrijf From

  5. Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides a brief overview of municipal solid waste energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply waste to energy within the Federal sector.

  6. Pennsylvania Solid Waste- Resource Recovery Development Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act promotes the construction and the application of solid waste disposal/processing and resource recovery systems that preserve and enhance the quality of air, water, and land resources. The...

  7. Packing TRU Waste Containers Design | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked QuestionsDepartmentGas and OilGeothermal andofEnergy

  8. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Typifies Optimizing Resources to...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Plant Typifies Optimizing Resources to Maximize Results Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Typifies Optimizing Resources to Maximize Results March 5, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis EM Carlsbad...

  9. Solid Waste Disposal Resource Recovery Facilities Act (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation authorizes local governing bodies to form joint agencies to advance the collection, transfer, processing of solid waste, recovery of resources, and sales of recovered resources in...

  10. Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality manages solid waste for the state of Louisiana under the authority of the Solid Waste Management and Resource Recover Law. The Department makes...

  11. Solid Waste Resource Recovery Financing Act (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The State of Texas encourages the processing of solid waste for the purpose of extracting, converting to energy, or otherwise separating and preparing solid waste for reuse. This Act provides for...

  12. Economic Analysis of a Waste Water Resource Heat Pump Air-Conditioning System in North China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, H.; Li, D.; Dai, X.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the situation of waste water resource in north China and the characteristics and styles of a waste water resource heat pump system, and analyzes the economic feasibility of a waste water resource heat pump air...

  13. Economic Analysis of a Waste Water Resource Heat Pump Air-Conditioning System in North China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, H.; Li, D.; Dai, X.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the situation of waste water resource in north China and the characteristics and styles of a waste water resource heat pump system, and analyzes the economic feasibility of a waste water resource heat pump air...

  14. State Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Plan (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The State supports the "good management of solid waste and the conservation of natural resources through the promotion or development of systems to collect, separate, reclaim, recycle, and dispose...

  15. Fate and transport of phenol in a packed bed reactor containing simulated solid waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saquing, Jovita M., E-mail: jmsaquing@gmail.com [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, Campus Box 7908, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7908 (United States); Knappe, Detlef R.U., E-mail: knappe@ncsu.edu [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, Campus Box 7908, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7908 (United States); Barlaz, Morton A., E-mail: barlaz@ncsu.edu [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, Campus Box 7908, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7908 (United States)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anaerobic column experiments were conducted at 37 Degree-Sign C using a simulated waste mixture. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sorption and biodegradation model parameters were determined from batch tests. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HYDRUS simulated well the fate and transport of phenol in a fully saturated waste column. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The batch biodegradation rate and the rate obtained by inverse modeling differed by a factor of {approx}2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tracer tests showed the importance of hydrodynamic parameters to improve model estimates. - Abstract: An assessment of the risk to human health and the environment associated with the presence of organic contaminants (OCs) in landfills necessitates reliable predictive models. The overall objectives of this study were to (1) conduct column experiments to measure the fate and transport of an OC in a simulated solid waste mixture, (2) compare the results of column experiments to model predictions using HYDRUS-1D (version 4.13), a contaminant fate and transport model that can be parameterized to simulate the laboratory experimental system, and (3) determine model input parameters from independently conducted batch experiments. Experiments were conducted in which sorption only and sorption plus biodegradation influenced OC transport. HYDRUS-1D can reasonably simulate the fate and transport of phenol in an anaerobic and fully saturated waste column in which biodegradation and sorption are the prevailing fate processes. The agreement between model predictions and column data was imperfect (i.e., within a factor of two) for the sorption plus biodegradation test and the error almost certainly lies in the difficulty of measuring a biodegradation rate that is applicable to the column conditions. Nevertheless, a biodegradation rate estimate that is within a factor of two or even five may be adequate in the context of a landfill, given the extended retention time and the fact that leachate release will be controlled by the infiltration rate which can be minimized by engineering controls.

  16. Technical resource document for assured thermal processing of wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrow, R.L.; Fisk, G.A.; Hartwig, C.M.; Hurt, R.H.; Ringland, J.T.; Swansiger, W.A.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a concise compendium of resource material covering assured thermal processing of wastes (ATPW), an area in which Sandia aims to develop a large program. The ATPW program at Sandia is examining a wide variety of waste streams and thermal processes. Waste streams under consideration include municipal, chemical, medical, and mixed wastes. Thermal processes under consideration range from various incineration technologies to non-incineration processes such as supercritical water oxidation or molten metal technologies. Each of the chapters describes the element covered, discusses issues associated with its further development and/or utilization, presents Sandia capabilities that address these issues, and indicates important connections to other ATPW elements. The division of the field into elements was driven by the team`s desire to emphasize areas where Sandia`s capabilities can lead to major advances and is therefore somewhat unconventional. The report will be valuable to Sandians involved in further ATPW program development.

  17. Jitter-aware time-frequency resource allocation and packing algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Huan

    One of the main components of the next generation protected military satellite communication systems is dynamic bandwidth resource allocation (DBRA). A centralized DBRA algorithm on the satellite dynamically grants terminals ...

  18. Resource recovery potential from secondary components of segregated municipal solid wastes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Resource recovery potential from secondary components of segregated municipal solid wastes H. N solid wastes (MSW) . Fermentation wastes . Solid-state stratified bed (SSB) . BMP Introduction India is building up its city level solid waste management in an extensive manner. It has framed necessary rules

  19. Challenges and Opportunities for Wet-Waste Feedstocks - Resource

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJuneWasteDepartment ofEnvironmentalNational Laboratory

  20. The Coal-Waste Artificial Reef Program (C-WARP): A New Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Coal-Waste Artificial Reef Program (C-WARP): A New Resource Potential for Fishing Reef ABSTRACT-Thefeasibility ofusing solid blocks of waste materialfrom coal:firedpower plantslor underwater (scrubber) sludge from coal-burning power stations. was constructed in the Atlantic Ocean offLong Island. N

  1. Packed Lunches.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reasonover, Frances L.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and digestion is easily upset, so plan light and easily digested foods. Because the body loses a lot of fluid in an effort to stay cool, drink plenty of water. A thermos of lemonade, iced tea with lemon or some other fruit drink is particularly refreshing... precautions used with paper bags. Another packing container is an insulated bag. In this case, frozen water in plastic cartons or reuseable ice packs can be used to keep food cold until lunchtime. Or, use thermos bottles to keep foods hot or cold. Small...

  2. organized in cooperation with TU Vienna, (Institute for Water Quality, Resource and Waste Management) Analysis, Evaluation and Design of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szmolyan, Peter

    Management) Analysis, Evaluation and Design of Sustainable Waste Management Systems Goal The objective such as Material Flow Analysis, case studies for design of waste management systems) with special emphasisorganized in cooperation with TU Vienna, (Institute for Water Quality, Resource and Waste

  3. Waste Authority wins 8th law suit against resource recovery project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cornerstone of a series of legal challenges launched against the plan to build a waste-to-energy resource recovery plant in the Port Washington sandpits has been dismissed by the New York State Supreme Court in favor of the North Hempstead Solid Waste Management Authority. The dismissal marks the fourth unsuccessful attempt by Residents for A More Beautiful Port Washington to have the environmental review performed by the Town's Solid Waste Management Authority overturned on the contention that it should have been performed by the State. The Residents law suit sought to have the entire two and one half year environmental review performed by the Solid Waste Management Authority discarded and redone by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

  4. Design and management for resource recovery. Volume 1. Energy from waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frankiewicz, T.C. (ed.)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 16 chapters in this volume represent a large fraction of the technical presentations made at the July 1979 Engineerng Foundation Conference, Municipal solid waste as a resource: the problem and the promise. This conference was held at a time when commercial interest in recovering resources from solid waste entered a growth phase and when the economics of energy recovery from waste improved dramatically. The purpose of the meeting, in Henniker, NH, was to deal openly with some of the past problems and look to the future to see if in fact the nagging early difficulties could be overcome. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 16 chapters, all of which were selected for Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA); 2 will appear in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA).

  5. Coal waste seen as valuable resource Published: March. 29, 2011 at 8:09 PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    Coal waste seen as valuable resource Published: March. 29, 2011 at 8:09 PM ANAHEIM, Calif., March 29 (UPI) -- Fly ash, a byproduct of coal-burning electric power plants, could save billions. More than 450 coal-burning electric power plants in the United States produce about 130 million tons

  6. Economic Analysis and Comparison of Waste Water Resource Heat Pump Heating and Air-Conditioning System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, C.; Wang, S.; Chen, H.; Shi, Y.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the heating and air-conditioning system of a high-rise residential building in Northern city, this paper provides a discussion on the choice and matching of different types of Waste Water Resource Heat Pump (WWRHP) heating and air...

  7. Economic Analysis and Comparison of Waste Water Resource Heat Pump Heating and Air-Conditioning System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, C.; Wang, S.; Chen, H.; Shi, Y.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the heating and air-conditioning system of a high-rise residential building in Northern city, this paper provides a discussion on the choice and matching of different types of Waste Water Resource Heat Pump (WWRHP) heating and air...

  8. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Typifies Optimizing Resources to Maximize

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradley Nickell Director ofDepartmentDRAFT -

  9. Approximating semidefinite packing programs ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we define semidefinite packing programs and describe an ... Semidefinite packing programs arise in many applications such as semidefinite.

  10. Packed-bed reactor/silent-discharge plasma design data report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1992, Congress passed the Federal Facility Compliance Act requiring the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to treat and dispose of its mixed waste in accordance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) land disposal restrictions (LDRs). The DOE Albuquerque Operations Office (AL) currently does not have adequate systems to treat the mixed wastes generated and stored at the nine DOE-AL sites. In response to the need for mixed-waste treatment capacity, DOE-AL organized a Treatment Selection Team under the Mixed-Waste Treatment Program (MWTP) to match mixed wastes with treatment options and develop a strategy for treatment of its mixed waste. The strategy developed by the Treatment Selection Team, as described in the AL Mixed-Waste Treatment Plan (DOE 1994), is to use available off-site commercial treatment facilities for all wastes that can be successfully and cost-effectively treated by such facilities. Where no appropriate commercial treatment facilities exist, mobile treatment units (MTUs) would be developed to treat wastes at the sites where the wastes are generated. Treatment processes used for mixed waste must not only address the hazardous component (i.e., meet LDRs) but also must contain the radioactive component in a form that allows final disposal while protecting workers, the public, and the environment. The packed-bed reactor/silent discharge plasma was chosen as a potential candidate for the treatment of the mixed wastes. The process is described.

  11. Maximization of revenues for power sales from a solid waste resources recovery facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report discusses the actual implementation of the best alternative in selling electrical power generated by an existing waste-to-energy facility, the Metro-Dade County Resources Recovery Plant. After the plant processes and extracts various products out of the municipal solid waste, it burns it to produce electrical power. The price for buying power to satisfy the internal needs of our Resources Recovery Facility (RRF) is substantially higher than the power price for selling electricity to any other entity. Therefore, without any further analysis, it was decided to first satisfy those internal needs and then export the excess power. Various alternatives were thoroughly explored as to what to do with the excess power. Selling power to the power utilities or utilizing the power in other facilities were the primary options.

  12. Comprehensive Municipal Solid Waste Management, Resource Recovery, and Conservation Act (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act encourages the establishment of regional waste management facilities and the cooperation of local waste management entities in order to streamline the management of municipal solid waste...

  13. RD & D priorities for energy production and resource conservation from municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) needs and priorities associated with municipal solid waste (MSW) management technologies that conserve or produce energy or resources. The changing character of MSW waste management and the public`s heightened awareness of its real and perceived benefits and costs creates opportunities for RD&D in MSW technologies. Increased recycling, for example, creates new opportunities for energy, chemicals, and materials recovery. New technologies to control and monitor emissions from MSW combustion facilities are available for further improvement or application. Furthermore, emerging waste-to-energy technologies may offer environmental, economic, and other advantages. Given these developments, DOE identified a need to assess the RD&D needs and pdodties and carefully target RD&D efforts to help solve the carbon`s waste management problem and further the National Energy Strategy. This report presents such an assessment. It identifies and Documents RD&D needs and priorities in the broad area of MSW resource . recovery, focusing on efforts to make MSW management technologies commercially viable or to improve their commercial deployment over a 5 to l0 year period. Panels of technical experts identifies 279 RD&D needs in 12 technology areas, ranking about one-fifth of these needs as priorities. A ``Peer Review Group`` identified mass-burn combustion, ``systems studies,`` landfill gas, and ash utilization and disposal as high priority areas for RD&D based on cost and the impacts of further RD&D. The results of this assessment are intended to provide guidance to DOE concerning possible future RD&D projects.

  14. Landfill Disamenities And Better Utilization of Waste Resources Presented to the Wisconsin Governor's Task Force on Waste Materials Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    're heading, or should be heading regarding solid waste disposal. I began my environmental engineering career in New York State in the 1960's. We had many problems with polluting solid waste dumps, landfill fires, WTE facilities. We know that municipal solid waste, MSW landfills in the US are estimated to release

  15. Appropriate Technologies and Systems to respond to Climate Change, Improved Water Resources Management, Waste Management and Sanitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    Resources Management, Waste Management and Sanitation A Review of Water Information Systems in the English availability, quality, use and demand. In this regard, Water Information Systems play a key role in the management of the resource. This paper examines the water information systems of St. Lucia, Jamaica

  16. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Diverting Waste, Conserving Natural Resources: Composting Toilets for the New SUB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Conserving Natural Resources: Composting Toilets for the New SUB Jay Baker-French University of British/SEEDS Composting Toilets for the New SUB Jay Baker-French 9/27/2011 1 DIVERTING WASTE, CONSERVING NATURAL RESOURCES: COMPOSTING TOILETS FOR THE NEW SUB Composting Toilets in the New SUB - Executive

  17. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure Plan Summary for Interim reasctive Waste Treatment Area (IRWTA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, E.T.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This closure plan has been prepared for the interim Reactive Waste Treatment Area (IRWT'A) located at the Y-12 Pkmt in oak Ridge, Tennessee (Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] Identification TN 389-009-0001). The actions required to achieve closure of the IRWTA are outlined in this plan, which is being submitted in accordance with Tennessee Ruie 1200- 1-1 1-.0S(7) and Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 265, Subpart G. The IRWTA was used to treat waste sodium and potassium (NaK) that are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The location of the IRWT'A is shown in Figures 1 and 2, and a diagram is shown in Figure 3. This pkm details all steps that wdi be petiormed to close the IRWTA. Note that this is a fmai ciosure.and a diagram is shown in Figure 3. This pkm details all steps that wdi be petiormed to close the IRWTA. Note that this is a fmai ciosure.

  18. Waste Management in Dsseldorf Combination of separate collection,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Waste Management in Düsseldorf Combination of separate collection, recycling and waste-to-energy Biowaste Garden waste Light packaging Paper Glass Wood from bulky waste Bulky waste Rest / mixed waste Bio- Garden- Paper Glass Light Metals Wood Bulky Rest waste waste Card- Pack. waste board Saved CO2

  19. Columbia University Hazardous Waste Room Inspection Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    Storage Area Hazardous Waste Room Inspection Report Location: Bldg. Room: Date: Inspected ByColumbia University Hazardous Waste Room Inspection Report Flammable Storage Area Lack Pack always closed while holding hazardous wastes? Comment: 12. Are containers labeled? Date

  20. Resource Conservative Manufacturing Transforming Waste into High Value Resource through Closed-Loop Product Systems (ResCoM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arleo, Angelo

    and the environment, the EU has no choice but to go for the transition to a resource-efficient and ultimately), supply chain management (integrated supply chains), business model development (closed-loop business of closed loop product design in terms of resource efficiency, CO2 production and energy use

  1. Cow2Joules: Distributed Conversion of Organic Waste to Energy Resources Background to the project THEY are undertaking at ESF DLJohnson, Feb. 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatterjee, Avik P.

    and commercial restaurant food waste supplies, offering an alternative to the composting, incineration or land for simple, stable, small-scale operations. 1 http://www.iea-biogas.net/ 2 http://www.epa.gov/epawaste/conserve/materials/organics/foodCow2Joules: Distributed Conversion of Organic Waste to Energy Resources Background to the project

  2. Professional Training Information Pack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, Christopher

    Intending Professional Training Students Year 2 Information Pack #12;- 1 - Applying for a Professional Training Placement To be allowed to do the Professional Training you must have enrolled on one must talk to Dr J. M. Thompson immediately. General introduction to professional training Students

  3. Optimization of blended battery packs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erb, Dylan C. (Dylan Charles)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis reviews the traditional battery pack design process for hybrid and electric vehicles, and presents a dynamic programming (DP) based algorithm that eases the process of cell selection and pack design, especially ...

  4. Packed Bed Combustion: An Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hallett, William L.H.

    Packed Bed Combustion: An Overview William Hallett Dept. of Mechanical Engineering Universit d'Ottawa - University of Ottawa #12;Packed Bed Combustion - University of Ottawa - CICS 2005 Introduction air fuel feedproducts xbed grate Packed Bed Combustion: fairly large particles of solid fuel on a grate, air supplied

  5. Enumerating rigid sphere packings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miranda C. Holmes-Cerfon

    2015-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Packing problems, which ask how to arrange a collection of objects in space to meet certain criteria, are important in a great many physical and biological systems, where geometrical arrangements at small scales control behaviour at larger ones. In many systems there is no single, optimal packing that dominates, but rather one must understand the entire set of possible packings. As a step in this direction we enumerate rigid clusters of identical hard spheres for $n\\leq 14$, and clusters with the maximum number of contacts for $n\\leq 19$. A rigid cluster is one that cannot be continuously deformed while maintaining all contacts. This is a nonlinear notion that arises naturally because such clusters are the metastable states when the spheres interact with a short-range potential, as is the case in many nano- or micro-scale systems. We expect these lists are nearly complete, except for a small number of highly singular clusters (linearly floppy but nonlinearly rigid.) The data contains some major geometrical surprises, such as the prevalence of hypostatic clusters: those with less than the $3n-6$ contacts generically necessary for rigidity. We discuss these and several other unusual clusters, whose geometries may shed insight into physical mechanisms, pose mathematical and computational problems, or bring inspiration for designing new materials.

  6. Utilization of geopressured resources in the oxidation of organic waste in supercritical water. Phase I, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz, Alexander F.; Herzog, Howard J.; Tester, Jefferson W.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geopressured resources are geothermal reservoirs containing dissolved methane in hot brine at pressures well in excess of their in situ hydrostatic pressure. In the US, geopressured resources are primarily located in the Gulf (of Mexico) Coast. The wells in this area are characterized by typical bottomhole temperatures of 120-180 C (250-360 F) (Negus-de Wys, 1991a) and bottomhole pressures of 675-1275 bar (9,800-18,500 psia) (Negus-de Wys, 1991b). Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is an emerging technology for the destruction of hazardous organic waste in which oxidation is carried out in a water medium above the critical point of pure water (374 C/705 F, 221 bar/3208 psia) (Tester et al., 1992). Geopressured resources are particularly suitable as an input stream to a SCWO waste treatment process due to the near critical conditions of their hot brine. By using a Rankine-type power cycle, electric power can be generated by capturing the available thermal and hydraulic energy from the geothermal resource and the chemical energy of the dissolved methane released by the oxidation process. In addition to oxidizing the methane to convert the chemical energy to thermal energy, auxiliary fuel in the form of an organic waste can be co-oxidized to increase the energy output to commercially sustainable levels. Coupling the treatment of geopressured brine with an organic waste in a SCWO process synergistically improves power production while providing a means for treating hazardous waste. The objective of this study is to assess the feasibility of using geopressured resources to simultaneously detoxify hazardous waste and generate electric power. Our ultimate aim is to develop conceptual process designs for above-ground and fully or modified in situ approaches to co-processing organic waste with geopressured brine in supercritical water. As a preparatory step for investigating in situ approaches, a realistic above-ground conceptual design was developed in this study. In that concept, the waste, brine and oxidant (air or oxygen) are introduced into the SCWO reactor at the system pressure of 234 bar (3400 psia). The heat of oxidation raises the temperature of the system to about 600 C (1100 F). Due to the low solubility of inorganic salts in supercritical water (about 200 ppm or less) (Armellini and Tester, 1990, 1991a, 1991b), solid salt forms and falls to the lower section of the reactor, where it is cooled and quenched with water, creating a concentrated (organic-free) brine that would be mixed with brackish water and reinjected back to the geopressured well. Power is generated by the expansion of the products of the SCWO process through a series of multi-stage turboexpanden. A processing capacity of 100,000 gallons per day (gpd) was initially taken as the design basis, following some investigations carried out at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (Propp et al., 1990). The process was modeled using the ASPEN PLUS{trademark} process flowsheet simulator and material and energy balances were determined. Both the cases of using air and oxygen as oxidant were investigated. Toluene was chosen as the model compound to represent the organic waste. Turbine design calculations based on the volumetric flowrates obtained for a 100,000 gpd capacity resulted in unrealistically high rotor rotational speeds and small wheel pitch diameters to achieve optimum efficiencies. Higher SCWO effluent flowrates would lower rotor rotational speeds and increase wheel pitch diameters to more practical levels. Thus, a 42-fold larger design capacity of 100,000 barrels per day (bpd) was adopted as the basis for an above-ground base case. The results for the material and energy balances for a processing capacity of 100,000 bpd using air and oxygen as oxidant scale up linearly from the results for the 100,000 gpd case. The best case flowsheet corresponding to a 100,000 bpi case using oxygen as oxidant is given in Figure 1. Our conceptual design study suggests that simultaneous detoxification of hazardous waste and production of power is possible by co-pr

  7. Convex Optimization Course Welcome Pack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Julian

    1 NATCOR Convex Optimization Course 23rd ­ 27th June 2014 Welcome Pack This pack contains. ABSTRACT Convex optimization is the fundamental process of optimal decision-making. Although mathematically restrictive, many practical problems may be modelled directly as convex optimization problems. Convex

  8. Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press ReleasesIn the InorganicResources Resources Policies,

  9. Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of0 Resource ProgramResources

  10. Valve stem and packing assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wordin, J.J.

    1991-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A valve stem and packing assembly is provided in which a rotatable valve stem includes a first tractrix surface for sliding contact with a stem packing and also includes a second tractrix surface for sliding contact with a bonnet. Force is applied by means of a spring, gland flange, and gland on the stem packing so the stem packing seals to the valve stem and bonnet. This configuration serves to create and maintain a reliable seal between the stem packing and the valve stem. The bonnet includes a second complementary tractrix surface for contacting the second sliding tractrix surface, the combination serving as a journal bearing for the entire valve stem and packing assembly. The journal bearing so configured is known as a Schiele's pivot. The Schiele's pivot also serves to maintain proper alignment of the valve stem with respect to the bonnet. Vertical wear between the surfaces of the Schiele's pivot is uniform at all points of contact between the second sliding tractrix surface and the second complementary tractrix surface of a bonnet. The valve stem is connected to a valve plug by means of a slip joint. The valve is opened and closed by rotating the valve stem. The slip joint compensates for wear on the Schiele's pivot and on the valve plug. A ledge is provided on the valve bonnet for the retaining nut to bear against. The ledge prevents over tightening of the retaining nut and the resulting excessive friction between stem and stem packing. 2 figures.

  11. Valve stem and packing assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wordin, John J. (Bingham County, ID)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A valve stem and packing assembly is provided in which a rotatable valve stem includes a first tractrix surface for sliding contact with a stem packing and also includes a second tractrix surface for sliding contact with a bonnet. Force is applied by means of a spring, gland flange, and gland on the stem packing so the stem packing seals to the valve stem and bonnet. This configuration serves to create and maintain a reliable seal between the stem packing and the valve stem. The bonnet includes a second complementary tractrix surface for contacting the second sliding tractrix surface, the combination serving as a journal bearing for the entire valve stem and packing assembly. The journal bearing so configured is known as a Schiele's pivot. The Schiele's pivot also serves to maintain proper alignment of the valve stem with respect to the bonnet. Vertical wear between the surfaces of the Schiele's pivot is uniform at all points of contact between the second sliding tractrix surface and the second complementary tractrix surface of a bonnet. The valve stem is connected to a valve plug by means of a slip joint. The valve is opened and closed by rotating the valve stem. The slip joint compensates for wear on the Schiele's pivot and on the valve plug. A ledge is provided on the valve bonnet for the retaining nut to bear against. The ledge prevents overtightening of the retaining nut and the resulting excessive friction between stem and stem packing.

  12. Challenges and Opportunities for Wet-Waste Feedstocks…Resource Assessment

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1. Feedstock & Production Challenge #

  13. NNSS Waste Disposal Proves Vital Resource for DOE Complex | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732onMake Your NextHow EMMinutes:Energy(1).pdf.pdfNNSA

  14. Method for packing chromatographic beds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Freeman, David H. (Potomac, MD); Angeles, Rosalie M. (Germantown, MD); Keller, Suzanne (Rockville, MD)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Column chromatography beds are packed through the application of static force. A slurry of the chromatography bed material and a non-viscous liquid is filled into the column plugged at one end, and allowed to settle. The column is transferred to a centrifuge, and centrifuged for a brief period of time to achieve a predetermined packing level, at a range generally of 100-5,000 gravities. Thereafter, the plug is removed, other fixtures may be secured, and the liquid is allowed to flow out through the bed. This results in an evenly packed bed, with no channeling or preferential flow characteristics.

  15. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 1, Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume includes the following chapters: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant RCRA A permit application; facility description; waste analysis plan; groundwater monitoring; procedures to prevent hazards; RCRA contingency plan; personnel training; corrective action for solid waste management units; and other Federal laws.

  16. Resource Management Plan for the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation. Volume 15, Appendix P: waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, B.A.

    1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since their inception, the DOE facilities on the Oak Ridge Reservation have been the source of a variety of airborne, liquid, and solid wastes which are characterized as nonhazardous, hazardous, and/or radioactive. The major airborne releases come from three primary sources: steam plant emissions, process discharge, and cooling towers. Liquid wastes are handled in various manners depending upon the particular waste, but in general, major corrosive waste streams are neutralized prior to discharge with the discharge routed to holding or settling ponds. The major solid wastes are derived from construction debris, sanitary operation, and radioactive processes, and the machining operations at Y-12. Nonradioactive hazardous wastes are disposed in solid waste storage areas, shipped to commercial disposal facilities, returned in sludge ponds, or sent to radioactive waste burial areas. The radioactive-hazardous wastes are treated in two manners: storage of the waste until acceptable disposal options are developed, or treatment of the waste to remove or destroy one of the components prior to disposal. 5 references, 4 figures, 13 tables.

  17. Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press ReleasesIn the Inorganic

  18. Measured Black Carbon Deposition on the Sierra Nevada Snow Pack and Implication for Snow Pack Retreat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadley, O.L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2007). As the snow pack ages the ice crystals undergoIn older snow packs containing larger ice grains, albedoarctic sea ice, mountain glaciers and snow packs. This study

  19. DataPackInvrpt

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell: Gas production well,505 UCC-700

  20. Cylinder valve packing nut studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blue, S.C. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Paducah, KY (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The design, manufacture, and use of cylinder valve packing nuts have been studied to improve their resistance to failure from stress corrosion cracking. Stress frozen photoelastic models have been analyzed to measure the stress concentrations at observed points of failure. The load effects induced by assembly torque and thermal expansion of stem packing were observed by strain gaging nuts. The effects of finishing operations and heat treatment were studied by the strain gage hole boring and X-ray methods. Modifications of manufacturing and operation practices are reducing the frequency of stress corrosion failures.

  1. Kold Pack: Order (2013-CE-5323)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Kold Pack, Inc. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Kold Pack had failed to certify that certain models of walk-in cooler and freezer components comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  2. RESOURCE ETH, 1ml RESOURCE ISO, 1 ml

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    RESOURCE ETH, 1ml RESOURCE ISO, 1 ml RESOURCE PHE, 1 ml RESOURCE HIC Test Kit instructions i 56-1188-26 AB #12;Introduction RESOURCETM ETH (ether), ISO (isopropyl) and PHE (phenyl) are pre-packed high will have the strongest hydrophobicity followed by RESOURCE ISO and RESOUR- CE ETH succesively. Fig. 1

  3. Adhesive Loose Packings of Small Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenwei Liu; Shuiqing Li; Adrian Baule; Hernn A. Makse

    2014-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore adhesive loose packings of dry small spherical particles of micrometer size using 3D discrete-element simulations with adhesive contact mechanics. A dimensionless adhesion parameter ($Ad$) successfully combines the effects of particle velocities, sizes and the work of adhesion, identifying a universal regime of adhesive packings for $Ad>1$. The structural properties of the packings in this regime are well described by an ensemble approach based on a coarse-grained volume function that includes correlations between bulk and contact spheres. Our theoretical and numerical results predict: (i) An equation of state for adhesive loose packings that appears as a continuation from the frictionless random close packing (RCP) point in the jamming phase diagram; (ii) The existence of a maximal loose packing point at the coordination number $Z=2$ and packing fraction $\\phi=1/2^{3}$. Our results highlight that adhesion leads to a universal packing regime at packing fractions much smaller than the random loose packing, which can be described within a statistical mechanical framework. We present a general phase diagram of jammed matter comprising frictionless, frictional, adhesive as well as non-spherical particles, providing a classification of packings in terms of their continuation from the spherical frictionless RCP.

  4. Hazardous Waste Management (Delaware)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The act authorizes the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environment Control (DNREC) to regulate hazardous waste and create a program to manage sources of hazardous waste. The act...

  5. Implementation of the Resource Disincentive in 40 CFR part 191.14 (e) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1986, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project Office (WPO) (DOE-WPO) prepared a strategy for complying with the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Standards for the management of transuranic (TRU) waste. Section 3.2.2.2 of the DOE`s report addressed compliance with the Assurance Requirements found in 40 CFR {section} 191.14. One of the Assurance Requirements addresses the selection of repository sites that contain recoverable natural resources. This report documents that the site selection process for the WIPP facility did indeed comply with the natural resource disincentive requirement in 40 CFR {section} 191,14(e) at the time selected and therefore complies with the standard at this time. Thus, it shall be shown that it is reasonably certain that the WIPP site provides better overall protection than practical alternatives that were available when the site was selected. It is important to point out here, and it will be discussed later in the report, that the resource disincentive requirement is a preliminary siting criterion that requires further evaluation of sites that have resources (i.e, hydrocarbons, minerals and groundwater) in the vicinity or on the site. This further evaluation requires that for sites that do have resources, a qualitative determination must be made that the site will provide better overall protection than practical alternatives. The purpose of this report is not to provide a quantitative evaluation for selection of the WIPP site. A further discussion on the difference between the qualitative analysis required under 40 CFR {section} 191.14(e) and the quantitative analysis under other sections of 40 CFR 191 is provided in {section}2.1 of this report.

  6. Solid Waste Policies (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute establishes the support of the state for alternative waste management practices that reduce the reliance upon land disposal and incorporate resource recovery. Cities and counties are...

  7. A High-Performance PHEV Battery Pack

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    piece cost by enabling lower cost automation, shipping, etc. Lower investment (tooling) by commonizing repeating parts Thermal Management Pack Thermal Challenges ...

  8. A method for dense packing discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoav Kallus; Veit Elser; Simon Gravel

    2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of packing a system of particles as densely as possible is foundational in the field of discrete geometry and is a powerful model in the material and biological sciences. As packing problems retreat from the reach of solution by analytic constructions, the importance of an efficient numerical method for conducting \\textit{de novo} (from-scratch) searches for dense packings becomes crucial. In this paper, we use the \\textit{divide and concur} framework to develop a general search method for the solution of periodic constraint problems, and we apply it to the discovery of dense periodic packings. An important feature of the method is the integration of the unit cell parameters with the other packing variables in the definition of the configuration space. The method we present led to improvements in the densest-known tetrahedron packing which are reported in [arXiv:0910.5226]. Here, we use the method to reproduce the densest known lattice sphere packings and the best known lattice kissing arrangements in up to 14 and 11 dimensions respectively (the first such numerical evidence for their optimality in some of these dimensions). For non-spherical particles, we report a new dense packing of regular four-dimensional simplices with density $\\phi=128/219\\approx0.5845$ and with a similar structure to the densest known tetrahedron packing.

  9. Tunable, self-powered integrated arc plasma-melter vitrification system for waste treatment and resource recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Titus, Charles H. (Newtown Square, PA); Cohn, Daniel R. (Chestnuthill, MA); Surma, Jeffrey E. (Kennewick, WA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a relatively compact self-powered, tunable waste conversion system and apparatus which has the advantage of highly robust operation which provides complete or substantially complete conversion of a wide range of waste streams into useful gas and a stable, nonleachable solid product at a single location with greatly reduced air pollution to meet air quality standards. The system provides the capability for highly efficient conversion of waste into high quality combustible gas and for high efficiency conversion of the gas into electricity by utilizing a high efficiency gas turbine or by an internal combustion engine. The solid product can be suitable for various commercial applications. Alternatively, the solid product stream, which is a safe, stable material, may be disposed of without special considerations as hazardous material. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, the arc plasma furnace and joule heated melter are formed as a fully integrated unit with a common melt pool having circuit arrangements for the simultaneous independently controllable operation of both the arc plasma and the joule heated portions of the unit without interference with one another. The preferred configuration of this embodiment of the invention utilizes two arc plasma electrodes with an elongated chamber for the molten pool such that the molten pool is capable of providing conducting paths between electrodes. The apparatus may additionally be employed with reduced or without further use of the gases generated by the conversion process. The apparatus may be employed as a self-powered or net electricity producing unit where use of an auxiliary fuel provides the required level of electricity production.

  10. The purpose of this pack This pack presents the Forestry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    think about forests and climate change? Living sustainably by reducing waste, recycling, reducing our impact on the environment. However, sustainable living is dealt with extensively elsewhere is not always bad for the environment. As long as woodlands are managed in a sustainable way, there can

  11. Cultural Resources Review for Closure of the nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and Solid Waste Landfill in the 600 Area, Hanford Site, Benton County, Washington, HCRC# 2010-600-018R

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutzeit, Jennifer L.; Kennedy, Ellen P.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Sharpe, James J.; DeMaris, Ranae; Venno, M.; Christensen, James R.

    2011-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office is proposing to close the Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill (NRDWL) and Solid Waste Landfill (SWL) located in the 600 Area of the Hanford Site. The closure of the NRDWL/SWL entails the construction of an evapotranspiration cover over the landfill. This cover would consist of a 3-foot (1-meter) engineered layer of fine-grained soil, modified with 15 percent by weight pea gravel to form an erosion-resistant topsoil that will sustain native vegetation. The area targeted for silt-loam borrow soil sits in Area C, located in the northern central portion of the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve Unit. The pea gravel used for the mixture will be obtained from both off-site commercial sources and an active gravel pit (Pit #6) located just west of the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. Materials for the cover will be transported along Army Loop Road, which runs from Beloit Avenue (near the Rattlesnake Barricade) east-northeast to the NRDWL/SWL, ending at State Route 4. Upgrades to Army Loop Road are necessary to facilitate safe bidirectional hauling traffic. This report documents a cultural resources review of the proposed activity, conducted according to Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

  12. Understanding radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, R.L.

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

  13. Radioactive mixed waste disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jasen, W.G.; Erpenbeck, E.G.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various types of waste have been generated during the 50-year history of the Hanford Site. Regulatory changes in the last 20 years have provided the emphasis for better management of these wastes. Interpretations of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA), and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) have led to the definition of radioactive mixed wastes (RMW). The radioactive and hazardous properties of these wastes have resulted in the initiation of special projects for the management of these wastes. Other solid wastes at the Hanford Site include low-level wastes, transuranic (TRU), and nonradioactive hazardous wastes. This paper describes a system for the treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of solid radioactive waste.

  14. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B Permit Application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Chapter E, Appendix E1, Chapter L, Appendix L1: Volume 12, Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project was authorized by the US Department of Energy 5 (DOE) National Security and Military Applications of the Nuclear Energy Authorization Act of 1980 (Public Law 96-164). Its legislative mandate is to provide a research and development facility to demonstrate the safe disposal of radioactive waste resulting from national defense programs and activities. To fulfill this mandate, the WIPP facility has been designed to perform scientific investigations of the behavior of bedded salt as a repository medium and the interactions between the soft and radioactive wastes. In 1991, DOE proposed to initiate a experimental Test Phase designed to demonstrate the performance of the repository. The Test Phase activities involve experiments using transuranic (TRU) waste typical of the waste planned for future disposal at the WIPP facility. Much of this TRU waste is co-contaminated with chemical constituents which are defined as hazardous under HWMR-7, Pt. II, sec. 261. This waste is TRU mixed waste and is the subject of this application. Because geologic repositories, such as the WIPP facility, are defined under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as land disposal facilities, the groundwater monitoring requirements of HWMR-7, PLV, Subpart X, must be addressed. HWMR-7, Pt. V, Subpart X, must be addressed. This appendix demonstrates that groundwater monitoring is not needed in order to demonstrate compliance with the performance standards; therefore, HWMR-7, Pt.V, Subpart F, will not apply to the WIPP facility.

  15. Application pack for funding commencing in 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kheifets, Anatoli

    Application pack for funding commencing in 2012 GROUP OF EIGHT AUSTRALIA­GERMANY JOINT RESEARCH COOPERATION SCHEME #12;PAGE 2 OF 9GROUP OF EIGHT AUSTRALIA­GERMANY JOINT RESEARCH COOPERATION SCHEME © GROUP OF EIGHT Application pack for funding commencing in 2012 ABOUT THE GROUP OF EIGHT AUSTRALIA­GERMANY JOINT

  16. Softening of Granular Packings with Dynamic Forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. J. Olson Reichhardt; L. M. Lopatina; X. Jia; P. A. Johnson

    2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform numerical simulations of a two-dimensional bidisperse granular packing subjected to both a static confining pressure and a sinusoidal dynamic forcing applied by a wall on one edge of the packing. We measure the response experienced by a wall on the opposite edge of the packing and obtain the resonant frequency of the packing as the static or dynamic pressures are varied. Under increasing static pressure, the resonant frequency increases, indicating a velocity increase of elastic waves propagating through the packing. In contrast, when the dynamic amplitude is increased for fixed static pressure, the resonant frequency decreases, indicating a decrease in the wave velocity. This occurs both for compressional and for shear dynamic forcing, and is in agreement with experimental results. We find that the average contact number $Z_c$ at the resonant frequency decreases with increasing dynamic amplitude, indicating that the elastic softening of the packing is associated with a reduced number of grain-grain contacts through which the elastic waves can travel. We image the excitations created in the packing and show that there are localized disturbances or soft spots that become more prevalent with increasing dynamic amplitude. Our results are in agreement with experiments on glass bead packings and earth materials such as sandstone and granite, and may be relevant to the decrease in elastic wave velocities that has been observed to occur near fault zones after strong earthquakes, in surficial sediments during strong ground motion, and in structures during earthquake excitation.

  17. Automated packing systems: Review of industrial implementations.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whelan, Paul F.

    Automated packing systems: Review of industrial implementations. Paul F. Whelan School in these applications. An outline of one such industrial application, the automated placement of shape templates Mathematics University of Wales Cardiff, Wales. ABSTRACT The problems involved in the automated packing

  18. Integrated Solid Waste Management Act (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act affirms the state's support for alternative waste management practices, including waste reduction and resource recovery. Each county and municipality is required to file an integrated...

  19. Missouri Hazardous Waste Management Law (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Hazardous Waste Program, administered by the Hazardous Waste Management Commission in the Department of Natural Resources, regulates the processing, transportation, and disposal of hazardous...

  20. Packing of elastic wires in flexible shells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vetter, Roman; Herrmann, Hans J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The packing problem of long thin filaments that are injected into confined spaces is of fundamental interest for physicists, biologists and materials engineers alike. How linear threads pack and coil is well known only for the ideal case of rigid containers, however. Here, we force long elastic rods into flexible spatial confinement borne by an elastic shell to examine under which conditions recently acquired knowledge on wire packing in rigid spheres breaks down. We find that unlike in rigid cavities, friction plays a key role by giving rise to the emergence of two distinct packing patterns. At low friction, the wire densely coils into an ordered toroidal bundle with semi-ellipsoidal cross section, while at high friction, it packs into a highly disordered, self-similar structure. These two morphologies are shown to be separated by a continuous phase transition.

  1. Packing of elastic wires in flexible shells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roman Vetter; Falk K. Wittel; Hans J. Herrmann

    2015-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The packing problem of long thin filaments that are injected into confined spaces is of fundamental interest for physicists, biologists and materials engineers alike. How linear threads pack and coil is well known only for the ideal case of rigid containers, however. Here, we force long elastic rods into flexible spatial confinement borne by an elastic shell to examine under which conditions recently acquired knowledge on wire packing in rigid spheres breaks down. We find that unlike in rigid cavities, friction plays a key role by giving rise to the emergence of two distinct packing patterns. At low friction, the wire densely coils into an ordered toroidal bundle with semi-ellipsoidal cross section, while at high friction, it packs into a highly disordered, self-similar structure. These two morphologies are shown to be separated by a continuous phase transition.

  2. Summary of Natural Resources that Potentially Influence Human Intrusion at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1993, Raytheon Services Nevada completed a review of natural resource literature and other sources to identify potentially exploitable resources and potential future land uses near the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada, that could lead to future inadvertent human intrusion and subsequent release of radionuclides to the accessible environment. National Security Technologies, LLC, revised the original limited-distribution document to conform to current editorial standards and U.S. Department of Energy requirements for public release. The researchers examined the potential for future development of sand, gravel, mineral, petroleum, water resources, and rural land uses, such as agriculture, grazing, and hunting. The study was part of the performance assessment for Greater Confinement Disposal boreholes. Sand and gravel are not considered exploitable site resources because the materials are common throughout the area and the quality at the Area 5 RWMS is not ideal for typical commercial uses. Site information also indicates a very low mineral potential for the area. None of the 23 mining districts in southern Nye County report occurrences of economic mineral deposits in unconsolidated alluvium. The potential for oil and natural gas is low for southern Nye County. No occurrences of coal, tar sand, or oil shale on the NTS are reported in available literature. Several potential future uses of water were considered. Agricultural irrigation is impractical due to poor soils and existing water supply regulations. Use of water for geothermal energy development is unlikely because temperatures are too low for typical commercial applications using current technology. Human consumption of water has the most potential for cause of intrusion. The economics of future water needs may create a demand for the development of deep carbonate aquifers in the region. However, the Area 5 RWMS is not an optimal location for extraction of groundwater from the deep carbonate aquifer. Grazing and hunting are unlikely to be potential causes for inadvertent human intrusion into waste areas because of vegetation characteristics and lack of significant game animal populations.

  3. A method for dense packing discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kallus, Yoav; Gravel, Simon

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of packing a system of particles as densely as possible is foundational in the field of discrete geometry and is a powerful model in the material and biological sciences. As packing problems retreat from the reach of solution by analytic constructions, the importance of an efficient numerical method for conducting de novo (from-scratch) searches for dense packings becomes crucial. In this paper, we use the divide and concur framework to develop a general search method for the solution of periodic constraint problems, and we apply it to the discovery of dense periodic packings. An important feature of the method is the integration of the unit cell parameters with the other packing variables in the definition of the configuration space. The method we present led to improvements in the densest-known tetrahedron packing which are reported in [arXiv:0910.5226]. Here, we use the method to reproduce the densest known lattice sphere packings and the best known lattice kissing arrangements in up to 14 and ...

  4. Electrochemical Studies of Packed Iron Powder Electrodes: Effects...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Packed Iron Powder Electrodes: Effects of Common Constituents of Natural Waters on Corrosion Electrochemical Studies of Packed Iron Powder Electrodes: Effects of Common...

  5. EV Everywhere Batteries Workshop - Pack Design and Optimization...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Pack Design and Optimization Breakout Session Report EV Everywhere Batteries Workshop - Pack Design and Optimization Breakout Session Report Breakout session presentation for the...

  6. DEM simulation of experimental dense granular packing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanifpour, Maryam; Allaei, Mehdi Vaez [Department of Physics, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Francois, Nicolas; Saadatfar, Mohammad [Department of Applied Mathematics, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra (Australia)

    2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study we present numerical analysis performed on the experimental results of sphere packings of mono-sized hard sphere whose packing fraction spans across a wide range of 0.59<{Phi}<0.72. Using X-ray Computed Tomography (XCT), we have full access to the 3D structure of the granular packings. Numerical analysis performed on thr data provides the first experimental proofs of how densification affects local order parameters. Furthermore by combining Discrete Element Method (DEM) and the experimental results from XCT, we investigate how the intergranular forces change with the onset of crystallization.

  7. Printed on recycled paper. 2013 Cornell Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    management by focusing University resources and capabilities on this pressing economic, environmental of waste generation and composition, waste reduction, risk management, environmental equity and publicPrinted on recycled paper. 2013 Cornell Waste Management Institute CWMI is a program

  8. Groundwater well with reactive filter pack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilmore, Tyler J. (Pasco, WA); Holdren, Jr., George R. (Kennewick, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques.

  9. Kold Pack: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5323)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Kold Pack, Inc. failed to certify walk-in cooler or freezer components as compliant with the energy conservation standards.

  10. PACKING ELLIPSOIDS WITH OVERLAP? 1. Introduction. Shape ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 7, 2013 ... problem of finding the densest sphere packing is still open. .... (c) Some measure of volumes of the pairwise overlaps Ei ? Ej, i, j = 1, 2,...,N,.

  11. Groundwater well with reactive filter pack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilmore, T.J.; Holdren, G.R. Jr.; Kaplan, D.I.

    1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques. 3 figs.

  12. Battery Pack Requirements and Targets Validation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments fromofBatteries from Brine Batteries from BrineHardwareID:Pack

  13. PACKING DIMENSIONS, TRANSVERSAL MAPPINGS AND GEODESIC FLOWS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jyväskylä, University of

    result for the packing dimension, dimp, of projected measures. They showed that if µ is a finite Borel measure on Rn , then (1.1) dimp PV µ = dimm µ for almost all V G(n, m), where dimm µ is a packing is the same for almost all projections, but it may happen that dimm µ dimp µ. The above results are "almost

  14. Solid Waste Management Program (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Solid Waste Management Program in the Department of Natural Resources regulates the management of solid waste in the state of Missouri. A permit is required prior to the construction or...

  15. Radioactive Waste Radioactive Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    form Separate liquid from solid Radionuclide Separate all but H3/C14 #12;#12;Radioactive Waste;Radioactive Waste H3/C14 solids Type B (non-incinerable) metal glass hazardous materials #12;#12;Radioactive#12;Radioactive Waste at UF Bldg 831 392-8400 #12;Radioactive Waste Program is designed to

  16. Dense periodic packings of tetrahedra with small repeating units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoav Kallus; Veit Elser; Simon Gravel

    2010-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a one-parameter family of periodic packings of regular tetrahedra, with the packing fraction $100/117\\approx0.8547$, that are simple in the sense that they are transitive and their repeating units involve only four tetrahedra. The construction of the packings was inspired from results of a numerical search that yielded a similar packing. We present an analytic construction of the packings and a description of their properties. We also present a transitive packing with a repeating unit of two tetrahedra and a packing fraction $\\frac{139+40\\sqrt{10}}{369}\\approx0.7194$.

  17. Review and Status of Solid Waste Management Practices in Multan, Pakistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Mirza, Umar Karim; Sarwar, Muhammad Avais

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resource Center. (2004). Solid waste management study,in management of liquid and solid waste, Multan City, JuneReview and Status of Solid Waste Management Practices in

  18. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 4, Revision 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy is currently constructing the Waste Isolation Pilot near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The full-scale pilot plant will demonstrate the feasibility of the safe disposal of defense-related nuclear waste in a bedded salt formation at a depth of 2160 feet below the surface. WIPP will provide for the permanent storage of 25,000 cu ft of remote-handled (RH) transuranic waste and 6,000,000 cu ft of contact-handled (CH) transuranic waste. This paper covers the major mechanical/structural design considerations for the waste hoist and its hoist tower structure. The design of the hoist system and safety features incorporates state-of-the-art technology developed in the hoist and mining industry to ensure safe operation for transporting nuclear waste underground. Also included are design specifications for VOC-10 monitoring system.

  19. Packing frustration in dense confined fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim Nygrd; Sten Sarman; Roland Kjellander

    2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Packing frustration for confined fluids, i.e., the incompatibility between the preferred packing of the fluid particles and the packing constraints imposed by the confining surfaces, is studied for a dense hard-sphere fluid confined between planar hard surfaces at short separations. The detailed mechanism for the frustration is investigated via an analysis of the anisotropic pair distributions of the confined fluid, as obtained from integral equation theory for inhomogeneous fluids at pair correlation level within the anisotropic Percus-Yevick approximation. By examining the mean forces that arise from interparticle collisions around the periphery of each particle in the slit, we calculate the principal components of the mean force for the density profile - each component being the sum of collisional forces on a particle's hemisphere facing either surface. The variations of these components with the slit width give rise to rather intricate changes in the layer structure between the surfaces, but, as shown in this paper, the basis of these variations can be easily understood qualitatively and often also semi-quantitatively. It is found that the ordering of the fluid is in essence governed locally by the packing constraints at each single solid-fluid interface. A simple superposition of forces due to the presence of each surface gives surprisingly good estimates of the density profiles, but there remain nontrivial confinement effects that cannot be explained by superposition, most notably the magnitude of the excess adsorption of particles in the slit relative to bulk.

  20. Virginia Geothermal Resources Conservation Act (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the policy of the Commonwealth of Virginia to foster the development, production, and utilization of geothermal resources, prevent waste of geothermal resources, protect correlative rights to...

  1. South Carolina Solid Waste Policy and Management Act (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The state of South Carolina supports a regional approach to solid waste management and encourages the development and implementation of alternative waste management practices and resource recovery....

  2. Energy Saving in Distillation Using Structured Packing and Vapor Recompression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, J.H.

    "Distillation is a big consumer of energy in process plant operations. A first step to energy cost savings is the use of high efficiency structured packing in place of trays or dumped packings in conventionally operated distillation columns. Larger...

  3. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B Permit Application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 2, Chapter C, Appendix C1--Chapter C, Appendix C3 (beginning), Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains appendices for the following: Rocky Flats Plant and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory waste process information; TRUPACT-II content codes (TRUCON); TRUPACT-II chemical list; chemical compatibility analysis for Rocky Flats Plant waste forms; chemical compatibility analysis for waste forms across all sites; TRU mixed waste characterization database; hazardous constituents of Rocky Flats Transuranic waste; summary of waste components in TRU waste sampling program at INEL; TRU waste sampling program; and waste analysis data.

  4. Virginia Resources Authority Act (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Virginia Resources Authority provides financing options to support community investment in a number of areas, including wastewater, flood prevention and dam safety, solid waste, water, land...

  5. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act: Part B, Permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 1, Revison 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains information related to the permit application for the WIPP facility. Information is presented on solid waste management; personnel safety; emergency plans; site characterization; applicable regulations; decommissioning; and ground water monitoring requirements.

  6. Random packing of hyperspheres and Marsaglia's Parking Lot Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitlock, Paula

    Random packing of hyperspheres and Marsaglia's Parking Lot Test Stefan C. Agapie and Paula A York 10021 September 30, 2009 Abstract Many studies of randomly packed hyperspheres in multiple box until some randomly loosely packed density is achieved. Then either a compression algorithm

  7. Waste Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1DOE AwardsDNitrate Salt Bearing Waste

  8. Mixed waste characterization reference document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste characterization and monitoring are major activities in the management of waste from generation through storage and treatment to disposal. Adequate waste characterization is necessary to ensure safe storage, selection of appropriate and effective treatment, and adherence to disposal standards. For some wastes characterization objectives can be difficult and costly to achieve. The purpose of this document is to evaluate costs of characterizing one such waste type, mixed (hazardous and radioactive) waste. For the purpose of this document, waste characterization includes treatment system monitoring, where monitoring is a supplement or substitute for waste characterization. This document establishes a cost baseline for mixed waste characterization and treatment system monitoring requirements from which to evaluate alternatives. The cost baseline established as part of this work includes costs for a thermal treatment technology (i.e., a rotary kiln incinerator), a nonthermal treatment process (i.e., waste sorting, macronencapsulation, and catalytic wet oxidation), and no treatment (i.e., disposal of waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)). The analysis of improvement over the baseline includes assessment of promising areas for technology development in front-end waste characterization, process equipment, off gas controls, and monitoring. Based on this assessment, an ideal characterization and monitoring configuration is described that minimizes costs and optimizes resources required for waste characterization.

  9. Waste Management Trends in Texas Industrial Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, C. S.; Heffington, W. M.

    have become familiar with several plant waste management practices. This paper discusses waste management practices in industrial plants in Texas with particular attention to the requirements of the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission...

  10. Solid Waste Reduction, Recovery, and Recycling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute expresses the strong support of the State of Wisconsin for the reduction of the amount of solid waste generated, the reuse, recycling and composting of solid waste, and resource...

  11. Surrogate formulations for thermal treatment of low-level mixed waste, Part II: Selected mixed waste treatment project waste streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bostick, W.D.; Hoffmann, D.P.; Chiang, J.M.; Hermes, W.H.; Gibson, L.V. Jr.; Richmond, A.A. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)] [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mayberry, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Frazier, G. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)] [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the formulation of surrogate waste packages, representing the major bulk constituent compositions for 12 waste stream classifications selected by the US DOE Mixed Waste Treatment Program. These waste groupings include: neutral aqueous wastes; aqueous halogenated organic liquids; ash; high organic content sludges; adsorbed aqueous and organic liquids; cement sludges, ashes, and solids; chloride; sulfate, and nitrate salts; organic matrix solids; heterogeneous debris; bulk combustibles; lab packs; and lead shapes. Insofar as possible, formulation of surrogate waste packages are referenced to authentic wastes in inventory within the DOE; however, the surrogate waste packages are intended to represent generic treatability group compositions. The intent is to specify a nonradiological synthetic mixture, with a minimal number of readily available components, that can be used to represent the significant challenges anticipated for treatment of the specified waste class. Performance testing and evaluation with use of a consistent series of surrogate wastes will provide a means for the initial assessment (and intercomparability) of candidate treatment technology applicability and performance. Originally the surrogate wastes were intended for use with emerging thermal treatment systems, but use may be extended to select nonthermal systems as well.

  12. Packed fluidized bed blanket for fusion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chi, John W. H. (Mt. Lebanon, PA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A packed fluidized bed blanket for a fusion reactor providing for efficient radiation absorption for energy recovery, efficient neutron absorption for nuclear transformations, ease of blanket removal, processing and replacement, and on-line fueling/refueling. The blanket of the reactor contains a bed of stationary particles during reactor operation, cooled by a radial flow of coolant. During fueling/refueling, an axial flow is introduced into the bed in stages at various axial locations to fluidize the bed. When desired, the fluidization flow can be used to remove particles from the blanket.

  13. Cooking with Canned Tuna (packed in water)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    E-75 12/08 Cooking with Canned Tuna (packed in water) Tuna is a nutritious source of protein, iron, and niacin. Because it is already cooked, it can be eaten right out of the can or used to make your favorite tuna dishes. A serving of tuna is 2...- by 13-inch baking dish. 4. Bake it at 350 degrees F for 30 to 35 minutes. Let it stand for about 10 minutes before serving. Note: You can also use 2 cups of cooked rice instead of macaroni. Quick Tuna Spread (makes 4 servings, ? cup each) Tuna...

  14. Waste generator services implementation plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mousseau, J.; Magleby, M.; Litus, M.

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recurring waste management noncompliance problems have spurred a fundamental site-wide process revision to characterize and disposition wastes at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The reengineered method, termed Waste Generator Services, will streamline the waste acceptance process and provide waste generators comprehensive waste management services through a single, accountable organization to manage and disposition wastes in a timely, cost-effective, and compliant manner. This report outlines the strategy for implementing Waste Generator Services across the INEEL. It documents the culmination of efforts worked by the LMITCO Environmental Management Compliance Reengineering project team since October 1997. These efforts have included defining problems associated with the INEEL waste management process; identifying commercial best management practices; completing a review of DOE Complex-wide waste management training requirements; and involving others through an Integrated Process Team approach to provide recommendations on process flow, funding/charging mechanisms, and WGS organization. The report defines the work that will be performed by Waste Generator Services, the organization and resources, the waste acceptance process flow, the funding approach, methods for measuring performance, and the implementation schedule and approach. Field deployment will occur first at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant in June 1998. Beginning in Fiscal Year 1999, Waste Generator Services will be deployed at the other major INEEL facilities in a phased approach, with implementation completed by March 1999.

  15. Packed bed carburization of tantalum and tantalum alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, Peter C. (Espanola, NM); Rodriguez, Patrick J. (Espanola, NM); Pereyra, Ramiro A. (Medanales, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Packed bed carburization of a tantalum or tantalum alloy object. A method for producing corrosion-resistant tantalum or tantalum alloy objects is described. The method includes the steps of placing the object in contact with a carburizing pack, heating the packed object in vacuum furnace to a temperature whereby carbon from the pack diffuses into the object forming grains with tantalum carbide along the grain boundaries, and etching the surface of the carburized object. This latter step removes tantalum carbides from the surface of the carburized tantalum object while leaving the tantalum carbide along the grain boundaries.

  16. Packed bed carburization of tantalum and tantalum alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lopez, P.C.; Rodriguez, P.J.; Pereyra, R.A.

    1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Packed bed carburization of a tantalum or tantalum alloy object is disclosed. A method for producing corrosion-resistant tantalum or tantalum alloy objects is described. The method includes the steps of placing the object in contact with a carburizing pack, heating the packed object in vacuum furnace to a temperature whereby carbon from the pack diffuses into the object forming grains with tantalum carbide along the grain boundaries, and etching the surface of the carburized object. This latter step removes tantalum carbides from the surface of the carburized tantalum object while leaving the tantalum carbide along the grain boundaries. 4 figs.

  17. RESOURCE GUIDE RECYCLING ELECTRONICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

    ://www.thesoftlanding.com/ AVOIDING BISPHENOL-A Eden Organics Beans http://www.edenfoods.com/ CD and DVD recycling httpRESOURCE GUIDE RECYCLING ELECTRONICS Batteries and Accessories Office Depot Cell Phones Any Verizon Plastics Call your local Solid Waste Management Facility eCycling resource (EPA) http

  18. Solid Waste Regulations (Nova Scotia, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nova Scotia Environment administers waste management for the province. Regulations include specific rules and standards for landfills, establish a Resource Recovery Fund, and guidelines for...

  19. Thermal vacancies in close-packing solids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mostafa Mortazavifar; Martin Oettel

    2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on Stillinger's version of cell cluster theory, we derive an expression for the equilibrium concentration of thermal monovacancies in solids which allows for a transparent interpretation of the vacancy volume and the energetic/entropic part in the corresponding Gibbs energy of vacancy formation $\\Delta G_{\\rm v}$. For the close--packing crystals of the hard sphere and Lennard--Jones model systems very good agreement with simulation data is found. Application to metals through the embedded--atom method (EAM) reveals a strong sensitivity of the variation of $\\Delta G_{\\rm v}$ with temperature to details of the EAM potential. Our truncation of the cell cluster series allows for an approximate, but direct measurement of crystal free energies and vacancy concentration in colloidal model systems using laser tweezers.

  20. Volatile Components from Packing Matrials, Rev. 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R. A.

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An outgassing study was conducted on five packing materials, comprising two experiments. These materials comprised 277-4 borated concrete, Borobond4 concrete, polyethylene bags, silica-filled silicone rubber seals, and silicone foam padding. The purpose was measure the volume of gases which diffuse from packaging materials when sealed in containers. Two heating profiles were used to study the offgassing quantities in a set of accelerated aging tests. It was determined that the concretes contain a large quantity of water. The plastic materials hold much less moisture, with the silicone materials even consuming water, possibly due to the presence of silica filler. Polyethylene tends to degrade as the temperature is elevated and the foam stiffens.

  1. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B Permit Application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 5, Chapter D, Appendix D1 (conclusion), Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reference design for the underground facilities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant was developed using the best criteria available at initiation of the detailed design effort. These design criteria are contained in the US Department of Energy document titled Design Criteria, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Revised Mission Concept-IIA (RMC-IIA), Rev. 4, dated February 1984. The validation process described in the Design Validation Final Report has resulted in validation of the reference design of the underground openings based on these criteria. Future changes may necessitate modification of the Design Criteria document and/or the reference design. Validation of the reference design as presented in this report permits the consideration of future design or design criteria modifications necessitated by these changes or by experience gained at the WIPP. Any future modifications to the design criteria and/or the reference design will be governed by a DOE Standard Operation Procedure (SOP) covering underground design changes. This procedure will explain the process to be followed in describing, evaluating and approving the change.

  2. CONCRETE OPTIMISATION WITH REGARD TO PACKING DENSITY AND RHEOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    CONCRETE OPTIMISATION WITH REGARD TO PACKING DENSITY AND RHEOLOGY François de Larrard LCPC Centre/organizers): .............. Keywords: packing density, rheology, grading curve, optimisation, self-compacting concrete, roller-compacted concrete. Author contacts Authors E-Mail Fax Postal address LCPC Centre de Nantes François de Larrard

  3. Liquid Holdup Profiles in Structured Packing Determined via Neutron Radiography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eldridge, R. Bruce

    scans of an operating air-water contactor were performed at the NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR packings are widely employed in vapor-liquid contacting devices for distillation, absorption, and stripping. The high specific surface areas (ap), regular geometries, and high void fraction () of structured packing

  4. Packed bed reactor for photochemical .sup.196 Hg isotope separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); Speer, Richard (Reading, MA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Straight tubes and randomly oriented pieces of tubing having been employed in a photochemical mercury enrichment reactor and have been found to improve the enrichment factor (E) and utilization (U) compared to a non-packed reactor. One preferred embodiment of this system uses a moving bed (via gravity) for random packing.

  5. Mixed waste characterization, treatment & disposal focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (referred to as the Mixed Waste Focus Area or MWFA) is to provide treatment systems capable of treating DOE`s mixed waste in partnership with users, and with continual participation of stakeholders, tribal governments, and regulators. The MWFA deals with the problem of eliminating mixed waste from current and future storage in the DOE complex. Mixed waste is waste that contains both hazardous chemical components, subject to the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and radioactive components, subject to the requirements of the Atomic Energy Act. The radioactive components include transuranic (TRU) and low-level waste (LLW). TRU waste primarily comes from the reprocessing of spent fuel and the use of plutonium in the fabrication of nuclear weapons. LLW includes radioactive waste other than uranium mill tailings, TRU, and high-level waste, including spent fuel.

  6. Evolving Design Rules for the Inverse Granular Packing Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc Z. Miskin; Heinrich M. Jaeger

    2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    If a collection of identical particles is poured into a container, different shapes will fill to different densities. But what is the shape that fills a container as close as possible to a pre-specified, desired density? We demonstrate a solution to this inverse-packing problem by framing it in the context of artificial evolution. By representing shapes as bonded spheres, we show how shapes may be mutated, simulated, and selected to produce particularly dense or loose packing aggregates, both with and without friction. Moreover, we show how motifs emerge linking these shapes together. The result is a set of design rules that function as an effective solution to the inverse packing problem for given packing procedures and boundary conditions. Finally, we show that these results are verified by experiments on 3D-printed prototypes used to make packings in the real world.

  7. Measured Black Carbon Deposition on the Sierra Nevada Snow Pack and Implication for Snow Pack Retreat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, O.L.; Corrigan, C.E.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Cliff, S.S.; Ramanathan, V.

    2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling studies show that the darkening of snow and ice by black carbon deposition is a major factor for the rapid disappearance of arctic sea ice, mountain glaciers and snow packs. This study provides one of the first direct measurements for the efficient removal of black carbon from the atmosphere by snow and its subsequent deposition to the snow packs of California. The early melting of the snow packs in the Sierras is one of the contributing factors to the severe water problems in California. BC concentrations in falling snow were measured at two mountain locations and in rain at a coastal site. All three stations reveal large BC concentrations in precipitation, ranging from 1.7 ng/g to 12.9 ng/g. The BC concentrations in the air after the snow fall were negligible suggesting an extremely efficient removal of BC by snow. The data suggest that below cloud scavenging, rather than ice nuclei, was the dominant source of BC in the snow. A five-year comparison of BC, dust, and total fine aerosol mass concentrations at multiple sites reveals that the measurements made at the sampling sites were representative of large scale deposition in the Sierra Nevada. The relative concentration of iron and calcium in the mountain aerosol indicates that one-quarter to one-third of the BC may have been transported from Asia.

  8. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Sodium Bearing Waste - Waste Incidental to Reprocessing Determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, Victor Levon

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management, Section I.1.C, requires that all radioactive waste subject to Department of Energy Order 435.1 be managed as high-level radioactive waste, transuranic waste, or low-level radioactive waste. Determining the radiological classification of the sodium-bearing waste currently in the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Tank Farm Facility inventory is important to its proper treatment and disposition. This report presents the technical basis for making the determination that the sodium-bearing waste is waste incidental to spent fuel reprocessing and should be managed as mixed transuranic waste. This report focuses on the radiological characteristics of the sodiumbearing waste. The report does not address characterization of the nonradiological, hazardous constituents of the waste in accordance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requirements.

  9. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B Permit Application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 4, Chapter D, Appendix D1 (beginning), Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lappin, A. R.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which is designed for receipt, handling, storage, and permanent isolation of defense-generated transuranic wastes, is being excavated at a depth of approximately 655 m in bedded halites of the Permian Salado Formation of southeastern New Mexico. Site-characterization activities at the present WIPP site began in 1976. Full construction of the facility began in 1983, after completion of ``Site and Preliminary Design Validation`` (SPDV) activities and reporting. Site-characterization activities since 1983 have had the objectives of updating or refining the overall conceptual model of the geologic, hydrologic, and structural behavior of the WIPP site and providing data adequate for use in WIPP performance assessment. This report has four main objectives: 1. Summarize the results of WIPP site-characterization studies carried out since the spring of 1983 as a result of specific agreements between the US Department of Energy and the State of New Mexico. 2. Summarize the results and status of site-characterization and facility-characterization studies carried out since 1983, but not specifically included in mandated agreements. 3. Compile the results of WIPP site-characterization studies into an internally consistent conceptual model for the geologic, hydrologic, geochemical, and structural behavior of the WIPP site. This model includes some consideration of the effects of the WIPP facility and shafts on the local characteristics of the Salado and Rustler Formations. 4. Discuss the present limitations and/or uncertainties in the conceptual geologic model of the WIPP site and facility. The objectives of this report are limited in scope, and do not include determination of whether or not the WIPP Project will comply with repository-performance criteria developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (40CFR191).

  10. Waste Toolkit A-Z Cartridges Reclaim-IT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melham, Tom

    -pack in suitable protective packaging before placing in recycling box Mobile phones include the battery and placeWaste Toolkit A-Z Cartridges Reclaim-IT How can I recycle cartridges? You can recycle cartridges via Reclaim-IT, one of the largest companies in the UK dedicated to reusing and recycling empty laser

  11. Waste Generated from LMR-AMTEC Reactor Concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasan, Ahmed; Mohamed, Yasser, T.; Mohammaden, Tarek, F.

    2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The candidate Liquid Metal Reactor-Alkali Metal Thermal -to- Electric Converter (LMR-AMTEC) is considered to be the first reactor that would use pure liquid potassium as a secondary coolant, in which potassium vapor aids in the conversion of thermal energy to electric energy. As with all energy production, the thermal generation of electricity produces wastes. These wastes must be managed in ways which safeguard human health and minimize their impact on the environment. Nuclear power is the only energy industry, which takes full responsibility for all its wastes. Based on the candidate design of the LMR-AMTEC components and the coolant types, different wastes will be generated from LMR. These wastes must be classified and characterized according to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulation, CFR. This paper defines the waste generation and waste characterization from LMR-AMTEC and reviews the applicable U.S. regulations that govern waste transportation, treatment, storage and final disposition. The wastes generated from LMR-AMTEC are characterized as: (1) mixed waste which is generated from liquid sodium contaminated by fission products and activated corrosion products; (2) hazardous waste which is generated from liquid potassium contaminated by corrosion products; (3) spent nuclear fuel; and (4) low-level radioactive waste which is generated from the packing materials (e.g. activated carbon in cold trap and purification units). The regulations and management of these wastes are summarized in this paper.

  12. Computer resources Computer resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Computer resources 1 Computer resources available to the LEAD group Cédric David 30 September 2009 #12;Ouline · UT computer resources and services · JSG computer resources and services · LEAD computers· LEAD computers 2 #12;UT Austin services UT EID and Password 3 https://utdirect.utexas.edu #12;UT Austin

  13. Resource guide for electrokinetics laboratory and field processes applicable to radioactive and hazardous mixed wastes in soil and groundwater from 1992-1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document attempted to list and describe all published work on electrokinetic remediation 1992 to 1997. This work includes electrokinetic remediation being used commercially or on a bench, pilot, field, or conceptual scale. There are three categories in this resource guide. The category, Category A, lists all electrokinetic processes that are used as the remediation tool at a contaminated site. Category B lists all electrokinetic processes that are being used on the bench, pilot, or field scale. Finally, Category C lists all electrokinetic process that are in the conceptual development stage. Electrokinetic remediation being used abroad was also included in this resource guide. Information about each electrokinetic system includes the developers` name and address, technical description, status, cost, and illustration (if available).

  14. Shaken, not stirred: why gravel packs better than bricks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anita Mehta; J. M. Luck

    2003-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the effect of shape -- jagged vs. regular -- in the jamming limit of very gently shaken packings. Our measure of shape $\\eps$ is the void space occupied by a disordered grain; we show that depending on its number-theoretic nature, two generic behaviours are obtained. Thus, regularly shaped grains (rational $\\eps$) have ground states of perfect packing, which are irretrievably lost under zero-temperature shaking; the reverse is the case for jagged grains (irrational $\\eps$), where the ground state is only optimally packed, but entirely retrievable. At low temperatures, we find intermittency at the surface, which has recently been seen experimentally.

  15. Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 534) and identity of liquid waste Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 534

  16. Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    2/2009 Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 200 West Arbor Dr. San Diego, CA 92103 (619 (9:1) OR Biohazard symbol (if untreated) and identity of liquid waste Biohazard symbol Address

  17. Efficiency Assessment of Parallel Workloads on Virtualized Resources Javier Delgado,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadjadi, S. Masoud

    Efficiency Assessment of Parallel Workloads on Virtualized Resources Javier Delgado, S. Masoud,ygliu,bobroff,sseelam}@us.ibm.com Abstract--In cloud computing, virtual containers on phys- ical resources are provisioned to requesting users. Resource providers may pack as many containers as possible onto each of their physical machines

  18. Missouri Department of Natural Resources Hazardous Waste Program Weldon Spring site remedial action project - status of project to date January 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the progress made by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MDNR) during the fourth year (1996) of the Agreement in Support (AIS) in its oversight role of the Weldon Springs Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP). The fourth year at the Weldon Springs Site shows sustained progress as the project moves through the final design and into the remedial action phases of the Chemical Plant Operable Unit. The remedial action phase includes the Foundations Removal work package, Chemical Solidification and Stabilization, and disposal cell.

  19. Nanostructure and Nanomechanics of Cement: Polydisperse Colloidal Packing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masoero, Enrico

    Cement setting and cohesion are governed by the precipitation and growth of calcium-silicate-hydrate, through a complex evolution of microstructure. A colloidal model to describe nucleation, packing, and rigidity of ...

  20. Center for Academic Success Tech Prep Student Packing List

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pele?, Slaven

    Center for Academic Success Tech Prep Student Packing List Personal items to bring or buy: shower items: alcoholic beverages (if under 21 years of age) candles (lighted), fireworks, weapons, incense

  1. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, Waste Analysis Plan The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, Waste Analysis Plan This...

  2. Effective thermal conductivity of packed beds of spheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Allen Buchanan

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECTIVE THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF PACKED BEDS OF SPHERES A Thesis ALLEN BUCHANAN DUNCAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree ot MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1987... Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering EFFECTIVE THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF PACKED BEDS OF SPHERES A Thesis by ALLEN BUCHANAN DUNCAN Approved as to style and content by: G. P. Peterson (Chairman of Committee) G. D. Allen (Member) W. M. Moses...

  3. Performance characterization of a packed bed electro-filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narayanan, Ajay

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PERFORMANCE CHARACTERIZATION OF A PACKED BED ELECTRO-FILTER A Thesis by A JAY NARAYANAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1990 Major Subject: Safety Engineering PERFORMANCE CHARACTERIZATION OF A PACKED BED ELECTRO-FILTER A Thesis by AJAY NARAYANAN Approved as to style and content by: John P. Wagn (Ch ' of the Com ittee) Aydin Akgerman (Member) Ri ard B...

  4. Performance characterization of a packed bed electro-filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narayanan, Ajay

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PERFORMANCE CHARACTERIZATION OF A PACKED BED ELECTRO-FILTER A Thesis by A JAY NARAYANAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1990 Major Subject: Safety Engineering PERFORMANCE CHARACTERIZATION OF A PACKED BED ELECTRO-FILTER A Thesis by AJAY NARAYANAN Approved as to style and content by: John P. Wagn (Ch ' of the Com ittee) Aydin Akgerman (Member) Ri ard B...

  5. Review and Status of Solid Waste Management Practices in Multan, Pakistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Mirza, Umar Karim; Sarwar, Muhammad Avais

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in management of liquid and solid waste, Multan City, JuneResource Center. (2004). Solid waste management study,The secondary data on solid waste and its management aspects

  6. Hazardous Waste Program (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This rule states criteria for identifying the characteristics of hazardous waste and for listing hazardous waste, lists of hazardous wastes, standards for the management of hazardous waste and...

  7. NUMERICAL CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASYMPTOTIC, DIFFUSION DOMINATED MASS-TRANSFER COEFFICIENT IN PACKED BED REACTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedkiw, Peter

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Calculations for the Asymptotic, Diffusion Dominated Mass-Transfer Coefficient in Packed Bed Reactors

  8. Recovery of coal from preparation plant effluents using a packed column

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choudhry, V.; Khan, L.; Yang, D.; Banerjee, D.D.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The feasibility of recovering coal from coal preparation plant waste (or effluent) streams at the pilot scale using the packed column flotation process is demonstrated. In Phase I of the project, a total of four effluent samples were tested at the bench scale with the objective of recovering low-ash, low-sulfur clean coal products that were, at a minimum, compatible with the quality of the clean coal produced by the preparation plants supplying the waste stream samples. Phase II of the project comprised demonstration of the technology at the pilot scale using a 4-in. I.D. {times} 20-ft tall column installed at the Applied Laboratory of the Illinois State Geological Survey. A large effluent sample was conducted, consisting of particle size distribution, proximate and complete analyses, and batch froth flotation testing. Ash, total and pyritic sulfur, and calorific value of the effluent sample were also determined. The effluent feed sample contained 50-55% ash and 2.2% total sulfur. Confirmatory tests were conducted at Michigan Technological University using a bench-scale packed column. A product containing 5.4% ash was obtained at 97.5% ash rejection and 71.8% combustible matter recovery. Changing the process operating parameters allowed the quality of the product to be controlled such that its ash content ranged between 6 and 10%, with combustible matter recoveries in the 71-77% range. Pilot testing was conducted using a test matrix designed to study the effects of primary variables (feed rate, percent solids, and reagent dosage) and operating variables (air rate, wash water, and pulp level) with the objective of optimizing the process performance. Feed rates of 20-108 lb/hour were tested, with very good performance being obtained at a feed rate of 32 lb/hour (374 lb/h/ft{sup 2}).

  9. New Impetus for resource recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marier, D.

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Indications are that the resource recovery field is getting a renewed focus as communities again respond to continuing waste problems and as more companies offer recycling and waste-to-energy services. Recent entries to the field include new divisions of an Australian firm, a Finnish environmental services company, an Italian tire recycler. Two utility affiliates have entered the resource recovery field, and one major engineering and construction firm is entering the field at the same time another is leaving. These companies and their waste processes are briefly described.

  10. Resource Engineering MSc Programme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    on ground-water flows, the safe storage of waste products underground and site remediation after to explore a specific aspect of the field in greater depth. The MSc track in Resource Engineering as the newest mining methods for underground, surface and deep-sea mining. Special attention is paid

  11. Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy Conversion, and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes...

  12. Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MHRC System Concept ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy Conversion, and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with...

  13. Information and Research Skills Student Pack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    spaces Wifi 5. How many electronic journal (academic magazines) articles are downloaded every year to avoid it!) as well as gain a better understanding of academic libraries and the resources, facilities to know an academic library Page 4 2. Video of Library Services at the University of Birmingham Page 6 3

  14. Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GREAGER, T.M.

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a generator of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the Hanford Site must ensure that its TRU waste meets the requirements of US. Department of Energy (DOE) 0 435.1, ''Radioactive Waste Management,'' and the Contact-Handled (CH) Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP-WAC). WIPP-WAC requirements are derived from the WIPP Technical Safety Requirements, WIPP Safety Analysis Report, TRUPACT-II SARP, WIPP Land Withdrawal Act, WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 191/194 Compliance Certification Decision. The WIPP-WAC establishes the specific physical, chemical, radiological, and packaging criteria for acceptance of defense TRU waste shipments at WIPP. The WPP-WAC also requires that participating DOE TRU waste generator/treatment/storage sites produce site-specific documents, including a certification plan, that describe their program for managing TRU waste and TRU waste shipments before transferring waste to WIPP. Waste characterization activities provide much of the data upon which certification decisions are based. Waste characterization requirements for TRU waste and TRU mixed waste that contains constituents regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) are established in the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Waste Analysis Plan (WAP). The Hanford Site Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) (HNF-2599) implements the applicable requirements in the WAP and includes the qualitative and quantitative criteria for making hazardous waste determinations. The Hanford Site must also ensure that its TRU waste destined for disposal at WPP meets requirements for transport in the Transuranic Package Transporter-11 (TRUPACT-11). The US. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) establishes the TRUPACT-11 requirements in the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package (TRUPACT-11 SARP). In addition, a TRU waste is eligible for disposal at WIPP only if it has been generated in whole or in part by one or more of the activities listed in Section 10101(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. DOE sites must determine that each waste stream to be disposed of at WIPP is ''defense'' TRU waste. (See also the definition of ''defense'' TRU waste.). Only CH TRU wastes meeting the requirements of the QAPjP, WIPP-WAP, WPP-WAC, and other requirements documents described above will be accepted for transportation and disposal at WIPP.

  15. Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GREAGER, T.M.

    2000-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    As a generator of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the Hanford Site must ensure that its TRU waste meets the requirements of US. Department of Energy (DOE) 0 435.1, ''Radioactive Waste Management,'' and the Contact-Handled (CH) Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP-WAC). WIPP-WAC requirements are derived from the WIPP Technical Safety Requirements, WIPP Safety Analysis Report, TRUPACT-II SARP, WIPP Land Withdrawal Act, WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 191/194 Compliance Certification Decision. The WIPP-WAC establishes the specific physical, chemical, radiological, and packaging criteria for acceptance of defense TRU waste shipments at WIPP. The WPP-WAC also requires that participating DOE TRU waste generator/treatment/storage sites produce site-specific documents, including a certification plan, that describe their program for managing TRU waste and TRU waste shipments before transferring waste to WIPP. Waste characterization activities provide much of the data upon which certification decisions are based. Waste characterization requirements for TRU waste and TRU mixed waste that contains constituents regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) are established in the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Waste Analysis Plan (WAP). The Hanford Site Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) (HNF-2599) implements the applicable requirements in the WAP and includes the qualitative and quantitative criteria for making hazardous waste determinations. The Hanford Site must also ensure that its TRU waste destined for disposal at WPP meets requirements for transport in the Transuranic Package Transporter-11 (TRUPACT-11). The US. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) establishes the TRUPACT-11 requirements in the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package (TRUPACT-11 SARP). In addition, a TRU waste is eligible for disposal at WIPP only if it has been generated in whole or in part by one or more of the activities listed in Section 10101(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. DOE sites must determine that each waste stream to be disposed of at WIPP is ''defense'' TRU waste. (See also the definition of ''defense'' TRU waste.). Only CH TRU wastes meeting the requirements of the QAPjP, WIPP-WAP, WPP-WAC, and other requirements documents described above will be accepted for transportation and disposal at WIPP.

  16. MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of solid and liquid wastes generated at mushroom producing facilities. Environmental guidelines#12;MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT PHASE I: AUDIT OF CURRENT PRACTICE The Mushroom Waste Management Project (MWMP) was initiated by Environment Canada, the BC Ministry

  17. Spherical codes, maximal local packing density, and the golden ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. Hopkins; F. H. Stillinger; S. Torquato

    2010-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The densest local packing (DLP) problem in d-dimensional Euclidean space Rd involves the placement of N nonoverlapping spheres of unit diameter near an additional fixed unit-diameter sphere such that the greatest distance from the center of the fixed sphere to the centers of any of the N surrounding spheres is minimized. Solutions to the DLP problem are relevant to the realizability of pair correlation functions for packings of nonoverlapping spheres and might prove useful in improving upon the best known upper bounds on the maximum packing fraction of sphere packings in dimensions greater than three. The optimal spherical code problem in Rd involves the placement of the centers of N nonoverlapping spheres of unit diameter onto the surface of a sphere of radius R such that R is minimized. It is proved that in any dimension, all solutions between unity and the golden ratio to the optimal spherical code problem for N spheres are also solutions to the corresponding DLP problem. It follows that for any packing of nonoverlapping spheres of unit diameter, a spherical region of radius less than or equal to the golden ratio centered on an arbitrary sphere center cannot enclose a number of sphere centers greater than one more than the number that can be placed on the region's surface.

  18. Hydrogen gettering packing material, and process for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    LeMay, James D. (Castro Valley, CA); Thompson, Lisa M. (Knoxville, TN); Smith, Henry Michael (Overland Park, KS); Schicker, James R. (Lee's Summit, MO)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrogen gettering system for a sealed container is disclosed comprising packing material for use within the sealed container, and a coating film containing hydrogen gettering material on at least a portion of the surface of such packing material. The coating film containing the hydrogen gettering material comprises a mixture of one or more organic materials capable of reacting with hydrogen and one or more catalysts capable of catalyzing the reaction of hydrogen with such one or more organic materials. The mixture of one or more organic materials capable of reacting with hydrogen and the one or more catalysts is dispersed in a suitable carrier which preferably is a curable film-forming material. In a preferred embodiment, the packing material comprises a foam material which is compatible with the coating film containing hydrogen gettering material thereon.

  19. Models for Metal Hydride Particle Shape, Packing, and Heat Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyle C. Smith; Timothy S. Fisher

    2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiphysics modeling approach for heat conduction in metal hydride powders is presented, including particle shape distribution, size distribution, granular packing structure, and effective thermal conductivity. A statistical geometric model is presented that replicates features of particle size and shape distributions observed experimentally that result from cyclic hydride decreptitation. The quasi-static dense packing of a sample set of these particles is simulated via energy-based structural optimization methods. These particles jam (i.e., solidify) at a density (solid volume fraction) of 0.665+/-0.015 - higher than prior experimental estimates. Effective thermal conductivity of the jammed system is simulated and found to follow the behavior predicted by granular effective medium theory. Finally, a theory is presented that links the properties of bi-porous cohesive powders to the present systems based on recent experimental observations of jammed packings of fine powder. This theory produces quantitative experimental agreement with metal hydride powders of various compositions.

  20. Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction Roles identified by the state. These three projects included: 1. Measuring ssepage losses from waste treatment-push technology for site characterization investigations. #12;Measuring Seepage Losses from Waste

  1. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B permit application [of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 11, Chapter D, Appendix D4--Chapter D, Appendix D17: Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains appendices D4 through D17 which cover the following: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site environmental report; ecological monitoring program at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant; site characterization; regional and site geology and hydrology; general geology; dissolution features; ground water hydrology; typical carbon sorption bed efficiency; VOC monitoring plan for bin-room tests; chemical compatibility analysis of waste forms and container materials; probable maximum precipitation; WHIP supplementary roof support system room 1, panel 1; and corrosion risk assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant ``humid`` test bins.

  2. Thermal Evaluation of the Honda Insight Battery Pack: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zolot, M.D.; Kelly, K.; Keyser, M.; Mihalic, M.; Pesaran, A.; Hieronymus, A.

    2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The hybrid vehicle test efforts at National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), with a focus on the Honda Insight's battery thermal management system, are presented. The performance of the Insight's high voltage NiMH battery pack was characterized by conducting in-vehicle dynamometer testing at Environmental Testing Corporation's high altitude dynamometer test facility, on-road testing in the Denver area, and out-of-car testing in NREL's Battery Thermal Management Laboratory. It is concluded that performance does vary considerably due to thermal conditions the pack encounters. The performance variations are due to both inherent NiMH characteristics, and the Insight's thermal management system.

  3. APPLICATION OF BOREHOLE GEOPHYSICS AT AN EXPERIMENTAL WASTE STORAGE SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, P.H.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    letal Ore Deposits, 11 in Geophysics and Geochemistry in the11 Applications of Borehole Geophysics to Water-ResourcesAPPLICATION OF BOREHOLE GEOPHYSICS AT AN EXPERIMENTAL WASTE

  4. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    waste NEPA National Environmental Policy Act RCRA Resource Conservation and Recovery Act RH-SC remote-handled special component ROD Record of Decision RPPDF River...

  5. assessment waste characterization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    evaluation of your land application practices should focus on the following question: Is manure a waste or a resource? The ease of use and reliability of commercial fertilizers...

  6. Thermal resistance gaps for solid breeder blankets using packed beds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorbis, Z.R.; Raffray, A.R.; Tillack, M.S.; Abdou, M.A.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main design features of a new concept for solid breeder blanket thermal resistance gaps are described and analysis is shown for the blanket thermal characteristics. The effective thermal conductivity of a helium-beryllium packed bed configuration is studied, including the effect of a purge stream. Possible applications of this concept to ITER blanket designs are stressed.

  7. Hydrogen Bonding Increases Packing Density in the Protein Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrogen Bonding Increases Packing Density in the Protein Interior David Schell,1,2 Jerry Tsai,1 J System Health Science Center, College Station, Texas 77843-1114 ABSTRACT The contribution of hydrogen to the stability, but experimental studies show that bury- ing polar groups, especially those that are hydrogen

  8. PACKING DIMENSION RESULTS FOR ANISOTROPIC GAUSSIAN RANDOM FIELDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Yimin

    and GrX [0, 1]N are determined by the lower index of . Namely, dimP X [0, 1]N = min d, N , a.s. (1.5) and dimP GrX [0, 1]N = min N , N + (1 - )d , a.s., (1.6) where dimP E denotes the packing dimension of E

  9. PACKING DIMENSION RESULTS FOR ANISOTROPIC GAUSSIAN RANDOM FIELDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    by the lower index of . Namely, dimP X [0, 1]N = min d, N , a.s. (1.5) and dimP GrX [0, 1]N = min N , N + (1 - )d , a.s., (1.6) where dimP E denotes the packing dimension o

  10. Particle Shape Effects on the Stress Response of Granular Packings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Athanasios G. Athanassiadis; Marc Z. Miskin; Paul Kaplan; Nicholas Rodenberg; Seung Hwan Lee; Jason Merritt; Eric Brown; John Amend; Hod Lipson; Heinrich M. Jaeger

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements of the stress response of packings formed from a wide range of particle shapes. Besides spheres these include convex shapes such as the Platonic solids, truncated tetrahedra, and triangular bipyramids, as well as more complex, non-convex geometries such as hexapods with various arm lengths, dolos, and tetrahedral frames. All particles were 3D-printed in hard resin. Well-defined initial packing states were established through preconditioning by cyclic loading under given confinement pressure. Starting from such initial states, stress-strain relationships for axial compression were obtained at four different confining pressures for each particle type. While confining pressure has the largest overall effect on the mechanical response, we find that particle shape controls the details of the stress-strain curves and can be used to tune packing stiffness and yielding. By correlating the experimentally measured values for the effective Young's modulus under compression, yield stress and energy loss during cyclic loading, we identify trends among the various shapes that allow for designing a packing's aggregate behavior.

  11. Geometry and Optimal Packing of Twisted Columns and Filaments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory M. Grason

    2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This review presents recent progress in understanding constraints and consequences of close-packing geometry of filamentous or columnar materials possessing non-trivial textures, focusing in particular on the common motifs of twisted and toroidal structures. The mathematical framework is presented that relates spacing between line-like, filamentous elements to their backbone orientations, highlighting the explicit connection between the inter-filament {\\it metric} properties and the geometry of non-Euclidean surfaces. The consequences of the hidden connection between packing in twisted filament bundles and packing on positively curved surfaces, like the Thomson problem, are demonstrated for the defect-riddled ground states of physical models of twisted filament bundles. The connection between the "ideal" geometry of {\\it fibrations} of curved three-dimensional space, including the Hopf fibration, and the non-Euclidean constraints of filament packing in twisted and toroidal bundles is presented, with a focus on the broader dependence of metric geometry on the simultaneous twisting and folded of multi-filament bundles.

  12. FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE GridPACK: Grid Parallel Advanced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE GridPACK: Grid Parallel Advanced Computational Kernels OBJECTIVE The U of the power grid will also have to evolve to insure accurate and timely simulations. On the other hand, the software tools available for power grid simulation today are primarily sequential single core programs

  13. ROV PACK: INFORMATION AND GUIDELINES www.serpentproject.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Oceanography Centre, Southampton

    are lucky enough to see Encourage best practice during offshore activities Map any impact footprint AND OBJECTIVES 5 TECHNIQUES 6 VIDEO SURVEY 6 NON DRILL-RIG OPERATIONS 7 PIPELINE AND IRM 7 DRILLING SUPPORT that is created when drilling offshore #12;ROV PACK: INFORMATION AND GUIDELINES www.serpentproject.com SERPENT

  14. Teacher Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Teacher Resources For Teachers Teachers Visit the Museum We Visit You Teacher Resources Home Schoolers Plan Your School Visit invisible utility element Teacher Resources Scavenger...

  15. Managing America`s solid waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1998-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an historical overview of the federal role in municipal solid waste management from 1965 to approximately 1995. Attention is focuses on the federal role in safeguarding public health, protecting the environment, and wisely using material and energy resources. It is hoped that this report will provide important background for future municipal solid waste research and development initiatives.

  16. Depleted uranium hexafluoride: Waste or resource?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwertz, N.; Zoller, J.; Rosen, R.; Patton, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Bradley, C. [USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, Technology, Washington, DC (United States); Murray, A. [SAIC (United States)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the US Department of Energy is evaluating technologies for the storage, disposal, or re-use of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}). This paper discusses the following options, and provides a technology assessment for each one: (1) conversion to UO{sub 2} for use as mixed oxide duel, (2) conversion to UO{sub 2} to make DUCRETE for a multi-purpose storage container, (3) conversion to depleted uranium metal for use as shielding, (4) conversion to uranium carbide for use as high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel. In addition, conversion to U{sub 3}O{sub 8} as an option for long-term storage is discussed.

  17. Resource Recovery from Solid Waste (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation establishes the state's support for the expansion and development of industries and commercial establishments which provide markets for materials and energy which can be recovered...

  18. Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and national laboratories to create a balanced portfolio of research in biomass feedstocks and conversion technologies. This program is largely focused on biomass fuels,...

  19. Waste Management Improvement Initiatives at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited - 13091

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, Nicholas; Adams, Lynne; Wong, Pierre [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)] [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL) Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) has been in operation for over 60 years. Radioactive, mixed, hazardous and non-hazardous wastes have been and continue to be generated at CRL as a result of research and development, radioisotope production, reactor operation and facility decommissioning activities. AECL has implemented several improvement initiatives at CRL to simplify the interface between waste generators and waste receivers: - Introduction of trained Waste Officers representing their facilities or activities at CRL; - Establishment of a Waste Management Customer Support Service as a Single-Point of Contact to provide guidance to waste generators for all waste management processes; and - Implementation of a streamlined approach for waste identification with emphasis on early identification of waste types and potential disposition paths. As a result of implementing these improvement initiatives, improvements in waste management and waste transfer efficiencies have been realized at CRL. These included: 1) waste generators contacting the Customer Support Service for information or guidance instead of various waste receivers; 2) more clear and consistent guidance provided to waste generators for waste management through the Customer Support Service; 3) more consistent and correct waste information provided to waste receivers through Waste Officers, resulting in reduced time and resources required for waste management (i.e., overall cost); 4) improved waste minimization and segregation approaches, as identified by in-house Waste Officers; and 5) enhanced communication between waste generators and waste management groups. (authors)

  20. Solid Waste Management Services Act (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act affirms the commitment of the state government to the development of systems and facilities and technology necessary to initiate large-scale processing of solid wastes and resource...

  1. Montana Solid Waste Management Act (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the public policy of the state to control solid waste management systems to protect the public health and safety and to conserve natural resources whenever possible. The Department of...

  2. Geothermal Direct-Use Minimizing Solid Waste

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Aquaculture and horticulture businesses, and other industries that use geothermal direct-use systems typically don't generate any more solid waste than those that use other energy resources.

  3. Size and polydispersity effect on the magnetization of densely packed magnetic nanoparticles.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Size and polydispersity effect on the magnetization of densely packed magnetic nanoparticles Paris 13, 93017 Bobigny, France. The magnetic properties of densely packed magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) assemblies are investi- gated from Monte Carlo simulations. The case of iron oxide nanoparticles

  4. Modeling the lubrication of the piston ring pack in internal combustion engines using the deterministic method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Haijie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Piston ring packs are used in internal combustion engines to seal both the high pressure gas in the combustion chamber and the lubricant oil in the crank case. The interaction between the piston ring pack and the cylinder ...

  5. Piston ring pack design effects on production spark ignition engine oil consumption : a simulation analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Senzer, Eric B

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most significant contributors to an engine's total oil consumption is the piston ring-pack. As a result, optimization of the ring pack is becoming more important for engine manufacturers and lubricant suppliers. ...

  6. Effects of lubricant viscosity and surface texturing on ring-pack performance in internal combustion engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takata, Rosalind (Rosalind Kazuko), 1978-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The piston ring-pack contributes approximately 25% of the mechanical losses in an internal combustion engine. Both lubricant viscosity and surface texturing were investigated in an effort to reduce this ring-pack friction ...

  7. Development of Cell/Pack Level Models for Automotive Li-Ion Batteries...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CellPack Level Models for Automotive Li-Ion Batteries with Experimental Validation Development of CellPack Level Models for Automotive Li-Ion Batteries with Experimental...

  8. Review of waste package verification tests. Semiannual report, October 1983-March 1984. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, H.; Veakis, E.; Soo, P.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current study is part of an ongoing task to specify tests that may be used to verify that engineered waste package/repository systems comply with NRC radionuclide containment and controlled release performance objectives. Work covered in this report includes crushed tuff packing material for use in a high-level waste tuff repository. Ranges of repository conditions relevant to its testing and other factors important for its performance are discussed. 23 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Facilitating the improved management of waste in South Africa through a national waste information system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godfrey, Linda [CSIR, Natural Resources and the Environment, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa)], E-mail: lgodfrey@csir.co.za

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing a waste information system (WIS) for a country is more than just about collecting routine data on waste; it is about facilitating the improved management of waste by providing timely, reliable information to the relevant role-players. It is a means of supporting the waste governance challenges facing South Africa - challenges ranging from strategic waste management issues at national government to basic operational challenges at local government. The paper addresses two hypotheses. The first is that the identified needs of government can provide a platform from which to design a national WIS framework for a developing country such as South Africa, and the second is that the needs for waste information reflect greater, currently unfulfilled challenges in the sustainable management of waste. Through a participatory needs analysis process, it is shown that waste information is needed by the three spheres of government, to support amongst others, informed planning and decision-making, compliance monitoring and enforcement, community participation through public access to information, human, infrastructure and financial resource management and policy development. These needs for waste information correspond closely with key waste management challenges currently facing the country. A shift in governments approach to waste, in line with national and international policy, is evident from identified current and future waste information needs. However, the need for information on landfilling remains entrenched within government, possibly due to the poor compliance of landfill sites in South Africa and the problems around the illegal disposal of both general and hazardous waste.

  10. Mixed Waste Management Options: 1995 Update. National Low-Level Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirner, N.; Kelly, J.; Faison, G.; Johnson, D. [Foster Wheeler Environmental Corp. (United States)

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the original mixed Waste Management Options (DOE/LLW-134) issued in December 1991, the question was posed, ``Can mixed waste be managed out of existence?`` That study found that most, but not all, of the Nation`s mixed waste can theoretically be managed out of existence. Four years later, the Nation is still faced with a lack of disposal options for commercially generated mixed waste. However, since publication of the original Mixed Waste Management Options report in 1991, limited disposal capacity and new technologies to treat mixed waste have become available. A more detailed estimate of the Nation`s mixed waste also became available when the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published their comprehensive assessment, titled National Profile on Commercially Generated Low-Level Radioactive Mixed Waste (National Profile). These advancements in our knowledge about mixed waste inventories and generation, coupled with greater treatment and disposal options, lead to a more applied question posed for this updated report: ``Which mixed waste has no treatment option?`` Beyond estimating the volume of mixed waste requiring jointly regulated disposal, this report also provides a general background on the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). It also presents a methodical approach for generators to use when deciding how to manage their mixed waste. The volume of mixed waste that may require land disposal in a jointly regulated facility each year was estimated through the application of this methodology.

  11. Fusion Engineering and Design 3940 (1998) 759764 Mechanical behavior and design database of packed beds for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    of packed beds for blanket designs Alice Y. Ying *, Zi Lu, Mohamed A. Abdou Mechanical and Aerospace

  12. New packing in absorption systems for trapping benzene from coke-oven gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V.V. Grabko; V.M. Li; T.A. Shevchenko; M.A. Solov'ev [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The efficiency of benzene removal from coke-oven gas in absorption units OAO Alchevskkoks with new packing is assessed.

  13. RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Hazardous waste identification (40 cfr part 261) updated July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The module introduces a specific hazardous waste identification process, which involves asking and analyzing a series of questions about any waste being evaluated. It analyzes in detail the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) definition of `hazardous waste.` It explains concepts that are essential to identifying a RCRA hazardous waste: hazardous waste listing, hazardous waste characteristics, the `mixture` and `derived-from` rules, the `contained-in` policy, and the hazardous waste identification rules (HWIR).

  14. A Dimensionless Model for Predicting the Mass-Transfer Area of Structured Packing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eldridge, R. Bruce

    area Introduction Packing is commonly used in absorption and distillation columns to promote efficient structured packings was measured in a 0.427 m ID column via absorption of CO2 from air into 0.1 kmol/m3 Na structured packing area model is especially critical for the analysis and design of these processes. Wang et

  15. Neural Network Modeling of Structured Packing Height Equivalent to a Theoretical Plate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eldridge, R. Bruce

    -transfer ef- ficiency in structured packing. Column designers use the HETP to calculate the height of packing properties of the chemical system, and the operating conditions of the column. In a previous paper, Whaley et a detailed investigation of the parameters which impact the performance of structured packing in distillation

  16. Hydraulic controls of summer Arctic pack ice albedo H. Eicken,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eicken, Hajo

    Hydraulic controls of summer Arctic pack ice albedo H. Eicken,1 T. C. Grenfell,2 D. K. Perovich,3 J. Perovich, J. A. Richter-Menge, and K. Frey (2004), Hydraulic controls of summer Arctic pack ice albedo, J that feedback processes involving the input of solar energy and subsequent changes in Arctic pack-ice albedo

  17. Computer modeling approach for microsphere-packed bone scaffold Pallavi Lal, Wei Sun*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Wei

    bone graft [5,6], for structural and human cellular assessment of scaffolds for bone repair [7 modeling approach for constructing a three-dimensional microsphere-packed bone graft structure is presented packing model to determine the number of microspheres packed in a synthesized bone graft. The pore size

  18. Savannah River Site offsite hazardous waste shipment data validation report. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, C.; Kudera, D.E.; Page, L.A.; Rohe, M.J.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this data validation is to verify that waste shipments reported in response to the US Department of Energy Headquarters data request are properly categorized according to DOE-HQ definitions. This report documents all findings and actions resulting from the independent review of the Savannah River Site data submittal, and provides a summary of the SRS data submittal and data validation strategy. The overall hazardous waste management and offsite release process from 1987--1991 is documented, along with an identification and description of the hazardous waste generation facilities. SRS did not ship any hazardous waste offsite before 1987. Sampling and analysis and surface surveying procedures and techniques used in determining offsite releasability of the shipments are also described in this report. SRS reported 150 manifested waste shipments from 1984 to 1991 that included 4,755 drums or lab packs and 13 tankers. Of these waste items, this report categorizes 4,251 as clean (including 12 tankers), 326 as likely clean, 138 as likely radioactive, and 55 as radioactive (including one tanker). Although outside the original scope of this report, 14 manifests from 1992 and 1993 are included, covering 393 drums or lab packs and seven tankers. From the 1992--1993 shipments, 58 drums or lab packs are categorized as radioactive and 16 drums are categorized as likely radioactive. The remainder are categorized as clean.

  19. Waste processing air cleaning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kriskovich, J.R.

    1998-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste processing and preparing waste to support waste processing relies heavily on ventilation. Ventilation is used at the Hanford Site on the waste storage tanks to provide confinement, cooling, and removal of flammable gases.

  20. HAZARDOUS WASTE [Written Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    HAZARDOUS WASTE MANUAL [Written Program] Cornell University [10/7/13 #12;Hazardous Waste Program................................................... 8 3.0 MINIMIZING HAZARDOUS WASTE GENERATION.........................................................10 4.0 HAZARDOUS WASTE GENERATOR REQUIREMENTS.....................................................10

  1. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B Permit Application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 6, Chapter D, Appendices D4--D13: Revision 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report (Vol. 6) for the WIPP facility contains appendices on the following information: Site characterization; general geology; ecological monitoring; and chemical compatibility of waste forms and container materials.

  2. Waste Disposal (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This article lays an outline of waste disposal regulations, permits and fees, hazardous waste management and underground storage tank requirements.

  3. Close-packed array of light emitting devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Simpson, John T.

    2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A close-packed array of light emitting diodes includes a nonconductive substrate having a plurality of elongate channels extending therethrough from a first side to a second side, where each of the elongate channels in at least a portion of the substrate includes a conductive rod therein. The conductive rods have a density over the substrate of at least about 1,000 rods per square centimeter and include first conductive rods and second conductive rods. The close-packed array further includes a plurality of light emitting diodes on the first side of the substrate, where each light emitting diode is in physical contact with at least one first conductive rod and in electrical contact with at least one second conductive rod.

  4. Sand pack residual oil saturations as affected by extraction with various solvents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, Clarence

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Water Flood Extraction Test (Sand Packs J, K, L, and N) 8. Results of Water Flood Extraction Test (Sand Pack M) TABLES I. Behavior of Oils Mixed with Various Solvents 18 II. Sand and Sand Pack Properties III. Fluid Properties IV. Results of Water... solvents which do not alter the rock-fluM properties. The present work was performed on sand, packs composed of pure ~ Oica sand to provide wetting properties simflar to natural cores and to provide packs with reproducible characteristics. Fluids studied...

  5. A mathematical model to predict leaching of hazardous inorganic wastes from solidified/stabilized waste forms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabharwal, Krishan

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Reauthorization Act (SARA). The other important law dealing with hazardous wastes is the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), enacted in 1976 and significantly amended by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984, RCRA provides "cradle... in 1980 to provide funding and enforcement authority to the EPA for cleaning up the numerous hazardous waste sites existing in the United States. In 1986, the act was made more comprehensive with the addition of the Superfund Amendments...

  6. EXAMPLES ILLUSTRATING THE INSTABILITY OF PACKING DIMENSIONS OF SECTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .3) dimH E n ?m and 0 dimp, (for bounds: if E Rn and V 2 Gn;m, then (1:4) dimH(E \\Va) maxf0;dimH E ?(n?m)g and (1:5) dimp(E \\Va) maxf0;dimp E ?(n?m)g for Hn?m-almost all a 2 V ? (see F3, Lemma 5] and Mat3, Chapter 10]). For the packing

  7. PACKING-DIMENSION PROFILES AND FRACTIONAL BROWNIAN MOTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khoshnevisan, Davar

    analytic set E RN and every integer 1 m N, (1.1) dimP (PV E) = DimmE for n,m-almost all V Gn,m, Date is the packing dimension dimP E. The principle aim of this note is to prove that (1.2) holds for all real numbers, 1985, Chapter 18). Xiao (1997) proved that for every analytic set E RN , (1.3) dimP X(E) = 1 H Dim

  8. Hollow Fibers as Structured Packing for Olefin/Paraffin Separation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, D. (Dali); Barbero, R. S. (Robert S.); Delvin, D. J. (David, J.); Carrera, Martin E.; Colling, Craig W.; Cussler, E. L.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the hollow fibers replace conventional trays and/or structured packing. Using a column less than 40 cm long, an {approx} 8% enrichment of propylene from a 30% propane/70%propylene mixture was achieved. An HTU as low as 8.8 cm was obtained. Such a low HTU has not been previously reported for propane/propylene separations. The mass transfer time was less than one second.

  9. Recycled Materials Resource Center Project No. 27

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    1 Recycled Materials Resource Center Project No. 27: Full Scale Monitoring for Assessment of Exothermal Reactions in Waste Tires Final Report February 2006 by Hailey L. Wappett1 Jorge G. Zornberg2 1....................................................................................................7 Tire Shredding

  10. Regulation of Oil and Gas Resources (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the public policy of the state to conserve and control the natural resources of oil and gas, and their products; to prevent waste of oil and gas; to provide for the protection and adjustment...

  11. Waste-to-Energy 25 Years Later: Technology with a Past, Present

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    solution Quite a Ride: UpsQuite a Ride: Ups MacArthur Resource Recovery Facility Islip, New York #12; Waste-to-energy Falls, New York #12; European Union: waste-to- energy preferable to landfills European Union directives and Consulting Federation of New York Solid Waste Associations Solid Waste/Recycling Conference Federation of New

  12. Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.NewofGeothermal848 UnlimitedIntegrated DisposalWaste Treatment and

  13. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulenceUtilizeRural PublicRates >-Plans andWaste Isolation

  14. Transfer Lines to Connect Liquid Waste Facilities and Salt Waste...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Transfer Lines to Connect Liquid Waste Facilities and Salt Waste Processing Facility Transfer Lines to Connect Liquid Waste Facilities and Salt Waste Processing Facility October...

  15. Algebraic approaches to resource conservation via process integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almutlaq, Abdulaziz M.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to identify rigorous targets for minimum usage of fresh resources, maximum recycle of process resources and minimum discharge of waste. These targets are identified a priori and without commitment to the detailed design of the recycle/reuse network...

  16. Mixed and Low-Level Treatment Facility Project. Appendix B, Waste stream engineering files, Part 1, Mixed waste streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This appendix contains the mixed and low-level waste engineering design files (EDFS) documenting each low-level and mixed waste stream investigated during preengineering studies for Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project. The EDFs provide background information on mixed and low-level waste generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. They identify, characterize, and provide treatment strategies for the waste streams. Mixed waste is waste containing both radioactive and hazardous components as defined by the Atomic Energy Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, respectively. Low-level waste is waste that contains radioactivity and is not classified as high-level waste, transuranic waste, spent nuclear fuel, or 11e(2) byproduct material as defined by DOE 5820.2A. Test specimens of fissionable material irradiated for research and development only, and not for the production of power or plutonium, may be classified as low-level waste, provided the concentration of transuranic is less than 100 nCi/g. This appendix is a tool that clarifies presentation format for the EDFS. The EDFs contain waste stream characterization data and potential treatment strategies that will facilitate system tradeoff studies and conceptual design development. A total of 43 mixed waste and 55 low-level waste EDFs are provided.

  17. C:\\Users\\gpike1\\Documents\\Dyslexia Information Pack.docx This pack is for students who think they may be dyslexic. It has

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miranda, Eduardo Reck

    C:\\Users\\gpike1\\Documents\\Dyslexia Information Pack.docx This pack is for students who think assessment for dyslexia. It includes: A. Financing your dyslexia assessment B. A flowchart outlining the whole process C. An information sheet `What next?' D. Information on finding a private dyslexia assessor

  18. VolPack: A Volume Rendering Library This chapter describes the design of an experimental software library called VolPack. The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    library based on userdefined callback functions for shading and classification. Alterna tivelyChapter 8 VolPack: A Volume Rendering Library This chapter describes the design of an experimental software library called VolPack. The library provides a highperformance implementation of the algorithms

  19. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 1, Part 1, Generator dangerous waste report, dangerous waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, weight, and waste designation.

  20. Waste minimization in the oil and gas industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, K.P.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent legislative actions place an emphasis on waste minimization as opposed to traditional end-of-pipe waste management. This new philosophy, coupled with increasing waste disposal costs and associated liabilities, sets the stage for investigating waste minimization opportunities in all industries wastes generated by oil and gas exploration and production (E P) and refuting activities are regulated as non-hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Potential reclassification of these wastes as hazardous would make minimization of these waste streams even more desirable. Oil and gas E P activities generate a wide variety of wastes, although the bulk of the wastes (98%) consists of a single waste stream: produced water. Opportunities to minimize E P wastes through point source reduction activities are limited by the extractive nature of the industry. Significant waste minimization is possible, however, through recycling. Recycling activities include underground injection of produced water, use of closed-loop drilling systems, reuse of produced water and drilling fluids in other oilfield activities, use of solid debris as construction fill, use of oily wastes as substitutes for road mix and asphalt, landspreading of produced sand for soil enhancement, and roadspreading of suitable aqueous wastes for dust suppression or deicing. Like the E P wastes, wastes generated by oil and gas treatment and refining activities cannot be reduced substantially at the point source but can be reduced through recycling. For the most part, extensive recycling and reprocessing of many waste streams already occurs at most petroleum refineries. A variety of innovative waste treatment activities have been developed to minimize the toxicity or volume of oily wastes generated by both E P and refining activities. These treatments include bioremediation, oxidation, biooxidation, incineration, and separation. Application of these treatment processes is still limited.

  1. Waste minimization in the oil and gas industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, K.P.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent legislative actions place an emphasis on waste minimization as opposed to traditional end-of-pipe waste management. This new philosophy, coupled with increasing waste disposal costs and associated liabilities, sets the stage for investigating waste minimization opportunities in all industries wastes generated by oil and gas exploration and production (E&P) and refuting activities are regulated as non-hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Potential reclassification of these wastes as hazardous would make minimization of these waste streams even more desirable. Oil and gas E&P activities generate a wide variety of wastes, although the bulk of the wastes (98%) consists of a single waste stream: produced water. Opportunities to minimize E&P wastes through point source reduction activities are limited by the extractive nature of the industry. Significant waste minimization is possible, however, through recycling. Recycling activities include underground injection of produced water, use of closed-loop drilling systems, reuse of produced water and drilling fluids in other oilfield activities, use of solid debris as construction fill, use of oily wastes as substitutes for road mix and asphalt, landspreading of produced sand for soil enhancement, and roadspreading of suitable aqueous wastes for dust suppression or deicing. Like the E&P wastes, wastes generated by oil and gas treatment and refining activities cannot be reduced substantially at the point source but can be reduced through recycling. For the most part, extensive recycling and reprocessing of many waste streams already occurs at most petroleum refineries. A variety of innovative waste treatment activities have been developed to minimize the toxicity or volume of oily wastes generated by both E&P and refining activities. These treatments include bioremediation, oxidation, biooxidation, incineration, and separation. Application of these treatment processes is still limited.

  2. Waste Description Pounds Reduced,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -labeled oligonucleotides Waste minimization 3,144 Radiological waste (396 ft3 ); Mixed waste (35 gallons); Hazardous Waste of radioactivity, thus avoiding radiological waste generation. This process won a 2008 DOE P2 Star Award environmentally friendly manor. BNL pays shipping fees to the recycling facility. Building demolition recycling

  3. Surface wave acoustics of granular packing under gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clement, Eric; Andreotti, Bruno [PMMH, ESPCI, CNRS (UMR 7636) and Univ. Paris 6 and Paris 7, 10 rue Vauquelin, 75005 Paris (France); Bonneau, Lenaic [PMMH, ESPCI, CNRS (UMR 7636) and Univ. Paris 6 and Paris 7, 10 rue Vauquelin, 75005 Paris (France)

    2009-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the non-linearity of Hertzian contacts, the speed of sound in granular matter increases with pressure. For a packing under gravity and in the presence of a free surface, bulk acoustic waves cannot propagate due to the inherent refraction toward the surface (the mirage effect). Thus, only modes corresponding to surface waves (Raleigh-Hertz modes) are able to propagate the acoustic signal. First, based on a non-linear elasticity model, we describe the main features associated to these surface waves. We show that under gravity, a granular packing is from the acoustic propagation point of view an index gradient waveguide that selects modes of two distinct families i.e. the sagittal and transverse waves localized in the vicinity of the free surface. A striking feature of these surface waves is the multi-modal propagation: for both transverse and sagittal waves, we show the existence of a infinite but discrete series of propagating modes. In each case, we determine the mode shape and and the corresponding dispersion relation. In the case of a finite size system, a geometric waveguide is superimposed to the index gradient wave guide. In this later case, the dispersion relations are modified by the appearance of a cut-off frequency that scales with depth. The second part is devoted to an experimental study of surface waves propagating in a granular packing confined in a long channel. This set-up allows to tune a monomodal emission by taking advantage of the geometric waveguide features combined with properly designed emitters. For both sagittal and transverses waves, we were able to isolate a single mode (the fundamental one) and to plot the dispersion relation. This measurements agree well with the Hertzian scaling law as predicted by meanfield models. Furthermore, it allows us to determine quantitatively relations on the elastic moduli. However, we observe that our data yield a shear modulus abnormally weak when compared to several meanfield predictions.

  4. Memo - Legacy Technical Area (TA)-55 Nitrate Salt Wastes at TA...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Memo - Legacy Technical Area (TA)-55 Nitrate Salt Wastes at TA-54, Potential Applicability of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) D001D002D003 Waste Codes Memo - Legacy...

  5. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant No-migration variance petition. Addendum: Volume 7, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes various aspects of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) including design data, waste characterization, dissolution features, ground water hydrology, natural resources, monitoring, general geology, and the gas generation/test program.

  6. Free volume distribution of nearly jammed hard sphere packings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moumita Maiti; Srikanth Sastry

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the free volume distributions of nearly jammed packings of monodisperse and bidisperse hard sphere configurations. These distributions differ qualitatively from those of the fluid, displaying a power law tail at large free volumes, which constitutes a distinct signature of nearly jammed configurations, persisting for moderate degrees of decompression. We reproduce and explain the observed distribution by considering the pair correlation function within the first coordination shell for jammed hard sphere configurations. We analyze features of the equation of state near jamming, and discuss the significance of observed asphericities of the free volumes to the equation of state.

  7. Hydraulically refueled battery employing a packed bed metal particle electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siu, S.C.; Evans, J.W.

    1998-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A secondary zinc air cell, or another selected metal air cell, employing a spouted/packed metal particle bed and an air electrode is described. More specifically, two embodiments of a cell, one that is capable of being hydraulically recharged, and a second that is capable of being either hydraulically or electrically recharged. Additionally, each cell includes a sloped bottom portion to cause stirring of the electrolyte/metal particulate slurry when the cell is being hydraulically emptied and refilled during hydraulically recharging of the cell. 15 figs.

  8. Power-law friction in closely-packed granular materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takahiro Hatano

    2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to understand the nature of friction in closely-packed granular materials, a discrete element simulation on granular layers subjected to isobaric plain shear is performed. It is found that the friction coefficient increases as the power of the shear rate, the exponent of which does not depend on the material constants. Using a nondimensional parameter that is known as the inertial number, the power-law can be cast in a generalized form so that the friction coefficients at different confining pressures collapse on the same curve. We show that the volume fraction also obeys a power-law.

  9. Hydraulically refueled battery employing a packed bed metal particle electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siu, Stanley C. (Castro Valley, CA); Evans, James W. (Piedmont, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A secondary zinc air cell, or another selected metal air cell, employing a spouted/packed metal particle bed and an air electrode. More specifically, two embodiments of a cell, one that is capable of being hydraulically recharged, and a second that is capable of being either hydraulically or electrically recharged. Additionally, each cell includes a sloped bottom portion to cause stirring of the electrolyte/metal particulate slurry when the cell is being hydraulically emptied and refilled during hydraulically recharging of the cell.

  10. Goddard rattler-jamming mechanism for quantifying pressure dependence of elastic moduli of grain packs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pride, Steven R.; Berryman, James G.

    2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis is presented to show how it is possible for unconsolidated granular packings to obey overall non-Hertzian pressure dependence due to the imperfect and random spatial arrangements of the grains in these packs. With imperfect arrangement, some gaps that remain between grains can be closed by strains applied to the grain packing. As these gaps are closed, former rattler grains become jammed and new stress-bearing contacts are created that increase the elastic stiffness of the packing. By allowing for such a mechanism, detailed analytical expressions are obtained for increases in bulk modulus of a random packing of grains with increasing stress and strain. Only isotropic stress and strain are considered in this analysis. The model is shown to give a favorable fit to laboratory data on variations in bulk modulus due to variations in applied pressure for bead packs.

  11. Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ELLEFSON, M.D.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

  12. RCRA/UST, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Hazardous waste identification (40 CFR part 261) updated as of July 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This module introduces a specific hazardous waste identification process, which involves asking and analyzing a series of questions about any waste being evaluated. Analyzes in detail the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) definition of hazardous waste. It explains the following concepts that are essential to identifying a RCRA hazardous waste: hazardous waste listing, hazardous waste characteristics, the mixture and derived-from rules, the contained-in policy, and the Hazardous Waste Identification Rule (HWIR).

  13. Radioactive Waste Management (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section regulates the transportation and disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Minnesota, and establishes a Nuclear Waste Council to monitor the federal high-level radioactive waste...

  14. The Scaleup of Structured Packing from Distillation Pilot Plant Testing to Commercial Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berven, O. J.; Ulowetz, M. A.

    The Scaleup of Structured Packing From Distillation Pilot Plant Testing to Commercial Application O. Jeffrey'Berven and Michael A. Ulowetz Koch Engineering Company, Inc. Wichita, Kansas Structured packing is being utilized more and more... in the process industry for increased efficiency, greater capacity, and energy savings in distillation columns. Pilot plant testing of the actual chemical system using commercially available structured packing is invaluable, but years of experience in pilot...

  15. Math. Proc. Camb. Phil. Soc. 115 (1994), 437--450. THE PACKING MEASURE OF SELFAFFINE CARPETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peres, Yuval

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ). Finally, define the packing dimension of E: (1.4) dimP (E) = inf f` : P ` (E) = 0g : We always have dimH (E) Ÿ dimP (E) Ÿ dimM (E); other general properties of packing measures are recalled in x2. A compact of packing dimension (see Corollary 2.3 below) easily imply that (1.6) dimP (K(T; D)) = dimM (K(T; D

  16. A numerical investigation of high-rate gas flow for gravel-packed completions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forrest, James Kenyon

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A-2 Three-Dimensional Cylindrical Grid System for Simulation of Gravel-Packed Gas Well 58 D-I Perforation Model Schematic 74 INTRODUCTION In recent years, operators have produced gas at ultra high flow rates from shallow, unconsolidated sands... the application of "Systems Analysis" to cased-hole, gravel-packed wells. The second part concerns the numerical simulation of flow in perforations and gravel-packed wells. The method presently used by some operators to analyze the productivity of wells...

  17. Development of iron phosphate ceramic waste form to immobilize radioactive waste solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Jongkwon; Um, Wooyong; Choung, Sungwook

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research was to develop an iron phosphate ceramic (IPC) waste form using converter slag obtained as a by-product of the steel industry as a source of iron instead of conventional iron oxide. Both synthetic off-gas scrubber solution containing technetium-99 (or Re as a surrogate) and LiCl-KCl eutectic salt, a final waste solution from pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuel, were used as radioactive waste streams. The IPC waste form was characterized for compressive strength, reduction capacity, chemical durability, and contaminant leachability. Compressive strengths of the IPC waste form prepared with different types of waste solutions were 16 MPa and 19 MPa for LiCl-KCl eutectic salt and the off-gas scrubber simulant, respectively, which meet the minimum compressive strength of 3.45 MPa (500 psi) for waste forms to be accepted into the radioactive waste repository. The reduction capacity of converter slag, a main dry ingredient used to prepare the IPC waste form, was 4,136 meq/kg by the Ce(IV) method, which is much higher than those of the conventional Fe oxides used for the IPC waste form and the blast furnace slag materials. Average leachability indexes of Tc, Li, and K for the IPC waste form were higher than 6.0, and the IPC waste form demonstrated stable durability even after 63-day leaching. In addition, the Toxicity Characteristic Leach Procedure measurements of converter slag and the IPC waste form with LiCl-KCl eutectic salt met the universal treatment standard of the leachability limit for metals regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This study confirms the possibility of development of the IPC waste form using converter slag, showing its immobilization capability for radionuclides in both LiCl-KCl eutectic salt and off-gas scrubber solutions with significant cost savings.

  18. Method for immobilizing particulate materials in a packed bed

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Even, Jr., William R. (Livermore, CA); Guthrie, Stephen E. (Livermore, CA); Raber, Thomas N. (Livermore, CA); Wally, Karl (Lafayette, CA); Whinnery, LeRoy L. (Livermore, CA); Zifer, Thomas (Manteca, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention pertains generally to immobilizing particulate matter contained in a "packed" bed reactor so as to prevent powder migration, compaction, coalescence, or the like. More specifically, this invention relates to a technique for immobilizing particulate materials using a microporous foam-like polymer such that a) the particulate retains its essential chemical nature, b) the local movement of the particulate particles is not unduly restricted, c) bulk powder migration and is prevented, d) physical and chemical access to the particulate is unchanged over time, and e) very high particulate densities are achieved. The immobilized bed of the present invention comprises a vessel for holding particulate matter, inlet and an outlet ports or fittings, a loosely packed bed of particulate material contained within the vessel, and a three dimensional porous matrix for surrounding and confining the particles thereby fixing the movement of individual particle to a limited local position. The established matrix is composed of a series of cells or chambers comprising walls surrounding void space, each wall forming the wall of an adjacent cell; each wall containing many holes penetrating through the wall yielding an overall porous structure and allowing useful levels of gas transport.

  19. Measuring the configurational temperature of a binary disc packing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song-Chuan Zhao; Matthias Schrter

    2014-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Jammed packings of granular materials differ from systems normally described by statistical mechanics in that they are athermal. In recent years a statistical mechanics of static granular media has emerged where the thermodynamic temperature is replaced by a configurational temperature X which describes how the number of mechanically stable configurations depends on the volume. Four different methods have been suggested to measure X. Three of them are computed from properties of the Voronoi volume distribution, the fourth takes into account the contact number and the global volume fraction. This paper answers two questions using experimental binary disc packings: First we test if the four methods to measure compactivity provide identical results when applied to the same dataset. We find that only two of the methods agree quantitatively. Secondly, we test if X is indeed an intensive variable; this becomes true only for samples larger than roughly 200 particles. This result is shown to be due to recently found correlations between the particle volumes [Zhao et al., Europhys. Lett., 2012, 97, 34004].

  20. Response Resources Demonstration

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy at Waste-to-Energy usingof Enhanced Dr. JuliaPOINTRespond to theResponse

  1. Non-linear approximations for solving 3D-packing MIP models: a ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manlio.Parisch

    2011-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    MIP models: a heuristic approach ... three-dimensional packing, MIP/MINLP models, linear/non-linear ..... Springer Science + Business Media, New York.

  2. Annual Waste Minimization Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred J. Karns

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the waste minimization efforts undertaken by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), during CY06. This report was developed in accordance with the requirements of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Permit (No. NEV HW0021) and as clarified in a letter dated April 21, 1995, from Paul Liebendorfer of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to Donald Elle of the DOE, Nevada Operations Office. The NNSA/NSO Pollution Prevention (P2) Program establishes a process to reduce the volume and toxicity of waste generated by the NNSA/NSO and ensures that proposed methods of treatment, storage, and/or disposal of waste minimize potential threats to human health and the environment. The following information provides an overview of the P2 Program, major P2 accomplishments during the reporting year, a comparison of the current year waste generation to prior years, and a description of efforts undertaken during the year to reduce the volume and toxicity of waste generated by the NNSA/NSO.

  3. Solid Waste (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The New Mexico Environment Department's Solid Waste Bureau manages solid waste in the state. The Bureau implements and enforces the rules established by the Environmental Improvement Board.

  4. Radioactive Waste Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1984-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish policies and guidelines by which the Department of Energy (DOE) manages tis radioactive waste, waste byproducts, and radioactively contaminated surplus facilities.

  5. Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation gives regulatory authority to the Department of Environmental Management to monitor commercial sites for hazardous wastes; fees on waste received at such sites; hearings and...

  6. Transuranic Waste Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The guide provides criteria for determining if a waste is to be managed in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter III, Transuranic Waste Requirements.

  7. Salt Waste Processing Initiatives

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1 Patricia Suggs Salt Processing Team Lead Assistant Manager for Waste Disposition Project Office of Environmental Management Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Initiatives...

  8. Waste Treatment Plant Overview

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the...

  9. Unreviewed Safety Question Determination - Processing Waste in...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Unreviewed Safety Question Determination - Processing Waste in the Waste Characterization Glovebox Unreviewed Safety Question Determination - Processing Waste in the Waste...

  10. Solid Waste and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter of the law that establishes the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency establishes the rules and regulations regarding solid waste.

  11. Radioactive and chemotoxic wastes: Only radioactive wastes?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eletti, G.F.; Tocci, M. [ENEA DISP, Rome (Italy)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive waste arising from Italian Nuclear Power Plants and Research Centers, classified as 1st and 2nd Category wastes, are managed only as radioactive wastes following the Technical Guide No. 26 issued by the Italian Regulatory Body: ENEA DISP on 1987. A very important Regulatory Regime revision for Italian Nuclear Activities started at the end of 1991. This paper considers the need to develop a new strategy dedicated to mixed waste in line with current international trends.

  12. Repackaging of High Fissile TRU Waste at the Transuranic Waste Processing Center - 13240

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oakley, Brian; Heacker, Fred [WAI, TRU Waste Processing Center, 100 WIPP Road Lenoir City, TN 37771 (United States)] [WAI, TRU Waste Processing Center, 100 WIPP Road Lenoir City, TN 37771 (United States); McMillan, Bill [DOE, Oak Ridge Operations, Bldg. 2714, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)] [DOE, Oak Ridge Operations, Bldg. 2714, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Twenty-six drums of high fissile transuranic (TRU) waste from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) operations were declared waste in the mid-1980's and placed in storage with the legacy TRU waste inventory for future treatment and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Repackaging and treatment of the waste at the TRU Waste Packaging Center (TWPC) will require the installation of additional equipment and capabilities to address the hazards for handling and repackaging the waste compared to typical Contact Handled (CH) TRU waste that is processed at the TWPC, including potential hydrogen accumulation in legacy 6M/2R packaging configurations, potential presence of reactive plutonium hydrides, and significant low energy gamma radiation dose rates. All of the waste is anticipated to be repackaged at the TWPC and certified for disposal at WIPP. The waste is currently packaged in multiple layers of containers which presents additional challenges for repackaging activities due to the potential for the accumulation of hydrogen gas in the container headspace in quantities than could exceed the Lower Flammability Limit (LFL). The outer container for each waste package is a stainless steel 0.21 m{sup 3} (55-gal) drum which contains either a 0.04 m{sup 3} or 0.06 m{sup 3} (10-gal or 15-gal) 6M drum. The inner 2R container in each 6M drum is ?12 cm (5 in) outside diameter x 30-36 cm (12-14 in) long and is considered to be a > 4 liter sealed container relative to TRU waste packaging criteria. Inside the 2R containers are multiple configurations of food pack cans, pipe nipples, and welded capsules. The waste contains significant quantities of high burn-up plutonium oxides and metals with a heavy weight percentage of higher atomic mass isotopes and the subsequent in-growth of significant quantities of americium. Significant low energy gamma radiation is expected to be present due to the americium in-growth. Radiation dose rates on inner containers are estimated to be 1-3 mSv/hr (100-300 mrem/hr) with an unshielded dose rate on the waste itself of over 10 mSv/hr (1 rem/hr). Additional equipment to be installed at the TWPC will include a new perma-con enclosure and a shielded/inert glovebox in the process building to repackage and stabilize the waste. All of the waste will be repackaged into Standard Pipe Overpacks. Most of the waste (21 of the 26 drums) is expected to be repackaged at the food-pack can level (i.e. the food-pack cans will not be opened). Five of the incoming waste containers are expected to be repackaged at the primary waste level. Three of the containers exceed the 200 gram Pu-239 Fissile Gram Equivalent (FGE) limit for the Standard Pipe Overpack. These three containers will be repackaged down to the primary waste level and divided into eight Standard Pipe Overpacks for shipment to WIPP. Two containers must be stabilized to eliminate any reactive plutonium hydrides that may be present. These containers will be opened in the inert, shielded glovebox, and the remaining corroded plutonium metal converted to a stable oxide form by using a 600 deg. C tube furnace with controlled oxygen feed in a helium carrier gas. The stabilized waste will then be packaged into two Standard Pipe Overpacks. Design and build out activities for the additional repackaging capabilities at the TWPC are scheduled to begin in Fiscal Year 2013 with repackaging, stabilization, and certification activities scheduled to begin in Fiscal Year 2014. Following repackaging and stabilization activities, the Standard Pipe Overpacks will be certified for disposal at WIPP utilizing Non-Destructive Examination (NDE) to verify the absence of prohibited items and Non-Destructive Assay (NDA) to verify the isotopic content under the TWPC WIPP certification program implemented by the Central Characterization Project (CCP). (authors)

  13. Recovery Act: Hydroelectric Facility Improvement Project - Replacement of Current Mechanical Seal System with Rope Packing System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, Jessica D.

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    On January 27, 2010 the City of North Little Rock, Arkansas received notification of the awarding of a Department of Energy (DOE) grant totaling $450,000 in funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) under the Project Title: Recovery Act: Hydroelectric Facility Improvement Project Automated Intake Clearing Equipment and Materials Management. The purpose of the grant was for improvements to be made at the Citys hydroelectric generating facility located on the Arkansas River. Improvements were to be made through the installation of an intake maintenance device (IMD) and the purchase of a large capacity wood grinder. The wood grinder was purchased in order to receive the tree limbs, tree trunks, and other organic debris that collects at the intake of the plant during high flow. The wood grinder eliminates the periodic burning of the waste material that is cleared from the intake and reduces any additional air pollution to the area. The resulting organic mulch has been made available to the public at no charge. Design discussion and planning began immediately and the wood grinder was purchased in July of 2010 and immediately put to work mulching debris that was gathered regularly from the intake of the facility. The mulch is currently available to the public for free. A large majority of the design process was spent in discussion with the Corps of Engineers to obtain approval for drawings, documents, and permits that were required in order to make changes to the structure of the powerhouse. In April of 2011, the Citys Project Engineer, who had overseen the application, resigned and left the Citys employ. A new Systems Mechanical Engineer was hired and tasked with overseeing the project. The transfer of responsibility led to a re-examination of the original assumptions and research upon which the grant proposal was based. At that point, the project went under review and a trip was booked for July 2011 to visit facilities that currently had an IMD installed. This further study of facilities revealed that the implementation of the project as originally described, while proving the benefits described in the original grant application, would likely intensify sand intake. Increased sand intake would lead to an increase in required shutdowns for maintenance and more rapid depreciation of key equipment which would result in a loss of generation capacity. A better solution to the problem, one that continued to meet the criteria for the original grant and ARRA standards, was developed. A supporting day trip was planned to visit other facilities located on the Arkansas River to determine how they were coping with the same strong amounts of sand, silt, and debris. Upon returning from the trip to other Arkansas River facilities it was extremely clear what direction to go in order to most efficiently address the issue of generator capacity and efficiency. Of the plants visited on the Arkansas River, every one of them was running what is called a rope packing shaft sealing system as opposed to mechanical shaft seals, which the facility was running. Rope packing is a time proven sealing method that has been around for centuries. It has proved to perform very well in dirty water situations just like that of the Arkansas River. In April of 2012 a scope change proposal was submitted to the DOE for approval. In August of 2012 the City received word that the change of scope had been approved. Plans were immediately set in motion to begin the conversion from mechanical seals to a packing box at the facility. Contractors arrived on October 1st, 2012 and the project team began unwatering the unit for disassembly. The seal conversion was completed on February 29th, 2013 with start-up of the unit. Further testing and adjusting was done throughout the first two weeks of March.

  14. Mixed Waste Treatment Project: LLNL and LANL computer simulations of integrated flowsheets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camp, D.W.; Dietsche, L.J.; Upadhye, R.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Borduin, L.C.; Pendergrass, J.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Thompson, T.K. [Thompson (T.K.), Inc., Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computer simulations of mixed waste processing flowsheets using ASPEN PLUS process simulation software were completed by a joint Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory/Los National Laboratory (LLNL/LANL) effort for the US Department of Energy Mixed Waste Treatment Project. The LLNL model used relatively detailed synthesized chemical ``cocktails`` to simulate waste streams. The LANL approach used less detail but made extensive use of simple steam splitters and thermodynamic coal models for combustible waste compositions. The two modeling approaches agreed within 16% for the product streams and within 25% for the auxiliary fuel rate. The discrepancy between the auxiliary fuel rates was traced to different methods of handling organics in lab packs and scintillation vials with the process models. The ASPEN models are valuable tools for evaluating waste processing flowsheets.

  15. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 4, Waste Management Facility report, Radioactive mixed waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, handling method and containment vessel, waste number, waste designation and amount of waste.

  16. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation.

  17. Technical area status report for waste destruction and stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalton, J.D.; Harris, T.L.; DeWitt, L.M. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) was established by the Department of Energy (DOE) to direct and coordinate waste management and site remediation programs/activities throughout the DOE complex. In order to successfully achieve the goal of properly managing waste and the cleanup of the DOE sites, the EM was divided into five organizations: the Office of Planning and Resource Management (EM-10); the Office of Environmental Quality Assurance and Resource Management (EM-20); the Office of Waste Operations (EM-30); the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40); and the Office of Technology and Development (EM-50). The mission of the Office of Technology Development (OTD) is to develop treatment technologies for DOE`s operational and environmental restoration wastes where current treatment technologies are inadequate or not available. The Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) was created by OTD to assist in the development of treatment technologies for the DOE mixed low-level wastes (MLLW). The MWIP has established five Technical Support Groups (TSGs) whose purpose is to identify, evaluate, and develop treatment technologies within five general technical areas representing waste treatment functions from initial waste handling through generation of final waste forms. These TSGs are: (1) Front-End Waste Handling, (2) Physical/Chemical Treatment, (3) Waste Destruction and Stabilization, (4) Second-Stage Destruction and Offgas Treatment, and (5) Final Waste Forms. This report describes the functions of the Waste Destruction and Stabilization (WDS) group. Specifically, the following items are discussed: DOE waste stream identification; summary of previous efforts; summary of WDS treatment technologies; currently funded WDS activities; and recommendations for future activities.

  18. IMPACT OF THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS ON THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY - 12112

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D.; Lambert, D.; Fox, K.; Stone, M.

    2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is investigating the deployment of a parallel technology to the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF, presently under construction) to accelerate high activity salt waste processing. The proposed technology combines large waste tank strikes of monosodium titanate (MST) to sorb strontium and actinides with two ion exchange columns packed with crystalline silicotitanate (CST) resin to sorb cesium. The new process was designated Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX), since the ion exchange columns were sized to fit within a waste storage tank riser. Loaded resins are to be combined with high activity sludge waste and fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for incorporation into the current glass waste form. Decontaminated salt solution produced by SCIX will be fed to the SRS Saltstone Facility for on-site immobilization as a grout waste form. Determining the potential impact of SCIX resins on DWPF processing was the basis for this study. Accelerated salt waste treatment is projected to produce a significant savings in the overall life cycle cost of waste treatment at SRS.

  19. Thermal conductivity of beryllium-gas packed bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, M.; Abdou, M.A.; Raffray, A.R. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Unsintered packed bed has been suggested as a material form for solid breeder and multiplier in the ITER and fusion power reactor blankets. Study of the effective bed thermal conductivity can provide tools for analysis of the blanket performance under different operating conditions, and of how to actively control the thermal behavior of the blanket. Issues of particular interest are the ability to predict and to control the thermal conductivity. The 2-D model developed at UCLA is used to study the effect of particle diameter, solid-to-gas conductivity ratio, bed porosity, contact area, and surface roughness characteristics on bed thermal conductivity. The study shows that all parameters except bed porosity play important roles in determining the bed thermal controllability.

  20. Potential use of battery packs from NCAP tested vehicles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamb, Joshua; Orendorff, Christopher J.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several large electric vehicle batteries available to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration are candidates for use in future safety testing programs. The batteries, from vehicles subjected to NCAP crashworthiness testing, are considered potentially damaged due to the nature of testing their associated vehicles have been subjected to. Criteria for safe shipping to Sandia is discussed, as well as condition the batteries must be in to perform testing work. Also discussed are potential tests that could be performed under a variety of conditions. The ultimate value of potential testing performed on these cells will rest on the level of access available to the battery pack, i.e. external access only, access to the on board monitoring system/CAN port or internal electrical access to the battery. Greater access to the battery than external visual and temperature monitoring would likely require input from the battery manufacturer.

  1. Confined polymer nematics: order and packing in a nematic drop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Svenek; Gregor Veble; Rudolf Podgornik

    2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the tight packing of nematic polymers inside a confining hard sphere. We model the polymer {\\sl via} the continuum Frank elastic free energy augmented by a simple density dependent part as well as by taking proper care of the connectivity of the polymer chains when compared with simple nematics. The free energy {\\sl ansatz} is capable of describing an orientational ordering transition within the sample between an isotropic polymer solution and a polymer nematic phase. We solve the Euler-Lagrange equations numerically with the appropriate boundary conditions for the director and density field and investigate the orientation and density profile within a sphere. Two important parameters of the solution are the exact locations of the beginning and the end of the polymer chain. Pending on their spatial distribution and the actual size of the hard sphere enclosure we can get a plethora of various configurations of the chain exhibiting different defect geometry.

  2. HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT REFERENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faraon, Andrei

    Principal Investigators 7 Laboratory Personnel 8 EH&S Personnel 8 HAZARDOUS WASTE ACCUMULATION AREAS 9 Satellite Accumulation Area 9 Waste Accumulation Facility 10 HAZARDOUS WASTE CONTAINER MANAGEMENT LabelingHAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT REFERENCE GUIDE Prepared by Environment, Health and Safety Office

  3. Hazardous Waste Management Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Pengcheng

    records. The initial training of Hazardous Waste Management and Waste Minimization is done in a classHazardous Waste Management Training Persons (including faculty, staff and students) working before handling hazardous waste. Departments are re- quired to keep records of training for as long

  4. Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2011 Liquid Nitrogen Packed Column Distributor Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    concepts for a liquid nitrogen distributor for a packed distillation column. The design team at Penn State distillation column design. Approach The design team first gathered customer specifications from Air ProductsPENNSTATE Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2011 Liquid Nitrogen Packed Column

  5. Packing Dimension and Cartesian Products Christopher J. Bishop1 Yuval Peres2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, Christopher

    that (dimH (A B) dimH(B)) ~ dimP(A) ; (1) where "dimP " denotes packing dimension (see) showed that dimP(E F ) ~ dimH(E) + dimP(F ) : (3) Hu the "* *regular- ization" of this index the lower packing dimension, denoted dim_P, although it * *is

  6. Energy Consumption Tools Pack Leandro Fontoura Cupertino, Georges DaCosta,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lefvre, Laurent

    Energy Consumption Library Data Acquisition Tool Data Monitoring Tool Energy Profiler 3 ConclusionsEnergy Consumption Tools Pack Leandro Fontoura Cupertino, Georges DaCosta, Amal Sayah, Jean Consumption Tools Pack 1 / 23 #12;Outline 1 Introduction Motivation Our proposal 2 Energy Consumption Tools

  7. Chromate transport through columns packed with surfactant-modified zeolite/zero valent iron pellets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhaohui

    Chromate transport through columns packed with surfactant-modified zeolite/zero valent iron pellets Chromate transport through columns packed with zeolite/zero valent iron (Z/ZVI) pellets, either untreated originated from chromate sorption onto the HDTMA modified Z/ZVI pellets. Due to dual porosity, the presence

  8. ERROR OF THE NETWORK APPROXIMATION FOR DENSELY PACKED COMPOSITES WITH IRREGULAR GEOMETRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlyand, Leonid

    of the effective conductivity of the high contrast, highly packed composites in which inclusions are irregularly in the case of the high contrast, highly packed particulate composites, that is, when the conductivity inclusions is high is particularly relevant to polymer/ceramic composites, because a polymer matrix com

  9. Wave propagation and thermodynamic losses in packed-bed thermal reservoirs for energy storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Alexander; McTigue, Joshua; Markides, Christos

    2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    . The reservoirs of interest here typically comprise a cylindrical pressure vessel containing the solid storage medium in the form of a packed bed of pebbles or gravel, or a uniform... WAVE PROPAGATION AND THERMODYNAMIC LOSSES IN PACKED-?BED THERMAL RESERVOIRS FOR ENERGY STORAGE Alexander White1, Joshua McTigue1, Christos Markides2 1 Cambridge University...

  10. Characterization of Oscillatory Boundary Layer over a Closely Packed Bed of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Sourabh V.

    Characterization of Oscillatory Boundary Layer over a Closely Packed Bed of Sediment Particles Boundary Layer over a Closely Packed Bed of Sediment Particles Chaitanya D. Ghodke*, Joseph Skitka a detailed knowledge of the small amplitude oscillatory flow over the sediment layer near the sea bed. Fully

  11. Design of a Lithium-ion Battery Pack for PHEV Using a Hybrid Optimization Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    Design of a Lithium-ion Battery Pack for PHEV Using a Hybrid Optimization Method Nansi Xue1 vehicle applications using a hybrid numerical optimization method that combines multiple individual is applied to minimize the mass, volume and material costs. The optimized pack design satisfies the energy

  12. The Climate Change Action Pack An interactive teaching supplement designed to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunawardena, Arunika

    #12;The Climate Change Action Pack An interactive teaching supplement designed to: Increase the understanding among young Nova Scotians and educators of the science and issues of climate change Equip Nova at home and in their future workplaces. #12;Climate Change Action Pack printed Mar. 2002 TABLE OF CONTENTS

  13. Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ELLEFSON, M.D.

    2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source special nuclear and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this document. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge. This document has been revised to meet the interim status waste analysis plan requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173 303-300(5). When the final status permit is issued, permit conditions will be incorporated and this document will be revised accordingly.

  14. Additional Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following resources are focused on Federal new construction and major renovation projects, sustainable construction, and the role of renewable energy technologies in such facilities. These...

  15. Fluctuations, structure factor and polytetrahedra in random packings of sticky hard spheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc Bletry; Jean Bletry

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Sequentially-built random sphere-packings have been numerically studied in the packing fraction interval $0.329 density, which appears to follow a power law. The FWHM of the Voronoi cells volume shows a regular variation over the whole packing fraction range. Dirac peaks appear on the pair correlation function as the packing fraction of the aggregates decreases, indicating the growth of larger and larger polytetrahedra, which manifest in two ways on the structure factor, at low and large $Q$values. These low PF aggregates have a composite structure made of regular polytetrahedra embedded in a more disordered matrix. Incidentally, the irregularity index of the building tetrahedron appears as a better parameter than the packing fraction to describe various features of the aggregates structure.

  16. The Energy Impact of Industrial Recycling and Waste Exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, W. C.

    , Environmental Protection Agency Hazardous Waste Management System: Identification and Listing of Hazardous Wastes" as published in the Federal Register, Volume 45, No. 98, for May 19, 1980, pages 33121-33127. Specifically note Section 261.6 Rnd check... in this category are lubricating or hydraulic oils; all are combustible, with heats of combustion in the range of 19,000 Btu/lb. Changes underway in Federal and State regulations governing the management of hazardous wastes under the Resource Conservation...

  17. Radioactive Waste Management Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07.

  18. Radium bearing waste disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tope, W.G.; Nixon, D.A.; Smith, M.L.; Stone, T.J.; Vogel, R.A. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Schofield, W.D. [Foster Wheeler Environmental Corp. (United States)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fernald radium bearing ore residue waste, stored within Silos 1 and 2 (K-65) and Silo 3, will be vitrified for disposal at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). A comprehensive, parametric evaluation of waste form, packaging, and transportation alternatives was completed to identify the most cost-effective approach. The impacts of waste loading, waste form, regulatory requirements, NTS waste acceptance criteria, as-low-as-reasonably-achievable principles, and material handling costs were factored into the recommended approach.

  19. The Hybrid Treatment Process for mixed radioactive and hazardous waste treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, W.A.; Kindle, C.H.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a new process for treating mixed hazardous and radioactive waste, commonly called mixed waste. The process is called the Hybrid Treatment Process (HTP), so named because it is built on the 20 years of experience with vitrification of wastes in melters, and the 12 years of experience with treatment of wastes by the in situ vitrification (ISV) process. It also uses techniques from several additional technologies. Mixed wastes are being generated by both the US Department of Energy (DOE) and by commercial sources. The wastes are those that contain both a hazardous waste regulated under the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Resource, Conservation, and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations and a radioactive waste with source, special nuclear, or byproduct materials. The dual regulation of the wastes increases the complexity of the treatment, handling, and storage of the waste. The DOE is the largest holder and generator of mixed waste. Its mixed wastes are classified as either high-level, transuranic (TRU), or low-level waste (LLW). High-level mixed wastes will be treated in vitrification plants. Transuranic wastes may be disposed of without treatment by obtaining a no-migration variance from the EPA. Lowlevel wastes, however, will require treatment, but treatment systems with sufficient capacity are not yet available to DOE. Various facilities are being proposed for the treatment of low-level waste. The concept described in this paper represents one option for establishing that treatment capacity.

  20. The Hybrid Treatment Process for mixed radioactive and hazardous waste treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, W.A.; Kindle, C.H.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a new process for treating mixed hazardous and radioactive waste, commonly called mixed waste. The process is called the Hybrid Treatment Process (HTP), so named because it is built on the 20 years of experience with vitrification of wastes in melters, and the 12 years of experience with treatment of wastes by the in situ vitrification (ISV) process. It also uses techniques from several additional technologies. Mixed wastes are being generated by both the US Department of Energy (DOE) and by commercial sources. The wastes are those that contain both a hazardous waste regulated under the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) Resource, Conservation, and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations and a radioactive waste with source, special nuclear, or byproduct materials. The dual regulation of the wastes increases the complexity of the treatment, handling, and storage of the waste. The DOE is the largest holder and generator of mixed waste. Its mixed wastes are classified as either high-level, transuranic (TRU), or low-level waste (LLW). High-level mixed wastes will be treated in vitrification plants. Transuranic wastes may be disposed of without treatment by obtaining a no-migration variance from the EPA. Lowlevel wastes, however, will require treatment, but treatment systems with sufficient capacity are not yet available to DOE. Various facilities are being proposed for the treatment of low-level waste. The concept described in this paper represents one option for establishing that treatment capacity.

  1. Effect of local cold-pack application on systemic anabolic and inflammatory response to sprint-interval training: a prospective comparative trial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nemet, Dan; Meckel, Yoav; Bar-Sela, Sheli; Zaldivar, Frank; Cooper, Dan M.; Eliakim, Alon

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    evaluated the eVect of cold ice-pack application following aon the eVec- tiveness of ice-pack application to improvecold- pack application could be made. In summary, local ice

  2. RDS and Recycling Waste Diversion in Food Prep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awtar, Shorya

    RDS and Recycling Waste Diversion in Food Prep Setting #12;Why Recycle? Recycling saves resources Recycling one ton of paper saves 17 trees! Recycling saves energy Recycling one aluminum can saves enough energy to power a television for 3 hours! Recycling is easy There are 4 waste categories here at UM

  3. Hazardous Waste Act (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Hazardous waste" means any solid waste or combination of solid wastes that because of their quantity, concentration or physical, chemical or infectious characteristics may: cause or significantly...

  4. Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act (HWMA) describes a comprehensive, Statewide program to manage hazardous wastes through regulating hazardous waste generation, transportation, storage,...

  5. Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waste Management Group

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Revision 6 Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan Waste6 WM QA Plan Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan LBNL/4 Management Quality Assurance

  6. waste | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AlternativesSupplements to Coal - Feedstock Flexibility Waste Streams Gasification can be applied to a variety of waste streams, of which municipal solid waste (MSW) and...

  7. Trends and Opportunities in Industrial Hazardous Waste Minimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atlas, M.

    This paper describes trends and opportunities in Resource Conservation and Recovery Act hazardous waste minimization. It uses U.S. Environmental Protection Agency data gathered since 1989 from over 20,000 facilities that account for almost all...

  8. Measurement Reconciliation and Interpretation in Packed Distillation Column Operation Teck C. Lee and Colin S. Howat, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Colin S. "Chip"

    . To overcome this limitation, a pilot plant scale, packed distillation column was designed, built, and tested plant scale, packed distillation column was designed, built, and tested. This column can be operatedMeasurement Reconciliation and Interpretation in Packed Distillation Column Operation Teck C. Lee

  9. Trends in the draft and extent of seasonal pack ice, Canadian Beaufort Humfrey Melling and David A. Riedel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gedalof, Ze'ev

    Trends in the draft and extent of seasonal pack ice, Canadian Beaufort Sea Humfrey Melling] Continuous observations by sub-sea sonar form a 12-year draft record for seasonal pack ice in the Beaufort of warming climate on seasonal pack ice. Citation: Melling, H., D. A. Riedel, and Z. Gedalof (2005), Trends

  10. Design and Execution of Model Experiments to Validate Numerical Modelling of 2D Ship Operations in Pack Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruneau, Steve

    in Pack Ice Roelof C. Dragt Offshore Engineering Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime and Material Engineering of experiments to validate a Graphics Processing Unit based numerical modelling of ship operations in 2D pack ice interaction, 2D Model Experiments, Image Processing. I. INTRODUCTION A ship travelling through pack ice

  11. rbedgar@stanford.edu June 6, 2008 DIRECTIONS FOR PACKING DRY ICE WITH NON-HAZARDOUS MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    rbedgar@stanford.edu June 6, 2008 DIRECTIONS FOR PACKING DRY ICE WITH NON-HAZARDOUS MATERIALS 1 to dry ice you are including additional hazardous materials, or for questions about packing and shipping. Obtain approved vendor's packing system. 5. Seal plastic bag. 2. Wear gloves, lab coat, eye protection. 6

  12. Resource Recovery Opportunities at Americas Water Resource Recovery Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 3AConversion Technologies III: Energy from Our WasteWill we Be Rich in Fuel or Knee Deep in Trash by 2025? Resource Recovery Opportunities at Americas Water Resource Recovery Facilities Todd Williams, Deputy Leader for Wastewater Infrastructure Practice, CH2M HILL

  13. Mixed waste removal from a hazardous waste storage tank

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geber, K.R.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spent fuel transfer canal at the Oak Ridge Graphite Reactor was found to be leaking 400 gallons of water per day into the surrounding soil. Sampling of the sediment layer on the floor of the canal to determine the environmental impact of the leak identified significant radiological contamination and elevated levels of cadmium and lead which are hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Under RCRA regulations and Rules of Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, the canal was considered a hazardous waste storage tank. This paper describes elements of the radiological control program established in support of a fast-track RCRA closure plan that involved underwater mapping of the radiation fields, vacuuming, and ultra-filtration techniques that were successfully used to remove the mixed waste sediments and close the canal in a method compliant with state and federal regulations.

  14. Hazardous Chemical Waste Management Reference Guide for Laboratories 11 Empty Container Decision Tree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, James

    Hazardous Chemical Waste Management Reference Guide for Laboratories 11 Empty Container Decision Tree Chemical waste materials must be handled as hazardous unless they are on the Non-Hazardous Waste List. Used hazardous materials containers are an exception, however. They have their own resource

  15. Press Release Von Roll Inova to build the UK's largest energy-from-waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    , and regenerative heat recovery is used to boost the plant's overall energy efficiency. The majority of the waste and commercial waste per year in average and generate 72 MW of electrical energy. Riverside Resource Recovery LtdPress Release Von Roll Inova to build the UK's largest energy-from-waste plant Zrich, September, 1

  16. Assessment of long term mining waste behaviour by a dynamic leaching test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    such as prospecting, extraction, treatment and storage of mineral resources, induce large amounts of mining wastes of mining wastes abandoned on the site after extraction, concentration or metallurgic processes-Salvy and Bentaillou respectively. Although both wastes display high contents of carbonate minerals associated

  17. Urban solid waste in southern countries: from a blurred object to common pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Urban solid waste in southern countries: from a blurred object to common pool resources Jrmie long that the question of the municipal solid waste management in developing cities has had elephants' have followed. Comprehending the solid waste handling in the South implies reconsidering

  18. Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities July 24, 2014 9:00AM to 3:30PM EDT U.S....

  19. Impacts of hazardous waste regulation on low-level waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharples, F.E.; Eyman, L.D.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 have greatly expanded the universe of what, and who, is regulated under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Handling requirements for hazardous waste are becoming increasingly more stringent, particularly where land disposal is concerned. DOE needs to begin actively pursuing strategies directed at keeping the management of LLW clearly separated from wastes that are legitimately regulated under RCRA. Such strategies would include instituting systemwide changes in internal management practices, establishing improved location standards for LLW disposal, and negotiating interagency compromise agreements to obtain variances from RCRA requirements where necessary and appropriate.

  20. Alba Field cased-hole horizontal gravel pack: A team approach to design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, K. [Chevron U.K. Ltd., London (United Kingdom); Winton, S. [Baker Hughes INTEQ, Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Price-Smith, C. [Dowell Schlumberger, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 700-ft cased-hole horizontal well was gravel packed and completed in the Alba Field, central North Sea. The completion incorporated a number of new technologies adopted for a horizontal cased-hole completion, including both equipment and fluids. The zone was completed in two stages using a horizontal stack-pack approach. Perforation packing was optimized by performing a staged acid prepack with the guns in the hole using a low-density synthetic gravel substitute in a shear thinning carrier fluid. This was a world-first achievement at a cased-hole gravel pack using the stack-pack approach in a horizontal well. A solids-free fluid-loss control material was evaluated and chosen for the high-permeability Alba sands (3 darcies). Extensive lab testing was performed to ensure minimal damage from various fluids. A 30-ft physical model was used to optimize annular pack efficiency. A gravel placement computer simulation was used to design pump rate, sand concentration, and gel loading to optimize annular and perforation-pack efficiency.

  1. Waste not - want not. DOE appropriate technology small grants program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work reported was to look at various alternatives for local solid waste management and develop an implementation strategy for a resource conservation and recovery plan for the community of Berea, Kentucky. A library on recycling and conservation of resources was compiled, and state and local plans were examined. To get a better understanding of how the community would respond to a waste reduction and recycling program, a series of surveys was conducted. A community recycling project plan is proposed. (LEW)

  2. Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report (HSWMUR) was originated to provide information responsive to Section 3004(u) of the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) of the 1984 United States Code (USC). The report provides a comprehensive inventory of all types of waste management units at the Hanford Site and consists of waste disposal units, including (1) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) disposal units, (2) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) disposal units, (3) unplanned releases, (4) inactive contaminated structure, (5) RCRA treatment and storage units, and (6) other storage areas. Because of the comprehensive nature of this report, the listing of sites is more extensive than required by Section 3004(u) of HSWA. In support of the Hanford RCRA permit, a field was added to designate whether the waste management unit is a solid waste management unit (SWMU). As SWMUs are identified, they will added to the Hanford Waste Information Data System (WIDS), which is the database supporting this report, and added to the report at its next annual update. A quality review of the WIDS was conducted this past year. The review included checking all data against their reference and making appropriate changes, updating the data elements using the most recent references, marking duplicate units for deletion, and addition additional information. 6 refs.

  3. Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report (HSWMUR) was originated to provide information responsive to Section 3004(u) of the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) of the 1984 United States Code (USC). The report provides a comprehensive inventory of all types of waste management units at the Hanford Site and consists of waste disposal units, including (1) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) disposal units, (2) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) disposal units, (3) unplanned releases, (4) inactive contaminated structures, (5) RCRA treatment and storage units, and (6) other storage areas. Because of the comprehensive nature of this report, the listing of sites is more extensive than required by Section 3004(u) of HSWA. In support of the Hanford RCRA permit, a field was added to designate whether the waste management unit is a solid waste management unit (SWMU). As SWMUs are identified, they will added to the Hanford Waste Information Data System (WIDS), which is the database supporting this report, and added to the report at its next annual update. A quality review of the WIDS was conducted this past year. The review included checking all data against their reference and making appropriate changes, updating the data elements using the most recent references, marking duplicate units for deletion, and adding additional information. 6 refs.

  4. Waste Hoist

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1DOE AwardsD ContractBOEDepartmentDisposal

  5. Waste Hoist

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1DOE AwardsD ContractBOEDepartmentDisposal

  6. Radioactive Waste Management Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. The purpose of the Manual is to catalog those procedural requirements and existing practices that ensure that all DOE elements and contractors continue to manage DOE's radioactive waste in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety, and the environment. Does not cancel other directives.

  7. RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Solid and hazardous waste exclusions (40 cfr section 261.4) updated July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Resources Conservation and Recovery Act`s (RCRA) Subtitle C hazardous waste management program is a comprehensive and carefully constructed system to ensure wastes are managed safely and lawfully. This program begins with a very specific, formal process to categorize wastes accurately and appropriately called waste identification. The module explains each waste exclusion and its scope, so you can apply this knowledge in determining whether a given waste is or is not regulated under RCRA Subtitle C.

  8. Similar Energetic Contributions of Packing in the Core of Membrane and Water-Soluble Proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joh, Nathan H.; Oberai, Amit; Yang, Duan; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Bowie, James U.; (UCLA)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A major driving force for water-soluble protein folding is the hydrophobic effect, but membrane proteins cannot make use of this stabilizing contribution in the apolar core of the bilayer. It has been proposed that membrane proteins compensate by packing more efficiently. We therefore investigated packing contributions experimentally by observing the energetic and structural consequences of cavity creating mutations in the core of a membrane protein. We observed little difference in the packing energetics of water and membrane soluble proteins. Our results imply that other mechanisms are employed to stabilize the structure of membrane proteins.

  9. Centrifugal compression of soft particle packings - theory and experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. N. Nordstrom; E. Verneuil; W. G. Ellenbroek; T. C. Lubensky; J. P. Gollub; D. J. Durian

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An exact method is developed for computing the height of an elastic medium subjected to centrifugal compression, for arbitrary constitutive relation between stress and strain. Example solutions are obtained for power-law media and for cases where the stress diverges at a critical strain -- for example as required by packings composed of deformable but incompressible particles. Experimental data are presented for the centrifugal compression of thermo-responsive N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) microgel beads in water. For small radial acceleration, the results are consistent with Hertzian elasticity, and are analyzed in terms of the Young elastic modulus of the bead material. For large radial acceleration, the sample compression asymptotes to a value corresponding to a space-filling particle volume fraction of unity. Therefore we conclude that the gel beads are incompressible, and deform without deswelling. In addition, we find that the Young elastic modulus of the particulate gel material scales with cross-link density raised to the power 3.3+-0.8, somewhat larger than the Flory expectation.

  10. Solid Waste Management Written Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Solid Waste Management Program Written Program Cornell University 8/28/2012 #12;Solid Waste.................................................................... 4 4.2.1 Compost Solid Waste Treatment Facility.................................................................... 4 4.2.2 Pathological Solid Waste Treatment Facility

  11. Secondary Waste Form Development and OptimizationCast Stone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sundaram, S. K.; Parker, Kent E.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Pitman, Stan G.; Chun, Jaehun; Chung, Chul-Woo; Kimura, Marcia L.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Um, Wooyong; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2011-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Washington River Protection Services is considering the design and construction of a Solidification Treatment Unit (STU) for the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at Hanford. The ETF is a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act-permitted, multi-waste, treatment and storage unit and can accept dangerous, low-level, and mixed wastewaters for treatment. The STU needs to be operational by 2018 to receive secondary liquid wastes generated during operation of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The STU to ETF will provide the additional capacity needed for ETF to process the increased volume of secondary wastes expected to be produced by WTP.

  12. Journey to the Nevada Test Site Radioactive Waste Management Complex

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Journey to the Nevada Test Site Radioactive Waste Management Complex begins with a global to regional perspective regarding the location of low-level and mixed low-level waste disposal at the Nevada Test Site. For decades, the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) has served as a vital disposal resource in the nation-wide cleanup of former nuclear research and testing facilities. State-of-the-art waste management sites at the NNSS offer a safe, permanent disposal option for U.S. Department of Energy/U.S. Department of Defense facilities generating cleanup-related radioactive waste.

  13. Hazardous and Radioactive Mixed Waste Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1989-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) hazardous and radioactive mixed waste policies and requirements and to implement the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) within the framework of the environmental programs established under DOE O 5400.1. This directive does not cancel any directives.

  14. Cornell Cooperative Extension Cornell Waste Management Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -255-1187 by: Mary Schwarz Jean Bonhotal Composting at Home - The Green and Brown Alternative Sustainability composting steps in; organic waste can be recycled through composting and the resulting product can be used composting program or for composting at home conserves energy and natural resources, reduces air and water

  15. Zero Waste Program 2011 Recycling Benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delgado, Mauricio

    Rutgers Zero Waste Program 2011 Recycling Benefits Through WM's Recycling Program, our company saved energy and reduced Greenhouse Gases through recycling. Recycling uses less energy, preserves from recycled material than from virgin, raw material. RESOURCE SAVINGS 4203 Metric Tons (MTCO2E

  16. Waste Management and WasteWaste Management and Waste--toto--EnergyEnergy Status in SingaporeStatus in Singapore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    ;20031970 The Solid Waste Challenge Waste Explosion 1,200 t/d1,200 t/d 6,900 t/d6,900 t/d #12;Waste ManagementWaste Management and WasteWaste Management and Waste--toto--EnergyEnergy Status in Singapore #12;Singapore's Waste Management In 2003, 6877 tonnes/day (2.51 M tonnes/year) of MSW collected

  17. Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Hazardous Waste Program is carried out by the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality which administers its' program under the Hazardous Waste management Act (Arkansas Code Annotated 8-7...

  18. Hazardous Waste Management (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This article states regulations for the disposal of hazardous waste. It also provides information about permit requirements for the transport, treatment and storage of such waste. It also mentions...

  19. The tenth conference on solid waste management & materials policy and the New York State solid waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proceedings of the Tenth Conference on Solid Waste Management and Materials Policy and the New York State Solid Waste Management held February 19-22, 1995 in New York City are presented. Such topics as recycling, resource recovery, emission characteristics of burn barrels, ash management, controlling landfill closure costs, flow control and federalism, composting programs, air pollutant emissions from MSW landfills, backyard waste management, waste-based manufacturing, and scrap tire management are covered. A separate abstract and indexing were prepared for each paper for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  20. Solid waste handling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parazin, R.J.

    1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents estimates of the solid radioactive waste quantities that will be generated in the Separations, Low-Level Waste Vitrification and High-Level Waste Vitrification facilities, collectively called the Tank Waste Remediation System Treatment Complex, over the life of these facilities. This study then considers previous estimates from other 200 Area generators and compares alternative methods of handling (segregation, packaging, assaying, shipping, etc.).

  1. Listed waste determination report. Environmental characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On September 23, 1988, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a notice clarifying interim status requirements for the management of radioactive mixed waste thereby subjecting the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and other applicable Department of Energy (DOE) sites to regulation under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Therefore, the DOE was required to submit a Part A Permit application for each treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) unit within the INEL, defining the waste codes and processes to be regulated under RCRA. The September 1990 revised Part A Permit application, that was approved by the State of Idaho identified 101 potential acute and toxic hazardous waste codes (F-, P-, and U- listed wastes according to 40 CFR 261.31 and 40 CFR 261.33) for some TSD units at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. Most of these waste were assumed to have been introduced into the High-level Liquid Waste TSD units via laboratory drains connected to the Process Equipment Waste (PEW) evaporator (PEW system). At that time, a detailed and systematic evaluation of hazardous chemical use and disposal practices had not been conducted to determine if F-, P-, or Unlisted waste had been disposed to the PEW system. The purpose of this investigation was to perform a systematic and detailed evaluation of the use and disposal of the 101 F-, P-, and Unlisted chemicals found in the approved September 1990 Part A Permit application. This investigation was aimed at determining which listed wastes, as defined in 40 CFR 261.31 (F-listed) and 261.33 (P & Unlisted) were discharged to the PEW system. Results of this investigation will be used to support revisions to the RCRA Part A Permit application.

  2. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Nitrate Salt Bearing Waste Container

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1DOE AwardsDNitrate Salt Bearing Waste Container

  3. Waste disposal package

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, M.J.

    1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a claim for a waste disposal package including an inner or primary canister for containing hazardous and/or radioactive wastes. The primary canister is encapsulated by an outer or secondary barrier formed of a porous ceramic material to control ingress of water to the canister and the release rate of wastes upon breach on the canister. 4 figs.

  4. Final Report Waste Incineration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    solid waste, the composition and com- bustion of it. A main focus is on the European emission from municipal solid waste incineration. In the latter area, concepts of treatment, such as physical with municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) and the problems that occur in connection to this. The emphasis

  5. Rethinking the Waste Hierarchy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    principles of EU waste policies. The environmental damage caused by waste depends on which type of manage, Environmental Assessment Institute For further information please contact: Environmental Assessment Institute.imv.dk #12;Environmental Assessment Institute Rethinking the Waste Hierarchy March 2005 Recommendations

  6. Epistemological resources 1 Running Head: EPISTEMOLOGICAL RESOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elby, Andy

    Epistemological resources 1 Running Head: EPISTEMOLOGICAL RESOURCES Epistemological resources University Maryland, College Park Trisha Kagey Montgomery County Public Schools #12;Epistemological resources are better understood as made up of finer-grained cognitive resources whose activation depends sensitively

  7. Supramolecular Materials: Molecular Packing of Tetranitrotetrapropoxycalix[4]arene in Highly Stable Films with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenis, Paul J. A.

    Supramolecular Materials: Molecular Packing of Tetranitrotetrapropoxycalix[4]arene in Highly Stable: calixarenes nonlinear optics structure elucidation su- pramolecular chemistry Introduction Materials, noncentrosymmetric crystals, such as urea, and inorganic materials, such as quartz and lithium niobate, are currently

  8. 3D Micromechanical modeling of packed beds Zi Lu, Mohamed Abdou *, Alice Ying

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    3D Micromechanical modeling of packed beds Zi Lu, Mohamed Abdou *, Alice Ying Mechanical: abdou@fusion.ucla.edu (M. Abdou). 0022-3115/01/$ - see front matter ? 2001 Elsevier Science B.

  9. Modular Approach for Continuous Cell-Level Balancing to Improve Performance of Large Battery Packs: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muneed ur Rehman, M.; Evzelman, M.; Hathaway, K.; Zane, R.; Plett, G. L.; Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Maksimovic, D.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy storage systems require battery cell balancing circuits to avoid divergence of cell state of charge (SOC). A modular approach based on distributed continuous cell-level control is presented that extends the balancing function to higher level pack performance objectives such as improving power capability and increasing pack lifetime. This is achieved by adding DC-DC converters in parallel with cells and using state estimation and control to autonomously bias individual cell SOC and SOC range, forcing healthier cells to be cycled deeper than weaker cells. The result is a pack with improved degradation characteristics and extended lifetime. The modular architecture and control concepts are developed and hardware results are demonstrated for a 91.2-Wh battery pack consisting of four series Li-ion battery cells and four dual active bridge (DAB) bypass DC-DC converters.

  10. Electrostatics and packing in biomolecules : accounting for conformational change in protein folding and binding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caravella, Justin Andrew, 1974-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of electrostatics and packing in protein folding and molecular association was assessed in different biomolecular systems. A continuum electrostatic model was applied to long-range electrostatic effects in the ...

  11. Electrically recharged battery employing a packed/spouted bed metal particle electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siu, Stanley C. (Alameda, CA); Evans, James W. (Piedmont, CA); Salas-Morales, Juan (Berkeley, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A secondary metal air cell, employing a spouted/packed metal particle bed and an air electrode. More specifically a zinc air cell well suited for use in electric vehicles which is capable of being either electrically or hydraulically recharged.

  12. Upper bound on the packing density of regular tetrahedra and octahedra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gravel, Simon; Kallus, Yoav

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We obtain an upper bound to the packing density of regular tetrahedra. The bound is obtained by showing the existence, in any packing of regular tetrahedra, of a set of disjoint spheres centered on tetrahedron edges, so that each sphere is not fully covered by the packing. The bound on the amount of space that is not covered in each sphere is obtained in a recursive way by building on the observation that non-overlapping regular tetrahedra cannot subtend a solid angle of $4\\pi$ around a point if this point lies on a tetrahedron edge. The proof can be readily modified to apply to other polyhedra with the same property. The resulting lower bound on the fraction of empty space in a packing of regular tetrahedra is $2.6\\ldots\\times 10^{-25}$ and reaches $1.4\\ldots\\times 10^{-12}$ for regular octahedra.

  13. Upper bound on the packing density of regular tetrahedra and octahedra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon Gravel; Veit Elser; Yoav Kallus

    2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We obtain an upper bound to the packing density of regular tetrahedra. The bound is obtained by showing the existence, in any packing of regular tetrahedra, of a set of disjoint spheres centered on tetrahedron edges, so that each sphere is not fully covered by the packing. The bound on the amount of space that is not covered in each sphere is obtained in a recursive way by building on the observation that non-overlapping regular tetrahedra cannot subtend a solid angle of $4\\pi$ around a point if this point lies on a tetrahedron edge. The proof can be readily modified to apply to other polyhedra with the same property. The resulting lower bound on the fraction of empty space in a packing of regular tetrahedra is $2.6\\ldots\\times 10^{-25}$ and reaches $1.4\\ldots\\times 10^{-12}$ for regular octahedra.

  14. Fact #823: June 2, 2014 Hybrid Vehicles use more Battery Packs...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    vehicle powertrains in model year 2013, the greatest number went into conventional hybrid vehicles which use battery packs that average about 1.3 kilowatt-hours (kWh). However,...

  15. Designing Safe Lithium-Ion Battery Packs Using Thermal Abuse Models (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesaran, A. A.; Kim, G. H.; Smith, K.; Darcy, E.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL and NASA developed a thermal-electrical model that resolves PTC and cell behavior under external shorting, now being used to evaluate safety margins of battery packs for spacesuit applications.

  16. Resource Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of0 Resource Program

  17. Distillation: Energy Savings and Other Benefits From the Use of High Efficiency Packings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bravo, J. L.; Fair, J. R.; Humphrey, J. L.

    DISTILLATION: ENERGY SAVINGS AND OTHER BENEFITS. FROM THE USE OF HIGH-EFFICIENCY PACKINGS -. Jose L. Bravo, James R. Fair, and Jimmy L. Humpnrey The University of Texas at Austin Austin, Texas ABSTRACT A great deal of attention has been... focused lately on the use of high-efficiency packings for distillation applications. This paper discusses benefits that can be derived from the use of these devices. In parti~ular, the reduction in energy requirements for a given separation...

  18. Utilization of Structured Packing for Energy Savings in Distillation and Absorption Columns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berven, O. J.; Howard, W. E.

    "UTILIZATION OF STRUCTURED PACKING FOR ENERGY SAVINGS IN DISTILLATION AND ABSORPTION COLUMNS" O. Jeffrey Berven and Wendell E. Howard Koch Engineering Company, Inc. Wi chita, Kansas As the need to reduce production costs causes... manufacturers to re-evaluate process ing schemes, hi gh efficiency structured packings are increasingly recognized as an effective alternative for reducing energy consumption in heat and mass transfer operations. In distillation, the high efficiency and low...

  19. An improvement to the Minkowski-Hlawka bound for packing superballs*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloane, Neil J. A.

    '', vol. 34 (1987), pp. 8­18. #12;1. Introduction The n-dimensional body Sn , = (x1 , . . . , xn ) Rn lattice packings of Sn , with density satisfying log2 - n(1 + o(1)) , as n (1) [4, p. 184], [10, p,2,3 ,... there exist lattice packings of the superball Sn , with density satisfying log2 - c n + O(log2 n) (2) as n

  20. Packing Dimension Profiles and Levy Processes D. Khoshnevisan, R.L. Schilling and Y. Xiao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khoshnevisan, Davar

    that computes the Hausdorff dimension dimH X(F) of X(F), see [13] and its extensive bibliography. Let dimP denote the packing dimension. The main goal of the present paper is to evaluate dimP X(F) in terms study the packing dimension dimP X(F). Let us point out two noteworthy cases where dimP X(F) has been

  1. Genetic variation of packing density within a selected population of Loblolly Pine (Pinus taeda L.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, Lamar

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Specific gravity of cell wall material Factors affecting the specific gravity of cell wall material Importance of the specific gravity of cell wall material Recent investigations concerning packing density 12 Chapter IV. Experimental des ign 13... Discussion of materials 13 Sample size 14 Chapter V. Method used for determining packing density in small wood samples 15 Definition and calculation 15 Measurement of specific gravity Measurement of cell wall material 15 17 Summary of overall...

  2. Combustion of waste fuels in a fluidized-bed boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zylkowski, J.; Ehrlich, S.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on a project whose objectives are to determine the impact of the waste fuels on Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion (AFBC) operating procedures, boiler performance, and emissions and to assess the potential for fuel-specific operating problems. The low-grade waste fuels investigated are hogged railroad ties, shredded rubber tires, peat, refuse-derived fuel, and one or more agricultiral wastes. The Northern States Power (NSP) Company converted their French Island Unit No. 2 stoker-fired boiler to a fluidized-bed combustor designed to burn wood waste. NSP and EPRI are investigating cofiring other waste fuels with wood waste. Topics considered include fluidized-bed boiler conversion, fuel resources, economic justification, environmental considerations, the wood-handling system, an auxiliary fuel system, the air quality control system, ash handling and disposal, and the alternate fuels test program.

  3. A model for a national low level waste program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blankenhorn, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A national program for the management of low level waste is essential to the success of environmental clean-up, decontamination and decommissioning, current operations and future missions. The value of a national program is recognized through procedural consistency and a shared set of resources. A national program requires a clear waste definition and an understanding of waste characteristics matched against available and proposed disposal options. A national program requires the development and implementation of standards and procedures for implementing the waste hierarchy, with a specitic emphasis on waste avoidance, minimization and recycling. It requires a common set of objectives for waste characterization based on the disposal facility's waste acceptance criteria, regulatory and license requirements and performance assessments. Finally, a national waste certification program is required to ensure compliance. To facilitate and enhance the national program, a centralized generator services organization, tasked with providing technical services to the generators on behalf of the national program, is necessary. These subject matter experts are the interface between the generating sites and the disposal facility(s). They provide an invaluable service to the generating organizations through their involvement in waste planning prior to waste generation and through championing implementation of the waste hierarchy. Through their interface, national treatment and transportation services are optimized and new business opportunities are identified. This national model is based on extensive experience in the development and on-going management of a national transuranic waste program and management of the national repository, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The Low Level Program at the Savannah River Site also successfully developed and implemented the waste hierarchy, waste certification and waste generator services concepts presented below. The Savannah River Site services over forty generators and has historically managed over 12,000 cubic meters of low level waste annually. The results of the waste minimization program at the site resulted in over 900 initiatives, avoiding over 220,000 cubic meters of waste for a life cycle cost savings of $275 million. At the Los Alamos National Laboratory, the low level waste program services over 20 major generators and several hundred smaller generators that produce over 4,000 cubic meters of low level waste annually. The Los Alamos National Laboratory low level waste program utilizes both on-site and off-site disposal capabilities. Off-site disposal requires the implementation of certification requirements to utilize both federal and commercial options. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is the US Department of Energy's first deep geological repository for the permanent disposal of Transuanic waste. Transuranic waste was generated and retrievably stored at 39 sites across the US. Transuranic waste is defined as waste with a radionuclide concentration equal to or greater than 100 nCi/g consisting of radionuclides with half-lives greater than 20 years and with an atomic mass greater than uranium. Combining the lessons learned from the national transuranic waste program, the successful low level waste program at Savannah River Site and the experience of off-site disposal options at Los Alamos National Laboratory provides the framework and basis for developing a viable national strategy for managing low level waste.

  4. WIPP Waste Characterization: Implementing Regulatory Requirements in the Real World

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper Wayman, J.D.; Goldstein, J.D.

    1999-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    It is imperative to ensure compliance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP) with applicable statutory and regulatory requirements. In particular, compliance with the waste characterization requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and its implementing regulation found at 40 CFR Parts 262,264 and 265 for hazardous and mixed wastes, as well as those of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, the Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1970, the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended, and the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act, as amended, and their implementing regulations found at 40 CFR Parts 191 and 194 for non-mixed radioactive wastes, are often difficult to ensure at the operational level. For example, where a regulation may limit a waste to a certain concentration, this concentration may be difficult to measure. For example, does the definition of transuranic waste (TRU) as 100 nCi/grain of alpha-emitting transuranic isotopes per gram of waste mean that the radioassay of a waste must show a reading of 100 plus the sampling and measurement error for the waste to be a TRU waste? Although the use of acceptable knowledge to characterize waste is authorized by statute, regulation and DOE Orders, its implementation is similarly beset with difficulty. When is a document or documents sufficient to constitute acceptable knowledge? What standard can be used to determine if knowledge is acceptable for waste characterization purposes? The inherent conflict between waste characterization regulatory requirements and their implementation in the real world, and the resolution of this conflict, will be discussed.

  5. Hazardous and Radioactive Mixed Waste

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1982-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish hazardous waste management procedures for facilities operated under authority of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (AEA). The procedures will follow. to the extent practicable, regulations issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). Although Department of Energy (DOE) operations conducted under authority other than the AEA are subject to EPA or State regulations conforming with RCRA, facilities administered under the authority of the AEA are not bound by such requirements.

  6. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Update

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian Nuclear Warheads|of Energy Washington SuccessWhenWasteWIPPWasteUpdate

  7. Radioactive Waste Management Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07. Admin Chg 2, dated 6-8-11, cancels DOE M 435.1-1 Chg 1.

  8. Radioactive Waste Management Basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, B K

    2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

  9. Municipal waste processing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayberry, J.L.

    1988-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to apparatus for processing municipal waste, and more particularly to vibrating mesh screen conveyor systems for removing grit, glass, and other noncombustible materials from dry municipal waste. Municipal waste must be properly processed and disposed of so that it does not create health risks to the community. Generally, municipal waste, which may be collected in garbage trucks, dumpsters, or the like, is deposited in processing areas such as landfills. Land and environmental controls imposed on landfill operators by governmental bodies have increased in recent years, however, making landfill disposal of solid waste materials more expensive. 6 figs.

  10. Mixed waste: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moghissi, A.A.; Blauvelt, R.K.; Benda, G.A.; Rothermich, N.E. [eds.] [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Safety and Health

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains the peer-reviewed and edited versions of papers submitted for presentation a the Second International Mixed Waste Symposium. Following the tradition of the First International Mixed Waste Symposium, these proceedings were prepared in advance of the meeting for distribution to participants. The symposium was organized by the Mixed Waste Committee of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The topics discussed at the symposium include: stabilization technologies, alternative treatment technologies, regulatory issues, vitrification technologies, characterization of wastes, thermal technologies, laboratory and analytical issues, waste storage and disposal, organic treatment technologies, waste minimization, packaging and transportation, treatment of mercury contaminated wastes and bioprocessing, and environmental restoration. Individual abstracts are catalogued separately for the data base.

  11. Exclusions and exemptions from RCRA hazardous waste regulation. RCRA Information Brief

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powers, J.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The provisions in 40 CFR 261 establish which solid waste and are regulated under Subtitle C of the Resource Considered hazardous waste and are regulated under Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). These provisions also exclude or exempt certain wastes from regulation. Wastes are excluded or exempted from coverage for a variety of reasons. The original RCRA legislation excluded a number of wastes that did not present a significant threat to human health or the environment or that were managed under other environmental programs. Other wastes were excluded by EPA to encourage their recycling or reuse as feedstocks in manufacturing processes. Some exclusions or exemptions serve to establish when a waste material becomes subject to regulation or when waste quantities are too minimal to be fully covered by the Federal hazardous waste regulatory program. As new regulations have caused the universe of RCRA generators and facilities to increase, the number of exclusions and exemptions have increased as well. This information Brief provides an overview of the types of waste and hazardous waste management units/facilities that may be excluded or exempted from regulation under the Federal hazardous waste (RCRA) Subtitle C) regulatory program. These wastes and units/facilities may or may not be excluded or exempted from coverage under authorized State RCRA programs.

  12. Eco-efficient waste glass recycling: Integrated waste management and green product development through LCA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blengini, Gian Andrea, E-mail: blengini@polito.it [DISPEA - Department of Production Systems and Business Economics, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); CNR-IGAG, Institute of Environmental Geology and Geo-Engineering, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Busto, Mirko, E-mail: mirko.busto@polito.it [DISPEA - Department of Production Systems and Business Economics, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Fantoni, Moris, E-mail: moris.fantoni@polito.it [DITAG - Department of Land, Environment and Geo-Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Fino, Debora, E-mail: debora.fino@polito.it [DISMIC - Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new eco-efficient recycling route for post-consumer waste glass was implemented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrated waste management and industrial production are crucial to green products. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most of the waste glass rejects are sent back to the glass industry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recovered co-products give more environmental gains than does avoided landfill. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy intensive recycling must be limited to waste that cannot be closed-loop recycled. - Abstract: As part of the EU Life + NOVEDI project, a new eco-efficient recycling route has been implemented to maximise resources and energy recovery from post-consumer waste glass, through integrated waste management and industrial production. Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been used to identify engineering solutions to sustainability during the development of green building products. The new process and the related LCA are framed within a meaningful case of industrial symbiosis, where multiple waste streams are utilised in a multi-output industrial process. The input is a mix of rejected waste glass from conventional container glass recycling and waste special glass such as monitor glass, bulbs and glass fibres. The green building product is a recycled foam glass (RFG) to be used in high efficiency thermally insulating and lightweight concrete. The environmental gains have been contrasted against induced impacts and improvements have been proposed. Recovered co-products, such as glass fragments/powders, plastics and metals, correspond to environmental gains that are higher than those related to landfill avoidance, whereas the latter is cancelled due to increased transportation distances. In accordance to an eco-efficiency principle, it has been highlighted that recourse to highly energy intensive recycling should be limited to waste that cannot be closed-loop recycled.

  13. Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF)...

  14. Cultural Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution4 Department of

  15. Solid Waste Management Plan. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The waste types discussed in this Solid Waste Management Plan are Municipal Solid Waste, Hazardous Waste, Low-Level Mixed Waste, Low-Level Radioactive Waste, and Transuranic Waste. The plan describes for each type of solid waste, the existing waste management facilities, the issues, and the assumptions used to develop the current management plan.

  16. EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation DOE's Radioactive Waste Management Priorities: Continue to manage waste...

  17. Transuranic (TRU) Waste | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Defined by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act as "waste containing more than 100 nanocuries of alpha-emitting...

  18. Waste minimization for commercial radioactive materials users generating low-level radioactive waste. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, D.K.; Gitt, M.; Williams, G.A.; Branch, S. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Otis, M.D.; McKenzie-Carter, M.A.; Schurman, D.L. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this document is to provide a resource for all states and compact regions interested in promoting the minimization of low-level radioactive waste (LLW). This project was initiated by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and Massachusetts waste streams have been used as examples; however, the methods of analysis presented here are applicable to similar waste streams generated elsewhere. This document is a guide for states/compact regions to use in developing a system to evaluate and prioritize various waste minimization techniques in order to encourage individual radioactive materials users (LLW generators) to consider these techniques in their own independent evaluations. This review discusses the application of specific waste minimization techniques to waste streams characteristic of three categories of radioactive materials users: (1) industrial operations using radioactive materials in the manufacture of commercial products, (2) health care institutions, including hospitals and clinics, and (3) educational and research institutions. Massachusetts waste stream characterization data from key radioactive materials users in each category are used to illustrate the applicability of various minimization techniques. The utility group is not included because extensive information specific to this category of LLW generators is available in the literature.

  19. Waste minimization for commercial radioactive materials users generating low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, D.K.; Gitt, M.; Williams, G.A.; Branch, S. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Otis, M.D.; McKenzie-Carter, M.A.; Schurman, D.L. (Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this document is to provide a resource for all states and compact regions interested in promoting the minimization of low-level radioactive waste (LLW). This project was initiated by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and Massachusetts waste streams have been used as examples; however, the methods of analysis presented here are applicable to similar waste streams generated elsewhere. This document is a guide for states/compact regions to use in developing a system to evaluate and prioritize various waste minimization techniques in order to encourage individual radioactive materials users (LLW generators) to consider these techniques in their own independent evaluations. This review discusses the application of specific waste minimization techniques to waste streams characteristic of three categories of radioactive materials users: (1) industrial operations using radioactive materials in the manufacture of commercial products, (2) health care institutions, including hospitals and clinics, and (3) educational and research institutions. Massachusetts waste stream characterization data from key radioactive materials users in each category are used to illustrate the applicability of various minimization techniques. The utility group is not included because extensive information specific to this category of LLW generators is available in the literature.

  20. 2401-W Waste storage building closure plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LUKE, S.M.

    1999-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan describes the performance standards met and closure activities conducted to achieve clean closure of the 2401-W Waste Storage Building (2401-W) (Figure I). In August 1998, after the last waste container was removed from 2401-W, the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) notified Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) in writing that the 2401-W would no longer receive waste and would be closed as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) unit (98-EAP-475). Pursuant to this notification, closure activities were conducted, as described in this plan, in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 and completed on February 9, 1999. Ecology witnessed the closure activities. Consistent with clean closure, no postclosure activities will be necessary. Because 2401-W is a portion of the Central Waste Complex (CWC), these closure activities become the basis for removing this building from the CWC TSD unit boundary. The 2401-W is a pre-engineered steel building with a sealed concrete floor and a 15.2-centimeter concrete curb around the perimeter of the floor. This building operated from April 1988 until August 1998 storing non-liquid containerized mixed waste. All waste storage occurred indoors. No potential existed for 2401-W operations to have impacted soil. A review of operating records and interviews with cognizant operations personnel indicated that no waste spills occurred in this building (Appendix A). After all waste containers were removed, a radiation survey of the 2401-W floor for radiological release of the building was performed December 17, 1998, which identified no radiological contamination (Appendix B).

  1. New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Waste Streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. E. Archibald

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the issues of conducting debris treatment in the New Waste Calcine Facility (NWCF) decontamination area and the methods currently being used to decontaminate material at the NWCF.

  2. Waste IncIneratIon and Waste PreventIon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and heat. In 2005/2006, German waste incineration plants provided some 6 terawatt hours (TWh-/Abfallgesetz) continues to hold: Waste prevention has priority over recovery and disposal. Nevertheless, the use of waste for en- ergy recovery is an indispensable element of sus- tainable waste management. Waste incineration

  3. Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste Read more overleaf Introduction Energy from waste provides us with an opportunity for a waste solution and a local source of energy rolled,itcan onlyaddressaportionofthewastestream andisnotsufficientonitsown. Energy obtained from the combustion of residual waste (Energy from

  4. www.d-waste.com info@d-waste.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    marketplace, about 47 grams of waste is produced-- with worldwide municipal solid waste generation totaling, the International Solid Waste Association, GIZ/SWEEP-Net, the Waste to Energy Research Council (WTERT) and the Solid management data available". According to David Newman, president of the International Solid Waste Association

  5. Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Timothy D. Stark, F.ASCE1 landfills may contain aluminum from residential and commercial solid waste, industrial waste, and aluminum American Society of Civil Engineers. CE Database subject headings: Solid wastes; Leaching; Aluminum

  6. Waste Disposal Guide HOW TO PROPERLY DISPOSE OF WASTE MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaefer, Marcus

    Waste Disposal Guide HOW TO PROPERLY DISPOSE OF WASTE MATERIALS GENERATED AT DEPAUL UNIVERSITY.4 Hazardous Waste Defined p.5 Chemical Waste Procedure for Generating Departments p.6 o A of Containers p.8 o E. Disposal of Empty Containers p.8 o F. Storage of Waste Chemicals p.8,9 o G

  7. Hanford Site Hazardous waste determination report for transuranic debris waste streams NPFPDL1A, NPFPDL1B, NPFPDL1C and NPFPDL1D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WINTERHALDER, J.A.

    1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This Hazardous Waste Determination Report is intended to satisfy the terms of a Memorandum of Agreement (Agreement signed on June 16, 1999) between the U.S. Department of Energy and the New Mexico Environment Department. The Agreement pertains to the exchange of information before a final decision is made on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant application for a permit under the ''New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act''. The Agreement will terminate upon the effective date of a final ''New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act'' permit for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. In keeping with the principles and terms of the Agreement, this report describes the waste stream data and information compilation process, and the physical and chemical analyses that the U.S. Department of Energy has performed on selected containers of transuranic debris waste to confirm that the waste is nonhazardous (non-mixed). This also summarizes the testing and analytical results that support the conclusion that the selected transuranic debris waste is not hazardous and thus, not subject to regulation under the ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' or the ''New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act''. This report will be submitted to the New Mexico Environment Department no later than 45 days before the first shipment of waste from the Hanford Site to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, unless the parties mutually agree in writing to a shorter time. The 52 containers of transuranic debris waste addressed in this report were generated, packaged, and placed into storage between 1995 and 1997. Based on reviews of administrative documents, operating procedures, waste records, generator certifications, and personnel interviews, this transuranic debris waste was determined to be nonhazardous. This determination is supported by the data derived from nondestructive examination, confirmatory visual examination, and the results of container headspace gas sampling and analysis. Therefore, it is concluded that this transuranic debris waste, which consists of 52 containers from waste streams NPFPDLIA, NPFPDLIB, NPFPDLIC, and NPFPDLID, is not hazardous waste, and no hazardous waste numbers specified in Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 261, have been assigned. Accordingly, the 52 containers of transuranic debris waste addressed in this report meet the requirements for transuranic waste as defined by the Department of Energy Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The 52 containers are acceptable for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as nonhazardous transuranic waste.

  8. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Colin A.; Novan, Kevin; Rausser, Gordon; Iho, Antti; Parker, Doug; Zilberman, David

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agricultural Economics University of California Animal WasteAgricultural and Food Markets Gordon Rausser..4 Animal Waste

  9. Process Knowledge Characterization of Radioactive Waste at the Classified Waste Landfill Remediation Project Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOTSON,PATRICK WELLS; GALLOWAY,ROBERT B.; JOHNSON JR,CARL EDWARD

    1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the development and application of process knowledge (PK) to the characterization of radioactive wastes generated during the excavation of buried materials at the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) Classified Waste Landfill (CWLF). The CWLF, located in SNL/NM Technical Area II, is a 1.5-acre site that received nuclear weapon components and related materials from about 1950 through 1987. These materials were used in the development and testing of nuclear weapon designs. The CWLF is being remediated by the SNL/NM Environmental Restoration (ER) Project pursuant to regulations of the New Mexico Environment Department. A goal of the CWLF project is to maximize the amount of excavated materials that can be demilitarized and recycled. However, some of these materials are radioactively contaminated and, if they cannot be decontaminated, are destined to require disposal as radioactive waste. Five major radioactive waste streams have been designated on the CWLF project, including: unclassified soft radioactive waste--consists of soft, compatible trash such as paper, plastic, and plywood; unclassified solid radioactive waste--includes scrap metal, other unclassified hardware items, and soil; unclassified mixed waste--contains the same materials as unclassified soft or solid radioactive waste, but also contains one or more Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) constituents; classified radioactive waste--consists of classified artifacts, usually weapons components, that contain only radioactive contaminants; and classified mixed waste--comprises radioactive classified material that also contains RCRA constituents. These waste streams contain a variety of radionuclides that exist both as surface contamination and as sealed sources. To characterize these wastes, the CWLF project's waste management team is relying on data obtained from direct measurement of radionuclide activity content to the maximum extent possible and, in cases where direct measurement is not technically feasible, from accumulated PK of the excavated materials.

  10. Key regulatory drivers affecting shipments of mixed transuranic waste from Los Alamos National Laboratory to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumann, P.B.; Bacigalupa, G.A.; Kosiewicz, S.T.; Sinkule, B.J. [and others

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of key regulatory drivers affect the nature, scope, and timing of Los Alamos National Laboratory`s (LANL`s) plans for mixed transuranic (MTRU) waste shipments to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which are planned to commence as soon as possible following WIPP`s currently anticipated November, 1997 opening date. This paper provides an overview of some of the key drivers at LANL, particularly emphasizing those associated with the hazardous waste component of LANL`s MTRU waste (MTRU, like any mixed waste, contains both a radioactive and a hazardous waste component). The key drivers discussed here derive from the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and its amendments, including the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAU), and from the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act (NMHWA). These statutory provisions are enforced through three major mechanisms: facility RCRA permits; the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Management Regulations, set forth in the New Mexico Administrative Code, Title 20, Chapter 4, Part 1: and compliance orders issued to enforce these requirements. General requirements in all three categories will apply to MTRU waste management and characterization activities at both WIPP and LANL. In addition, LANL is subject to facility-specific requirements in its RCRA hazardous waste facility permit, permit conditions as currently proposed in RCRA Part B permit applications presently being reviewed by the New Mexico Environment Department (NNED), and facility-specific compliance orders related to MTRU waste management. Likewise, permitting and compliance-related requirements specific to WIPP indirectly affect LANL`s characterization, packaging, record-keeping, and transportation requirements for MTRU waste. LANL must comply with this evolving set of regulatory requirements to begin shipments of MTRU waste to WIPP in a timely fashion.

  11. Guidelines for mixed waste minimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owens, C.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, there is no commercial mixed waste disposal available in the United States. Storage and treatment for commercial mixed waste is limited. Host States and compacts region officials are encouraging their mixed waste generators to minimize their mixed wastes because of management limitations. This document provides a guide to mixed waste minimization.

  12. Utility Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict SolarJohnpotential-calc Sign InPages

  13. Archaeological Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperational Management » History »Dept

  14. Online Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Astrophysics One ofSpeeding accessOfficeAdsorptionOnline

  15. Computing Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit theInnovationComputationalEnergyEvents

  16. Volunteers - Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulenceUtilize AvailableMedia1.1 TheVolker

  17. Business Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced MaterialsEnergy,EnvelopeJeffersonBusinessPractices Sign In About

  18. Marketing Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your Home and It'llMappingMariaHereld Manager,Markdefault

  19. Subcontractor Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solid ... StrengtheningLab (NewportStudying theSubcontactor

  20. Teacher Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2D AlloysTrails TakingRTapeUpdatedTeachers »

  1. Privacy Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 Hg Mercury 35 Br Bromine 43 cPoints of Contact

  2. Mobile Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTION A. Revised:7,AMission MissionMistakesMoMobile

  3. Underground waste barrier structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saha, Anuj J. (Hamburg, NY); Grant, David C. (Gibsonia, PA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is an underground waste barrier structure that consists of waste material, a first container formed of activated carbonaceous material enclosing the waste material, a second container formed of zeolite enclosing the first container, and clay covering the second container. The underground waste barrier structure is constructed by forming a recessed area within the earth, lining the recessed area with a layer of clay, lining the clay with a layer of zeolite, lining the zeolite with a layer of activated carbonaceous material, placing the waste material within the lined recessed area, forming a ceiling over the waste material of a layer of activated carbonaceous material, a layer of zeolite, and a layer of clay, the layers in the ceiling cojoining with the respective layers forming the walls of the structure, and finally, covering the ceiling with earth.

  4. It Just Keeps Getting Better-Tru Waste Inventory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lott, S.; Crawford, B.; McInroy, W.; Van Soest, G.; McTaggart, J.; Guerin, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory-Carlsbad Operations, Carlsbad, NM (United States); Patterson, R. [U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad, Field Office, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) opened on March 26, 1999, becoming the nation's first deep geologic repository for the permanent disposal of defense-generated transuranic (TRU) waste. In May 1998, the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) certified WIPP and re-certified WIPP in March 2006. The knowledge of TRU waste inventory is fundamental to packaging, transportation, disposal strategies, resource allocation, and is also imperative when working in a regulatory framework. TRU waste inventory data are used to define the waste that will fill the WIPP repository in terms of volume, radionuclides, waste material parameters, other chemical components, and to model the impact of the waste on the performance of the WIPP over a 10,000-year evolution. The data that pertain to TRU waste is defined in the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA), as '..waste containing more that 100 nanocuries of alpha-emitting transuranic isotopes per gram of waste, with half-lives greater than 20 years..' Defining TRU waste further, the wastes are classified as either contact-handled (CH) or remote-handled (RH) TRU waste, depending on the dose rate at the surface of the waste container. CH TRU wastes are packaged with an external surface dose rate not greater than 200 milli-rem (mrem) per hour, while RH TRU wastes are packaged with an external surface dose rate of 200 mrem per hour or greater. The Los Alamos National Laboratory-Carlsbad Operations (LANL-CO) Inventory Team has developed a powerful new database, the Comprehensive Inventory Database (CID), to maintain the TRU waste inventory information. The CID is intended to replace the Transuranic Waste Baseline Inventory Database (TWBID), Revision 2.1, as the central inventory information repository for tracking all existing and potential (TRU) waste generated across the Department of Energy (DOE) TRU waste complex. It is also the source for information submitted for the Annual TRU Waste Inventory Reports some of which will be used in future Compliance Re-certification Applications (CRAs) for the WIPP. Currently, the DOE is preparing for the second re-certification, CRA-2009. The CID contains comprehensive TRU waste inventory that is consistent, relevant, and easily accessible to support DOE needs, not only the CRAs and performance assessments, but also waste management planning activities and other regulatory needs (e.g., National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) analyses). The comprehensive inventory contains information obtained via inventory updates and approved acceptable knowledge (AK) characterization information to ensure inventory data integrity is maintained and the inventory is current. The TRU waste inventory is maintained in the CID under configuration management as defined in the LANL-CO Quality Assurance Program. The CID was developed using Microsoft{sup TM} Access Data Project{sup TM} (ADP) technology with a Microsoft SQL Server{sup TM} back end. The CID is user friendly, contains more fields, provides for easy upload of data, and has the capability to generate fully qualified data reports. To go along with the new database, the LANL-CO Inventory Team has developed an improved data collection/screening process and has excellent communications with the TRU waste site personnel. WIPP has now received over 6,000 shipments, emplaced over 50,000 cubic meters of CH waste, and successfully completed one re-certification. With a new robust qualified database, the CID, to maintain the inventory information, the TRU waste inventory information is continuously improving in quality, accuracy, and usability (better). (authors)

  5. Operational Waste Volume Projection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STRODE, J.N.

    1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2018 are projected based on assumption as of July 1999. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement.

  6. Operational Waste Volume Projection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STRODE, J.N.

    2000-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of June. 2000.

  7. Operational waste volume projection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koreski, G.M.

    1996-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of June 1996.

  8. Vitrification of waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300.degree. C. to 800.degree. C. to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100.degree. C. to 1400.degree. C. at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

  9. Vitrification of waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wicks, G.G.

    1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300 C to 800 C to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100 C to 1400 C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

  10. Solid Waste Management (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solid waste facilities operating in Connecticut must abide by these regulations, which describe requirements and procedures for issuing construction and operating permits; environmental...

  11. Solid Waste Permits (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality administers the rules and regulations governing the storage, collection, processing, recovery, and reuse of solid waste protect the air,...

  12. Norcal Waste Systems, Inc.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet describes the LNG long-haul heavy-duty trucks at Norcal Waste Systems Inc.'s Sanitary Fill Company.

  13. Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Department of Environmental...

  14. Solid Waste Management (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Indiana Department of...

  15. Solid Waste Management (Michigan)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act encourages the Department of Environmental Quality and Health Department representatives to develop and encourage methods for disposing solid waste that are environmentally sound, that...

  16. Waste Heat Recovery

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DRAFT - PRE-DECISIONAL - DRAFT 1 Waste Heat Recovery 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the TechnologySystem ......

  17. Challenges when performing economic optimization of waste treatment: A review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juul, N., E-mail: njua@dtu.dk [DTU Management, Ris Campus, Technical University of Denmark (Denmark); Mnster, M., E-mail: maem@dtu.dk [DTU Management, Ris Campus, Technical University of Denmark (Denmark); Ravn, H., E-mail: hans.ravn@aeblevangen.dk [RAM-lse edb, blevangen 55, 2765 Smrum (Denmark); Sderman, M. Ljunggren, E-mail: maria.ljunggren@chalmers.se [Energy and Environment, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden); IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Review of main optimization tools in the field of waste management. Different optimization methods are applied. Different fractions are analyzed. There is focus on different parameters in different geographical regions. More research is needed which encompasses both recycling and energy solutions. - Abstract: Strategic and operational decisions in waste management, in particular with respect to investments in new treatment facilities, are needed due to a number of factors, including continuously increasing amounts of waste, political demands for efficient utilization of waste resources, and the decommissioning of existing waste treatment facilities. Optimization models can assist in ensuring that these investment strategies are economically feasible. Various economic optimization models for waste treatment have been developed which focus on different parameters. Models focusing on transport are one example, but models focusing on energy production have also been developed, as well as models which take into account a plants economies of scale, environmental impact, material recovery and social costs. Finally, models combining different criteria for the selection of waste treatment methods in multi-criteria analysis have been developed. A thorough updated review of the existing models is presented, and the main challenges and crucial parameters that need to be taken into account when assessing the economic performance of waste treatment alternatives are identified. The review article will assist both policy-makers and model-developers involved in assessing the economic performance of waste treatment alternatives.

  18. Secondary Waste Cast Stone Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Cast Stone a cementitious waste form, has been selected for solidification of this secondary waste stream after treatment in the ETF. The secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. This secondary waste Cast Stone waste form qualification testing plan outlines the testing of the waste form and immobilization process to demonstrate that the Cast Stone waste form can comply with the disposal requirements. Specifications for the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form have not been established. For this testing plan, Cast Stone specifications are derived from specifications for the immobilized LAW glass in the WTP contract, the waste acceptance criteria for the IDF, and the waste acceptance criteria in the IDF Permit issued by the State of Washington. This testing plan outlines the testing needed to demonstrate that the waste form can comply with these waste form specifications and acceptance criteria. The testing program must also demonstrate that the immobilization process can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. This testing plan also outlines the testing needed to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support performance assessment analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form in the IDF

  19. Excavation and Repackaging of Retrievably-Stored, Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skinner, R. [US DOE, Oak Ridge Operations, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bolling, D. [Washington Safety Management Solutions, LLC, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Johnson, Ch.; Cange, J. [Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Turner, D. [Visionary Solutions, LLC, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Between 1972 and 1981, remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) wastes generated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) were retrievably stored through shallow land burial in a series of 22 earthen trenches in the northern portion of Solid Waste Storage Area 5 in ORNL's Melton Valley. A Dispute Resolution Agreement signed by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation and DOE specified removal of the buried (stored) waste to allow for repackaging, processing, and offsite disposal at an appropriate facility. A total of 204 concrete casks were successfully retrieved and over-packed from the 22-trench area between November 2004 and June 2006. Wastes originally stored in boxes, drums or placed without packaging was also recovered and repackaged. The repackaged wastes were transported to a nearby temporary storage facility at ORNL pending processing at DOE's Transuranic Waste Processing Center. In summary: The objective of the MVTRU Waste Retrieval Project was to satisfy conditions of the Dispute Resolution Agreement. This remedial action consisted of removal of all buried waste containers and loose items from the 22-trench area. The TRU waste casks were placed in steel overpacks, while other waste boxes, drums, and loose items were placed in steel drums or boxes. The over-packed waste was placed in an approved staging area until it can be accepted for treatment at the ORNL TRU Waste Processing Facility and ultimately disposed. A total of 204 casks were indicated by historical records to have been buried in the 22-Trench area, and 204 casks were found and over-packed during the retrieval operations. The historical records also indicated that some 18 steel or wood boxes, 12 steel drums, and approximately 15 m{sup 3} of loose waste were buried in the trenches. The contents of approximately 12 boxes, 3 drums, and approximately the expected 15 m{sup 3} quantity of loose waste were retrieved and over-packed. One significant deviation from the actions described in the Dispute Resolution Agreement occurred during the excavation of Trench 13. Pyrophoric material was encountered and a reaction occurred, causing a brief flame in the excavator bucket. No personnel contamination or radioactive material release occurred. The waste buried in Trench 13, consisting of approximately eight 208-liter (55-gal) drums and one 114-liter (30-gal) drum, was stabilized in-place due to risks associated with the retrieval and handling of this pyrophoric material. The Dispute Resolution Agreement completion date was revised to allow this material to remain stabilized in place as interim storage until a disposition path is established. The baseline schedule called for site mobilization and preparation to begin in November 2003, soil excavation and waste retrieval to be completed by March 2006, and site restoration and demobilization to be complete by April 2006, with the draft letter of completion submitted in May 2006. Soil excavation and waste retrieval were completed in March 2006 as planned, and no significant deviations to the baseline schedule were encountered. (authors)

  20. Process Knowledge Summary Report for Materials and Fuels Complex Contact-Handled Transuranic Debris Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. P. Grant; P. J. Crane; S. Butler; M. A. Henry

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Process Knowledge Summary Report summarizes the information collected to satisfy the transportation and waste acceptance requirements for the transfer of transuranic (TRU) waste between the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP). The information collected includes documentation that addresses the requirements for AMWTP and the applicable portion of their Resource Conservation and Recovery Act permits for receipt and treatment of TRU debris waste in AMWTP. This report has been prepared for contact-handled TRU debris waste generated by the Idaho National Laboratory at MFC. The TRU debris waste will be shipped to AMWTP for purposes of supercompaction. This Process Knowledge Summary Report includes information regarding, but not limited to, the generation process, the physical form, radiological characteristics, and chemical contaminants of the TRU debris waste, prohibited items, and packaging configuration. This report, along with the referenced supporting documents, will create a defensible and auditable record for waste originating from MFC.

  1. An overview of the sustainability of solid waste management at military installations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borglin, S.; Shore, J.; Worden, H.; Jain, R.

    2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Sustainable municipal solid waste management at military solutions necessitates a combined approach that includes waste reduction, alternative disposal techniques, and increased recycling. Military installations are unique because they often represent large employers in the region in which they are located, thereby making any practices they employ impact overall waste management strategies of the region. Solutions for waste sustainability will be dependent on operational directives and base location, availability of resources such as water and energy, and size of population. Presented in this paper are descriptions of available waste strategies that can be used to support sustainable waste management. Results presented indicate source reduction and recycling to be the most sustainable solutions. However, new waste-to-energy plants and composting have potential to improve on these well proven techniques and allow military installations to achieve sustainable waste management.

  2. RCRA Part B Permit Application for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory - Volume 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pamela R. Cunningham

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This section of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) Part B permit application describes the waste characteristics Of the transuranic (TRU) mixed wastes at the RWMC waste management units to be permitted: the Intermediate-Level Transuranic Storage Facility (ILTSF) and the Waste Storage Facility (WSF). The ILTSF is used to store radioactive remote-handled (RH) wastes. The WSF will be used to store radioactive contact-handled (CH) wastes. The Transuranic Storage Area (TSA) was established at the RWMC to provide interim storage of TRU waste. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A defines TRU waste as waste contaminated with alpha-emitting transuranium radionuclides with half-lives greater than 20 years in concentrations greater than 100 nanocuries per gram (nCi/g) o f waste material. The TSA serves generators both on and off the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The ILTSF is located at the TSA, and the WSF will be located there also. Most of the wastes managed at the TSA are mixed wastes, which are radioactive wastes regulated under the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) that also contain hazardous materials regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Regulations. These wastes include TRU mixed wastes and some low-level mixed wastes. Accordingly, the TSA is subject to the permitting requirements of RCRA and the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act (IDAPA). Prior to 1982, DOE orders defined TRU wastes as having transuranium radionuclides in concentrations greater than 10 nCi/g, The low-level mixed wastes managed at the TSA are those wastes with 10 to 100 nCi/g of TRU radionuclides that prior to 1982 were considered TRU waste.

  3. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    licensed to safely and permanently dispose of transuranic radioactive waste, or TRU waste, left over from the production of nuclear weapons. After more than 20 years of...

  4. Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act provides for planning for the processing and disposal of municipal waste; requires counties to submit plans for municipal waste management systems within their boundaries; authorizes...

  5. Solid Waste Act (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The main purpose of the Solid Waste Act is to authorize and direct the establishment of a comprehensive solid waste management program. The act states details about specific waste management...

  6. Virginia Waste Management Act (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solid waste and hazardous waste are regulated under a number of programs at the Department of Environmental Quality. These programs are designed to encourage the reuse and recycling of solid waste...

  7. Hazardous Waste Management (North Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These rules identify and list hazardous waste and set standards for the generators and operators of such waste as well as owners or operators of waste facilities. They also stats standards for...

  8. Solid Waste Disposal Act (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality is responsible for the regulation and management of municipal solid waste and hazardous waste. A fee is applied to all solid waste disposed in the...

  9. Georgia Waste Control Law (Georgia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Waste Control Law makes it unlawful to dump waste in any lakes, streams or surfaces waters of the State or on any private property without consent of the property owner. Waste is very broadly...

  10. Resin-coated sand slurry pack gas deliverabilities: Field and laboratory results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, B.; Nelson, C.; Stadleman, J.

    1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although through-tubing resin-coated sand slurry packs (RCSSP's) are significantly less expensive than conventional gravel packs, they have not been widely used as a sand control completion technique. This low usage is mainly due to two inherent problems. The first is the high risk of localized pack failure in the perforation tunnels when the RCSSP casing plug is milled out. The second problem is the difficulty associated with predicting flow rates (and therefore economics) of RCSSP completed wells, especially if the casing plug is not milled out. This paper presents a modified velocity coefficient correlation for gas turbulence, an innovative RCSSP completion configuration with an associated simulation technique, and supporting field results that demonstrate an expanded application for RCSSP's in the area of gas well through-tubing plugbacks where, until recently, their general application was thought to be uneconomical.

  11. Statistics of Conserved Quantities in Mechanically Stable Packings of Frictionless Disks Above Jamming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yegang Wu; S. Teitel

    2014-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We numerically simulate mechanically stable packings of soft-core, frictionless, bidisperse disks in two dimensions, above the jamming packing fraction $\\phi_J$. For configurations with a fixed isotropic global stress tensor, we compute the averages, variances, and correlations of conserved quantities (stress $\\Gamma_{\\cal C}$, force-tile area $A_{\\cal C}$, Voronoi volume $V_{\\cal C}$, number of particles $N_{\\cal C}$, and number of small particles $N_{s{\\cal C}}$) on compact subclusters of particles ${\\cal C}$, as a function of the cluster size and the global system stress. We find several significant differences depending on whether the cluster ${\\cal C}$ is defined by a fixed radius $R$ or a fixed number of particles $M$. We comment on the implications of our findings for maximum entropy models of jammed packings.

  12. Analysis ofRH TRU Wastes for Containment in Lead Shielded Containers INV-SAR-08, Revision 0 Page I Of~'P~8tJ},f1-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .2 Cellulose, Plastic, Rubber, Steel and Lead Associated with Shielded Container Emplacement 6 4.3 Number of 30-gallon Containers, 3-Packs and Stacks for Shielded Containers 8 4.4 Mass of Plastic, Steel, and LeadAnalysis ofRH TRU Wastes for Containment in Lead Shielded Containers INV-SAR-08, Revision 0 Page I

  13. Pretreatment options for waste-to-energy facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz, L.F.; Savage, G.M. [CalRecovery, Inc., Hercules, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes various options available for processing MSW before the material is introduced to waste-to-energy facilities. Specifically, the paper reviews the type of equipment currently available for the recovery of resources from the waste stream. In addition, the paper discusses other matters which in many cases are ignored but are extremely important for the design of the processes. Some of these matters include the use of reliable waste characterization data during conceptual design and definition of the properties and specifications of the recovered materials and/or energy forms (e.g., RDF). Finally, the paper discusses other factors that have a critical impact on the facility such as potential environmental consequences of pretreatment of the waste prior to its combustion in waste-to-energy facilities.

  14. Hazardous waste minimization report for CY 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kendrick, C.M.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a multipurpose research and development facility. Its primary role is the support of energy technology through applied research and engineering development and scientific research in basic and physical sciences. ORNL also is a valuable resource in the solution of problems of national importance, such as nuclear and chemical waste management. In addition, useful radioactive and stable isotopes which are unavailable from the private sector are produced at ORNL. As a result of these activities, hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes are generated at ORNL. A formal hazardous waste minimization program for ORNL was launched in mid 1985 in response to the requirements of Section 3002 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). During 1986, a task plan was developed. The six major tasks include: planning and implementation of a laboratory-wide chemical inventory and the subsequent distribution, treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) of unneeded chemicals; establishment and implementation of a distribution system for surplus chemicals to other (internal and external) organizations; training and communication functions necessary to inform and motivate laboratory personnel; evaluation of current procurement and tracking systems for hazardous materials and recommendation and implementation of improvements; systematic review of applicable current and proposed ORNL procedures and ongoing and proposed activities for waste volume and/or toxicity reduction potential; and establishment of criteria by which to measure progress and reporting of significant achievements. 8 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  15. Solid Waste Paul Woodson, East Central University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of groundwater contamination, air pollution, and odor. Solid wastes may be displeasing to the public either, industrial and medical wastes, food wastes, mineral waste, and nonhazardous wastes. In addition/reservoirs, special wastes, such as medical wastes, low level radioactive wastes, construction/demolition debris

  16. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) fact sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pursuant to the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as amended (42 USC 6901, et seq.), and the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act (Section 74-4-1 et seq., NMSA 1978), Permit is issued to the owner and operator of the US DOE, WIPP site (hereafter called the Permittee(s)) to operate a hazardous waste storage facility consisting of a container storage unit (Waste Handling Building) and two Subpart X miscellaneous below-ground storage units (Bin Scale Test Rooms 1 and 3), all are located at the above location. The Permittee must comply with all terms and conditions of this Permit. This Permit consists of the conditions contained herein, including the attachments. Applicable regulations cited are the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Management Regulations, as amended 1992 (HWMR-7), the regulations that are in effect on the date of permit issuance. This Permit shall become effective upon issuance by the Secretary of the New Mexico Environment Department and shall be in effect for a period of ten (10) years from issuance. This Permit is also based on the assumption that all information contained in the Permit application and the administrative record is accurate and that the activity will be conducted as specified in the application and the administrative record. The Permit application consists of Revision 3, as well as associated attachments and clarifying information submitted on January 25, 1993, and May 17, 1993.

  17. EV Everywhere Batteries Workshop - Pack Design and Optimization Breakout

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal Register / Vol.6: RecordJune 20,in the101ESPCProject

  18. Battery Pack Requirements and Targets Validation FY 2009 DOE Vehicle

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments fromofBatteries from Brine Batteries from BrineHardware

  19. GM Li-Ion Battery Pack Manufacturing | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdfTechnologiesNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTALnaturalGENII2 DOE Hydrogen and

  20. GM Li-Ion Battery Pack Manufacturing | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdfTechnologiesNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTALnaturalGENII2 DOE Hydrogen and1

  1. GM Li-Ion Battery Pack Manufacturing | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdfTechnologiesNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTALnaturalGENII2 DOE Hydrogen

  2. EV Everywhere Batteries Workshop - Pack Design and Optimization Breakout

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work4/11 ENVIROISSUES ESF 12 EventsANBreakoutSession

  3. Correlations Between Metallic Lubricant Additive Species in the Ring Pack

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJuly 30, 2013Department of EnergyCore Measure5and Ash

  4. LEDS Collaboration in Action Workshop Participant Pack | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMALTexas:KujuBiography Jump

  5. Leaders of the Fuel Cell Pack | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil & Gas »of Energy Laser-Firing

  6. Battery Pack Requirements and Targets Validation FY 2009 DOE Vehicle

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'s ReplyApplication ofTribal RenewableBattery Chargers |

  7. A High-Performance PHEV Battery Pack | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of BadTHEEnergyReliability2015GrossA Few Simple Steps2 DOE Hydrogen

  8. A High-Performance PHEV Battery Pack | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of BadTHEEnergyReliability2015GrossA Few Simple Steps2 DOE

  9. A High-Performance PHEV Battery Pack | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of BadTHEEnergyReliability2015GrossA Few Simple Steps2 DOE1 DOE

  10. Hazardous Waste Management (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The New Mexico Environment Department's Hazardous Waste Bureau is responsible for the management of hazardous waste in the state. The Bureau enforces the rules established by the Environmental...

  11. Solid Waste Management (South Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute contains provisions for solid waste management systems, groundwater monitoring, liability for pollution, permitting, inspections, and provisions for waste reduction and recycling...

  12. RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL IN GRANITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL IN GRANITE Paul A. WitherspoonRADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL IN GRANITE Paul A. Wither spoona repository site in granite are to evaluate the suitability

  13. Solid Waste Management Act (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act establishes rules for the permitting, posting of security, construction, operation, closure, maintenance and remediation of solid waste disposal sites; disposal of solid waste in ways that...

  14. Animal Waste Technology Fund (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A bill passed in 2012 transferred responsibility for animal waste management technology projects to the Maryland Department of Agriculture. The Department will maintain the Animal Waste Technology...

  15. Solid Waste Rules (New Hampshire)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The solid waste statute applies to construction and demolition debris, appliances, recyclables, and the facilities that collect, process, and dispose of solid waste. DES oversees the management of...

  16. Nebraska Hazardous Waste Regulations (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Environmental Quality, contain provisions pertaining to hazardous waste management, waste standards, permitting requirements, and land disposal...

  17. Solid Waste Management (North Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Solid Waste Program regulates safe management of solid waste through guidance, technical assistance, regulations, permitting, environmental monitoring, compliance evaluation and enforcement....

  18. NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING THE UNIVERSITY Resources Research Institute, 212 Agricultural ~ngineering, East Campus. OBJECTIVES OF THE NWRRI The Hater for centralization of data collection, analysis, storage and retrieval waste-water reuse economics of pollution

  19. Assessment of natural gas technology opportunities in the treatment of selected metals containing wastes. Topical report, June 1994-August 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGervey, J.; Holmes, J.G.; Bluestein, J.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report analyzes the disposal of certain waste streams that contain heavy metals, as determined by Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations. Generation of the wastes, the regulatory status of the wastes, and current treatment practices are characterized, and the role of natural gas is determined. The four hazardous metal waste streams addressed in this report are electric arc furnace (EAF) dust, electroplating sludge wastes, used and off-specification circuit boards and cathode ray tubes, and wastes from lead manufacturing. This report assesses research and development opportunities relevant to natural gas technologies that may result from current and future enviromental regulations.

  20. Effects of Spatial Variations in Packing Fraction on Reactor Physics Parameters in Pebble-Bed Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William K. Terry; A. M. Ougouag; Farzad Rahnema; Michael Scott McKinley

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The well-known spatial variation of packing fraction near the outer boundary of a pebble-bed reactor core is cited. The ramifications of this variation are explored with the MCNP computer code. It is found that the variation has negligible effects on the global reactor physics parameters extracted from the MCNP calculations for use in analysis by diffusion-theory codes, but for local reaction rates the effects of the variation are naturally important. Included is some preliminary work in using first-order perturbation theory for estimating the effect of the spatial variation of packing fraction on the core eigenvalue and the fision density distribution.

  1. Waste classification sampling plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landsman, S.D.

    1998-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this sampling is to explain the method used to collect and analyze data necessary to verify and/or determine the radionuclide content of the B-Cell decontamination and decommissioning waste stream so that the correct waste classification for the waste stream can be made, and to collect samples for studies of decontamination methods that could be used to remove fixed contamination present on the waste. The scope of this plan is to establish the technical basis for collecting samples and compiling quantitative data on the radioactive constituents present in waste generated during deactivation activities in B-Cell. Sampling and radioisotopic analysis will be performed on the fixed layers of contamination present on structural material and internal surfaces of process piping and tanks. In addition, dose rate measurements on existing waste material will be performed to determine the fraction of dose rate attributable to both removable and fixed contamination. Samples will also be collected to support studies of decontamination methods that are effective in removing the fixed contamination present on the waste. Sampling performed under this plan will meet criteria established in BNF-2596, Data Quality Objectives for the B-Cell Waste Stream Classification Sampling, J. M. Barnett, May 1998.

  2. Nuclear waste solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walker, Darrel D. (1684 Partridge Dr., Aiken, SC 29801); Ebra, Martha A. (129 Hasty Rd., Aiken, SC 29801)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High efficiency removal of technetium values from a nuclear waste stream is achieved by addition to the waste stream of a precipitant contributing tetraphenylphosphonium cation, such that a substantial portion of the technetium values are precipitated as an insoluble pertechnetate salt.

  3. Radioactive waste disposal package

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lampe, Robert F. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

  4. Heterogeneous waste processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vanderberg, Laura A. (Los Alamos, NM); Sauer, Nancy N. (Los Alamos, NM); Brainard, James R. (Los Alamos, NM); Foreman, Trudi M. (Los Alamos, NM); Hanners, John L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combination of treatment methods are provided for treatment of heterogeneous waste including: (1) treatment for any organic compounds present; (2) removal of metals from the waste; and, (3) bulk volume reduction, with at least two of the three treatment methods employed and all three treatment methods emplyed where suitable.

  5. Hanford site waste minimization and pollution prevention awareness program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkendall, J.R.

    1996-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan documents the requirements of the Hanford Site Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention (WMin/P2) Program. The plan specifies requirements for Hanford contractors to prevent pollution from entering the environment, to conserve resources and energy, and to reduce the quantity and toxicity of hazardous, radioactive, mixed, and sanitary waste generated at Hanford. The Pollution Prevention Awareness Program required by DOE 5400.1 (DOE 1988A) is included in the Hanford WMin/P2 Program.

  6. Pinellas Plant contingency plan for the hazardous waste management facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subpart D of Part 264 (264.50 through .56) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations require that each facility maintain a contingency plan detailing procedures to {open_quotes}minimize hazards to human health or the environment from fires, explosions, or any unplanned sudden or non-sudden release of hazardous waste or hazardous waste constituents to air, soil, or surface water.{close_quotes}

  7. AVLIS production plant waste management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the executive summary, this document contains the following: (1) waste management facilities design objectives; (2) AVLIS production plant wastes; (3) waste management design criteria; (4) waste management plan description; and (5) waste management plan implementation. 17 figures, 18 tables.

  8. Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the waste acceptance criteria applicable to the transportation, storage, and disposal of contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These criteria serve as the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) primary directive for ensuring that CH-TRU waste is managed and disposed of in a manner that protects human health and safety and the environment.The authorization basis of WIPP for the disposal of CH-TRU waste includes the U.S.Department of Energy National Security and Military Applications of Nuclear EnergyAuthorization Act of 1980 (reference 1) and the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA;reference 2). Included in this document are the requirements and associated criteriaimposed by these acts and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA,reference 3), as amended, on the CH-TRU waste destined for disposal at WIPP.|The DOE TRU waste sites must certify CH-TRU waste payload containers to thecontact-handled waste acceptance criteria (CH-WAC) identified in this document. Asshown in figure 1.0, the flow-down of applicable requirements to the CH-WAC istraceable to several higher-tier documents, including the WIPP operational safetyrequirements derived from the WIPP CH Documented Safety Analysis (CH-DSA;reference 4), the transportation requirements for CH-TRU wastes derived from theTransuranic Package Transporter-Model II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT Certificates ofCompliance (references 5 and 5a), the WIPP LWA (reference 2), the WIPP HazardousWaste Facility Permit (reference 6), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency(EPA) Compliance Certification Decision and approval for PCB disposal (references 7,34, 35, 36, and 37). The solid arrows shown in figure 1.0 represent the flow-down of allapplicable payload container-based requirements. The two dotted arrows shown infigure 1.0 represent the flow-down of summary level requirements only; i.e., the sitesmust reference the regulatory source documents from the U.S. Nuclear RegulatoryCommission (NRC) and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) for acomprehensive and detailed listing of the requirements.This CH-WAC does not address the subject of waste characterization relating to adetermination of whether the waste is hazardous; rather, the sites are referred to theWaste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit fordetails of the sampling and analysis protocols to be used in determining compliance withthe required physical and chemical properties of the waste. Requirements andassociated criteria pertaining to a determination of the radiological properties of thewaste, however, are addressed in appendix A of this document. The collectiveinformation obtained from waste characterization records and acceptable knowledge(AK) serves as the basis for sites to certify that their CH-TRU waste satisfies the WIPPwaste acceptance criteria listed herein.

  9. Hanford Tank Waste Information Enclosure 1 Hanford Tank Waste Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) and the definition of HLW from the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended (NWPA). The WIPP Land Withdrawal Act by the disposal regulations; or #12;Hanford Tank Waste Information Enclosure 1 2 (C) waste that the Nuclear 10, Code of Federal Regulations. The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (42 U.S.C. 10101

  10. Groundwater quality assessment report for Solid Waste Storage Area 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee -- 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6, located at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) facility, is a shallow land burial site for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and other waste types. Wastes were disposed of in unlined trenches and auger holes from 1969 until May 1986, when it was determined that Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulated wastes were being disposed of there. DOE closed SWSA 6 until changes in operating procedures prevented the disposal of RCRA wastes at SWSA 6. The site, which reopened for waste disposal activities in July 1986, is the only currently operating disposal area for low-level radioactive waste at ORNL. In addition to SWSA 6, it was determined that hazardous wastes were treated at the Explosives Detonation Trench (EDT). Explosives and shock-sensitive chemicals such as picric acid, phosphorus, and ammonium nitrate were detonated; debris from the explosions was backfilled into the trench.

  11. Relative performance of body fitted and fictitious domain simulations of flow through fixed packed beds of spheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Sourabh V.

    porescale flow in complex configurations of fixed packed beds of spheres at moderate pore Reynolds numbersRelative performance of body fitted and fictitious domain simulations of flow through fixed packed beds of spheres Justin Finn , Sourabh V. Apte School of Mechanical Industrial and Manufacturing

  12. L4 Certificate Leadership and Management Candidate Pack 2012-13[1].docx Level 4 Certificate in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mumby, Peter J.

    for establishing, maintaining and improving systems (eg quality, marketing, sales, energy, health and safety, etcL4 Certificate Leadership and Management Candidate Pack 2012-13[1].docx Page 1 Level 4 Certificate in Leadership and Management Candidate and Assessment Pack 2012/13 Clive Betts Centre Co-ordinator #12;L4

  13. Paper No. ICETECH12-XYZ-R0 Daley Page number: 1 GPU Modeling of Ship Operations in Pack Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Dennis

    Paper No. ICETECH12-XYZ-R0 Daley Page number: 1 GPU Modeling of Ship Operations in Pack Ice Claude The paper explores the use of an event-mechanics approach to assess vessel performance in pack ice of simulation domains, each containing hundreds of discrete and interacting ice floes is modeled. A simple

  14. Top Resources | Commercial Buildings Resource Database

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home Programs & Offices Consumer Information Commercial Buildings Resource Database Resources to support the adoption of energy-saving building technologies Search form Search...

  15. Flow Field Visualization in Structured Packing Using Real Time X-ray Radiography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eldridge, R. Bruce

    efficiency improvements in distillation column operation and column internal design. Structured packing distillation columns require replacement. Substantial cost savings can be achieved by relatively small process of an operating vapor-liquid contactor will be required to design next-generation column internals. Historically

  16. Competitive Adsorption and Ordered Packing of Counterions near Highly Charged Surfaces: From

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Bo

    Competitive Adsorption and Ordered Packing of Counterions near Highly Charged Surfaces: From Mean Competitive adsorption of counterions of multiple species to charged surfaces is studied by a size surface. It is found that, for a low surface charge density, the adsorption of ions with a higher valence

  17. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION AND ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECTIVE THERMAL PROPERTIES OF BERYLLIUM PACKED BEDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION AND ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECTIVE THERMAL PROPERTIES OF BERYLLIUM PACKED Angeles, CA 90095-1597 ali@fusion.ucla.edu ABSTRACT Beryllium, in its pebble form, has been proposed Beryllium (as a neutron multiplier) is considered one of the prime candidates to enhance tritium breeding

  18. Electrically recharged battery employing a packed/spouted bed metal particle electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siu, S.C.; Evans, J.W.; Salas-Morales, J.

    1995-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A secondary metal air cell, employing a spouted/packed metal particle bed and an air electrode, is described. More specifically a zinc air cell well suited for use in electric vehicles which is capable of being either electrically or hydraulically recharged. 5 figs.

  19. A Genetic Algorithm for Packing ThreeDimensional NonConvex Objects Having Cavities and Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coello, Carlos A. Coello

    packing, non convex objects, selective laser sintering, rapid proto typing 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 SELECTIVE, the selective laser sintering (SLS) machine produces parts directly from CAD files through an additive manufac tions of parts at each layer. Selective laser sintering uses fine, heatfusible powder to build a part

  20. Scanning Force Microscopy Studies on Molecular Packing and Friction Anisotropy in Thin Films of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenis, Paul J. A.

    Scanning Force Microscopy Studies on Molecular Packing and Friction Anisotropy in Thin Films in bulk, was studied using differential scanning calorimetry, optical microscopy, magic angle solid were investigated at the molecular level by a combination of multimode scanning force microscopy (SFM

  1. PowerPack: Energy Profiling and Analysis of High-Performance Systems and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PowerPack: Energy Profiling and Analysis of High-Performance Systems and Applications Rong Ge of power and energy on the computer systems community, few studies provide insight to where and how power of these systems. These analyses include the impacts of chip multiprocessing on power and energy efficiency

  2. Comparison of Different Packing Materials for the Biofiltration of Air Toxics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Four inorganic packing materials were com- pared previously for the removal of H2S or NH3.7,8 Both materials (two porous ce- ramics, perlite, and open pore polyurethane foam) were compared for the removal, exhibited the highest performance. The critical load (i.e., load at which 95% removal occurred) was 29 g m 3

  3. Error of the network approximation for densely packed composites with irregular geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novikov, Alexei

    properties such as the effective conductivity or the effective dielectric constant of composite materials the concentration of the filling inclusions is high is particularly relevant to polymer/ceramic composites, becauseError of the network approximation for densely packed composites with irregular geometry Leonid

  4. Error of the network approximation for densely packed composites with irregular geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    such as the effective conductivity or the effective dielectric constant of composite materials in which a large number in the case of the high contrast, highly packed particular composites, that is when the conductivity inclusions is high is particularly relevant to polymer/ceramic composites, because a polymer matrix

  5. Numerically exact computer simulations of light scattering by densely packed, random particulate media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Review Numerically exact computer simulations of light scattering by densely packed, random Astronomical Observatory of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 27 Zabolotny Street, 03680 Kyiv- albedo Solar System objects are caused by CB. Published by Elsevier Ltd. Contents 1. Introduction

  6. Journal of Embedded Computing 2 (2006) 93102 93 Frame packing algorithms for automotive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navet, Nicolas

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    design is a standard procedure in the automotive industry. The second reason to minimize the bandwidthJournal of Embedded Computing 2 (2006) 93102 93 IOS Press Frame packing algorithms for automotive Vandoeuvre-l `es-Nancy, France Abstract. The set of frames exchanged in automotive applications must meet two

  7. Molecular Packing and Solar Cell Performance in Blends of Polymers with a Bisadduct Fullerene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGehee, Michael

    Molecular Packing and Solar Cell Performance in Blends of Polymers with a Bisadduct Fullerene States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: We compare the solar cell performance of several polymers the efficiency of the solar cells only when they do not intercalate between the polymer side chains. When

  8. Magnetism of Ho and Er Atoms on Close-Packed Metal Surfaces F. Donati,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thévenaz, Jacques

    Magnetism of Ho and Er Atoms on Close-Packed Metal Surfaces F. Donati,1 A. Singha,1 S. Stepanow,2 C; published 3 December 2014) We investigated the magnetic properties of individual Ho atoms adsorbed on the (111) surface of Pt, which have been recently claimed to display single ion magnetic behavior

  9. Extent of Hydrogen-Bond Protection in Folded Proteins: A Constraint on Packing Architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, R. Stephen

    Extent of Hydrogen-Bond Protection in Folded Proteins: A Constraint on Packing Architectures Ariel structuring and ultimately exclusion of water by hydrophobes surrounding backbone hydrogen bonds turn hydrophobes yields an optimal hydrogen-bond stabilization. This motif is shown to be nearly ubiquitous

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2013: A High-Performance PHEV Battery Pack

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by LG Chem at 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about a high-performance battery pack the company is researching for plug-in electric vehicles.

  11. Shearing of frictional sphere packings Jean-Franois Mtayer, * Donald J. Suntrup III,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin. University of

    and jammed materials. Abstract We measure shear stress in packings of glass spheres by pulling a thin metal of jamming/unjamming in particulate soft-matter systems such as colloids, foams and emulsions. However, most. 2 Experiment Our experimental set-up [Fig. 1] consists of a vertical glass tube (diameter 38.7 mm

  12. Shearing of frictional sphere packings Jean-Franois Mtayer, * Donald J. Suntrup III,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and jammed materials. Abstract We measure shear stress in packings of glass spheres by pulling a thin metal of jamming/unjamming in particulate soft-matter systems such as colloids, foams and emulsions. However, most of a vertical glass tube (diameter 38.7 mm, height 300 mm) filled with water and soda-lime glass beads (diameter

  13. Technical Safety Requirements for the B695 Segment of the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, H L

    2007-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) Division's B695 Segment of the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the B695 Segment of the DWTF. The TSRs are derived from the Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) for the B695 Segment of the DWTF (LLNL 2004). The analysis presented there determined that the B695 Segment of the DWTF is a low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 3, nonreactor nuclear facility. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits as well as controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard analyses. Furthermore, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls section of the TSRs. The B695 Segment of the DWTF (B695 and the west portion of B696) is a waste treatment and storage facility located in the northeast quadrant of the LLNL main site. The approximate area and boundary of the B695 Segment of the DWTF are shown in the B695 Segment of the DWTF DSA. Activities typically conducted in the B695 Segment of the DWTF include container storage, lab-packing, repacking, overpacking, bulking, sampling, waste transfer, and waste treatment. B695 is used to store and treat radioactive, mixed, and hazardous waste, and it also contains equipment used in conjunction with waste processing operations to treat various liquid and solid wastes. The portion of the building called Building 696 Solid Waste Processing Area (SWPA), also referred to as B696S in this report, is used primarily to manage solid radioactive waste. Operations specific to the SWPA include sorting and segregating low-level waste (LLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste, lab-packing, sampling, and crushing empty drums that previously contained LLW. A permit modification for B696S was submitted to DTSC in January 2004 to store and treat hazardous and mixed waste. Upon approval of the permit modification, B696S rooms 1007, 1008, and 1009 will be able to store hazardous and mixed waste for up to 1 year. Furthermore, an additional drum crusher and a Waste Packaging Unit will be permitted to treat hazardous and mixed waste. RHWM generally processes LLW with no, or extremely low, concentrations of transuranics (i.e., much less than 100 nCi/g). Wastes processed often contain only depleted uranium and beta- and gamma-emitting nuclides, e.g., {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 3}H. Chapter 5 of the DSA documents the derivation of TSRs and develops the operational limits that protect the safety envelope defined for this facility. The DSA is applicable to the handling of radioactive waste stored and treated in the B695 Segment of the DWTF. Section 5 of the TSR, Administrative Controls, contains those Administrative Controls necessary to ensure safe operation of the B695 Segment of the DWTF. A basis explanation follows each of the requirements described in Section 5.5, Specific Administrative Controls. The basis explanation does not constitute an additional requirement, but is intended as an expansion of the logic and reasoning behind development of the requirement. Programmatic Administrative Controls are addressed in Section 5.6.

  14. Hazardous Waste Compliance Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, G.L.; Holstein, K.A.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hazardous Waste Compliance Program Plan (HWCPP) describes how the Rocky Flats Plant institutes a more effective waste management program designed to achieve and maintain strict adherence to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. Emphasis is given to improve integration of line operations with programmatic and functional support activities necessary to achieve physical compliance to RCRA regulated equipment, facilities and operations at the floor level. This program focuses on specific activities occurring or which need to occur within buildings containing RCRA regulated units and activities. The plan describes a new approach to achieving and maintaining compliance. This approach concentrates authority and accountability for compliance with the line operating personnel, with support provided from the programmatic functions. This approach requires a higher degree of integration and coordination between operating and program support organizations. The principal changes in emphases are; (1) increased line operations involvement, knowledge and accountability in compliance activities, (2) improved management systems to identify, correct and/or avoid deficiencies and (3) enhanced management attention and employee awareness of compliance related matters.

  15. Future perspectives of using hollow fibers as structured packings in light hydrocarbon distillation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Dali [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Orler, Bruce [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tornga, Stephanie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Welch, Cindy [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Olefin and paraffin are the largest chemical commodities. Furthermore, they are major building blocks for the petrochemical industry. Each year, petroleum refining, consumes 4,500 TBtu/yr in separation energy, making it one of the most energy-intensive industries in the United States). Just considering liquefied petroleum gas (ethane/propane/butane) and olefins (ethylene and propylene) alone, the distillation energy consumption is about 400 TBtu/yr in the US. Since petroleum distillation is a mature technology, incremental improvements in column/tray design will only provide a few percent improvements in the performance. However, each percent saving in net energy use amounts to savings of 10 TBtu/yr and reduces CO{sub 2} emissions by 0.2 MTon/yr. In practice, distillation columns require 100 to 200 trays to achieve the desired separation. The height of a transfer unit (HTU) of conventional packings is typical in the range of 36-60 inch. Since 2006, we had explored using several non-selective membranes as the structured packings to replace the conventional packing materials used in propane and propylene distillation. We obtained the lowest HTU of < 8 inch for the hollow fiber column, which was >5 times shorter than that of the conventional packing materials. In 2008, we also investigated this type of packing materials in iso-/n-butane distillation. Because of a slightly larger relative volatility of iso-/n-butane than that of propane/propylene, a wider and a more stable operational range was obtained for the iso-/n-butane pair. However, all of the experiments were conducted on a small scale with flowrate of < 25 gram/min. Recently, we demonstrated this technology on a larger scale (<250 gram/min). Within the loading range of F-factor < 2.2 Pa{sup 0.5}, a pressure drop on the vapor side is below 50 mbar/m, which suggests that the pressure drop of hollow fibers packings is not an engineering barrier for the applications in distillations. The thermal stability study suggests that polypropylene hollow fibers are stable after a long time exposure to C{sub 2} - C{sub 4} mixtures. The effects of packing density on the separation efficiency will be discussed.

  16. Evaluation and compilation of DOE waste package test data: Biannual report, August 1986-January 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Interrante, C.; Escalante, E.; Fraker, A.; Harrison, S.; Shull, R.; Linzer, M.; Ricker, R.; Ruspi, J.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes results of the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) evaluations of Department of Energy (DOE) activities on waste packages designed for containment of radioactive high-level nuclear waste (HLW). The waste package is a proposed engineered barrier that is part of a permanent repository for HLW. Metal alloys are the principal barriers within the engineered system. Technical discussions are given for the corrosion of metals proposed for the canister, particularly carbon and stainless steels, and copper. In the section on tuff, the current level of understanding of several canister materials is questioned. Within the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) section, discussions are given on problems concerning groundwater, materials for use in the metallic overpack, and diffusion through the packing. For the proposed salt site, questions are raised on the work on both ASTM A216 Steel and Ti-Code 12. NBS work related to the vitrification of HLW borosilicate glass at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) and the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is covered. NBS reviews of selected DOE technical reports and a summary of current waste-package activities of the Materials Characterization Center (MCC) is presented. Using a database management system, a computerized database for storage and retrieval of reviews and evaluations of HLW data has been developed and is described. 17 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Waste to Energy Time Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SEMINAR Waste to Energy Time Activities 9:30-9:40 Brief introduction of participants 9:40-10:10 Presentation of Dr. Kalogirou, "Waste to Energy: An Integral Part of Worldwide Sustainable Waste Management" 10. Sofia Bethanis, "Production of synthetic aggregates for use in structural concrete from waste to energy

  18. Hazardous Waste Disposal Sites (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These sections contain information on fees and monitoring relevant to operators of hazardous waste disposal sites.

  19. Contained recovery of oily waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jr., Lyle A. (Laramie, WY); Sudduth, Bruce C. (Laramie, WY)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for recovering oily waste from oily waste accumulations underground comprising sweeping the oily waste accumulation with hot water to recover said oily waste, wherein said area treated is isolated from surrounding groundwater hydraulically. The hot water may be reinjected after the hot-water displacement or may be treated to conform to any discharge requirements.

  20. Methane generation from waste materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Samani, Zohrab A. (Las Cruces, NM); Hanson, Adrian T. (Las Cruces, NM); Macias-Corral, Maritza (Las Cruces, NM)

    2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An organic solid waste digester for producing methane from solid waste, the digester comprising a reactor vessel for holding solid waste, a sprinkler system for distributing water, bacteria, and nutrients over and through the solid waste, and a drainage system for capturing leachate that is then recirculated through the sprinkler system.

  1. Radioactive waste material disposal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide. 3 figs.

  2. Radioactive waste material disposal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles W. (155 Newport Dr., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Beahm, Edward C. (106 Cooper Cir., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Parker, George W. (321 Dominion Cir., Knoxville, TN 37922)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide.

  3. Specifying Waste Heat Boilers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganapathy, V.

    or hydrochloric acid vapor should be mentioned upfront so the HRSG designer can take proper precauations while designing the unit.Material selection is also impacted by the presence of corrosive gases.If partial pressure of hydrogen is high in the gas stream...SPECIFYING WASTE HEAT BOILERS V.Ganapathy.ABCO Industries Abilene,Texas ABSTRACT Waste heat boilers or Heat Recovery Steam 'Generators(HRSGs) as they are often called are used to recover energy from waste gas streams in chemical plants...

  4. Resources | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources Training & Development Mentoring Safety Program Brochure Postdoctoral Blog Resources The resources in this section have been curated to better support you in your...

  5. LANSCE | User Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    proposal process to the completion of the experiment, LANSCE provides its users with resources critical to their experiements and their experience. Lujan Resources WNR Resources...

  6. Certification Plan, low-level waste Hazardous Waste Handling Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert, R.

    1992-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan also incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end-product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; an executive summary of the Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP) for the HWHF and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification. This plan provides guidance from the HWHF to waste generators, waste handlers, and the Waste Certification Specialist to enable them to conduct their activities and carry out their responsibilities in a manner that complies with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Waste generators have the primary responsibility for the proper characterization of LLW. The Waste Certification Specialist verifies and certifies that LBL LLW is characterized, handled, and shipped in accordance with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Certification is the governing process in which LBL personnel conduct their waste generating and waste handling activities in such a manner that the Waste Certification Specialist can verify that the requirements of WHC-WAC are met.

  7. Hanford Site Secondary Waste Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westsik, Joseph H.

    2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is making plans to dispose of 54 million gallons of radioactive tank wastes at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The high-level wastes and low-activity wastes will be vitrified and placed in permanent disposal sites. Processing of the tank wastes will generate secondary wastes, including routine solid wastes and liquid process effluents, and these need to be processed and disposed of also. The Department of Energy Office of Waste Processing sponsored a meeting to develop a roadmap to outline the steps necessary to design the secondary waste forms. Representatives from DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Washington State Department of Ecology, the Oregon Department of Energy, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, technical experts from the DOE national laboratories, academia, and private consultants convened in Richland, Washington, during the week of July 21-23, 2008, to participate in a workshop to identify the risks and uncertainties associated with the treatment and disposal of the secondary wastes and to develop a roadmap for addressing those risks and uncertainties. This report describes the results of the roadmap meeting in Richland. Processing of the tank wastes will generate secondary wastes, including routine solid wastes and liquid process effluents. The secondary waste roadmap workshop focused on the waste streams that contained the largest fractions of the 129I and 99Tc that the Integrated Disposal Facility risk assessment analyses were showing to have the largest contribution to the estimated IDF disposal impacts to groundwater. Thus, the roadmapping effort was to focus on the scrubber/off-gas treatment liquids with 99Tc to be sent to the Effluent Treatment Facility for treatment and solidification and the silver mordenite and carbon beds with the captured 129I to be packaged and sent to the IDF. At the highest level, the secondary waste roadmap includes elements addressing regulatory and performance requirements, waste composition, preliminary waste form screening, waste form development, process design and support, and validation. The regulatory and performance requirements activity will provide the secondary waste-form performance requirements. The waste-composition activity will provide workable ranges of secondary waste compositions and formulations for simulants and surrogates. Preliminary waste form screening will identify candidate waste forms for immobilizing the secondary wastes. The waste form development activity will mature the waste forms, leading to a selected waste form(s) with a defensible understanding of the long-term release rate and input into the critical decision process for a secondary waste treatment process/facility. The process and design support activity will provide a reliable process flowsheet and input to support a robust facility design. The validation effort will confirm that the selected waste form meets regulatory requirements. The final outcome of the implementation of the secondary waste roadmap is the compliant, effective, timely, and cost-effective disposal of the secondary wastes. The work necessary to address the programmatic, regulatory, and technical risks and uncertainties identified through the Secondary Waste Roadmap Workshop are assembled into several program needs elements. Programmatic/Regulatory needs include: Select and deploy Hanford tank waste supplemental treatment technology Provide treatment capability for secondary waste streams from tank waste treatment Develop consensus on secondary waste form acceptance. Technology needs include: Define secondary waste composition ranges and uncertainties Identify and develop waste forms for secondary waste immobilization and disposal Develop test methods to characterize secondary waste form performance. Details for each of these program elements are provided.

  8. Hazardous Waste Management (Michigan)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A person shall not generate, dispose, store, treat, or transport hazardous waste in this state without complying with the requirements of this article. The department, in the conduct of its duties...

  9. Solid Waste Management (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act aims to establish and maintain a cooperative state and local program of planning and technical and financial assistance for comprehensive solid waste management. No person shall construct,...

  10. Waste and Recycling

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McCarthy, Kathy

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear engineer Dr. Kathy McCarthy talks about nuclear energy, the challenge of nuclear waste and the research aimed at solutions. For more information about nuclear energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  11. WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    labeled chemicals Waste Minimization/ Volume Reduction 0 Solid Radioactive Waste $2,168 $3,795 $2,168 VialWASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED, REUSED, RECYCLED OR CONSERVED IN 2003 WASTE TYPE DESCRIPTION DETAILS * Radioactive Waste Source Reduction 1,500 Radioactive Waste $6,000 $2,500 $6,000 Waste

  12. Small Waste Tank Sampling and Retrieval System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magleby, Mary Theresa

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Test Reactor Area of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), four 1500-gal catch tanks were found to contain RCRAhazardous waste. A system was needed to obtain a representative sample of the liquid, as well as the hardpacked heels, and to ultimately homogenize and remove the tank contents for disposal. After surveying the available technologies, the AEA Fluidic Pulse Mixing and Retrieval System was chosen for a technology demonstration. A demonstration, conducted with nonhazardous surrogate material, proved that the system was capable of loosening the hard-packed heel, homogenizing the entire tank contents, and collecting a representative sample. Based on the success of the demonstration, a detailed evaluation was done to determine the applicability of the system to other tanks. The evaluation included the sorting of data on more than 700 tanks to select candidates for further deployment of the system. A detailed study was also done to determine if the purchase of a second system would be cost effective. The results of the evaluation indicated that a total of thirteen tanks at the INEEL are amenable to sampling and/or remediation using the AEA Fluidic Pulse Mixing and Retrieval System. Although the currently-owned system appears sufficient for the needs of one INEEL program, it is insufficient to meet the combined needs at the INEEL. The INEEL will commence operation of the system on the TRA-730 Catch Tank System in June 2002.

  13. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report. Volume 1, Part 2, Generator dangerous waste report dangerous waste: Calendar Year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, weight, waste description, and waste designation.

  14. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report. Volume 1, Part 1, Generator dangerous waste report dangerous waste: Calendar Year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, weight, waste description, and waste designation.

  15. Citrus Waste Biomass Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karel Grohman; Scott Stevenson

    2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewable Spirits is developing an innovative pilot plant bio-refinery to establish the commercial viability of ehtanol production utilizing a processing waste from citrus juice production. A novel process based on enzymatic hydrolysis of citrus processing waste and fermentation of resulting sugars to ethanol by yeasts was successfully developed in collaboration with a CRADA partner, USDA/ARS Citrus and Subtropical Products Laboratory. The process was also successfully scaled up from laboratory scale to 10,000 gal fermentor level.

  16. Industrial Waste Heat Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, M. E.; Solomon, N. G.; Tabb, E. S.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INDUSTRIAL WASTE HEAT RECOVREY M. E. Ward and N. G. Solomon E. S. Tabb Solar Turbines International and Gas Research Institute San Diego, California Chicago, Illinois ABSTRACT i I One hundred fifty reports were reviewed along with interviews... tests, promising low temperature heat exchanger tube alloys and coated surfaces were identified. 1INTROUCTION of advanced technology heat recovery techniques 1_ Recovering waste heat from the flue gases of the pr~ary objective. Specific objectives...

  17. Resource Recovery Contracting: Risk Analysis and Other Critical Considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lester, P. A.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . C. Quantity of Waste 4. There should be a gu ranty of 1. Is there a minimum required quantity posal of non-recover ble materia of waste to be processed? a. b. What happens if the maximum quantity is surpassed and waste cannot be processed... for inflation and forces outside the cont~ol of the C~ntractor? or, 2. Should there be a gu ranreed payment of th tipping fe~ whether or not ther~ is delivery of wastp. to the Resource Recovery Facility? 3. Should the tipping fee be subject...

  18. Alternative approaches for better municipal solid waste management in Mumbai, India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rathi, Sarika [International Research Institute for Climate Prediction, Earth Institute, Columbia University, 61 Rt. 9W, Monell, Palisades, NY 10964 (United States)]. E-mail: sarika@iri.columbia.edu

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste is an unavoidable by product of human activities. Economic development, urbanization and improving living standards in cities, have led to an increase in the quantity and complexity of generated waste. Rapid growth of population and industrialization degrades the urban environment and places serious stress on natural resources, which undermines equitable and sustainable development. Inefficient management and disposal of solid waste is an obvious cause of degradation of the environment in most cities of the developing world. Municipal corporations of the developing countries are not able to handle increasing quantities of waste, which results in uncollected waste on roads and in other public places. There is a need to work towards a sustainable waste management system, which requires environmental, institutional, financial, economic and social sustainability. This study explores alternative approaches to municipal solid waste (MSW) management and estimates the cost of waste management in Mumbai, India. Two alternatives considered in the paper are community participation and public private partnership in waste management. Data for the present study are from various non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and from the private sector involved in waste management in Mumbai. Mathematical models are used to estimate the cost per ton of waste management for both of the alternatives, which are compared with the cost of waste management by Municipal Corporation of Greater Mumbai (MCGM). It is found that the cost per ton of waste management is Rs. 1518 (US$35) with community participation; Rs. 1797 (US$41) with public private partnership (PPP); and Rs. 1908 (US$44) when only MCGM handles the waste. Hence, community participation in waste management is the least cost option and there is a strong case for comprehensively involving community participation in waste management.

  19. Department of Mathematics: Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resources Internal Resources Computing Information Business Office Information for TAs and Limited-Term Lecturers Information for Faculty Information for...

  20. [DOE method for evaluating environmental and waste management samples: Revision 1, Addendum 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goheen, S.C.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Dapartment of Energy`s (DOE`s) environmental and waste management (EM) sampling and analysis activities require that large numbers of samples be analyzed for materials characterization, environmental surveillance, and site-remediation programs. The present document, DOE Methods for Evaluating Environmental and Waste Management Samples (DOE Methods), is a supplemental resource for analyzing many of these samples.