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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste regulations nova" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Solid Waste Regulations (Nova Scotia, Canada) | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solid Waste Regulations (Nova Scotia, Canada) Solid Waste Regulations (Nova Scotia, Canada) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial...

2

Department of Energy - Nova Scotia  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3929 en Solid Waste Regulations (Nova Scotia, Canada) http:energy.govsavingssolid-waste-regulations-nova-scotia-canada waste-regulations-nova-scotia-can...

3

Nonhazardous Solid Waste Management Regulations & Criteria (Mississippi)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of the Nonhazardous Solid Waste Management Regulations & Criteria is to establish a minimum State Criteria under the Mississippi Solid Waste Law for all solid waste management...

4

Solid Waste and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) Solid Waste and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter of the law that establishes the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency establishes the rules and regulations regarding solid waste. The chapter establishes specific regulations for biomass facilities, which includes permitting, siting, operation, safety guidelines, and closing requirements. Siting regulations include setbacks from waste handling areas for state facilities (1000 feet from jails, schools), requirements for not siting

5

Hazardous Waste Management Standards and Regulations (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This act states the standards and regulations for the management of hazardous waste. No person shall construct, modify or operate a hazardous waste facility or otherwise dispose of hazardous waste...

6

Solid Waste Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities (Rhode  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities (Rhode Island) Solid Waste Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Management Facilities which compost putrescible waste and/or leaf and yard waste are subject to these regulations. The regulations establish permitting, registration, and operational requirements for composting facilities. Operational requirements for putrescible waste facilities include siting, distance, and buffer requirements, as well as standards for avoiding harm to endangered species and contamination of air and water sources. Specific

7

Rules and Regulations for Hazardous Waste Management (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations establish permitting and operational requirements for hazardous waste facilities. They are designed to minimize...

8

Nova Scotia/EZFeed Policies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Quality (Nova Scotia, Canada) Nova Scotia Environmental Regulations Yes BiomassBiogas Coal with CCS Natural Gas Nuclear StateProvince Nova Scotia Environment is responsible for...

9

Solid Waste Facilities Regulations (Massachusetts) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solid Waste Facilities Regulations (Massachusetts) Solid Waste Facilities Regulations (Massachusetts) Solid Waste Facilities Regulations (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Protection This chapter of the Massachusetts General Laws governs the operation of solid waste facilities. It seeks to encourage sustainable waste management

10

Nebraska Hazardous Waste Regulations (Nebraska) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nebraska Hazardous Waste Regulations (Nebraska) Nebraska Hazardous Waste Regulations (Nebraska) Nebraska Hazardous Waste Regulations (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Environmental Quality These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Environmental Quality, contain provisions pertaining to hazardous waste management, waste standards, permitting requirements, and land disposal restrictions

11

Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (Mississippi) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulations (Mississippi) Regulations (Mississippi) Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations Sales Tax Incentive Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Hazardous Waste Management Regulations follow the EPA's definitions and guidelines for the most part, which are listed in 40 CFR parts 260-282. In addition to these federal regulations the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality requires that each generator of greater than 220

12

Nonhazardous Solid Waste Management Regulations and Criteria (Mississippi)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nonhazardous Solid Waste Management Regulations and Criteria Nonhazardous Solid Waste Management Regulations and Criteria (Mississippi) Nonhazardous Solid Waste Management Regulations and Criteria (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations

13

Hazardous waste identification: A guide to changing regulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) was enacting in 1976 and amended in 1984 by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA). Since then, federal regulations have generated a profusion of terms to identify and describe hazardous wastes. Regulations that5 define and govern management of hazardous wastes are codified in Title 40 of the code of Federal Regulations, Protection of the environment''. Title 40 regulations are divided into chapters, subchapters and parts. To be defined as hazardous, a waste must satisfy the definition of solid waste any discharged material not specifically excluded from regulation or granted a regulatory variance by the EPA Administrator. Some wastes and other materials have been identified as non-hazardous and are listed in 40 CFR 261.4(a) and 261.4(b). Certain wastes that satisfy the definition of hazardous waste nevertheless are excluded from regulation as hazardous if they meet specific criteria. Definitions and criteria for their exclusion are found in 40 CFR 261.4(c)-(f) and 40 CFR 261.5.

Stults, R.G. (OHM Remediation Services Corp., Findlay, OH (United States))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Rules and Regulations Pertaining to the Management of Wastes (Nebraska) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pertaining to the Management of Wastes Pertaining to the Management of Wastes (Nebraska) Rules and Regulations Pertaining to the Management of Wastes (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Environmental Quality These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Environmental Quality, contain provisions pertaining to waste management permits and licenses,

15

Vermont Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations are intended to protect public health and the environment by comprehensively regulating the generation, storage, collection, transport, treatment, disposal, use, reuse, and...

16

Hazardous and Nonhazardous Solid Waste Applicant Disclosure Regulations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous and Nonhazardous Solid Waste Applicant Disclosure Hazardous and Nonhazardous Solid Waste Applicant Disclosure Regulations (Mississippi) Hazardous and Nonhazardous Solid Waste Applicant Disclosure Regulations (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Mississippi Program Type

17

Low-level radioactive waste regulation: Science, politics and fear  

SciTech Connect

An inevitable consequence of the use of radioactive materials is the generation of radioactive wastes and the public policy debate over how they will be managed. In 1980, Congress shifted responsibility for the disposal of low-level radioactive wastes from the federal government to the states. This act represented a sharp departure from more than 30 years of virtually absolute federal control over radioactive materials. Though this plan had the enthusiastic support of the states in 1980, it now appears to have been at best a chimera. Radioactive waste management has become an increasingly complicated and controversial issue for society in recent years. This book discusses only low-level wastes, however, because Congress decided for political reasons to treat them differently than high-level wastes. The book is based in part on three symposia sponsored by the division of Chemistry and the Law of the American Chemical Society. Each chapter is derived in full or in part from presentations made at these meetings, and includes: (1) Low-level radioactive wastes in the nuclear power industry; (2) Low-level radiation cancer risk assessment and government regulation to protect public health; and (3) Low-level radioactive waste: can new disposal sites be found.

Burns, M.E. (ed.)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Environmental Assessment (Nova Scotia, Canada) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nova Scotia, Canada) Nova Scotia, Canada) Environmental Assessment (Nova Scotia, Canada) < Back Eligibility Construction Developer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Nova Scotia Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Nova Scotia Environment Nova Scotia Environment conducts environmental assessments on projects and developments to ensure they adhere to the laws and regulations of the province. Developments required to undergo an environmental assessment are listed in the Environmental Assessment Regulations; all large scale electricity generation projects will need to undergo an environmental

19

Nova Scotia Business Development Program (Nova Scotia, Canada...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Business Development Program (Nova Scotia, Canada) Nova Scotia Business Development Program (Nova Scotia, Canada) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel...

20

General requirements for RCRA regulated hazardous waste tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as amended, requires that tanks used for the storage or treatment of hazardous waste (HazW) be permitted, and comply with the requirements contained within the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) TItle 40 in Subpart J of Part 264/265, unless those tanks have been exempted. Subpart J specifies requirements for the design, construction, installation, operation, inspection, maintenance, repair, release, response, and closure of HazW tanks. Also, the regulations make a distinction between new and existing tanks. Effective December 6, 1995, standards for controlling volatile organic air emissions will apply to non-exempt HazW tanks. HazW tanks will have to be equipped with a cover or floating roof, or be designed to operate as a closed system, to be in compliance with the air emission control requirements. This information brief describes those tanks that are subject to the Subpart J requirements, and will also discuss secondary containment, inspection, restrictions on waste storage, release response, and closure requirements associated with regulated HazW tanks.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste regulations nova" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Rules and Regulations for the Disposal of Low-Level Radioactive Waste (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Environmental Quality, contain provisions pertaining to the disposal of low-level radioactive waste, disposal facilities, and applicable fees.

22

Air Quality (Nova Scotia, Canada) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Regulations Affected Technologies BiomassBiogas, Coal with CCS, Natural Gas, Nuclear Active Policy Yes Implementing Sector StateProvince Program Administrator Nova...

23

Nova Scotia Jobs Fund (Nova Scotia, Canada) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nova Scotia Jobs Fund (Nova Scotia, Canada) Nova Scotia Jobs Fund (Nova Scotia, Canada) Nova Scotia Jobs Fund (Nova Scotia, Canada) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Nova Scotia Program Type Grant Program Training/Technical Assistance Workforce development Provider Nova Scotia Department of Economic and Rural Development and Tourism The Nova Scotia Jobs Fund pursues investment opportunities for assisting

24

Nova Scotia | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Canada Nova Scotia Nova Scotia July 12, 2013 Community Feed-in Tariff (Nova Scotia, Canada) The Community Feed-In Tariff Program (COMFIT) is designed to increase local ownership...

25

Analysis of environmental regulations governing the disposal of geothermal wastes in California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Federal and California regulations governing the disposal of sludges and liquid wastes associated with the production of electricity from geothermal resources were evaluated. Current disposal practices, near/far term disposal requirements, and the potential for alternate disposal methods or beneficial uses for these materials were determined. 36 refs., 3 figs., 15 tabs. (ACR)

Royce, B.A.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Mixed waste landfill cell construction at energy solutions LLC: a regulator's perspective  

SciTech Connect

A small percentage of the property that EnergySolutions' (formerly Envirocare) operates at Clive, Utah is permitted by the State of Utah as a treatment, storage and disposal facility for mixed waste. Mixed Waste is defined as a hazardous waste (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 261.3) that also has a radioactive component. Typically, the waste EnergySolutions receives at its mixed waste facility is contaminated with heavy metals and organic compounds while also contaminated with radioactivity. For EnergySolutions, the largest generator of mixed waste is the United States Department of Energy. However, EnergySolutions also accepts a wide variety of mixed waste from other generators. For many wastes, EnergySolutions goes through the process of characterization and acceptance (if appropriate) of the waste, treating the waste (if necessary), confirmation that the waste meets Land Disposal Restriction, and disposal of the waste in its mixed waste landfill cell (MWLC). EnergySolutions originally received its State-issued Part B (RCRA) permit in 1990. The Permit allows a mixed waste landfill cell footprint that covers roughly 10 hectares and includes 20 individual 'sumps'. EnergySolutions chose to build small segments of the landfill cell as waste receipts dictated. Nearly 16 years later, EnergySolutions has just completed its Phase V construction project. 18 of the 20 sumps in the original design have been constructed. The last two sumps are anticipated to be its Phase VI construction project. Further expansion of its mixed waste disposal landfill capacity beyond the current design would require a permit modification request and approval by the Executive Secretary of the Utah Solid and Hazardous Waste Control Board. Construction of the landfill cell is governed by the Construction Quality Assurance/Quality Control manual of its State-issued Permit. The construction of each sump is made up of (from the bottom up): a foundation; three feet of engineered clay; primary and secondary geo-synthetics (60 mil HDPE, geo-fabric and geo-textile); a two foot soil protective cover; tertiary geo-synthetics (80 mil HDPE, geo-fabric and geo-textile); and a final two foot soil protective cover. The Utah Department of Environmental Quality Division of Solid and Hazardous Waste (UDEQ/DSHW) oversees the construction process and reviews the documentation after the construction is complete. If all aspects of the construction process are met, the Executive Secretary of the Utah Solid and Hazardous Waste Control Board approves the landfill cell for disposal. It is the role of the regulator to ensure to the stakeholders that the landfill cell has been constructed in accordance with the State-issued permit and that the cell is protective of human health and the environment. A final determination may require conflict resolution between the agency and the facility. (authors)

Lukes, G.C.; Willoughby, O.H. [Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Div. of Solid and Hazardous Waste (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Nova Scotia Energy Training Program (Nova Scotia, Canada) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Training Program (Nova Scotia, Canada) Energy Training Program (Nova Scotia, Canada) Nova Scotia Energy Training Program (Nova Scotia, Canada) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Schools Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Nova Scotia Program Type Training/Technical Assistance Workforce development The Energy Training Program for Students was created to encourage private sector employers to hire Nova Scotia post-secondary students for career-related work terms in all sectors of the energy industry.

28

Low-level radioactive waste disposal in the United States: An overview of current commercial regulations and concepts  

SciTech Connect

Commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal in the United States is regulated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) under 10 CFR 61 (1991). This regulation was issued in 1981 after a lengthy and thorough development process that considered the radionuclide concentrations and characteristics associated with commercial low-level radioactive waste streams; alternatives for waste classification; alternative technologies for low-level radioactive waste disposal; and data, modeling, and scenario analyses. The development process also included the publication of both draft and final environmental impact statements. The final regulation describes the general provisions; licenses; performance objectives; technical requirements for land disposal; financial assurances; participation by state governments and Indian tribes; and records, reports, tests, and inspections. This paper provides an overview of, and tutorial on, current commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal regulations in the United States.

Kennedy, W.E. Jr.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Capital Investment Incentive (Nova Scotia, Canada) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Capital Investment Incentive (Nova Scotia, Canada) Capital Investment Incentive (Nova Scotia, Canada) Eligibility Commercial Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer...

30

An Economic Assessment of Market-Based Approaches to Regulating the Municipal Solid Waste Stream  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in id. ). The number of mixed waste processing facilitiesWaste separation occurs at mixed waste processing facilitiesban disposal of yard waste in mixed refuse. Variable Rate

Menell, Peter S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Michael Burns: Low-Level Radioactive Waste Regulation: Science, Politics and Fear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

based categories for mixed waste and waste below regulatorysite a disposal facility. Mixed wastes controlled by the EPAguidelines for siting LLRW mixed waste facilities. However,

Waendelin, Anna W.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Price regulation for waste hauling franchises in California: an examination of how regulators regulate pricing and the effects of competition on regulated markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thomadakis, Stavros. “Price Regulation Under Uncertainty in698. Bös, Dieter. Pricing and Price Regulation. Elsevier.Optimal Structure of Public Prices. ” The American Economic

Seltzer, Steven A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

An Economic Assessment of Market-Based Approaches to Regulating the Municipal Solid Waste Stream  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation of biofuel waste energy and increases the rate ofthe design and siting of waste to energy incinerators. Theregion is burned in waste-to-energy incineration facilities.

Menell, Peter S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

General Properties of Quiescent Novae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The observed properties of novae before and after eruption are discussed. The distribution of orbital periods of novae shows a concentration near 3.2 h, which resembles that of magnetic cataclysmic variables, and there is some evidence that many of the novae themselves are magnetic near that orbital period. Desynchronisation of polars by nova eruptions can lead to an estimate (~2 x 10^3 y) for the time between eruptions for the strongly magnetic systems; this is much shorter than that found from other methods. The similarity of pre- and post-nova luminosities, at high rates of mass transfer, is ascribed to irradiation of the secondary producing a self-sustained high Mdot state. This slows cooling of the white dwarf after eruption, delays the onset of full scale dwarf nova outbursts in most systems, and delays any descent into a hibernation state of low rate of mass transfer.

Brian Warner

2002-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

35

Price regulation for waste hauling franchises in California: an examination of how regulators regulate pricing and the effects of competition on regulated markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regulate? The Case of Electricity. ” Journal of Law andRegulate: The Case of Electricity” (1962). Their goal is toof nuclear-generated electricity. 1.5 Final Thoughts on the

Seltzer, Steven A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Renewable Energy Standard (Nova Scotia, Canada) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standard (Nova Scotia, Canada) Renewable Energy Standard (Nova Scotia, Canada) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor General PublicConsumer...

37

Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste transportation regulations and requirements study. National Low-Level Waste Management Program  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to identify the regulations and requirements for transporting greater-than-Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and to identify planning activities that need to be accomplished in preparation for transporting GTCC LLW. The regulations and requirements for transporting hazardous materials, of which GTCC LLW is included, are complex and include several Federal agencies, state and local governments, and Indian tribes. This report is divided into five sections and three appendices. Section 1 introduces the report. Section 2 identifies and discusses the transportation regulations and requirements. The regulations and requirements are divided into Federal, state, local government, and Indian tribes subsections. This report does not identify the regulations or requirements of specific state, local government, and Indian tribes, since the storage, treatment, and disposal facility locations and transportation routes have not been specifically identified. Section 3 identifies the planning needed to ensure that all transportation activities are in compliance with the regulations and requirements. It is divided into (a) transportation packaging; (b) transportation operations; (c) system safety and risk analysis, (d) route selection; (e) emergency preparedness and response; and (f) safeguards and security. This section does not provide actual planning since the details of the Department of Energy (DOE) GTCC LLW Program have not been finalized, e.g., waste characterization and quantity, storage, treatment and disposal facility locations, and acceptance criteria. Sections 4 and 5 provide conclusions and referenced documents, respectively.

Tyacke, M.; Schmitt, R.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

An Economic Assessment of Market-Based Approaches to Regulating the Municipal Solid Waste Stream  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total (lbs) Total recycle compost Community Characteristicsdiscards percent diverted compost Waste/HH/Day after PAYTof recycled waste streams, compost, and possibly from energy

Menell, Peter S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

AT Cnc: A SECOND DWARF NOVA WITH A CLASSICAL NOVA SHELL  

SciTech Connect

We are systematically surveying all known and suspected Z Cam-type dwarf novae for classical nova shells. This survey is motivated by the discovery of the largest known classical nova shell, which surrounds the archetypal dwarf nova Z Camelopardalis. The Z Cam shell demonstrates that at least some dwarf novae must have undergone classical nova eruptions in the past, and that at least some classical novae become dwarf novae long after their nova thermonuclear outbursts, in accord with the hibernation scenario of cataclysmic binaries. Here we report the detection of a fragmented 'shell', 3 arcmin in diameter, surrounding the dwarf nova AT Cancri. This second discovery demonstrates that nova shells surrounding Z Cam-type dwarf novae cannot be very rare. The shell geometry is suggestive of bipolar, conical ejection seen nearly pole-on. A spectrum of the brightest AT Cnc shell knot is similar to that of the ejecta of the classical nova GK Per, and of Z Cam, dominated by [N II] emission. Galaxy Evolution Explorer FUV imagery reveals a similar-sized, FUV-emitting shell. We determine a distance of 460 pc to AT Cnc, and an upper limit to its ejecta mass of {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} M {sub Sun }, typical of classical novae.

Shara, Michael M.; Mizusawa, Trisha; Zurek, David [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024-5192 (United States); Wehinger, Peter [Steward Observatory, the University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Martin, Christopher D.; Neill, James D.; Forster, Karl [Department of Physics, Math and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Mail Code 405-47, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Seibert, Mark [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

40

A Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 191 Evaluation of Buried Transuranic Waste at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

In 1986, 21 m{sup 3} of transuranic (TRU) waste was inadvertently buried in a shallow land burial trench at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is considered five options for management of the buried TRU waste. One option is to leave the waste in-place if the disposal can meet the requirements of Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191, 'Environmental Radiation Protection Standard for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level, and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes'. This paper describes analyses that assess the likelihood that TRU waste in shallow land burial can meet the 40 CFR 191 standards for a geologic repository. The simulated probability of the cumulative release exceeding 1 and 10 times the 40 CFR 191.13 containment requirements is estimated to be 0.009 and less than 0.0001, respectively. The cumulative release is most sensitive to the number of groundwater withdrawal wells drilled through the disposal trench. The mean total effective dose equivalent for a member of the public is estimated to reach a maximum of 0.014 milliSievert (mSv) at 10,000 years, or approximately 10 percent of the 0.15 mSv 40 CFR 191.15 individual protection requirement. The dose is predominantly from inhalation of short-lived Rn-222 progeny in air produced by low-level waste disposed in the same trench. The transuranic radionuclide released in greatest amounts, Pu-239, contributes only 0.4 percent of the dose. The member of public dose is most sensitive to the U-234 inventory and the radon emanation coefficient. Reasonable assurance of compliance with the Subpart C groundwater protection standard is provided by site characterization data and hydrologic processes modeling which support a conclusion of no groundwater pathway within 10,000 years. Limited quantities of transuranic waste in a shallow land burial trench at the NTS can meet the requirements of 40 CFR 191.

G. J. Shott, V. Yucel, L. Desotell

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste regulations nova" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 191 Evaluation of Buried Transuranic Waste at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

In 1986, 21 m{sup 3} of transuranic (TRU) waste was inadvertently buried in a shallow land burial trench at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is considered five options for management of the buried TRU waste. One option is to leave the waste in-place if the disposal can meet the requirements of Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191, 'Environmental Radiation Protection Standard for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level, and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes'. This paper describes analyses that assess the likelihood that TRU waste in shallow land burial can meet the 40 CFR 191 standards for a geologic repository. The simulated probability of the cumulative release exceeding 1 and 10 times the 40 CFR 191.13 containment requirements is estimated to be 0.009 and less than 0.0001, respectively. The cumulative release is most sensitive to the number of groundwater withdrawal wells drilled through the disposal trench. The mean total effective dose equivalent for a member of the public is estimated to reach a maximum of 0.014 milli-Sievert (mSv) at 10,000 years, or approximately 10 percent of the 0.15 mSv 40 CFR 191.15 individual protection requirement. The dose is predominantly from inhalation of short-lived Rn-222 progeny in air produced by low-level waste disposed in the same trench. The transuranic radionuclide released in greatest amounts, Pu-239, contributes only 0.4 percent of the dose. The member of public dose is most sensitive to the U-234 inventory and the radon emanation coefficient. Reasonable assurance of compliance with the Subpart C groundwater protection standard is provided by site characterization data and hydrologic processes modeling which support a conclusion of no groundwater pathway within 10,000 years. Limited quantities of transuranic waste in a shallow land burial trench at the NTS can meet the requirements of 40 CFR 191. (authors)

Shott, G.J.; Yucel, V.; Desotell, L. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Pyles, G.; Carilli, J. [U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Spectra Nova Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

technology company, active in solar simulation, and servicing the global photovoltaic solar manufacturing market. References Spectra Nova Technologies Inc.1 LinkedIn...

43

Radiation dose assessment methodology and preliminary dose estimates to support US Department of Energy radiation control criteria for regulated treatment and disposal of hazardous wastes and materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides unit dose to concentration levels that may be used to develop control criteria for radionuclide activity in hazardous waste; if implemented, these criteria would be developed to provide an adequate level of public and worker health protection, for wastes regulated under U.S, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements (as derived from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act [RCRA] and/or the Toxic Substances Control Act [TSCA]). Thus, DOE and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission can fulfill their obligation to protect the public from radiation by ensuring that such wastes are appropriately managed, while simultaneously reducing the current level of dual regulation. In terms of health protection, dual regulation of very small quantities of radionuclides provides no benefit.

Aaberg, R.L.; Baker, D.A.; Rhoads, K.; Jarvis, M.F.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Radioactive Waste Management (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section regulates the transportation and disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Minnesota, and establishes a Nuclear Waste Council to monitor the federal high-level radioactive waste...

45

Disposal of low-level radioactive biomedical wastes: a problem in regulation, not science  

SciTech Connect

The author discusses the public fear of radiation at any level, and shows how small the radioactivity from radioactive medical waste is compared to natural radioactivity. In view of this the author argues for a change in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission rules.

Yalow, R.S.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Compatibility of technologies with regulations in the waste management of H-3, I-129, C-14, and Kr-85. Part I. Initial information base  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the information base that was collected and reviewed in preparation for carrying out an analysis of the compatibility with regulations of waste management technologies for disposal of H-3, I-129, C-14, and Kr-85. Based on the review of this literature, summaries are presented here of waste-form characteristics, packaging, transportation, and disposal methods. Also discussed are regulations that might apply to all operations involved in disposal of the four nuclides, including the processing of irradiated fuel in a fuel reprocessing plant, packaging, storage, transport, and final disposal. The compliance assessment derived from this information is reported in a separate document. 309 references.

Trevorrow, L.E.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Kolba, V.M.; Steindler, M.J.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Waste Disposal (Illinois) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Disposal (Illinois) Waste Disposal (Illinois) Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Utility Program Information Illinois Program Type Environmental Regulations This...

48

Climate Action Plan (Nova Scotia, Canada) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Climate Action Plan (Nova Scotia, Canada) Climate Action Plan (Nova Scotia, Canada) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Industrial InstallerContractor...

49

Air Quality (Nova Scotia, Canada) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Quality (Nova Scotia, Canada) Air Quality (Nova Scotia, Canada) Eligibility Agricultural Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Multi-Family Residential MunicipalPublic Utility...

50

Fermilab | Recovery Act | NOvA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NOvA Neutrino Project NOvA Neutrino Project NOvA Building This rendering depicts the future NOvA detector facility on the property. Rendering by Holabird & Root. The NOνA experiment, a collaboration of over 180 scientists from some 28 institutions, will be the world's most advanced neutrino experiment. NOvA physicists will address the question "What happened to the antimatter in the universe?" The Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory will send an intense neutrino beam from Fermilab in Illinois to the NOνA Detector Facility, a new international laboratory of the University of Minnesota's School of Physics and Astronomy, in Ash River, about 40 miles southeast of International Falls, Minnesota. Construction of the facility, supported under a cooperative agreement for

51

University of Waste Procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Maryland Hazardous And Regulated Waste Procedures Manual Revised July 2001 #12;Review II. HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT III. BIOLOGICAL, PATHOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL WASTE (BPMW) MANAGEMENT IV. LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE (LLRW) MANAGEMENT V. EMERGENCY PROCEDURES VI. WASTE MINIMIZATION VII

Rubloff, Gary W.

52

Relevance of biotic pathways to the long-term regulation of nuclear waste disposal. Phase I. Final report. Vol. 4  

SciTech Connect

Licensing and regulation of commercial low-level waste (CLLW) burial facilities require that anticipated risks associated with burial sites be evaluated for the life of the facility. This work reviewed the existing capability to evaluate dose to man resulting from the potential redistribution of buried radionuclides by plants and animals that we have termed biotic transport. Through biotic transport, radionuclides can be moved to locations where they can enter exposure pathways to man. We found that predictive models currently in use did not address the long-term risks resulting from the cumulative transport of radionuclides. Although reports in the literature confirm that biotic transport phenomena are common, assessments routinely ignore the associated risks or dismiss them as insignificant without quantitative evaluation. To determine the potential impacts of biotic transport, we made order-of-magnitude estimates of the dose to man for biotic transport processes at reference arid and humid CLLW disposal sites. Estimated doses to site residents after assumed loss of institutional control were comparable to dose estimates for the intruder-agricultural scenario defined in the DEIS for 10 CFR 61 (NRC). The reported lack of potential importance of biotic transport at low-level waste sites in earlier assessment studies is not confirmed by order of magnitude estimates presented in this study. 17 references, 10 figures, 8 tables.

McKenzie, D.H.; Cadwell, L.L.; Eberhardt, L.E.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Peloquin, R.A.; Simmons, M.A.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This regulation regulates the generation, storage, transportation, treatment, and disposal of hazardous waste, and wherever feasible, reduces or eliminates waste at the source. It is the policy of...

54

Dwarf Nova Oscillations: New Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New and archived observations of VW Hyi in outburst show the occasional presence of optical Dwarf Nova Oscillations (DNOs) over the range of 18 - 40 s. There is a rapid increase in period near the end of outburst, at the same time that the EUV falls almost to zero, which we attribute to propellering. The DNOs return to a shorter period after this phase, but are very incoherent. The DNOs show some modulation by the Quasi-Periodic Oscillations (QPOs) that are also occasionally present in the light curve. We interpret the QPOs as a prograde travelling wave in the inner disc, which obscures and/or reprocesses radiation from the central region. The model is applied to observations of OY Car and WZ Sge.

Brian Warner; Patrick Woudt

2001-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

55

The NOvA Technical Design Report  

SciTech Connect

Technical Design Report (TDR) describes the preliminary design of the NOvA accelerator upgrades, NOvA detectors, detector halls and detector sites. Compared to the March 2006 and November 2006 NOvA Conceptual Design Reports (CDR), critical value engineering studies have been completed and the alternatives still active in the CDR have been narrowed to achieve a preliminary technical design ready for a Critical Decision 2 review. Many aspects of NOvA described this TDR are complete to a level far beyond a preliminary design. In particular, the access road to the NOvA Far Detector site in Minnesota has an advanced technical design at a level appropriate for a Critical Decision 3a review. Several components of the accelerator upgrade and new neutrino detectors also have advanced technical designs appropriate for a Critical Decision 3a review. Chapter 1 is an Executive Summary with a short description of the NOvA project. Chapter 2 describes how the Fermilab NuMI beam will provide a narrow band beam of neutrinos for NOvA. Chapter 3 gives an updated overview of the scientific basis for the NOvA experiment, focusing on the primary goal to extend the search for {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations and measure the sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 13}) parameter. This parameter has not been measured in any previous experiment and NOvA would extend the search by about an order of magnitude beyond the current limit. A secondary goal is to measure the dominant mode oscillation parameters, sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 23}) and {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2} to a more precise level than previous experiments. Additional physics goals for NOvA are also discussed. Chapter 4 describes the Scientific Design Criteria which the Fermilab accelerator complex, NOvA detectors and NOvA detector sites must satisfy to meet the physics goals discussed in Chapter 3. Chapter 5 is an overview of the NOvA project. The changes in the design relative to the NOvA CDR are discussed. Chapter 6 summarizes the NOvA design performance relative to the Design Criteria set out in Chapter 4. Chapter 7 presents the Work Breakdown Structure dictionary at Level 3 and the Milestone dictionary. Chapters 8 through 17 then take each Level 2 WBS element of the NOvA project and present each part of the design in more detail than the overview given in Chapter 5. Specific technical design criteria are delineated for each part of the project in addition to the scientific design criteria outlined in Chapter 4. Changes in the design since the NOvA CDR are discussed in detail. The work remaining to bring each part of this preliminary design to a final design is outlined. Appendix A is a guide to other NOvA Project documentation with links to those documents.

Ayres, D.S.; Drake, G.R.; Goodman, M.C.; Grudzinski, J.J.; Guarino, V.J.; Talaga, R.L.; Zhao, A.; /Argonne; Stamoulis, P.; Stiliaris, E.; Tzanakos, G.; Zois, M.; /Athens U. /Caltech /UCLA /Fermilab /College de France /Harvard U. /Indiana U. /Lebedev Inst. /Michigan State U. /Minnesota U., Duluth /Minnesota U.

2007-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

56

REGULATORY STRATEGIES TO MINIMIZE GENERATION OF REGULATED WASTES FROM CLEANUP, CONTINUED USE OR DECOMMISSIONING OF NUCLEAR FACILITIES CONTAMINATED WITH POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (PCBS) - 11198  

SciTech Connect

Disposal costs for liquid PCB radioactive waste are among the highest of any category of regulated waste. The high cost is driven by the fact that disposal options are extremely limited. Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) regulations require most liquids with PCBs at concentration of {ge} 50 parts-per-million to be disposed by incineration or equivalent destructive treatment. Disposal fees can be as high as $200 per gallon. This figure does not include packaging and the cost to transport the waste to the disposal facility, or the waste generator's labor costs for managing the waste prior to shipment. Minimizing the generation of liquid radioactive PCB waste is therefore a significant waste management challenge. PCB spill cleanups often generate large volumes of waste. That is because the removal of PCBs typically requires the liberal use of industrial solvents followed by a thorough rinsing process. In a nuclear facility, the cleanup process may be complicated by the presence of radiation and other occupational hazards. Building design and construction features, e.g., the presence of open grating or trenches, may also complicate cleanup. In addition to the technical challenges associated with spill cleanup, selection of the appropriate regulatory requirements and approach may be challenging. The TSCA regulations include three different sections relating to the cleanup of PCB contamination or spills. EPA has also promulgated a separate guidance policy for fresh PCB spills that is published as Subpart G of 40 CFR 761 although it is not an actual regulation. Applicability is based on the circumstances of each contamination event or situation. Other laws or regulations may also apply. Identification of the allowable regulatory options is important. Effective communication with stakeholders, particularly regulators, is just as important. Depending on the regulatory path that is taken, cleanup may necessitate the generation of large quantities of regulated waste. Allowable options must be evaluated carefully in order to reduce compliance risks, protect personnel, limit potential negative impacts on facility operations, and minimize the generation of wastes subject to TSCA. This paper will identify critical factors in selecting the appropriate TSCA regulatory path in order to minimize the generation of radioactive PCB waste and reduce negative impacts to facilities. The importance of communicating pertinent technical issues with facility staff, regulatory personnel, and subsequently, the public, will be discussed. Key points will be illustrated by examples from five former production reactors at the DOE Savannah River Site. In these reactors a polyurethane sealant was used to seal piping penetrations in the biological shield walls. During the intense neutron bombardment that occurred during reactor operation, the sealant broke down into a thick, viscous material that seeped out of the piping penetrations over adjacent equipment and walls. Some of the walls were painted with a PCB product. PCBs from the paint migrated into the degraded sealant, creating PCB 'spill areas' in some of these facilities. The regulatory cleanup approach selected for each facility was based on its operational status, e.g., active, inactive or undergoing decommissioning. The selected strategies served to greatly minimize the generation of radioactive liquid PCB waste. It is expected that this information would be useful to other DOE sites, DOD facilities, and commercial nuclear facilities constructed prior to the 1979 TSCA ban on most manufacturing and uses of PCBs.

Lowry, N.

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

57

Disposal Site Economic Model for Coal Combustion Residuals Under Proposed Federal Non-Hazardous Waste Regulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proposed federal coal combustion residual (CCR) disposal rules, along with anticipated regulations governing steam electric effluent guidelines, are expected to result in closure of many existing wet disposal facilities and construction of new landfills. Although each CCR project and each project site is unique, many of the major cost items associated with these projects should be reasonably consistent. This report provides baseline costs for four major CCR projects: existing impoundment closure, existin...

2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

58

Nova Scotia | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

assessment are listed in the Environmental Assessment Regulations; all large scale electricity generation projects will need to undergo an environmental assessment. These...

59

Waste Cleanup: Status and Implications of Compliance Agreements Between DOE and Its Regulators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses compliance agreements that affect the Department of Energy's (DOE) cleanup program. Compliance agreements are legally enforceable documents between DOE and its regulators, specifying cleanup activities and milestones that DOE has agreed to achieve. Over the years, these compliance agreements have been used to implement much of the cleanup activity at DOE sites, which is carried our primarily under two federal laws - the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980, as amended (CERCLA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 0f 1976, as amended (RCRA). Our objectives were to determine the types of compliance agreements in effect at DOE cleanup sites, DOE's progress in achieving the milestones contained in the agreements, whether the agreements allowed DOE to prioritize work across sites according to relative risk, and possible implications the agreements have on DOE's efforts to improve the cleanup program.

Jones, G. L.; Swick, W. R.; Perry, T. C.; Kintner-Meyer, N.K.; Abraham, C. R.; Pollack, I. M.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

60

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 360: Solid Waste Management Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Solid Waste Management 0: Solid Waste Management Facilities (New York) Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 360: Solid Waste Management Facilities (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations apply to all solid wastes with the exception of hazardous or radioactive waste. Proposed solid waste processing facilities are required to obtain permits prior to construction, and the regulations provide details about permitting, construction, registration, and operation requirements. The regulations contain specific guidance for land

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste regulations nova" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Virginia Waste Management Act (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Solid waste and hazardous waste are regulated under a number of programs at the Department of Environmental Quality. These programs are designed to encourage the reuse and recycling of solid waste...

62

Solid Waste Disposal Act (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality is responsible for the regulation and management of municipal solid waste and hazardous waste. A fee is applied to all solid waste disposed in the...

63

Climate Action Plan (Nova Scotia, Canada) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nova Scotia, Canada) Nova Scotia, Canada) Climate Action Plan (Nova Scotia, Canada) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Nova Scotia Program Type Climate Policies Provider Nova Scotia Environment Nova Scotia's Climate Change Action Plan has two main goals: reducing the province's contribution to climate change by reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and preparing for changes to the province's climate that are already inevitable. REDUCING GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS

64

Nova Scotia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nova Scotia: Energy Resources Nova Scotia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Name Nova Scotia Equivalent URI DBpedia GeoNames ID 6091530 Coordinates 45°, -63° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45,"lon":-63,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

65

NovaTorque Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NovaTorque Inc NovaTorque Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name NovaTorque, Inc. Place Sunnyvale, California Zip 94086 Sector Efficiency Product A California-based motor company that has developed an electric motor technology that provides energy efficiency. Coordinates 32.780338°, -96.547405° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.780338,"lon":-96.547405,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

66

Federal Regulations: Environmental Protection Agency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Disposal Practices and Applicable Regulations Hazardous Waste Exemption for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Wastes. In 1980, Congress conditionally exempted oil and gas...

67

Solid Waste Permits (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality administers the rules and regulations governing the storage, collection, processing, recovery, and reuse of solid waste protect the air,...

68

Energy Security in Nova Scotia Larry Hughes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Governance Committee (EMGC) report listed 89 recommendations for changing the way the electricity. The recently proposed renewable energy standard (RES), Nova Scotia's version of RPS, has a 5 percent "new Norway to northern Europe and LNG to Spain and the U.K. are being touted as the means of helping

Hughes, Larry

69

NovaTorque | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NovaTorque NovaTorque Jump to: navigation, search Logo: NovaTorque Name NovaTorque Address 145 N. Wolfe Road Place Sunnyvale, California Zip 94086 Sector Efficiency Product high efficiency electric motors Year founded 2005 Number of employees 11-50 Phone number 408-737-2400 Website http://www.novatorque.com/ Coordinates 37.3766589°, -122.014231° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.3766589,"lon":-122.014231,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

70

Engineering the Petawatt Laser into Nova  

SciTech Connect

The engineering process of integrating the Petawatt (10{sup 15} watts) laser system into the existing 30 kJ (UV) Nova laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is described in detail. The nanosecond-long, chirped Petawatt laser pulse is initially generated in a separate master oscillator room and then injected into one of Nova`s 10 beamlines. There, the pulse is further amplified and enlarged to {approximately}{phi}60 cm, temporally compressed under vacuum to <500 fs using large diameter diffraction gratings, and then finally focused onto targets using a parabolic mirror. The major Petawatt components are physically large which created many significant engineering challenges in design, installation and implementation. These include the diffraction gratings and mirrors, vacuum compressor chamber, target chamber, and parabolic focusing mirror. Other Petawatt system components were also technically challenging and include: an injection beamline, transport spatial filters, laser diagnostics, alignment components, motor controls, interlocks, timing and synchronization systems, support structures, and vacuum systems. The entire Petawatt laser system was designed, fabricated, installed, and activated while the Nova laser continued its normal two-shift operation. This process required careful engineering and detailed planning to prevent experimental downtime and to complete the project on schedule.

Tietbohl, G.L.; Bell, P.M.; Hamilton, R.M. [and others

1997-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

71

TheIndustriallandscape 1 ProNova  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

used to have flour mills, a smith's hammer, a weapons factory and abundant salmon and eel fishing. 7, gathered together in what used to be the famous Tuppen spinning mill. ProNova is a part of Norrköping as a cotton mill and is the oldest kept industrial building in the Industrial Landscape. The centre's activity

Zhao, Yuxiao

72

An Extended Grid of Nova Models: II. The Parameter Space of Nova Outbursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is a sequel to an earlier paper devoted to multiple, multicycle nova evolution models (Prialnik & Kovetz 1995, first paper of the series), which showed that the different characteristics of nova outbursts can be reproduced by varying the values of three basic and independent parameters: the white dwarf mass-M_{WD}, the temperature of its isothermal core-T_{WD} and the mass transfer rate-Mdot. Apart from being the largest computational classical novae parameter-space survey, we show here that the parameter space is constrained by several analytical considerations and find its limiting surfaces. Consequently, we extend the grid of multicycle nova evolution models presented in Paper I almost to its limits, adding multicycle nova outburst calculations for a considerable number of new parameter combinations. In particular, the extended parameter pace that produces nova eruptions includes low mass transfer rates down to 5e-13 Msun/yr, and more models for low T_{WD}. Resulting characteristics of these...

Yaron, O; Shara, M M; Kovetz, A

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Capital Investment Incentive (Nova Scotia, Canada) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Capital Investment Incentive (Nova Scotia, Canada) Capital Investment Incentive (Nova Scotia, Canada) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Maximum Rebate $1 million (Canadian) Program Info State Nova Scotia Program Type Grant Program Rebate Program Provider Nova Scotia Department of Economic and Rural Development and Tourism The Capital Investment Incentive (CII) is part of the Productivity Investment Program as outlined in the economic growth plan for Nova Scotia,

74

Missouri Hazardous Waste Management Law (Missouri)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Hazardous Waste Program, administered by the Hazardous Waste Management Commission in the Department of Natural Resources, regulates the processing, transportation, and disposal of hazardous...

75

An Extended Grid of Nova Models: II. The Parameter Space of Nova Outbursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is a sequel to an earlier paper devoted to multiple, multicycle nova evolution models (Prialnik & Kovetz 1995, first paper of the series), which showed that the different characteristics of nova outbursts can be reproduced by varying the values of three basic and independent parameters: the white dwarf mass-M_{WD}, the temperature of its isothermal core-T_{WD} and the mass transfer rate-Mdot. Apart from being the largest computational classical novae parameter-space survey, we show here that the parameter space is constrained by several analytical considerations and find its limiting surfaces. Consequently, we extend the grid of multicycle nova evolution models presented in Paper I almost to its limits, adding multicycle nova outburst calculations for a considerable number of new parameter combinations. In particular, the extended parameter pace that produces nova eruptions includes low mass transfer rates down to 5e-13 Msun/yr, and more models for low T_{WD}. Resulting characteristics of these runs are added to the former parameter combination results, to provide a full grid spanning the entire parameter space for Carbon-Oxygen white dwarfs. The full grid covers the entire range of observed nova characteristics, even those of peculiar objects, which have not been numerically reproduced until now. Most remarkably, runs for very low Mdot lead to very high values for some characteristics, such as outburst amplitude A>~20, high super-Eddington luminosities at maximum, heavy element abundance of the ejecta Z_{ej}~0.63 and high ejected masses m_{ej}~7e-4 Msun.

O. Yaron; D. Prialnik; M. M. Shara; A. Kovetz

2005-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

76

Relevance of biotic pathways to the long-term regulation of nuclear waste disposal: Phase 2, Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results reported here establish the relevance and propose a method for including biotic transport in the assessment and licensing process for commercial low-level waste disposal sites. Earlier work identified the biotic transport mechanisms and process scenarios linking biotic transport with dose to man, and developed models for assessment of impacts. Model modification and improvement efforts in enhancing the ability to represent soil erosion and soil transport within the trench cover. Two alternative hypotheses on plant root uptake were incorporated into the model to represent transport of radionuclides by roots that penetrate the buried waste. Enhancements were also made to the scenario for future site intruder activities. Representation of waste package decomposition in the model was confirmed as the best available alternative. Results from sensitivity analyses indicate that additional information is needed to evaluate the alternative hypotheses for plant root uptake of buried wastes. Site-specific evaluations of the contribution from biotic transport to the potential dose to man establish the relevance in the assessment process. The BIOPORT/MAXI1 computer software package is proposed for dose assessments of commercial low-level waste disposal sites.

McKenzie, D.H.; Cadwell, L.L.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Prohammer, L.A.; Simmons, M.A.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Scotia Energy Electricity - Net Metering Program (Nova Scotia, Canada) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Scotia Energy Electricity - Net Metering Program (Nova Scotia, Scotia Energy Electricity - Net Metering Program (Nova Scotia, Canada) Scotia Energy Electricity - Net Metering Program (Nova Scotia, Canada) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Schools Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Nova Scotia Program Type Net Metering Provider Nova Scotia Power, Inc Nova Scotia Power Inc. Net Metering allows residential and commercial customers to connect small, renewable energy generating units to the provincial power grid. Generating units that produce renewable energy such as wind, solar, small hydro or biomass can be added to homes or businesses with the addition of a bi-directional meter. This meter monitors the electricity generated by the

78

NOVA NERSC's Online VASP Application Annette Greiner Shreyas...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real-Time Monitoring Current State of NOVA * Django application using the NEWT API * Early version implements some graphical features * Checks INCAR keywords and values *...

79

Nova Scotia Department of Energy's "Nova Scotia Energy Strategy -Progress Report"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for promoting oil and (natural) gas, the above paragraph should clarify these misconceptions. Exploration that were designed to encourage exploration, development, and production in our offshore, bring natural gas to Nova Scotians, and reap the benefits of the exciting growth in the oil and gas industry. [Page 2

Hughes, Larry

80

WIPP Documents - Federal Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Federal Regulations 40 CFR Part 191 Environmental radiation protection standards for management and disposal of spent nuclear fuel, high-level and transuranic radioactive wastes....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste regulations nova" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Solid Waste Management Program (Missouri)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Solid Waste Management Program in the Department of Natural Resources regulates the management of solid waste in the state of Missouri. A permit is required prior to the construction or...

82

Polymers replace glass in Nova fuel capsules  

SciTech Connect

The glass fuel-capsule designs used in previous laser-fusion research are not adaptable to the implosion-physics requirements of Nova and other more powerful laser facilities that may be available in the future. As one tries to learn more about the physics of high-density compression, it becomes increasingly important to replace the glass with lower-Z material. Accordingly, the authors have shut down the high-temperature drop-tower furnaces they used to make glass capsules, and they are focusing all their efforts on developing new techniques for making polymer capsules. These capsules are ten times larger in diameter than the glass capsules used in the early days of laser-fusion research, but they are still only one-tenth as large as a high-gain capsule must be. The polymer capsules will be used in classified indirect-drive targets. This article describes how the decisions were made on which polymers to use in the NOVA fuel capsules, the techniques explored, and the properties of the prototype capsules.

Burnham, A.K.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

The NOvA Experiment: Status and Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The NOvA long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment is currently under construction and will use an upgraded NuMI neutrino source at Fermilab and a 14-kton detector at Ash River, Minnesota to explore the neutrino sector. NOvA uses a highly active, finely segmented detector design that offers superb event identification capability, allowing precision measurements of \

R. B. Patterson; for the NOvA Collaboration

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

84

Qualifying RPS Market States (Nova Scotia, Canada) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nova Scotia, Canada) Nova Scotia, Canada) Qualifying RPS Market States (Nova Scotia, Canada) < Back Eligibility Developer Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Nova Scotia Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals This entry lists the states with RPS policies that accept generation located in Nova Scotia, Canada as eligible sources towards their Renewable Portfolio Standard targets or goals. For specific information with regard to eligible technologies or other restrictions which may vary by state, see the RPS policy entries for the individual states, shown below in the Authority listings. Typically energy must be delivered to an in-state utility or Load Serving Entity, and often only a portion of compliance

85

Optimizing Organic Waste to Energy Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A waste-to-energy firm that recycles organic waste with energy recovery performs two environmentally beneficial functions: it diverts waste from landfills and it produces renewable energy. At the same time, the waste-to-energy firm serves and collects ... Keywords: environment, operating strategy, organic waste to energy, regulation, sustainability

Bar?? Ata; Deishin Lee; Mustafa H. Tongarlak

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Remedial investigation plan for Waste Area Grouping 1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Responses to regulator comments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document, ES/ER-6 D2, is a companion document to ORNL/RAP/Sub-87/99053/4 R1, Remedial Investigation Plan for ORNL Waste Area Grouping 1, dated August 1989. This document lists comments received from the Environmental Protection Agency, Region 4 (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE) and responses to each of these comments. As requested by EPA, a revised Remedial Investigation (RI) Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 1 will not be submitted. The document is divided into two Sections and Appendix. Section I contains responses to comments issued on May 22, 1990, by EPA's Region 4 program office responsible for implementing the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). Section 2 contains responses to comments issued on April 7, 1989, by EPA's program office responsible for implementing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); these comments include issues raised by the TDHE. The Appendix contains the attachments referenced in a number of the responses. 35 refs.

Not Available

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Solid Waste Management Act (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act provides for the planning and regulation of solid waste storage, collection, transportation, processing, treatment, and disposal. It requires that municipalities submit plans for municipal...

88

Time resolved side scatter diagnostics at NOVA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Side scattering of the radiation during the interaction of a laser beam with the long scale length plasma in hohlraum is a difficult problem of relevance to the viability of ICF. It is important to measure the absolute amount of the laser side scatter as well as the angular distribution of that scatter. The OSA diagnostics has been implemented on NOVA to measure these quantities. We have implemented a fiber-optically coupled streak camera to measure the temporally and angularly resolved side scatter radiation at 351 nm at 9 different angles. Filtered PIN diodes were positioned at 31 various angles in the E-field planed and B-field plane of the incident probe beam to sample and measure the scattered radiation at the 351 nm wavelength of the probe. The diode data was used to calibrate the Brillouin power received by the 9 strategically located fiber optic channels. This presentation will describe the OSA and associated diagnostics.

Kyrala, G.A.; Evans, S.C.; Jimerson, J.R.; Fernandez, J.C.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Mixed Waste Management Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The management of mixed waste presents serious challenges to nuclear utilities. Regulatory and practical predicaments make compliance with the letter of all applicable regulations extremely difficult. Utility experts developed these guidelines to identify opportunities for improving work practices and regulatory compliance while minimizing any potential adverse impacts of mixed waste management.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

90

Community Feed-in Tariff (Nova Scotia, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Community Feed-In Tariff Program (COMFIT) is designed to increase local ownership of small-scale energy projects in Nova Scotia. The program provides an opportunity for community-based power...

91

Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations

92

Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on February 13, 2013. EZFeed Policy Place Pennsylvania Name Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) Policy Category Other Policy Policy Type Environmental Regulations Affected Technologies Biomass/Biogas, Coal with CCS, Concentrating Solar Power, Energy Storage, Fuel Cells, Geothermal Electric, Hydroelectric, Hydroelectric (Small), Natural Gas, Nuclear, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind energy Active Policy Yes Implementing Sector State/Province Program Administrator Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection

93

Solid Waste Management (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solid Waste Management (Indiana) Solid Waste Management (Indiana) Solid Waste Management (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Utility Program Info State Indiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Association of Indiana Solid Wastes Districts Inc. The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Indiana Department of Environmental Management and the Indiana Solid Waste Management Board are tasked with planning and adopting rules and regulations governing solid waste management practices. Provisions pertaining to landfill management and expansion, permitting,

94

Mixed Low-Level Radioactive Waste (MLLW) Primer  

SciTech Connect

This document presents a general overview of mixed low-level waste, including the regulatory definitions and drivers, the manner in which the various kinds of mixed waste are regulated, and a discussion of the waste treatment options.

W. E. Schwinkendorf

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Underground Injection Control Regulations (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article prohibits injection of hazardous or radioactive wastes into or above an underground source of drinking water, establishes permit conditions and states regulations for design,...

96

Application to ship nonmixed transuranic waste to the Nevada Test Site for interim storage. Waste Cerification Program  

SciTech Connect

This report documents various regulations on radioactive waste processing and discusses how the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant will comply with and meet these requirements. Specific procedures are discussed concerning transuranic, metal scrap, salt block, solid, and glove box wastes.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Management of Solid Waste (Oklahoma) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management of Solid Waste (Oklahoma) Management of Solid Waste (Oklahoma) Management of Solid Waste (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality The Solid Waste Management Division of the Department of Environmental Quality regulates solid waste disposal or any person who generates, collects, transports, processes, and/or disposes of solid waste and/or waste tires. The following solid waste disposal facilities require a solid waste permit prior to construction and/or operation: land disposal facilities; solid waste processing facilities, including: transfer stations; solid waste incinerators receiving waste from off-site sources; regulated medical waste

98

Chapter 31 Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste (Kentucky)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This administrative regulation establishes the general provisions necessary for identification and listing of a hazardous waste. The regulation also establishes the criteria for identifying the...

99

Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Management Act (Massachusetts)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act contains regulations for safe disposal of hazardous waste, and establishes that a valid license is required to collect, transport, store, treat, use, or dispose of hazardous waste. Short...

100

Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines This legislation gives regulatory authority to the Department of Environmental Management to monitor commercial sites for hazardous wastes; fees on waste received at such sites; hearings and investigations. The legislation also states responsibilities of generators and transporters of hazardous waste as well as responsibilities of hazardous waste storage and treatment facility and hazardous waste disposal site operators. There

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste regulations nova" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Multi-Dimensional Modeling of Nova with Realistic Nuclear Physics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This contract covered the period from 03/09/2010 to 09/30/2010. Over this period, we adapted the low Mach number hydrodynamics code MAESTRO to perform simulations of novae. A nova is the thermonuclear runaway of an accreted hydrogen layer on the surface of a white dwarf. As the accreted layer grows in mass, the temperature and density at the base increase to the point where hydrogen fusion can begin by the CNO cycle - a burning process that uses carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen to complete the fusion of four hydrogen nuclei into one helium-4 nucleus. At this point, we are running initial models of nova, exploring the details of the convection. In the follow-on contract to this one, we will continue this investigation.

Zingale, M; Hoffman, R D

2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

102

EPA streamlines requirements for universal wastes  

SciTech Connect

The Universal Waste rule issued Feb. 11, 1993, fosters the recycling of certain universal wastes typically discarded by consumers. Because these wastes are disposed of from households, they are excluded from hazardous waste regulation under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). However, any commercial entity that accepts these wastes is subject to full RCRA regulation. Hence, there has been little incentive to recycle these wastes. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has concluded certain universal wastes are hazardous and are predominantly generated in municipal settings both household and commercial. These wastes could benefit from and safely be managed under a regulatory scheme less burdensome than the full RCRA Subtitle C program now applicable to these waters. The Universal Waste rule proposes requirements for used nickel-cadmium and small, sealed lead-acid batteries and canceled pesticides. The Agency is considering expanding the scope of the rule to other forms of universal wastes, including antifreeze and light bulbs.

Bryant, C. (Technical Group Inc., Washington, DC (United States))

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Certification Plan, Radioactive Mixed Waste Hazardous Waste Handling Facility  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of radioactive mixed waste (RMW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). RMW is low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or transuranic (TRU) waste that is co-contaminated with dangerous waste as defined in the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) and the Washington State Dangerous Waste Regulations, 173-303-040 (18). This waste is to be transferred to the Hanford Site Central Waste Complex and Burial Grounds in Hanford, Washington. This plan incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end-product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; an executive summary of the Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP) for the HWHF (Section 4); and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification.

Albert, R.

1992-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

104

Louisiana Hazardous Waste Control Law (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality is responsible for administering the Louisiana Hazardous Waste Control Law and the regulations created under that law.

105

Fermilab | Web Cams | NOvA Far Detector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Follow us on: Facebook Twitter NOvA Far Detector Live Webcam South View This text will be replaced North View This text will be replaced View this full feed on Twitter! @NOvANuz Twitter Feed Tweets by @NOvANuz You are watching the creation of the most powerful neutrino experiment in North America. It's called NOvA, and it's a collaboration among roughly 170 scientists at 34 institutions around the world. The project is currently under construction in two locations - the 360-ton NOvA near detector is being built underground at Fermilab, while the 14,000-ton far detector is being assembled in this building near Ash River, Minnesota, as you can see above. The far detector will be made up of 28 PVC blocks, each 51 feet high and wide, and seven feet deep. When it's finished, the device will be about 200 feet long. Filled with a transparent liquid and outfitted with light-sensitive sensors, the NOvA far detector will analyze a beam of neutrinos that begins its journey at Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois, and travels through about 500 miles of earth to the detector.

106

Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Tennessee Department Of Environment and Conservation The Solid Waste Disposal Laws and Regulations are found in Tenn. Code 68-211. These rules are enforced and subject to change by the Public Waste Board (PWB), which is established by the Division of Solid and Hazardous

107

DOE Waste Treatability Group Guidance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guidance presents a method and definitions for aggregating U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) waste into streams and treatability groups based on characteristic parameters that influence waste management technology needs. Adaptable to all DOE waste types (i.e., radioactive waste, hazardous waste, mixed waste, sanitary waste), the guidance establishes categories and definitions that reflect variations within the radiological, matrix (e.g., bulk physical/chemical form), and regulated contaminant characteristics of DOE waste. Beginning at the waste container level, the guidance presents a logical approach to implementing the characteristic parameter categories as part of the basis for defining waste streams and as the sole basis for assigning streams to treatability groups. Implementation of this guidance at each DOE site will facilitate the development of technically defined, site-specific waste stream data sets to support waste management planning and reporting activities. Consistent implementation at all of the sites will enable aggregation of the site-specific waste stream data sets into comparable national data sets to support these activities at a DOE complex-wide level.

Kirkpatrick, T.D.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Sources, classification, and disposal of radioactive wastes: History and legal and regulatory requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the following topics: (1) early definitions of different types (classes) of radioactive waste developed prior to definitions in laws and regulations; (2) sources of different classes of radioactive waste; (3) current laws and regulations addressing classification of radioactive wastes; and requirements for disposal of different waste classes. Relationship between waste classification and requirements for permanent disposal is emphasized; (4) federal and state responsibilities for radioactive wastes; and (5) distinctions between radioactive wastes produced in civilian and defense sectors.

Kocher, D.C.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Press Pass - Press Release - March 28, 2013: NOvA neutrino detector records  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 March 28, 2013 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Images available here: http://www.fnal.gov/pub/presspass/press_releases/2013/NOvA-201303-images.html Live webcast of detector construction: http://fnal.gov/pub/webcams/nova_webcam Additional resources: NOvA project website: http://www-nova.fnal.gov NOvA: Exploring Neutrino Mysteries video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fe4veClYxkE NOvA neutrino detector records first 3-D particle tracks What will soon be the most powerful neutrino detector in the United States has recorded its first three-dimensional images of particles. Using the first completed section of the NOvA neutrino detector, scientists have begun collecting data from cosmic rays-particles produced by a constant rain of atomic nuclei falling on the Earth's atmosphere from space .

110

ZERO WASTE.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of the thesis was to develop a clear vision on better waste management system. The thesis introduced the sustainable waste management along with… (more)

Upadhyaya, Luv

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Energy from Waste: A good practice guide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and regulation of Energy from Waste 16 5. The planning context 18 6. Waste characterisation, composition 9. Processed waste technologies 36 10. Flue gas treatment options 40 11. Residue management 47 12; an approach that focuses on repeatedly benefiting from a materials~ natural attributes before finally

Columbia University

112

Acceptable knowledge document for INEEL stored transuranic waste -- Rocky Flats Plant waste. Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document and supporting documentation provide a consistent, defensible, and auditable record of acceptable knowledge for waste generated at the Rocky Flats Plant which is currently in the accessible storage inventory at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The inventory consists of transuranic (TRU) waste generated from 1972 through 1989. Regulations authorize waste generators and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities to use acceptable knowledge in appropriate circumstances to make hazardous waste determinations. Acceptable knowledge includes information relating to plant history, process operations, and waste management, in addition to waste-specific data generated prior to the effective date of the RCRA regulations. This document is organized to provide the reader a comprehensive presentation of the TRU waste inventory ranging from descriptions of the historical plant operations that generated and managed the waste to specific information about the composition of each waste group. Section 2 lists the requirements that dictate and direct TRU waste characterization and authorize the use of the acceptable knowledge approach. In addition to defining the TRU waste inventory, Section 3 summarizes the historical operations, waste management, characterization, and certification activities associated with the inventory. Sections 5.0 through 26.0 describe the waste groups in the inventory including waste generation, waste packaging, and waste characterization. This document includes an expanded discussion for each waste group of potential radionuclide contaminants, in addition to other physical properties and interferences that could potentially impact radioassay systems.

NONE

1998-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

113

EPRI Review of Geologic Disposal for Used Fuel and High Level Radioactive Waste: Volume II--U.S. Regulations for Geologic Disposal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

U.S. efforts to site and construct a deep geologic repository for used fuel and high level radioactive waste (HLW) proceeded sporadically over a three-decade period from the late 1950s until 1982, when the U.S. Congress enacted the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) codifying a national approach for developing a deep geologic repository. Amendment of the NWPA in 1987 resulted in a number of dramatic changes in direction for the U.S. program, most notably the selection of Yucca Mountain as the only site of t...

2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

114

Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana) Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana) Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Program Info State Indiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Indiana Department of Environmental Management The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Department of Environmental Management is tasked regulating hazardous waste management facilities and practices. Provisions pertaining to permitting, site approval, construction, reporting, transportation, and remediation practices and fees are discussed in these

115

Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual defines the Hanford Site radioactive, hazardous, and sanitary solid waste acceptance criteria. Criteria in the manual represent a guide for meeting state and federal regulations; DOE Orders; Hanford Site requirements; and other rules, regulations, guidelines, and standards as they apply to acceptance of radioactive and hazardous solid waste at the Hanford Site. It is not the intent of this manual to be all inclusive of the regulations; rather, it is intended that the manual provide the waste generator with only the requirements that waste must meet in order to be accepted at Hanford Site TSD facilities.

Not Available

1993-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

116

Mixed waste characterization, treatment & disposal focus area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mission of the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (referred to as the Mixed Waste Focus Area or MWFA) is to provide treatment systems capable of treating DOE`s mixed waste in partnership with users, and with continual participation of stakeholders, tribal governments, and regulators. The MWFA deals with the problem of eliminating mixed waste from current and future storage in the DOE complex. Mixed waste is waste that contains both hazardous chemical components, subject to the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and radioactive components, subject to the requirements of the Atomic Energy Act. The radioactive components include transuranic (TRU) and low-level waste (LLW). TRU waste primarily comes from the reprocessing of spent fuel and the use of plutonium in the fabrication of nuclear weapons. LLW includes radioactive waste other than uranium mill tailings, TRU, and high-level waste, including spent fuel.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Report to Congress: management of wastes from the exploration, development, and production of crude oil, natural gas, and geothermal energy. Volume 3. Appendices. A. Summary of state oil and gas regulations. B. Glossary of terms for Volume 1. C. Damage case summaries  

SciTech Connect

Section 3001(b)(2)(A) of the 1980 Amendments to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) temporarily exempted several types of solid waste from regulation under the Federal hazardous-waste control program. These exempted wastes included drilling fluids, produced waters, and other wastes associated with the exploration, development, or production of crude oil or natural gas or geothermal energy. Section 8002(m) of the RCRA Amendments requires EPA to study these wastes and submit a final report to Congress. The report responds to those requirements. This is volume 3 of 3 reports to Congress. The volume contains the Appendices which include a summary of: (1) State oil and gas regulatory programs; and (2) the damage cases compiled for the oil and gas industry. A glossary of oil and gas industry terms is also included in the volume.

Not Available

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Summary Notes from 28 May 2008 Generic Technical Issue...

119

CLASSICAL NOVAE IN ANDROMEDA: LIGHT CURVES FROM THE PALOMAR TRANSIENT FACTORY AND GALEX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present optical light curves of 29 novae in M31 during the 2009 and 2010 observing seasons of the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). The dynamic and rapid cadences in PTF monitoring of M31, from one day to ten minutes, provide excellent temporal coverage of nova light curves, enabling us to record the photometric evolution of M31 novae in unprecedented detail. We also detect eight of these novae in the near-ultraviolet (UV) band with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) satellite. Novae M31N 2009-10b and M31N 2010-11a show prominent UV emission peaking a few days prior to their optical maxima, possibly implying aspherical outbursts. Additionally, our blueshifted spectrum of the recent outburst of PT And (M31N 2010-12a) indicates that it is a recurrent nova in M31 and not a dwarf nova in the Milky Way as was previously assumed. Finally, we systematically searched for novae in all confirmed globular clusters (GCs) of M31 and found only M31N 2010-10f associated with Bol 126. The specific nova rate in the M31 GC system is thus about one per year, which is not enhanced relative to the rate outside the GC system.

Cao Yi; Lou Yuqing [Tsinghua Center for Astrophysics (THCA), Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Neill, James D.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Quimby, Robert M. [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ben-Ami, Sagi [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Bloom, Joshua S.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Nugent, Peter E. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Law, Nicholas M. [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, M5S 3H4 Ontario (Canada); Ofek, Eran O. [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, Faculty of Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Poznanski, Dovi, E-mail: ycao@astro.caltech.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

120

LABORATORY ANALYSIS OF PRESOLAR SILICATE STARDUST FROM A NOVA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the major element as well as the oxygen, magnesium, and silicon isotope composition of a unique presolar silicate grain found in the fine-grained fraction of the Antarctic CR2 chondrite Graves Nunataks 95229. The grain is characterized by an extremely high {sup 17}O/{sup 16}O ratio (6.3 {+-} 0.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}) relative to solar values, whereas its {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O ratio is solar within measurement uncertainty. It also shows enrichments in {sup 25,26}Mg and a significant excess in {sup 30}Si relative to solar system compositions, with {delta}{sup 25}Mg = 79 {+-} 21 per mille , {delta}{sup 26}Mg = 70 {+-} 20 per mille , and {delta}{sup 30}Si = 379 {+-} 92 per mille . This isotopic composition is consistent with an origin in the ejecta of a {approx}1.3-1.4 M{sub Sun} ONe nova with large contributions of material from a main-sequence companion star of roughly solar metallicity. However, many details of the stellar source remain undetermined, owing to the uncertainties of current nova nucleosynthesis models. Auger electron spectroscopic analyses identify O, Mg, Si, and Fe as the grain's major constituents. Its (Mg+Fe)/Si atomic ratios are lower than that of olivine and correspond on average to Fe-Mg-pyroxene. A complex texture and heterogeneous major element distribution within the grain attest to condensation under non-equilibrium conditions, which is consistent with the proposed nova origin.

Leitner, J.; Kodolanyi, J.; Hoppe, P. [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Particle Chemistry Department, Hahn-Meitner-Weg 1, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Floss, C., E-mail: jan.leitner@mpic.de [Laboratory for Space Sciences and Physics Department, Washington University, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste regulations nova" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Equation of State measurements of hydrogen isotopes on Nova  

SciTech Connect

High intensity lasers can be used to perform measurements of materials at extremely high pressures if certain experimental issues can be overcome. We have addressed those issues and used the Nova laser to shock-compress liquid deuterium and obtain measurements of density and pressure on the principal Hugoniot at pressures from 300 kbar to more than 2 Mbar. The data are compared with a number of equation of state models. The data indicate that the effect of molecular dissociation of the deuterium into a monatomic phase may have a significant impact on the equation of state near 1 Mbar.

Collins, G. W., LLNL

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Multimedia from the NOvA (Fermilab E929) Project  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, which manages the NOvA project, will generate a beam of neutrinos to send to a 15,000-ton detector in Ash River, Minnesota. The particles will complete the 500-mile interstate trip in less than three milliseconds. Because neutrinos rarely interact with other matter, they travel straight through the Earth without a tunnel. Scientists will detect a small fraction of the neutrinos in a near-detector at Fermilab and in a larger far-detector in Minnesota looking for signals that the neutrinos are changing from one type to another on their trip.

NOvA Collaboration

123

Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan  

SciTech Connect

As a generator of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the Hanford Site must ensure that its TRU waste meets the requirements of US. Department of Energy (DOE) 0 435.1, ''Radioactive Waste Management,'' and the Contact-Handled (CH) Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP-WAC). WIPP-WAC requirements are derived from the WIPP Technical Safety Requirements, WIPP Safety Analysis Report, TRUPACT-II SARP, WIPP Land Withdrawal Act, WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 191/194 Compliance Certification Decision. The WIPP-WAC establishes the specific physical, chemical, radiological, and packaging criteria for acceptance of defense TRU waste shipments at WIPP. The WPP-WAC also requires that participating DOE TRU waste generator/treatment/storage sites produce site-specific documents, including a certification plan, that describe their program for managing TRU waste and TRU waste shipments before transferring waste to WIPP. Waste characterization activities provide much of the data upon which certification decisions are based. Waste characterization requirements for TRU waste and TRU mixed waste that contains constituents regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) are established in the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Waste Analysis Plan (WAP). The Hanford Site Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) (HNF-2599) implements the applicable requirements in the WAP and includes the qualitative and quantitative criteria for making hazardous waste determinations. The Hanford Site must also ensure that its TRU waste destined for disposal at WPP meets requirements for transport in the Transuranic Package Transporter-11 (TRUPACT-11). The US. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) establishes the TRUPACT-11 requirements in the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package (TRUPACT-11 SARP). In addition, a TRU waste is eligible for disposal at WIPP only if it has been generated in whole or in part by one or more of the activities listed in Section 10101(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. DOE sites must determine that each waste stream to be disposed of at WIPP is ''defense'' TRU waste. (See also the definition of ''defense'' TRU waste.). Only CH TRU wastes meeting the requirements of the QAPjP, WIPP-WAP, WPP-WAC, and other requirements documents described above will be accepted for transportation and disposal at WIPP.

GREAGER, T.M.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan  

SciTech Connect

As a generator of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the Hanford Site must ensure that its TRU waste meets the requirements of US. Department of Energy (DOE) 0 435.1, ''Radioactive Waste Management,'' and the Contact-Handled (CH) Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP-WAC). WIPP-WAC requirements are derived from the WIPP Technical Safety Requirements, WIPP Safety Analysis Report, TRUPACT-II SARP, WIPP Land Withdrawal Act, WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 191/194 Compliance Certification Decision. The WIPP-WAC establishes the specific physical, chemical, radiological, and packaging criteria for acceptance of defense TRU waste shipments at WIPP. The WPP-WAC also requires that participating DOE TRU waste generator/treatment/storage sites produce site-specific documents, including a certification plan, that describe their program for managing TRU waste and TRU waste shipments before transferring waste to WIPP. Waste characterization activities provide much of the data upon which certification decisions are based. Waste characterization requirements for TRU waste and TRU mixed waste that contains constituents regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) are established in the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Waste Analysis Plan (WAP). The Hanford Site Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) (HNF-2599) implements the applicable requirements in the WAP and includes the qualitative and quantitative criteria for making hazardous waste determinations. The Hanford Site must also ensure that its TRU waste destined for disposal at WPP meets requirements for transport in the Transuranic Package Transporter-11 (TRUPACT-11). The US. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) establishes the TRUPACT-11 requirements in the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package (TRUPACT-11 SARP). In addition, a TRU waste is eligible for disposal at WIPP only if it has been generated in whole or in part by one or more of the activities listed in Section 10101(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. DOE sites must determine that each waste stream to be disposed of at WIPP is ''defense'' TRU waste. (See also the definition of ''defense'' TRU waste.). Only CH TRU wastes meeting the requirements of the QAPjP, WIPP-WAP, WPP-WAC, and other requirements documents described above will be accepted for transportation and disposal at WIPP.

GREAGER, T.M.

2000-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

125

Hazardous Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 6   General refractory disposal options...D landfill (b) Characterized hazardous waste by TCLP

126

Solid Waste Policies (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policies (Iowa) Policies (Iowa) Solid Waste Policies (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources This statute establishes the support of the state for alternative waste management practices that reduce the reliance upon land disposal and incorporate resource recovery. Cities and counties are required to establish and operate a comprehensive solid waste reduction program. These regulations discuss land application of processed wastes as well as requirements for sanitary landfills and for groundwater monitoring near land disposal sites

127

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 534) and identity of liquid waste Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 534

Russell, Lynn

128

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2/2009 Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 200 West Arbor Dr. San Diego, CA 92103 (619 (9:1) OR Biohazard symbol (if untreated) and identity of liquid waste Biohazard symbol Address

Firtel, Richard A.

129

Dendrochronological dating of coal mine workings at the Joggins Fossil Cliffs, Nova Scotia, Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dendrochronological dating of coal mine workings at the Joggins Fossil Cliffs, Nova Scotia, Canada,NovaScotia,wasoneofthefirstplacesinNorthAmericawherecoalwasmined.Dendrochronologicalmeth- ods were employed to date timber pit props preserved within relic coal mine workings on the closely"levels"thatcomprisepart of a later mine dug by the Joggins Coal Mining Company (1872­1877). Findings improve knowledge of the Joggins

Laroque, Colin

130

Freezing in the dark: Energy security and heating emergencies in Nova Scotia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Freezing in the dark: Energy security and heating emergencies in Nova Scotia Larry Hughes, Ph://lh.ece.dal.ca/enen Presented to Freezing in the dark: Energy security, heating emergencies, and electricity supply in Nova Scotia Saint Mary's University, Halifax 10 March 2009 ERG/200903 #12;Freezing in the dark: Energy

Hughes, Larry

131

Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law (Louisiana) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law (Louisiana) Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality manages solid waste for the state of Louisiana under the authority of the Solid Waste Management and Resource Recover Law. The Department makes rules and regulations that establish standards governing the storage, collection, processing, recovery and reuse, and disposal of solid waste; implement a management program that

132

South Carolina Radioactive Waste Transportation and Disposal Act (South Carolina)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Health and Environmental Control is responsible for regulating the transportation of radioactive waste, with some exceptions, into or within the state for storage, disposal, or...

133

DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

District of Columbia Applies to Municipality District of Columbia Name DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia) Policy Type Environmental Regulations Affected...

134

South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Carolina)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Health and Environmental Control is authorized to promulgate rules and regulations to prevent exposure of persons, animals, or the environment to hazardous waste. The construction...

135

Hazardous Waste Program (Alabama)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This rule states criteria for identifying the characteristics of hazardous waste and for listing hazardous waste, lists of hazardous wastes, standards for the management of hazardous waste and...

136

Solid Waste Management Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Solid Waste Management Program Plan (SWMPP) is to provide a summary level comprehensive approach for the storage, treatment, and disposal of current and future solid waste received at the Hanford Site (from onsite and offsite generators) in a manner compliant with current and evolving regulations and orders (federal, state, and Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford)). The Plan also presents activities required for disposal of selected wastes currently in retrievable storage. The SWMPP provides a central focus for the description and control of cost, scope, and schedule of Hanford Site solid waste activities, and provides a vehicle for ready communication of the scope of those activities to onsite and offsite organizations. This Plan represents the most complete description available of Hanford Site Solid Waste Management (SWM) activities and the interfaces between those activities. It will be updated annually to reflect changes in plans due to evolving regulatory requirements and/or the SWM mission. 8 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

Duncan, D.R.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Mixed Waste Management Options: 1995 Update. National Low-Level Waste Management Program  

SciTech Connect

In the original mixed Waste Management Options (DOE/LLW-134) issued in December 1991, the question was posed, ``Can mixed waste be managed out of existence?`` That study found that most, but not all, of the Nation`s mixed waste can theoretically be managed out of existence. Four years later, the Nation is still faced with a lack of disposal options for commercially generated mixed waste. However, since publication of the original Mixed Waste Management Options report in 1991, limited disposal capacity and new technologies to treat mixed waste have become available. A more detailed estimate of the Nation`s mixed waste also became available when the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published their comprehensive assessment, titled National Profile on Commercially Generated Low-Level Radioactive Mixed Waste (National Profile). These advancements in our knowledge about mixed waste inventories and generation, coupled with greater treatment and disposal options, lead to a more applied question posed for this updated report: ``Which mixed waste has no treatment option?`` Beyond estimating the volume of mixed waste requiring jointly regulated disposal, this report also provides a general background on the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). It also presents a methodical approach for generators to use when deciding how to manage their mixed waste. The volume of mixed waste that may require land disposal in a jointly regulated facility each year was estimated through the application of this methodology.

Kirner, N.; Kelly, J.; Faison, G.; Johnson, D. [Foster Wheeler Environmental Corp. (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Waste form product characteristics  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy has operated nuclear facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to support national interests for several decades. Since 1953, it has supported the development of technologies for the storage and reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels (SNF) and the resultant wastes. However, the 1992 decision to discontinue reprocessing of SNF has left nearly 768 MT of SNF in storage at the INEL with unspecified plans for future dispositioning. Past reprocessing of these fuels for uranium and other resource recovery has resulted in the production of 3800 M{sup 3} calcine and a total inventory of 7600 M{sup 3} of radioactive liquids (1900 M{sup 3} destined for immediate calcination and the remaining sodium-bearing waste requiring further treatment before calcination). These issues, along with increased environmental compliance within DOE and its contractors, mandate operation of current and future facilities in an environmentally responsible manner. This will require satisfactory resolution of spent fuel and waste disposal issues resulting from the past activities. A national policy which identifies requirements for the disposal of SNF and high level wastes (HLW) has been established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) Sec.8,(b) para(3)) [1982]. The materials have to be conditioned or treated, then packaged for disposal while meeting US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. The spent fuel and HLW located at the INEL will have to be put into a form and package that meets these regulatory criteria. The emphasis of Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) future operations has shifted toward investigating, testing, and selecting technologies to prepare current and future spent fuels and waste for final disposal. This preparation for disposal may include mechanical, physical and/or chemical processes, and may differ for each of the various fuels and wastes.

Taylor, L.L.; Shikashio, R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Alabama State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State Regulations » Alabama State Regulations » Alabama State Regulations: Alabama State of Alabama The State Oil and Gas Board of Alabama, under the direction of the State Geologist and Oil and Gas Supervisor, is responsible for the regulation of oil and gas operations. The Board is divided into two administrative regions-north and south. The Board has broad authority in Alabama's oil and gas conservation statutes to promulgate and enforce rules and regulations to ensure the conservation and proper development of Alabama's petroleum resources. A major duty of the Board is to prevent pollution of fresh water supplies by oil, gas, salt water, or other contaminants resulting from oil and gas operations. The Alabama Department of Environmental Management (ADEM) administers the major federal environmental protection laws through regulations governing air pollution, water quality and supply, solid and hazardous waste management.

140

NOVA-NREL Optimal Vehicle Acquisition Analysis (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

Federal fleet managers face unique challenges in accomplishing their mission - meeting agency transportation needs while complying with Federal goals and mandates. Included in these challenges are a variety of statutory requirements, executive orders, and internal goals and objectives that typically focus on petroleum consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reductions, alternative fuel vehicle (AFV) acquisitions, and alternative fuel use increases. Given the large number of mandates affecting Federal fleets and the challenges faced by all fleet managers in executing day-to-day operations, a primary challenge for agencies and other organizations is ensuring that they are as efficient as possible in using constrained fleet budgets. An NREL Optimal Vehicle Acquisition (NOVA) analysis makes use of a mathematical model with a variety of fleet-related data to create an optimal vehicle acquisition strategy for a given goal, such as petroleum or GHG reduction. The analysis can helps fleets develop a vehicle acquisition strategy that maximizes petroleum and greenhouse gas reductions.

Blakley, H.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste regulations nova" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

NOvA (Fermilab E929) Official Plots and Figures  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The NOvA collaboration, consisting of 180 researchers across 28 institutions and managed by the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), is developing instruments for a neutrino-focused experiment that will attempt to answer three fundamental questions in neutrino physics: 1) Can we observe the oscillation of muon neutrinos to electron neutrinos; 2) What is the ordering of the neutrino masses; and 3) What is the symmetry between matter and antimatter? The collaboration makes various data plots and figures available. These are grouped under five headings, with brief descriptions included for each individual figure: Neutrino Spectra, Detector Overview, Theta12 Mass Hierarchy CP phase, Theta 23 Delta Msqr23, and NuSterile.

142

Hydrogen Burning of 17-O in Classical Novae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the observation of a previously unknown resonance at E=194.1+/-0.6 keV (lab) in the 17-O(p,alpha)14-N reaction, with a measured resonance strength omega_gamma(p,alpha)=1.6+/-0.2 meV. We studied in the same experiment the 17-O(p,gamma)18-F reaction by an activation method and the resonance-strength ratio was found to be omega_gamma(p,alpha)/omega_gamma(p,gamma)=470+/-50. The corresponding excitation energy in the 18-F compound nucleus was determined to be 5789.8+/-0.3 keV by gamma-ray measurements using the 14-N(alpha,gamma)18-F reaction. These new resonance properties have important consequences for 17-O nucleosynthesis and gamma-ray astronomy of classical novae.

A. Chafa; V. Tatischeff; P. Aguer; S. Barhoumi; A. Coc; F. Garrido; M. Hernanz; J. Jose; J. Kiener; A. Lefebvre-Schuhl; S. Ouichaoui; N. de Sereville; J. -P. Thibaud

2005-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

143

Waste= Capital.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The evolution of manufacturing practices over the last century has led to the creation of excess waste during the production process, depleting resources and overwhelming… (more)

Stidham, Steve P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Constraining nova observables: direct measurements of resonance strengths in 33S(p,?)34Cl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 33S(p,\\gamma)34Cl reaction is important for constraining predictions of certain isotopic abundances in oxygen-neon novae. Models currently predict as much as 150 times the solar abundance of 33S in oxygen-neon nova ejecta. This overproduction factor may, however, vary by orders of magnitude due to uncertainties in the 33S(p,\\gamma)34Cl reaction rate at nova peak temperatures. Depending on this rate, 33S could potentially be used as a diagnostic tool for classifying certain types of presolar grains. Better knowledge of the 33S(p,\\gamma)34Cl rate would also aid in interpreting nova observations over the S-Ca mass region and contribute to the firm establishment of the maximum endpoint of nova nucleosynthesis. Additionally, the total S elemental abundance which is affected by this reaction has been proposed as a thermometer to study the peak temperatures of novae. Previously, the 33S(p,\\gamma)34Cl reaction rate had only been studied directly down to resonance energies of 432 keV. However, for nova peak temperatures of 0.2-0.4 GK there are 7 known states in 34Cl both below the 432 keV resonance and within the Gamow window that could play a dominant role. Direct measurements of the resonance strengths of these states were performed using the DRAGON recoil separator at TRIUMF. Additionally two new states within this energy region are reported. Several hydrodynamic simulations have been performed, using all available experimental information for the 33S(p,\\gamma)34Cl rate, to explore the impact of the remaining uncertainty in this rate on nucleosynthesis in nova explosions. These calculations give a range of ~ 20-150 for the expected 33S overproduction factor, and a range of ~ 100-450 for the 32S/33S ratio expected in ONe novae.

J. Fallis; A. Parikh; P. F. Bertone; S. Bishop; L. Buchmann; A. A. Chen; G. Christian; J. A. Clark; J. M. D'Auria; B. Davids; C. M. Deibel; B. R. Fulton; U. Greife; B. Guo; U. Hager; C. Herlitzius; D. A. Hutcheon; J. José; A. M. Laird; E. T. Li; Z. H. Li; G. Lian; W. P. Liu; L. Martin; K. Nelson; D. Ottewell; P. D. Parker; S. Reeve; A. Rojas; C. Ruiz; K. Setoodehnia; S. Sjue; C. Vockenhuber; Y. B. Wang; C. Wrede

2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

145

MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT PHASE I: AUDIT OF CURRENT PRACTICE The Mushroom Waste Management Project (MWMP) was initiated by Environment Canada, the BC Ministry of solid and liquid wastes generated at mushroom producing facilities. Environmental guidelines

146

Solid Waste Management (Kansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solid Waste Management (Kansas) Solid Waste Management (Kansas) Solid Waste Management (Kansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Kansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Health and Environment This act aims to establish and maintain a cooperative state and local program of planning and technical and financial assistance for comprehensive solid waste management. No person shall construct, alter or operate a solid waste processing facility or a solid waste disposal area of a solid waste management system, except for clean rubble disposal sites, without first obtaining a permit from the secretary. Every person desiring to obtain a permit shall make application for such a permit on forms

147

Waste disposal options report. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

Volume 2 contains the following topical sections: estimates of feed and waste volumes, compositions, and properties; evaluation of radionuclide inventory for Zr calcine; evaluation of radionuclide inventory for Al calcine; determination of k{sub eff} for high level waste canisters in various configurations; review of ceramic silicone foam for radioactive waste disposal; epoxides for low-level radioactive waste disposal; evaluation of several neutralization cases in processing calcine and sodium-bearing waste; background information for EFEs, dose rates, watts/canister, and PE-curies; waste disposal options assumptions; update of radiation field definition and thermal generation rates for calcine process packages of various geometries-HKP-26-97; and standard criteria of candidate repositories and environmental regulations for the treatment and disposal of ICPP radioactive mixed wastes.

Russell, N.E.; McDonald, T.G.; Banaee, J.; Barnes, C.M.; Fish, L.W.; Losinski, S.J.; Peterson, H.K.; Sterbentz, J.W.; Wenzel, D.R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE January 2010 Prepared for the Interagency DE-AC05-76RL01830 Waste Disposal Workshops: Anthrax-Contaminated Waste AM Lesperance JF Upton SL #12;#12;PNNL-SA-69994 Waste Disposal Workshops: Anthrax- Contaminated Waste AM Lesperance JF Upton SL

149

Chapter 30 Waste Management: General Administrative Procedures (Kentucky) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter 30 Waste Management: General Administrative Procedures Chapter 30 Waste Management: General Administrative Procedures (Kentucky) Chapter 30 Waste Management: General Administrative Procedures (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Solar Buying & Making Electricity Wind Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department for Environmental Protection The waste management administrative regulations apply to the disposal of solid waste and the management of all liquid, semisolid, solid, or gaseous

150

DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia) DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia) DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider District Department of the Environment This regulation regulates the generation, storage, transportation, treatment, and disposal of hazardous waste, and wherever feasible, reduces

151

Comparison of Wind Profiler and Aircraft Wind Measurements at Chebogue Point, Nova Scotia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In August 1993, a 915-MHz boundary layer wind-profiling radar was deployed at Chebogue Point, Nova Scotia, to provide wind, turbulence, and boundary layer structure information for the North Atlantic Regional Experiment summer 1993 intensive ...

Wayne M. Angevine; J. Ian Macpherson

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Waste Generated from LMR-AMTEC Reactor Concept  

SciTech Connect

The candidate Liquid Metal Reactor-Alkali Metal Thermal -to- Electric Converter (LMR-AMTEC) is considered to be the first reactor that would use pure liquid potassium as a secondary coolant, in which potassium vapor aids in the conversion of thermal energy to electric energy. As with all energy production, the thermal generation of electricity produces wastes. These wastes must be managed in ways which safeguard human health and minimize their impact on the environment. Nuclear power is the only energy industry, which takes full responsibility for all its wastes. Based on the candidate design of the LMR-AMTEC components and the coolant types, different wastes will be generated from LMR. These wastes must be classified and characterized according to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulation, CFR. This paper defines the waste generation and waste characterization from LMR-AMTEC and reviews the applicable U.S. regulations that govern waste transportation, treatment, storage and final disposition. The wastes generated from LMR-AMTEC are characterized as: (1) mixed waste which is generated from liquid sodium contaminated by fission products and activated corrosion products; (2) hazardous waste which is generated from liquid potassium contaminated by corrosion products; (3) spent nuclear fuel; and (4) low-level radioactive waste which is generated from the packing materials (e.g. activated carbon in cold trap and purification units). The regulations and management of these wastes are summarized in this paper.

Hasan, Ahmed; Mohamed, Yasser, T.; Mohammaden, Tarek, F.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

153

Hanford Facility Annual Dangerous Waste Report Calendar Year 2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hanford CY 2002 dangerous waste generation and management forms. The Hanford Facility Annual Dangerous Waste Report (ADWR) is prepared to meet the requirements of Washington Administrative Code Sections 173-303-220, Generator Reporting, and 173-303-390, Facility Reporting. In addition, the ADWR is required to meet Hanford Facility RCRA Permit Condition I.E.22, Annual Reporting. The ADWR provides summary information on dangerous waste generation and management activities for the Calendar Year for the Hanford Facility EPA ID number assigned to the Department of Energy for RCRA regulated waste, as well as Washington State only designated waste and radioactive mixed waste. The Solid Waste Information and Tracking System (SWITS) database is utilized to collect and compile the large array of data needed for preparation of this report. Information includes details of waste generated on the Hanford Facility, waste generated offsite and sent to Hanford for management, and other waste management activities conducted at Hanford, including treatment, storage, and disposal. Report details consist of waste descriptions and weights, waste codes and designations, and waste handling codes. In addition, for waste shipped to Hanford for treatment and/or disposal, information on manifest numbers, the waste transporter, the waste receiving facility, and the original waste generators are included. In addition to paper copies, electronic copies of the report are also transmitted to the regulatory agency.

FREEMAN, D.A.

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Activation of 200 MW refusegenerated CHP upward regulation effect...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

References EU Smart Grid Projects Map1 Overview Waste CHP plants can be used in the electricity market for upward regulation by bypassing the steam turbine. The technical...

155

Hanford Site solid waste acceptance criteria  

SciTech Connect

Order 5820.2A requires that each treatment, storage, and/or disposal facility (referred to in this document as TSD unit) that manages low-level or transuranic waste (including mixed waste and TSCA PCB waste) maintain waste acceptance criteria. These criteria must address the various requirements to operate the TSD unit in compliance with applicable safety and environmental requirements. This document sets forth the baseline criteria for acceptance of radioactive waste at TSD units operated by WMH. The criteria for each TSD unit have been established to ensure that waste accepted can be managed in a manner that is within the operating requirements of the unit, including environmental regulations, DOE Orders, permits, technical safety requirements, waste analysis plans, performance assessments, and other applicable requirements. Acceptance criteria apply to the following TSD units: the Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBG) including both the nonregulated portions of the LLBG and trenches 31 and 34 of the 218-W-5 Burial Ground for mixed waste disposal; Central Waste Complex (CWC); Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP); and T Plant Complex. Waste from all generators, both from the Hanford Site and from offsite facilities, must comply with these criteria. Exceptions can be granted as provided in Section 1.6. Specific waste streams could have additional requirements based on the 1901 identified TSD pathway. These requirements are communicated in the Waste Specification Records (WSRds). The Hanford Site manages nonradioactive waste through direct shipments to offsite contractors. The waste acceptance requirements of the offsite TSD facility must be met for these nonradioactive wastes. This document does not address the acceptance requirements of these offsite facilities.

Ellefson, M.D.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Solid Waste Program (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program (Alabama) Program (Alabama) Solid Waste Program (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer General Public/Consumer Industrial Residential Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Environmental Regulations This article states the authority of the department, regulations for the control of unauthorized dumping, disposal fees, violations and penalties. Solid waste refers to any garbage, rubbish, construction or demolition debris, ash, or sludge from a waste treatment facility, water supply plant, or air pollution control facility, and any other discarded materials, including solid, liquid, semisolid, or contained gaseous material resulting

157

Pulsed power supply for Nova Upgrade. Final report, August 1, 1991 to March 31, 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work carried out at the Center for Electromechanics at The University of Texas at Austin (CEM-UT). A baseline design of the Nova Upgrade has been completed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Nova Upgrade is an 18 beamline Nd: glass laser design utilizing fully relayed 4x4 30 cm aperture segmented optical components. The laser thus consists of 288 independent beamlets nominally producing 1.5 to 2.0 MJ of 0.35 {mu}m light in a 3 to 5 ns pulse. The laser design is extremely flexible and will allow a wide range of pulses to irradiate ICF targets. This facility will demonstrate ignition/gain and the scientific feasibility of ICF for energy and defense applications. The pulsed power requirements for the Nova Upgrade are given. CEM-UT was contracted to study and develop a design for a homopolar generator/inductor (HPG/inductor) opening switch system which would satisfy the pulsed power supply requirements of the Nova Upgrade. The Nd:glass laser amplifiers used in the Nova Upgrade will be powered by light from xenon flashlamps. The pulsed power supply for the Nova Upgrade powers the xenon flashlamps. This design and study was for a power supply to drive flashlamps.

Bacon, J.L.; Kajs, J.P.; Walls, A.; Weldon, W.F.; Zowarka, R.C. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (US). Center for Electromechanics] [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (US). Center for Electromechanics

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

158

Influence of new reaction rates on 18F production in novae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gamma-ray emission from classical novae is dominated, during the first hours, by positron annihilation resulting from the beta decay of radioactive nuclei. The main contribution comes from the decay of 18F and hence is directly related to 18F formation during the outburst. A good knowledge of the nuclear reaction rates of production and destruction of 18F is required to study 18F synthesis in novae and the resulting gamma-ray emission. The rates relevant for the main mode of 18F destruction (i.e, through proton captures) have been the object of many recent experiments. However, subsequent analyses were focused on providing rates for X-ray burst nucleosynthesis not valid at nova temperatures (lower than 3.5 10^8 K). Accordingly, it is crucial to propose and discuss new reaction rates, incorporating all new experimental results, down to the domain of nova nucleosynthesis. We show that in this temperature regime, the 18F(p,gamma) and (p,alpha) reaction rates remain uncertain and deserve further experimental and theoretical efforts. Our hydrodynamic calculations including the new nuclear rates demonstrate that their impact on 18F synthesis in nova explosions is quite large and, consequently, the early gamma-ray emission from classical novae is also affected.

Alain Coc; Margarita Hernanz; Jordi Jose; Jean-Pierre Thibaud

2000-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

159

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Parts 370-376: Hazardous Waste Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Parts 370-376: Hazardous Waste Parts 370-376: Hazardous Waste Management System (New York) Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Parts 370-376: Hazardous Waste Management System (New York) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations prescribe the management of hazardous waste facilities in New York State. They identify and list different types of hazardous wastes and describe standards for generators, transporters, as well as treatment, storage and disposal facilities. The regulations also define specific types

160

Mixed Waste Focus Area program management plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes the program management principles and functions to be implemented in the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA). The mission of the MWFA is to provide acceptable technologies that enable implementation of mixed waste treatment systems developed in partnership with end-users, stakeholders, tribal governments and regulators. The MWFA will develop, demonstrate and deliver implementable technologies for treatment of mixed waste within the DOE Complex. Treatment refers to all post waste-generation activities including sampling and analysis, characterization, storage, processing, packaging, transportation and disposal.

Beitel, G.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste regulations nova" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Overview of the SuperNova/Acceleration probe (SNAP)  

SciTech Connect

The SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) is a space-based experiment to measure the expansion history of the Universe and study both its dark energy and the dark matter. The experiment is motivated by the startling discovery that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating. A 0.7 square-degree imager comprised of 36 large format fully-depleted n-type CCD's sharing a focal plane with 36 HgCdTe detectors forms the heart of SNAP, allowing discovery and lightcurve measurements simultaneously for many supernovae. The imager and a high-efficiency low-resolution integral field spectrograph are coupled to a 2-m three mirror anastigmat wide-field telescope, which will be placed in a high-earth orbit. The SNAP mission can obtain high-signal-to-noise calibrated light-curves and spectra for over 2000 Type Ia supernovae at redshifts between z = 0.1 and 1.7. The resulting data set can not only determine the amount of dark energy with high precision, but test the nature of the dark energy by examining its equation of state. In particular, dark energy due to a cosmological constant can be differentiated from alternatives such as ''quintessence'', by measuring the dark energy's equation of state to an accuracy of {+-} 0.05, and by studying its time dependence.

galdering@lbl.gov

2002-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

162

Waste Hoist  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

45-ton Rope-Guide Friction Hoist Completely enclosed (for contamination control), the waste hoist at WIPP is a modern friction hoist with rope guides. With a 45-ton capacity, it...

163

Proceedings: 1996 EPRI International Low Level Waste Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the changing business environment, U.S. utilities are evaluating methods to improve operations while minimizing costs. EPRI's fifth annual International Low Level Waste (LLW) Conference featured 65 papers on a variety of topics. More than a third of the papers emphasized liquid-wet waste processing enhancements, new or improved technologies, and LLW program cost reduction. Other subjects included dry active waste processing cost reduction, the new DOT/NRC transport regulations, mixed waste, vitrif...

1996-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

164

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 361: Siting of Industrial Hazardous  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Siting of Industrial 1: Siting of Industrial Hazardous Waste Facilities (New York) Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 361: Siting of Industrial Hazardous Waste Facilities (New York) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations describe the siting of new industrial hazardous waste facilities located wholly or partially within the State. Industrial hazardous waste facilities are defined as facilities used for the purpose of treating, storing, compacting, recycling, exchanging or disposing of industrial hazardous waste materials, including treatment, compacting,

165

Chapter 47 Solid Waste Facilities (Kentucky) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter 47 Solid Waste Facilities (Kentucky) Chapter 47 Solid Waste Facilities (Kentucky) Chapter 47 Solid Waste Facilities (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Environmental Regulations Fees Siting and Permitting Provider Kentucky Division of Waste Management This chapter establishes the permitting standards for solid waste sites or facilities, the standards applicable to all solid waste sites or

166

Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Environmental Quality This Act addresses the safe and proper management of hazardous wastes and used oil, the permitting of hazardous waste facilities, and the siting of facilities. The Department of Environmental Quality is authorized to enact regulations pertaining to all aspects of hazardous waste storage and disposal, and the Act addresses permitting requirements for disposal

167

Proceedings of the eighteenth mid-Atlantic industrial waste conference on toxic and hazardous wastes  

SciTech Connect

This book presents the papers given at a conference on the management of hazardous materials. Topics considered at the conference included underground storage tanks, underground industrial waste tank releases, regulations, cost estimation, metal leaching, spent oil shales, siting power plant ash disposal areas, phosphorous removal by a coal media filter, and waste water characterization and treatment for the coal slurry pipeline industry.

Boardman, G.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

The King County Solid Waste Division handles 100 % of the mixed solid waste generated in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(PSAPCA)) Regulation I, Article 7. Unlike the permit, this document is not a legally enforceable document. It includes references to the applicable statutory or regulatory provisions that relate to King County Solid Waste Division’s air emissions, and provides a description of King County Solid Waste Division’s activities, including a short compliance history. Statement of Basis – January 4, 2001

unknown authors

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Nuclear Waste and the Distant Future Nuclear Waste and the Distant Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Waste and the Distant Future 1 Nuclear Waste and the Distant Future PER F. PETERSON WILLIAM://www.issues.org/22.4/peterson.html Regulation of nuclear hazards must be consistent with rules governing other of the radioactive material generated by nuclear energy decays away over short times ranging from minutes to several

Kammen, Daniel M.

170

REGULATIONS ON PHOTOVOLTAIC MODULE DISPOSAL AND RECYCLING.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental regulations can have a significant impact on product use, disposal, and recycling. This report summarizes the basic aspects of current federal, state and international regulations which apply to end-of-life photovoltaic (PV) modules and PV manufacturing scrap destined for disposal or recycling. It also discusses proposed regulations for electronics that may set the ground of what is to be expected in this area in the near future. In the US, several states have started programs to support the recycling of electronic equipment, and materials destined for recycling often are excepted from solid waste regulations during the collection, transfer, storage and processing stages. California regulations are described separately because they are different from those of most other states. International agreements on the movement of waste between different countries may pose barriers to cross-border shipments. Currently waste moves freely among country members of the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and between the US and the four countries with which the US has bilateral agreements. However, it is expected, that the US will adopt the rules of the Basel Convention (an agreement which currently applies to 128 countries but not the US) and that the Convection's waste classification system will influence the current OECD waste-handling system. Some countries adopting the Basel Convention consider end-of-life electronics to be hazardous waste, whereas the OECD countries consider them to be non-hazardous. Also, waste management regulations potentially affecting electronics in Germany and Japan are mentioned in this report.

FTHENAKIS,V.

2001-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

171

Advanced Electrochemical Waste Forms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes ... Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b.

172

Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas) Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas) Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Transportation Utility Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Sales Tax Incentive Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Hazardous Waste Program is carried out by the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality which administers its' program under the Hazardous Waste management Act (Arkansas Code Annotated 8-7-202.) The Hazardous Waste Program is based off of the Federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act set forth in 40 CFR parts 260-279. Due to the great similarity to the

173

Análise política, econômica e ambiental da nova política energética européia: um enfoque sobre a indústria brasileira de bioetanol.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??O estudo proposto tem como objetivo conduzir uma análise política, ambiental e econômica da nova política energética européia em relação à indústria brasileira do bioetanol.… (more)

Luana Ladu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Act (Pennsylvania) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Act (Pennsylvania) Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Act (Pennsylvania) Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Act (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection This act provides a comprehensive strategy for the siting of commercial low-level waste compactors and other waste management facilities, and to ensure the proper transportation, disposal and storage of low-level radioactive waste. Commercial incineration of radioactive wastes is prohibited. Licenses are required for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities not licensed to accept low-level radioactive waste. Disposal at

175

California State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

California California State Regulations: California State of California The California Department of Conservation's Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources oversees the drilling, operation, maintenance, and plugging and abandonment of oil, natural gas, and geothermal wells. The regulatory program emphasizes the development of oil, natural gas, and geothermal resources in the state through sound engineering practices that protect the environment, prevent pollution, and ensure public safety. Other agencies that may be involved in the regulation of drilling wastes include the State Water Resources Control Board and appropriate Regional Water Quality Control Boards, the California Integrated Waste Management Board, the California Air Resources Board and appropriate Air Quality Management Districts or Air Pollution Control Districts, and the Department of Toxic Substances Control.

176

Colorado State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Colorado Colorado State Regulations: Colorado State of Colorado The Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC), a division of the Department of Natural Resources (DNR), regulates oil and gas activities in Colorado. The COGCC has broad statutory authority with respect to impacts on any air, water, soil, or biological resources resulting from oil and gas operations. The COGCC implements the state ground water standards and classifications as they relate to oil and gas exploration and production (E&P) activities. The COGCC has jurisdiction for all Class II injection wells except those on Indian lands. The COGCC has jurisdiction for the management of all E&P wastes except at commercial disposal facilities. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) administers the environmental protection laws related to air quality, waste discharge to surface water, and commercial disposal facilities.

177

Wyoming State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wyoming Wyoming State Regulations: Wyoming State of Wyoming The Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (WOGCC) is the state agency authorized to regulate oil and gas exploration and production waste. The Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) administers general environmental protection regulations. Contact Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission 2211 King Blvd. Casper, WY 82602 (street address) P.O. Box 2640 Casper, WY 82602 (mailing address) (307) 234-7147 (phone) (307) 234-5306 (fax) Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality 122 West 25th Street, Herscheler Building Cheyenne, WY 82002 (307) 777-7937 (phone) (307) 777-7682 (fax) Disposal Practices and Applicable Regulations Document # 4855, Agency (Oil and Gas Conservation Commission), General Agency, Board or Commission Rules, Chapter 4 (Environmental Rules, Including Underground Injection Control Program Rules for Enhanced Recovery and Disposal Projects), Section 1. Pollution and Surface Damage (Forms 14A and 14B) of the Wyoming Rules and Regulations contains the environmental rules administered by the WOGCC with respect to management options for exploration and production waste.

178

Transuranic contaminated waste container characterization and data base. Revision I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is developing regulations governing the management, handling and disposal of transuranium (TRU) radioisotope contaminated wastes as part of the NRC's overall waste management program. In the development of such regulations, numerous subtasks have been identified which require completion before meaningful regulations can be proposed, their impact evaluated and the regulations implemented. This report was prepared to assist in the development of the technical data base necessary to support rule-making actions dealing with TRU-contaminated wastes. An earlier report presented the waste sources, characteristics and inventory of both Department of Energy (DOE) generated and commercially generated TRU waste. In this report a wide variety of waste sources as well as a large TRU inventory were identified. The purpose of this report is to identify the different packaging systems used and proposed for TRU waste and to document their characteristics. This document then serves as part of the data base necessary to complete preparation and initiate implementation of TRU waste container and packaging standards and criteria suitable for inclusion in the present TRU waste management program. It is the purpose of this report to serve as a working document which will be used as appropriate in the TRU Waste Management Program. This report, and those following, will be compatible not only in format, but also in reference material and direction.

Kniazewycz, B.G.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

MESA MODELS OF CLASSICAL NOVA OUTBURSTS: THE MULTICYCLE EVOLUTION AND EFFECTS OF CONVECTIVE BOUNDARY MIXING  

SciTech Connect

Novae are cataclysmic variables driven by accretion of H-rich material onto a white dwarf (WD) star from its low-mass main-sequence binary companion. New time-domain observational capabilities, such as the Palomar Transient Factory and Pan-STARRS, have revealed a diversity of their behavior that should be theoretically addressed. Nova outbursts depend sensitively on nuclear physics data, and more readily available nova simulations are needed in order to effectively prioritize experimental effort in nuclear astrophysics. In this paper, we use the MESA stellar evolution code to construct multicycle nova evolution sequences with CO WD cores. We explore a range of WD masses and accretion rates as well as the effect of different cooling times before the onset of accretion. In addition, we study the dependence on the elemental abundance distribution of accreted material and convective boundary mixing at the core-envelope interface. Models with such convective boundary mixing display an enrichment of the accreted envelope with C and O from the underlying WD that is commensurate with observations. We compare our results with the previous work and investigate a new scenario for novae with the {sup 3}He-triggered convection.

Denissenkov, Pavel A.; Herwig, Falk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); Bildsten, Lars; Paxton, Bill, E-mail: pavelden@uvic.ca, E-mail: fherwig@uvic.ca, E-mail: bildsten@kitp.ucsb.edu, E-mail: paxton@kitp.ucsb.edu [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, Kohn Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)] [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, Kohn Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

HANFORD FACILITY ANNUAL DANGEROUS WASTE REPORT CY2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Facility Annual Dangerous Waste Report (ADWR) is prepared to meet the requirements of Washington Administrative Code Sections 173-303-220, Generator Reporting, and 173-303-390, Facility Reporting. In addition, the ADWR is required to meet Hanford Facility RCR4 Permit Condition I.E.22, Annual Reporting. The ADWR provides summary information on dangerous waste generation and management activities for the Calendar Year for the Hanford Facility EPA ID number assigned to the Department of Energy for RCRA regulated waste, as well as Washington State only designated waste and radioactive mixed waste. An electronic database is utilized to collect and compile the large array of data needed for preparation of this report. Information includes details of waste generated on the Hanford Facility, waste generated offsite and sent to Hanford for management, and other waste management activities conducted at Hanford, including treatment, storage, and disposal. Report details consist of waste descriptions and weights, waste codes and designations, and waste handling codes, In addition, for waste shipped to Hanford for treatment and/or disposal, information on manifest numbers, the waste transporter, the waste receiving facility, and the original waste generators are included. In addition to paper copies, the report is also transmitted electronically to a web site maintained by the Washington State Department of Ecology.

SKOLRUD, J.O.

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste regulations nova" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Cost of meeting geothermal liquid effluent disposal regulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Background information is presented on the characteristics of liquid wastes and the available disposal options. Regulations that may directly or indirectly influence liquid waste disposal are reviewed. An assessment of the available wastewater-treatment systems is provided. A case study of expected liquid-waste-treatment and disposal costs is summarized. (MHR)

Wells, K.D.; Currie, J.W.; Price, B.A.; Rogers, E.A.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Understanding Cement Waste Forms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 29, 2009 ... Ongoing nuclear operations, decontamination and decommissioning, salt waste disposal, and closure of liquid waste tanks result in ...

183

Waste Minimization Contents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About the 1996 International Symposium on Extraction and Processing for the Treatment and Minimization of Wastes: Waste Minimization Contents ...

184

Gaines County Solid Waste Management Act (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gaines County Solid Waste Management Act (Texas) Gaines County Solid Waste Management Act (Texas) Gaines County Solid Waste Management Act (Texas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Gaines County Solid Waste Management District This Act establishes the Gaines County Solid Waste Management District, a governmental body to develop and carry out a regional water quality protection program through solid waste management and regulation of waste disposal. The District has the power to prepare, adopt plans for, purchase, obtain permits for, construct, acquire, own, operate, maintain, repair, improve, and extend inside and outside the boundaries of the district any works,

185

Chapter 38 Hazardous Waste Permitting Process (Kentucky) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 Hazardous Waste Permitting Process (Kentucky) 8 Hazardous Waste Permitting Process (Kentucky) Chapter 38 Hazardous Waste Permitting Process (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department for Environmental Protection This administrative regulation establishes the general provisions for storage, treatment, recycling, or disposal of hazardous waste. It provides information about permits and specific requirements for containers, tanks,

186

Chapter 32 Standards Applicable to Generators of Hazardous Waste (Kentucky)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 Standards Applicable to Generators of Hazardous Waste 2 Standards Applicable to Generators of Hazardous Waste (Kentucky) Chapter 32 Standards Applicable to Generators of Hazardous Waste (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department for Environmental Protection This administrative regulation establishes procedures to establish the applicable general provisions for generators of hazardous waste. It also

187

Construction of AC Motor Controllers for NOvA Experiment Upgrades  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I have been constructing Alternating Current (AC) motor controllers for manipulation of particle beam detectors. The capability and reliability of these motor controllers are essential to the Laboratory's mission of accurate analysis of the particle beam's position. The device is moved in and out of the beam's path by the motor controller followed by the Neutrinos at the Main Injector Off-Axis {nu}{sub e} Appearance (NOvA) Experiment further down the beam pipe. In total, I built and tested ten ac motor controllers for new beam operations in the NOvA experiment. These units will prove to be durable and provide extremely accurate beam placement for NOvA Experiment far into the future.

Cooley, Patrick; /Fermilab

2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

188

Clean Stuff: the Latest from NOVA's "Making Stuff" Mini-Series | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Stuff: the Latest from NOVA's "Making Stuff" Mini-Series Clean Stuff: the Latest from NOVA's "Making Stuff" Mini-Series Clean Stuff: the Latest from NOVA's "Making Stuff" Mini-Series February 4, 2011 - 3:27pm Addthis Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What are the key facts? Materials Science technology of transforming plastics - say from grocery bags - into carbon nanotubes and spheres, which can then be used in lithium-ion batteries, can be used for an array of other applications. The same technology can be used to produce the anti-malarial drug artemisinin thereby reducing its price, and increasing its availability, to people in the developing world. After yet another Snowpocalypse, everyone's beginning to think spring. Presumably that includes Punxsutawney Phil, who called for an early one

189

Regulatory requirements important to Hanford single-shell tank waste management decisions  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an initial analysis of the regulations that may be pertinent to SST management activities (e.g., characterization, disposal, retrieval, processing, etc.) and the interrelationships among those regulations. Waste disposal decisions regarding SST waste must consider the regulatory requirements against which technical solutions will be evaluated. Regulatory requirements can also be used as guidelines for management and disposal of waste in a manner that protects human health and safety and the environment. Also, in cases where waste management regulations do not specifically address a waste form, such as radioactive mixed waste, the SST waste may come under the purview of a number of regulations related to radioactive waste management, hazardous waste management, and water and air quality protection. This report provides a comprehensive review of the environmental pollution control and radioactive waste management statutes and regulations that are relevant to SST waste characterization and management. Also, other statutes and regulations that contain technical standards that may be used in the absence of directly applicable regulations are analyzed. 8 refs., 4 figs.

Keller, J.F.; Woodruff, M.G.; Schmidt, A.J.; Hendrickson, P.L.; Selby, K.B.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Mixed waste removal from a hazardous waste storage tank  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spent fuel transfer canal at the Oak Ridge Graphite Reactor was found to be leaking 400 gallons of water per day into the surrounding soil. Sampling of the sediment layer on the floor of the canal to determine the environmental impact of the leak identified significant radiological contamination and elevated levels of cadmium and lead which are hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Under RCRA regulations and Rules of Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, the canal was considered a hazardous waste storage tank. This paper describes elements of the radiological control program established in support of a fast-track RCRA closure plan that involved underwater mapping of the radiation fields, vacuuming, and ultra-filtration techniques that were successfully used to remove the mixed waste sediments and close the canal in a method compliant with state and federal regulations.

Geber, K.R.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource! energy forum Case Studies from Estonia, Switzerland, Germany BREFs and their BATs Next Generation of Waste Fired Power Plants: Getting the most out of your trash Bossart,· ABB Waste-to-Energy Plants Edmund Fleck,· ESWET Marcel van Berlo,· Afval Energie Bedrijf From

Columbia University

192

Waste and Materials Disposition Information | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste and Materials Disposition Waste and Materials Disposition Information Waste and Materials Disposition Information Waste and Materials Disposition Information As the Office of Environmental Management (EM) fulfills its mission, waste and materials disposition plays a vital role in the cleanup of radioactive waste and the environmental legacy of nuclear weapons production and nuclear energy research. Disposal of waste frequently falls on the critical path of cleanup projects. Significant planning resources are spent to identify alternatives and find a path that is cost-effective and in the best interest of the Federal government. In many instances, waste disposition, (processing, treatment and disposal) is part of cleanup agreements and is of interest to stakeholders and requires the oversight of regulators.

193

Georgia Waste Control Law (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Control Law (Georgia) Waste Control Law (Georgia) Georgia Waste Control Law (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Waste Control Law makes it unlawful to dump waste in any lakes, streams

194

Solid Waste Reduction, Recovery, and Recycling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reduction, Recovery, and Recycling Reduction, Recovery, and Recycling Solid Waste Reduction, Recovery, and Recycling < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Natural Resources This statute expresses the strong support of the State of Wisconsin for the reduction of the amount of solid waste generated, the reuse, recycling and composting of solid waste, and resource recovery from solid waste. The statute also notes that research, development and innovation in the design, management and operation of solid waste reduction, reuse, recycling,

195

Hazardous Waste Management (North Carolina) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(North Carolina) (North Carolina) Hazardous Waste Management (North Carolina) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Construction Fuel Distributor Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environment and Natural Resources These rules identify and list hazardous waste and set standards for the generators and operators of such waste as well as owners or operators of waste facilities. They also stats standards for surface impoundments and location standards for facilities. An applicant applying for a permit for a hazardous waste facility shall

196

Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Dakota) Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Dakota) Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Fuel Distributor Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources It is the public policy of the state of South Dakota to regulate the control and generation, transportation, treatment, storage, and disposal of hazardous wastes. The state operates a comprehensive regulatory program of hazardous waste management, and the South Dakota Department of Environment

197

Optimizing the National TRU waste system transportation program.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of the National TRU Waste Program (NTP) is to operate the system safely and cost-effectively, in compliance with applicable regulations and agreements, and at full capacity in a fully integrated mode. One of the objectives of the Department of Energy's Carlsbad Field Office (DOE/CBFO) is to complete the current Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) mission for the disposal of the nation's legacy transuranic (TRU) waste at least IO years earlier thus saving approximately %7B. The National TRU Waste Optimization Plan (1) recommends changes to accomplish this. This paper discusses the optimization of the National TRU Waste System Transportation Program.

Lott, S. A. (Sheila A.); Countiss, S. (Sue)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Update on cavern disposal of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some types of oil and gas production and processing wastes contain naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). If NORM is present at concentrations above regulatory levels in oil field waste, the waste requires special disposal practices. The existing disposal options for wastes containing NORM are limited and costly. Argonne National Laboratory has previously evaluated the feasibility, legality, risk and economics of disposing of nonhazardous oil field wastes, other than NORM waste, in salt caverns. Cavern disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste, other than NORM waste, is occurring at four Texas facilities, in several Canadian facilities, and reportedly in Europe. This paper evaluates the legality, technical feasibility, economics, and human health risk of disposing of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes in salt caverns as well. Cavern disposal of NORM waste is technically feasible and poses a very low human health risk. From a legal perspective, a review of federal regulations and regulations from several states indicated that there are no outright prohibitions against NORM disposal in salt caverns or other Class II wells, except for Louisiana which prohibits disposal of radioactive wastes or other radioactive materials in salt domes. Currently, however, only Texas and New Mexico are working on disposal cavern regulations, and no states have issued permits to allow cavern disposal of NORM waste. On the basis of the costs currently charged for cavern disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW), NORM waste disposal in caverns is likely to be cost competitive with existing NORM waste disposal methods when regulatory agencies approve the practice.

Veil, J. A.

1998-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

199

GRR/Elements/18-CA-c.1 - What Level of Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Does  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Elements/18-CA-c.1 - What Level of Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Does GRR/Elements/18-CA-c.1 - What Level of Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Does the Facility Require < GRR‎ | Elements Jump to: navigation, search Edit 18-CA-b.1 - What Level of Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Does the Facility Require California employs a five-tier permitting program which imposes regulatory requirements matching the degree of risk posed by the level of hazardous waste: * The Full Permit Tier includes all facilities requiring a RCRA permit as well as selected non-RCRA activities under Title 22 California Code of Regulations. * The Standardized Permit Tier includes facilities that manage waste not regulated by RCRA, but regulated as hazardous waste in California. * Onsite Treatment Permits (3-Tiered) includes onsite treatment of non-RCRA waste regulated in California.

200

Environmental Regulators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Reports Brookhaven's Environmental Regulators When it comes to the environment, Brookhaven National Laboratory must comply with the regulations of many local, state and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste regulations nova" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

GRR/Section 18-CO-b - Hazardous Waste Permit Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 18-CO-b - Hazardous Waste Permit Process GRR/Section 18-CO-b - Hazardous Waste Permit Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-CO-b - Hazardous Waste Permit Process 18COBHazardousWastePermitProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment Regulations & Policies Colorado Hazardous Waste Regulations Part 260 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18COBHazardousWastePermitProcess.pdf 18COBHazardousWastePermitProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Hazardous waste is a regulated substance and facilities that treat, store

202

Purex waste facility scope design -- 241-AX  

SciTech Connect

It is planned for the Purex plant to be the base load plant and therefore it will not be effected by small changes in production schedules. It is of utmost importance to have adequate waste storage capacities at Purex to handle all conceivable production demands and to permit flexibility in semi-permanent storage of self-boiling wastes without jeopardizing production schedules, and diminishing safety regulations, or reducing operability. The purpose of this report is to present the design scope and the fundamental requirements for a new Purex waste storage tank farm to be designated as 241-AX.

Stivers, H.W.

1956-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

203

The Remote-Handled TRU Waste Program  

SciTech Connect

RH TRU Waste is radioactive waste that requires shielding in addition to that provided by the container to protect people nearby from radiation exposure. By definition, the radiation dose rate at the outer surface of the container is greater than 200 millirem per hour and less than 1,000 rem per hour. The DOE is proposing a process for the characterization of RH TRU waste planned for disposal in the WIPP. This characterization process represents a performance-driven approach that satisfies the requirements of the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations for WIPP long-term performance, the transportation requirements of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Department of Transportation, as well as the technical safety requirements of RH TRU waste handling. The transportation, management and disposal of RH TRU waste is regulated by external government agencies as well as by the DOE itself. Externally, the characterization of RH-TRU waste for disposal at the WIPP is regulated by 20.4.1.500 New Mexico Administrative Code (incorporating 40 CFR 261.13) for the hazardous constituents and 40 CFR 194.24 for the radioactive constituents. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission certifies the shipping casks and the transportation system must meet DOT regulations. Internally, the DOE evaluates the environmental impacts of RH TRU waste transportation, handling and disposal through its National Environmental Policy Act program. The operational safety is assessed in the RH TRU Waste Safety Analysis Report, to be approved by the DOE. The WIPP has prepared a modification request to the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit that includes modifications to the WIPP facility for the safe receipt and handling of RH TRU waste and the addition of an RH TRU waste analysis plan. Modifications to the facility include systems and equipment for safe handling of RHTRU containers. Two shipping casks are to be used to optimize RH TRU was te throughput: the RH-72B and the CNS 10-160B transportation casks. Additionally, a draft Notification of Proposed Change to the EPA 40 CFR 194 Certification of the WIPP has been prepared, which contains a proposal for the RH TRU characterization program for compliance with the EPA requirements.

Gist, C. S.; Plum, H. L.; Wu, C. F.; Most, W. A.; Burrington, T. P.; Spangler, L. R.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

204

Record of Decision on Treating Transuranic (TRU)/Alpha Low-Level Waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (DOE/EIS-0305) (8/9/00)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

83 83 Federal Register / Vol. 65, No. 154 / Wednesday, August 9, 2000 / Notices 1 TRU waste is waste containing alpha-emitting radionuclides with an atomic number greater than 92 and half-lives greater than 20 years, at concentrations greater than 100 nanocuries per gram of waste. 2 Alpha low-level waste is low-level waste that contains alpha-emitting isotopes. 3 Mixed waste contains radioactive waste regulated under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, and a hazardous component subject to RCRA regulation. 4 Low-level waste is any radioactive waste that is not classified as high-level waste, spent nuclear fuel, TRU waste, byproduct material, or mixed waste. 5 Remote-handled TRU/alpha low-level waste contains alpha-, beta-, and gamma-emitting isotopes with a surface dose rate greater than 200 millirem

205

Waste Hoist  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Primary Hoist: 45-ton Rope-Guide Friction Hoist Largest friction hoist in the world when it was built in 1985 Completely enclosed (for contamination control), the waste hoist at WIPP is a modern friction hoist with rope guides (uses a balanced counterweight and tail ropes). With a 45-ton capacity, it was the largest friction hoist in the world when it was built in 1986. Hoist deck footprint: 2.87m wide x 4.67m long Hoist deck height: 2.87m wide x 7.46m high Access height to the waste hoist deck is limited by a high-bay door at 4.14m high Nominal configuration is 2-cage (over/under), with bottom (equipment) cage interior height of 4.52m The photo, at left, shows the 4.14m high-bay doors at the top collar of the waste hoist shaft. The perpendicular cross section of the opening is 3.5m x 4.14m, but the bottom cage cross section is 2.87m x 4.5m (and 4.67m into the plane of the photo).

206

The K1 Tide on the Continental Shelf from Nova Scotia to Cape Hatteras  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A description is given of the K1 tide over the northeast continental shelf off North America from Nova Scotia to Cape Hatteras. Analyzed pressure data obtained from W. Brown and J. Irish (University of New Hampshire) have been used to draw up the ...

Peter R. Daifuku; Robert C. Beardsley

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Storm-Induced Circulation in Lunenburg Bay of Nova Scotia: Observations and Numerical Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An extreme weather event (Hurricane Juan) made landfall in Nova Scotia, Canada, in September 2003. The storm produced an 70-cm storm surge and 40 cm s?1 coastal currents in Lunenburg Bay, registered by a coastal observing system. A fine-...

Liang Wang; Jinyu Sheng; Alex E. Hay; Douglas J. Schillinger

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Instrumented Aircraft Observations of the Katabatic Wind Regime Near Terra Nova Bay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two aircraft missions to sample the boundary layer dynamics associated with the intense katabatic wind regime at Terra Nova Bay, Antarctica were flown on successive days in early November 1987. Light winds averaging 5 m s?1 were monitored at the ...

Thomas R. Parish; David H. Bromwich

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

The Structure of a Winter Storm Producing Heavy Precipitation over Nova Scotia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 22 February 1986 Nova Scotia experienced heavy precipitation in the form of snow, freezing precipitation, and rain from a storm having a central pressure no lower than 99.3 kPa. Using observations obtained during the Canadian Atlantic Storms ...

R. E. Stewart; C. A. Lin; S. R. Macpherson

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Exquisite Nova Light Curves from the Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present light curves of three classical novae (KT Eridani, V598 Puppis, V1280 Scorpii) and one recurrent nova (RS Ophiuchi) derived from data obtained by the Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI) on board the Coriolis satellite. SMEI provides near complete sky-map coverage with precision visible-light photometry at 102-minute cadence. The light curves derived from these sky maps offer unprecedented temporal resolution around, and especially before, maximum light, a phase of the nova eruption normally not covered by ground-based observations. They allow us to explore fundamental parameters of individual objects including the epoch of the initial explosion, the reality and duration of any pre-maximum halt (found in all three fast novae in our sample), the presence of secondary maxima, speed of decline of the initial light curve, plus precise timing of the onset of dust formation (in V1280 Sco) leading to estimation of the bolometric luminosity, white dwarf mass and object distance. For KT Eri, Liverpool Telescop...

Hounsell, R; Hick, P P; Buffington, A; Jackson, B V; Clover, J M; Shafter, A W; Darnley, M J; Mawson, N R; Steele, I A; Evans, A; Eyres, S P S; O'Brien, T J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Medical School Biomedical Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medical School Biomedical Waste Labware, gloves, pipets, pipet tips Stock cultures, bacterial with or without needles, razor blades, scalpel blades) Key: Pathological waste BL1 & BL2 waste (low risk ­ LR) BL2 waste (moderate risk - MR)/BL3 waste Blood Blood Autoclave Needle box Metal Cart Must either bleach

Cooley, Lynn

212

Waste Sorting Activity Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Sorting Activity Introduction: This waste sorting game was originally designed to be one have completed the waste sorting activity quickly, no team was able to complete the waste sorting task who were unfamiliar with Dalhousie's waste management system. Goals: The primary goal of the activity

Beaumont, Christopher

213

2007 Annual Mitigation Report for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CFR Part 194, Criteria for the Certification and Re-Certification of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Compliance with the 40 CFR Part 191 Disposal Regulations. 25. U.S....

214

RANKINE CYCLE WASTE HEAT RECOVERY SYSTEM - Energy Innovation Portal  

This disclosure relates to a waste heat recovery (WHR) system and to a system and method for regulation of a fluid inventory in a condenser and a receiver of a ...

215

Hanford Site Hazardous waste determination report for transuranic debris waste streams NPFPDL2A  

SciTech Connect

This hazardous waste determination report (Report) describes the process and information used on the Hanford Site to determine that waste stream number NPFPDLZA, consisting of 30 containers of contact-handled transuranic debris waste, is not hazardous waste regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) or the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act. For a waste to be hazardous under these statutes, the waste either must be specifically listed as a hazardous waste, or exhibit one or more of the characteristics of a hazardous waste, Le., ignitability, corrosivity, reactivity, or toxicity. Waste stream NPFPDLZA was generated, packaged, and placed into storage between 1993 and 1997. Extensive knowledge of the waste generating process, facility operational history, and administrative controls and operating procedures in effect at the time of generation, supported the initial nonhazardous waste determination. Because of the extent and reliability of information pertaining to this waste type, and the total volume of waste in the debris matrix parameter category, the Hanford Site is focusing initial efforts on this and similar waste streams for the first shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). RCRA regulations authorize hazardous waste determinations to be made either by using approved sampling and analysis methods or by applying knowledge of the waste in light of the materials or the process(es) used. This latter approach typically is referred to as process knowledge. The Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan (CAO-94-1010) for WIPP refers to acceptable knowledge in essentially the same terms; acceptable knowledge as used throughout this Report is synonymous with the term process knowledge. The 30 containers addressed in this Report were characterized by the following methods: Acceptable knowledge; Nondestructive examination using real-time radiography; Visual examination; and Headspace gas sampling and analysis. The initial nonhazardous waste determination was based solely on acceptable knowledge. Relevant administrative documents and operating methods in effect at the time of waste generation were reviewed, generator waste profiles and certifications were examined, and personnel interviews were conducted. The acceptable knowledge information and supporting data were further evaluated based on the results of nondestructive examination, visual examination, and container headspace gas analysis. In all cases, the physical examination processes supported the initial nonhazardous waste determination, and in effect served to validate and finalize that determination. Sections 2.0 through 5.0 of this Report describe in more detail the actions taken and conclusions reached with respect to this nonhazardous waste determination, The hazardous waste determination process described in this Report fully satisfies the requirements of 40 CFR 261, and the Memorandum of Agreement (MOA-June 16, 1999) signed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the New Mexico Environment Department pertaining to the exchange of waste stream information.

WINTERHALDER, J.A.

1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

216

Numerical simulation of hydrothermal salt separation process and analysis and cost estimating of shipboard liquid waste disposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to environmental regulations, waste water disposal for US Navy ships has become a requirement which impacts both operations and the US Navy's budget. In 2006, the cost for waste water disposal Navy-wide was 54 million ...

Hunt, Andrew Robert

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Waste Management Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Management Facility ISO 14001 Registered A wide range of wastes are generated during the normal course of business at BNL. These waste streams are common to many businesses...

218

Waste Logic Decommissioning Waste Manager 2.0 Users Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Decommissioning Waste Manager, part of EPRI's Waste Logic series of computer programs, analyzes decommissioning waste cost and volume reduction strategies with the intent of quantifying the existing waste management program for any given waste generator.

2001-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

219

Disposal of Rocky Flats residues as waste  

SciTech Connect

Work is underway at the Rocky Flats Plant to evaluate alternatives for the removal of a large inventory of plutonium-contaminated residues from the plant. One alternative under consideration is to package the residues as transuranic wastes for ultimate shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Current waste acceptance criteria and transportation regulations require that approximately 1000 cubic yards of residues be repackaged to produce over 20,000 cubic yards of WIPP certified waste. The major regulatory drivers leading to this increase in waste volume are the fissile gram equivalent, surface radiation dose rate, and thermal power limits. In the interest of waste minimization, analyses have been conducted to determine, for each residue type, the controlling criterion leading to the volume increase, the impact of relaxing that criterion on subsequent waste volume, and the means by which rules changes may be implemented. The results of this study have identified the most appropriate changes to be proposed in regulatory requirements in order to minimize the costs of disposing of Rocky Flats residues as transuranic wastes.

Dustin, D.F.; Sendelweck, V.S. [EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Plant; Rivera, M.A. [Lamb Associates, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Environmental Restoration and Waste Management: Strategic plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) site is currently divided into five major areas, Operable Units (OUs), and several Areas of Concern (AOCs), which are the focus of investigation and clean-up. The primary environmental concern is groundwater contamination and a major emphasis of the restoration activities is focused on this medium. Each year, BNL generates 60 tons of hazardous waste and 7,000 to 8,000 cubic feet of radioactive waste that result from research activities. These wastes are collected at a central location, packaged and shipped off site for disposal. The operations for Hazardous and Radioactive Waste Management are conducted in compliance with EPA and DOE regulations. BNL has continued to actively pursue means by which these wastes may be minimized. Activities in both the remediation and waste management arenas are intimately connected with the future vision of BNL. The long-range goal for remediation in conjunction with vigorous monitoring of BNL`s activities is to restore the site and maintain strong environmental controls. The goals of the waste minimization program include activities to find environmentally safe alternatives to materials currently in use. By careful planning, BNL will minimize the amount of all waste, including sanitary, that is generated on site.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste regulations nova" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Solid Waste (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The New Mexico Environment Department's Solid Waste Bureau manages solid waste in the state. The Bureau implements and enforces the rules established by the Environmental Improvement Board.

222

Industrial Waste Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9) Page 2 of 7 Industrial Waste Generation Work with Engineered Nanomaterials Power Consumption Historical Contamination (groundwater, soil) Hazardous Waste Generation Atmospheric...

223

Recycling Electronic Waste - Website  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 18, 2010 ... Joined: 2/13/2007. Below is a link to a website that has articles on recycling electronic waste. http://www.scientificamerican....ectronic-waste- ...

224

International Trade with Waste.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In this thesis, trade with waste between developed countries and the third world will be presented to analyze whether waste?trading can create a possible… (more)

Willén, Jenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact (South Dakota) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact (South Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact (South Dakota) Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Fuel Distributor Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Commission This legislation authorizes the state's entrance into the Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact, which provides for the cooperative management of low-level radioactive waste. The Compact is administered by a commission, which can regulate and impose fees on in-state radioactive waste generators. The states of Arizona, California,

226

Evaluating the quality and effectiveness of hazardous waste training programs  

SciTech Connect

An installation`s compliance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste regulations is strongly dependent on the knowledge, skill, and behavior of all individuals involved in the generation and management of hazardous waste. Recognizing this, Headquarters Air Force Materiel Command (HQ/AFMC) determined that an in-depth evaluation of hazardous waste training programs at each AFMC installation was an appropriate element in assessing the overall effectiveness of installation hazardous waste management programs in preventing noncompliant conditions. Consequently, pursuant to its authority under Air Force Instruction (AFI) 32-7042, Solid and Hazardous Waste Compliance (May 12, 1994) to support and maintain hazardous waste training, HQ/AFMC directed Argonne National Laboratory to undertake the Hazardous Waste Training Initiative. This paper summarizes the methodology employed in performing the evaluation and presents the initiative`s salient conclusions.

Kolpa, R.L.; Haffenden, R.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Weaver, M.A. [Headquarters Air Force Materiel Command, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality A hazardous waste facility permit from the Department of Environmental Quality is required to store, treat or dispose of hazardous waste materials, or to construct, own or operate any facility engaged in the operation of storing, treating or disposing of hazardous waste or storing recyclable materials. The Department shall not issue a permit for the treatment, disposal or temporary storage of any liquid hazardous waste in a

228

Illinois Solid Waste Management Act (Illinois) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Illinois Solid Waste Management Act (Illinois) Illinois Solid Waste Management Act (Illinois) Illinois Solid Waste Management Act (Illinois) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Illinois Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Illinois EPA It is the purpose of this Act to reduce reliance on land disposal of solid waste, to encourage and promote alternative means of managing solid waste, and to assist local governments with solid waste planning and management. In furtherance of those aims, while recognizing that landfills will continue to be necessary, this Act establishes the following waste management hierarchy, in descending order of preference, as State policy: volume reduction at the source; recycling and reuse; combustion

229

Technologies for environmental cleanup: Toxic and hazardous waste management  

SciTech Connect

This is the second in a series of EUROCOURSES conducted under the title, ``Technologies for Environmental Cleanup.`` To date, the series consist of the following courses: 1992, soils and groundwater; 1993, Toxic and Hazardous Waste Management. The 1993 course focuses on recent technological developments in the United States and Europe in the areas of waste management policies and regulations, characterization and monitoring of waste, waste minimization and recycling strategies, thermal treatment technologies, photolytic degradation processes, bioremediation processes, medical waste treatment, waste stabilization processes, catalytic organic destruction technologies, risk analyses, and data bases and information networks. It is intended that this course ill serve as a resource of state-of-the-art technologies and methodologies for the environmental protection manager involved in decisions concerning the management of toxic and hazardous waste.

Ragaini, R.C.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

1987 Oak Ridge model conference: Proceedings: Volume I, Part 2, Waste Management  

SciTech Connect

A conference sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) was held on Waste Mangement. Topics discussed were waste stabilization technologies regulations and standards, innovative treatment technology, waste stabilization projects. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Waste analysis plan for central waste complex  

SciTech Connect

This waste analysis plan (WAP) has been prepared for the Central Waste Complex which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. This WAP documents the methods used to characterize, and obtain and analyze representative samples of waste managed at this unit.

Weston, N.L.

1996-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

232

Texas State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Texas Texas State Regulations: Texas State of Texas The Railroad Commission of Texas (RCC), through the Oil and Gas Division, administers oil and gas exploration, development, and production operations, except for oil and gas leasing, royalty payments, surface damages through oil and gas operations, and operator-landowner contracts. The RCC and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ), formerly, the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC), have entered into a Memorandum of Understanding clarifying jurisdiction over oil field wastes generated in connection with oil and gas exploration, development, and production. The RCC Oil and Gas Division operates nine district offices, each staffed with field enforcement and support personnel.

233

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 4, Waste Management Facility report, Radioactive mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, handling method and containment vessel, waste number, waste designation and amount of waste.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

234

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

235

WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit - 2008 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Important new changes to the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) were implemented during 2007. The challenge was to implement these changes without impacting shipping schedules. Many of the changes required advanced preparation and coordination in order to transition to the new waste analysis paradigm, both at the generator sites and at the WIPP without interrupting the flow of waste to the disposal facility. Not only did aspects of waste characterization change, but also a new Permittees' confirmation program was created. Implementing the latter change required that new equipment and facilities be obtained, personnel hired, trained and qualified, and operating procedures written and approved without interruption to the contact-handled (CH) transuranic (TRU) waste shipping schedule. This was all accomplished successfully with no delayed or cancelled shipments. Looking forward to 2008 and beyond, proposed changes that will deal with waste in the DOE TRU waste complex is larger than the TRUPACT-IIs can handle. Size reduction of the waste would lead to unnecessary exposure risk and ultimately create more waste. The WIPP is working to have the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) certify the TRUPACT-III. The TRUPACT-III will be able to accommodate larger sized TRU mixed waste. Along with this new NRC-certified shipping cask, a new disposal container, the Standard Large Box, must be proposed in a permit modification. Containers for disposal of TRU mixed waste at the WIPP must meet the DOT 7A standards and be filtered. Additionally, as the TRUPACT-III/Standard Large Box loads and unloads from the end of the shipping cask, the proposed modification will add horizontal waste handling techniques to WIPP's vertical CH TRU waste handling operations. Another major focus will be the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit reapplication. The WIPP received its HWFP in October of 1999 for a term of ten years. The regulations and the HWFP require that a new permit application be submitted 180-days before the expiration date of the HWFP. At that time, the WIPP will request only one significant change, the permitting of Panel 8 to receive TRU mixed waste. (author)

Kehrman, R.F.; Most, W.A. [Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services, Carlsbad, New Mexico (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Tough Stuff: A Look Back at NOVA's "Making Stuff" Mini-Series | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tough Stuff: A Look Back at NOVA's "Making Stuff" Mini-Series Tough Stuff: A Look Back at NOVA's "Making Stuff" Mini-Series Tough Stuff: A Look Back at NOVA's "Making Stuff" Mini-Series January 21, 2011 - 12:12pm Addthis Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What are the key facts? Scientists at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab imitated the structure of mother of pearl to create the toughest ceramic ever produced and recently helped to develop a new type of damage-tolerant metallic glass that's stronger and tougher than steel. Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory developed a new 'super' stainless steel alloy that tolerates heat and resists rust far better than other metals -- and steel that can stand up to the blazing heat produced by stars. PBS' NOVA kicked off a four-part series, partially funded by the

237

MHK Projects/OpenHydro Bay of Fundy Nova Scotia CA | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bay of Fundy Nova Scotia CA Bay of Fundy Nova Scotia CA < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.7728,"lon":-66.3096,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

238

Microsoft Word - FINAL NOvA EA Text 061108 _3_.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

570 570 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Environmental Assessment for Construction and Operation of Neutrinos at the Main Injector Off-Axis Electron Neutrino (ν e ) Appearance Experiment (NOvA) at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois, and St. Louis County, Minnesota U.S. Department of Energy, Lead Agency Fermi Site Office Batavia, IL U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Cooperating Agency St. Paul District St. Paul, MN June 2008 (DOE/EA-1570) NOvA Environmental Assessment June 2008 ii DISCLAIMER Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any

239

New Eyes on the Expanding Universe: The SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Eyes on the Expanding Universe: The SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) New Eyes on the Expanding Universe: The SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) The Equation of the Universe PowerPoint Presentation The Cosmological Constant Slide 5 Hubble's Great Discovery - and Einstein's "biggest blunder" Slide 7 Slide 8 Slide 9 Slide 10 Slide 11 Slide 12 Slide 13 Slide 14 A Revolution in Cosmology Slide 16 Who Ordered That?! What we don't know Slide 19 Slide 20 Slide 21 Dark Energy Task Force Slide 23 Slide 24 Slide 25 Slide 26 Slide 27 "Standard-izable" Candles Slide 29 Slide 30 Slide 31 Slide 32 Slide 33 Slide 34 Slide 35 Slide 36 Slide 37 Slide 38 Slide 39 What is the Physical Mechanism for Type Ia SNe? Discovering Supernovae Slide 42 The Expansion History of the Universe Discovering Supernovae from Space Gravitational Weak Lensing Slide 46 Slide 47

240

First proton transfer reaction to study 18F+p resonances of novae interest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 18F(p,a)15O reaction is recognized as the predominant destruction mechanism of 18F in novae, and its rate is therefore important for understanding 18F production in nova outbursts. We have studied the properties of resonances in the 18F + p system using the proton-transfer reaction 18F(d, n) for the first time. We have observed fifteen 19Ne levels, five of which are below the proton threshold, including a subthreshold state at Ex = 6.289 MeV which has significant lp = 0 strength. The proton asymptotic normalization coefficient for this state and proton widths of states above the proton threshold, are extracted from angular distributions. The 18F(p,a)15O S-factor and reaction rate are re-evaluated, taking into account the subthreshold resonance and other new information determined in this experiment.

Adekola, Aderemi S [ORNL; Bardayan, Daniel W [ORNL; Blackmon, Jeff C [ORNL; Brune, C. [Ohio University; Chae, K. Y. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Domizioli, Carlo P [ORNL; Greife, U. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Heinen, Z. [Ohio University; Hornish, M. [Ohio University; Jones, K. L. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Kozub, R. L. [Tennessee Technological University; Livesay, Jake [ORNL; Ma, Zhanwen [ORNL; Massey, T. [Ohio University; Moazen, Brian [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nesaraja, Caroline D [ORNL; Pain, S. D. [Rutgers University; ShrinerJr., J. F. [Tennessee Technological University; Smith, Nathan A [ORNL; Smith, Michael Scott [ORNL; Thomas, J. S. [Rutgers University; Visser, D. W. [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Voinov, A. [Ohio University

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste regulations nova" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

First proton-transfer study of 18F + p resonances relevant for novae  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 18F(p, )15O reaction is the predominant destruction mechanism in novae of the radionuclide 18F, a target of -ray observatories. Thus, its rate is important for understanding 18F production in novae. We have studied resonances in the 18F+p system by making a measurement of a protontransfer reaction 18F(d,n). We have observed 15 19Ne levels, 5 of which are below the proton threshold, including a subthreshold state, which has significant lp=0 strength. Our data provide a direct determination of the spectroscopic strength of these states and new constraints on their spins and parities, thereby resolving a controversy, which involves the 8- and 38- keV resonances. The 18F(p, )15O reaction rate is reevaluated, which takes the subthreshold resonance and other new information determined in this experiment into account.

Adekola, A. S. [Ohio University, Athens; Bardayan, Daniel W [ORNL; Blackmon, Jeff C [ORNL; Brune, C. [Ohio University; Chae, K. Y. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Domizioli, C. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Greife, U. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Heinen, Z. [Ohio University; Hornish, M. [Ohio University; Jones, K. L. [Rutgers University; Kozub, R. L. [Tennessee Technological University; Livesay, R. J. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Ma, Z. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Massey, T. [Ohio University; Moazen, Brian [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nesaraja, Caroline D [ORNL; Pain, S. D. [Rutgers University; ShrinerJr., J. F. [Tennessee Technological University; Smith, N. D. [Tennessee Technological University; Smith, Michael Scott [ORNL; Thomas, J. S. [Rutgers University; Visser, D. W. [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Voinov, A. [Ohio University

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Nova-Scotia Power's Point Aconi plant overcomes CFB design problems to become rock of reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Point Aconi's circulating fluidized-bed boiler experienced erosion, corrosion, and fouling problems from the day it went on-line in 1993. After several frustrating years of unreliable operation, in late 1999, Nova Scotia Power discovered the right combination of engineering and fuel modifications. Today, after a switch to 80% petroleum coke and major boiler modifications, Point Aconi's output exceeds its original nameplate rating. For having the vision and fortitude to plan and execute a multi year, $20 million project to revitalize North America's first in-service utility CFB boiler, Nova Scotia Power's Point Aconi plant is the well-deserved winner of POWER magazine's 2006 Marmaduke Award for excellence in O & M. The award is named for Marmaduke Surfaceblow, the fictional marine engineer/plant troubleshooter par excellence. 10 figs. 1 tab.

Peltier, R.

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer Spectroscopy of the Nova-like BB Doradus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an analysis of the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer ({\\it{FUSE}}) spectra of the little-known southern nova-like BB Doradus. The spectrum was obtained as part of our Cycle 8 {\\it FUSE} survey of high declination nova-like stars. The FUSE spectrum of BB Dor, observed in a high state, is modeled with an accretion disk with a very low inclination (possibly lower than 10deg). Assuming an average WD mass of 0.8 solar leads to a mass accretion rate of 1.E-9 Solar mass/year and a distance of the order of 650 pc, consistent with the extremely low galactic reddening in its direction. The spectrum presents some broad and deep silicon and sulfur absorption lines, indicating that these elements are over-abundant by 3 and 20 times solar, respectively.

P. Godon; E. M. Sion; P. E. Barrett; P. Szkody; E. M. Schlegel

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

244

Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer Spectroscopy of the Nova-like BB Doradus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an analysis of the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer ({\\it{FUSE}}) spectra of the little-known southern nova-like BB Doradus. The spectrum was obtained as part of our Cycle 8 {\\it FUSE} survey of high declination nova-like stars. The FUSE spectrum of BB Dor, observed in a high state, is modeled with an accretion disk with a very low inclination (possibly lower than 10deg). Assuming an average WD mass of 0.8 solar leads to a mass accretion rate of 1.E-9 Solar mass/year and a distance of the order of 650 pc, consistent with the extremely low galactic reddening in its direction. The spectrum presents some broad and deep silicon and sulfur absorption lines, indicating that these elements are over-abundant by 3 and 20 times solar, respectively.

Godon, P; Barrett, P E; Szkody, P; Schlegel, E M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Radioactive tank waste remediation focus area  

SciTech Connect

EM`s Office of Science and Technology has established the Tank Focus Area (TFA) to manage and carry out an integrated national program of technology development for tank waste remediation. The TFA is responsible for the development, testing, evaluation, and deployment of remediation technologies within a system architecture to characterize, retrieve, treat, concentrate, and dispose of radioactive waste stored in the underground stabilize and close the tanks. The goal is to provide safe and cost-effective solutions that are acceptable to both the public and regulators. Within the DOE complex, 335 underground storage tanks have been used to process and store radioactive and chemical mixed waste generated from weapon materials production and manufacturing. Collectively, thes tanks hold over 90 million gallons of high-level and low-level radioactive liquid waste in sludge, saltcake, and as supernate and vapor. Very little has been treated and/or disposed or in final form.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Infectious waste feed system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An infectious waste feed system for comminuting infectious waste and feeding the comminuted waste to a combustor automatically without the need for human intervention. The system includes a receptacle for accepting waste materials. Preferably, the receptacle includes a first and second compartment and a means for sealing the first and second compartments from the atmosphere. A shredder is disposed to comminute waste materials accepted in the receptacle to a predetermined size. A trough is disposed to receive the comminuted waste materials from the shredder. A feeding means is disposed within the trough and is movable in a first and second direction for feeding the comminuted waste materials to a combustor.

Coulthard, E. James (York, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Understanding radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect

This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

Murray, R.L.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Solid Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Solid Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) Solid Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality This Act establishes rules for the permitting, posting of security, construction, operation, closure, maintenance and remediation of solid waste disposal sites; disposal of solid waste in ways that are environmentally safe and sanitary, as well as economically feasible; submission of laboratory reports or analyses performed by certified laboratories for the purposes of compliance monitoring and testing and for

249

Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Utility Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides rules and guidelines for landfills, including those that treat waste to generate electricity. The law provides information for permitting, installing, maintaining, monitoring, and closing landfills. There are no special provisions or exemptions for landfills used to generate electricity. However, the law does apply to landfills that do

250

Hazardous Waste Transporter Permits (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Waste Transporter Permits (Connecticut) Hazardous Waste Transporter Permits (Connecticut) Hazardous Waste Transporter Permits (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection Transportation of hazardous wastes into or through the State of Connecticut requires a permit. Some exceptions apply. The regulations provide

251

Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Waste Management Act Hazardous Waste Management Act Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act (HWMA) describes a

252

Interim Storage of Greater Than Class C Low Level Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report serves as a guideline for the safe, interim, on-site storage of low level radioactive waste (LLW) that exceeds the activity limitations for near-surface disposal set forth in 10 CFR 61.55. This waste, referred to as greater than Class C (GTCC) waste, exceeds the Class C limits in the referenced regulation. At the present time, there is no licensed disposal facility for GTCC waste in the United States. This situation forces commercial nuclear reactors to store it on site until a disposal facil...

2001-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

253

NOvA detector technology with intial performance from the surface prototype  

SciTech Connect

NOvA, the NuMI Off-Axis {nu}{sub e} Appearance experiment, will study {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations characterized by the mixing angle {Theta}{sub 13}. Provided {Theta}{sub 13} is large enough, NOvA may ultimately determine the ordering of the neutrino masses and measure CP violation in neutrino oscillations. A complementary pair of detectors will be constructed {approx}14 mrad off beam axis to optimize the energy profile of the neutrinos. This system consists of a surface based 14 kTon liquid scintillator tracking volume located 810 km from the main injector source (NuMI) in Ash River, Minnesota and a smaller underground 222 Ton near detector at the Fermilab. The first neutrino signals at the Ash River Site are expected prior to the 2012 accelerator shutdown. In the meantime, a near detector surface prototype has been completed and neutrinos from two Fermilab sources have been observed using the same highly segmented PVC and liquid scintillator detector system that will be deployed in the full scale experiment. Design and initial performance characteristics of this prototype system are being fed back into the design for the full NOvA program.

Muether, M.; /Fermilab

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Determining the Octant of $?_{23}$ with PINGU, T2K, NOvA and Reactor Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore the prospects of determining the octant of $\\theta_{23}$ with atmospheric neutrinos at PINGU. We study in detail the impact of energy and angle resolutions of the neutrino on the octant sensitivity. We show that the systematic uncertainties on the atmospheric neutrino flux predictions, especially the ones which affect the energy and zenith angle spectrum of the neutrinos, make a rather drastic reduction of the sensitivity of PINGU. We also study the prospects of measuring the octant of $\\theta_{23}$ in the long baseline experiments T2K and NOvA in conjunction with the reactor experiments. We study this for two configurations of NOvA and T2K and make a comparative analysis of them. From just 3 years of PINGU data, the octant could be determined at more than $3\\sigma$ C.L. for $sin^2\\theta_{23}0.586$ if we add the reactor data and if normal hierarchy is true. On addition of the data from T2K and NOvA, the sensitivity improves so that the octant could be determined at the $4\\sigma$ C.L. for $sin^2\\theta_{23}0.586$ if normal hierarchy is true. Even a $5\\sigma$ significance for the right octant can be achieved if $sin^2\\theta_{23}0.585$ from the combined data set for this case.

Sandhya Choubey; Anushree Ghosh

2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

255

Atlantic Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact (South  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Atlantic Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact Atlantic Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact (South Carolina) Atlantic Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Program Info Start Date 1986 State South Carolina Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Atlantic Compact Commission The Atlantic (Northeast) Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact is a cooperative effort to plan, regulate, and administer the disposal of low-level radioactive waste in the region. The states of Connecticut, New Jersey, and South Carolina are party to this compact

256

Nuclear waste solidification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High level liquid waste solidification is achieved on a continuous basis by atomizing the liquid waste and introducing the atomized liquid waste into a reaction chamber including a fluidized, heated inert bed to effect calcination of the atomized waste and removal of the calcined waste by overflow removal and by attrition and elutriation from the reaction chamber, and feeding additional inert bed particles to the fluidized bed to maintain the inert bed composition.

Bjorklund, William J. (Richland, WA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Los Alamos Waste Management Cost Estimation Model; Final report: Documentation of waste management process, development of Cost Estimation Model, and model reference manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report completes the Los Alamos Waste Management Cost Estimation Project, and includes the documentation of the waste management processes at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for hazardous, mixed, low-level radioactive solid and transuranic waste, development of the cost estimation model and a user reference manual. The ultimate goal of this effort was to develop an estimate of the life cycle costs for the aforementioned waste types. The Cost Estimation Model is a tool that can be used to calculate the costs of waste management at LANL for the aforementioned waste types, under several different scenarios. Each waste category at LANL is managed in a separate fashion, according to Department of Energy requirements and state and federal regulations. The cost of the waste management process for each waste category has not previously been well documented. In particular, the costs associated with the handling, treatment and storage of the waste have not been well understood. It is anticipated that greater knowledge of these costs will encourage waste generators at the Laboratory to apply waste minimization techniques to current operations. Expected benefits of waste minimization are a reduction in waste volume, decrease in liability and lower waste management costs.

Matysiak, L.M.; Burns, M.L.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Business Plan : Residential Solid Waste Collection.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Residential solid waste means all the solid wastes produced in household level, which includes bio-waste, metal, mixed wastes, organic and inorganic waste. The inability of… (more)

Mazengo, Dorice

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) Eligibility...

260

State Water Permit Regulation (Arkansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Permit Regulation (Arkansas) Permit Regulation (Arkansas) State Water Permit Regulation (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Fuel Distributor Industrial Utility Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Quality It is the purpose of this regulation to adopt standards applicable to the storage, discharge, or disposal of any waste which, if unregulated, will cause pollution of waters of the state or result in wastes being placed in a location where it is likely to cause pollution of the waters of the state. These standards are intended to protect public health and the environment, and prevent, control, or abate pollution. The State Water Permit Regulation is implemented to adopt standards applicable to the storage, discharge, or disposal of any waste that, if

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste regulations nova" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility project  

SciTech Connect

Mixed and low-level wastes generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are required to be managed according to applicable State and Federal regulations, and Department of Energy Orders that provide for the protection of human health and the environment. The Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project was chartered in 1991, by the Department of Energy to provide treatment capability for these mixed and low-level waste streams. The first project task consisted of conducting engineering studies to identify the waste streams, their potential treatment strategies, and the requirements that would be imposed on the waste streams and the facilities used to process them. The engineering studies, initiated in July 1991, identified 37 mixed waste streams, and 55 low-level waste streams. This report documents the waste stream information and potential treatment strategies, as well as the regulatory requirements for the Department of Energy-owned treatment facility option. The total report comprises three volumes and two appendices. This report consists of Volume 1, which explains the overall program mission, the guiding assumptions for the engineering studies, and summarizes the waste stream and regulatory information, and Volume 2, the Waste Stream Technical Summary which, encompasses the studies conducted to identify the INEL's waste streams and their potential treatment strategies.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Hazardous waste management in the Texas construction industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This pilot study reports the statewide, regulatory compliance of general construction contractors in Texas who generated regulated amounts of hazardous waste during 1990, defined by existing state and federal hazardous-waste-management regulations: specifically, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Texas Solid Waste Disposal Act (TSWDA). The study was needed because there is presently no knowledge of how well general contractors in Texas are complying with laws enacted to protect human health and the environment from the mismanagement of hazardous waste. The importance of this study is that it addresses the issue of whether regulatory compliance is a problem for general contractors in Texas and the construction industry in general. The implications for this stem from the potential that both environmental harm and enforcement activity could increase as a consequence . Using a combination of survey and archival design methods, the study derived two counts: (1) actual number of general contractors in Texas who generate regulated amounts of hazardous waste and observe regulatory requirements; and (2) estimated number of contractors in Texas who generate regulated amounts of hazardous waste. The comparison equates to one of "compilers" versus "should be complying." Dividing the count of compilers by the count of should-be compilers, equals the degree of regulatory compliance. Using a 95% confidence interval, the study observed that during 1990 only 1 out of 28 general contractors, generating regulated amounts of hazardous waste complied with regulatory requirements (a strong showing of noncompli-ance). In order to resolve the problem of non-compliance, the study recommends that related efforts be undertaken to: (a) expand this study, both in scope and detail to verify the problem identified; (b) improve industry understanding of waste management regulations; (c) promote observance of proper waste-management procedures; (d) summon government support for outreach programs aimed at improving waste management in the construction industry - in particular hazardous waste; (e) initiate further research to design solutions for hazardous-waste-management problems; and (f) implement hazardous-waste minimization and recovery practices in the construction industry.

Sprinkle, Donald Lee

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

HANFORD FACILITY ANNUAL DANGEROUS WASTE REPORT CY2003 [SEC 1 & 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Facility Annual Dangerous Waste Report (ADWR) is prepared to meet the requirements of Washington Administrative Code Sections 173-303-220, Generator Reporting, and 173-303-390, Facility Reporting. In addition, the ADWR is required to meet Hanford Facility RCRA Permit Condition I.E.22, Annual Reporting. The ADWR provides summary information on dangerous waste generation and management activities for the Calendar Year for the Hanford Facility EPA ID number assigned to the Department of Energy for RCRA regulated waste, as well as Washington State only designated waste and radioactive mixed waste. The Solid Waste Information and Tracking System (SWITS) database is utilized to collect and compile the large array of data needed for preparation of this report. Information includes details of waste generated on the Hanford Facility, waste generated offsite and sent to Hanford for management, and other waste management activities conducted at Hanford, including treatment, storage, and disposal. Report details consist of waste descriptions and weights, waste codes and designations, and waste handling codes. In addition, for waste shipped to Hanford for treatment and or disposal, information on manifest numbers, the waste transporter, the waste receiving facility, and the original waste generators are included. In addition to paper copies, the report is also transmitted electronically to a web site maintained by the Washington State Department of Ecology.

FREEMAN, D.A.

2004-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

264

Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Raya James Johnson Rad/Mixed Waste** Steve Bakhtiar – Leadhazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste at the Hazardoustraining. Radioactive and mixed waste generators must take

Waste Management Group

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Waste Minimization Plan Prepared by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Minimization Plan Prepared by: Environmental Health and Safety Department Revised February 2012 #12;Waste Minimization Plan Table of Contents Policy Statement........................................................... 3 Centralized Waste Management Program

266

Hazardous Waste Act (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

"Hazardous waste" means any solid waste or combination of solid wastes that because of their quantity, concentration or physical, chemical or infectious characteristics may:  cause or significantly...

267

NATURE OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES  

SciTech Connect

The integrated processes of nuclear industry are considered to define the nature of wastes. Processes for recovery and preparation of U and Th fuels produce wastes containing concentrated radioactive materials which present problems of confinement and dispersal. Fundamentals of waste treatment are considered from the standpoint of processes in which radioactive materials become a factor such as naturally occurring feed materials, fission products, and elements produced by parasitic neutron capture. In addition, the origin of concentrated fission product wastes is examined, as well as characteristics of present wastes and the level of fission products in wastes. Also, comments are included on high-level wastes from processes other than solvent extraction, active gaseous wastes, and low- to intermediate-level liquid wastes. (J.R.D.)

Culler, F.L. Jr.

1959-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

268

Applicable Laws and Regulations (List A) Modification M017  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Radioactive Material 6 CCR 1007-3 - Colorado Hazardous Waste Regulations 7 CCR 1101-14 - USTs and ASTs 8 CCR 1507-1 - Colorado Operation of Commercial Vehicles and...

269

Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) Reports and Records of Decision Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) Reports and Records of Decision The Final Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) is a nationwide study examining the environmental impacts of managing more than 2 million cubic meters of radioactive wastes from past, present, and future DOE activities. The WM PEIS will assist the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in improving the efficiency and reliability of management of its current and anticipated volumes of radioactive and hazardous wastes and will help DOE continue to comply with applicable laws and regulations and protect workers, public health and safety, and the environment. The WM PEIS

270

Transportation of RCRA hazardous wastes. RCRA Information Brief  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act (HMTA) regulate the transport of hazardous wastes. Under these statutes, specific pretransport regulatory requirements must be met by DOE before the shipment of hazardous wastes, including radioactive mixed wastes. The pretransport requirements are designed to help reduce the risk of loss, leakage, or exposure during shipment of hazardous materials and to communicate information on potential hazards posed by the hazardous material in transport. These goals are accomplished through the tracking of shipments, correctly packaging and labeling containers, and communicating potential hazards. Specific requirements include manifesting, packaging, marking and labeling waste packages; placarding transport vehicles; choosing appropriate waste transporters and shipment destinations; and record keeping and reporting. This information Brief focuses primarily on the transporter requirements both for transportation within a DOE facility and using a commercial transporter to transport RCRA hazardous wastes off-site.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Development of Cementitious Waste Forms for Nuclear Waste ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials Solutions for the Nuclear Renaissance. Presentation Title, Development of Cementitious Waste Forms for Nuclear Waste Immobilization.

272

Um modelo de vida em fadiga multiaxial de alto ciclo baseado em uma nova medida para a amplitude de tensão cisalhante.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Esta tese propõe um modelo de estimativa de vida para fadiga multiaxial de alto ciclo, baseado em uma nova medida para a amplitude de tensão… (more)

Roberto Dias Algarte

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Directions in low-level radioactive waste management: A brief history of commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a history of commercial low-level radioactive waste management in the United States, with emphasis on the history of six commercially operated low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The report includes a brief description of important steps that have been taken during the 1980s to ensure the safe disposal of low-level waste in the 1990s and beyond. These steps include the issuance of Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 61, Licensing Requirements for the Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, and steps taken by states and regional compacts to establish additional disposal sites. 42 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

How to deal with laboratory waste Radioactive waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How to deal with laboratory waste Radioactive waste: Any laboratory waste, whether chemical or biological, containing radioactive material, should be disposed as radioactive waste. Radioactive waste should be removed from the laboratory to the departmental waste area, soon after finishing the experiment

Maoz, Shahar

275

Solid Waste Management (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Connecticut) Connecticut) Solid Waste Management (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection Solid waste facilities operating in Connecticut must abide by these regulations, which describe requirements and procedures for issuing construction and operating permits; environmental considerations;

276

Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration stakeholder involvement model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is a program funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development. BWID supports the applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that together form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. Stakeholder participation in the DOE Environmental Management decision-making process is critical to remediation efforts. Appropriate mechanisms for communication with the public, private sector, regulators, elected officials, and others are being aggressively pursued by BWID to permit informed participation. This document summarizes public outreach efforts during FY-93 and presents a strategy for expanded stakeholder involvement during FY-94.

Kaupanger, R.M.; Kostelnik, K.M.; Milam, L.M.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Transuranic (TRU) Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Defined by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act as "waste containing more than 100 nanocuries of alpha-emitting transuranic isotopes per gram of waste with half-lives greater than 20 years, except for (A)...

278

Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is being designed to immobilize pretreated Hanford high-level waste and transuranic waste in borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters. Testing is being conducted in the HWVP Technology Development Project to ensure that adapted technologies are applicable to the candidate Hanford wastes and to generate information for waste form qualification. Empirical modeling is being conducted to define a glass composition range consistent with process and waste form qualification requirements. Laboratory studies are conducted to determine process stream properties, characterize the redox chemistry of the melter feed as a basis for controlling melt foaming and evaluate zeolite sorption materials for process waste treatment. Pilot-scale tests have been performed with simulated melter feed to access filtration for solids removal from process wastes, evaluate vitrification process performance and assess offgas equipment performance. Process equipment construction materials are being selected based on literature review, corrosion testing, and performance in pilot-scale testing. 3 figs., 6 tabs.

Larson, D.E.; Allen, C.R. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Kruger, O.L.; Weber, E.T. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Transuranic Waste Screener  

The TRU waste screener (TRU-WS) is a multifunctional system for the rapid screening of transuranic material for criticality safety or screening for TRU content in open trays or waste containers.

280

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy (DOE) is closing the circle on the generation, management, and disposal of transuranic waste. But the WIPP story is not just about radioactive waste. It is...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste regulations nova" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Immobilization of Nuclear Wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 20, 2010 ... Glassy and Glass Composite Nuclear Wasteforms: Michael Ojovan1; Bill Lee2; ... wastes which should be solidified for safe storage and disposal. ... has been vitrifying the Department of Energy's High Level Waste (HLW) at ...

282

Pet Waste Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

About 1 million pounds of dog waste is deposited daily in North Texas alone. That's why proper disposal of pet waste can make a big difference in the environment. 5 photos, 2 pages

Mechell, Justin; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

283

The wild wild waste: e-waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

E-Waste is a popular, informal name for discarded electronic products such as computers, VCRs, cameras, which have reached the end of their "useful life". Discarded electronic products contain a stew of toxic metals and chemicals such as lead, mercury, ... Keywords: donate, e-waste, ecology, efficiency, environment, green computing, hazardous material, re-use, recycle, reduce, thin-client, upgrade, virtualization

Scott E. Hanselman; Mahmoud Pegah

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Waste canister for storage of nuclear wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A waste canister for storage of nuclear wastes in the form of a solidified glass includes fins supported from the center with the tips of the fins spaced away from the wall to conduct heat away from the center without producing unacceptable hot spots in the canister wall.

Duffy, James B. (Fullerton, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Program for certification of waste from contained firing facility: Establishment of waste as non-reactive and discussion of potential waste generation problems  

SciTech Connect

Debris from explosives testing in a shot tank that contains 4 weight percent or less of explosive is shown to be non-reactive under the specified testing protocol in the Code of Federal Regulations. This debris can then be regarded as a non-hazardous waste on the basis of reactivity, when collected and packaged in a specified manner. If it is contaminated with radioactive components (e.g. depleted uranium), it can therefore be disposed of as radioactive waste or mixed waste, as appropriate (note that debris may contain other materials that render it hazardous, such as beryllium). We also discuss potential waste generation issues in contained firing operations that are applicable to the planned new Contained Firing Facility (CFF). The goal of this program is to develop and document conditions under which shot debris from the planned Contained Firing Facility (CFF) can be handled, shipped, and accepted for waste disposal as non-reactive radioactive or mixed waste. This report fulfills the following requirements as established at the outset of the program: 1. Establish through testing the maximum level of explosive that can be in a waste and still have it certified as non-reactive. 2. Develop the procedure to confirm the acceptability of radioactive-contaminated debris as non-reactive waste at radioactive waste disposal sites. 3. Outline potential disposal protocols for different CFF scenarios (e.g. misfires with scattered explosive).

Green, L., Garza, R., Maienschein, J., Pruneda, C.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

286

Mixed Waste Treatment Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of an ongoing integrated mixed waste program, EPRI has documented nuclear utility industry experience in the on-site treatment of mixed waste. This report reviews all available exclusions/exceptions to EPA permitting requirements for environmentally responsible on-site management of mixed waste. Included is a description of emerging mixed waste treatment technologies along with a detailed evaluation of off-site treatment/disposal facilities.

1996-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

287

Waste Package Design Methodology Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to describe the analytical methods and processes used by the Waste Package Design Section to establish the integrity of the various waste package designs, the emplacement pallet, and the drip shield. The scope of this report shall be the methodology used in criticality, risk-informed, shielding, source term, structural, and thermal analyses. The basic features and appropriateness of the methods are illustrated, and the processes are defined whereby input values and assumptions flow through the application of those methods to obtain designs that ensure defense-in-depth as well as satisfy requirements on system performance. Such requirements include those imposed by federal regulation, from both the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and those imposed by the Yucca Mountain Project to meet repository performance goals. The report is to be used, in part, to describe the waste package design methods and techniques to be used for producing input to the License Application Report.

D.A. Brownson

2001-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

288

Recycle Plastic Waste Recommended Action  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AR No. 5 Recycle Plastic Waste Recommended Action Separate scrap plastic bag waste from solid waste stream and recycle. This can be accomplished by either arranging for no-cost pick-up of loose waste or by selling baled waste material. Assessment Recommendation Summary Recommended Waste Cost Implementation

Tullos, Desiree

289

Waste Management and WasteWaste Management and Waste--toto--EnergyEnergy Status in SingaporeStatus in Singapore  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Management and WasteWaste Management and Waste--toto--EnergyEnergy Status in Singapore #12;Singapore's Waste Management · In 2003, 6877 tonnes/day (2.51 M tonnes/year) of MSW collected plants · 8% (non-incinerable waste) and incineration ash goes to the offshore Semakau Landfill · To reach

Columbia University

290

Bottlenecks and Waiting Points in Nucleosynthesis in X-ray bursts and Novae  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To better understand the energy generation and element synthesis occurring in novae and X-ray bursts, we give quantitative definitions to the concepts of ''bottlenecks'' and ''waiting points'' in the thermonuclear reaction flow. We use these criteria to search for bottlenecks and waiting points in post-processing element synthesis explosion simulations. We have incorporated these into the Computational Infrastructure for Nuclear Astrophysics, a suite of nuclear astrophysics codes available online at nucastrodata.org, so that anyone may perform custom searches for bottlenecks and waiting points.

Smith, Michael S.; Hix, W. Raphael; Nesaraja, Caroline D. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Lab, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831-6354 (United States); Sunayama, Tomomi [Knox College, 2 East South Street, Galesburg, Illinois, 61401-4999 (United States); Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, 06520 (United States); Lingerfelt, Eric J. [Computational Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Lab, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831-6354 (United States); Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Lab, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831-6354 (United States)

2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

291

Reducing waste, Photoby stcvcchan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I ' I I t Reducing waste, Photoby stcvcchan AMs President Mike Lee (left to right), Point Grey M U recycling given high priority on campus By GAVIN WILSON UBC is taking stepsto reduce waste and encourageGellatly,Vice-President,Administration and Finance,to develop and recommend university policies on waste recycling. Another task force has submitted

Farrell, Anthony P.

292

Hazardous Waste Management Training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hazardous Waste Management Training Persons (including faculty, staff and students) working be thoroughly familiar with waste handling and emergency procedures ap- plicable to their job responsibilities before handling hazardous waste. Departments are re- quired to keep records of training for as long

Dai, Pengcheng

293

Waste disposal package  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This is a claim for a waste disposal package including an inner or primary canister for containing hazardous and/or radioactive wastes. The primary canister is encapsulated by an outer or secondary barrier formed of a porous ceramic material to control ingress of water to the canister and the release rate of wastes upon breach on the canister. 4 figs.

Smith, M.J.

1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

294

Waste acceptance criteria for closure generated waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The PORTS Facility has been operating since 1954. The PORTS Facility is used to enrich uranium for nuclear navy applications and commercial nuclear reactors. The PORTS process uses molecular diffusion techniques to separate the U-235 isotope from the U-238 isotope. The PORTS Facility consists of a complex cascade of compressors and converters through which gaseous uranium hexafluoride feed is processed. The feed contains approximately 0.7 percent U-235 by weight while products contain from 4 to 97 percent U-235 by weight, depending on the final application. In general, the majority of the closure wastes generated at PORTS consists of personal protective equipment (PPE), rags, soils, decontamination solutions, and construction related debris. These hazardous wastes will be predominately characterized on the basis of process knowledge. PORTS assumes its conservative waste characterizations that are based on process knowledge are correct unless and until further investigation and/or analysis proves the constituents are not present or are present at concentrations below characteristic regulatory thresholds. Waste Acceptance Criteria for wastes generated by the closure of active and inactive RCRA facilities at PORTS has been developed. The criteria presented in this document govern the activities that are performed during the closure and subsequent generation of waste and relocation from the closure locations to the storage unit. These criteria are intended to ensure the proper handling, classification, processing, and storage of wastes in order to prevent hazardous waste release that may pose a threat to human health or the environment. Any wastes currently stored at each of the facilities that are to be closed will be transferred to the X-326 or X-7725 Storage Units. The waste transfers will be accomplished in accordance with the Container Transfer Plan.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Waste Disposal Matrix Type of Chemical University-related Waste Personal Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Disposal Matrix Type of Chemical University-related Waste Personal Waste Batteries, used or unwanted including lithium, alkaline, lead ­ acid or lithium aluminum hydride Chemical Waste Check Disposal of Toxics website for disposal options or Take to Bookstore Biological Waste Biological Waste Residential

Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

296

Direct measurement of the {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}){sup 15}O reaction at nova temperatures  

SciTech Connect

The {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}){sup 15}O reaction rate is crucial for understanding the final abundance of {sup 18}F predicted by nova models. The {gamma}-ray emission in the first few hours after a nova outburst is expected to be dominated by 511 keV annihilation photons from the decay of {sup 18}F, and so understanding its production can provide important constraints on the conditions during the outburst when compared with observations. Results are presented from the lowest-energy direct measurement to date, performed at the Isotope Separator and Accelerator radioactive beam facility at the TRIUMF laboratory, Canada. Cross section measurements at center-of-mass energies of 250, 330, 453, and 673 keV are obtained and the results compared to previous data and R-matrix calculations. The implications for the overall reaction rate in the context of nova explosions have been discussed.

Beer, C. E.; Laird, A. M.; Bentley, M. A.; Diget, C. A.; Fox, S. P.; Fulton, B. R. [Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Murphy, A. St. J.; Davinson, T.; Salter, P. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Buchman, L.; Davids, B.; Hager, U.; Howell, D.; Martin, L.; Ruiz, C.; Ruprecht, G.; Vockenhuber, C.; Walden, P. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

Radioactive Waste Management Basis  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

Perkins, B K

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

298

Municipal waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to apparatus for processing municipal waste, and more particularly to vibrating mesh screen conveyor systems for removing grit, glass, and other noncombustible materials from dry municipal waste. Municipal waste must be properly processed and disposed of so that it does not create health risks to the community. Generally, municipal waste, which may be collected in garbage trucks, dumpsters, or the like, is deposited in processing areas such as landfills. Land and environmental controls imposed on landfill operators by governmental bodies have increased in recent years, however, making landfill disposal of solid waste materials more expensive. 6 figs.

Mayberry, J.L.

1988-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

299

Government Regulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Interest in the use of so-called voluntary approaches to supplement or replace formal environmental regulation is on the rise, both in Europe and in the United States. These approaches fall into two general ...

Ashford, Nicholas

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

ASSEMBLAGES ON WASTE ROCK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Natural regeneration on waste rock was investigated at the old Wangaloa coal mine, south-east Otago. A 450-m long waste rock stack had been created 40–50 years ago, and has had little anthropogenic intervention since. The stack is made up of a gradient of three main waste rock types, defined as ‘silt-rich’, ‘mixed’, and ‘quartz-rich’, which reflect different proportions of loess siltstone and quartz gravel conglomerate. Plant species assemblages were quantified in four 5-m 2 quadrats in each waste rock type. Invertebrates were heat extracted from substrate cores (7 cm diameter; depth 5 cm) collected from quadrats over an eight-week period in spring 2003. Ordination analysis showed statistically distinct plant and invertebrate assemblages had arisen on each waste rock type. Revegetation patterns were dominated by native, woody individuals on all waste rock types, particularly manuka (Leptospermum scoparium) and kanuka (Kunzea ericoides). Plant cover on ‘silt-rich ’ waste rock was four-fold that on ‘quartz-rich ’ waste rock. Total numbers of invertebrates were highest on ‘quartz-rich’ waste rock, but richness greatest on ‘silt-rich ’ waste rock. Collembola dominated the fauna but their numbers were proportionally greatest in poorly vegetated areas. Further work is required to explain the absence of plants and invertebrates from local areas of waste rock. ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

C. G. Rufaut; S. Hammit; D. Craw; S. G. Clearwater

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste regulations nova" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Mixed waste: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the peer-reviewed and edited versions of papers submitted for presentation a the Second International Mixed Waste Symposium. Following the tradition of the First International Mixed Waste Symposium, these proceedings were prepared in advance of the meeting for distribution to participants. The symposium was organized by the Mixed Waste Committee of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The topics discussed at the symposium include: stabilization technologies, alternative treatment technologies, regulatory issues, vitrification technologies, characterization of wastes, thermal technologies, laboratory and analytical issues, waste storage and disposal, organic treatment technologies, waste minimization, packaging and transportation, treatment of mercury contaminated wastes and bioprocessing, and environmental restoration. Individual abstracts are catalogued separately for the data base.

Moghissi, A.A.; Blauvelt, R.K.; Benda, G.A.; Rothermich, N.E. [eds.] [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Safety and Health

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

302

Evolution of the Symbiotic Nova PU Vul -- Outbursting White Dwarf, Nebulae, and Pulsating Red Giant Companion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a composite light-curve model of the symbiotic nova PU Vul (Nova Vulpeculae 1979) that shows a long-lasted flat optical peak followed by a slow decline. Our model light-curve consists of three components of emission, i.e., an outbursting white dwarf (WD), its M-giant companion, and nebulae. The WD component dominates in the flat peak while the nebulae dominate after the photospheric temperature of the WD rises to log T (K) >~ 4.5, suggesting its WD origin. We analyze the 1980 and 1994 eclipses to be total eclipses of the WD occulted by the pulsating M-giant companion with two sources of the nebular emission; one is an unocculted nebula of the M-giant's cool-wind origin and the other is a partially occulted nebula associated to the WD. We confirmed our theoretical outburst model of PU Vul by new observational estimates, that spanned 32 yr, of the temperature and radius. Also our eclipse analysis confirmed that the WD photosphere decreased by two orders of magnitude between the 1980 and 1994 eclipses...

Kato, Mariko; Hachisu, Izumi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Alternative Regulation (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Utility regulators, including the Public Service Board, have applied a new type of regulation, often called "alternative regulation" or "incentive regulation." There are many variants of this type...

304

Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Maximum and Minimum Forecast for SRS  

SciTech Connect

This report is the third phase (Phase III) of the Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Forecast for Facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Phase I of the forecast, Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Forecast for Facilities at SRS, forecasts the yearly quantities of low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste, mixed waste, and transuranic (TRU) wastes generated over the next 30 years by operations, decontamination and decommissioning and environmental restoration (ER) activities at the Savannah River Site. The Phase II report, Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Forecast by Treatability Group (U), provides a 30-year forecast by waste treatability group for operations, decontamination and decommissioning, and ER activities. In addition, a 30-year forecast by waste stream has been provided for operations in Appendix A of the Phase II report. The solid wastes stored or generated at SRS must be treated and disposed of in accordance with federal, state, and local laws and regulations. To evaluate, select, and justify the use of promising treatment technologies and to evaluate the potential impact to the environment, the generic waste categories described in the Phase I report were divided into smaller classifications with similar physical, chemical, and radiological characteristics. These smaller classifications, defined within the Phase II report as treatability groups, can then be used in the Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement process to evaluate treatment options. The waste generation forecasts in the Phase II report includes existing waste inventories. Existing waste inventories, which include waste streams from continuing operations and stored wastes from discontinued operations, were not included in the Phase I report. Maximum and minimum forecasts serve as upper and lower boundaries for waste generation. This report provides the maximum and minimum forecast by waste treatability group for operation, decontamination and decommissioning, and ER activities.

Thomas, L.C.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Kentucky State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kentucky Kentucky State Regulations: Kentucky State of Kentucky The Division of Oil and Gas (DOG) in the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) fosters conservation of all mineral resources, encourages exploration of such resources, protects the correlative rights of land and mineral owners, prohibits waste and unnecessary surface loss and damage, and encourages the maximum recovery of oil and gas from all deposits. The Energy and Environment Cabinet brings together various Kentucky agencies. It is tasked with protecting and enhancing Kentucky's natural resources. The Department for Environmental Protection (DEP) administers the major environmental protection laws. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 4 administers Class II underground injection control (UIC) programs in Kentucky in direct implementation.

306

Nebraska State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nebraska Nebraska State Regulations: Nebraska State of Nebraska The Nebraska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (NOGCC) seeks to prevent waste, protect correlative rights of all owners, and encourage and authorize secondary recovery, pressure maintenance, cycling, or recycling, in order that the greatest ultimate recovery of oil and gas may be obtained within the state while protecting the environment. Otherwise, the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality (NDEQ) administers the major environmental protection laws. Contact Nebraska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission 922 Illinois Street, P.O. Box 399 Sidney, NE 69162 (308) 254-6919 (phone) (308) 254-6922 (fax) Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality 1200 "N" Street, Suite 400 P.O. Pox 98922 Lincoln, NE 68509

307

GRR/Section 18-UT-b - Hazardous Waste Permit Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UT-b - Hazardous Waste Permit Process UT-b - Hazardous Waste Permit Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-UT-b - Hazardous Waste Permit Process 18UTBHazardousWastePermitProcess (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Hazardous Waste Rules R315-1 et seq Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18UTBHazardousWastePermitProcess (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative A hazardous waste is specifically listed by the Utah Solid and Hazardous Waste Rules or exhibits a characteristic such as ignitability, corrosivity,

308

GRR/Section 18-ID-b - Hazardous Waste Permit Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 18-ID-b - Hazardous Waste Permit Process GRR/Section 18-ID-b - Hazardous Waste Permit Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-ID-b - Hazardous Waste Permit Process 18IDBHazardousWastePermitProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act IDAPA 58.01.05 Rules and Standards for Hazardous Waste 40 CFR 124.31 Pre-application public meeting and notice 40 CRF 124.10 Public notice of permit actions and public comment period 40 CFR 124.12 Public hearings 40 CFR 270.13 Contents of Part A of the permit application Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18IDBHazardousWastePermitProcess.pdf 18IDBHazardousWastePermitProcess.pdf

309

RH-TRU Waste Inventory Characterization by AK and Proposed WIPP RH-TRU Waste Characterization Objectives  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) has developed draft documentation to present the proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) remote-handled (RH-) transuranic (TRU) waste characterization program to its regulators, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the New Mexico Environment Department. Compliance with Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 191 and 194; the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (PL 102-579); and the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, as well as the Certificates of Compliance for the 72-B and 10-160B Casks, requires that specific waste parameter limits be imposed on DOE sites disposing of TRU waste at WIPP. The DOE-CBFO must control the sites' compliance with the limits by specifying allowable characterization methods. As with the established WIPP contact handled TRU waste characterization program, the DOE-CBFO has proposed a Remote-Handled TRU Waste Acceptance Criteria (RH-WAC) document consolidating the requirements from various regulatory drivers and proposed allowable characterization methods. These criteria are consistent with the recommendation of a recent National Academy Sciences/National Research Council to develop an RH-TRU waste characterization approach that removes current self imposed requirements that lack a legal or safety basis. As proposed in the draft RH-WAC and other preliminary documents, the DOE-CBFO RH-TRU waste characterization program proposes the use of acceptable knowledge (AK) as the primary method for obtaining required characterization information. The use of AK involves applying knowledge of the waste in light of the materials or processes used to generate the waste. Documentation, records, or processes providing information about various attributes of a waste stream, such as chemical, physical, and radiological properties, may be used as AK and may be applied to individual waste containers either independently or in conjunction with radiography, visual examination, assay, and other sampling and analytical data. RH-TRU waste cannot be shipped to WIPP on the basis of AK alone if documentation demonstrating that all of the prescribed limits in the RH-WAC are met is not available, discrepancies exist among AK source documents describing the same waste stream and the most conservative assumptions regarding those documents indicates that a limit will not be met, or all required data are not available for a given waste stream.

Most, W. A.; Kehrman, R.; Gist, C.; Biedscheid, J.; Devarakonda, J.; Whitworth, J.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

310

Control of incidental asbestos exposure at hazardous waste sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses asbestos regulations that are not part of Superfund and examines how these regulations can help to identify, evaluate and manage the risk associated with Asbestos Containing Material (ACM) at hazardous waste cleanup sites. Unless one knows where to look for ACM at hazardous waste sites, it may go undetected even after all the traditional sampling is done. Although EPA is currently developing a policy for evaluating risk from asbestos exposure at certain Superfund sites, information from existing regulations can be used to manage hazards associated with asbestos exposure at hazardous waste sites. This paper also identifies where to find governmental agency personnel and consultants who may be retained for site-specific help.

Kaustas, R.N. (Environmental Protection Agency, Edison, NJ (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Energy potential of municipal solid waste is limited  

SciTech Connect

Energy recovery from municipal solid waste has the potential for making only a limited contribution to the nation`s overall energy production. Although the current contribution of waste-derived energy production is less than one-half of 1 percent of the nation`s total energy Supply, DOE has set a goal for energy from waste at 2 percent of the total supply by 2010. The industry`s estimates show a smaller role for waste as an energy source in the future. The energy potential from waste is limited not only by the volume and energy content of the waste itself, but also by the factors affecting the use of waste disposal options, including public opposition and the availability of financing. Energy production from waste combustors and from landfill gases generates pollutants, although these are reduced through current regulations that require the use of emissions control technology and define operational criteria for the facilities. Although DOE estimates that one-third of the energy available from waste is available in the form of energy savings through the recycling of materials, the Department`s research in this area is ongoing.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Low level tank waste disposal study  

SciTech Connect

Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) contracted a team consisting of Los Alamos Technical Associates (LATA), British Nuclear Fuel Laboratories (BNFL), Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), and TRW through the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Technical Support Contract to conduct a study on several areas concerning vitrification and disposal of low-level-waste (LLW). The purpose of the study was to investigate how several parameters could be specified to achieve full compliance with regulations. The most restrictive regulation governing this disposal activity is the National Primary Drinking Water Act which sets the limits of exposure to 4 mrem per year for a person drinking two liters of ground water daily. To fully comply, this constraint would be met independently of the passage of time. In addition, another key factor in the investigation was the capability to retrieve the disposed waste during the first 50 years as specified in Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. The objective of the project was to develop a strategy for effective long-term disposal of the low-level waste at the Hanford site.

Mullally, J.A.

1994-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

313

Missouri State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

skip navigation Drilling Waste Management Information System: The information resource for better management of drilling wastes DWM Logo Search Search Technology Descriptions you...

314

Ohio State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

skip navigation Drilling Waste Management Information System: The information resource for better management of drilling wastes DWM Logo Search Search Technology Descriptions you...

315

Arkansas State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

skip navigation Drilling Waste Management Information System: The information resource for better management of drilling wastes DWM Logo Search Search Technology Descriptions you...

316

Tank Waste and Waste Processing | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing The Defense Waste Processing Facility set a record by producing 267 canisters filled with glassified waste in a year. New bubbler technology and other enhancements will increase canister production in the future. The Defense Waste Processing Facility set a record by producing 267 canisters filled with glassified waste in a year. New bubbler technology and other enhancements will increase canister production in the future. A Savannah River Remediation employee uses a manipulator located inside a shielded enclosure at the Defense Waste Processing Facility where the melter is pouring molten glass inside a canister. A Savannah River Remediation employee uses a manipulator located inside a

317

Methods for verifying compliance with low-level radioactive waste acceptance criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the methods that are currently employed and those that can be used to verify compliance with low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facility waste acceptance criteria (WAC). This report presents the applicable regulations representing the Federal, State, and site-specific criteria for accepting LLW. Typical LLW generators are summarized, along with descriptions of their waste streams and final waste forms. General procedures and methods used by the LLW generators to verify compliance with the disposal facility WAC are presented. The report was written to provide an understanding of how a regulator could verify compliance with a LLW disposal facility`s WAC. A comprehensive study of the methodology used to verify waste generator compliance with the disposal facility WAC is presented in this report. The study involved compiling the relevant regulations to define the WAC, reviewing regulatory agency inspection programs, and summarizing waste verification technology and equipment. The results of the study indicate that waste generators conduct verification programs that include packaging, classification, characterization, and stabilization elements. The current LLW disposal facilities perform waste verification steps on incoming shipments. A model inspection and verification program, which includes an emphasis on the generator`s waste application documentation of their waste verification program, is recommended. The disposal facility verification procedures primarily involve the use of portable radiological survey instrumentation. The actual verification of generator compliance to the LLW disposal facility WAC is performed through a combination of incoming shipment checks and generator site audits.

NONE

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Waste Confidence Discussion | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Confidence Discussion Waste Confidence Discussion Long-Term Waste Confidence Update. Waste Confidence Discussion More Documents & Publications Status Update: Extended Storage...

319

New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the issues of conducting debris treatment in the New Waste Calcine Facility (NWCF) decontamination area and the methods currently being used to decontaminate material at the NWCF.

K. E. Archibald

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Georgia Comprehensive Solid Waste Management Act of 1990 (Georgia) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Georgia Comprehensive Solid Waste Management Act of 1990 (Georgia) Georgia Comprehensive Solid Waste Management Act of 1990 (Georgia) Georgia Comprehensive Solid Waste Management Act of 1990 (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Georgia Comprehensive Solid Waste Management Act (SWMA) of 1990 was implemented in order to improve solid waste management procedures,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste regulations nova" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Program (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Siting Program (Maryland) Facility Siting Program (Maryland) Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Program (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Program Info State Maryland Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Maryland Department of the Environment The Hazardous Waste Facilities Siting Board is responsible for overseeing the siting of hazardous waste facilities in Maryland, and will treat hazardous waste facilities separately from low-level nuclear waste facilities. This legislation describes the factors considered by the Board in making siting decisions. The Board is authorized to enact rules and regulations pertaining to the siting of hazardous and low-level nuclear

322

TSA waste stream and final waste form composition  

SciTech Connect

A final vitrified waste form composition, based upon the chemical compositions of the input waste streams, is recommended for the transuranic-contaminated waste stored at the Transuranic Storage Area of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The quantities of waste are large with a considerable uncertainty in the distribution of various waste materials. It is therefore impractical to mix the input waste streams into an ``average`` transuranic-contaminated waste. As a result, waste stream input to a melter could vary widely in composition, with the potential of affecting the composition and properties of the final waste form. This work examines the extent of the variation in the input waste streams, as well as the final waste form under conditions of adding different amounts of soil. Five prominent Rocky Flats Plant 740 waste streams are considered, as well as nonspecial metals and the ``average`` transuranic-contaminated waste streams. The metals waste stream is the most extreme variation and results indicate that if an average of approximately 60 wt% of the mixture is soil, the final waste form will be predominantly silica, alumina, alkaline earth oxides, and iron oxide. This composition will have consistent properties in the final waste form, including high leach resistance, irrespective of the variation in waste stream. For other waste streams, much less or no soil could be required to yield a leach resistant waste form but with varying properties.

Grandy, J.D.; Eddy, T.L.; Anderson, G.L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Integrated Waste Services Association National Solid Wastes Management Association  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Can Help Meet Our Energy Needs October 5, 2006 - WASHINGTON, DC--A broad coalition of government-244-4700 Evan Von Leer, SWANA 240-494-2252 John Varrasi, ASME 212-591-8158 Don't Waste Waste! Waste-Based Energy and utilization of energy produced from waste, or waste-based energy (WBE). The United States Conference of Mayors

Columbia University

324

Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste Read more overleaf Introduction Energy from waste provides us with an opportunity for a waste solution and a local source of energy rolled,itcan onlyaddressaportionofthewastestream andisnotsufficientonitsown. Energy obtained from the combustion of residual waste (Energy from

325

WIPP Waste Information System Waste Container Data Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIPP Waste Information System Waste Container Data Report 06/06/2008 07:50 2.6 % LASB00411 % % Report Date Run by Report Site Id Container Number Waste Stream Data Status Code PEARCYM Version RP0360 Selection Criteria - Total Pages PRD02Instance 5 #12;Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Container Data Report

326

8-Waste treatment and disposal A. Responsibility for waste management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8- Waste treatment and disposal A. Responsibility for waste management 1. Each worker is responsible for correctly bagging and labeling his/her own waste. 2. A BSL3 technician will be responsible for transporting and autoclaving the waste. Waste will be autoclaved once or twice per day, depending on use

327

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is collected by the RSO. 2. Dry radioactive waste must be segregated by isotope. 3. Liquid radioactive waste must be separated by isotope. 4. Liquid scintillation vials must be collected separately. 5. Any "mixed waste" must be cleared with the RSO and labeled

328

WIPP Waste Information System Waste Container Data Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIPP Waste Information System Waste Container Data Report 06/06/2008 07:49 2.6 % LAS817174 % % Report Date Run by Report Site Id Container Number Waste Stream Data Status Code PEARCYM Version RP0360 Selection Criteria - Total Pages PRD02Instance 5 #12;Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Container Data Report

329

Relevance of biotic pathways to the long-term regulation of nuclear waste disposal. Estimation of radiation dose to man resulting from biotic transport: the BIOPORT/MAXI1 software package. Volume 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BIOPORT/MAXI1 is a collection of five computer codes designed to estimate the potential magnitude of the radiation dose to man resulting from biotic transport processes. Dose to man is calculated for ingestion of agricultural crops grown in contaminated soil, inhalation of resuspended radionuclides, and direct exposure to penetrating radiation resulting from the radionuclide concentrations established in the available soil surface by the biotic transport model. This document is designed as both an instructional and reference document for the BIOPORT/MAXI1 computer software package and has been written for two major audiences. The first audience includes persons concerned with the mathematical models of biological transport of commercial low-level radioactive wastes and the computer algorithms used to implement those models. The second audience includes persons concerned with exercising the computer program and exposure scenarios to obtain results for specific applications. The report contains sections describing the mathematical models, user operation of the computer programs, and program structure. Input and output for five sample problems are included. In addition, listings of the computer programs, data libraries, and dose conversion factors are provided in appendices.

McKenzie, D.H.; Cadwell, L.L.; Gano, K.A.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Napier, B.A.; Peloquin, R.A.; Prohammer, L.A.; Simmons, M.A.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Integrated Waste Treatment Facility Fact Sheet | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Management Tank Waste and Waste Processing Integrated Waste Treatment Facility Fact Sheet Integrated Waste Treatment Facility Fact Sheet Waste Management Nuclear...

331

NDAA Section 3116 Waste Determinations with Related Disposal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NDAA Section 3116 Waste Determinations with Related Disposal Performance Assessments Waste Management Nuclear Materials & Waste Tank Waste and Waste Processing Waste...

332

Hanford land disposal restrictions plan for mixed wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the early 1940s, the Hanford Site has been involved in the production and purification of nuclear defense materials. These production activities have resulted in the generation of large quantities of liquid and solid radioactive mixed waste. This waste is subject to regulation under authority of both the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) and the Atomic Energy Act. The State of Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the US Department of Energy (DOE) have entered into an agreement, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) to bring Hanford Site Operations into compliance with dangerous waste regulations. The Tri-Party Agreement was amended to require development of the Hanford Land Disposal Restrictions Plan for Mixed Wastes (this plan) to comply with land disposal restrictions requirements for radioactive mixed waste. The Tri-Party Agreement requires, and the this plan provides, the following sections: Waste Characterization Plan, Storage Report, Treatment Report, Treatment Plan, Waste Minimization Plan, a schedule, depicting the events necessary to achieve full compliance with land disposal restriction requirements, and a process for establishing interim milestones. 34 refs., 28 figs., 35 tabs.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

The Mixed Waste Focus Area: Status and accomplishments  

SciTech Connect

The Mixed Waste Focus Area began operations in February of 1995. Its mission is to provide acceptable technologies that enable implementation of mixed waste treatment systems developed in partnership with end-users, stakeholders, tribal governments, and regulators. The MWFA will develop, demonstrate, and deliver implementable technologies for treatment of mixed waste within the DOE complex. Treatment refers to all post waste-generation activities including sampling and analysis, characterization, storage, processing, packaging, transportation, and disposal. The MWFA`s mission arises from the Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as amended by the Federal Facility Compliance Act. Each DOE site facility that generates or stores mixed waste prepared a plan, the Site Treatment Plan, for developing treatment capacities and treating that waste. Agreements for each site were concluded with state regulators, resulting in Consent Orders providing enforceable milestones for achieving treatment of the waste. The paper discusses the implementation of the program, its status, accomplishments and goals for FY1996, and plans for 1997.

Conner, J.E. [Dept. of Energy, Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho Operations Office; Williams, R.E. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Potential dispositioning flowsheets for ICPP SNF and wastes  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INEL), has reprocessed irradiated nuclear fuels for the US Department of Energy (DOE) since 1953. This activity resulted mainly in the recovery of uranium and the management of the resulting wastes. The acidic radioactive high-level liquid waste was routinely stored in stainless steel tanks and then calcined to form a dry granular solid. The calcine is stored in stainless steel bins that are housed in underground concrete vaults. In April 1992, the DOE discontinued the practice of reprocessing irradiated nuclear fuels. This decision has left a legacy of 1.8 million gallons of radioactive liquid wastes (1.5 million gallons of radioactive sodium-bearing liquid wastes and 0.3 million gallons of high-level liquid waste), 3800 cubic meters of calcine waste, and 289 metric tons of heavy metal within unprocessed spent nuclear fuel (SNF) left in inventory at the ICPP. The nation`s radioactive waste policy has been established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA), which requires the final disposal of SNF and radioactive waste in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) standards. In accordance with these regulations and other legal agreements between the State of Idaho and the DOE, the DOE must, among other requirements, (1) complete a final Environmental Impact Statement by April 30, 1995, (2) evaluate and test sodium-bearing waste pre-treatment technologies, (3) select the sodium-bearing and calcine waste pre-treatment technology, if necessary, by June 1, 1995, and (4) select a technology for converting calcined waste into an appropriate disposal form by June 1, 1995.

Olson, A.L. [ed.; Anderson, P.A.; Bendixsen, C.L. [and others

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Guidelines for mixed waste minimization  

SciTech Connect

Currently, there is no commercial mixed waste disposal available in the United States. Storage and treatment for commercial mixed waste is limited. Host States and compacts region officials are encouraging their mixed waste generators to minimize their mixed wastes because of management limitations. This document provides a guide to mixed waste minimization.

Owens, C.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

The Road to Re-certification: WIPP TRU Waste Inventory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located near Carlsbad, New Mexico, is a deep geologic repository for the disposal of transuranic (TRU) wastes generated by atomic energy defense activities. The WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA) [1] requires the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to submit documentation to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that demonstrates WIPP's continuing compliance with the disposal regulations in Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191 Subparts B and C, not later than five years after initial receipt of waste for disposal at the repository, and every five years thereafter until the decommissioning of the facility is completed. On May 18, 1998, after review of the Compliance Certification Application (CCA) (63 FR 27405), the EPA certified that the WIPP did comply with the final disposal regulations and criteria of 40 CFR parts 191 and 194. On March 26, 1999, the first receipt of contact-handled (CH) TRU waste was received at WIPP thus initiating the 5-year countdown to the first re-certification. Five years after the first receipt of waste at WIPP, on March 26, 2004, the DOE submitted a Compliance Re-certification Application (CRA) [2]. The CRA includes TRU waste inventory as a key factor. The TRU waste inventory defines what is expected to be emplaced in the repository; and, therefore, how the performance of the repository will be affected. Performance of the WIPP is determined via the Performance Assessment (PA), a set of complex algorithms used to model the long-term performance of the repository. The TRU waste inventory data that are important to this assessment include: 1) volumes of stored, projected and emplaced waste; 2) radionuclide activity concentrations; 3) waste material parameter densities; 4) estimates of the masses of chelating agents; 5) estimates of the oxyanions; 6) estimates of expected cement masses; and 7) estimates of the types and amounts of materials that will be used to emplace the waste. The data that are collected and maintained as the TRU waste inventory provide the waste source term used in the PA to model long-term repository performance. (authors)

Crawford, B.A.; Lott, S.A.; Sparks, L.D.; Van Soest, G.; Mclnroy, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory -Carlsbad Operations, 115 N. Main St., Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

18 18 19 T he WIPP's first waste receipt, 11 years later than originally planned, was a monumental step forward in the safe management of nuclear waste. Far from ending, however, the WIPP story has really just begun. For the next 35 years, the DOE will face many challenges as it manages a complex shipment schedule from transuranic waste sites across the United States and continues to ensure that the repository complies with all regulatory requirements. The DOE will work to maintain the highest level of safety in waste handling and trans- portation. Coordination with sites Disposal operations require coordination with sites that will ship transuranic waste to the WIPP and include periodic certification of waste characterization and handling practices at those facilities. During the WIPP's

338

SRS - Programs - Waste Solidification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Solidification Waste Solidification The two primary facilities operated within the Waste Solidification program are Saltstone and the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Each DWPF canister is 10 feet tall and 2 feet in diameter, and typically takes a little over a day to fill. Each DWPF canister is 10 feet tall and 2 feet in diameter, and typically takes a little over a day to fill. The largest radioactive waste glassification plant in the world, DWPF converts the high-level liquid nuclear waste currently stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) into a solid glass form suitable for long-term storage and disposal. Scientists have long considered this glassification process, called "vitrification," as the preferred option for immobilizing high-level radioactive liquids into a more stable, manageable form until a federal

339

Underground waste barrier structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an underground waste barrier structure that consists of waste material, a first container formed of activated carbonaceous material enclosing the waste material, a second container formed of zeolite enclosing the first container, and clay covering the second container. The underground waste barrier structure is constructed by forming a recessed area within the earth, lining the recessed area with a layer of clay, lining the clay with a layer of zeolite, lining the zeolite with a layer of activated carbonaceous material, placing the waste material within the lined recessed area, forming a ceiling over the waste material of a layer of activated carbonaceous material, a layer of zeolite, and a layer of clay, the layers in the ceiling cojoining with the respective layers forming the walls of the structure, and finally, covering the ceiling with earth.

Saha, Anuj J. (Hamburg, NY); Grant, David C. (Gibsonia, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

GRR/Section 18-AK-c - Waste Disposal Permit Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AK-c - Waste Disposal Permit Process AK-c - Waste Disposal Permit Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-AK-c - Waste Disposal Permit Process 18AKC - WasteDisposalPermitProcess (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation Regulations & Policies AS 46.03.110 Waste Disposal Permit Regulations 18 AAC 60.200 et seq Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18AKC - WasteDisposalPermitProcess (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) is responsible

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste regulations nova" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Advances in Sustainable Petroleum Engineering Science ISSN 1937-7991 Volume 2, Number 3 2011 Nova Science Publishers, Inc.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

factor, 0 = oil formation volume factor at pressure 0 , = fluid compressibility of the system, 1Advances in Sustainable Petroleum Engineering Science ISSN 1937-7991 Volume 2, Number 3 © 2011 Nova it with commercial simulator, ECLIPSE. A 1-D, horizontal, and heterogeneous reservoir with time dependent rock

Hossain, M. Enamul

342

Seabed Stresses in Combined Wave and Steady Flow Conditions on the Nova Scotia Continental Shelf: Field Measurements and Predictions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A tripod holding electromagnetic flowmeters at two heights within 1 m above the seabed has been deployed at two shallow sites (25 and 45 m depths) on the continental shelf off Nova Scotia, Canada. Wave flows are comparable with the small mean ...

D. A. Huntley; D. G. Hazen

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Impact assessment of draft DOE Order 5820.2B. Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared a revision to DOE Order 5820.2A, entitled ``Radioactive Waste Management.`` DOE issued DOE Order 5820.2A in September 1988 and, as the title implies, it covered only radioactive waste forms. The proposed draft order, entitled ``Waste Management,`` addresses the management of both radioactive and nonradioactive waste forms. It also includes spent nuclear fuel, which DOE does not consider a waste. Waste forms covered include hazardous waste, high-level waste, transuranic (TRU) waste, low-level radioactive waste, uranium and thorium mill tailings, mixed waste, and sanitary waste. The Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program (TSP) of Leached Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) is facilitating the revision of this order. The EM Regulatory Compliance Division (EM-331) has requested that TSP estimate the impacts and costs of compliance with the revised order. TSP requested Dames & Moore to aid in this assessment by comparing requirements in Draft Order 5820.2B to ones in DOE Order 5820.2A and other DOE orders and Federal regulations. The assessment started with a draft version of 5820.2B dated January 14, 1994. DOE has released three updated versions of the draft order since then (dated May 20, 1994; August 26, 1994; and January 23, 1995). Each time DOE revised the order, Dames and Moore updated the assessment work to reflect the text changes. This report reflects the January 23, 1995 version of the draft order.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Framework for managing wastes from oil and gas exploration and production (E&P) sites.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil and gas companies operate in many countries around the world. Their exploration and production (E&P) operations generate many kinds of waste that must be carefully and appropriately managed. Some of these wastes are inherently part of the E&P process; examples are drilling wastes and produced water. Other wastes are generic industrial wastes that are not unique to E&P activities, such as painting wastes and scrap metal. Still other wastes are associated with the presence of workers at the site; these include trash, food waste, and laundry wash water. In some host countries, mature environmental regulatory programs are in place that provide for various waste management options on the basis of the characteristics of the wastes and the environmental settings of the sites. In other countries, the waste management requirements and authorized options are stringent, even though the infrastructure to meet the requirements may not be available yet. In some cases, regulations and/or waste management infrastructure do not exist at all. Companies operating in these countries can be confronted with limited and expensive waste management options.

Veil, J. A.; Puder, M. G.; Environmental Science Division

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

Operational Waste Volume Projection  

SciTech Connect

Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of June. 2000.

STRODE, J.N.

2000-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

346

Norcal Waste Systems, Inc.  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet describes the LNG long-haul heavy-duty trucks at Norcal Waste Systems Inc.'s Sanitary Fill Company.

Not Available

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

CLAB Transuranic Waste Spreadsheets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Building 772-F Far-Field Transuranic (TRU) Waste Counting System is used to measure the radionuclide content of waste packages produced at the Central Laboratory Facilities (CLAB). Data from the instrument are entered into one of two Excel spreadsheets. The waste stream associated with the waste package determines which spreadsheet is actually used. The spreadsheets calculate the necessary information required for completion of the Transuranic Waste Characterization Form (OSR 29-90) and the Radioactive Solid Waste Burial Ground Record (OSR 7-375 or OSR 7-375A). In addition, the spreadsheets calculate the associated Low Level Waste (LLW) stream information that potentially could be useful if the waste container is ever downgraded from TRU to LLW. The spreadsheets also have the capability to sum activities from source material added to a waste container after assay. A validation data set for each spreadsheet along with the appropriate results are also presented in this report for spreadsheet verification prior to each use.

Leyba, J.D.

2000-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

348

Waste Confidence Discussion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-Term Long-Term Waste Confidence Update Christine Pineda Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission National Transportation Stakeholders Forum May 2012 ♦ Knoxville, Tennessee Long-Term Update Draft Report, "Background and Preliminary Assumptions for an Environmental Impact Statement- Long-Term Waste Confidence Update" Elements of the Long-Term Update - Draft environmental impact statement - Draft Waste Confidence Decision - Proposed Waste Confidence Rule based on the EIS and Decision, if applicable 2 Overview of Draft Report Background and assumptions report is first step in process. Basic topics in the report are:

349

Nuclear Waste Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Management's Yucca Mountain Project and the Office of Nuclear Energy's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) and Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) programs. Efforts...

350

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300 C to 800 C to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100 C to 1400 C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, G.G.

1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

351

The Power of Waste.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Abstract It is estimated that up to 2 percent of the population in Third World countries survives on waste in one way or another.… (more)

Frykman, Carina

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Making waste public.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis questions the boundaries that define waste as a public or private dilemma, investigating these boundaries as productive sites for the imagination of social… (more)

Gambetta, Curt

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300.degree. C. to 800.degree. C. to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100.degree. C. to 1400.degree. C. at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Make love not waste.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The purpose of this thesis was to investigate a waste management project and its public awareness components, in the Korca region, Albania. We wanted… (more)

Carlsson Engström, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Making Waste Public.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis questions the boundaries that define waste as a public or private dilemma, investigating these boundaries as productive sites for the imagination of social… (more)

Gambetta, Curt

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

WEB RESOURCE: Radioactive Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 8, 2007 ... This resource offers a a very broad explanation of how the Belgian Agency for Management of Radioactive Waste and Enriched Fissile Material ...

357

Integrated waste management.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Integrated waste management is considered from a systems’ approach, with a particular emphasis on advancing sustainability. The focus of the thesis is to examine the… (more)

Seadon, Jeffrey Keith

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Waste Clean Up 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... deployment and clean-up activities of robot arms into a nuclear contaminated pit at the opening of waste storage tank C-106 at Hanford, Washington ...

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

359

Secondary Waste Cast Stone Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Cast Stone – a cementitious waste form, has been selected for solidification of this secondary waste stream after treatment in the ETF. The secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. This secondary waste Cast Stone waste form qualification testing plan outlines the testing of the waste form and immobilization process to demonstrate that the Cast Stone waste form can comply with the disposal requirements. Specifications for the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form have not been established. For this testing plan, Cast Stone specifications are derived from specifications for the immobilized LAW glass in the WTP contract, the waste acceptance criteria for the IDF, and the waste acceptance criteria in the IDF Permit issued by the State of Washington. This testing plan outlines the testing needed to demonstrate that the waste form can comply with these waste form specifications and acceptance criteria. The testing program must also demonstrate that the immobilization process can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. This testing plan also outlines the testing needed to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support performance assessment analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form in the IDF

Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

360

M-Area hazardous waste management facility groundwater monitoring report -- first quarter 1994. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during first quarter 1994 as required by South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989 and section 264.100(g) of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations. During first quarter 1994, 42 point-of-compliance (POC) wells at the M-Area HWMF were sampled for drinking water parameters.

Evans, C.S.; Washburn, F.; Jordan, J.; Van Pelt, R.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste regulations nova" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning methods and equipment for reclamation and recycling of waste oils. Citations discuss recovery, disposal, and reuse of lubricating oils. Topics include economic analysis, programs assessment, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil evaluation. Regulations and standards for waste oil treatment and waste oil refineries are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning methods and equipment for reclamation and recycling of waste oils. Citations discuss recovery, disposal, and reuse of lubricating oils. Topics include economic analysis, programs assessment, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil evaluation. Regulations and standards for waste oil treatment and waste oil refineries are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning methods and equipment for reclamation and recycling of waste oils. Citations discuss recovery, disposal, and reuse of lubricating oils. Topics include economic analysis, programs assessment, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil evaluation. Regulations and standards for waste oil treatment and waste oil refineries are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

(Project title: E-mc2, A Two-Hour Television Program on NOVA)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Executive Summary A woman in the early 1700s who became one of Europe’s leading interpreters of mathematics and a poor bookbinder who became one of the giants of nineteenth-century science are just two of the pioneers whose stories NOVA explored in Einstein’s Big Idea. This two-hour documentary premiered on PBS in October 2005 and is based on the best-selling book by David Bodanis, E=mc2: A Biography of the World’s Most Famous Equation. The film and book chronicle the scientific challenges and discoveries leading up to Einstein’s startling conclusion that mass and energy are one, related by the formula E = mc2.

Susanne Simpson

2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

365

The orbital and superhump periods of the deeply eclipsing dwarf nova PU UMa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report unfiltered photometry during superoutbursts of PU UMa in 2009 and 2012. The amplitude was 4.5 magnitudes above mean quiescence and lasted at least 9 to 10 days. Superhumps were present with a peak-to-peak amplitude of up to ~0.3 mag, thereby confirming it to be a member of the SU UMa family of dwarf novae. The mean superhump period during the later part of the 2012 outburst was Psh = 0.08076(40) d. Analysis of the eclipse times of minimum, supplemented with data from other researchers, revealed an orbital period of Porb = 0.077880551(17) d. The superhump period excess was epsilon = 0.037(5). During the 2012 outburst, which was the better observed of the two, the FWHM eclipse duration gradually declined from 9.5 to 5 min. The eclipse depth was up to 1.7 magnitudes.

Shears, Jeremy; Littlefield, Colin; Miller, Ian; Morelle, Etienne; Pickard, Roger; Pietz, Jochen; Sabo, Richard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Multiwavelength modeling the SED of very slow novae PU Vul and V723 Cas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evolution in the spectrum of very slow novae PU Vul and V723 Cas during their transition from the optical maximum to the nebular phase is investigated using the method of disentangling the composite UV/optical spectra. Model SEDs suggested that a transient decrease in the WD luminosity, during the decline from the maximum, was caused by a negative beaming effect, when a neutral disk around the WD was formed. When the disk disappeared, the luminosity increased again to values from the beginning of the outburst (in the case of V723 Cas, at/above the Eddington limit). This suggests the presence of a mechanism maintaining a high energy output for a much longer time than it is predicted by the current theories. Similarity of light curves, but enormous difference of the separation between the components of PU Vul and V723 Cas binaries suggest that the mechanism is basically powered by the accretor.

Skopal, Augustin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

dispose of transuranic radioactive waste, or TRU waste, left over from the production of nuclear weapons. After more than 20 years of scientific study, public input, and...

368

Solid Waste Act (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The main purpose of the Solid Waste Act is to authorize and direct the establishment of a comprehensive solid waste management program. The act states details about specific waste management...

369

QU Car: a very high luminosity nova-like binary with a carbon-enriched companion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

QU Car is listed in cataclysmic variable star catalogues as a nova-like variable. This little-studied, yet bright interacting binary is re-appraised here in the light of new high-quality ultraviolet (UV) interstellar line data obtained with STIS on board the Hubble Space Telescope. The detection of a component of interstellar absorption at a mean LSR velocity of $-$14 km s$^{-1}$ indicates that the distance to QU Car may be $\\sim$2 kpc or more -- a considerable increase on the previous lower-limiting distance of 500 pc. If so, the bolometric luminosity of QU Car could exceed $10^{37}$ ergs s$^{-1}$. This would place this binary in the luminosity domain occupied by known compact-binary supersoft X-ray sources. Even at a 500 pc, QU Car appears to be the most luminous nova-like variable known. New intermediate dispersion optical spectroscopy of QU Car spanning 3800--7000 \\AA is presented. These data yield the discovery that C{\\sc iv} $\\lambda\\lambda$5801,12 is present as an unusually prominent emission line in an otherwise low-contrast line spectrum. Using measurements of this and other lines in a recombination line analysis, it is shown that the C/He abundance as proxied by the n(C$^{4+}$)/n(He$^{2+}$) ratio may be as high as 0.06 (an order of magnitude higher than the solar ratio). Furthermore, the C/O abundance ratio is estimated to be greater than 1. These findings suggest that the companion in QU Car is a carbon star. If so, it would be the first example of a carbon star in such a binary. An early-type R star best matches the required abundance pattern and could escape detection at optical wavelengths provided the distance to QU Car is $\\sim$2 kpc or more.

J. E. Drew; L. E. Hartley; K. S. Long; J. van der Walt

2002-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

370

Proceedings of NAWTEC16 16th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the energy generated is optimized. HISTORY WTE's were constructed and began operations under regulatedProceedings of NAWTEC16 16th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference May 19-21, 2008, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA NAWTEC16-1913 OPTIONS AND STRATEGIES FOR WASTE TO ENERGY FACILITY ENERGY SALES

Columbia University

371

Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the reclamation and recycling of used lubricating oils. Topics include specific program descriptions, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil performance. Appropriate regulations, standards, and clean-up efforts at sites contaminated by waste oils or waste oil refineries are included. (Contains a minimum of 222 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the reclamation and recycling of used lubricating oils. Topics include specific program descriptions, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil performance. Appropriate regulations, standards, and clean-up efforts at sites contaminated by waste oils or waste oil refineries are included. (Contains a minimum of 228 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Dynamic modeling and multivariable control of organic Rankine cycles in waste heat utilizing processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the dynamics of organic Rankine cycles (ORCs) in waste heat utilizing processes is investigated, and the physical model of a 100 kW waste heat utilizing process is established. In order to achieve both transient performance and steady-state ... Keywords: Linear quadratic regulator, Organic Rankine cycles, Process control

Jianhua Zhang; Wenfang Zhang; Guolian Hou; Fang Fang

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Nondestructive Evaluation of Low-Level Radioactive Waste Canisters for Free-Water Content  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Federal regulations set limits on free-standing liquid in radioactive waste containers. This report identifies four nondestructive evaluation methods that may provide nuclear power plant operators with reliable and accurate determinations of the existence and amount of free-standing liquids in low-level radioactive waste (LLW) containers.

1991-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

375

Manual for Management of Low-Volume Wastes From Fossil-Fuel-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If a low-volume waste (LVW) is classified as hazardous, off-site disposal could cost 3 to 15 times more than conventional treatment. An integrated approach to LVW management is now available that summarizes current federal regulations, discusses classifications for 10 major wastes, and presents treatment/disposal options with estimated costs.

1987-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

376

Miscellaneous Waste-Form FEPs  

SciTech Connect

The US DOE must provide a reasonable assurance that the performance objectives for the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) potential radioactive-waste repository can be achieved for a 10,000-year post-closure period. The guidance that mandates this direction is under the provisions of 10 CFR Part 63 and the US Department of Energy's ''Revised Interim Guidance Pending Issuance of New US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulations (Revision 01, July 22, 1999), for Yucca Mountain, Nevada'' (Dyer 1999 and herein referred to as DOE's Interim Guidance). This assurance must be demonstrated in the form of a performance assessment that: (1) identifies the features, events, and processes (FEPs) that might affect the performance of the potential geologic repository; (2) examines the effects of such FEPs on the performance of the potential geologic repository; (3) estimates the expected annual dose to a specified receptor group; and (4) provides the technical basis for inclusion or exclusion of specific FEPs.

A. Schenker

2000-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

377

Modules for estimating solid waste from fossil-fuel technologies  

SciTech Connect

Solid waste has become a subject of increasing concern to energy industries for several reasons. Increasingly stringent air and water pollution regulations result in a larger fraction of residuals in the form of solid wastes. Control technologies, particularly flue gas desulfurization, can multiply the amount of waste. With the renewed emphasis on coal utilization and the likelihood of oil shale development, increased amounts of solid waste will be produced. In the past, solid waste residuals used for environmental assessment have tended only to include total quantities generated. To look at environmental impacts, however, data on the composition of the solid wastes are required. Computer modules for calculating the quantities and composition of solid waste from major fossil fuel technologies were therefore developed and are described in this report. Six modules have been produced covering physical coal cleaning, conventional coal combustion with flue gas desulfurization, atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion, coal gasification using the Lurgi process, coal liquefaction using the SRC-II process, and oil shale retorting. Total quantities of each solid waste stream are computed together with the major components and a number of trace elements and radionuclides.

Crowther, M.A.; Thode, H.C. Jr.; Morris, S.C.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Commercial treatability study capabilities for application to the US Department of Energy`s anticipated mixed waste streams  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA), which represents a national effort to develop and coordinate treatment solutions for mixed waste among all DOE facilities. The hazardous waste component of mixed waste is regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), while the radioactive component is regulated under the Atomic Energy Act, as implemented by the DOE, making mixed waste one of the most complex types of waste for the DOE to manage. The MWFA has the mission to support technologies that meet the needs of the DOE`s waste management efforts to characterize, treat, and dispose of mixed waste being generated and stored throughout the DOE complex. The technologies to be supported must meet all regulatory requirements, provide cost and risk improvements over available technologies, and be acceptable to the public. The most notable features of the DOE`s mixed-waste streams are the wide diversity of waste matrices, volumes, radioactivity levels, and RCRA-regulated hazardous contaminants. Table 1-1 is constructed from data from the proposed site treatment plans developed by each DOE site and submitted to DOE Headquarters. The table shows the number of mixed-waste streams and their corresponding volumes. This table illustrates that the DOE has a relatively small number of large-volume mixed-waste streams and a large number of small-volume mixed-waste streams. There are 1,033 mixed-waste streams with volumes less than 1 cubic meter; 1,112 mixed-waste streams with volumes between 1 and 1,000 cubic meters; and only 61 mixed-waste streams with volumes exceeding 1,000 cubic meters.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Integrating Total Quality Management (TQM) and hazardous waste management  

SciTech Connect

The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and its subsequent amendments have had a dramatic impact on hazardous waste management for business and industry. The complexity of this law and the penalties for noncompliance have made it one of the most challenging regulatory programs undertaken by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The fundamentals of RCRA include ``cradle to grave`` management of hazardous waste, covering generators, transporters, and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. The regulations also address extensive definitions and listing/identification mechanisms for hazardous waste along with a tracking system. Treatment is favored over disposal and emphasis is on ``front-end`` treatment such as waste minimization and pollution prevention. A study of large corporations such as Xerox, 3M, and Dow Chemical, as well as the public sector, has shown that well known and successful hazardous waste management programs emphasize pollution prevention and employment of techniques such as proactive environmental management, environmentally conscious manufacturing, and source reduction. Nearly all successful hazardous waste programs include some aspects of Total Quality Management, which begins with a strong commitment from top management. Hazardous waste management at the Rocky Flats Plant is further complicated by the dominance of ``mixed waste`` at the facility. The mixed waste stems from the original mission of the facility, which was production of nuclear weapons components for the Department of Energy (DOE). A Quality Assurance Program based on the criterion in DOE Order 5700.6C has been implemented at Rocky Flats. All of the elements of the Quality Assurance Program play a role in hazardous waste management. Perhaps one of the biggest waste management problems facing the Rocky Flats Plant is cleaning up contamination from a forty year mission which focused on production of nuclear weapon components.

Kirk, N. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

RCRA delisting of agent-decontaminated waste and remediation waste at Dugway Proving Ground: A program update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In July 1988, the state of Utah issued regulations that declared residues resulting from the demilitarization, treatment, and testing of military chemical agents to be hazardous wastes. These residues were designated as corrosive, reactive, toxic, and acute hazardous (Hazardous Waste No. F999). These residues are not listed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), which is the primary law governing management of hazardous waste in the United States. The RCRAI regulations (40 CFR 260-280), the Utah Administrative Code (R-315), and other state hazardous waste programs list specific wastes as hazardous but allow generators to petition the regulator to {open_quotes}delist{close_quotes} if it can be demonstrated that such wastes are not hazardous. In 1994, the U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command FECOM initiated a project with the Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to demonstrate that certain categories of F999 residues are not hazardous waste and to achieve delisting. The initial focus is on delisting agent-decontaminated residues and soil with a history of contamination at the U.S. Army Dugway Proving Ground (DPG), Utah. An overview of the DPG delisting program was presented at the 1995 American Defense Preparedness Association Environmental Symposium. Since that time, much progress has been made. The purpose of this paper is to review the DPG delisting program and discuss overall progress. Emphasis is placed on progress with regard to analytical methods that will be used to demonstrate that the target residues do not contain hazardous amounts of chemical agent.

Kimmell, T.A.; Anderson, A.W.; O`Neill, H.J. [and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste regulations nova" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

SRS - Programs - Solid Waste Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

manner possible. SRS's waste is categorized as transuranic, low-level, hazardous, mixed, high-level or sanitary waste. SWM is responsible for managing all of these...

382

Chapter 19 - Nuclear Waste Fund  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Waste Fund 19-1 Nuclear Waste Fund 19-1 CHAPTER 19 NUCLEAR WASTE FUND 1. INTRODUCTION. a. Purpose. This chapter establishes the financial, accounting, and budget policies and procedures for civilian and defense nuclear waste activities, as authorized in Public Law 97-425, the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended, referred to hereafter as the Act. b. Applicability. This chapter applies to all Departmental elements, including the National Nuclear Security Administration, and activities that are funded by the Nuclear Waste Fund (NWF) or the Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal appropriation. c. Background. The Act established the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) and assigned it responsibility for the management

383

Animal Waste Technology Fund (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A bill passed in 2012 transferred responsibility for animal waste management technology projects to the Maryland Department of Agriculture. The Department will maintain the Animal Waste Technology...

384

Drilling Waste Management Technology Descriptions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

skip navigation Drilling Waste Management Information System: The information resource for better management of drilling wastes DWM Logo Search Search you are in this section...

385

Municipal Waste Combustion (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This rule establishes requirements for emissions from, and design and operation of, municipal waste combustion units. "Municipal waste" means all materials and substances discarded from residential...

386

Hazardous Waste Management (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The New Mexico Environment Department's Hazardous Waste Bureau is responsible for the management of hazardous waste in the state. The Bureau enforces the rules established by the Environmental...

387

Solid waste management of Jakarta.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Solid waste management has been one of the critical issues in Jakarta, Indonesia.With enormous amounts of generated waste per day and limited supportinginfrastructure, the… (more)

Trisyanti, Dini

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Treatment of Waste Soils / Solids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About the 1996 International Symposium on Extraction and Processing for the Treatment and Minimization of Wastes: Treatment of Waste Soils / Solids ...

389

Mixed Waste Characterization Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents an overview of the process of characterizing potential mixed waste streams from nuclear power plants. Utility experts developed these guidelines to help guide utility personnel through the characterization process and provide a mechanism for properly documenting the characterization of individual waste streams.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

390

Radioactive waste storage issues  

SciTech Connect

In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state`s boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected.

Kunz, D.E.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

Nuclear waste solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High efficiency removal of technetium values from a nuclear waste stream is achieved by addition to the waste stream of a precipitant contributing tetraphenylphosphonium cation, such that a substantial portion of the technetium values are precipitated as an insoluble pertechnetate salt.

Walker, Darrel D. (1684 Partridge Dr., Aiken, SC 29801); Ebra, Martha A. (129 Hasty Rd., Aiken, SC 29801)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Radioactive waste disposal package  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

Lampe, Robert F. (Bethel Park, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Heterogeneous waste processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combination of treatment methods are provided for treatment of heterogeneous waste including: (1) treatment for any organic compounds present; (2) removal of metals from the waste; and, (3) bulk volume reduction, with at least two of the three treatment methods employed and all three treatment methods emplyed where suitable.

Vanderberg, Laura A. (Los Alamos, NM); Sauer, Nancy N. (Los Alamos, NM); Brainard, James R. (Los Alamos, NM); Foreman, Trudi M. (Los Alamos, NM); Hanners, John L. (Los Alamos, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility project. Executive summary: Volume 1, Program summary information; Volume 2, Waste stream technical summary: Draft  

SciTech Connect

Mixed and low-level wastes generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are required to be managed according to applicable State and Federal regulations, and Department of Energy Orders that provide for the protection of human health and the environment. The Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project was chartered in 1991, by the Department of Energy to provide treatment capability for these mixed and low-level waste streams. The first project task consisted of conducting engineering studies to identify the waste streams, their potential treatment strategies, and the requirements that would be imposed on the waste streams and the facilities used to process them. The engineering studies, initiated in July 1991, identified 37 mixed waste streams, and 55 low-level waste streams. This report documents the waste stream information and potential treatment strategies, as well as the regulatory requirements for the Department of Energy-owned treatment facility option. The total report comprises three volumes and two appendices. This report consists of Volume 1, which explains the overall program mission, the guiding assumptions for the engineering studies, and summarizes the waste stream and regulatory information, and Volume 2, the Waste Stream Technical Summary which, encompasses the studies conducted to identify the INEL`s waste streams and their potential treatment strategies.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Standard Guide for Preparing Waste Management Plans for Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This guide addresses the development of waste management plans for potential waste streams resulting from decommissioning activities at nuclear facilities, including identifying, categorizing, and handling the waste from generation to final disposal. 1.2 This guide is applicable to potential waste streams anticipated from decommissioning activities of nuclear facilities whose operations were governed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or Agreement State license, under Department of Energy (DOE) Orders, or Department of Defense (DoD) regulations. 1.3 This guide provides a description of the key elements of waste management plans that if followed will successfully allow for the characterization, packaging, transportation, and off-site treatment or disposal, or both, of conventional, hazardous, and radioactive waste streams. 1.4 This guide does not address the on-site treatment, long term storage, or on-site disposal of these potential waste streams. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address ...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

T h e W a s t e I s o l a t i o n P i l o t P l a n t DOE 1980. Final Environmental Impact Statement, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. DOE/EIS-0026, Washington, DC, Office of Environmental Management, U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1981. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP): Record of Decision. Federal Register, Vol. 46, No. 18, p. 9162, (46 Federal Register 9162), January 28, 1981. U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1990. Final Supplement Environmental Impact Statement, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. DOE/EIS-0026-FS, Washington, DC, Office of Environmental Management, U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1990. Record of Decision: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Federal Register, Vol. 55, No. 121, 25689-25692, U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1994. Comparative Study of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Transportation Alternatives.

397

Salt Waste Processing Initiatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Patricia Suggs Patricia Suggs Salt Processing Team Lead Assistant Manager for Waste Disposition Project Office of Environmental Management Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Initiatives 2 Overview * Current SRS Liquid Waste System status * Opportunity to accelerate salt processing - transformational technologies - Rotary Microfiltration (RMF) and Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) - Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (ARP/MCU) extension with next generation extractant - Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) performance enhancement - Saltstone enhancements * Life-cycle impacts and benefits 3 SRS Liquid Waste Total Volume >37 Million Gallons (Mgal) Total Curies 183 MCi (51% ) 175 MCi (49% ) >358 Million Curies (MCi) Sludge 34.3 Mgal (92% ) 3.0 Mgal (8%)

398

HLW Glass Waste Loadings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HLW HLW Glass Waste Loadings Ian L. Pegg Vitreous State Laboratory The Catholic University of America Washington, DC Overview Overview  Vitrification - general background  Joule heated ceramic melter (JHCM) technology  Factors affecting waste loadings  Waste loading requirements and projections  WTP DWPF  DWPF  Yucca Mountain License Application requirements on waste loading  Summary Vitrification  Immobilization of waste by conversion into a glass  Internationally accepted treatment for HLW  Why glass?  Amorphous material - able to incorporate a wide spectrum of elements over wide ranges of composition; resistant to radiation damage  Long-term durability - natural analogs Relatively simple process - amenable to nuclearization at large  Relatively simple process - amenable to nuclearization at large scale  There

399

AVLIS production plant waste management plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following the executive summary, this document contains the following: (1) waste management facilities design objectives; (2) AVLIS production plant wastes; (3) waste management design criteria; (4) waste management plan description; and (5) waste management plan implementation. 17 figures, 18 tables.

Not Available

1984-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

400

Advanced Off-Gas Control System Design For Radioactive And Mixed Waste Treatment  

SciTech Connect

Treatment of radioactive and mixed wastes is often required to destroy or immobilize hazardous constituents, reduce waste volume, and convert the waste to a form suitable for final disposal. These kinds of treatments usually evolve off-gas. Air emission regulations have become increasingly stringent in recent years. Mixed waste thermal treatment in the United States is now generally regulated under the Hazardous Waste Combustor (HWC) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards. These standards impose unprecedented requirements for operation, monitoring and control, and emissions control. Off-gas control technologies and system designs that were satisfactorily proven in mixed waste operation prior to the implementation of new regulatory standards are in some cases no longer suitable in new mixed waste treatment system designs. Some mixed waste treatment facilities have been shut down rather than have excessively restrictive feed rate limits or facility upgrades to comply with the new standards. New mixed waste treatment facilities in the U. S. are being designed to operate in compliance with the HWC MACT standards. Activities have been underway for the past 10 years at the INL and elsewhere to identify, develop, demonstrate, and design technologies for enabling HWC MACT compliance for mixed waste treatment facilities. Some specific off-gas control technologies and system designs have been identified and tested to show that even the stringent HWC MACT standards can be met, while minimizing treatment facility size and cost.

Nick Soelberg

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste regulations nova" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

South Dakota State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Identification Home Federal and State Regulations State Regulations South Dakota State Regulations: South Dakota State of South Dakota The South Dakota...

402

Waste Management & Research290 Waste Manage Res 2002: 20: 290301  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Management & Research290 Waste Manage Res 2002: 20: 290­301 Printed in UK ­ all rights reserved Copyright © ISWA 2002 Waste Management & Research ISSN 0734­242X Introduction Chromated copper of sorting technologies for CCA treated wood waste Monika Blassino Helena Solo-Gabriele University of Miami

Florida, University of

403

L/O/G/OL/O/G/O Waste Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L/O/G/OL/O/G/O #12;· Waste Waste · Value () · · Flow #12;Genchi GenbutsuGenchi Genbutsu Top management should participate in regular "Ground Zero" walks CQI CQI RCA #12; waste/ value waste/ value · Eliminate · Re-arrange · Re-structure · Simplify · Combine · IT #12

Laksanacharoen, Sathaporn

404

WASTE SEPARATION-DOES IT INFLUENCE MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTOR EMISSIONS?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE SEPARATION- DOES IT INFLUENCE MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTOR EMISSIONS? A. John Chandler A a commendable job in proving that trace emissions from a modem waste to energy plant have little to do with the trace compounds in individual components of municipal solid waste. Ogden, the leader in designing

Columbia University

405

Waste Management & Research172 Waste Manage Res 2003: 21: 172177  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Management & Research172 Waste Manage Res 2003: 21: 172­177 Printed in UK ­ all rights reserved Copyright © ISWA 2003 Waste Management & Research ISSN 0734­242X In many market segments of PVC in Germany increased by 9%, the fastest growth rate of all plastics. The waste stream in Germany

Columbia University

406

FROM WASTE TO WORTH: THE ROLE OF WASTE DIVERSION IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FROM WASTE TO WORTH: THE ROLE OF WASTE DIVERSION IN THE GREEN ECONOMY Submission to the Ministry of the Environment Regarding the Minister's Report on the Waste Diversion Act 2002 Review Submitted by: Submitted to of the Environment 10 Rambert Crescent Integrated Environmental Policy Division Toronto, Ontario M6S 1E6 Waste

Columbia University

407

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Treating Transuranic (TRU)/Alpha Low-level Waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The DOE proposes to construct, operate, and decontaminate/decommission a TRU Waste Treatment Facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The four waste types that would be treated at the proposed facility would be remote-handled TRU mixed waste sludge, liquid low-level waste associated with the sludge, contact-handled TRU/alpha low-level waste solids, and remote-handled TRU/alpha low-level waste solids. The mixed waste sludge and some of the solid waste contain metals regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and may be classified as mixed waste. This document analyzes the potential environmental impacts associated with five alternatives--No Action, the Low-Temperature Drying Alternative (Preferred Alternative), the Vitrification Alternative, the Cementation Alternative, and the Treatment and Waste Storage at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Alternative.

N /A

2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

408

TRU Waste Sampling Program: Volume I. Waste characterization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Volume I of the TRU Waste Sampling Program report presents the waste characterization information obtained from sampling and characterizing various aged transuranic waste retrieved from storage at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The data contained in this report include the results of gas sampling and gas generation, radiographic examinations, waste visual examination results, and waste compliance with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant-Waste Acceptance Criteria (WIPP-WAC). A separate report, Volume II, contains data from the gas generation studies.

Clements, T.L. Jr.; Kudera, D.E.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Hanford Tank Waste Residuals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Hanford Tank Waste Residuals DOE HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 Chris Kemp, DOE ORP Bill Hewitt, YAHSGS LLC Hanford Tanks & Tank Waste * Single-Shell Tanks (SSTs) - ~27 million gallons of waste* - 149 SSTs located in 12 SST Farms - Grouped into 7 Waste Management Areas (WMAs) for RCRA closure purposes: 200 West Area S/SX T TX/TY U 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) - ~26 million gallons of waste* - 28 DSTs located in 6 DST Farms (1 West/5 East) * 17 Misc Underground Storage Tanks (MUST) * 43 Inactive MUST (IMUST) 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Volumes fluctuate as SST retrievals and 242-A Evaporator runs occur. Major Regulatory Drivers * Radioactive Tank Waste Materials - Atomic Energy Act - DOE M 435.1-1, Ch II, HLW - Other DOE Orders * Hazardous/Dangerous Tank Wastes - Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (TPA) - Retrieval/Closure under State's implementation

410

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan, fiscal year 1994. Revision 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A was promulgated in final form on September 26, 1988. The order requires heads of field organizations to prepare and to submit updates on the waste management plans for all operations under their purview according to the format in Chap. 6, {open_quotes}Waste Management Plan Outline.{close_quotes} These plans are to be submitted by the DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO) in December of each year and distributed to the DP-12, ES&H-1, and other appropriate DOE Headquarters (DOE-HQ) organizations for review and comment. This document was prepared in response to this requirement for fiscal year (FY) 1994. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) waste management mission is reduction, collection, storage, treatment, and disposal of DOE wastes, generated primarily in pursuit of ORNL missions, in order to protect human health and safety and the environment. In carrying out this mission, waste management staff in the Waste Management and Remedial Action Division (WMRAD) will (1) guide ORNL in optimizing waste reduction and waste management capabilities and (2) conduct waste management operations in a compliant, publicly acceptable, technically sound, and cost-efficient manner. Waste management requirements for DOE radioactive wastes are detailed in DOE Order 5820.2A, and the ORNL Waste Management Program encompasses all elements of this order. The requirements of this DOE order and other appropriate DOE orders, along with applicable Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules and regulations, provide the principal source of regulatory guidance for waste management operations at ORNL. The objective of this document is compilation and consolidation of information on how the ORNL Waste Management Program is conducted, which waste management facilities are being used to manage wastes, what activities are planned for FY 1994, and how all of the activities are documented.

Turner, J.W. [ed.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

The Role of Anomalously Warm Sea Surface Temperatures on the Intensity of Hurricane Juan (2003) during Its Approach to Nova Scotia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When Hurricane Juan tracked toward Nova Scotia, Canada, in September 2003, forecasters were faced with the challenge of predicting the intensity and timing of the hurricane’s landfall. There were two competing factors dictating the storm’s ...

Christopher T. Fogarty; Richard J. Greatbatch; Harold Ritchie

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Development of a Three-Dimensional Meso-? Primitive Equation Model: Katabatic Winds Simulation in the Area of Terra Nova Bay, Antarctica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spatial evolution of Antarctic katabatic winds in the area of Terra Nova Bay is examined using the three-dimensional version of the Université Catholique de Louvain-Modèle Atmosphérique Régional (UCL-MAR) mesoscale primitive equation models. ...

Hubert Gallée; Guy Schayes

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

An Analysis of Near-Surface Winds, Air Temperature, and Cyclone Activity in Terra Nova Bay, Antarctica, from 1993 to 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In September 2009, the first unmanned aerial vehicles were flown over Terra Nova Bay, Antarctica, to collect information regarding air–sea interactions. Prior to the field season, wind and temperature data from a local automatic weather station (...

Shelley L. Knuth; John J. Cassano

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

L/O/G/OL/O/G/O Waste Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L/O/G/OL/O/G/O #12;· Waste Waste · Value () · · Flow #12;Genchi GenbutsuGenchi Genbutsu of waste) Zero Inventory #12;Just in Time in HealthcareJust in Time in Healthcare Takt time (pitch), one · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 5 WHY · · · RCA · · · 5 WHY · · #12; waste/ value waste/ value

Laksanacharoen, Sathaporn

415

DEVELOPMENT QUALIFICATION AND DISPOSAL OF AN ALTERNATIVE IMMOBILIZED LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE FORM AT THE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect

Demonstrating that a waste form produced by a given immobilization process is chemically and physically durable as well as compliant with disposal facility acceptance criteria is critical to the success of a waste treatment program, and must be pursued in conjunction with the maturation of the waste processing technology. Testing of waste forms produced using differing scales of processing units and classes of feeds (simulants versus actual waste) is the crux of the waste form qualification process. Testing is typically focused on leachability of constituents of concern (COCs), as well as chemical and physical durability of the waste form. A principal challenge regarding testing immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) forms is the absence of a standard test suite or set of mandatory parameters against which waste forms may be tested, compared, and qualified for acceptance in existing and proposed nuclear waste disposal sites at Hanford and across the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. A coherent and widely applicable compliance strategy to support characterization and disposal of new waste forms is essential to enhance and accelerate the remediation of DOE tank waste. This paper provides a background summary of important entities, regulations, and considerations for nuclear waste form qualification and disposal. Against this backdrop, this paper describes a strategy for meeting and demonstrating compliance with disposal requirements emphasizing the River Protection Project (RPP) Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at the Hanford Site and the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) mineralized low-activity waste (LAW) product stream.

SAMS TL; EDGE JA; SWANBERG DJ; ROBBINS RA

2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

416

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide. 3 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

417

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide.

Forsberg, Charles W. (155 Newport Dr., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Beahm, Edward C. (106 Cooper Cir., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Parker, George W. (321 Dominion Cir., Knoxville, TN 37922)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Method for calcining radioactive wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a method for the preparation of radioactive wastes in a low leachability form by calcining the radioactive waste on a fluidized bed of glass frit, removing the calcined waste to melter to form a homogeneous melt of the glass and the calcined waste, and then solidifying the melt to encapsulate the radioactive calcine in a glass matrix.

Bjorklund, William J. (Richland, WA); McElroy, Jack L. (Richland, WA); Mendel, John E. (Kennewick, WA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Methane generation from waste materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An organic solid waste digester for producing methane from solid waste, the digester comprising a reactor vessel for holding solid waste, a sprinkler system for distributing water, bacteria, and nutrients over and through the solid waste, and a drainage system for capturing leachate that is then recirculated through the sprinkler system.

Samani, Zohrab A. (Las Cruces, NM); Hanson, Adrian T. (Las Cruces, NM); Macias-Corral, Maritza (Las Cruces, NM)

2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

420

Copenhagen Waste Management and Incineration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copenhagen Waste Management and Incineration Florence, April 24 2009 Julie B. Svendsen 24 20092 Presentation · General introduction to Copenhagen Waste Management System · National incentives · Waste Management plan 2012 · Incineration plants #12;Florence, April 24 20093 Copenhagen Waste

Columbia University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste regulations nova" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Waste to Energy Time Activities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEMINAR Waste to Energy Time Activities 9:30-9:40 Brief introduction of participants 9:40-10:10 Presentation of Dr. Kalogirou, "Waste to Energy: An Integral Part of Worldwide Sustainable Waste Management" 10. Sofia Bethanis, "Production of synthetic aggregates for use in structural concrete from waste to energy

Columbia University

422

Contained recovery of oily waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for recovering oily waste from oily waste accumulations underground comprising sweeping the oily waste accumulation with hot water to recover said oily waste, wherein said area treated is isolated from surrounding groundwater hydraulically. The hot water may be reinjected after the hot-water displacement or may be treated to conform to any discharge requirements.

Johnson, Jr., Lyle A. (Laramie, WY); Sudduth, Bruce C. (Laramie, WY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Urban Wood Waste Resource Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study collected and analyzed data on urban wood waste resources in 30 randomly selected metropolitan areas in the United States. Three major categories wood wastes disposed with, or recovered from, the municipal solid waste stream; industrial wood wastes such as wood scraps and sawdust from pallet recycling, woodworking shops, and lumberyards; and wood in construction/demolition and land clearing debris.

Wiltsee, G.

1998-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

424

Federal Court Dismisses Waste Fee Challenges | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Court Dismisses Waste Fee Challenges Federal Court Dismisses Waste Fee Challenges Federal Court Dismisses Waste Fee Challenges December 13, 2010 - 2:31pm Addthis The D.C. Circuit today dismissed petitions filed by the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) and other entities seeking (1) to force the Department to issue an assessment of the adequacy of the nuclear waste fund fee and (2) compelling suspension of the fee. These petitions were filed before the Department's recent issuance of a new fee assessment, and, in that context, the court determined that the petitions were moot and unripe. The court's order can be found here. Addthis Related Articles NARUC Releases Cybersecurity Primer for Utility Regulators (June 2012) DOE Does Not Oppose Petitions to Intervene in Yucca Mountain NRC Proceeding

425

Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Regional Facility Act (Pennsylvania) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Regional Facility Act Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Regional Facility Act (Pennsylvania) Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Regional Facility Act (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Utility Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations Fees This act establishes a low-level radioactive waste disposal regional facility siting fund that requires nuclear power reactor constructors and operators to pay to the Department of Environmental Resources funds to be utilized for disposal facilities. This act ensures that nuclear facilities and the Department comply with the Low-Level Radioactive Disposal Act. The regional facility siting fund is used for reimbursement of expenses

426

Transportation functions of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System  

SciTech Connect

Within the framework of Public Law 97.425 and provisions specified in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10 Part 961, the US Department of Energy has the responsibility to accept and transport spent fuel and high-level waste from various organizations which have entered into a contract with the federal government in a manner that protects the health and safety of the public and workers. In implementing these requirements, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) has, among other things, supported the identification of functions that must be performed by a transportation system (TS) that will accept the waste for transport to a federal facility for storage and/or disposal. This document, through the application of system engineering principles, identifies the functions that must be performed to transport waste under this law.

Shappert, L.B. (ed.); Attaway, C.R.; Pope, R.B. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Best, R.E.; Danese, F.L. (Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)); Dixon, L.D. (Dixon (L.D.), Martinez, GA (United States)); Jones, R.H. (Jones (R.H.), Los Gatos, CA (United States)); Klimas, M.J. (USDOE Chicago Operations Office, Argonne, IL (United States)); Peterson, R.W

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Certification Plan, low-level waste Hazardous Waste Handling Facility  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan also incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end-product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; an executive summary of the Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP) for the HWHF and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification. This plan provides guidance from the HWHF to waste generators, waste handlers, and the Waste Certification Specialist to enable them to conduct their activities and carry out their responsibilities in a manner that complies with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Waste generators have the primary responsibility for the proper characterization of LLW. The Waste Certification Specialist verifies and certifies that LBL LLW is characterized, handled, and shipped in accordance with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Certification is the governing process in which LBL personnel conduct their waste generating and waste handling activities in such a manner that the Waste Certification Specialist can verify that the requirements of WHC-WAC are met.

Albert, R.

1992-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

428

Nova Virgem :b the story of a nineteenth-century Brazilian slave smuggler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the close of the legal transatlantic slave trade in 1807 agricultural markets of the New World were reluctant to relinquish their dependence on free labor from Africa. British insistence on the opposite eventually caused most of those who held out to give in and end the traffic, but not for some time. Brazil held a unique privilege during the early stages of the abolition of the slave trade. Through treaty with Great Britain, Brazilians were allowed to continue the trade provided they met a number of conditions. Among these were a limit of five slaves per two ship tons, the mandatory presence of a surgeon on all slaving voyages, and most importantly the restriction of all slaving voyages to ports south of the Equator. This thesis will examine the story of one Brazilian slaver, the Nova Virgem, which was captured in July 1828 off the coast of Nigeria by HMS Primrose. Taken 300 miles north of the Equator, with more than 350 slaves aboard, the ship was declared a legal prize of Britain and sent to Sierra Leone for trial and later condemned. As this vessel's tale unfolds it is soon evident that the slavers had broken the law in almost every aspect of their voyage, from the tonnage calculation to the clearance papers signed by Bahian officials. This thesis will examine the voyage of this Brazilian slaver in order to ask a very important question: Why was this ship breaking laws virtually every step of the way? In the end, the Nova Virgem will be shown as a raindrop in a storm of slave smugglers being stopped by the umbrella of the British government and navy. These laws were being broken because it was well known that slavers could do so with little fear of the consequences. With the potential for tremendous profits the negligible slap on the wrist that might, under remote possibilities, be awaiting them was almost something to be laughed at. This story reflects the battle of morality and "civilization" versus the desire to reap a profit. Like any commerce, the slave trade was simply the product of shrewd businessmen providing their customers with what they wanted. As long as there is someone willing to purchase a commodity, there will be someone there to sell it. The story can be seen as almost identical to modern drug smuggling. No matter how hard the authorities may wish to end the traffic, they will never achieve their goals unless the people of the nation cooperate. Without the aid of the country's citizens, the traffic will continue simply because the police are bound by the law and the smugglers are not.

Miller, Mason Daniel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2005 Site Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide information needed by the DOE to assess WIPP's environmental performance and to make WIPP environmental information available to stakeholders and members of the public. This report has been prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A and DOE guidance. This report documents WIPP's environmental monitoring programs and their results for 2004. The WIPP Project is authorized by the DOE National Security and Military Applications of Nuclear Energy Authorization Act of 1980 (Pub. L. 96-164). After more than 20 years of scientific study and public input, WIPP received its first shipment of waste on March 26, 1999. Located in southeastern New Mexico, WIPP is the nation's first underground repository permitted to safely and permanently dispose of TRU radioactive and mixed waste (as defined in the WIPP LWA) generated through defense activities and programs. TRU waste is defined, in the WIPP LWA, as radioactive waste containing more than 100 nanocuries (3,700 becquerels [Bq]) of alpha-emitting TRU isotopes per gram of waste, with half-lives greater than 20 years except for high-level waste, waste that has been determined not to require the degree of isolation required by the disposal regulations, and waste the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has approved for disposal. Most TRU waste is contaminated industrial trash, such as rags and old tools; sludges from solidified liquids; glass; metal; and other materials from dismantled buildings. TRU waste is eligible for disposal at WIPP if it has been generated in whole or in part by one or more of the activities listed in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (42 United States Code [U.S.C.] §10101, et seq.), including naval reactors development, weapons activities, verification and control technology, defense nuclear materials production, defense nuclear waste and materials by-products management,defense nuclear materials security and safeguards and security investigations, and defense research and development. The waste must also meet the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria. When TRU waste arrives at WIPP, it is transported into the Waste Handling Building. The waste containers are removed from the shipping containers, placed on the waste hoist, and lowered to the repository level of 655 m (2,150 ft; approximately 0.5 mi) below the surface. Next, the containers of waste are removed from the hoist and placed in excavated disposal rooms in the Salado Formation, a thick sequence of evaporite beds deposited approximately 250 million years ago (Figure 1.1). After each panel of seven rooms has been filled with waste, specially designed closures are emplaced. When all of WIPP's panels have been filled, at the conclusion of WIPP operations, seals will be placed in the shafts. One of the main attributes of salt, as a rock formation in which to isolate radioactive waste, is the ability of the salt to creep, that is, to deform continuously over time. Excavations into which the waste-filled drums are placed will close eventually, flowing around the drums and sealing them within the formation.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

2006-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

430

Some aspects of low-level radioactive-waste disposal in the US  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the NRC supported Shallow Land Burial research program at Brookhaven National Laboraotry and its relationship to the proposed revised ruling on disposal of low level radioactive waste, 10 CFR Part 61. Section of the proposed regulation, which establish the new low level waste classification system and the performance objective placed on waste form, are described briefly. The report also summarizes the preliminary results obtained from the EPA program in which low level waste drums were retrieved from the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans.

Schweitzer, D.G.; Davis, R.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Interim Storage of Greater than Class C Low Level Waste, Rev. 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report serves as a guideline for the safe, interim on-site storage of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) that exceeds the activity limitations for near-surface disposal set forth in 10 CFR 61.55. The nuclear industry refers to this waste as "greater than Class C (GTTC) waste" as it exceeds the Class C limits in the referenced regulation. At the present time, there is no licensed disposal facility for GTCC waste in the United States . This situation forces commercial nuclear reactors to store it on si...

2003-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

432

Context: Policy & Regulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Regulation of Halon and Halon Substitutes. ... Disparities in Environmental Regulations and Their Effect ... Impediments and Incentives for Incorporating ...

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

433

Study of investigation-derived waste management options. Master's thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

USAF is dedicated to the clean up of past releases of hazardous substances at its bases under the Installation Restoration Program (IRP) . Clean up decisions are based upon data produced from investigations. Large amounts of waste may be derived from investigations. Investigation-derived waste (IDW), especially that with a hazardous component, may pose significant health protection and regulatory compliance problems if neglected. This study identifies the status and the need for improvement of IDW management to avoid those problems. Information on the background of IDW management was collected through a review of environmental laws, waste management regulations, and existing guidance. Practical IDW management information was gleaned from conversations with iRP managers at twelve USAF bases around the country. This study revealed that IDW management needs improvement. All bases acknowledged IDW concerns and have adopted various methods to deal with them. However, current methods appear to rely more upon expediency rather than permanence. This study showed that critical protection and compliance issues are being overlooked. Development of specific IDW management guidance may better assure that critical issues are addressed. Waste minimization, Waste management, Environmental management, Nonhazardous wastes, Hazardous material, Solid wastes.

Mountain, B.C.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Treatment of Mixed Wastes via Fixed Bed Gasification  

SciTech Connect

This report outlines the details of research performed under USDOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-96MC33258 to evaluate the ChemChar hazardous waste system for the destruction of mixed wastes, defined as those that contain both RCRA-regulated haz- ardous constituents and radionuclides. The ChemChar gasification system uses a granular carbonaceous char matrix to immobilize wastes and feed them into the gasifier. In the gasifier wastes are subjected to high temperature reducing conditions, which destroy the organic constituents and immobilize radionuclides on the regenerated char. Only about 10 percent of the char is consumed on each pass through the gasifier, and the regenerated char can be used to treat additional wastes. When tested on a 4-inch diameter scale with a continuous feed unit as part of this research, the ChemChar gasification system was found to be effective in destroying RCRA surrogate organic wastes (chlorobenzene, dichloroben- zene, and napht.halene) while retaining on the char RCRA heavy metals (chromium, nickel, lead, and cadmium) as well as a fission product surrogate (cesium) and a plutonium surrogate (cerium). No generation of harmful byproducts was observed. This report describes the design and testing of the ChemChar gasification system and gives the operating procedures to be followed in using the system safely and effectively for mixed waste treatment.

None

1998-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

435

Order Module--self-study program: HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS AND EMERGENCY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

self-study program: HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS AND self-study program: HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE Order Module--self-study program: HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE This module will discuss the objectives and requirements associated with this rule from the code of federal regulations. We have provided an example to help familiarize you with the material. The example will also help prepare you for the practice at the end of this module and for the criterion test. Before continuing, you should obtain a copy of the regulation at Hazardous waste operations and emergency response or through the course manager. You may need to refer to these documents to complete the example, practice, and criterion test. DOE Order Self Study Modules - 29 CFR 1910.120 Hazardous Waste Operations

436

Photometric study of new southern SU UMa-type dwarf novae and candidates: V877 Ara, KK Tel and PU CMa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We photometrically observed three dwarf novae V877 Ara, KK Tel and PU CMa. We discovered undisputed presence of superhumps in V877 Ara and KK Tel, with mean periods of 0.08411(2) d and 0.08808(3) d, respectively. Both V877 Ara and KK Tel are confirmed to belong to long-period SU UMa-type dwarf novae. In V877 Ara, we found a large decrease of the superhump period (dot(P)/P = -14.5 +/- 2.1 x 10^(-5)). There is evidence that the period of KK Tel decreased at a similar or a more exceptional rate. Coupled with the past studies of superhump period changes, these findings suggest that a previously neglected diversity of phenomena is present in long-period SU UMa-type dwarf novae. The present discovery of a diversity in long-period SU UMa-type systems would become an additional step toward a full understanding the dwarf nova phenomenon. PU CMa is shown to be an excellent candidate for an SU UMa-type dwarf nova. We examined the outburst properties of these dwarf novae, and derived characteristic outburst recurrence times. Combined with the recently published measurement of the orbital period of PU CMa, we propose that PU CMa is the first object filling the gap between the extreme WZ Sge-type and ER UMa-type stars.

T. Kato; R. Santallo; G. Bolt; T. Richards; P. Nelson; B. Monard; M. Uemura; S. Kiyota; R. Stubbings; A. Pearce; T. Watanabe; P. Schmeer; H. Yamaoka

2002-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

437

Medical and Biohazardous Waste Generator's Guide (Revision 2)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biohazardous Waste Training Medical/Biohazardous WasteInspections 7. Forms and Supplies Medical Waste AccumulationLog Ordering Medical Waste Supplies 8. Solid Medical Waste

Waste Management Group

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Tank Waste Strategy Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tank Waste Subcommittee www.em.doe.gov safety performance cleanup closure E M Environmental Management 1 Tank Waste Subcommittee Ken Picha Office of Environmental Management December 5, 2011 Background Tank Waste Subcommittee (TWS)originally chartered, in response to Secretary's request to perform a technical review of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) in May 2010. Three tasks: o Verification of closure of WTP External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issues. o WTP Technical Design Review o WTP potential improvements Report completed and briefed to DOE in September 2010 www.em.doe.gov safety performance cleanup closure E M Environmental Management 2 Report completed and briefed to DOE in September 2010 Follow-on scope for TWS identified immediately after briefing to DOE and

439

Waste Treatment Plant Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, was the largest of three defense production sites in the U.S. Over the span of 40 years, it was used to produce 64 metric tons of plutonium, helping end World War II and playing a major role in military defense efforts during the Cold War. As a result, 56 million gallons of radioactive and chemical wastes are now stored in 177 underground tanks on the Hanford Site. To address this challenge, the U.S. Department of Energy contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the "Vit Plant," will use vitrification to immobilize most of Hanford's dangerous tank waste.

440

ORNL radioactive waste operations  

SciTech Connect

Since its beginning in 1943, ORNL has generated large amounts of solid, liquid, and gaseous radioactive waste material as a by-product of the basic research and development work carried out at the laboratory. The waste system at ORNL has been continually modified and updated to keep pace with the changing release requirements for radioactive wastes. Major upgrading projects are currently in progress. The operating record of ORNL waste operation has been excellent over many years. Recent surveillance of radioactivity in the Oak Ridge environs indicates that atmospheric concentrations of radioactivity were not significantly different from other areas in East Tennesseee. Concentrations of radioactivity in the Clinch River and in fish collected from the river were less than 4% of the permissible concentration and intake guides for individuals in the offsite environment. While some radioactivity was released to the environment from plant operations, the concentrations in all of the media sampled were well below established standards.

Sease, J.D.; King, E.M.; Coobs, J.H.; Row, T.H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste regulations nova" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Handford Waste Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Hanford Waste Diversion SAN Teleconference June 21, 2012 Tom Ferns, DOE-RL 2 Hanford Site Mission The Hanford Site is engaged in one of the largest and most complex environmental...

442

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

request for further delays After the EPA certified that the WIPP met the standards for disposal of transuranic waste in May 1998, then-New Mexico Attorney General Tom Udall...

443

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300{degrees}C to 800{degrees}C to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100{degrees}C to 1400{degrees}C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, G.G.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

444

Treatment of organic waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An organic waste containing at least one element selected from the group consisting of strontium, cesium, iodine and ruthenium is treated to achieve a substantial reduction in the volume of the waste and provide for fixation of the selected element in an inert salt. The method of treatment comprises introducing the organic waste and a source of oxygen into a molten salt bath maintained at an elevated temperature to produce solid and gaseous reaction products. The gaseous reaction products comprise carbon dioxide and water vapor, and the solid reaction products comprise the inorganic ash constituents of the organic waste and the selected element which is retained in the molten salt. The molten salt bath comprises one or more alkali metal carbonates, and may optionally include from 1 to about 25 wt.% of an alkali metal sulfate.

Grantham, LeRoy F. (Calabasas, CA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

New Constraints on the 18F(p,alpha) 15O Rate in Novae from the (d,p) Reaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The degree to which the (p,gamma) and (p,alpha) reactions destroy 18F at temperatures 1-4x10^8 K is important for understanding the synthesis of nuclei in nova explosions and for using the long-lived radionuclide 18F, a target of gamma-ray astronomy, as a diagnostic of nova mechanisms. The reactions are dominated by low-lying proton resonances near the 18F+p threshold (E_x=6.411 MeV in 19Ne). To gain further information about these resonances, we have used a radioactive 18F beam from the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility to selectively populate corresponding mirror states in 19F via the inverse d(18F,p)19F neutron transfer reaction. Neutron spectroscopic factors were measured for states in 19F in the excitation energy range 0-9 MeV. Widths for corresponding proton resonances in 19Ne were calculated using a Woods-Saxon potential. The results imply significantly lower 18F(p,gamma)19Ne and 18F(p,alpha)15O reaction rates than reported previously, thereby increasing the prospect of observing the 511-keV annihilation radiation associated with the decay of 18F in the ashes ejected from novae.

R. L. Kozub; D. W. Bardayan; J. C. Batchelder; J. C. Blackmon; C. R. Brune; A. E. Champagne; J. A. Cizewski; T. Davinson; U. Greife; C. J. Gross; C. C. Jewett; R. J. Livesay; Z. Ma; B. H. Moazen; C. D. Nesaraja; L. Sahin; J. P. Scott; D. Shapira; M. S. Smith; J. S. Thomas; P. J. Woods

2004-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

446

Citrus Waste Biomass Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Renewable Spirits is developing an innovative pilot plant bio-refinery to establish the commercial viability of ehtanol production utilizing a processing waste from citrus juice production. A novel process based on enzymatic hydrolysis of citrus processing waste and fermentation of resulting sugars to ethanol by yeasts was successfully developed in collaboration with a CRADA partner, USDA/ARS Citrus and Subtropical Products Laboratory. The process was also successfully scaled up from laboratory scale to 10,000 gal fermentor level.

Karel Grohman; Scott Stevenson

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

447

Just-in-time characterization and certification of DOE-generated wastes  

SciTech Connect

Transportation and disposal of wastes generated by Department of Energy (DOE) activities, including weapons production and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of facilities, require that wastes be certified as complying with various regulations and requirements. These certification requirements are typically summarized by disposal sites in their specific waste acceptance criteria. Although a large volume of DOE wastes have been generated by past activities and are presently in storage awaiting disposal, a significant volume of DOE wastes, particularly from D&D projects. have not yet been generated. To prepare DOE-generated wastes for disposal in an efficient manner. it is suggested that a program of just-in-time characterization and certification be adopted. The goal of just-in-time characterization and certification, which is based on the just-in-time manufacturing process, is to streamline the certification process by eliminating redundant layers of oversight and establishing pro-active waste management controls. Just-in-time characterization and certification would rely on a waste management system in which wastes are characterized at the point of generation, precertified as they are generated (i.e., without iterative inspections and tests subsequent to generation and storage), and certified at the point of shipment, ideally the loading dock of the building from which the wastes are generated. Waste storage would be limited to accumulating containers for cost-efficient transportation.

Arrenholz, D.A.; Primozic, F.J. [Benchmark Environmental Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Robinson, M.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

448

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2003 Site Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide information needed by the DOE to assess WIPP's environmental performance and to convey that performance to stakeholders and members of the public. This report has been prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A and DOE guidance. This report documents WIPP's environmental monitoring programs and their results for 2003. The WIPP Project is authorized by the DOE National Security and Military Applications of Nuclear Energy Authorization Act of 1980 (Pub. L. 96-164). After more than 20 years of scientific study and public input, WIPP received its first shipment of waste on March 26, 1999. Located in southeastern New Mexico, WIPP is the nation's first underground repository permitted to safely and permanently dispose of TRU radioactive and mixed waste (as defined in the WIPP LWA) generated through the research and production of nuclear weapons and other activities related to the national defense of the United States. TRU waste is defined in the WIPP LWA as radioactive waste containing more than 100 nanocuries (3,700 becquerels [Bq]) of alpha-emitting transuranic isotopes per gram of waste, with half-lives greater than 20 years. Exceptions are noted as high-level waste, waste that has been determined not to require the degree of isolation required by the disposal regulations, and waste the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has approved for disposal. Most TRU waste is contaminated industrial trash, such as rags and old tools, and sludges from solidified liquids; glass; metal; and other materials from dismantled buildings. A TRU waste is eligible for disposal at WIPP if it has been generated in whole or in partby one or more of the activities listed in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (42 United States Code [U.S.C.] §10101, et seq.), including naval reactors development, weapons activities, verification and control technology, defense nuclear materials production, defense nuclear waste and materials by-products management, defense nuclear materials security and safeguards and security investigations, and defense research and development. The waste must also meet the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria. When TRU waste arrives at WIPP, it is transported into the Waste Handling Building. The waste containers are removed from the shipping containers, placed on the waste hoist, and lowered to the repository level of 655 m (2,150 ft; approximately 0.5 mi) below the surface. Next, the containers of waste are removed from the hoist and placed in excavated storage rooms in the Salado Formation, a thick sequence of evaporite beds deposited approximately 250 million years ago (Figure 1.1). After each panel has been filled with waste, specially designed closures are emplaced. When all of WIPP's panels have been filled, at the conclusion of WIPP operations, seals will be placed in the shafts. Salt under pressure is relatively plastic, and mine openings will be allowed to creep closed for final disposal, encapsulating and isolating the waste.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

2005-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

449

Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities Project Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility  

SciTech Connect

This feasibility study report presents a draft design of the Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility (VWISF), which is one of three subprojects of the Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities (IWVF) project. The primary goal of the IWVF project is to design and construct a treatment process system that will vitrify the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) to a final waste form. The project will consist of three subprojects that include the Waste Collection Tanks Facility, the Waste Vitrification Facility (WVF), and the VWISF. The Waste Collection Tanks Facility will provide for waste collection, feed mixing, and surge storage for SBW and newly generated liquid waste from ongoing operations at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The WVF will contain the vitrification process that will mix the waste with glass-forming chemicals or frit and turn the waste into glass. The VWISF will provide a shielded storage facility for the glass until the waste can be disposed at either the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as mixed transuranic waste or at the future national geological repository as high-level waste glass, pending the outcome of a Waste Incidental to Reprocessing determination, which is currently in progress. A secondary goal is to provide a facility that can be easily modified later to accommodate storage of the vitrified high-level waste calcine. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of the VWISF, which would be constructed in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local laws. This project supports the Department of Energy’s Environmental Management missions of safely storing and treating radioactive wastes as well as meeting Federal Facility Compliance commitments made to the State of Idaho.

Bonnema, Bruce Edward

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project. Appendix B, Waste stream engineering files: Part 2, Low-level waste streams  

SciTech Connect

Mixed and low-level wastes generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are required to be managed according to applicable State and Federal regulations, and Department of Energy Orders that provide for the protection of human health and the environment. The Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project was chartered in 1991, by the Department of Energy to provide treatment capability for these mixed and low-level waste streams. The first project task consisted of conducting engineering studies to identify the waste streams, their potential treatment strategies, and the requirements that would be imposed on the waste streams and the facilities used to process them. This report documents those studies so the project can continue with an evaluation of programmatic options, system tradeoff studies, and the conceptual design phase of the project. This report, appendix B, comprises the engineering design files for this project study. The engineering design files document each waste steam, its characteristics, and identified treatment strategies.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Surface Coal Mining Regulations (Mississippi) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Surface Coal Mining Regulations (Mississippi) Surface Coal Mining Regulations (Mississippi) Surface Coal Mining Regulations (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Utility Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality The Surface Coal Mining Regulations are a combination of permitting requirements and environmental regulations that limit how, where and when coal can be mined. It protects lands that are under special regulation due to their nature, and applies only to state lands. When applied to Coal with Carbon Capture and Storage projects the rules that would apply to a normal coal-mining project still apply. In addition to these measures, a CCS plant would need to adhere to all waste disposal requirements, water usage

452

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Waste -...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste: Hazardous, Biohazardous, Medical or Radioactive Do not transport or ship hazardous material wastes off-site. Only Waste Management, Radiation Protection or approved...

453

Hazardous Waste Management (Oklahoma) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

treatment and storage of such waste. It also mentions the availability of tax credits for waste facilities. Energy recovery from the destruction of a hazardous waste may be...

454

Annual Transuranic Waste Inventory Report - 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

contain both combustible and noncombustible waste items. Combustible waste may include wood, plastics, paper, and rags. Noncombustible waste items may include metals, glass,...

455

Bioenergy development from agricultural waste on Northern ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Summary This project will convert agricultural waste, including food waste, rice straw, and other organic farm waste to bioethanol through bacterial ...

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

456

Site Programs & Cooperative Agreements: Waste Isolation Pilot...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site Programs & Cooperative Agreements: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) The DOE Carlsbad Field Office funds a number of...

457

Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Project Waste Form Qualification Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy has created a waste acceptance process to help guide the overall program for the disposal of high-level nuclear waste in a federal repository. This Waste Form Qualification Program Plan describes the hierarchy of strategies used by the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Project to satisfy the waste form qualification obligations of that waste acceptance process. A description of the functional relationship of the participants contributing to completing this objective is provided. The major activities, products, providers, and associated scheduling for implementing the strategies also are presented.

Randklev, E.H.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Certification plan transuranic waste: Hazardous Waste Handling Facility  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of transuranic (TRU) waste handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). The plan incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end-product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; an executive summary of the Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP) for the HWBF; and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Focus Sheet | Hazardous Waste Checklist How to be ready for state hazardous waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Focus Sheet | Hazardous Waste Checklist How to be ready for state hazardous waste inspectors. See a hazardous waste inspection. ons, rrosive. n hemicals? ical waste. Waste-like chemicals have als Are you. Are your waste containers properly labeled? us Waste label as soon t Do you accumulate waste in a safe

Wilcock, William

460

Low-Level Waste Forum notes and summary reports for 1994. Volume 9, Number 3, May-June 1994  

SciTech Connect

This issue includes the following articles: Vermont ratifies Texas compact; Pennsylvania study on rates of decay for classes of low-level radioactive waste; South Carolina legislature adjourns without extending access to Barnwell for out-of-region generators; Southeast Compact Commission authorizes payments for facility development, also votes on petitions, access contracts; storage of low-level radioactive waste at Rancho Seco removed from consideration; plutonium estimates for Ward Valley, California; judgment issued in Ward Valley lawsuits; Central Midwest Commission questions court`s jurisdiction over surcharge rebates litigation; Supreme Court decides commerce clause case involving solid waste; parties voluntarily dismiss Envirocare case; appellate court affirms dismissal of suit against Central Commission; LLW Forum mixed waste working group meets; US EPA Office of Radiation and Indoor Air rulemakings; EPA issues draft radiation site cleanup regulation; EPA extends mixed waste enforcement moratorium; and NRC denies petition to amend low-level radioactive waste classification regulations.

NONE

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste regulations nova" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Molten salt oxidation of mixed wastes: Separation of radioactive materials and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is involved in a program to apply a molten salt oxidation (MSO) process to the treatment of mixed wastes at Oak Ridge and other Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Mixed wastes are defined as those wastes that contain both radioactive components, which are regulated by the atomic energy legislation, and hazardous waste components, which are regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). A major part of our ORNL program involves the development of separation technologies that are necessary for the complete treatment of mixed wastes. The residues from the MSO treatment of the mixed wastes must be processed further to separate the radioactive components, to concentrate and recycle residues, or to convert the residues into forms acceptable for final disposal. This paper is a review of the MSO requirements for separation technologies, the information now available, and the concepts for our development studies.

Bell, J.T.; Haas, P.A.; Rudolph, J.C.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z