Sample records for waste policy act

  1. The Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended with appropriations acts appended

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 provides for the development of repositories for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel, to establish a program of research, development and demonstration regarding the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. Titles 1 and 2 cover these subjects. Also included in this Act are: Title 3: Other provisions relating to radioactive waste; Title 4: Nuclear waste negotiation; Title 5: Nuclear waste technical review board; and Title 6: High-level radioactive waste. An appendix contains excerpts from appropriations acts from fiscal year 1984--1994.

  2. Nuclear Waste Policy Act.doc

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartment of Energy Advanced1, 2014NuclearCommission,ScienceWaste

  3. South Carolina Solid Waste Policy and Management Act (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The state of South Carolina supports a regional approach to solid waste management and encourages the development and implementation of alternative waste management practices and resource recovery....

  4. Recommendation by the Secretary of Energy Regarding the Suitability of the Yucca Mountain Site for a Repository Under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recommendation by the Secretary of Energy Regarding the Suitability of the Yucca Mountain Site for a Repository Under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982

  5. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapter six describes the basis for facility design, the completed facility conceptual design, the completed analytical work relating to the resolution of design issues, and future design-related work. The basis for design and the conceptual design information presented in this chapter meet the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, for a conceptual repository design that takes into account site-specific requirements. This information is presented to permit a critical evaluation of planned site characterization activities. Chapter seven describes waste package components, emplacement environment, design, and status of research and development that support the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) Project. The site characterization plan (SCP) discussion of waste package components is contained entirely within this chapter. The discussion of emplacement environment in this chapter is limited to considerations of the environment that influence, or which may influence, if perturbed, the waste packages and their performance (particularly hydrogeology, geochemistry, and borehole stability). The basis for conceptual waste package design as well as a description of the design is included in this chapter. The complete design will be reported in the advanced conceptual design (ACD) report and is not duplicated in the SCP. 367 refs., 173 figs., 68 tabs.

  6. Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act (HWMA) describes a comprehensive, Statewide program to manage hazardous wastes through regulating hazardous waste generation, transportation, storage,...

  7. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site; to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. Chapter 3 summarizes present knowledge of the regional and site hydrologic systems. The purpose of the information presented is to (1) describe the hydrology based on available literature and preliminary site-exploration activities that have been or are being performed and (2) provide information to be used to develop the hydrologic aspects of the planned site characterization program. Chapter 4 contains geochemical information about the Yucca Mountain site. The chapter references plan for continued collection of geochemical data as a part of the site characterization program. Chapter 4 describes and evaluates data on the existing climate and site meterology, and outlines the suggested procedures to be used in developing and validating methods to predict future climatic variation. 534 refs., 100 figs., 72 tabs.

  8. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in acordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and eveloping a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing prinicples, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed. 880 refs., 130 figs., 25 tabs.

  9. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended and approved by the President for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site; to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package; and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstate the suitability of the site for a repository, to desin the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and developing a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next; it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing principles, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed.

  10. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yucca Mountain site in Neavada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended and approved for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package;and to present the plans for obtaining hte geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare and environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and developing a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing principles, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed.

  11. Solid Waste Act (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The main purpose of the Solid Waste Act is to authorize and direct the establishment of a comprehensive solid waste management program. The act states details about specific waste management...

  12. Solid Waste Management Act (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act establishes rules for the permitting, posting of security, construction, operation, closure, maintenance and remediation of solid waste disposal sites; disposal of solid waste in ways that...

  13. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorically Excluded...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Management System NEPA National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorically Excluded Actions National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorically Excluded...

  14. Minnesota Environmental Policy Act (MEPA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Minnesota Environmental Policy Act (MEPA) Jennie Ross, Environmental Assessment Unit Mn/DOT Office of Environmental Services March 31, 2009 #12;Minnesota State Environmental Review Minnesota Environmental Policy Environmental Impact Statement Threshold Criteria - Environmental Impact Statement is required for construction

  15. Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act addresses the safe and proper management of hazardous wastes and used oil, the permitting of hazardous waste facilities, and the siting of facilities. The Department of Environmental...

  16. Montana Environmental Policy Act (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Montana Environmental Policy Act aims to provide for the consideration of environmental impacts by the legislature when enacting laws, and for public transparency regarding the possible...

  17. Solid Waste Management Act (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act provides for the planning and regulation of solid waste storage, collection, transportation, processing, treatment, and disposal. It requires that municipalities submit plans for municipal...

  18. Integrated Solid Waste Management Act (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act affirms the state's support for alternative waste management practices, including waste reduction and resource recovery. Each county and municipality is required to file an integrated...

  19. Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act provides for planning for the processing and disposal of municipal waste; requires counties to submit plans for municipal waste management systems within their boundaries; authorizes...

  20. National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Strategy for the Remote-Handled Low-level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peggy Hinman

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) needs to have disposal capability for remote-handled low level waste (LLW) generated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) at the time the existing disposal facility is full or must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the INL Subsurface Disposal Area in approximately the year 2017.

  1. Aligning National Environmental Policy Act Process with Environmental...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Aligning National Environmental Policy Act Process with Environmental Management Systems Aligning National Environmental Policy Act Process with Environmental Management Systems...

  2. YUCCA MOUNTAIN PROJECT RECOMMENDATION BY THE SECRETARY OF ENERGY REGARDING THE SUITABILITY OF THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE FOR A REPOSITORY UNDER THE NUCLEAR WASTE POLICY ACT OF 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NA

    2002-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    For more than half a century, since nuclear science helped us win World War II and ring in the Atomic Age, scientists have known that !he Nation would need a secure, permanent facility in which to dispose of radioactive wastes. Twenty years ago, when Congress adopted the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA or ''the Act''), it recognized the overwhelming consensus in the scientific community that the best option for such a facility would be a deep underground repository. Fifteen years ago, Congress directed the Secretary of Energy to investigate and recommend to the President whether such a repository could be located safely at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Since then, our country has spent billions of dollars and millions of hours of research endeavoring to answer this question. I have carefully reviewed the product of this study. In my judgment, it constitutes sound science and shows that a safe repository can be sited there. I also believe that compelling national interests counsel in favor of proceeding with this project. Accordingly, consistent with my responsibilities under the NWPA, today I am recommending that Yucca Mountain be developed as the site for an underground repository for spent fuel and other radioactive wastes. The first consideration in my decision was whether the Yucca Mountain site will safeguard the health and safety of the people, in Nevada and across the country, and will be effective in containing at minimum risk the material it is designed to hold. Substantial evidence shows that it will. Yucca Mountain is far and away the most thoroughly researched site of its kind in the world. It is a geologically stable site, in a closed groundwater basin, isolated on thousands of acres of Federal land, and farther from any metropolitan area than the great majority of less secure, temporary nuclear waste storage sites that exist in the country today. This point bears emphasis. We are not confronting a hypothetical problem. We have a staggering amount of radioactive waste in this country--nearly 100,000,000 gallons of high-level nuclear waste and more than 40,000 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel with more created every day. Our choice is not between, on the one hand, a disposal site with costs and risks held to a minimum, and, on the other, a magic disposal system with no costs or risks at all. Instead, the real choice is between a single secure site, deep under the ground at Yucca Mountain, or making do with what we have now or some variant of it--131 aging surface sites, scattered across 39 states. Every one of those sites was built on the assumption that it would be temporary. As time goes by. every one is closer to the limit of its safe life span. And every one is at least a potential security risk--safe for today, but a question mark in decades to come.

  3. Hazardous Waste Act (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Hazardous waste" means any solid waste or combination of solid wastes that because of their quantity, concentration or physical, chemical or infectious characteristics may: cause or significantly...

  4. Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Management Act (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act contains regulations for safe disposal of hazardous waste, and establishes that a valid license is required to collect, transport, store, treat, use, or dispose of hazardous waste. Short...

  5. Illinois Solid Waste Management Act (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the purpose of this Act to reduce reliance on land disposal of solid waste, to encourage and promote alternative means of managing solid waste, and to assist local governments with solid...

  6. Solid Waste Resource Recovery Financing Act (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The State of Texas encourages the processing of solid waste for the purpose of extracting, converting to energy, or otherwise separating and preparing solid waste for reuse. This Act provides for...

  7. Gaines County Solid Waste Management Act (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act establishes the Gaines County Solid Waste Management District, a governmental body to develop and carry out a regional water quality protection program through solid waste management and...

  8. Solid Waste Planning and Recycling Act (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the purpose of this Act to provide incentives for decreased generation of municipal waste, to require certain counties to develop comprehensive waste management plans that place substantial...

  9. Virginia Waste Management Act (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solid waste and hazardous waste are regulated under a number of programs at the Department of Environmental Quality. These programs are designed to encourage the reuse and recycling of solid waste...

  10. Solid Waste Disposal Act (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality is responsible for the regulation and management of municipal solid waste and hazardous waste. A fee is applied to all solid waste disposed in the...

  11. Evaluation of Groundwater Impacts to Support the National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Assessment for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annette Schafer, Arthur S. Rood, A. Jeffrey Sondrup

    2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Groundwater impacts have been analyzed for the proposed remote-handled low-level waste disposal facility. The analysis was prepared to support the National Environmental Policy Act environmental assessment for the top two ranked sites for the proposed disposal facility. A four-phase screening and analysis approach was documented and applied. Phase I screening was site independent and applied a radionuclide half-life cut-off of 1 year. Phase II screening applied the National Council on Radiation Protection analysis approach and was site independent. Phase III screening used a simplified transport model and site-specific geologic and hydrologic parameters. Phase III neglected the infiltration-reducing engineered cover, the sorption influence of the vault system, dispersion in the vadose zone, vertical dispersion in the aquifer, and the release of radionuclides from specific waste forms. These conservatisms were relaxed in the Phase IV analysis which used a different model with more realistic parameters and assumptions. Phase I screening eliminated 143 of the 246 radionuclides in the inventory from further consideration because each had a half-life less than 1 year. An additional 13 were removed because there was no ingestion dose coefficient available. Of the 90 radionuclides carried forward from Phase I, 57 radionuclides had simulated Phase II screening doses exceeding 0.4 mrem/year. Phase III and IV screening compared the maximum predicted radionuclide concentration in the aquifer to maximum contaminant levels. Of the 57 radionuclides carried forward from Phase II, six radionuclides were identified in Phase III as having simulated future aquifer concentrations exceeding maximum contaminant limits. An additional seven radionuclides had simulated Phase III groundwater concentrations exceeding 1/100th of their respective maximum contaminant levels and were also retained for Phase IV analysis. The Phase IV analysis predicted that none of the thirteen remaining radionuclides would exceed the maximum contaminant levels for either site location. The predicted cumulative effective dose equivalent from all 13 radionuclides also was less than the dose criteria set forth in Department of Energy Order 435.1 for each site location. An evaluation of composite impacts showed one site is preferable over the other based on the potential for commingling of groundwater contamination with other facilities.

  12. Waste Management Assistance Act (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section promotes the proper and safe storage, treatment, and disposal of solid, hazardous, and low-level radioactive wastes in Iowa, and calls on Iowans to assume responsibility for waste...

  13. Solid Waste Policies (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute establishes the support of the state for alternative waste management practices that reduce the reliance upon land disposal and incorporate resource recovery. Cities and counties are...

  14. Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the public policy of the state of South Dakota to regulate the control and generation, transportation, treatment, storage, and disposal of hazardous wastes. The state operates a comprehensive...

  15. Montana Solid Waste Management Act (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the public policy of the state to control solid waste management systems to protect the public health and safety and to conserve natural resources whenever possible. The Department of...

  16. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (NEPA) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) All Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) projects are reviewed under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of...

  17. Template for Expedited National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review of Certain State Energy Program Projects Template for Expedited National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review of Certain State...

  18. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Management System National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Regulations and Links DOE NEPA Website NEPA Compliance Program...

  19. DOE Secretarial Notice: National Environmental Policy Act (February...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Notice: National Environmental Policy Act (February 5, 1990, status: cancelled) DOE Secretarial Notice: National Environmental Policy Act (February 5, 1990, status: cancelled) This...

  20. National Energy Policy Act Guide for State Energy Program and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Energy Policy Act Guide for State Energy Program and Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Projects National Energy Policy Act Guide for State Energy Program and...

  1. Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Applicable to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) - List of Covered Electric Utilities. Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the Energy...

  2. GAO Report -- National Environmental Policy Act: Little Information...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    GAO Report -- National Environmental Policy Act: Little Information Exists on NEPA Analyses GAO Report -- National Environmental Policy Act: Little Information Exists on NEPA...

  3. Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act establishes the means by which developers of proposed hazardous waste facilities will work with the community in which they wish to construct a facility. When the intent to construct,...

  4. Pennsylvania Solid Waste- Resource Recovery Development Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act promotes the construction and the application of solid waste disposal/processing and resource recovery systems that preserve and enhance the quality of air, water, and land resources. The...

  5. Solid Waste Management Services Act (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act affirms the commitment of the state government to the development of systems and facilities and technology necessary to initiate large-scale processing of solid wastes and resource...

  6. Local Solid Waste Disposal Act (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the purpose of this Act and the policy of this State to protect the public health and welfare and the quality of the environment by providing local governments with the ability to properly...

  7. National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Order is to establish DOE internal requirements and responsibilities for implementing the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations Implementing the Procedural Provisions of NEPA (40 CFR Parts 1500-1508), and the DOE NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR Part 1021). Change 1 has been added to this Order 9/28/2001.

  8. Georgia Comprehensive Solid Waste Management Act of 1990 (Georgia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Georgia Comprehensive Solid Waste Management Act (SWMA) of 1990 was implemented in order to improve solid waste management procedures, permitting processes and management throughout the state. ...

  9. Policy Flash 2014-05 Continuing Appropriations Act, 2014 -- Implementa...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    G, Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2013, Pub. L. No. 113-6 Policy Flash 2014-05 Continuing Appropriations Act, 2014 -- Implementation of Division F,...

  10. National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order establishes DOE internal requirements and responsibilities for implementing the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations Implementing the Procedural Provisions of NEPA (40 CFR Parts 1500-1508), and the DOE NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR Part 1021). Chg 1 (9-28-01) reflects the Under Secretary/Administrator of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) approval of certain NNSA environmental impact statements. 9/28/2001. Chg 2 (6-25-10) reflects changes to Deputy Secretary Policy and DOE organization. Superseded by DOE O 451.1B Admin Chg 3.

  11. Draft Report to Congress: Energy Policy Act of 2005, Section...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Report to Congress: Energy Policy Act of 2005, Section 1813, Indian Land Rights-of-Way Study Draft Report to Congress: Energy Policy Act of 2005, Section 1813, Indian Land...

  12. Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (1994) Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (1994) The purpose of this guidance...

  13. National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes DOE internal requirements and responsibilities for implementing the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations Implementing the Procedural Provisions of NEPA (40 CFR Parts 1500-1508), and the DOE NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR Part 1021). Chg 1, dated 9-28-01; Chg 2, dated 6-25-10; Admin Chg 3, dated 1-19-12, cancels DOE O 451.1B Chg 2.

  14. National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Order is to establish DOE internal requirements and responsibilities for implementing the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations Implementing the Procedural Provisions of NEPA (40 CFR Parts 1500-1508), and the DOE NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR Part 1021). (Hereinafter, the latter two will be referred to as "the Regulations.") Cancels DOE O 451.1A.

  15. National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) responsibilities and procedures to implement the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) Cancels DOE O 5440.1D. Canceled by DOE O 451.1 of 9-11-1995 and by DOE N 251.4 & Para. 5b(1) and 6a(23) is canceled by DOE O 231.1 of 9-30-1995.

  16. Statement of Work-National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Support...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Policy Act (NEPA) Support Services Acquisition: Preparation and Review of Environmental Impact Statements, Environmental Assessments, Environmental Reports, and other...

  17. Review: Lynton Keith Caldwell: An Environmental Visionary and the National Environmental Policy Act

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Byron

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the National Environmental Policy Act By Wendy Readand the National Environmental Policy Act. Bloomington, IN:of the 1969 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the

  18. Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Act (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act provides a comprehensive strategy for the siting of commercial low-level waste compactors and other waste management facilities, and to ensure the proper transportation, disposal and...

  19. FSH 1909.15 - National Environmental Policy Act Handbook: Chapter...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for FSH 1909.15 - National Environmental Policy Act Handbook: Chapter Zero Code Citation USFS. 20014. FSH 1909.15 -...

  20. FSH 1909.15 - National Environmental Policy Act Handbook: Chapter...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: FSH 1909.15 - National Environmental Policy Act Handbook: Chapter 30, Categorical Exclusion from DocumentationPermittin...

  1. Title 10 CFR 1021 National Environmental Policy Act Implementing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1 National Environmental Policy Act Implementing Procedures Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal Regulation:...

  2. FSH 1909.15 - National Environmental Policy Act Handbook: Chapter...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: FSH 1909.15 - National Environmental Policy Act Handbook: Chapter 40, Environmental Assessments and Related...

  3. FSH 1909.15 - National Environmental Policy Act Handbook: Chapter...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FSH 1909.15 - National Environmental Policy Act Handbook: Chapter 20, Environmental Impact Statements and Related Documents Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd...

  4. Policy Flash 2014-04 Continuing Appropriations Act, 2014 -- Congressio...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2014 -- Congressional Notification of Pending Contract or Financial Assistance Actions Policy Flash 2014-04 Continuing Appropriations Act, 2014 -- Congressional Notification of...

  5. Site characterization progress report: Yucca Mountain, Nevada, October 1, 1994--March 31, 1995, Number 12. Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 113)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the first half of fiscal year 1995, most activities at the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project were directed at implementing the Program Plan developed by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The Plan is designed to enable the Office to make measurable and significant progress toward key objectives over the next five years within the financial resources that can be realistically expected. Activities this period focused on the immediate goal of determining by 1998 whether Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is technically suitable as a possible site for a geologic repository for the permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Work on the Project advanced in several critical areas, including programmatic activities such as issuing the Program Plan, completing the first technical basis report to support the assessment of three 10 CFR 960 guidelines, developing the Notice of Intent for the Environmental Impact Statement, submitting the License Application Annotated Outline, and beginning a rebaselining effort to conform with the goals of the Program Plan. Scientific investigation and analysis of the site and design and construction activities to support the evaluation of the technical suitability of the site also advanced. Specific details relating to all Project activities and reports generated are presented in this report.

  6. Progress report on the scientific investigation program for the Nevada Yucca Mountain site, September 15, 1988--September 30, 1989; Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 113), Number 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this report on the progress of site characterization activities at Yucca Mountain in southern Nevada. This report is the first of a series of reports that will hereafter be issued at intervals of approximately 6-months during site characterization. The DOE`s plans for site characterization are described in the Site Characterization Plan (SCP) for the Yucca Mountain site. The SCP has been reviewed and commented on by the NRC, the State of Nevada, the affected units of local government, other interested parties, and the public. More detailed information on plans for site characterization is being presented in study plans for the various site characterization activities. This progress report presents short summaries of the status of site characterization activities and cites technical reports and research products that provide more detailed information on the activities. The report provides highlights of work started during the reporting period, work in progress, and work completed and documented during the reporting period. In addition, the report is the vehicle for discussing major changes, if any, to the DOE`s site characterization program resulting from ongoing collection and evaluation of site information; the development of repository and waste-package designs; receipt of performance-assessment results; and changes, if any, that occur in response to external comments on the site characterization programs. 80 refs.

  7. National Environmental Policy Act compliance guide. Volume II (reference book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document (Volume II of the National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Guide) contains current copies of regulations and guidance from the Council on Environmental Quality, the Department of Energy, the Department of State, and the Environmental Protection Agency, related to compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA).

  8. Solid Waste Management Act (West Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In addition to establishing a comprehensive program of controlling all phases of solid waste management and assigning responsibilities for solid waste management to the Secretary of Department of...

  9. Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A hazardous waste facility permit from the Department of Environmental Quality is required to store, treat or dispose of hazardous waste materials, or to construct, own or operate any facility...

  10. Nuclear Waste Policy Act | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced ScorecardReactor Technology Subcommittee of NEACSummary NucleariNuclear

  11. Environmental Management Waste and Recycling Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haase, Markus

    Environmental Management Waste and Recycling Policy October 2006 The University is committed and promoting recycling and the use of recycled materials. We will actively encourage the recycling of office reduction techniques · Provide facilities for recycling on campus · Give guidance and information to staff

  12. DOE National Environmental Policy Act Implementing Procedures...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    species or their habitat; and Federally-protected marine mammals and Essential Fish Habitat (Marine Mammals Protection Act; Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and...

  13. Montana Integrated Waste Management Act (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation sets goals for the reduction of solid waste generated by households, businesses, and governments, through source reduction, reuse, recycling, and composting. The state aims to...

  14. Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Regional Facility Act (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act establishes a low-level radioactive waste disposal regional facility siting fund that requires nuclear power reactor constructors and operators to pay to the Department of Environmental...

  15. Comprehensive Municipal Solid Waste Management, Resource Recovery, and Conservation Act (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act encourages the establishment of regional waste management facilities and the cooperation of local waste management entities in order to streamline the management of municipal solid waste...

  16. County Solid Waste Control Act (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this chapter is to authorize a cooperative effort by counties, public agencies, and other persons for the safe and economical collection, transportation, and disposal of solid waste...

  17. Fifty years of federal radioactive waste management: Policies and practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, R.G.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a chronological history of policies and practices relating to the management of radioactive waste for which the US Atomic Energy Commission and its successor agencies, the Energy Research and Development Administration and the Department of Energy, have been responsible since the enactment of the Atomic Energy Act in 1946. The defense programs and capabilities that the Commission inherited in 1947 are briefly described. The Commission undertook a dramatic expansion nationwide of its physical facilities and program capabilities over the five years beginning in 1947. While the nuclear defense activities continued to be a major portion of the Atomic Energy Commission`s program, there was added in 1955 the Atoms for Peace program that spawned a multiplicity of peaceful use applications for nuclear energy, e.g., the civilian nuclear power program and its associated nuclear fuel cycle; a variety of industrial applications; and medical research, diagnostic, and therapeutic applications. All of these nuclear programs and activities generated large volumes of radioactive waste that had to be managed in a manner that was safe for the workers, the public, and the environment. The management of these materials, which varied significantly in their physical, chemical, and radiological characteristics, involved to varying degrees the following phases of the waste management system life cycle: waste characterization, storage, treatment, and disposal, with appropriate transportation linkages. One of the benefits of reviewing the history of the waste management program policies and practices if the opportunity it provides for identifying the lessons learned over the years. Examples are summarized at the end of the report and are listed in no particular order of importance.

  18. Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Solid Waste Disposal Laws and Regulations are found in Tenn. Code 68-211. These rules are enforced and subject to change by the Public Waste Board (PWB), which is established by the Division...

  19. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Guide, Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, R.P. [Hansen Environmental Consultants, Englewood, CO (United States)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains a comprehensive National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Guide for the Sandia National Laboratories. It is based on the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) NEPA regulations in 40 CFR Parts 1500 through 1508; the US Department of Energy (DOE) N-EPA implementing procedures in 10 CFR Part 102 1; DOE Order 5440.1E; the DOE ``Secretarial Policy Statement on the National Environmental Policy Act`` of June 1994- Sandia NEPA compliance procedures-, and other CEQ and DOE guidance. The Guide includes step-by-step procedures for preparation of Environmental Checklists/Action Descriptions Memoranda (ECL/ADMs), Environmental Assessments (EAs), and Environmental Impact Statements (EISs). It also includes sections on ``Dealing With NEPA Documentation Problems`` and ``Special N-EPA Compliance Issues.``

  20. Capacity-to-Act in India's Solid Waste Management and Waste-to-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    it to energy is not a new phenomenon in India. Rural India has gained considerable experience in anaerobic1 Capacity-to-Act in India's Solid Waste Management and Waste-to- Energy Industries Perinaz Bhada concern is the inadequate supply of energy and increasing demand for electricity, amplified by a booming

  1. Name of Policy: Detecting and Preventing Fraud, Waste and Abuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viola, Ronald

    Name of Policy: Detecting and Preventing Fraud, Waste and Abuse Policy Number: 3364-15-02 Issuing applicable laws and regulations, including those laws and regulations that address fraud, waste and abuse in federal health care programs and the proper billing of Medicare, Medicaid and other payors. The University

  2. Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Waste Management Program Summary In response to the the requirement of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management in the...

  3. Draft Guidance for Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Draft Guidance for Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 - Hydroelectric Production Incentive Program - July 2014 Draft Guidance for Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of...

  4. The Impacts of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 on Industrial End...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    about the impacts of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 on industrial end users of electric motor-driven systems. The Impacts of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 on Industrial End Users...

  5. Order Module--DOE O 451.1B, NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Order Module--DOE O 451.1B, NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT COMPLIANCE PROGRAM Order Module--DOE O 451.1B, NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT COMPLIANCE PROGRAM DOE O 451.1B,...

  6. Montana Environmental Policy Act Guide | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 Climate Zone Subtype A. PlacesEnergyProgramPolicy Act Guide Jump

  7. Recovery Act Funding Leads to Record Year for Transuranic Waste Shipments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With the help of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) received the most transuranic waste shipments in a single year since waste operations began...

  8. Guidelines for compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act and the California Environmental Quality Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kielusiak, C.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) sets forth national policy for the protection of the environment. The NEPA process is intended to help officials of the federal government make decisions that are based on an understanding of environmental consequences, and take actions that protect, restore, and enhance the environment. The California Environmental Quality Act of 1970 (CEQA) is similar to NEPA. The California legislature established CEQA to inform both state and local governmental decision-makers and the public about potential significant environmental effects of proposed activities, to identify ways to avoid or reduce environmental impacts, and to disclose to the public the reasons why a project is approved if significant environmental effects are involved. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), complies with the provisions of both NEPA and CEQA. This document defines the responsibilities and authorities for NEPA/CEQA compliance at LBL.

  9. Solid Waste Management Policy and Programs (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These statutes encourage the State and local governments to develop waste management strategies to achieve the maximum possible reduction in waste generation, eliminate or reduce adverse...

  10. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Eschbach, Tara O.; Fowler, Richard A.; Fritz, Brad G.; Goodwin, Shannon M.; Harvey, David W.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Hoitink, Dana J.; Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Prendergast-Kennedy, Ellen L.; Rohay, Alan C.; Scott, Michael J.; Thorne, Paul D.

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents being prepared by DOE contractors. No statements of significance or environmental consequences are provided. This year's report is the thirteenth revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the fourteenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is typically presented in environmental impact statements (Weiss) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological, and historical resources, socioeconomics, occupational safety, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to the NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities.

  11. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Cannon, Sandra D.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Fowler, Richard A.; Fritz, Brad G.; Harvey, David W.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Hoitink, Dana J.; Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Prendergast-Kennedy, Ellen L.; Reidel, Steve P.; Rohay, Alan C.; Scott, Michael J.; Thorne, Paul D.

    2004-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents being prepared by DOE contractors. No statements of significance or environmental consequences are provided. This year's report is the sixteenth revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the seventeenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is typically presented in environmental impact statements (Weiss) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological, and historical resources, socioeconomics, occupational safety and health, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to the NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities.

  12. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization, Revision 15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Burk, Kenneth W.; Cannon, Sandra D.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Fowler, Richard A.; Fritz, Brad G.; Harvey, David W.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Prendergast-Kennedy, Ellen L.; Reidel, Steve P.; Scott, Michael J.; Thorne, Paul D.; Woody, Dave M.

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents being prepared by DOE contractors. No statements of significance or environmental consequences are provided. This year's report is the thirteenth revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the fourteenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is typically presented in environmental impact statements (Weiss) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological, and historical resources, socioeconomics, occupational safety, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to the NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities.

  13. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Antonio, Ernest J.; Eschbach, Tara O.; Fowler, Richard A.; Goodwin, Shannon M.; Harvey, David W.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Hoitink, Dana J.; Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Prendergast, Ellen L.; Rohay, Alan C.; Thorne, Paul D.

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents being prepared by DOE contractors. No statements of significance or environmental consequences are provided. This year's report is the thirteenth revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the fourteenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is typically presented in environmental impact statements (Weiss) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological, and historical resources, socioeconomics, occupational safety, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to the NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities.

  14. Energy Policy Act 2005 Summary (released in AEO2006)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. House of Representatives passed H.R. 6 EH, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, on April 21, 2005, and the Senate passed H.R. 6 EAS on June 28, 2005. A conference committee was convened to resolve differences between the two bills, and a report was approved and issued on July 27, 2005. The House approved the conference report on July 28, 2005, and the Senate followed on July 29, 2005. EPACT2005 was signed into law by President Bush on August 8, 2005, and became Public Law 109-058.

  15. National Environmental Policy Act RM | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecemberInitiativesNational Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) NationalNationalNational

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha-bearing radioactive waste Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Statutory and Regulatory Categories of Radioactive Waste... Disposal Restrictions LLRWPAA Low-level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 LLW Low-level Waste... of ......

  17. A Brief Guide: DOE-wide National Environmental Policy Act Contracts...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    May 2,2003 Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance (Mansoor, 202-586-9326) DOE-wide National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Contracts Secretarial Officers and Heads of Field...

  18. National Environmental Policy Act Hazards Assessment for the TREAT Alternative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd D. Christensen; Annette L. Schafer

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides an assessment of hazards as required by the National Environmental Policy Act for the alternative of restarting the reactor at the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) facility by the Resumption of Transient Testing Program. Potential hazards have been identified and screening level calculations have been conducted to provide estimates of unmitigated dose consequences that could be incurred through this alternative. Consequences considered include those related to use of the TREAT Reactor, experiment assembly handling, and combined events involving both the reactor and experiments. In addition, potential safety structures, systems, and components for processes associated with operating TREAT and onsite handling of nuclear fuels and experiments are listed. If this alternative is selected, a safety basis will be prepared in accordance with 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Management, Subpart B, Safety Basis Requirements.

  19. National Environmental Policy Act Hazards Assessment for the TREAT Alternative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd D. Christensen; Annette L. Schafer

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides an assessment of hazards as required by the National Environmental Policy Act for the alternative of restarting the reactor at the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) facility by the Resumption of Transient Testing Program. Potential hazards have been identified and screening level calculations have been conducted to provide estimates of unmitigated dose consequences that could be incurred through this alternative. Consequences considered include those related to use of the TREAT Reactor, experiment assembly handling, and combined events involving both the reactor and experiments. In addition, potential safety structures, systems, and components for processes associated with operating TREAT and onsite handling of nuclear fuels and experiments are listed. If this alternative is selected, a safety basis will be prepared in accordance with 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Management, Subpart B, Safety Basis Requirements.

  20. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, D.A. [ed.] [ed.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Fosmire, C.J. [and others] [and others

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This ninth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Chapters 4 and 6 in Hanford Site-related NEPA documents. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) includes information on climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological and historical resources, socioeconomics, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE directives and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site. Not all of the sections have been updated for this revision. The following lists the updated sections: climate and meteorology; ecology (threatened and endangered species section only); culture, archaeological, and historical resources; socioeconomics; all of Chapter 6.

  1. Procedures for preparation, printing, and distribution of UMTRA Project National Environmental Policy Act documents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the procedures for preparation, printing and distribution of Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project National Environmental Policy Act documents. (KJD)

  2. U.S. Department of Energy National Environmental Policy Act Categorica...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21 This action would not: threaten a violation of applicable statutory, regulatory,...

  3. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, D.A. [ed.] [ed.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Fosmire, C.J.; Fowler, R.A. [and others] [and others

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This eighth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Chapters 4 and 6 in Hanford Site-related NEPA documents. Chapter 4 (Affected Environment) includes information on climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, historical, archaeological and cultural resources, socioeconomics, and noise. Chapter 6 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE directives and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site. The following sections were updated in this revision: climate and meteorology; ecology (threatened and endangered species section only); historical; archaeological and cultural resources; and all of chapter 6. No conclusions or recommendations are given in this report. Rather, it is a compilation of information on the Hanford Site environment that can be used directly by Site contractors. This information can also be used by any interested individual seeking baseline data on the hanford Site and its past activities by which to evaluate projected activities and their impacts.

  4. The National Energy Policy Act and lamp replacement options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryerson, C.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Policy Act of 1992 involves the creation of energy efficiency standards for a wide range of products including fluorescent and incandescent lamps. Minimum efficacy (lumens per watt) and color rendering index (CRI) standards are mandated for the popular fluorescent lamps: four-foot medium bi-pin, two-foot U-bent, eight-foot slimline and eight-foot high output. Minimum efficacies are mandated for specific incandescent R and PAR reflector lamps. These standards will affect selected colors and designs of fluorescent lamps, the most significant being the standard lamps in the cool white and warm white colors. The incandescent reflector lamps will include the R-30, R-40, PAR-38 lamps above 40 watts, excluding the halogen types. These efficiency and color rendering standards will require end-users and specifiers to select replacement fluorescent lamps from a range of performance characteristics (lumen output, efficacy, CRI and price). The choice of replacement for the R and PAR incandescent lamps will include the halogen designs and compact fluorescent designs. In this paper, replacement options will be analyzed and discussed and the effect of these options on the performance of the lighting system will be explored in detail.

  5. National Environmental Policy Act source guide for the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jansky, M.T.

    1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Source Guide will assist those working with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 to become more familiar with the environmental assessments (EA) and environmental impact statements (EIS) that apply to specific activities and facilities on the Hanford Site. This document should help answer questions concerning NEPA coverage, history, processes, and the status of many of the buildings and units on and related to the Hanford Site. This document summarizes relevant EAs and EISs by briefly outlining the proposed action of each document and the decision made by the US Department of Energy (DOE) or its predecessor agencies, the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and the US Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA). The summary includes the proposed action alternatives and current status of the proposed action. If a decision officially was stated by the DOE, as in a finding of no significant impact (FONSI) or a record of decision (ROD), and the decision was located, a summary is provided. Not all federal decisions, such as FONSIs and RODS, can be found in the Federal Register (FR). For example, although significant large-action FONSIs can be found in the FR, some low-interest FONSIs might have been published elsewhere (i.e., local newspapers).

  6. On the effect of demographic characteristics on the formulation of solid waste charging policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    On the effect of demographic characteristics on the formulation of solid waste charging policy A. Trends in municipal solid waste charging policies Municipal waste services constitute a very important of municipal charges in Greece, as the fees paid by municipal waste producers to the municipal authorities

  7. Waste Minimization Policy at the Romanian Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrei, V.; Daian, I.

    2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The radioactive waste management system at Cernavoda Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) in Romania was designed to maintain acceptable levels of safety for workers and to protect human health and the environment from exposure to unacceptable levels of radiation. In accordance with terminology of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), this system consists of the ''pretreatment'' of solid and organic liquid radioactive waste, which may include part or all of the following activities: collection, handling, volume reduction (by an in-drum compactor, if appropriate), and storage. Gaseous and aqueous liquid wastes are managed according to the ''dilute and discharge'' strategy. Taking into account the fact that treatment/conditioning and disposal technologies are still not established, waste minimization at the source is a priority environmental management objective, while waste minimization at the disposal stage is presently just a theoretical requirement for future adopted technologies . The necessary operational and maintenance procedures are in place at Cernavoda to minimize the production and contamination of waste. Administrative and technical measures are established to minimize waste volumes. Thus, an annual environmental target of a maximum 30 m3 of radioactive waste volume arising from operation and maintenance has been established. Within the first five years of operations at Cernavoda NPP, this target has been met. The successful implementation of the waste minimization policy has been accompanied by a cost reduction while the occupational doses for plant workers have been maintained at as low as reasonably practicable levels. This paper will describe key features of the waste management system along with the actual experience that has been realized with respect to minimizing the waste volumes at the Cernavoda NPP.

  8. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushing, C.E. (ed.)

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the Hanford Site environment (Chapter 4) and contains data in Chapter 5 and 6 which will guide users in the preparation of National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA)-related documents. Many NEPA compliance documents have been prepared and are being prepared by site contractors for the US Department of Energy, and examination of these documents reveals inconsistencies in the amount of detail presented and the method of presentation. Thus, it seemed necessary to prepare a consistent description of the Hanford environment to be used in preparing Chapter 4 of environmental impact statements and other site-related NEPA documentation. The material in Chapter 5 is a guide to the models used, including critical assumptions incorporated in these models, in previous Hanford NEPA documents. The users will have to select those models appropriate for the proposed action. Chapter 6 is essentially a definitive NEPA Chapter 6, which describes the applicable laws, regulations, and DOE and state orders. In this document, a complete description of the environment is presented in Chapter 4 without excessive tabular data. For these data, sources are provided. Most subjects are divided into a general description of the characteristics of the Hanford Site, followed by site-specific information where it is available on the 100, 200, 300, and other Areas. This division will allow a person requiring information to go immediately to those sections of particular interest. However, site-specific information on each of these separate areas is not always complete or available. In this case, the general Hanford Site description should be used. 131 refs., 19 figs., 32 tabs.

  9. Solid waste management: a public policy study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayawant, Mandar Prabhatkumar

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . reported in Gottinger). Present policy measures that seek to remedy some of the perceived externalities from landfills remain restricted to traditional "command and control" instruments. Examples being environmental regulations that prescribe specified... requiring disposal in landfills, it creates problems of air pollution; and residual ash requires very careful management and disposal, necessitating considerations relating to the toxicity of incinerator ash, leachability of metals in incinerator ash...

  10. Audit Report on "Waste Processing and Recovery Act Acceleration Efforts for Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste at the Hanford Site"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management's (EM), Richland Operations Office (Richland), is responsible for disposing of the Hanford Site's (Hanford) transuranic (TRU) waste, including nearly 12,000 cubic meters of radioactive contact-handled TRU wastes. Prior to disposing of this waste at the Department's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), Richland must certify that it meets WIPP's waste acceptance criteria. To be certified, the waste must be characterized, screened for prohibited items, treated (if necessary) and placed into a satisfactory disposal container. In a February 2008 amendment to an existing Record of Decision (Decision), the Department announced its plan to ship up to 8,764 cubic meters of contact-handled TRU waste from Hanford and other waste generator sites to the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) at Idaho's National Laboratory (INL) for processing and certification prior to disposal at WIPP. The Department decided to maximize the use of the AMWTP's automated waste processing capabilities to compact and, thereby, reduce the volume of contact-handled TRU waste. Compaction reduces the number of shipments and permits WIPP to more efficiently use its limited TRU waste disposal capacity. The Decision noted that the use of AMWTP would avoid the time and expense of establishing a processing capability at other sites. In May 2009, EM allocated $229 million of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) funds to support Hanford's Solid Waste Program, including Hanford's contact-handled TRU waste. Besides providing jobs, these funds were intended to accelerate cleanup in the short term. We initiated this audit to determine whether the Department was effectively using Recovery Act funds to accelerate processing of Hanford's contact-handled TRU waste. Relying on the availability of Recovery Act funds, the Department changed course and approved an alternative plan that could increase costs by about $25 million by processing Hanford TRU-waste on-site rather than at AMWTP. Further, under the newly adopted alternative approach, the Department would fail to achieve the previously anticipated reductions in volume associated with the use of existing AMWTP waste compaction capabilities.

  11. act drug policies: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of alcoholic beverages. These standards conform to state and federal laws. The policy described in this brochure pertains to alcohol and other drug use behaviors in...

  12. South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Health and Environmental Control is authorized to promulgate rules and regulations to prevent exposure of persons, animals, or the environment to hazardous waste. The construction...

  13. South Carolina Radioactive Waste Transportation and Disposal Act (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Health and Environmental Control is responsible for regulating the transportation of radioactive waste, with some exceptions, into or within the state for storage, disposal, or...

  14. Solid Waste Disposal Resource Recovery Facilities Act (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation authorizes local governing bodies to form joint agencies to advance the collection, transfer, processing of solid waste, recovery of resources, and sales of recovered resources in...

  15. Nuclear Waste Policy Act Signed | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArms Control R&D ConsortiumNuclearSafeguardsResearch

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - account radioactive waste Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    42 U... of repositories for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. Low Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act... adequate disposal ... Source: Yucca Mountain...

  17. The High-Level Radioactive Waste Act (Manitoba, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Manitoba bars the storage of high-level radioactive wastes from spent nuclear fuel, not intended for research purposes, that was produced at a nuclear facility or in a nuclear reactor outside the...

  18. Recommendations for developing and managing an integrated electronic waste policy & infrastructure in the Republic of Mauritius

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballal, Hrishikesh

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronic waste (e-waste) is a rapidly growing problem as well as a business opportunity given the huge volume that is generated. While there are a number policies and philosophies that guide end-of-life handling of ...

  19. 10 CFR 1021 -- National Environmental Policy Act Implementing Procedures

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment( Sample of Shipment Notice)1021 -- NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY

  20. Environmental Justice: Guidance Under the National Environmental Policy Act

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES AND INTER-JURISDICTIONAL56-2011 June 2011 DOE| Department of Energy

  1. Washington State Environmental Policy Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformationSEDS dataIndiana:Coop Inc Place:Existing WaterAct Jump to:

  2. Policy Flash 2014-04 Continuing Appropriations Act, 2014 -- Congressional

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartment ofOil's ImpactAppendix3 Photoin EP Act5|FOREnergy 3

  3. Energy Policy Act of 2005 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6 No revisionWind,SoilsfilesystemEventsPerformance MonitorAct

  4. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, T.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Community Involvement and Issues Management Dept.; Hansen, R.P. [Hansen Environmental Consultants, Englewood, CO (United States)

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report on National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) chronicles past and current compliance activities and includes a recommended strategy that can be implemented for continued improvement. This report provides a list of important references. Attachment 1 contains the table of contents for SAND95-1648, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Guide Sandia National Laboratories (Hansen, 1995). Attachment 2 contains a list of published environmental assessments (EAs) and environmental impact statements (EISs) prepared by SNL/NM. Attachment 3 contains abstracts of NEPA compliance papers authored by SNL/NM and its contractors.

  5. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushing, C.E. (ed.)

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fifth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. Information is presented on climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels, prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. Models are described that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclide transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. Federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable for the NEPA documents at the Hanford Site, are provided.

  6. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization. Revision 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushing, C.E. [ed.] [ed.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fifth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. Information is presented on climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels, prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. Models are described that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclide transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. Federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable for the NEPA documents at the Hanford Site, are provided.

  7. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushing, C.E. [ed.] ed.; Baker, D.A.; Chamness, M.A. [and others] and others

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This seventh revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. Chapter 4.0 summarizes up-to-date information on climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, environmental monitoring, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. More detailed data are available from reference sources cited or from the authors. Chapter 5.0 was not updated from the sixth revision (1994). It describes models, including their principal underlying assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclide transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. The updated Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE Orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site, following the structure of Chapter 4.0. No conclusions or recommendations are given in this report. Rather, it is a compilation of information on the Hanford Site environment that can be used directly by Site contractors. This information can also be used by any interested individual seeking baseline data on the Hanford Site and its past activities by which to evaluate projected activities and their impacts.

  8. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushing, C.E. [ed.; Baker, D.A.; Chamness, M.A. [and others

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This sixth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. Chapter 4.0 summarizes up-to-date information on climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. More detailed data are available from reference sources cited or from the authors; Chapter 5.0 has been significantly updated from the fifth revision. It describes models, including their principal underlying assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclide transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions; The updated Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site, following the structure of Chapter 4.0. No conclusions or recommendations are given in this report. Rather, it is a compilation of information on the Hanford Site environment that can be utilized directly by Site contractors. This information can also be used by any interested individual seeking baseline data on the Hanford Site and its past activities by which to evaluate projected activities and their impacts.

  9. Hanford Site National Evnironmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushing, C.E. (ed.)

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fourth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. In Chapter 4.0 are presented summations of up-to-date information about climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels. Chapter 5.0 describes models, including their principal assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclides transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable for environmental impact statements for the Hanford Site, following the structure Chapter 4.0. NO conclusions or recommendations are given in this report.

  10. Hanford Site National Evnironmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushing, C.E. [ed.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fourth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. In Chapter 4.0 are presented summations of up-to-date information about climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels. Chapter 5.0 describes models, including their principal assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclides transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable for environmental impact statements for the Hanford Site, following the structure Chapter 4.0. NO conclusions or recommendations are given in this report.

  11. Recovery Act: Waste Energy Project at AK Steel Corporation Middletown

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joyce, Jeffrey

    2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2008, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products) began development of a project to beneficially utilize waste blast furnace topgas generated in the course of the iron-making process at AK Steel Corporations Middletown, Ohio works. In early 2010, Air Products was awarded DOE Assistance Agreement DE-EE002736 to further develop and build the combined-cycle power generation facility. In June 2012, Air Products and AK Steel Corporation terminated work when it was determined that the project would not be economically viable at that time nor in the foreseeable future. The project would have achieved the FOA-0000044 Statement of Project Objectives by demonstrating, at a commercial scale, the technology to capture, treat, and convert blast furnace topgas into electric power and thermal energy.

  12. Energy Policy 33 (2005) 16911702 Paradise recovered: energy production and waste management in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Energy Policy 33 (2005) 1691­1702 Paradise recovered: energy production and waste management the conclusions of a previous study by the authors regarding the competitiveness of waste-to-energy (WTE in the earlier study and the island is currently seeking to modernize its energy production and waste management

  13. Subject: Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA): Flexible Benefits HIPAA Privacy Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    defined by HIPAA) of participants in the Flexible Spending Account for Health Care Expenses ("FSA of health care to a participant and that identifies the participant or for which there is a reasonable basisPOLICY Subject: Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA): Flexible Benefits

  14. Enclosure 3 DOE Response to EPA Question Regarding "High-Level Liquid Radioactive Waste"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to date, which is from the definitions in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act: The term "high-level radioactive waste" means-- (A) the highly radioactive material resulting from the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel of waste streams as from the applicable definition of HLW in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. 5/11/20051 #12

  15. State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) Environmental Checklist Form 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds Closure Plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds Closure Plan (Revision 1) consists of a Part A Dangerous Waste Permit Application and a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure Plan. An explanation of the Part A submitted with this document is provided at the beginning of the Part A Section. The closure plan consists of nine chapters and five appendices. The 216-B-3 Pond System consists of a series of four earthen, unlined, interconnected ponds and the 216-B-3-3 Ditch that receive waste water from various 200 East Area operating facilities. These four ponds, collectively. Waste water (primarily cooling water, steam condensate, and sanitary water) from various 200 East Area facilities is discharged to the 216-B-3-3 Ditch. Water discharged to the 216-8-3-3 Ditch flows directly into the 216-B-3 Pond. In the past, waste water discharges to B Pond and the 216-B-3-3 Ditch contained mixed waste (radioactive waste and dangerous waste). The radioactive portion of mixed waste has been interpreted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to be regulated under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954; the nonradioactive dangerous portion of mixed waste is regulated under RCRA. Mixed waste also may be considered a hazardous substance under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) when considering remediation of waste sites.

  16. Metering and the New Federal Requirements of Energy Policy Act 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ream, A.; Verdict, M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    agencies to meter electricity use in all federal buildings by Oct. 1, 2012 using advanced meters or metering devices that provide data at least daily. Six months after the enactment of EPAct, DOEs Federal Energy Management Program, or FEMP... Station, Texas ABSTRACT Section 103 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005) (1) mandates the installation of meters and advanced electric meters on all Federal Buildings by 2012 using guidelines developed by the US Department of Energy...

  17. Federal policy and the endangered species act: the politics, perceptions, and technologies of protecting sea turtles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risenhoover, Alan Dean

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1990 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences PEDERAL POLICY AND THE ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT: THE POLITICS, PERCEPTIONS~ AND TECHNOLOGIES OP PROTECTING SEA TURTLES A Thesis ALAN DEAN... perceptions were the primary factors which influenced decisionmaking. The orientation of the National Marine Fisheries Service to promote commercial fishing delayed formulation of regulations aimed at ending incidental catch. Critical habitat designations...

  18. Energy policy act transportation study: Interim report on natural gas flows and rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Interim Report on Natural Gas Flows and Rates, is the second in a series mandated by Title XIII, Section 1340, ``Establishment of Data Base and Study of Transportation Rates,`` of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102--486). The first report Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Availability of Data and Studies, was submitted to Congress in October 1993; it summarized data and studies that could be used to address the impact of legislative and regulatory actions on natural gas transportation rates and flow patterns. The current report presents an interim analysis of natural gas transportation rates and distribution patterns for the period from 1988 through 1994. A third and final report addressing the transportation rates and flows through 1997 is due to Congress in October 2000. This analysis relies on currently available data; no new data collection effort was undertaken. The need for the collection of additional data on transportation rates will be further addressed after this report, in consultation with the Congress, industry representatives, and in other public forums.

  19. Campus Energy, Water, and Waste Reduction Policy Page 1 of 7 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University No. 5505 Rev.: 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Campus Energy, Water, and Waste Reduction Policy Page 1 of 7 Virginia Polytechnic Institute __________________________________________________________________________________ Subject: Campus Energy, Water, and Waste Reduction Policy the highest standards in energy/water usage and waste reduction with consideration of the impact

  20. Life cycle assessment of a national policy proposal - The case of a Swedish waste incineration tax

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjoerklund, Anna E. [Division of Environmental Strategies Research - fms, Royal Institute of Technology, Drottning Kristinas vaeg 30 III, SE-100 44, Stockholm (Sweden)], E-mail: annab@infra.kth.se; Finnveden, Goeran [Division of Environmental Strategies Research - fms, Royal Institute of Technology, Drottning Kristinas vaeg 30 III, SE-100 44, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the core of EU and Swedish waste policy is the so-called waste hierarchy, according to which waste should first be prevented, but should otherwise be treated in the following order of prioritisation: reuse, recycling when environmentally motivated, energy recovery, and last landfilling. Some recent policy decisions in Sweden aim to influence waste management in the direction of the waste hierarchy. In 2001 a governmental commission assessed the economic and environmental impacts of introducing a weight-based tax on waste incineration, the purpose of which would be to encourage waste reduction and increase materials recycling and biological treatment. This paper presents the results of a life cycle assessment (LCA) of the waste incineration tax proposal. It was done in the context of a larger research project concerning the development and testing of a framework for Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA). The aim of this paper is to assess the life cycle environmental impacts of the waste incineration tax proposal, and to investigate whether there are any possibilities of more optimal design of such a tax. The proposed design of the waste incineration tax results in increased recycling, but only in small environmental improvements. A more elaborate tax design is suggested, in which the tax level would partly be related to the fossil carbon content of the waste.

  1. UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    con202vf UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD 2300 Clarendon Boulevard, Suite 1300, the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board (Board) submits its second report of 2003 in accordance with provisions of the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, Public Law 100-203. The Act requires the Board

  2. Savannah River Site, Liquid Waste Program, Savannah River Remediation American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Benefits and Lessons Learned - 12559

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitz, Mark A.; Crouse, Thomas N. [Savannah River Remediation, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilizing funding provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), the Liquid Waste Program at Savannah River site successfully executed forty-one design, procurement, construction, and operating activities in the period from September 2009 through December 2011. Project Management of the program included noteworthy practices involving safety, integrated project teams, communication, and cost, schedule and risk management. Significant upgrades to plant capacity, progress toward waste tank closure and procurement of needed infrastructure were accomplished. Over 1.5 million hours were worked without a single lost work day case. Lessons Learned were continually identified and applied to enhance the program. Investment of Recovery Act monies into the Liquid Waste Program has ensured continued success in the disposition of radioactive wastes and the closure of high level waste tanks at SRS. The funding of a portion of the Liquid Waste Program at SRS by ARRA was a major success. Significant upgrades to plant capacity, progress toward waste tank closure and procurement of needed infrastructure was accomplished. Integrated Project Teams ensured quality products and services were provided to the Operations customers. Over 1.5 million hours were worked without a single lost work day case. Lessons Learned were continually reviewed and reapplied to enhance the program. Investment of Recovery Act monies into the Liquid Waste Program has ensured continued success in the disposition of radioactive wastes and the closure of high level waste tanks at SRS. (authors)

  3. Waste pickers in Bogot : from informal practice to policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Betancourt, Andrea Alejandra

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste pickers constitute the base and most essential work force of the recycling business in Latin American cities. Waste pickers have overtaken this commercial and environmental task as a survival strategy long before the ...

  4. Public Policy is Like Having a Vaudeville Act: Languages of Duty and Difference among Think Tank-Affiliated Policy Experts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medvetz, Thomas

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oligarchic tendencies in national policy-making: The roleof the private policy-planning organizations. Journal ofMandate for leadership: Policy management in a conservative

  5. Annotated bibliography National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents for Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, J.M.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following annotated bibliography lists documents prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE), and predecessor agencies, to meet the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) for activities and facilities at Sandia National Laboratories sites. For each NEPA document summary information and a brief discussion of content is provided. This information may be used to reduce the amount of time or cost associated with NEPA compliance for future Sandia National Laboratories projects. This summary may be used to identify model documents, documents to use as sources of information, or documents from which to tier additional NEPA documents.

  6. Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015 | Department ofThatGrid3ofBuildingsEnergy Policy Act of

  7. Title 7 CFR 1b National Environmental Policy Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd JumpOperations Jump to:National Environmental Policy Act Jump to:

  8. State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) environmental checklist forms for 304 Concretion Facility Closure Plan. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 300 Area of the Hanford Site contains reactor fuel manufacturing facilities and several research and development laboratories. Recyclable scrap uranium with zircaloy-2 and copper silicon alloy, uranium-titanium alloy, beryllium/zircaloy-2 alloy, and zircaloy-2 chips and fines were secured in concrete billets (7.5-gallon containers) in the 304 Facility, located in the 300 Area. The beryllium/zircaloy-2 alloy and zircaloy-2 chips and fines are designated as mixed waste with the characteristic of ignitability. The concretion process reduced the ignitability of the fines and chips for safe storage and shipment. This process has been discontinued and the 304 Facility is now undergoing closure as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Dangerous Waste Regulations, WAC 173-303-040. This closure plan presents a description of the 304 Facility, the history of materials and waste managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the 304 Facility. The 304 Facility is located within the 300-FF-3 (source) and 300-FF-5 (groundwater) operable units, as designated in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) (Ecology et al. 1992). Contamination in the operable units 300-FF-3 and 300-FF-5 is scheduled to be addressed through the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 remedial action process. Therefore, all soil remedial action at the 304 Facility will be conducted as part of the CERCLA remedial action of operable units 300-FF-3 and 300-FF-5.

  9. The East Tennessee Technology Park Progress Report for the Tennessee Hazardous Waste Reduction Act for Calendar Year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is prepared for the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly the Oak Ridge K-25 Site) (ETTP) in compliance with the ''Tennessee Hazardous Waste Reduction Act of 1990'' (THWRA) (TDEC 1990), Tennessee Code Annotated 68-212-306. Annually, THWRA requires a review of the site waste reduction plan, completion of summary waste reduction information as part of the site's annual hazardous waste reporting, and completion of an annual progress report analyzing and quantifying progress toward THWRA-required waste stream-specific reduction goals. This THWRA-required progress report provides information about ETTP's hazardous waste streams regulated under THWRA and waste reduction progress made in calendar year (CY) 1999. This progress report also documents the annual review of the site plan, ''Oak Ridge Operations Environmental Management and Enrichment Facilities (EMEF) Pollution Prevention Program Plan'', BJC/OR-306/R1 (Bechtel Jacobs Company 199a). In 1996, ETTP established new goal year ratios that extended the goal year to CY 1999 and targeted 50 percent waste stream-specific reduction goals. In CY 1999, these CY 1999 goals were extended to CY 2000 for all waste streams that generated waste in 1999. Of the 70 ETTP RCRA waste streams tracked in this report from base years as early as CY 1991, 51 waste streams met or exceeded their reduction goal based on the CY 1999 data.

  10. The East Tennessee Technology Park Progress Report for the Tennessee Hazardous Waste Reduction Act for Calendar Year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is prepared for the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly the Oak Ridge K-25 Site) (ETTP) in compliance with the ''Tennessee Hazardous Waste Reduction Act of 1990'' (THWRA) (TDEC 1990), Tennessee Code Annotated 68-212-306. Annually, THWRA requires a review of the site waste reduction plan, completion of summary waste reduction information as part of the site's annual hazardous waste reporting, and completion of an annual progress report analyzing and quantifying progress toward THWRA-required waste stream-specific reduction goals. This THWRA-required progress report provides information about ETTP's hazardous waste streams regulated under THWRA and waste reduction progress made in calendar year (CY) 2000. This progress report also documents the annual review of the site plan, ''Oak Ridge Operations Environmental Management and Enrichment Facilities (EMEF) Pollution Prevention Program Plan'', BJC/OR-306/R1 (Bechtel Jacobs Company 2000). In 1996, ETTP established new goal year ratios that extended the goal year to CY 1999 and targeted 50 percent waste stream-specific reduction goals. In CY 2000, these goals were extended to CY 2001 for all waste streams that generated waste in 2000. Of the 70 ETTP RCRA waste streams tracked in this report from base years as early as CY 1991, 50 waste streams met or exceeded their reduction goal based on the CY 2000 data.

  11. Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978. Annual report to Congress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None,

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Titles I and III of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) establish retail regulatory policies for electric and natural gas utilities, respectively, aimed at achieving three purposes: conservation of energy supplied by electric and gas utilities; efficiency in the use of facilities and resources by these utilities; equitable rates to electricity and natural gas consumers. PURPA also continues the pilot utility implementation program, authorized under Title II of the Energy Conservation and Production ACT (ECPA), to encourage adoption of cost-based rates and efficient energy-management practices. The purpose of this report is twofold: (1) to summarize and analyze the progress that state regulatory authorities and certain nonregulated utilities have made in their consideration of the PURPA standards; and (2) to summarize the Department of Energy (DOE) activities relating to PURPA and ECPA. The report provides a broad overview and assessment of the status of electric and gas regulation nationwide, and thus helps provide the basis for congressional and DOE actions targeted on the utility industry to address pressing national energy problems.

  12. U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Strategic Plan: Fiscal Years 20042009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix G Appendix G U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Strategic Plan: Fiscal Years 2004­2009 (Revised March 2004) Statement of the Board The Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987 directed the U-level radioactive waste. The Act also established the U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board as an indepen dent

  13. U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Strategic Plan: Fiscal Years 20042009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix G Appendix G U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Strategic Plan: Fiscal Years 2004­2009 (Revised March 2004) Statement of the Board The Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987 directed the U-level radioactive waste. The Act also established the U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board as an independent

  14. Laws and Policies Relating to Detecting and Preventing Fraud, Waste and Abuse in Federal Health Care Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niebur, Ernst

    and regulations, including those laws and regulations that address fraud, waste and abuse in Federal health care fraud, waste and abuse in Federal health care programs. Further, the University has a StatementLaws and Policies Relating to Detecting and Preventing Fraud, Waste and Abuse in Federal Health

  15. Kelly Gallagher, ed., Acting in Time on Energy Policy, Brookings Institution Press, 2009, c. 188pp. Making Carbon Capture and Storage Work

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrag, Daniel

    Kelly Gallagher, ed., Acting in Time on Energy Policy, Brookings Institution Press, 2009, c. 188pp, in particular the MIT report on The Future of Coal and the IPCC 39 #12;Kelly Gallagher, ed., Acting in Time

  16. Nuclear waste policy and public acceptance in France

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guais, J.C. [NUSYS, Paris (France)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In France, the development of an extensive nuclear program has traditionally met relative support from the public and the politicals. Yet, facing some unusual opposition in 1991, the government declared a moratorium on the selection process of a geological repository. The authors review in this paper the successive steps of the nuclear waste storage program over the last 12 years, from the successful siting of two LLW storage facilities by ANDRA, the national agency for the storage of nuclear waste, to the more difficult years of the search for a suitable site to host the HLW repository which led to a new approach of the issue.

  17. Recovery Act: State Assistance for Recovery Act Related Electricity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Center Recovery Act Recovery Act: State Assistance for Recovery Act Related Electricity Policies Recovery Act: State Assistance for Recovery Act Related Electricity...

  18. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure Plan Summary for Interim reasctive Waste Treatment Area (IRWTA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, E.T.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This closure plan has been prepared for the interim Reactive Waste Treatment Area (IRWT'A) located at the Y-12 Pkmt in oak Ridge, Tennessee (Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] Identification TN 389-009-0001). The actions required to achieve closure of the IRWTA are outlined in this plan, which is being submitted in accordance with Tennessee Ruie 1200- 1-1 1-.0S(7) and Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 265, Subpart G. The IRWTA was used to treat waste sodium and potassium (NaK) that are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The location of the IRWT'A is shown in Figures 1 and 2, and a diagram is shown in Figure 3. This pkm details all steps that wdi be petiormed to close the IRWTA. Note that this is a fmai ciosure.and a diagram is shown in Figure 3. This pkm details all steps that wdi be petiormed to close the IRWTA. Note that this is a fmai ciosure.

  19. Tank waste remediation system characterization project quality policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Board, D.C.

    1997-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This quality plan describes the system used by Characterization Project management to achieve quality. This plan is comprised of eleven quality policies which, when taken together, form a management system deployed to achieve quality. This quality management system is based on the customer`s quality requirements known as the `RULE`, 10 CFR 830.120, Quality Assurance.

  20. Tank waste remediation system characterization project quality policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trible, T.C., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This quality plan describes the system used by Characterization Project management to achieve quality. This plan is comprised on eleven quality policies which, when taken together, form a management system deployed to achieve quality. This quality management system is based on the customer`s quality requirements known as the `RULE`, 10 CFR 830.120, Quality Assurance.

  1. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Program -- FY 2010 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weeks, Regan S.

    2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    During fiscal year (FY) 2010, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Environmental Protection and Regulatory Programs Division (before March 1, 2011 known as the Environmental Management Services Department) staff performed a number of activities as part of PNNLs National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance program. These activities helped to verify U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) and Richland Operations Office (RL) compliance with NEPA requirements and streamline the NEPA process for federal activities conducted at PNNL. Self-assessments were performed to address NEPA compliance and cultural and biological resource protection. The NEPA self-assessments focused on implementation within the PNNL Energy and Environment Directorate and routine maintenance activities conducted during the previous calendar year. The cultural and biological resource self-assessments were conducted in accordance with the PNSO Cultural and Biological Resources Management Plan, which specifies annual monitoring of important resources to assess and document the status of the resources and the associated protective mechanisms in place to protect sensitive resources.

  2. Lessons learned and new challenges for integrated assessment under the National Environmental Policy Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carnes, S.A.; Reed, R.M.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the first government-sponsored demands for integrated assessment to support decision making in the United States is embodied in the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Over the past 25 years, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has supported federal agencies` in evaluating health and environmental impacts as required by NEPA. Many of ORNL`s efforts have focused on complex, programmatic assessments that break new ground and require and integrate expertise from a wide range of technical disciplines. Examples of ORNL projects that illustrate the use of integrated assessment approaches include environmental documentation for: (1) the Department of the Army`s Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program, (2) the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s licensing activities related to the Owens River Basin in eastern California and along a 500-mile reach of the upper Ohio River, and (3) the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s decision regarding restart of the undamaged reactor (Unit 1) at Three Mile Island. Our discussion of these examples illustrates successful integrated assessment approaches and identifies new challenges facing integrated assessment activities.

  3. RISKIND: An enhanced computer code for National Environmental Policy Act transportation consequence analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J.; Chen, S.Y.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The RISKIND computer program was developed for the analysis of radiological consequences and health risks to individuals and the collective population from exposures associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or other radioactive materials. The code is intended to provide scenario-specific analyses when evaluating alternatives for environmental assessment activities, including those for major federal actions involving radioactive material transport as required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). As such, rigorous procedures have been implemented to enhance the code`s credibility and strenuous efforts have been made to enhance ease of use of the code. To increase the code`s reliability and credibility, a new version of RISKIND was produced under a quality assurance plan that covered code development and testing, and a peer review process was conducted. During development of the new version, the flexibility and ease of use of RISKIND were enhanced through several major changes: (1) a Windows{sup {trademark}} point-and-click interface replaced the old DOS menu system, (2) the remaining model input parameters were added to the interface, (3) databases were updated, (4) the program output was revised, and (5) on-line help has been added. RISKIND has been well received by users and has been established as a key component in radiological transportation risk assessments through its acceptance by the U.S. Department of Energy community in recent environmental impact statements (EISs) and its continued use in the current preparation of several EISs.

  4. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Source Guide for the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JANSKY, M.T.

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Source Guide will assist those working with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 to become more familiar with the environmental assessments (EA) and environmental impact statements (EIS) that apply to specific activities and facilities on the Hanford Site. This document should help answer questions concerning NEPA coverage, history, processes, and the status of many of the buildings and units on and related to the Hanford Site. This document summarizes relevant EAs and EISs by briefly outlining the proposed action of each document and the decision made by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) or its predecessor agencies, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA). The summary includes the proposed action alternatives and current status of the proposed action. If a decision officially was stated by the DOE, as in a finding of no significant impact (FONSI) or a record of decision (ROD), and the decision was located, a summary is provided. Not all federal decisions, such as FONSIs and RODs, can be found in the Federal Register (FR). For example, although significant large-action FONSIs can be found in the FR, some low-interest FONSIs might have been published elsewhere (i.e., local newspapers).

  5. Addressing environmental justice under the National Environment Policy Act at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, T.M.; Bleakly, D.R.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under Executive Order 12898, Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations, the Department of Energy (DOE) and Sandia National Laboratories New Mexico (SNL) are required to identify and address, as appropriate, disproportionately high, adverse human health or environmental effects of their activities on minority and low-income populations. The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) also requires that environmental justice issues be identified and addressed. This presents a challenge for SNL because it is located in a culturally diverse area. Successfully addressing potential impacts is contingent upon accurately identifying them through objective analysis of demographic information. However, an effective public participation process, which is necessarily subjective, is also needed to understand the subtle nuances of diverse populations that can contribute to a potential impact, yet are not always accounted for in a strict demographic profile. Typically, there is little or no coordination between these two disparate processes. This report proposes a five-step method for reconciling these processes and uses a hypothetical case study to illustrate the method. A demographic analysis and community profile of the population within 50 miles of SNL were developed to support the environmental justice analysis process and enhance SNL`s NEPA and public involvement programs. This report focuses on developing a methodology for identifying potentially impacted populations. Environmental justice issues related to worker exposures associated with SNL activities will be addressed in a separate report.

  6. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization Report, Revision 17

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Cannon, Sandra D.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Fowler, Richard A.; Fritz, Brad G.; Harvey, David W.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Hoitink, Dana J.; Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Prendergast-Kennedy, Ellen L.; Reidel, Steve P.; Rohay, Alan C.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Scott, Michael J.; Thorne, Paul D.

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many environmental documents being prepared by DOE contractors concerning the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). No statements about significance or environmental consequences are provided. This years report is the seventeenth revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the eighteenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is typically presented in environmental impact statements (EISs) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology; air quality; geology; hydrology; ecology; cultural, archaeological, and historical resources; socioeconomics; noise; and occupational health and safety. Sources for extensive tabular data related to these topics are provided in the chapter. Most subjects are divided into a general description of the characteristics of the Hanford Site, followed by site-specific information, where available, of the 100, 200, 300, and other areas. This division allows the reader to go directly to those sections of particular interest. When specific information on each of these separate areas is not complete or available, the general Hanford Site description should be used. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to the NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities. Information in Chapter 6 of this document can be adapted and supplemented with specific information for a chapter covering statutory and regulatory requirements in an environmental assessment or environmental impact statement. When preparing environmental assessments and EISs, authors should also be cognizant of the document titled Recommendations for the Preparation of Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements published by the DOE Office of NEPA Oversight (DOE 2004). Additional guidance on preparing DOE NEPA documents can be found at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/nepa/guidance.html. Any interested individual seeking baseline data on the Hanford Site and its past activities may also use the information contained in this document to evaluate projected activities and their impacts. For this 2005 revision, the following sections of the document were reviewed by the authors and updated with the best available information through May 2005: Climate and Meteorology Air Quality Geology Seismicity section only Hydrology Flow charts for the Columbia and Yakima rivers only Ecology Threatened and Endangered Species subsection only Socioeconomics Occupational Safety All of Chapter 6.

  7. Policy brief | Price subsidy schemes for artemisinin-based combination theraPies (acts): do they work? | 1 Price Subsidy Schemes for Artemisinin-Based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Ophir

    Policy brief | Price subsidy schemes for artemisinin-based combination theraPies (acts): do they work? | 1 Price Subsidy Schemes for Artemisinin-Based Combination Therapies (ACTs): Do They Work of act is very limited, partly due to its high price in pharmacies and retail stores. the affordable

  8. Revised August 9, 2010 Laws and Policies Relating to Detecting and Preventing Fraud, Waste and Abuse in Federal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Harold A. "Hal"

    , Waste and Abuse in Federal Health Care Programs The Johns Hopkins University is committed to following and abuse in Federal health care programs and the proper billing of Medicare, Medicaid and other payors and preventing fraud, waste and abuse. Laws The Federal False Claims Act. This law prohibits a person from

  9. 1996 annual report on low-level radioactive waste management progress. Report to Congress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is prepared in response to the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act (the Act), Public Law 96-573, 1980, as amended by the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, Public Law 99-240. The report summarizes the activities during calendar year 1996 related to the establishment of new disposal facilities for commercially-generated low-level radioactive waste. The report emphasizes significant issues and events that have affected progress in developing new disposal facilities, and also includes an introduction that provides background information and perspective on US policy for low-level radioactive waste disposal.

  10. Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB)/Radioactive Waste Annual Inventory for Calendar Year 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    no author on report

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Substances Control Act, 40 CFR 761.65(a)(1) provides an exemption from the one year storage time limit for PCB/radioactive waste. PCB/radioactive waste may exceed the one year time limit provided that the provisions at 40 CFR 761.65(a)(2)(ii) and 40 CFR 761.65(a)(2)(iii) are followed. These two subsections require, (ii) "A written record documenting all continuing attempts to secure disposal is maintained until the waste is disposed of" and (iii) "The written record required by subsection (ii) of this section is available for inspection or submission if requested by EPA." EPA Region 10 has requested the Department of Energy (DOE) to submit an inventory of radioactive-contaminated PCB waste in storage at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the previous calendar year. The annual inventory is separated into two parts, INL without Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) (this includes Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC, and the Naval Reactors Facility), and AMWTP.

  11. U.S. Department of Energy National Environmental Policy Act Categorica...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description: 1) Upgrade HVAC system - Hoover Municipal Center, 2) upgrade HVAC system at Hoover Recreation Center,...

  12. U.S. Department of Energy National Environmental Policy Act categorica...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description 1) Develop and install solar photovoltaic system on the roof of City Hall; 2) replace metal halide light fixtures...

  13. Introduction This paper provides the perspective of the members of the Nuclear Waste Tech-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction This paper provides the perspective of the members of the Nuclear Waste Tech- nical.S. program for managing spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. It discusses the Board's opinion Waste Management Program In 1982, the U.S. Congress enacted the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Public Law 97

  14. renewable energy from waste 1730 RHODE ISLAND AVENUE, NW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    renewable energy from waste 1730 RHODE ISLAND AVENUE, NW SUITE 700 WASHINGTON, DC 20036 WWW Energy and Security Act of 2009 that was released as a discussion draft on March 31. While waste-to-energy gas reductions and renewable energy provided by waste-to-energy and if it implemented policies

  15. RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Hazardous waste identification (40 cfr part 261) updated July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The module introduces a specific hazardous waste identification process, which involves asking and analyzing a series of questions about any waste being evaluated. It analyzes in detail the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) definition of `hazardous waste.` It explains concepts that are essential to identifying a RCRA hazardous waste: hazardous waste listing, hazardous waste characteristics, the `mixture` and `derived-from` rules, the `contained-in` policy, and the hazardous waste identification rules (HWIR).

  16. Appendix C: Cost of Climate Policy and the Waxman-Markey American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 (H.R. 2454)1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix C: Cost of Climate Policy and the Waxman-Markey American Clean Energy and Security Act The American Clean Energy and Security Act (H.R.2454) passed the House of Representatives after the completion standard (RES), limits on new coal power plants and support for carbon capture and storage(CCS), applying

  17. Draft environmental assessment: Richton Dome site, Mississippi. Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 112). [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy identified the Richton dome site as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geo

  18. Implementation of Section 180(c) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | Department ofHTS CableDepartment of EnergyAwardDepartment of Energy

  19. S. 2415: Title I may be cited as the Uranium Enrichment Act of 1990; Title II may be cited as the Uranium Security and Tailings Reclamation Act of 1989; and Title III may be cited as The Solar, Wind, Waste, and Geothermal Power Production Incentives Act of 1990, introduced in the Senate, One Hundred First Congress, Second Session, April 4, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S. 2415 (which started out as a bill to encourage solar and geothermal power generation) now would amend the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 to redirect uranium enrichment enterprises to further the national interest, respond to competitive market forces, and to ensure the nation's common defense and security. It would establish a United States Enrichment Corporation for the following purposes: to acquire feed materials, enriched uranium, and enrichment facilities; to operate these facilities; to market enriched uranium for governmental purposes and qualified domestic and foreign persons; to conduct research into uranium enrichment; and to operate as a profitable, self-financing, reliable corporation and in a manner consistent with the health and safety of the public. The bill describes powers and duties of the corporation; the organization, finance, and management; decontamination and decommissioning. The second part of the bill would ensure an adequate supply of domestic uranium for defense and power production; provide assistance to the domestic uranium industry; and establish, facilitate, and expedite a comprehensive system for financing reclamation and remedial action at active uranium and thorium processing sites. The third part of the bill would remove the size limitations on power production facilities now part of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978. Solar, wind, waste, or geothermal power facilities would no longer have to be less than 80 MW to qualify as a small power production facility.

  20. RCRA/UST, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Hazardous waste identification (40 CFR part 261) updated as of July 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This module introduces a specific hazardous waste identification process, which involves asking and analyzing a series of questions about any waste being evaluated. Analyzes in detail the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) definition of hazardous waste. It explains the following concepts that are essential to identifying a RCRA hazardous waste: hazardous waste listing, hazardous waste characteristics, the mixture and derived-from rules, the contained-in policy, and the Hazardous Waste Identification Rule (HWIR).

  1. Fermilab | Director's Policy Manual | No. 24.000 Freedom of Information Act

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibility ofSmall15.000 Rev. 0 Financial Management21.000 Rev.

  2. Title 43 CFR 46 Implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act of

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd JumpOperations Jump to: navigation, searchHomestead Act | Open1969

  3. The First Recovery Act Funded Waste Shipment depart from the Advanced Mixed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 and NbSe2Different ImpactsTheRollingCompetitionWaste

  4. Assessment of state plans for Title III of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (NECPA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the study reported is to assess the quality of the state plans for managing federal funds granted under the Institutional Conservation Program (ICP) to support energy conservation activities in schools, hospitals, local government buildings, and public care institutions, and to estimate the effects of the various state plans on the overall ability of the national ICP to meet its objectives, which are to save energy, reduce budget pressures on local institutions, and to encourage the use of more abundant fuel types. A further goal was to insure that active state involvement in the short-term CIP effort would foster the longer ragne state commitment to this national policy of energy conservation. The state planws and their energy conservation measure formulas are assessed, and their energy conservation measure scenarios are ranked and analyzed. (LEW)

  5. Rules implementing Sections 201 and 210 of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978: a regulatory history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danziger, R.N.; Caples, P.W.; Huning, J.R.

    1980-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis is made of the rules implementing Sections 201 and 210 of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA). The act provides that utilities must purchase power from qualifying producers of electricity at nondiscriminatory rates, and it exempts private generators from virtually all state and Federal utility regulations. Most of the analysis presented is taken from the perspective of photovoltaics (PV) and solar thermal electric point-focusing distributed receivers (pfdr). It is felt, however, that the analysis is applicable both to cogeneration and other emerging technologies. Chapters presented are: The FERC Response to Oral Comments on the Proposed Rules Implementing Sections 201 and 210 of PURPA; Additional Changes Made or Not Made That Were Addressed in Other Than Oral Testimony; View on the Proposed Rules Implementing Sections 201 and 210 of PURPA; Response to Comments on the Proposed 201 and 210 Rules; and Summary Analysis of the Environmental Assessment of the Rules. Pertinent reference material is provided in the Appendices, including the text of the rules. (MCW)

  6. Energy Policy Act transportation rate study: Interim report on coal transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary purpose of this report is to examine changes in domestic coal distribution and railroad coal transportation rates since enactment of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90). From 1988 through 1993, the demand for low-sulfur coal increased, as a the 1995 deadline for compliance with Phase 1 of CAAA90 approached. The shift toward low-sulfur coal came sooner than had been generally expected because many electric utilities switched early from high-sulfur coal to ``compliance`` (very low-sulfur) coal. They did so to accumulate emissions allowances that could be used to meet the stricter Phase 2 requirements. Thus, the demand for compliance coal increased the most. The report describes coal distribution and sulfur content, railroad coal transportation and transportation rates, and electric utility contract coal transportation trends from 1979 to 1993 including national trends, regional comparisons, distribution patterns and regional profiles. 14 figs., 76 tabs.

  7. Recovery Act: Brea California Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galowitz, Stephen

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill near Brea, California. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting Project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives: Meeting the environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas Utilizing proven and reliable technology and equipment Maximizing electrical efficiency Maximizing electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill Maximizing equipment uptime Minimizing water consumption Minimizing post-combustion emissions The Project produced and will produce a myriad of beneficial impacts. o The Project created 360 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 15 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. o By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). o The Project will annually produce 280,320 MWhs of clean energy o By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO2 equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 27.4 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

  8. Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978: Natural Gas Rate Design Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    First, the comments on May 3, 1979 Notice of Inquiry of DOE relating to the Gas Utility Rate Design Study Required by Section 306 of PURPA are presented. Then, comments on the following are included: (1) ICF Gas Utility Model, Gas Utility Model Data Outputs, Scenario Design; (2) Interim Model Development Report with Example Case Illustrations; (3) Interim Report on Simulation of Seven Rate Forms; (4) Methodology for Assessing the Impacts of Alternative Rate Designs on Industrial Energy Use; (5) Simulation of Marginal-Cost-Based Natural Gas Rates; and (6) Preliminary Discussion Draft of the Gas Rate Design Study. Among the most frequent comments expressed were the following: (a) the public should be given the opportunity to review the final report prior to its submission to Congress; (b) results based on a single computer model of only four hypothetical utility situations cannot be used for policy-making purposes for individual companies or the entire gas industry; (c) there has been an unobjective treatment of traditional and economic cost rate structures; the practical difficulties and potential detrimental consequences of economic cost rates are not fully disclosed; and (d) it is erroneous to assume that end users, particularly residential customers, are influenced by price signals in the rate structure, as opposed to the total bill.

  9. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Strategic Plan for FY 2001-2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix G Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Strategic Plan for FY 2001-2006 (Revised March 2001) Statement of the Chairman The U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board was established as an independent agency of the United States Government on December 22, 1987, in the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act

  10. U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Fiscal Year 2002-2007 Strategic Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix G Appendix G U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Fiscal Year 2002-2007 Strategic Plan Statement of the Chairman The U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board was established of Energy Mission The Board's mission, established in the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act (NWPAA

  11. U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Strategic Plan: Fiscal Years 20032008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix G Appendix G U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Strategic Plan: Fiscal Years 2003­2008 Statement of the Chairman The Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987 directed the U.S. Department as the location of a permanent repository for dis posing of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste

  12. Uranium effluent testing for the Oak Ridge Toxic Substances Control Act mixed waste incinerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shor, J.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bostick, W.D.; Hoffmann, D.P.; Gibson, L.V. Jr. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States); Ho, T.C. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge K-25 Site Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator has been undergoing a series of routine tests to determine uranium partitioning to the stack, scrubber waters, and bottom ash. This paper discusses the results of the most recent experiment in which relatively high rates of uranium stack gas emissions were identified: 6.11 g/h or 8 wt % based on the uranium feed. These data are compared with earlier data, and an empirical correlation is suggested between the stack emissions of uranium and the product of the uranium and chlorine concentration of the feed. This is consistent with certain findings with other metals, in which increasing chlorine feed contents led to increasing emissions.

  13. Standard Compliance: Guidelines to Help State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets Meet Their Energy Policy Act Requirements, 10 CFR Part 490 (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guidebook addresses the primary requirements of the Alternative Fuel Transportation Program to help state and alternative fuel provider fleets comply with the Energy Policy Act via the Standard Compliance option. It also addresses the topics that covered fleets ask about most frequently.

  14. Standard Compliance: Guidelines to Help State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets Meet Their Energy Policy Act Requirements, 10 CFR Part 490 (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guidebook addresses the primary requirements of the Alternative Fuel Transportation Program to help state and alternative fuel provider fleets comply with the Energy Policy Act via the Standard Compliance option. It also addresses the topics that covered fleets ask about most frequently.

  15. Recovery Act: Johnston Rhode Island Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galowitz, Stephen

    2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill in Johnston, Rhode Island. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives. 1) Meet environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas. 2) Utilize proven and reliable technology and equipment. 3) Maximize electrical efficiency. 4) Maximize electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill. 5) Maximize equipment uptime. 6) Minimize water consumption. 7) Minimize post-combustion emissions. To achieve the Project Objective the project consisted of several components. 1) The landfill gas collection system was modified and upgraded. 2) A State-of-the Art gas clean up and compression facility was constructed. 3) A high pressure pipeline was constructed to convey cleaned landfill gas from the clean-up and compression facility to the power plant. 4) A combined cycle electric generating facility was constructed consisting of combustion turbine generator sets, heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. 5) The voltage of the electricity produced was increased at a newly constructed transformer/substation and the electricity was delivered to the local transmission system. The Project produced a myriad of beneficial impacts. 1) The Project created 453 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 25 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. 2) By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). 3) The Project will annually produce 365,292 MWh?s of clean energy. 4) By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO{sub 2} equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 28.3 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

  16. Wastes as co-fuels: the policy framework for solid recovered fuel (SRF) in Europe, with UK implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anurag Garg; Richard Smith; Daryl Hill; Nigel Simms; Simon Pollard [Cranfield University, Cranfield (United Kingdom). Sustainable Systems Department, School of Applied Sciences

    2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    European Union (EU) member states are adopting the mechanical-biological treatment (MBT) of municipal solid waste (MSW) to comply with EU Landfill Directive (LD) targets on landfill diversion. We review the policy framework for MSW-derived solid recovered fuel (SRF), composed of paper, plastic, and textiles, in the energy-intensive industries. A comparatively high calorific value (15-18 MJ/kg) fuel, SRF has the potential to partially replace fossil fuel in energy-intensive industries, alongside MSW in dedicated combustion facilities. Attempts by the European standards organization (CEN) to classify fuel properties consider net calorific value (CV) and chlorine and mercury content. However, the particle size, moisture content, and fuel composition also require attention and future studies must address these parameters. We critically review the implications of using SRF as a co-fuel in thermal processes. A thermodynamic analysis provides insight into the technical and environmental feasibility of co-combusting SRF in coal-fired power plants and cement kilns. Results indicate the use of SRF as co-fuel can reduce global warming and acidification potential significantly. This policy analysis is of value to waste managers, policy specialists, regulators, and the waste management research community. 63 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act tasks the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection with regulating hazardous waste. The department is charged with siting, review, permitting and development of hazardous waste...

  18. 24.01.01.V1.11 HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL WASTE Supplements System Policy 24.01 and System Regulation 24.01.01

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    24.01.01.V1.11 HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL WASTE DISPOSAL Supplements System Policy 24.01 and System, and federal regulations, and is enforced by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). A hazardous waste management program shall

  19. Voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992: General Guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of concerns with the growing threat of global climate change from increasing emissions of greenhouse gases, Congress authorized a voluntary program for the public to report achievements in reducing those gases. This document offers guidance on recording historic and current greenhouse gas emissions, emissions reductions, and carbon sequestration. Under the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) reporters will have the opportunity to highlight specific achievements. If you have taken actions to lessen the greenhouse gas effect, either by decreasing greenhouse gas emissions or by sequestering carbon, the Department of Energy (DOE) encourages you to report your achievements under this program. The program has two related, but distinct parts. First, the program offers you an opportunity to report your annual emissions of greenhouse gases. Second, the program records your specific projects to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and increase carbon sequestration. Although participants in the program are strongly encouraged to submit reports on both, reports on either annual emissions or emissions reductions and carbon sequestration projects will be accepted. These guidelines and the supporting technical documents outline the rationale for the program and approaches to analyzing emissions and emissions reduction projects. Your annual emissions and emissions reductions achievements will be reported.

  20. Impacts Analyses Supporting the National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Assessment for the Resumption of Transient Testing Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annette L. Schafer; Lloyd C. Brown; David C. Carathers; Boyd D. Christensen; James J. Dahl; Mark L. Miller; Cathy Ottinger Farnum; Steven Peterson; A. Jeffrey Sondrup; Peter V. Subaiya; Daniel M. Wachs; Ruth F. Weiner

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental and health impacts are presented for activities associated with transient testing of nuclear fuel and material using two candidate test reactors. Transient testing involves irradiation of nuclear fuel or materials for short time-periods under high neutron flux rates. The transient testing process includes transportation of nuclear fuel or materials inside a robust shipping cask to a hot cell, removal from the shipping cask, pre-irradiation examination of the nuclear materials, assembly of an experiment assembly, transportation of the experiment assembly to the test reactor, irradiation in the test reactor, transport back to the hot cell, and post-irradiation examination of the nuclear fuel or material. The potential for environmental or health consequences during the transportation, examination, and irradiation actions are assessed for normal operations, off-normal (accident) scenarios, and transportation. Impacts to the environment (air, soil, and groundwater), are assessed during each phase of the transient testing process. This report documents the evaluation of potential consequences to the general public. This document supports the Environmental Assessment (EA) required by the U.S. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) (42 USC Subsection 4321 et seq.).

  1. Clean Air Act General Conformity Requirements and the National...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Clean Air Act General Conformity Requirements and the National Environmental Policy Act Process Clean Air Act General Conformity Requirements and the National Environmental Policy...

  2. Energy Policy Act of 2005 -Select News and Analysis WSU Extension Energy Library http://www.energy.wsu.edu/library/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    , Section 351 Oil Shale, Tar Sands, and Other Strategic Unconventional Fuels Act of 2005 - Title III

  3. Energy Policy Act of 2005 -Select News and Analysis WSU Extension Energy Library http://www.energy.wsu.edu/library/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Geological and Geophysical Data Preservation Program Act of 2005 -Title III, Section 351 Oil Shale, Tar

  4. Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization Online Policy. Mission statement. Optimization Online is a repository of eprints about optimization and related topics. It facilitates quick...

  5. Implementation of EU Waste Recycling Regulation in Macedonia: The Challenges of Policy Integration and Normative Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilievska Kremer, Jannika Sjostrand

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    No. 34. USAID Plastic Recycling Project. Accessed March Recycling Regulation in Macedoniathe Macedonian waste and recycling regulatory framework with

  6. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 1, Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume includes the following chapters: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant RCRA A permit application; facility description; waste analysis plan; groundwater monitoring; procedures to prevent hazards; RCRA contingency plan; personnel training; corrective action for solid waste management units; and other Federal laws.

  7. Geothermal Development and the Use of Categorical Exclusions Under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levine, A.; Young, K. R.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The federal environmental review process under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) can be complex and time consuming. Currently, a geothermal developer may have to complete the NEPA process multiple times during the development of a geothermal project. One mechanism to reduce the timeframe of the federal environmental review process for activities that do not have a significant environmental impact is the use of Categorical Exclusions (CXs), which can exempt projects from having to complete an Environmental Assessment or Environmental Impact Statement. This study focuses primarily on the CX process and its applicability to geothermal exploration. In this paper, we: Provide generalized background information on CXs, including previous NEPA reports addressing CXs, the process for developing CXs, and the role of extraordinary circumstances; Examine the history of the Bureau of Land Management's (BLM) geothermal CXs; Compare current CXs for oil, gas, and geothermal energy; Describe bills proposing new statutory CXs; Examine the possibility of standardizing geothermal CXs across federal agencies; and Present analysis from the Geothermal NEPA Database and other sources on the potential for new geothermal exploration CXs. As part of this study, we reviewed Environmental Assessments (EAs) conducted in response to 20 geothermal exploration drilling permit applications (Geothermal Drilling Permits or Notices of Intents) since the year 2001, the majority of which are from the last 5 years. All 20 EAs reviewed for this study resulted in a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). While many of these FONS's involved proponent proposed or federal agency required mitigation, this still suggests it may be appropriate to create or expand an exploration drilling CX for geothermal, which would have a significant impact on reducing geothermal exploration timelines and up-front costs. Ultimately, federal agencies tasked with permitting and completing environmental reviews for geothermal exploration drilling activities and/or legislative representatives are the responsible parties to discuss the merits and implementation of new or revised CXs for geothermal development.

  8. Directions in low-level radioactive waste management: A brief history of commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a history of commercial low-level radioactive waste management in the United States, with emphasis on the history of six commercially operated low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The report includes a brief description of important steps that have been taken during the 1980s to ensure the safe disposal of low-level waste in the 1990s and beyond. These steps include the issuance of Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 61, Licensing Requirements for the Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, and steps taken by states and regional compacts to establish additional disposal sites. 42 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Transuranic (TRU) Waste | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Defined by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act as "waste containing more than 100 nanocuries of alpha-emitting...

  10. 1989 Annual report on low-level radioactive waste management progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the progress during 1989 of states and compacts in establishing new low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. It also provides summary information on the volume of low-level waste received for disposal in 1989 by commercially operated low-level waste disposal facilities. This report is in response to Section 7(b) of Title I of Public Law 99--240, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985. 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Stormwater Management Act (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The policy and purpose of this act is to encourage planning and management of storm water runoff in each watershed consistent with sound water and land use practices.

  12. Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GREAGER, T.M.

    2000-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    As a generator of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the Hanford Site must ensure that its TRU waste meets the requirements of US. Department of Energy (DOE) 0 435.1, ''Radioactive Waste Management,'' and the Contact-Handled (CH) Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP-WAC). WIPP-WAC requirements are derived from the WIPP Technical Safety Requirements, WIPP Safety Analysis Report, TRUPACT-II SARP, WIPP Land Withdrawal Act, WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 191/194 Compliance Certification Decision. The WIPP-WAC establishes the specific physical, chemical, radiological, and packaging criteria for acceptance of defense TRU waste shipments at WIPP. The WPP-WAC also requires that participating DOE TRU waste generator/treatment/storage sites produce site-specific documents, including a certification plan, that describe their program for managing TRU waste and TRU waste shipments before transferring waste to WIPP. Waste characterization activities provide much of the data upon which certification decisions are based. Waste characterization requirements for TRU waste and TRU mixed waste that contains constituents regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) are established in the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Waste Analysis Plan (WAP). The Hanford Site Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) (HNF-2599) implements the applicable requirements in the WAP and includes the qualitative and quantitative criteria for making hazardous waste determinations. The Hanford Site must also ensure that its TRU waste destined for disposal at WPP meets requirements for transport in the Transuranic Package Transporter-11 (TRUPACT-11). The US. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) establishes the TRUPACT-11 requirements in the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package (TRUPACT-11 SARP). In addition, a TRU waste is eligible for disposal at WIPP only if it has been generated in whole or in part by one or more of the activities listed in Section 10101(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. DOE sites must determine that each waste stream to be disposed of at WIPP is ''defense'' TRU waste. (See also the definition of ''defense'' TRU waste.). Only CH TRU wastes meeting the requirements of the QAPjP, WIPP-WAP, WPP-WAC, and other requirements documents described above will be accepted for transportation and disposal at WIPP.

  13. Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GREAGER, T.M.

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a generator of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the Hanford Site must ensure that its TRU waste meets the requirements of US. Department of Energy (DOE) 0 435.1, ''Radioactive Waste Management,'' and the Contact-Handled (CH) Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP-WAC). WIPP-WAC requirements are derived from the WIPP Technical Safety Requirements, WIPP Safety Analysis Report, TRUPACT-II SARP, WIPP Land Withdrawal Act, WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 191/194 Compliance Certification Decision. The WIPP-WAC establishes the specific physical, chemical, radiological, and packaging criteria for acceptance of defense TRU waste shipments at WIPP. The WPP-WAC also requires that participating DOE TRU waste generator/treatment/storage sites produce site-specific documents, including a certification plan, that describe their program for managing TRU waste and TRU waste shipments before transferring waste to WIPP. Waste characterization activities provide much of the data upon which certification decisions are based. Waste characterization requirements for TRU waste and TRU mixed waste that contains constituents regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) are established in the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Waste Analysis Plan (WAP). The Hanford Site Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) (HNF-2599) implements the applicable requirements in the WAP and includes the qualitative and quantitative criteria for making hazardous waste determinations. The Hanford Site must also ensure that its TRU waste destined for disposal at WPP meets requirements for transport in the Transuranic Package Transporter-11 (TRUPACT-11). The US. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) establishes the TRUPACT-11 requirements in the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package (TRUPACT-11 SARP). In addition, a TRU waste is eligible for disposal at WIPP only if it has been generated in whole or in part by one or more of the activities listed in Section 10101(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. DOE sites must determine that each waste stream to be disposed of at WIPP is ''defense'' TRU waste. (See also the definition of ''defense'' TRU waste.). Only CH TRU wastes meeting the requirements of the QAPjP, WIPP-WAP, WPP-WAC, and other requirements documents described above will be accepted for transportation and disposal at WIPP.

  14. Hazardous and Radioactive Mixed Waste Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1989-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) hazardous and radioactive mixed waste policies and requirements and to implement the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) within the framework of the environmental programs established under DOE O 5400.1. This directive does not cancel any directives.

  15. Radioactive Waste Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1984-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish policies and guidelines by which the Department of Energy (DOE) manages tis radioactive waste, waste byproducts, and radioactively contaminated surplus facilities.

  16. Integrated electronic waste management in Mexico : law, technology and public policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez Llera, Ricardo, 1971-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    What is electronic waste? Why is it considered a problem? What are the public health implications of its mishandling? The electronic industry, a sector that has experienced one of the highest growth rates of the last decade, ...

  17. A Novel Fuel/Reactor Cycle to Implement the 300 Years Nuclear Waste Policy Approach - 12377

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carelli, M.D.; Franceschini, F.; Lahoda, E.J. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC., Cranberry Township, PA (United States); Petrovic, B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thorium-based fuel cycle system can effectively burn the currently accumulated commercial used nuclear fuel and move to a sustainable equilibrium where the actinide levels in the high level waste are low enough to yield a radiotoxicity after 300 years lower than that of the equivalent uranium ore. The second step of the Westinghouse approach to solving the waste 'problem' has been completed. The thorium fuel cycle has indeed the potential of burning the legacy TRU and achieve the waste objective proposed. Initial evaluations have been started for the third step, development and selection of appropriate reactors. Indications are that the probability of show-stoppers is rather remote. It is, therefore, believed that development of the thorium cycle and associated technologies will provide a permanent solution to the waste management. Westinghouse is open to the widest collaboration to make this a reality. (authors)

  18. Disposal of Hazardous Medical Waste Policy and Procedures Commencement Date: 27 November, 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manipulation Advisory Committee's publication, Guidelines for the Storage, Transport and Disposal of Medical" and must comply with the Guidelines for the Storage, Transport and Disposal of Medical Waste issued of their chemical, biological or physical properties. Sharps Means objects or devices having acute rigid corners

  19. Hazardous Waste Management (Delaware)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The act authorizes the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environment Control (DNREC) to regulate hazardous waste and create a program to manage sources of hazardous waste. The act...

  20. Low-level Waste Forum meeting report. Winter meeting, January 26--28, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of representatives of states and compacts established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies. The Forum participants include representatives from regional compacts, designated host states, unaffiliated states, and states with currently-operating low-level radioactive waste facilities. This report contains information synthesizing the accomplishments of the Forum, as well as any new advances that have been made in the management of low-level radioactive wastes.

  1. Low-level Waste Forum meeting report. Summer meeting, July 21--23, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of representatives of states and compacts established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies. The Forum participants include representatives from regional compacts, designated host states, unaffiliated states, and states with currently-operating low-level radioactive waste facilities. This report contains information synthesizing the accomplishments of the Forum, as well as any new advances that have been made in the management of low-level radioactive wastes.

  2. Low-level Waste Forum meeting report. Quarterly meeting, July 25--26, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of representatives of states and compacts established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies. The Forum participants include representatives from regional compacts, designated host states, unaffiliated states, and states with currently-operating low-level radioactive waste facilities. This report contains information synthesizing the accomplishments of the Forum, as well as any new advances that have been made in the management of low-level radioactive wastes.

  3. Low-level Waste Forum meeting report. Spring meeting, April 28--30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of representatives of states and compacts established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies. The Forum participants include representatives from regional compacts, designated host states, unaffiliated states, and states with currently-operating low-level radioactive waste facilities. This report contains information synthesizing the accomplishments of the Forum, as well as any new advances that have been made in the management of low-level radioactive wastes.

  4. Environmental Protection Act (Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The broad-ranging Environmental Protection Act has sections on waste management, air quality, environmental assessment, and hazardous or polluting substances. The act establishes the framework for...

  5. POLICY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSales LLCDieselEnergyHistory May 3,3, 2013 POLICY *

  6. POLICY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSales LLCDieselEnergyHistory May 3,3, 2013 POLICY *November

  7. Policies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar Home Design Passive SolarCenterYou are here:andPoints ofPolaronPolicies

  8. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B Permit Application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Chapter E, Appendix E1, Chapter L, Appendix L1: Volume 12, Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project was authorized by the US Department of Energy 5 (DOE) National Security and Military Applications of the Nuclear Energy Authorization Act of 1980 (Public Law 96-164). Its legislative mandate is to provide a research and development facility to demonstrate the safe disposal of radioactive waste resulting from national defense programs and activities. To fulfill this mandate, the WIPP facility has been designed to perform scientific investigations of the behavior of bedded salt as a repository medium and the interactions between the soft and radioactive wastes. In 1991, DOE proposed to initiate a experimental Test Phase designed to demonstrate the performance of the repository. The Test Phase activities involve experiments using transuranic (TRU) waste typical of the waste planned for future disposal at the WIPP facility. Much of this TRU waste is co-contaminated with chemical constituents which are defined as hazardous under HWMR-7, Pt. II, sec. 261. This waste is TRU mixed waste and is the subject of this application. Because geologic repositories, such as the WIPP facility, are defined under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as land disposal facilities, the groundwater monitoring requirements of HWMR-7, PLV, Subpart X, must be addressed. HWMR-7, Pt. V, Subpart X, must be addressed. This appendix demonstrates that groundwater monitoring is not needed in order to demonstrate compliance with the performance standards; therefore, HWMR-7, Pt.V, Subpart F, will not apply to the WIPP facility.

  9. Energy transport corridors: the potential role of Federal lands in states identified by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, section 368(b).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krummel, J.; Hlohowskyj, I.; Kuiper, J.; Kolpa, R.; Moore, R.; May, J.; VanKuiken, J.C.; Kavicky, J.A.; McLamore, M.R.; Shamsuddin, S. (Decision and Information Sciences); ( EVS)

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On August 8, 2005, the President signed the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct) into law. In Subtitle F of EPAct, Congress set forth various provisions that would change the way certain federal agencies (Agencies) coordinate to authorize the use of land for a variety of energy-related purposes. As part of Subtitle F of EPAct, Section 368 addresses the issue of energy transportation corridors on federal land for oil, gas, and hydrogen pipelines, as well as electricity transmission and distribution facilities. Because of the critical importance of improving the nation's electrical transmission grid, Congress recognized that electricity transmission issues should receive added attention when the Agencies address corridor location and analysis issues. In Section 368, Congress specifically directed the Agencies to consider the need for upgraded and new facilities to deliver electricity: In carrying out [Section 368], the Secretaries shall take into account the need for upgraded and new electricity transmission and distribution facilities to (1) improve reliability; (2) relieve congestion; and (3) enhance capability of the national grid to deliver electricity. Section 368 does not require the Agencies to consider or approve specific projects, applications for rights-of-way (ROWs), or other permits within designated energy corridors. Importantly, Section 368 does not direct, license, or otherwise permit any on-the-ground activity of any sort. If an applicant is interested in obtaining an authorization to develop a project within any corridor designated under Section 368, the applicant would have to apply for a ROW authorization and applicable permits. The Agencies would consider each application by applying appropriate project-specific reviews under requirements of laws and related regulations, including, but not limited to, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act, Section 7 of the Endangered Species Act (ESA), and Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA). Under Section 368, Congress divided the United States into two groups of states: the 11 contiguous western states and the remaining states. Direction for energy transportation corridor analysis and selection in the 11 western states was addressed in Section 368(a) of EPAct, while direction for energy transportation corridor analysis and selection in all other states was addressed under Section 368(b) of EPAct. It was clearly the priority of Congress to conduct corridor location studies and designation first on federal lands in the western states. Under Section 368(a), the Agencies produced a programmatic environmental impact statement (EIS), Designation of Energy Corridors on Federal Land in the 11 Western States (DOE and DOI 2008), that was used in part as the basis for designating more than 6,000 mi (9,656 km) of energy transportation corridors on federal land in 11 western states. Under Section 368(a) of EPAct, Congress clearly stated the Agencies needed to (1) designate energy transportation corridors on federal land, (2) conduct the necessary environmental review of the designated corridors, and (3) incorporate the designated corridors into the appropriate land use plans. Congressional direction under Section 368(b) of EPAct differs from that provided under Section 368(a). Specifically, Section 368(b) requires the secretaries of the Agencies, in consultation with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), affected utility industries, and other interested persons, to jointly: (1) Identify corridors for oil, gas, and hydrogen pipelines and electricity transmission and distribution facilities on federal land in states other than the 11 western states identified under Section 368(a) of EPAct, and (2) Schedule prompt action to identify, designate, and incorporate the corridors into the applicable land use plans. While Section 368(a) clearly directs designation as a necessary first step for energy transportation corridors in the 11 western states, Section 368(b) directs the Agencies to first identify corridor

  10. An integrated analytical framework for quantifying the LCOE of waste-to-energy facilities for a range of greenhouse gas emissions policy and technical factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townsend, Aaron K., E-mail: aarontownsend@utexas.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Webber, Michael E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents a novel integrated method for considering the economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities with priced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions based upon technical and economic characteristics of the WTE facility, MSW stream, landfill alternative, and GHG emissions policy. The study demonstrates use of the formulation for six different policy scenarios and explores sensitivity of the results to ranges of certain technical parameters as found in existing literature. The study shows that details of the GHG emissions regulations have large impact on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of WTE and that GHG regulations can either increase or decrease the LCOE of WTE depending on policy choices regarding biogenic fractions from combusted waste and emissions from landfills. Important policy considerations are the fraction of the carbon emissions that are priced (i.e. all emissions versus only non-biogenic emissions), whether emissions credits are allowed due to reducing fugitive landfill gas emissions, whether biogenic carbon sequestration in landfills is credited against landfill emissions, and the effectiveness of the landfill gas recovery system where waste would otherwise have been buried. The default landfill gas recovery system effectiveness assumed by much of the industry yields GHG offsets that are very close to the direct non-biogenic GHG emissions from a WTE facility, meaning that small changes in the recovery effectiveness cause relatively larger changes in the emissions factor of the WTE facility. Finally, the economics of WTE are dependent on the MSW stream composition, with paper and wood being advantageous, metal and glass being disadvantageous, and plastics, food, and yard waste being either advantageous or disadvantageous depending upon the avoided tipping fee and the GHG emissions price.

  11. Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Alternatives Implementation Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles M. Barnes; James B. Bosley; Clifford W. Olsen

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to discuss issues related to the implementation of each of the five down-selected INEEL/INTEC radioactive liquid waste (sodium-bearing waste - SBW) treatment alternatives and summarize information in three main areas of concern: process/technical, environmental permitting, and schedule. Major implementation options for each treatment alternative are also identified and briefly discussed. This report may touch upon, but purposely does not address in detail, issues that are programmatic in nature. Examples of these include how the SBW will be classified with respect to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA), status of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) permits and waste storage availability, available funding for implementation, stakeholder issues, and State of Idaho Settlement Agreement milestones. It is assumed in this report that the SBW would be classified as a transuranic (TRU) waste suitable for disposal at WIPP, located in New Mexico, after appropriate treatment to meet transportation requirements and waste acceptance criteria (WAC).

  12. Pollution Control Act (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act declares the maintenance of reasonable standards of purity of air and water to be the public policy of the state. The Act authorizes the Department of Health and Environmental Control to...

  13. Impacts Analyses Supporting the National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Assessment for the Resumption of Transient Testing Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annette L. Schafer; LLoyd C. Brown; David C. Carathers; Boyd D. Christensen; James J. Dahl; Mark L. Miller; Cathy Ottinger Farnum; Steven Peterson; A. Jeffrey Sondrup; Peter V. Subaiya; Daniel M. Wachs; Ruth F. Weiner

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the analysis details and summary of analyses conducted to evaluate the environmental impacts for the Resumption of Transient Fuel and Materials Testing Program. It provides an assessment of the impacts for the two action alternatives being evaluated in the environmental assessment. These alternatives are (1) resumption of transient testing using the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and (2) conducting transient testing using the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratory in New Mexico (SNL/NM). Analyses are provided for radiologic emissions, other air emissions, soil contamination, and groundwater contamination that could occur (1) during normal operations, (2) as a result of accidents in one of the facilities, and (3) during transport. It does not include an assessment of the biotic, cultural resources, waste generation, or other impacts that could result from the resumption of transient testing. Analyses were conducted by technical professionals at INL and SNL/NM as noted throughout this report. The analyses are based on bounding radionuclide inventories, with the same inventories used for test materials by both alternatives and different inventories for the TREAT Reactor and ACRR. An upper value on the number of tests was assumed, with a test frequency determined by the realistic turn-around times required between experiments. The estimates provided for impacts during normal operations are based on historical emission rates and projected usage rates; therefore, they are bounding. Estimated doses for members of the public, collocated workers, and facility workers that could be incurred as a result of an accident are very conservative. They do not credit safety systems or administrative procedures (such as evacuation plans or use of personal protective equipment) that could be used to limit worker doses. Doses estimated for transportation are conservative and are based on transport of the bounding radiologic inventory that will be contained in any given test. The transportation analysis assumes all transports will contain the bounding inventory.

  14. AUGUST 2014 POLICY PAPER | Why did major global health institutions scale up ACTs but ignore combination zinc/oral rehydration therapy? | 1 Why did major global health institutions scale up artemisinin-based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mullins, Dyche

    AUGUST 2014 POLICY PAPER | Why did major global health institutions scale up ACTs but ignore combination zinc/oral rehydration therapy? | 1 Why did major global health institutions scale up artemisinin agencies. Over the last decade, these institu- tions took concerted action to scale up the newly

  15. State of Nevada, Agency for Nuclear Projects/Nuclear Waste Project Office narrative report, January 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Agency for Nuclear Projects/Nuclear Waste Project Office (NWPO) is the State of Nevada agency designated by State law to monitor and oversee US Department of Energy (DOE) activities relative to the possible siting, construction, operation and closure of a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain and to carry out the State of Nevada`s responsibilities under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. During the reporting period the NWPO continued to work toward the five objectives designed to implement the Agency`s oversight responsibilities: (1) Assure that the health and safety of Nevada`s citizens are adequately protected with regard to any federal high-level radioactive waste program within the State; (2) Take the responsibilities and perform the duties of the State of Nevada as described in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (Public Law 97-425) and the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987; (3) Advise the Governor, the State Commission on Nuclear Projects and the Nevada State Legislature on matters concerning the potential disposal of high-level radioactive waste in the State; (4) Work closely and consult with affected local governments and State agencies; (5) Monitor and evaluate federal planning and activities regarding high-level radioactive waste disposal. Plan and conduct independent State studies regarding the proposed repository.

  16. Impact of the deployment schedule of fast breeding reactors in the frame of French act for nuclear materials and radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le Mer, J.; Garzenne, C.; Lemasson, D. [Electricite de France R and D, 1, Avenue du General De Gaulle, 92141 Clamart (France)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the frame of the French Act of June 28, 2006 on 'a sustainable management of nuclear materials and radioactive waste' EDF R and D assesses various research scenarios of transition between the actual French fleet and a Generation IV fleet with a closed fuel cycle where plutonium is multi-recycled. The basic scenarios simulate a deployment of 60 GWe of Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs) in two steps: one third from 2040 to 2050 and the rest from 2080 to 2100 (scenarios 2040). These research scenarios assume that SFR technology will be ready for industrial deployment in 2040. One of the many sensitivity analyses that EDF, as a nuclear power plant operator, must evaluate is the impact of a delay of SFR technology in terms of uranium consumptions, plutonium needs and fuel cycle utilities gauging. The sensitivity scenarios use the same assumptions as scenarios 2040 but they simulate a different transition phase: SFRs are deployed in one step between 2080 and 2110 (scenarios 2080). As the French Act states to conduct research on minor actinides (MA) management, we studied different options for 2040 and 2080 scenarios: no MA transmutation, americium transmutation in heterogeneous mode based on americium Bearing Blankets (AmBB) in SFRs and all MA transmutation in heterogeneous mode based on MA Bearing Blankets (MABB). Moreover, we studied multiple parameters that could impact the deployment of these reactors (SFR load factor, increase of the use of MOX in Light Water Reactors, increase of the cooling time in spent nuclear fuel storage...). Each scenario has been computed with the EDF R and D fuel cycle simulation code TIRELIRE-STRATEGIE and optimized to meet various fuel cycle constraints such as using the reprocessing facility with long period of constant capacity, keeping the temporary stored mass of plutonium and MA under imposed limits, recycling older assemblies first... These research scenarios show that the transition from the current PWR fleet to an equivalent fleet of Generation IV SFR can follow different courses. The design of SFR-V2B that we used in our studies needs a high inventory of plutonium resulting in tension on this resource. Several options can be used in order to loosen this tension: our results lead to favour the use of axial breeding blanket in SFR. Load factor of upcoming reactors has to be regarded with attention as it has a high impact on plutonium resource for a given production of electricity. The deployment of SFRs beginning in 2080 instead of 2040 following the scenarios we described creates higher tensions on reprocessing capacity, separated plutonium storage and spent fuel storage. In the frame of the French Act, we studied minor actinides transmutation. The flux of MA in all fuel cycle plants is really high, which will lead to decay heat, a and neutron emission related problems. In terms of reduction of MA inventories, the deployment of MA transmutation cycle must not delay the installation of SFRs. The plutonium production in MABB and AmBB does not allow reducing the use of axial breeding blankets. The impact of MA or Am transmutation over the high level waste disposal is more important if the SFRs are deployed later. Transmutation option (americium or all MA) does not have a significant impact on the number of canister produced nor on its long-term thermal properties. (authors)

  17. Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management in the United States: What Have We Wrought? The Richard S. Hodes, M.D. Honor Lecture Award - 12222

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobi, Lawrence R.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1979, radioactive waste disposal was an important national issue. State governors were closing the gates on the existing low-level radioactive waste disposal sites and the ultimate disposition of spent fuel was undecided. A few years later, the United States Congress thought they had solved both problems by passing the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1981, which established a network of regional compacts for low-level radioactive waste disposal, and by passing the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 to set out how a final resting place for high-level waste would be determined. Upon passage of the acts, State, Regional and Federal officials went to work. Here we are some 30 years later with little to show for our combined effort. The envisioned national repository for high-level radioactive waste has not materialized. Efforts to develop the Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste disposal facility were abandoned after spending $13 billion on the failed project. Recently, the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future issued its draft report that correctly concludes the existing policy toward high-level nuclear waste is 'all but completely broken down'. A couple of new low-level waste disposal facilities have opened since 1981, but neither were the result of efforts under the act. What the Act has done is interject a system of interstate compacts with a byzantine interstate import and export system to complicate the handling of low-level radioactive waste, with attendant costs. As this paper is being written in the fourth-quarter of 2011, after 30 years of political and bureaucratic turmoil, a new comprehensive low-level waste disposal facility at Andrews Texas is approaching its initial operating date. The Yucca Mountain project might be completed or it might not. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is commencing a review of their 1981 volume reduction policy statement. The Department of Energy after 26 years has yet to figure out how to implement its obligations under the 1985 amendments to the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act. But, the last three decades have not been a total loss. A great deal has been learned about radioactive waste disposal since 1979 and the efforts of the public and private sector have shaped and focused the work to be done in the future. So, this lecturer asks the question: 'What have we wrought?' to which he provides his perspective and his recommendations for radioactive waste management policy for the next 30 years. (author)

  18. Summary report. Low-level radioactive waste management activities in the states and compacts. Volume 4, No. 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    `Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Activities in the States and Compacts` is a supplement to `LLW Notes` and is distributed periodically by Afton Associates, Inc. to state, compact and federal officials that receive `LLW Notes`. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low- Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

  19. Summary report, low-level radioactive waste management activities in the states and compacts. Vol. 4. No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    `Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Activities in the States and Compacts` is a supplement to `LLW Notes` and is distributed periodically by Afton Associates, Inc. to state, compact and federal officials that receive `LLW Notes`. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low- Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

  20. Policy Name: Policy on the Personal Information Protection and Electronic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Jeff W.

    Policy Name: Policy on the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act, Canada Committee Date of Original Policy: May 24, 1995 Last Updated: November 2013 Mandatory Revision Date: November 2018 Contact: University Secretary Policy: [Note: This Policy replaces the policy known as "Access

  1. State of Nevada, Agency for Nuclear Projects/Nuclear Waste Project Office narrative report, October 1--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Agency for Nuclear Projects/Nuclear Waste Project Office (NWPO) is the State of Nevada agency designated by State law to monitor and oversee US Department of Energy (DOE) activities relative to the possible siting, construction, operation and closure of a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain and to carry out the State of Nevada`s responsibilities under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. During the reporting period the NWPO continued to work toward the five objectives designed to implement the Agency`s oversight responsibilities. (1) Assure that the health and safety of Nevada`s citizens are adequately protected with regard to any federal high-level radioactive waste program within the State. (2) Take the responsibilities and perform the duties of the State of Nevada as described in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (Public Law 97-425) and the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987. (3) Advise the Governor, the State Commission on Nuclear Projects and the Nevada State Legislature on matters concerning the potential disposal of high-level radioactive waste in the State. (4) Work closely and consult with affected local governments and State agencies. (5) Monitor and evaluate federal planning and activities regarding high-level radioactive waste disposal. Plan and conduct independent State studies regarding the proposed repository.

  2. DWPF waste form compliance plan (Draft Revision)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plodinec, M.J.; Marra, S.L.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy currently has over 100 million liters of high-level radioactive waste in storage at the Savannah River Site (SRS). In the late 1970`s, the Department of Energy recognized that there were significant safety and cost advantages associated with immobilizing the high-level waste in a stable solid form. Several alternative waste forms were evaluated in terms of product quality and reliability of fabrication. This evaluation led to a decision to build the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at SRS to convert the easily dispersed liquid waste to borosilicate glass. In accordance with the NEPA (National Environmental Policy Act) process, an Environmental Impact Statement was prepared for the facility, as well as an Environmental Assessment of the alternative waste forms, and issuance of a Record of Decision (in December, 1982) on the waste form. The Department of Energy, recognizing that start-up of the DWPF would considerably precede licensing of a repository, instituted a Waste Acceptance Process to ensure that these canistered waste forms would be acceptable for eventual disposal at a federal repository. This report is a revision of the DWPF compliance plan.

  3. DWPF waste form compliance plan (Draft Revision)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plodinec, M.J.; Marra, S.L.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy currently has over 100 million liters of high-level radioactive waste in storage at the Savannah River Site (SRS). In the late 1970's, the Department of Energy recognized that there were significant safety and cost advantages associated with immobilizing the high-level waste in a stable solid form. Several alternative waste forms were evaluated in terms of product quality and reliability of fabrication. This evaluation led to a decision to build the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at SRS to convert the easily dispersed liquid waste to borosilicate glass. In accordance with the NEPA (National Environmental Policy Act) process, an Environmental Impact Statement was prepared for the facility, as well as an Environmental Assessment of the alternative waste forms, and issuance of a Record of Decision (in December, 1982) on the waste form. The Department of Energy, recognizing that start-up of the DWPF would considerably precede licensing of a repository, instituted a Waste Acceptance Process to ensure that these canistered waste forms would be acceptable for eventual disposal at a federal repository. This report is a revision of the DWPF compliance plan.

  4. National Environmental Policy Act RM

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15, 2010 Printing andNancy Anne BaugherRFI |Group ReportNational

  5. Connecticut Environmental Policy Act (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Environmental impact reports must be prepared for all proposed projects initiated by state agencies or funded in whole or in part by the state. Reports will assess the likely direct, indirect, and...

  6. 10 CFR 1021 -- Department of Energy: National Environmental Policy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    10 CFR 1021 -- Department of Energy: National Environmental Policy Act Implementing Procedures 10 CFR 1021 -- Department of Energy: National Environmental Policy Act Implementing...

  7. Data Protection Policy Page 1 DATA PROTECTION POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenlees, John

    Data Protection Policy Page 1 DATA PROTECTION POLICY POLICY STATEMENT The University intends to fully comply with all requirements of the Data Protection Act 1998 (,,Act) in so far as it affects the Universitys activities. SCOPE This Data Protection Policy: Covers the processing of all personal information

  8. Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Hazardous Waste Program is carried out by the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality which administers its' program under the Hazardous Waste management Act (Arkansas Code Annotated 8-7...

  9. Superfund Policy Statements and Guidance Regarding Disposition of Radioactive Waste in Non-NRC Licensed Disposal Facilities - 13407

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Stuart [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (United States)] [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This talk will discuss EPA congressional testimony and follow-up letters, as well as letters to other stakeholders on EPA's perspectives on the disposition of radioactive waste outside of the NRC licensed disposal facility system. This will also look at Superfund's historical practices, and emerging trends in the NRC and agreement states on waste disposition. (author)

  10. Reporting Fraud, Waste, and Abuse to the Office of Inspector General

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish policies and procedures for reporting fraud, waste, abuse, misuse, corruption, criminal acts, or mismanagement to the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Inspector General (OIG). Cancels DOE 2030.4B. Canceled by DOE O 221.1A, 8-19-08.

  11. Livestock Waste Management Act (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute establishes the animal feeding operation permitting program and gives the Department of Environmental Quality the authority to administer the state permitting program. Permits are...

  12. Solid Waste Management (Michigan)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act encourages the Department of Environmental Quality and Health Department representatives to develop and encourage methods for disposing solid waste that are environmentally sound, that...

  13. Virginia Geothermal Resources Conservation Act (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the policy of the Commonwealth of Virginia to foster the development, production, and utilization of geothermal resources, prevent waste of geothermal resources, protect correlative rights to...

  14. DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This regulation regulates the generation, storage, transportation, treatment, and disposal of hazardous waste, and wherever feasible, reduces or eliminates waste at the source. It is the policy of...

  15. Maine Rivers Policy (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Maine Rivers Policy accompanies the Maine Waterway Development and Conservation Act and provides additional protection for some river and stream segments, which are designated as outstanding...

  16. Climate Change, the Clean Air Act, and Industrial Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaswan, Alice

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate Change, the Clean Air Act, and Industrial PollutionCONSIDERATIONS IN CLIMATE POLICY . A.pollutant Considerations into Climate Policy 1.

  17. REFERENCE GUIDE ENERGY CONSERVATION ASSISTANCE ACT (ECAA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with this requirement. Waste management guidance and plan template can be downloaded at http://www.energy that generate waste. Attachments: Energy Commission Waste Management Plan Guidance Waste Management Plan1 REFERENCE GUIDE ENERGY CONSERVATION ASSISTANCE ACT (ECAA) STATE ENERGY PROGRAM (SEP) AMERICAN

  18. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 4, Revision 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy is currently constructing the Waste Isolation Pilot near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The full-scale pilot plant will demonstrate the feasibility of the safe disposal of defense-related nuclear waste in a bedded salt formation at a depth of 2160 feet below the surface. WIPP will provide for the permanent storage of 25,000 cu ft of remote-handled (RH) transuranic waste and 6,000,000 cu ft of contact-handled (CH) transuranic waste. This paper covers the major mechanical/structural design considerations for the waste hoist and its hoist tower structure. The design of the hoist system and safety features incorporates state-of-the-art technology developed in the hoist and mining industry to ensure safe operation for transporting nuclear waste underground. Also included are design specifications for VOC-10 monitoring system.

  19. Environmental Planning and Policy in a Post-Rio World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duane, Timothy P

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R . N . L 1 992. "Environmental Policy-Making i n the Unitedregulation. The National Environmental Policy Act (1969) andof and participants in environmental policy have changed

  20. Radioactive mixed waste disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jasen, W.G.; Erpenbeck, E.G.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various types of waste have been generated during the 50-year history of the Hanford Site. Regulatory changes in the last 20 years have provided the emphasis for better management of these wastes. Interpretations of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA), and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) have led to the definition of radioactive mixed wastes (RMW). The radioactive and hazardous properties of these wastes have resulted in the initiation of special projects for the management of these wastes. Other solid wastes at the Hanford Site include low-level wastes, transuranic (TRU), and nonradioactive hazardous wastes. This paper describes a system for the treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of solid radioactive waste.

  1. Electronic Waste Management in India: A Stakeholders Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borthakur, Anwesha; Sinha, Kunal

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    E-waste Management Policy in India: Stakeholders Perceptionand Policy Implications of Electronic Waste in India. M.PhilTake-Back policies are also in practice in India, although

  2. Water Pollution Control Act (West Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Water Pollution Control Act empowers the Division of Water and Waste Management of the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection to maintain reasonable standards of purity and...

  3. Georgia Hazardous Site Response Act (Georgia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Georgia Hazardous Site Response Act is Georgias version of Superfund. The Act provides for graduated fees on the disposal of hazardous waste, a trust fund to enable the EPD to clean up or plan...

  4. Long-range master plan for defense transuranic waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Long Range Master Plan for the Defense Transuranic Waste Program (DTWP), or ''Master Plan,'' details current TRU waste management plans and serves as a framework for the DTWP. Not all final decisions concerning activities presented in the Master Plan have been made (e.g., land withdrawal legislation, the WIPP Compliance and Operational Plan and the TRUPACT Certificate of Compliance). It is the goal of the DTWP to end interim storage and achieve permanent disposal of TRU waste. To accomplish this goal, as much TRU waste as possible will be certified to meet the WIPP Acceptance Criteria (WAC). The certified waste will then be disposed of at WIPP. The small quantity of waste which is not practical to certify will be disposed of via alternative methods that require DOE Headquarters approval and shall comply with the National Environmental Policy Act requirements and EPA/State Regulations. The definition of TRU waste is ''without regard to source or form, waste that is contaminated with alpha-emitting transuranium radionuclides with half-lives greater than 20 years and concentrations greater than 100 nanocuries/gram (nCi/g) at the time of assay. Heads of Field Elements can determine that other alpha contaminated wastes, peculiar to a specific site, must be managed as transuranic waste.''

  5. Potential dispositioning flowsheets for ICPP SNF and wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, A.L. [ed.; Anderson, P.A.; Bendixsen, C.L. [and others

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INEL), has reprocessed irradiated nuclear fuels for the US Department of Energy (DOE) since 1953. This activity resulted mainly in the recovery of uranium and the management of the resulting wastes. The acidic radioactive high-level liquid waste was routinely stored in stainless steel tanks and then calcined to form a dry granular solid. The calcine is stored in stainless steel bins that are housed in underground concrete vaults. In April 1992, the DOE discontinued the practice of reprocessing irradiated nuclear fuels. This decision has left a legacy of 1.8 million gallons of radioactive liquid wastes (1.5 million gallons of radioactive sodium-bearing liquid wastes and 0.3 million gallons of high-level liquid waste), 3800 cubic meters of calcine waste, and 289 metric tons of heavy metal within unprocessed spent nuclear fuel (SNF) left in inventory at the ICPP. The nation`s radioactive waste policy has been established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA), which requires the final disposal of SNF and radioactive waste in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) standards. In accordance with these regulations and other legal agreements between the State of Idaho and the DOE, the DOE must, among other requirements, (1) complete a final Environmental Impact Statement by April 30, 1995, (2) evaluate and test sodium-bearing waste pre-treatment technologies, (3) select the sodium-bearing and calcine waste pre-treatment technology, if necessary, by June 1, 1995, and (4) select a technology for converting calcined waste into an appropriate disposal form by June 1, 1995.

  6. Rethinking the Waste Hierarchy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    principles of EU waste policies. The environmental damage caused by waste depends on which type of manage, Environmental Assessment Institute For further information please contact: Environmental Assessment Institute.imv.dk #12;Environmental Assessment Institute Rethinking the Waste Hierarchy March 2005 Recommendations

  7. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 7: Revision 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This permit application (Vol. 7) for the WIPP facility contains appendices related to the following information: Ground water protection; personnel; solid waste management; and memorandums concerning environmental protection standards.

  8. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act: Part B, Permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 1, Revison 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains information related to the permit application for the WIPP facility. Information is presented on solid waste management; personnel safety; emergency plans; site characterization; applicable regulations; decommissioning; and ground water monitoring requirements.

  9. The disposal of orphan wastes using the greater confinement disposal concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonano, E.J.; Chu, M.S.Y.; Price, L.L.; Conrad, S.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA); Dickman, P.T. [Department of Energy, Las Vegas, NV (USA). Nevada Operations Office

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the United States, radioactive wastes are conventionally classified as high-level wastes, transuranic wastes, or low-level wastes. Each of these types of wastes, by law, has a ``home`` for their final disposal; i.e., high-level wastes are destined for disposal at the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, transuranic waste for the proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, and low-level waste for shallow-land disposal sites. However, there are some radioactive wastes within the United States Department of Energy (DOE) complex that do not meet the criteria established for disposal of either high-level waste, transuranic waste, or low-level waste. The former are called ``special-case`` or ``orphan`` wastes. This paper describes an ongoing project sponsored by the DOE`s Nevada Operations Office for the disposal of orphan wastes at the Radioactive Waste Management Site at Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site using the greater confinement disposal (GCD) concept. The objectives of the GCD project are to evaluate the safety of the site for disposal of orphan wastes by assessing compliance with pertinent regulations through performance assessment, and to examine the feasibility of this disposal concept as a cost-effective, safe alternative for management of orphan wastes within the DOE complex. Decisions on the use of GCD or other alternate disposal concepts for orphan wastes can be expected to be addressed in a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement being prepared by DOE. The ultimate decision to use GCD will require a Record of Decision through the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process. 20 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. POLICY SECTIONS POLICY OFFICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    POLICY SECTIONS POLICY OFFICE POLICIES FORMS PROCEDURES UNIVERSITY POLICY #12;guide to WRITING POLICIES Administrative policies align opera- tions, set behavior expectations across the University system and communicate policy roles and responsibilities. You, as the policy owner or writer, have the important task

  11. The 2010 OSU Clery Act Report Fire Safety Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    The 2010 OSU Clery Act Report And Fire Safety Report The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act #12;#12;Page | i Table of Contents The Annual Clery Act Report..........................................................................................................................................1 Reportable Areas

  12. Hazardous Waste Management Standards and Regulations (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act states the standards and regulations for the management of hazardous waste. No person shall construct, modify or operate a hazardous waste facility or otherwise dispose of hazardous waste...

  13. Jan. 6 Introduction and course overview Waste generation and characterization EPA 2011 Waste Characterization Report (Exec. Sum., Ch. 1-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barlaz, Morton A.

    Policy & Global Solid Waste Management 24 Regulatory Policy & Global Solid Waste Management 27 Regulatory Policy & Global Solid Waste Management 29 Life-cycle analysis (LCA) Life-Cycle Assessment Principles Final exam at 8 AM 2014 Course Syllabus CE 477/CE 577 Solid Waste Engineering #12;

  14. National Energy Policy Plan; A Report to Congress Required by Title VIII of the Department of Energy Organization Act (Public Law 95-91)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan report is divided into the following chapters: the course ahead, currently predominant fuels (oil, gas), America's energy triad, sources of diversity and long-term supply, sources of uncertainty, summary of current projections, and public comments on the nation's policy toward energy. (DLC)

  15. Bayesian Policy Search with Policy Priors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wingate, David

    We consider the problem of learning to act in partially observable, continuous-state-and-action worlds where we have abstract prior knowledge about the structure of the optimal policy in the form of a distribution over ...

  16. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B Permit Application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 2, Chapter C, Appendix C1--Chapter C, Appendix C3 (beginning), Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains appendices for the following: Rocky Flats Plant and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory waste process information; TRUPACT-II content codes (TRUCON); TRUPACT-II chemical list; chemical compatibility analysis for Rocky Flats Plant waste forms; chemical compatibility analysis for waste forms across all sites; TRU mixed waste characterization database; hazardous constituents of Rocky Flats Transuranic waste; summary of waste components in TRU waste sampling program at INEL; TRU waste sampling program; and waste analysis data.

  17. Health and Safety Policy This Health and Safety Policy document comprises a Policy Statement and details the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    ) The Corporate Manslaughter and Corporate Homicide Act and (ii) The Health & Safety at Work etc. Act. UnderHealth and Safety Policy UHSP/0/10 This Health and Safety Policy document comprises a Policy for implementing and monitoring them (UEP/0/10). The University has a Food Safety Policy Statement that covers all

  18. Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management annual report to Congress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the fifth Annual Report to Congress by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The report covers the activities and expenditures of OCRWM during fiscal year 1987, which ended on September 30, 1987. The activities and accomplishments of OCRWM during fiscal year 1987 are discussed in chapters 1 through 9 of this report. The audited financial statements of the Nuclear Waste Fund are provided in chapter 10. Since the close of the fiscal year, a number of significant events have occurred. Foremost among them was the passage of the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987 (Amendments Act) on December 21, 1987, nearly 3 months after the end of the fiscal year covered by this report. As a result, some of the plans and activities discussed in chapters 1 through 9 are currently undergoing significant change or are being discontinued. Most prominent among the provisions of the Amendments Act is the designation of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as the only candidate first repository site to be characterized. Therefore, the site characterization plans for Deaf Smith, Texas, and Hanford, Washington, discussed in chapter 3, will not be issued. The refocusing of the waste management program under the Amendments Act is highlighted in the epilogue, chapter 11. 68 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs.

  19. active liquid wastes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Assessment Institute Rethinking the Waste Hierarchy March 2005 Recommendations A number of specific recommendations for achieving cost-effective waste policies can be made...

  20. active liquid waste: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Assessment Institute Rethinking the Waste Hierarchy March 2005 Recommendations A number of specific recommendations for achieving cost-effective waste policies can be made...

  1. Solid waste disposal options: an optimum disposal model for the management of municipal solid waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haney, Brenda Ann

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Solid Waste Disposal Act and shifted the emphasis from disposal practices to recycling, resource recovery, and energy conversion of wastes. ' The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) provided for the disposal of solid waste in such a... was constructed in 1930 in New York City. " But waste- to-energy technology development was hindered by poor reliability, poor efficiency, and low cost effectiveness. " The Resource Recovery Act of 1970 and RCRA of 1976, shifted the em- phasis in solid waste...

  2. Section 175 report: Secretary of Energy report to the Congress pursuant to Section 175 of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contributes to, but does not supplant, ongoing studies being conducted by DOE to ensure that potentially significant adverse effects that may result from the repository program are minimized to the maximum extent practicable. As indicated in the Environmental Assessment for the Yucca Mountain site (US DOE, 1986) DOE does not believe significant adverse effects will result from site characterization activities. Nevertheless, DOE is conducting a variety of studies to determine if this conclusion is valid. These studies include, but are not limited to, monitoring of air and water quality and other environmental factors; monitoring the number of immigrating repository program workers and their residential locations; identifying cultural resources in the Yucca Mountain area and traditional culture and religious values of American Indian people associated with those resources; evaluating possible rail access routes to the Yucca Mountain site; and evaluating possible highway routes. These studies have been implemented after consultation with affected parties in Nevada. As part of the determination of suitability, and Environmental Impact Statement will be written and will include an analysis of potential impacts associated with constructing, operating, closing, and decommissioning a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. 59 refs., 33 figs., 12 tabs.

  3. Evaluation of Groundwater Impacts to Support the National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Assessment for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annette Schafer; Arthur S. Rood; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The groundwater impacts have been analyzed for the proposed RH-LLW disposal facility. A four-step analysis approach was documented and applied. This assessment compared the predicted groundwater ingestion dose to the more restrictive of either the 25 mrem/yr all pathway dose performance objective, or the maximum contaminant limit performance objective. The results of this analysis indicate that the groundwater impacts for either proposed facility location are expected to be less than the performance objectives. The analysis was prepared to support the NEPA-EA for the top two ranking of the proposed RH-LLW sites. As such, site-specific conditions were incorporated for each set of results generated. These site-specific conditions were included to account for the transport of radionuclides through the vadose zone and through the aquifer at each site. Site-specific parameters included the thickness of vadose zone sediments and basalts, moisture characteristics of the sediments, and aquifer velocity. Sorption parameters (Kd) were assumed to be very conservative values used in Track II analysis of CERCLA sites at INL. Infiltration was also conservatively assumed to represent higher rates corresponding to disturbed soil conditions. The results of this analysis indicate that the groundwater impacts for either proposed facility location are expected to be less than the performance objectives.

  4. Evaluation of Groundwater Impacts to Support the National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Assessment for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annette Schafer; Arthur S. Rood; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The groundwater impacts have been analyzed for the proposed RH-LLW disposal facility. A four-step analysis approach was documented and applied. This assessment compared the predicted groundwater ingestion dose to the more restrictive of either the 25 mrem/yr all pathway dose performance objective, or the maximum contaminant limit performance objective. The results of this analysis indicate that the groundwater impacts for either proposed facility location are expected to be less than the performance objectives. The analysis was prepared to support the NEPA-EA for the top two ranking of the proposed RH-LLW sites. As such, site-specific conditions were incorporated for each set of results generated. These site-specific conditions were included to account for the transport of radionuclides through the vadose zone and through the aquifer at each site. Site-specific parameters included the thickness of vadose zone sediments and basalts, moisture characteristics of the sediments, and aquifer velocity. Sorption parameters (Kd) were assumed to be very conservative values used in Track II analysis of CERCLA sites at INL. Infiltration was also conservatively assumed to represent higher rates corresponding to disturbed soil conditions. The results of this analysis indicate that the groundwater impacts for either proposed facility location are expected to be less than the performance objectives.

  5. National Energy Policy Plan; A Report to the Congress Required by Title VIII of the Department of Energy Organization Act (Public Law 95-91)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the third National Energy Plan in 1981 total energy efficiency has increased, domestic energy resources are being developed more effectively, oil prices have declined, US dependence on foreign energy sources has diminished, and the nation's vulnerability to energy supply disruptions has been reduced markedly. The policy goal is an adequate supply of energy at reasonable costs. Strategies include minimizing federal control and involvement in energy markets while maintaining public health and safety and environmental quality and promoting a balanced and mixed energy resource system. Federal programs and actions in energy are reviewed.

  6. Acceptable Knowledge Summary Report for Waste Stream: SR-T001-221F-HET/Drums

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lunsford, G.F.

    1999-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Since beginning operations in 1954, the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site FB-Line conducted atomic energy defense activities consistent with the listing in Section 10101(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. The facility mission was to process and convert dilute plutonium solution into highly purified weapons grade plutonium metal. As a result of various activities conducted in support of the mission (e.g., operation, maintenance, repair, clean up, and facility modifications), the facility generated transuranic waste. This document, along with referenced supporting documents, provides a defensible and auditable record of acceptable knowledge for one of the waste streams from the FB-Line. The waste was packaged in 55-gallon drums, then shipped to the transuranic waste storage facility in ''E'' area of the Savannah River Site. This acceptable knowledge report includes information relating to the facility's history, configuration,equipment, process operations, and waste management practices.

  7. Fifteenth annual U.S. Department of Energy low-level radioactive waste management conference: Agenda and abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the conference was to give the opportunity to identify and discuss low-level radioactive waste management issues, share lessons learned, and hear about some of the latest advances in technology. Abstracts of the presentations are arranged into the following topical sections: (1) Performance Management Track: Performance assessment perspectives; Site characterization; Modeling and performance assessment; and Remediation; (2) Technical Track: Strategic planning; Tools and options; Characterization and validation; Treatment updates; Technology development; and Storage; (3) Institutional Track: Orders and regulatory issues; Waste management options; Legal, economic, and social issues; Public involvement; Siting process; and Low-level radioactive waste policy amendment acts.

  8. Safe interim storage of Hanford tank wastes, draft environmental impact statement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Draft EIS is prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Washington State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA). DOE and Ecology have identified the need to resolve near-term tank safety issues associated with Watchlist tanks as identified pursuant to Public Law (P.L.) 101-510, Section 3137, ``Safety Measures for Waste Tanks at Hanford Nuclear Reservation,`` of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1991, while continuing to provide safe storage for other Hanford wastes. This would be an interim action pending other actions that could be taken to convert waste to a more stable form based on decisions resulting from the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) EIS. The purpose for this action is to resolve safety issues concerning the generation of unacceptable levels of hydrogen in two Watchlist tanks, 101-SY and 103-SY. Retrieving waste in dilute form from Tanks 101-SY and 103-SY, hydrogen-generating Watchlist double shell tanks (DSTs) in the 200 West Area, and storage in new tanks is the preferred alternative for resolution of the hydrogen safety issues.

  9. It Just Keeps Getting Better-Tru Waste Inventory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lott, S.; Crawford, B.; McInroy, W.; Van Soest, G.; McTaggart, J.; Guerin, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory-Carlsbad Operations, Carlsbad, NM (United States); Patterson, R. [U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad, Field Office, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) opened on March 26, 1999, becoming the nation's first deep geologic repository for the permanent disposal of defense-generated transuranic (TRU) waste. In May 1998, the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) certified WIPP and re-certified WIPP in March 2006. The knowledge of TRU waste inventory is fundamental to packaging, transportation, disposal strategies, resource allocation, and is also imperative when working in a regulatory framework. TRU waste inventory data are used to define the waste that will fill the WIPP repository in terms of volume, radionuclides, waste material parameters, other chemical components, and to model the impact of the waste on the performance of the WIPP over a 10,000-year evolution. The data that pertain to TRU waste is defined in the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA), as '..waste containing more that 100 nanocuries of alpha-emitting transuranic isotopes per gram of waste, with half-lives greater than 20 years..' Defining TRU waste further, the wastes are classified as either contact-handled (CH) or remote-handled (RH) TRU waste, depending on the dose rate at the surface of the waste container. CH TRU wastes are packaged with an external surface dose rate not greater than 200 milli-rem (mrem) per hour, while RH TRU wastes are packaged with an external surface dose rate of 200 mrem per hour or greater. The Los Alamos National Laboratory-Carlsbad Operations (LANL-CO) Inventory Team has developed a powerful new database, the Comprehensive Inventory Database (CID), to maintain the TRU waste inventory information. The CID is intended to replace the Transuranic Waste Baseline Inventory Database (TWBID), Revision 2.1, as the central inventory information repository for tracking all existing and potential (TRU) waste generated across the Department of Energy (DOE) TRU waste complex. It is also the source for information submitted for the Annual TRU Waste Inventory Reports some of which will be used in future Compliance Re-certification Applications (CRAs) for the WIPP. Currently, the DOE is preparing for the second re-certification, CRA-2009. The CID contains comprehensive TRU waste inventory that is consistent, relevant, and easily accessible to support DOE needs, not only the CRAs and performance assessments, but also waste management planning activities and other regulatory needs (e.g., National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) analyses). The comprehensive inventory contains information obtained via inventory updates and approved acceptable knowledge (AK) characterization information to ensure inventory data integrity is maintained and the inventory is current. The TRU waste inventory is maintained in the CID under configuration management as defined in the LANL-CO Quality Assurance Program. The CID was developed using Microsoft{sup TM} Access Data Project{sup TM} (ADP) technology with a Microsoft SQL Server{sup TM} back end. The CID is user friendly, contains more fields, provides for easy upload of data, and has the capability to generate fully qualified data reports. To go along with the new database, the LANL-CO Inventory Team has developed an improved data collection/screening process and has excellent communications with the TRU waste site personnel. WIPP has now received over 6,000 shipments, emplaced over 50,000 cubic meters of CH waste, and successfully completed one re-certification. With a new robust qualified database, the CID, to maintain the inventory information, the TRU waste inventory information is continuously improving in quality, accuracy, and usability (better). (authors)

  10. Construction and operation of replacement hazardous waste handling facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0423, for the construction and operation of a replacement hazardous waste handling facility (HWHF) and decontamination of the existing HWHF at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), Berkeley, California. The proposed facility would replace several older buildings and cargo containers currently being used for waste handling activities and consolidate the LBL`s existing waste handling activities in one location. The nature of the waste handling activities and the waste volume and characteristics would not change as a result of construction of the new facility. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 USC. 4321 et seq. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required.

  11. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Land Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To reflect the requirement of section 4 of the Wastes Isolation Pilot Plant Land Withdrawal Act (the Act) (Public Law 102-579), this land management plan has been written for the withdrawal area consistent with the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976. The objective of this document, per the Act, is to describe the plan for the use of the withdrawn land until the end of the decommissioning phase. The plan identifies resource values within the withdrawal area and promotes the concept of multiple-use management. The plan also provides opportunity for participation in the land use planning process by the public and local, State, and Federal agencies. Chapter 1, Introduction, provides the reader with the purpose of this land management plan as well as an overview of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Chapter 2, Affected Environment, is a brief description of the existing resources within the withdrawal area. Chapter 3, Management Objectives and Planned Actions, describes the land management objectives and actions taken to accomplish these objectives.

  12. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B Permit Application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 5, Chapter D, Appendix D1 (conclusion), Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reference design for the underground facilities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant was developed using the best criteria available at initiation of the detailed design effort. These design criteria are contained in the US Department of Energy document titled Design Criteria, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Revised Mission Concept-IIA (RMC-IIA), Rev. 4, dated February 1984. The validation process described in the Design Validation Final Report has resulted in validation of the reference design of the underground openings based on these criteria. Future changes may necessitate modification of the Design Criteria document and/or the reference design. Validation of the reference design as presented in this report permits the consideration of future design or design criteria modifications necessitated by these changes or by experience gained at the WIPP. Any future modifications to the design criteria and/or the reference design will be governed by a DOE Standard Operation Procedure (SOP) covering underground design changes. This procedure will explain the process to be followed in describing, evaluating and approving the change.

  13. Management activities for retrieved and newly generated transuranic waste, Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to assess the potential environmental impacts of the retrieval and processing of retrieved and newly generated transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste at the Savannah River Plant (SRP), including the transportation of the processes TRU waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. A new TRU Waste Facility (TWF) will be constructed at SRP to retrieve and process the SRP TRU waste in interim storage to meet WIPP criteria. This EA has been prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, and the requirements of the Council of Environmental Quality Regulations for implementing NEPA (40 CFR Parts 1500--1508). The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires the assessment of environmental consequences of all major federal actions that may affect the quality of the human environment. This document describes the environmental impact of constructing and operating the TWF facility for processing and shipment of the TRU waste to WIPP and considers alternatives to the proposed action. 40 refs., 12 figs., 12 tabs.

  14. Final environmental impact statement. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this document as environmental input to future decisions regarding the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which would include the disposal of transuranic waste, as currently authorized. The alternatives covered in this document are the following: (1) Continue storing transuranic (TRU) waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) as it is now or with improved confinement. (2) Proceed with WIPP at the Los Medanos site in southeastern New Mexico, as currently authorized. (3) Dispose of TRU waste in the first available repository for high-level waste. The Los Medanos site would be investigated for its potential suitability as a candidate site. This is administration policy and is the alternative preferred by the DOE. (4) Delay the WIPP to allow other candidate sites to be evaluated for TRU-waste disposal. This environmental impact statement is arranged in the following manner: Chapter 1 is an overall summary of the analysis contained in the document. Chapters 2 and 4 set forth the objectives of the national waste-management program and analyze the full spectrum of reasonable alternatives for meeting these objectives, including the WIPP. Chapter 5 presents the interim waste-acceptance criteria and waste-form alternatives for the WIPP. Chapters 6 through 13 provide a detailed description and environmental analysis of the WIPP repository and its site. Chapter 14 describes the permits and approvals necessary for the WIPP and the interactions that have taken place with Federal, State, and local authorities, and with the general public in connection with the repository. Chapter 15 analyzes the many comments received on the DEIS and tells what has been done in this FEIS in response. The appendices contain data and discussions in support of the material in the text.

  15. Public Policy Seminar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wassoff, Fran

    Recent policy response to family breakdown has been to emphasise the importance of maintained contact between children and absent parents. Since 1995, with the Children (Scotland) Act, parents have had a responsibility to maintain contact...

  16. Solid Waste Management (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act aims to establish and maintain a cooperative state and local program of planning and technical and financial assistance for comprehensive solid waste management. No person shall construct,...

  17. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B Permit Application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 4, Chapter D, Appendix D1 (beginning), Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which is designed for receipt, handling, storage, and permanent isolation of defense-generated transuranic wastes, is being excavated at a depth of approximately 655 m in bedded halites of the Permian Salado Formation of southeastern New Mexico. Site-characterization activities at the present WIPP site began in 1976. Full construction of the facility began in 1983, after completion of ``Site and Preliminary Design Validation`` (SPDV) activities and reporting. Site-characterization activities since 1983 have had the objectives of updating or refining the overall conceptual model of the geologic, hydrologic, and structural behavior of the WIPP site and providing data adequate for use in WIPP performance assessment. This report has four main objectives: 1. Summarize the results of WIPP site-characterization studies carried out since the spring of 1983 as a result of specific agreements between the US Department of Energy and the State of New Mexico. 2. Summarize the results and status of site-characterization and facility-characterization studies carried out since 1983, but not specifically included in mandated agreements. 3. Compile the results of WIPP site-characterization studies into an internally consistent conceptual model for the geologic, hydrologic, geochemical, and structural behavior of the WIPP site. This model includes some consideration of the effects of the WIPP facility and shafts on the local characteristics of the Salado and Rustler Formations. 4. Discuss the present limitations and/or uncertainties in the conceptual geologic model of the WIPP site and facility. The objectives of this report are limited in scope, and do not include determination of whether or not the WIPP Project will comply with repository-performance criteria developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (40CFR191).

  18. Implementation Guidance for the DOE Policy on Documentation and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    To further transparency and openness in its implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Department of Energy (DOE) has established a policy requiring each...

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - act provisions fisheries Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in USA fisheries and the role of policy in shaping management Summary: , Migratory Bird Treaty Act; MMPA, Marine Mammal Protection Act; MSA, Magnuson-Stevens (Fishery...

  20. Recent accomplishments in nuclear waste management and disposal - The Kenyan Situation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otwoma, D.; Oyoo, S.P. [Radiation Protection Board, Nairobi (Kenya)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is about the activities and experiences of the Radiation Protection Board in the recent past - from 1989 - in the management of radioactive wastes (RW). The Board`s functions are outlined in the Radiation Protection Act which was enacted to protect man and the environment from the harmful effects of ionizing radiation. The secretariat of the Board basically implement the policies of the Board. The interplay between the Board, RW producers and proposed RW managers is contained in this paper.

  1. Low-level radioactive waste regulation: Science, politics and fear

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, M.E. (ed.)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An inevitable consequence of the use of radioactive materials is the generation of radioactive wastes and the public policy debate over how they will be managed. In 1980, Congress shifted responsibility for the disposal of low-level radioactive wastes from the federal government to the states. This act represented a sharp departure from more than 30 years of virtually absolute federal control over radioactive materials. Though this plan had the enthusiastic support of the states in 1980, it now appears to have been at best a chimera. Radioactive waste management has become an increasingly complicated and controversial issue for society in recent years. This book discusses only low-level wastes, however, because Congress decided for political reasons to treat them differently than high-level wastes. The book is based in part on three symposia sponsored by the division of Chemistry and the Law of the American Chemical Society. Each chapter is derived in full or in part from presentations made at these meetings, and includes: (1) Low-level radioactive wastes in the nuclear power industry; (2) Low-level radiation cancer risk assessment and government regulation to protect public health; and (3) Low-level radioactive waste: can new disposal sites be found.

  2. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 3, Chapter C, Appendix C3 (conclusion)--Chapter C, Appendix C9: Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains appendices for the following: results of extraction procedure (EP) toxicity data analyses; summary of headspace gas analysis in Rocky Flats Plant sampling program-FY 1988; waste drum gas generation sampling program at Rocky Flats Plant during FY 1988; TRU waste sampling program waste characterization; summary of headspace gas analyses in TRU waste sampling program; summary of volatile organic compounds analyses in TRU waste sampling program; totals analysis versus toxicity characteristic leaching procedure; Waste Isolation Pilot Plant waste characterization sampling and analysis methods; Waste Isolation Pilot Plant waste characterization analytical methods; data reduction, validation and reporting; examples of waste screening checklists; and Waste Isolation Pilot Plant generator/storage site waste screening and acceptance audit program.

  3. Recovery Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recovery Act and Energy Department programs were designed to stimulate the economy while creating new power sources, conserving resources and aligning the nation to once again lead the global energy economy.

  4. act nepa characterization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    was amended by the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Land Withdrawal Act. Katherine Biggs, Associate Director, NEPA Compliance Division, Office of Federal Activities. FR Doc....

  5. Steelmaker Matches Recovery Act Funds to Save Energy & Reduce...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and installed with DOE Recovery Act Funding. Blast Furnace Gas Recovery Boiler Provides Steam and Power at Steel Mill More Documents & Publications Capturing Waste Gas: Saves...

  6. Radioactive Waste Radioactive Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    #12;Radioactive Waste at UF Bldg 831 392-8400 #12;Radioactive Waste · Program is designed to;Radioactive Waste · Program requires · Generator support · Proper segregation · Packaging · labeling #12;Radioactive Waste · What is radioactive waste? · Anything that · Contains · or is contaminated

  7. Price regulation for waste hauling franchises in California: an examination of how regulators regulate pricing and the effects of competition on regulated markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seltzer, Steven A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Residential Municipal Solid Waste. Journal of PolicyA Cost Analysis of Municipal Solid Waste Services. Landand Dean Schreiner. Solid Waste Management for Rural Areas:

  8. PUBLIC INTEREST DISCLOSURE (PID) POLICY AND PROCEDURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    i PUBLIC INTEREST DISCLOSURE (PID) POLICY AND PROCEDURES #12;PUBLIC INTEREST DISCLOSURE POLICY a disclosure under the PID Act 7 5.2. How to make a disclosure under the PID Act 7 6. PROCEDURES FOR AUTHORISED OFFICERS 9 7.1. Authorised Officer must provide information about the PID Act 9 7.2. Receiving

  9. Initial performance assessment of the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste stored at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 2: Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rechard, R.P. [ed.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This performance assessment characterized plausible treatment options conceived by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for its spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste and then modeled the performance of the resulting waste forms in two hypothetical, deep, geologic repositories: one in bedded salt and the other in granite. The results of the performance assessment are intended to help guide INEL in its study of how to prepare wastes and spent fuel for eventual permanent disposal. This assessment was part of the Waste Management Technology Development Program designed to help the US Department of Energy develop and demonstrate the capability to dispose of its nuclear waste, as mandated by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. The waste forms comprised about 700 metric tons of initial heavy metal (or equivalent units) stored at the INEL: graphite spent fuel, experimental low enriched and highly enriched spent fuel, and high-level waste generated during reprocessing of some spent fuel. Five different waste treatment options were studied; in the analysis, the options and resulting waste forms were analyzed separately and in combination as five waste disposal groups. When the waste forms were studied in combination, the repository was assumed to also contain vitrified high-level waste from three DOE sites for a common basis of comparison and to simulate the impact of the INEL waste forms on a moderate-sized repository, The performance of the waste form was assessed within the context of a whole disposal system, using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes, 40 CFR 191, promulgated in 1985. Though the waste form behavior depended upon the repository type, all current and proposed waste forms provided acceptable behavior in the salt and granite repositories.

  10. DOE/WIPP-12-3487 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AND RECOVERY ACT AND SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL ACTDraft DOE/WIPP-12-3487 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Biennial Environmental Compliance Report United States Department of Energy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Carlsbad Field Office Carlsbad, New Mexico

  11. Minnesota Power Plant Siting Act (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act regulates the siting of large electric power generating plants, which are defined as plants designed for or capable of operating with a capacity of 50,000 kW or more. The policy of the...

  12. 1994 annual report on low-level radioactive waste management progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report for calendar year 1994 summarizes the progress that states and compact regions made during the year in establishing new low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. Although events that have occurred in 1995 greatly alter the perspective in terms of storage versus disposal, the purpose of this report is to convey the concerns as evidenced during calendar year 1994. Significant developments occurring in 1995 are briefly outlined in the transmittal letter and will be detailed in the report for calendar year 1995. The report also provides summary information on the volume of low-level radioactive waste received for disposal in 1994 by commercially operated low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities, and is prepared is in response to Section 7(b) of Title I of Public Law 99-240, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985.

  13. Bubblers Speed Nuclear Waste Processing at SRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site, American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding has supported installation of bubbler technology and related enhancements in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The improvements will accelerate the processing of radioactive waste into a safe, stable form for storage and permit expedited closure of underground waste tanks holding 37 million gallons of liquid nuclear waste.

  14. Bubblers Speed Nuclear Waste Processing at SRS

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site, American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding has supported installation of bubbler technology and related enhancements in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The improvements will accelerate the processing of radioactive waste into a safe, stable form for storage and permit expedited closure of underground waste tanks holding 37 million gallons of liquid nuclear waste.

  15. Low Level Radioactive Waste Authority (Michigan)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal laws passed in 1980 and 1985 made each state responsible for the low-level radioactive waste produced within its borders. Act 204 of 1987 created the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Authority ...

  16. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2005 Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

    2006-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide information needed by the DOE to assess WIPP's environmental performance and to make WIPP environmental information available to stakeholders and members of the public. This report has been prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A and DOE guidance. This report documents WIPP's environmental monitoring programs and their results for 2004. The WIPP Project is authorized by the DOE National Security and Military Applications of Nuclear Energy Authorization Act of 1980 (Pub. L. 96-164). After more than 20 years of scientific study and public input, WIPP received its first shipment of waste on March 26, 1999. Located in southeastern New Mexico, WIPP is the nation's first underground repository permitted to safely and permanently dispose of TRU radioactive and mixed waste (as defined in the WIPP LWA) generated through defense activities and programs. TRU waste is defined, in the WIPP LWA, as radioactive waste containing more than 100 nanocuries (3,700 becquerels [Bq]) of alpha-emitting TRU isotopes per gram of waste, with half-lives greater than 20 years except for high-level waste, waste that has been determined not to require the degree of isolation required by the disposal regulations, and waste the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has approved for disposal. Most TRU waste is contaminated industrial trash, such as rags and old tools; sludges from solidified liquids; glass; metal; and other materials from dismantled buildings. TRU waste is eligible for disposal at WIPP if it has been generated in whole or in part by one or more of the activities listed in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (42 United States Code [U.S.C.] 10101, et seq.), including naval reactors development, weapons activities, verification and control technology, defense nuclear materials production, defense nuclear waste and materials by-products management,defense nuclear materials security and safeguards and security investigations, and defense research and development. The waste must also meet the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria. When TRU waste arrives at WIPP, it is transported into the Waste Handling Building. The waste containers are removed from the shipping containers, placed on the waste hoist, and lowered to the repository level of 655 m (2,150 ft; approximately 0.5 mi) below the surface. Next, the containers of waste are removed from the hoist and placed in excavated disposal rooms in the Salado Formation, a thick sequence of evaporite beds deposited approximately 250 million years ago (Figure 1.1). After each panel of seven rooms has been filled with waste, specially designed closures are emplaced. When all of WIPP's panels have been filled, at the conclusion of WIPP operations, seals will be placed in the shafts. One of the main attributes of salt, as a rock formation in which to isolate radioactive waste, is the ability of the salt to creep, that is, to deform continuously over time. Excavations into which the waste-filled drums are placed will close eventually, flowing around the drums and sealing them within the formation.

  17. Economic impact analysis for proposed emission standards and guidelines for municipal waste combustors: A description of the basis for, and impacts of, proposed revisions to air pollutant emission regulations for new and existing municipal waste combustors under Clean Air Act Sections 111(b), 111(d), and 129. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jellicorse, B.L.; Dempsey, J.L.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EPA is proposing revised and expanded air pollutant emission standards for new, and guidelines for existing, municipal waste combustors (MWCs), pursuant to Sections 111(b), 111(d), and 129 of the Clean Air Act of 1990. The regulations will replace or supplement those promulgated by EPA on February 11, 1991. The standards and guidelines will apply to MWCs with a capacity to combust 35 or more Mg of municipal solid waste per day. The pollutants to be regulated are particulate matter (total and fine), opacity, sulfur dioxide, hydrogen chloride, oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, lead, cadmium mercury, and dibenzofurans and dioxins. The report describes the standards and guidelines, their potential economic impacts, and related matters. EPA estimates the national annual cost of the standards in 1994 will be $44 million, plus the cost of the 1991 standards, $157 million, for a total of $201 million. EPA estimates the equivalent cost of the guidelines at $280 million plus $168 million for a total of $448 million.

  18. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2003 Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

    2005-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide information needed by the DOE to assess WIPP's environmental performance and to convey that performance to stakeholders and members of the public. This report has been prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A and DOE guidance. This report documents WIPP's environmental monitoring programs and their results for 2003. The WIPP Project is authorized by the DOE National Security and Military Applications of Nuclear Energy Authorization Act of 1980 (Pub. L. 96-164). After more than 20 years of scientific study and public input, WIPP received its first shipment of waste on March 26, 1999. Located in southeastern New Mexico, WIPP is the nation's first underground repository permitted to safely and permanently dispose of TRU radioactive and mixed waste (as defined in the WIPP LWA) generated through the research and production of nuclear weapons and other activities related to the national defense of the United States. TRU waste is defined in the WIPP LWA as radioactive waste containing more than 100 nanocuries (3,700 becquerels [Bq]) of alpha-emitting transuranic isotopes per gram of waste, with half-lives greater than 20 years. Exceptions are noted as high-level waste, waste that has been determined not to require the degree of isolation required by the disposal regulations, and waste the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has approved for disposal. Most TRU waste is contaminated industrial trash, such as rags and old tools, and sludges from solidified liquids; glass; metal; and other materials from dismantled buildings. A TRU waste is eligible for disposal at WIPP if it has been generated in whole or in partby one or more of the activities listed in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (42 United States Code [U.S.C.] 10101, et seq.), including naval reactors development, weapons activities, verification and control technology, defense nuclear materials production, defense nuclear waste and materials by-products management, defense nuclear materials security and safeguards and security investigations, and defense research and development. The waste must also meet the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria. When TRU waste arrives at WIPP, it is transported into the Waste Handling Building. The waste containers are removed from the shipping containers, placed on the waste hoist, and lowered to the repository level of 655 m (2,150 ft; approximately 0.5 mi) below the surface. Next, the containers of waste are removed from the hoist and placed in excavated storage rooms in the Salado Formation, a thick sequence of evaporite beds deposited approximately 250 million years ago (Figure 1.1). After each panel has been filled with waste, specially designed closures are emplaced. When all of WIPP's panels have been filled, at the conclusion of WIPP operations, seals will be placed in the shafts. Salt under pressure is relatively plastic, and mine openings will be allowed to creep closed for final disposal, encapsulating and isolating the waste.

  19. Civilian radioactive waste management program plan. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This revision of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Plan describes the objectives of the Civilian Radioactive Waste management Program (Program) as prescribed by legislative mandate, and the technical achievements, schedule, and costs planned to complete these objectives. The Plan provides Program participants and stakeholders with an updated description of Program activities and milestones for fiscal years (FY) 1998 to 2003. It describes the steps the Program will undertake to provide a viability assessment of the Yucca Mountain site in 1998; prepare the Secretary of Energy`s site recommendation to the President in 2001, if the site is found to be suitable for development as a repository; and submit a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in 2002 for authorization to construct a repository. The Program`s ultimate challenge is to provide adequate assurance to society that an operating geologic repository at a specific site meets the required standards of safety. Chapter 1 describes the Program`s mission and vision, and summarizes the Program`s broad strategic objectives. Chapter 2 describes the Program`s approach to transform strategic objectives, strategies, and success measures to specific Program activities and milestones. Chapter 3 describes the activities and milestones currently projected by the Program for the next five years for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project; the Waste Acceptance, Storage and Transportation Project; ad the Program Management Center. The appendices present information on the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended, and the Energy Policy Act of 1992; the history of the Program; the Program`s organization chart; the Commission`s regulations, Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Wastes in geologic Repositories; and a glossary of terms.

  20. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorically Excluded...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    on Roads Used to Access Groundwater Monitoring Wells South of the Tuba City, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) Title I Ste 05282013 B1.3 LM 01-13 Current...

  1. The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Reviewwill help prepare local studentsEJ/EK EN V National

  2. National Environmental Policy Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWende New Energy CoFirst Second Power Equipment CoEnvironmental

  3. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Process

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of the Yucca0Administration Names15-16 | National

  4. Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 2005

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program -Department oftoThese Web sitesEERECommercial Buildings |Department

  5. Farmland Protection Policy Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6 NoSan Leandro,LawFEMAProject Jump to:2

  6. WIPP Documents - National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies | Blandine Jerome VelenciaNewsNewsFederal Regulations

  7. Partnerships for technology introduction -- Putting the technologies of tomorrow into the marketplace of today. Report to Congress on Sections 127 and 128 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report to Congress was prepared on behalf of the Secretary of the US Department of Energy (DOE) in response to Sections 127 and 128 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), Pub. L. 102-486. In preparing the report to the Congress, DOE has assessed the national and regional energy savings potential of products already on the market and those that will be available to consumers by the late 1990s. The Department has also examined the present cost-effectiveness of these emerging appliances as mature technologies. To help in its assessment, DOE organized eight workshops at which representatives from manufacturing and building industries, utilities, retailers and wholesalers, public interest groups and Federal and state government agencies could express their views. The information derived from these workshops was key to the formulation of the report`s general and specific recommendations. DOE has concluded that the Federal Government can effectively stimulate the market for emerging technologies by forming partnerships with the appliance industry and other interested parties promoting the use of highly efficient appliances. Based on the interaction with industry at the eight workshops and through direct contact, DOE has concluded that Federal action and technical assistance is not only desired by industry, but crucial to the expansion of these markets. Section 128 of EPAct requires an assessment of the energy savings and environmental benefits of replacing older, less efficient appliances with more efficient products than currently required by Federal law. Since early replacement of appliances is but one possible market-stimulating action, DOE has elected to include its discussion as part of the overall report to the Congress.

  8. Mixed waste characterization, treatment & disposal focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (referred to as the Mixed Waste Focus Area or MWFA) is to provide treatment systems capable of treating DOE`s mixed waste in partnership with users, and with continual participation of stakeholders, tribal governments, and regulators. The MWFA deals with the problem of eliminating mixed waste from current and future storage in the DOE complex. Mixed waste is waste that contains both hazardous chemical components, subject to the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and radioactive components, subject to the requirements of the Atomic Energy Act. The radioactive components include transuranic (TRU) and low-level waste (LLW). TRU waste primarily comes from the reprocessing of spent fuel and the use of plutonium in the fabrication of nuclear weapons. LLW includes radioactive waste other than uranium mill tailings, TRU, and high-level waste, including spent fuel.

  9. DOE/LX/07-0096 Secondary Document DMSA C-337-45 Solid Waste Management...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aerosol can, a tube of gasket adhesive, container of roof cement, drum of gloves and boots, batteries, and waste oil. The Toxic Substances Control Act waste formerly stored...

  10. A mathematical model to predict leaching of hazardous inorganic wastes from solidified/stabilized waste forms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabharwal, Krishan

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Reauthorization Act (SARA). The other important law dealing with hazardous wastes is the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), enacted in 1976 and significantly amended by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984, RCRA provides "cradle... in 1980 to provide funding and enforcement authority to the EPA for cleaning up the numerous hazardous waste sites existing in the United States. In 1986, the act was made more comprehensive with the addition of the Superfund Amendments...

  11. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan is to compile and to consolidate information annually on how the ORNL Waste Management Program is conducted, which waste management facilities are being used to manage wastes, what forces are acting to change current waste management systems, what activities are planned for the forthcoming fiscal year (FY), and how all of the activities are documented.

  12. On Going TRU Waste Disposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ongoing effort to contain dangerous, radioactive TRU waste. Under the Recovery Act, the Savannah River Site is able to safely test and transport these items to WIPP in Carlsbad, New Mexico.

  13. WIPP WASTE MINIMIZATION PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carlsbad, New Mexico 8822 1 NOV 2 3 2011 Mr. John Kieling , Acting Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environme nt Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1...

  14. On Going TRU Waste Disposition

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The ongoing effort to contain dangerous, radioactive TRU waste. Under the Recovery Act, the Savannah River Site is able to safely test and transport these items to WIPP in Carlsbad, New Mexico.

  15. DOE Secretarial Policy Statement on the National Environmental Policy Act |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Deliciouscritical_materials_workshop_presentations.pdf MoreProgramof EnergyDepartment of

  16. THE ENVIRONMENT Green Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steiner, Ullrich

    energy in 2013, compared with that used in 2010 reducing per capita water consumption by 10% by 2012 and responsibly disposing of non-recyclable waste (eg under the WEEE regulations) reducing the per capita policies and practices in all areas of its activities minimise the consumption of carbon-rich energy

  17. Federal Tax Policy Towards Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metcalf, Gilbert E.

    On Aug. 8, 2005, President Bush signed the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (PL 109-58). This was the first major piece of energy legislation enacted since 1992 following five years of Congressional efforts to pass energy ...

  18. Administration Policy Complete Policy Title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haykin, Simon

    Administration Policy Complete Policy Title: McMaster University Alcohol Policy Policy Number, 1998 Supersedes/Amends Policy dated: May 11, 1998 Responsible Executive: Vice-President (Administration policy and the written copy held by the policy owner, the written copy prevails. INTRODUCTION Mc

  19. Radiation Protection Act (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act combines the radiation safety provisions of The Atomic Energy Development and Radiation Control Act and the Environmental Radiation Protection Act, and empowers the Department of...

  20. The Dermatology Acting Internship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, John B; Raimer, Sharon S; Jr, Richard F Wagner

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    our experience with an acting internship in dermatology, weevolving role of the acting internship in the medical SchoolThe Dermatology Acting Internship John B Stephens MD, Sharon

  1. Federal Facilities Compliance Act, Conceptual Site Treatment Plan. Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This Conceptual Site Treatment Plan was prepared by Ames Laboratory to meet the requirements of the Federal Facilities Compliance Act. Topics discussed in this document include: general discussion of the plan, including the purpose and scope; technical aspects of preparing plans, including the rationale behind the treatability groupings and a discussion of characterization issues; treatment technology needs and treatment options for specific waste streams; low-level mixed waste options; TRU waste options; and future waste generation from restoration activities.

  2. Politics and promises of nuclear waste disposal: the view from Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, R.H.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE`s betrayal of the principles and standards of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) has distorted the agency`s repository-siting decisions. Leadership is needed to make midcourse corrections and to return to the promise of state-federal cooperation on which the act was built. NWPA managed to incorporate the interests of diverse factions into a decision-making process that was viewed as an equitable and workable solution to the nation`s nuclear waste disposal dilemma. The House of Representatives subcommittees report documents conclusively a substantial and pervasive bias in favor of the selection of sites at Yucca Mountain and Hanford and a politization of the siting process.

  3. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B permit application [of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 11, Chapter D, Appendix D4--Chapter D, Appendix D17: Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains appendices D4 through D17 which cover the following: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site environmental report; ecological monitoring program at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant; site characterization; regional and site geology and hydrology; general geology; dissolution features; ground water hydrology; typical carbon sorption bed efficiency; VOC monitoring plan for bin-room tests; chemical compatibility analysis of waste forms and container materials; probable maximum precipitation; WHIP supplementary roof support system room 1, panel 1; and corrosion risk assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant ``humid`` test bins.

  4. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains highlights from the 1991 fall meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics included legal updates; US NRC updates; US EPA updates; mixed waste issues; financial assistance for waste disposal facilities; and a legislative and policy report.

  5. Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania)

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 ClimateSpurr GeothermalCarmelAlum| Open Energy Information

  6. Policy Flash 2014-35 Rescission of American Recovery and Reinvestment...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    4-35 Rescission of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Reporting Requirements. Policy Flash 2014-35 Rescission of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Reporting Requirements....

  7. Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance, Staff Directory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance, Staff Directory including phone number and areas of responsibility for the Energy and Waste Management Unit, Western Energy and Waste Management Unit, and the...

  8. Oak Ridge Reservation Waste Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, J.W. [ed.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the waste management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation facilities. The primary purpose is to convey what facilities are being used to manage wastes, what forces are acting to change current waste management systems, and what plans are in store for the coming fiscal year.

  9. POLICY: A:VPFA # / Purchasing Policy PROCEDURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jeff

    POLICY: A:VPFA # / Purchasing Policy PROCEDURES: APPENDIX: Approved: April 1, 2013 Revised: Cross References: Purchasing Policy Capital Projects and Renovations Policy Conflict of Interest Policy Sustainability Policy Green Procurement Policy 1 of 9 PROCEDURES: Purchasing Policy AUTHORITY: University

  10. Administration Policy Complete Policy Title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    Administration Policy Complete Policy Title: Engagement of Independent Contractors Policy Number of Original Approval: Supersedes/Amends Policy dated: Payments to Individuals (Independent Contractors) versus between this electronic policy and the written copy held by the policy owner, the written copy prevails

  11. A comparison of public policies for lead recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sigman, Hilary

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Policies that encourage recycling may be used to reduce environmental costs from waste disposal when direct restrictions on disposal are difficult to enforce. Four recycling policies have been advanced: (i) taxes on the ...

  12. Policy No.: Approval Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ollivier-Gooch, Carl

    the environment. 1.4. The Manager, Environmental Programs and the UBC Okanagan HSE Officer, both reporting through. General 1.1. UBC will act responsibly and demonstrate accountable management of the property and affairs management system consistent with the purpose of this policy and with the goal of continual improvement. 1

  13. Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and Privacy Act Requests |...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and Privacy Act Requests Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and Privacy Act Requests FOIA and Privacy Act Requests FOIA Requests FOIA information...

  14. Cement encapsulation of intermediate-level waste slurries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, H.G.; Cassidy, C.M. [British Nuclear Fuels plc, Risley (United Kingdom)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel at BNFL`s Sellafield site produces a range of radioactive wastes. BNFL has adopted a detailed policy for radioactive waste management in order that: effluent discharges to the environment are minimized, solid low-level waste is safely disposed of as it arises, and all other wastes are stored, conditioned and treated for eventual disposal.

  15. Providing Innovative Waste Management Disposition for the DOE...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Trains for Waste Shipments to Yucca Mountain." Under this policy DOE will use dedicated train service - train service dedicated to one Commodity - for its rail transport of spent...

  16. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B Permit Application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 6, Chapter D, Appendices D4--D13: Revision 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report (Vol. 6) for the WIPP facility contains appendices on the following information: Site characterization; general geology; ecological monitoring; and chemical compatibility of waste forms and container materials.

  17. Scientific Solutions to Nuclear Waste Environmental Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Bradley R.

    2014-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hidden Cost of Nuclear Weapons The Cold War arms race drove an intense plutonium production program in the U.S. This campaign produced approximately 100 tons of plutonium over 40 years. The epicenter of plutonium production in the United States was the Hanford site, a 586 square mile reservation owned by the Department of Energy and located on the Colombia River in Southeastern Washington. Plutonium synthesis relied on nuclear reactors to convert uranium to plutonium within the reactor fuel rods. After a sufficient amount of conversion occurred, the rods were removed from the reactor and allowed to cool. They were then dissolved in an acid bath and chemically processed to separate and purify plutonium from the rest of the constituents in the used reactor fuel. The acidic waste was then neutralized using sodium hydroxide and the resulting mixture of liquids and precipitates (small insoluble particles) was stored in huge underground waste tanks. The byproducts of the U.S. plutonium production campaign include over 53 million gallons of high-level radioactive waste stored in 177 large underground tanks at Hanford and another 34 million gallons stored at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. This legacy nuclear waste represents one of the largest environmental clean-up challenges facing the world today. The nuclear waste in the Hanford tanks is a mixture of liquids and precipitates that have settled into sludge. Some of these tanks are now over 60 years old and a small number of them are leaking radioactive waste into the ground and contaminating the environment. The solution to this nuclear waste challenge is to convert the mixture of solids and liquids into a durable material that won't disperse into the environment and create hazards to the biosphere. What makes this difficult is the fact that the radioactive half-lives of some of the radionuclides in the waste are thousands to millions of years long. (The half-life of a radioactive substance is the amount of time it takes for one-half of the material to undergo radioactive decay.) In general, the ideal material would need to be durable for approximately 10 half-lives to allow the activity to decay to negligible levels. However, the potential health effects of each radionuclide vary depending on what type of radiation is emitted, the energy of that emission, and the susceptibility for the human body to accumulate and concentrate that particular element. Consequently, actual standards tend to be based on limiting the dose (energy deposited per unit mass) that is introduced into the environment. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has the responsibility to establish standards for nuclear waste disposal to protect the health and safety of the public. For example, the Energy Policy Act of 1992 directed the EPA to establish radiation protection standards for the Yucca Mountain geologic repository for nuclear wastes. The standards for Yucca Mountain were promulgated in 2008, and limit the dose to 15 millirem per year for the first 10,000 years, and 100 milirem per year between 10,000 years and 1 million years (40 CFR Part 197; http://www.epa.gov/radiation/yucca/2008factsheet.html). So, the challenge is two-fold: (1) develop a material (a waste form) that is capable of immobilizing the waste over geologic time scales, and (2) develop a process to convert the radioactive sludge in the tanks into this durable waste form material. Glass: Hard, durable, inert, and with infinite chemical versatility Molten glass is a powerful solvent liquid, which can be designed to dissolve almost anything. When solidified, it can be one of the most chemically inert substances known to man. Nature's most famous analogue to glass is obsidian, a vitreous product of volcanic activity; formations over 17 million years old have been found. Archaeologists have found man-made glass specimens that are five thousand years old.

  18. Massachusetts Oil and Hazardous Material Release Prevention and Response Act, State Superfund Law (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act contains information on prevention strategies for hazardous material release, permits for facilities managing hazardous waste, and response tactics and liability in the event such release...

  19. Strategic moves: Where can you put your waste?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbasi, R.A.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Corrective Action Management Unit/Treatment Unit (CAMU/TU) rule allows effective remediation by providing less stringent regulations for various types of waste management activities under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) corrective action process. At the same time, the rule includes important restrictions to protect public health and the environment. It should be noted that other existing requirements, policies and guidelines for site-specific remediation goals remain in effect for sites subject to RCRA corrective action. The primary impact of this rule is the ability to place, and subsequently treat waste from an on-site area in a designated CAMU, without necessitating compliance with land disposal restrictions (LDRs) and minimum technology requirements (MTRs). It also allows for existing closed and/or closing RCRA regulated land-based units such as surface impoundments, wastepiles or landfills to be designated as CAMUs, in order to enhance the management of remediation waste. The TU rule allows TUs to be used for short term treatment in the management of remediation wastes. The criteria used must be protective of public health and the environment. In a majority of cases, however, when a TU is designated it is already operating under RCRA requirements, so modification to the standards is not necessarily required.

  20. Trade Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashford, Nicholas A.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an otherwise insightful and thoughtful article, Sebastian Pfotenhauer (Trade Policy Is Science Policy, Issues, Fall 2013) might better have entitled his contribution Trade Policy Needs to Be Reconciled with Science ...

  1. EQUAL OPPORTUNITIES POLICY POLICY STATEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EQUAL OPPORTUNITIES POLICY POLICY STATEMENT Imperial College London is committed to a policy Resources (HR) has overall responsibility for the formulation, implementation and monitoring of the policy that this policy is effective by: · advising the College's senior management, other appropriate members of staff

  2. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Sodium Bearing Waste - Waste Incidental to Reprocessing Determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, Victor Levon

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management, Section I.1.C, requires that all radioactive waste subject to Department of Energy Order 435.1 be managed as high-level radioactive waste, transuranic waste, or low-level radioactive waste. Determining the radiological classification of the sodium-bearing waste currently in the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Tank Farm Facility inventory is important to its proper treatment and disposition. This report presents the technical basis for making the determination that the sodium-bearing waste is waste incidental to spent fuel reprocessing and should be managed as mixed transuranic waste. This report focuses on the radiological characteristics of the sodiumbearing waste. The report does not address characterization of the nonradiological, hazardous constituents of the waste in accordance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requirements.

  3. Security Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Security Policy analyzes, develops and interprets safeguards and security policy governing national security functions and the protection of related critical assets entrusted to the...

  4. DOE Media Advisory- DOE extends public comment period on Draft Environmental Assessment for Replacement Capability for Disposal of Remote-Handled Low-Level Radioactive Waste Generated at the U.S. Department of Energys Idaho Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In response to requests from people interested in National Environmental Policy Act activities occurring at the U.S. Department of Energys Idaho Operations Office, the department has extended the public comment period that began September 1 on the Draft Environmental Assessment for Replacement Capability for Disposal of Remote-Handled Low-Level Radioactive Waste Generated at the U.S. Department of Energys Idaho Site.

  5. PLUTONIUM/HIGH-LEVEL VITRIFIED WASTE BDBE DOSE CALCULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.C. Richardson

    2003-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, Yucca Mountain was designated as the site to be investigated as a potential repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The Yucca Mountain site is an undeveloped area located on the southwestern edge of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), about 100 miles northwest of Las Vegas. The site currently lacks rail service or an existing right-of-way. If the Yucca Mountain site is found suitable for the repository, rail service is desirable to the Office of Civilian Waste Management (OCRWM) Program because of the potential of rail transportation to reduce costs and to reduce the number of shipments relative to highway transportation. A Preliminary Rail Access Study evaluated 13 potential rail spur options. Alternative routes within the major options were also developed. Each of these options was then evaluated for potential land use conflicts and access to regional rail carriers. Three potential routes having few land use conflicts and having access to regional carriers were recommended for further investigation. Figure 1-1 shows these three routes. The Jean route is estimated to be about 120 miles long, the Carlin route to be about 365 miles long, and Caliente route to be about 365 miles long. The remaining ten routes continue to be monitored and should any of the present conflicts change, a re-evaluation of that route will be made. Complete details of the evaluation of the 13 routes can be found in the previous study. The DOE has not identified any preferred route and recognizes that the transportation issues need a full and open treatment under the National Environmental Policy Act. The issue of transportation will be included in public hearings to support development of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) proceedings for either the Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility or the Yucca Mountain Project or both.

  6. Water Management Act (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act regulates and registers water withdrawals in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to enable effective planning and management of water use and conservation. The Act establishes a Water...

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - act sepa environmental Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mathematics, Ohio State University Collection: Mathematics 3 Addressing Climate Change in Environmental Impact Analysis Summary: Environmental Policy Act Applicable to many...

  8. Florida Air and Water Pollution Control Act (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the policy of the state of Florida to protect, maintain, and improve the quality of the air and waters of the state. This Act authorizes the Department of Environmental Protection to enact...

  9. Policy Flash 2013-28 Implementation of Indian Energy Preference...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Indian Energy Preference Provision in EP Act 2005 and Acquisition Letter 2013-02 Policy Flash 2013-28 Implementation of Indian Energy Preference Provision in EP Act 2005 and...

  10. Guidance for State Energy Program Recipients on Policy and Procedures...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for State Energy Program Recipients on Policy and Procedures Pursuant to the Closeout of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Grants Guidance for State Energy Program Recipients...

  11. Federal Facilities Compliance Act, Draft Site Treatment Plan: Background Volume, Part 2, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Draft Site Treatment Plan was prepared by Ames Laboratory to meet the requirements of the Federal Facilities Compliance Act. Topics discussed include: purpose and scope of the plan; site history and mission; draft plant organization; waste minimization; waste characterization; preferred option selection process; technology for treating low-level radioactive wastes and TRU wastes; future generation of mixed waste streams; funding; and process for evaluating disposal issues in support of the site treatment plan.

  12. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides highlights from the 1992 fall meeting of the Low LEvel Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics included: disposal options after 1992; interregional agreements; management alternatives; policy; and storage.

  13. Essays in monetary policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakdawala, Aeimit Kirti

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monetary Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.11.2.3 Optimal Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Monetary policy shocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  14. Report on waste burial charges. Escalation of decommissioning waste disposal costs at low-level waste burial facilities, Revision 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the requirements placed upon nuclear power reactor licensees by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is for the licensees to periodically adjust the estimate of the cost of decommissioning their plants, in dollars of the current year, as part of the process to provide reasonable assurance that adequate funds for decommissioning will be available when needed. This report, which is scheduled to be revised periodically, contains the development of a formula for escalating decommissioning cost estimates that is acceptable to the NRC. The sources of information to be used in the escalation formula are identified, and the values developed for the escalation of radioactive waste burial costs, by site and by year, are given. The licensees may use the formula, the coefficients, and the burial escalation factors from this report in their escalation analyses, or they may use an escalation rate at least equal to the escalation approach presented herein. This fourth revision of NUREG-1307 contains revised spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference PWR and the reference BWR and the ratios of disposal costs at the Washington, Nevada, and South Carolina sites for the years 1986, 1988, 1991 and 1993, superseding the values given in the May 1993 issue of this report. Burial cost surcharges mandated by the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (LLRWPAA) have been incorporated into the revised ratio tables for those years. In addition, spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference reactors and ratios of disposal costs at the two remaining burial sites in Washington and South Carolina for the year 1994 are provided. These latter results do not include any LLRWPAA surcharges, since those provisions of the Act expired at the end of 1992. An example calculation for escalated disposal cost is presented, demonstrating the use of the data contained in this report.

  15. Report on waste burial charges: Escalation of decommissioning waste disposal costs at Low-Level Waste Burial facilities. Revision 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the requirements placed upon nuclear power reactor licensees by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is for the licensees to periodically adjust the estimate of the cost of decommissioning their plants, in dollars of the current year, as part of the process to provide reasonable assurance that adequate funds for decommissioning will be available when needed. This report, which is scheduled to be revised periodically, contains the development of a formula for escalating decommissioning cost estimates that is acceptable to the NRC. The sources of information to be used in the escalation formula are identified, and the values developed for the escalation of radioactive waste burial costs, by site and by year, are given. The licensees may use the formula, the coefficients, and the burial escalation factors from this report in their escalation analyses, or they may use an escalation rate at least equal to the escalation approach presented herein. This fifth revision of NUREG-1307 contains revised spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference PWR and the reference BWR and the ratios of disposal costs at the Washington, Nevada, and South Carolina sites for the years 1986, 1988, 1991, 1993, and 1994, superseding the values given in the June 1994 issue of this report. Burial cost surcharges mandated by the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (LLRWPAA) have been incorporated into the revised ratio tables for those years. In addition, spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference reactors and ratios of disposal costs at the two remaining burial sites in Washington and South Carolina for the year 1995 are provided. These latter results do not include any LLRWPAA surcharges, since those provisions of the Act expired at the end of 1992. An example calculation for escalated disposal cost is presented, demonstrating the use of the data contained in this report.

  16. Policies, Procedures and Guidelines Complete Policy Title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haykin, Simon

    processes to promote development and operation of sustainable buildings. #12;Policies, Procedures and Guidelines Complete Policy Title: Sustainable Building Policy Policy this electronic policy and the written copy held by the policy owner, the written copy prevails. Sustainable

  17. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2, Part B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two types of projects in the spent nuclear fuel and environmental restoration and waste management activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are described. These are: foreseeable proposed projects where some funding for preliminary planning and/or conceptual design may already be authorized, but detailed design or planning will not begin until the Department of Energy (DOE) has determined that the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act process for the project have been completed; planned or ongoing projects not yet completed but whose National Environmental Policy Act documentation is already completed or is expected to be completed before the Record of Decision for this Envirorunental Impact Statement (EIS) is issued. The section on project summaries describe the projects (both foreseeable proposed and ongoing).They provide specific information necessary to analyze the environmental impacts of these projects. Chapter 3 describes which alternative(s) each project supports. Summaries are included for (a) spent nuclear fuel projects, (b) environmental remediation projects, (c) the decontamination and decommissioning of surplus INEL facilities, (d) the construction, upgrade, or replacement of existing waste management facilities, (e) infrastructure projects supporting waste management activities, and (f) research and development projects supporting waste management activities.

  18. Privacy Act of 1974; Publication of Compilation of Privacy Act...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Privacy Act of 1974; Publication of Compilation of Privacy Act Systems of Records Privacy Act of 1974; Publication of Compilation of Privacy Act Systems of Records Privacy Act of...

  19. Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    waste (i.e, mixture of biohazardous and chemical or radioactive waste), call Environment, Health2/2009 Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 200 West Arbor Dr. San Diego, CA 92103 (619

  20. Non-Thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-Level Mixed Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE proposes to transport contact-handled LLMW from the Hanford Site to the Allied Technology Group (ATG) Mixed Waste Facility (MWF) in Richland, Washington, for non-thermal treatment and to return the treated waste to the Hanford Site for eventual land disposal. Over a 3-year period the waste would be staged to the ATG MWF, and treated waste would be returned to the Hanford Site. The ATG MWF would be located on an 18 hectare (ha) (45 acre [at]) ATG Site adjacent to ATG's licensed low-level waste processing facility at 2025 Battelle Boulevard. The ATG MWF is located approximately 0.8 kilometers (km) (0.5 miles [mi]) south of Horn Rapids Road and 1.6 km (1 mi) west of Stevens Drive. The property is located within the Horn Rapids triangle in northern Richland (Figure 2.1). The ATG MWF is to be located on the existing ATG Site, near the DOE Hanford Site, in an industrial area in the City of Richland. The effects of siting, construction, and overall operation of the MWF have been evaluated in a separate State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) EIS (City of Richland 1998). The proposed action includes transporting the LLMW from the Hanford Site to the ATG Facility, non-thermal treatment of the LLMW at the ATG MWF, and transporting the waste from ATG back to the Hanford Site. Impacts fi-om waste treatment operations would be bounded by the ATG SEPA EIS, which included an evaluation of the impacts associated with operating the non-thermal portion of the MWF at maximum design capacity (8,500 metric tons per year) (City of Richland 1998). Up to 50 employees would be required for non-thermal treatment portion of the MWF. This includes 40 employees that would perform waste treatment operations and 10 support staff. Similar numbers were projected for the thermal treatment portion of the MWF (City of Richland 1998).

  1. An Approach to Evaluating Equipment Efficiency Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newsom, D. E.; Evans, A. R.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Energy Conservation Policy Act of 1978 authorized studies of several types of industrial equipment to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of labeling rules and minimum energy efficiency standards. An approach...

  2. 5(b)/9(c) Final Revised Policy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Revised Policy on Determining Net Requirements of Pacific Northwest Utility Customers Under Sections 5(b)(1) and 9(c) of the Northwest Power Act (First revision. Issued March 19,...

  3. Electronic waste management approaches: An overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiddee, Peeranart [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus, Adelaide, SA 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment, Mawson Lakes Campus, Adelaide, SA 5095 (Australia); Naidu, Ravi, E-mail: ravi.naidu@crccare.com [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus, Adelaide, SA 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment, Mawson Lakes Campus, Adelaide, SA 5095 (Australia); Wong, Ming H. [Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong (China)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? Human toxicity of hazardous substances in e-waste. ? Environmental impacts of e-waste from disposal processes. ? Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), Material Flow Analysis (MFA), Multi Criteria Analysis (MCA) and Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) to and solve e-waste problems. ? Key issues relating to tools managing e-waste for sustainable e-waste management. - Abstract: Electronic waste (e-waste) is one of the fastest-growing pollution problems worldwide given the presence if a variety of toxic substances which can contaminate the environment and threaten human health, if disposal protocols are not meticulously managed. This paper presents an overview of toxic substances present in e-waste, their potential environmental and human health impacts together with management strategies currently being used in certain countries. Several tools including Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), Material Flow Analysis (MFA), Multi Criteria Analysis (MCA) and Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) have been developed to manage e-wastes especially in developed countries. The key to success in terms of e-waste management is to develop eco-design devices, properly collect e-waste, recover and recycle material by safe methods, dispose of e-waste by suitable techniques, forbid the transfer of used electronic devices to developing countries, and raise awareness of the impact of e-waste. No single tool is adequate but together they can complement each other to solve this issue. A national scheme such as EPR is a good policy in solving the growing e-waste problems.

  4. CHALLENGES WITH RETRIEVING TRANSURANIC WASTE FROM THE HANFORD BURIAL GROUNDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SWAN, R.J.; LAKES, M.E.

    2007-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. DOE's Hanford Reservation produced plutonium and other nuclear materials for the nation's defense starting in World War II. The defense mission generated wastes that were either retrievably stored (i.e. retrievably stored waste) and/or disposed of in burial grounds. Challenges have emerged from retrieving suspect TRU waste including adequacy of records, radiological concerns, container integrity, industrial hygiene and safety issues, the lack of processing/treatment facilities, and the integration of regulatory requirements. All retrievably stored waste is managed as mixed waste and assumed to be TRU waste, unless documented otherwise. Mixed waste is defined as radioactive waste that contains hazardous constituents. The Atomic Energy Act governs waste with radionuclides, and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) governs waste with hazardous constituents. Waste may also be governed by the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), and a portion may be managed under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). In 1970, TRU waste was required to be placed in 20-year retrievable storage and segregated from other Waste. Prior to that date, segregation did not occur. Because of the changing definition of TRU over the years, and the limitations of early assay equipment, all retrievably stored waste in the burial grounds is managed as suspect TRU. Experience has shown that some of this waste will be characterized as low-level (non-TRU) waste after assay. The majority of the retrieved waste is not amenable to sampling due to waste type and/or radiological issues. Key to waste retrieval and disposition are characterization, historical investigation and research, knowledge of past handling and packaging, as well as a broad understanding and application of the regulations.

  5. Interim reclamation report, Basalt Waste Isolation project: Boreholes, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Hefty, M.G.

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1968, a program was started to assess the feasibility of storing Hanford Site defense waste in deep caverns constructed in basalt. This program was expanded in 1976 to include investigations of the Hanford Site as a potential location for a mined commercial nuclear waste repository. An extensive site characterization program was begun to determine the feasibility of using the basalts beneath the Hanford Site for the repository. Site research focused primarily on determining the direction and speed of groundwater movement, the uniformity of basalt layers, and tectonic stability. Some 98 boreholes were sited, drilled, deepened, or modified by BWIP between 1977 and 1988 to test the geologic properties of the Site. On December 22, 1987, President Reagan signed into law the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, which effectively stopped all repository-related activities except reclamation of disturbed lands at the Hanford Site. This report describes the development of the reclamation program for the BWIP boreholes, its implementation, and preliminary estimates of its success. The goal of the reclamation program is to return sites disturbed by the repository program as nearly as practicable to their original conditions using native plant species. 48 refs., 28 figs., 14 tabs.

  6. Recovery Act Milestones

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rogers, Matt

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Every 100 days, the Department of Energy is held accountable for a progress report on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Update at 200 days, hosted by Matt Rogers, Senior Advisor to Secretary Steven Chu for Recovery Act Implementation.

  7. Coastal Management Act (Georgia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Coastal Management Act provides enabling authority for the State to prepare and administer a coastal management program. The Act does not establish new regulations or laws; it is designed to...

  8. Intergovernmental Personnel Act Assignments

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual implements provisions of the Intergovernmental Personnel Act (IPA) within the Department of Energy (DOE) and establishes requirements, responsibilities, and authority for effecting assignments under the Act. Does not cancel other directives.

  9. Deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Brady, Patrick Vane; Swift, Peter N.; Rechard, Robert Paul; Arnold, Bill Walter; Kanney, Joseph F.; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary evaluation of deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel indicates the potential for excellent long-term safety performance at costs competitive with mined repositories. Significant fluid flow through basement rock is prevented, in part, by low permeabilities, poorly connected transport pathways, and overburden self-sealing. Deep fluids also resist vertical movement because they are density stratified. Thermal hydrologic calculations estimate the thermal pulse from emplaced waste to be small (less than 20 C at 10 meters from the borehole, for less than a few hundred years), and to result in maximum total vertical fluid movement of {approx}100 m. Reducing conditions will sharply limit solubilities of most dose-critical radionuclides at depth, and high ionic strengths of deep fluids will prevent colloidal transport. For the bounding analysis of this report, waste is envisioned to be emplaced as fuel assemblies stacked inside drill casing that are lowered, and emplaced using off-the-shelf oilfield and geothermal drilling techniques, into the lower 1-2 km portion of a vertical borehole {approx}45 cm in diameter and 3-5 km deep, followed by borehole sealing. Deep borehole disposal of radioactive waste in the United States would require modifications to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act and to applicable regulatory standards for long-term performance set by the US Environmental Protection Agency (40 CFR part 191) and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (10 CFR part 60). The performance analysis described here is based on the assumption that long-term standards for deep borehole disposal would be identical in the key regards to those prescribed for existing repositories (40 CFR part 197 and 10 CFR part 63).

  10. ACT-ARA

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003092IBMPC00 ACT-ARA: Code System for the Calculation of Changes in Radiological Source Terms with Time

  11. The effects of hazardous waste taxes on generation and disposal of chlorinated solvent waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sigman, Hilary

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989, 30 states levied taxes on e generation or management of hazardous waste. These taxes constitute one of the broadest applications of an emissions tax in U.S. environmental policy and provide a natural experiment ...

  12. Mixed Waste Management Options: 1995 Update. National Low-Level Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirner, N.; Kelly, J.; Faison, G.; Johnson, D. [Foster Wheeler Environmental Corp. (United States)

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the original mixed Waste Management Options (DOE/LLW-134) issued in December 1991, the question was posed, ``Can mixed waste be managed out of existence?`` That study found that most, but not all, of the Nation`s mixed waste can theoretically be managed out of existence. Four years later, the Nation is still faced with a lack of disposal options for commercially generated mixed waste. However, since publication of the original Mixed Waste Management Options report in 1991, limited disposal capacity and new technologies to treat mixed waste have become available. A more detailed estimate of the Nation`s mixed waste also became available when the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published their comprehensive assessment, titled National Profile on Commercially Generated Low-Level Radioactive Mixed Waste (National Profile). These advancements in our knowledge about mixed waste inventories and generation, coupled with greater treatment and disposal options, lead to a more applied question posed for this updated report: ``Which mixed waste has no treatment option?`` Beyond estimating the volume of mixed waste requiring jointly regulated disposal, this report also provides a general background on the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). It also presents a methodical approach for generators to use when deciding how to manage their mixed waste. The volume of mixed waste that may require land disposal in a jointly regulated facility each year was estimated through the application of this methodology.

  13. Revised Spring 2008 NIH Public Access Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revised Spring 2008 NIH Public Access Policy Notice Number: NOT-OD-08-033 - (See Notice NOT-OD-08-161 (Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2008), the NIH voluntary Public Access Policy (NOT-OD-05-022) is now mandatory funded by the NIH submit or have submitted for them to the National Library of Medicine's PubMed Central

  14. Data Protection Policy Version History Data Protection Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doran, Simon J.

    PROTECTION POLICY 1. Introduction 1.1 The Data Protection Act 1998 applies to all personal information about state that: 1. Personal data shall be processed fairly and lawfully 2. Personal data shall be obtained incompatible with that purpose or purposes 3. Personal data shall be adequate, relevant and not excessive

  15. Regulatory requirements affecting disposal of asbestos-containing waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities are undergoing decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities. The performance of these activities may generate asbestos-containing waste because asbestos was formerly used in many building materials, including floor tile, sealants, plastics, cement pipe, cement sheets, insulating boards, and insulating cements. The regulatory requirements governing the disposal of these wastes depend on: (1) the percentage of asbestos in the waste and whether the waste is friable (easily crumbled or pulverized); (2) other physical and chemical characteristics of the waste; and (3) the State in which the waste is generated. This Information Brief provides an overview of the environment regulatory requirements affecting disposal of asbestos-containing waste. It does not address regulatory requirements applicable to worker protection promulgated under the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHAct), the Mining Safety and Health Act (MSHA), or the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA).

  16. INTERIM POLICY JANUARY 9, 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    INTERIM POLICY JANUARY 9, 2004 CORNELL UNIVERSITY POLICY LIBRARY Health and Safety POLICY 2 _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ POLICY STATEMENT. _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ REASON FOR POLICY

  17. Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 534) and identity of liquid waste Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 534

  18. Policy Overview and Options for Maximizing the Role of Policy in Geothermal Electricity Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doris, E.; Kreycik, C.; Young, K.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal electricity production capacity has grown over time because of multiple factors, including its renewable, baseload, and domestic attributes; volatile and high prices for competing technologies; and policy intervention. Overarching federal policies, namely the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA), provided certainty to project investors in the 1980s, leading to a boom in geothermal development. In addition to market expansion through PURPA, research and development policies provided an investment of public dollars toward developing technologies and reducing costs over time to increase the market competitiveness of geothermal electricity. Together, these efforts are cited as the primary policy drivers for the currently installed capacity. Informing policy decisions depends on the combined impacts of policies at the federal and state level on geothermal development. Identifying high-impact suites of policies for different contexts, and the government levels best equipped to implement them, would provide a wealth of information to both policy makers and project developers.

  19. Wetlands protection acts: a closer look

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linton, Margaret Temple

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA hereafter), which required the federal government to cooperate with the other governmental, public, and private organizations in order to "use all practical means and measures. . . to create and main- tain... conditions under which man and nature can exist in productive harmony. . . " Under NEPA, "major Federal actions, significantly af- ?34 fecting the human environment" or those actions using federal monies or assistance require an Environmental Impact...

  20. Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act Section 120(e)(5). Annual report to Congress for Fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to conducting its operations in a safe and environmentally sound manner. High priorities for the Department are identifying and correcting environmental problems at DOE facilities that resulted from past operations, and preventing environmental problems from occurring during present and future operations. In this regard, the Department is committed to clean up the 1989 inventory of sites in the Environmental Restoration Program by the year 2019. DOE has issued an Order and guidance establishing policy and procedures for activities conducted under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA), and has developed a Five-Year Plan, updated annually, that integrates planning for corrective activities, environmental restoration and waste management operations at its facilities. DOE also continues to conduct assessments (e.g., Management Audits, Environmental Safety and Health (ES & H) Progress Assessments, Internal Self Assessments) at its operating facilities to provide the Secretary of Energy with information on current environmental compliance status and follow-up on findings.

  1. Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chikalla, T.D.; Powell, J.A.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reports and summaries are presented for the following: high-level waste process development; alternative waste forms; TMI zeolite vitrification demonstration program; nuclear waste materials characterization center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton implantation; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; NWVP off-gas analysis; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; verification instrument development; mobility of organic complexes of radionuclides in soils; handbook of methods to decrease the generation of low-level waste; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology program; high-level waste form preparation; development of backfill materials; development of structural engineered barriers; disposal charge analysis; and analysis of spent fuel policy implementation.

  2. Wetlands Protection Act (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act establishes regulations regarding the removal, dredging, filling, and altering of land bordering waters, allowing such activity only with permits and in certain situations. Specific...

  3. Energy Monitoring Act (Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act requires that every energy enterprise file with the Minister a return setting out statistics and information relating to its ownership and control; financial information; information,...

  4. Recovery Act Project Stories

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, these Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) projects exemplify the range of technical assistance provided to federal agencies.

  5. Wetland Conservation Act (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter of the Minnesota Administrative Rules implements the Wetland Conservation Act of 1991, setting standards for water preservation, withdrawal, and replacement.

  6. Shore Protection Act (Georgia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Shore Protection Act is the primary legal authority for protection and management of Georgia's shoreline features including sand dunes, beaches, sandbars, and shoals, collectively known as the...

  7. Hazardous Waste Program (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This rule states criteria for identifying the characteristics of hazardous waste and for listing hazardous waste, lists of hazardous wastes, standards for the management of hazardous waste and...

  8. Energy Policy ] (

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cañizares, Claudio A.

    to the locational marginal prices of several pricing points in the New England, New York, and PJM electricityEnergy Policy ] (

  9. Password Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Password Policy. All of the following sets of rules must be met: passwords must be between 8 and 127 characters inclusive; passwords must contain at least one

  10. Calculator Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    charlotb

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    MA 15300 Calculator Policy. ONLY a TI-30Xa scientific calculator is allowed on quizzes and exams. If you have questions, please email the course coordinator...

  11. Calculator Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    charlotb

    2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    MA 15910 Calculator Policy. ONLY a TI-30Xa scientific calculator is allowed on quizzes and exams. If you have questions, please email the course coordinator...

  12. Calculator Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    charlotb

    2014-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    MA 16010 -- CALCULATOR POLICY. A ONE-LINE scientific calculator is REQUIRED. No other calculator is allowed. RECOMMENDED: TI-30Xa calculator

  13. Energy Policy ] (

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Arne

    energy consumption on a per capita or per productivity basis (e.g. kWh/capita, kWh/GDP), are widely usedEnergy Policy ] (

  14. Energy Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department is focusing on an all-of-the-above energy policy, investing in all sources of American energy.

  15. English Language Policy 1 English Language Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Technology, Sydney

    English Language Policy 1 English Language Policy Abstract This policy sets out UTS's requirements their courses of study. Dates Policy or amendment approved Policy or amendment takes effect Policy is due for review (up to 5 years) 03/11/2010 22/11/2010 11/2015 Policy amendment approved 02/11/2011 Approved

  16. Mixed and Low-Level Treatment Facility Project. Appendix B, Waste stream engineering files, Part 1, Mixed waste streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This appendix contains the mixed and low-level waste engineering design files (EDFS) documenting each low-level and mixed waste stream investigated during preengineering studies for Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project. The EDFs provide background information on mixed and low-level waste generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. They identify, characterize, and provide treatment strategies for the waste streams. Mixed waste is waste containing both radioactive and hazardous components as defined by the Atomic Energy Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, respectively. Low-level waste is waste that contains radioactivity and is not classified as high-level waste, transuranic waste, spent nuclear fuel, or 11e(2) byproduct material as defined by DOE 5820.2A. Test specimens of fissionable material irradiated for research and development only, and not for the production of power or plutonium, may be classified as low-level waste, provided the concentration of transuranic is less than 100 nCi/g. This appendix is a tool that clarifies presentation format for the EDFS. The EDFs contain waste stream characterization data and potential treatment strategies that will facilitate system tradeoff studies and conceptual design development. A total of 43 mixed waste and 55 low-level waste EDFs are provided.

  17. RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Solid and hazardous waste exclusions (40 cfr section 261.4) updated July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Resources Conservation and Recovery Act`s (RCRA) Subtitle C hazardous waste management program is a comprehensive and carefully constructed system to ensure wastes are managed safely and lawfully. This program begins with a very specific, formal process to categorize wastes accurately and appropriately called waste identification. The module explains each waste exclusion and its scope, so you can apply this knowledge in determining whether a given waste is or is not regulated under RCRA Subtitle C.

  18. Sustainable Waste Management; Case study of Nagpur INDIA Dr. Vivek S. Agrawal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Municipal Solid Waste (Management and Handling) Rules 2000, under the Environmental Protection Act, 1986 a significant increase in municipal solid waste (MSW) generation in India in the last few decades increase in solid waste generation will have significant impacts in terms of the land required for waste

  19. Nye County, Nevada 1992 nuclear waste repository program: Program overview. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to provide an overview of the Nye County FY92 Nuclear Waste Repository Program (Program). Funds to pay for Program costs will come from the Federal Nuclear Waste Fund, which was established under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA). In early 1983, the Yucca Mountain was identified as a potentially suitable site for the nation`s first geologic repository for spent reactor fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Later that year, the Nye County Board of County Commissioners (Board) established the capability to monitor the Federal effort to implement the NWPA and evaluate the potential impacts of repository-related activities on Nye County. Over the last eight years, the County`s program has grown in complexity and cost in order to address DOE`s evolving site characterization studies, and prepare for the potential for facility construction and operation. Changes were necessary as well, in response to Congress`s redirection of the repository program specified in the amendments, to the NWPA approved in 1987. In early FY 1991, the County formally established a project office to plan and implement its program of work. The Repository Project Office`s (RPO) mission and functions are provided in Section 2.0. The RPO organization structure is described in Section 3.0.

  20. Environmental assessment for the Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management Facility: Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-0466) under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 for the proposed completion of construction and subsequent operation of a central Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management Facility (RMWMF), in the southeastern portion of Technical Area III at Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque (SNLA). The RMWMF is designed to receive, store, characterize, conduct limited bench-scale treatment of, repackage, and certify low-level waste (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) (as necessary) for shipment to an offsite disposal or treatment facility. The RMWMF was partially constructed in 1989. Due to changing regulatory requirements, planned facility upgrades would be undertaken as part of the proposed action. These upgrades would include paving of road surfaces and work areas, installation of pumping equipment and lines for surface impoundment, and design and construction of air locks and truck decontamination and water treatment systems. The proposed action also includes an adjacent corrosive and reactive metals storage area, and associated roads and paving. LLW and MW generated at SNLA would be transported from the technical areas to the RMWMF in containers approved by the Department of Transportation. The RMWMF would not handle nonradioactive hazardous waste. Based on the analysis in the EA, the proposed completion of construction and operation of the RMWMF does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement for the proposed action is not required.

  1. Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MHRC System Concept ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy Conversion, and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with...

  2. Health and Safety Policy 2014 V6.docx Health and Safety Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doran, Simon J.

    complies with the requirements of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 (and other associated legislationHealth and Safety Policy 2014 V6.docx 1 Health and Safety Policy Originator name: Director of Health and Safety Section / Dept: Health and Safety Committee Implementation date: 21st March 2014 Date

  3. Metropolitan Landfill Abatement Act (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A fee is imposed on operators of mixed municipal solid waste disposal facilities corresponding to the amount of waste taken in. Waste residue from recycling facilities or resource recovery...

  4. ICDF Complex Waste Profile and Verification Sample Guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. M. Heileson

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guidance document will assist waste generators who characterize waste streams destined for disposal at the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) Complex. The purpose of this document is to develop a conservative but appropriate way to (1) characterize waste for entry into the ICDF; (2) ensure compliance with the waste acceptance criteria; and (3) facilitate disposal at the ICDF landfill or evaporation pond. In addition, this document will establish the waste verification process used by ICDF personnel to ensure that untreated waste meets applicable ICDF acceptance limits

  5. Final Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement (HSW EIS) provides environmental and technical information concerning U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ongoing and proposed waste management practices at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The HSW EIS updates some analyses of environmental consequences from previous documents and provides evaluations for activities that may be implemented consistent with the Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS; DOE 1997c) Records of Decision (RODs). The draft HSW EIS was initially issued in April 2002 for public comment (DOE 2002b). A revised draft HSW EIS was issued in March 2003 to address new waste management alternatives that had been proposed since the initial draft HSW EIS was prepared, and to address comments received during the public review period for the first draft (DOE 2003d). The revised draft HSW EIS also incorporated alternatives for disposal of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) from treatment of Hanford Site tank waste in the waste treatment plant (WTP) currently under construction, an activity that was not included in the first draft (68 FR 7110). This final HSW EIS describes the DOE preferred alternative, and in response to public comments received on the March 2003 revised draft, provides additional analyses for some environmental consequences associated with the preferred alternative, with other alternatives, and with cumulative impacts. Public comments on the revised draft HSW EIS are addressed in the comment response document (Volume III of this final EIS). This HSW EIS describes the environmental consequences of alternatives for constructing, modifying, and operating facilities to store, treat, and/or dispose of low-level (radioactive) waste (LLW), transuranic (TRU) waste, ILAW, and mixed low-level waste (MLLW) including WTP melters at Hanford. In addition, the potential long-term consequences of LLW, MLLW, and ILAW disposal on groundwater and surface water are evaluated for a 10,000-year period, although the DOE performance standards only require assessment for the first 1000 years after disposal (DOE 2001f). This document does not address non-radioactive waste that contains ''hazardous'' or ''dangerous'' waste, as defined under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 (42 USC 6901) and Washington State Dangerous Waste regulations (WAC 173-303). Following a previous National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA, 42 USC 4321) review (DOE 1997d), DOE decided to dispose of TRU waste in New Mexico at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a repository that meets the requirements of 40 CFR 191 (63 FR 3623). This HSW EIS has been prepared in accordance with NEPA, the DOE implementing procedures for NEPA 10 CFR 1021, and the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Provisions of NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508).

  6. Environmental assessment operation of the HB-Line facility and frame waste recovery process for production of Pu-238 oxide at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0948, addressing future operations of the HB-Line facility and the Frame Waste Recovery process at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, South Carolina. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, DOE has concluded that, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact.

  7. Geothermal Resources Act (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The policy of the state of Texas is to encourage the rapid and orderly development of geothermal energy and associated resources. The primary consideration of the development process is to provide...

  8. Opencut Mining Act (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The policy of the state is to provide adequate remedies to protect the environmental life support system from degradation and to prevent unreasonable depletion and degradation of natural resources...

  9. Maryland Radiation Act (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The policy of the state is to provide for the constructive use of radiation and control radiation emissions. This legislation authorizes the Department of the Environment to develop comprehensive...

  10. MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of solid and liquid wastes generated at mushroom producing facilities. Environmental guidelines#12;MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT PHASE I: AUDIT OF CURRENT PRACTICE The Mushroom Waste Management Project (MWMP) was initiated by Environment Canada, the BC Ministry

  11. LASER SAFETY POLICY Policy Statement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    LASER SAFETY POLICY Policy Statement Each department that acquires or operates lasers for use in laboratories or research is responsible for reporting laser acquisition to the Office of Laboratory Safety, selecting a departmental deputy laser safety officer, mandating training for its laser operators

  12. UC Santa Barbara Policy 5145 Issuing Unit: Administrative Services Date: May 1, 1985

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    Revision Contact Accounting PAYMENTS TO ALIENS I. REFERENCES: A. U.S. Tax Reform Act of 1984, Internal, Policy 5150, Payment to Aliens. D. UCSB Policies Manual, Policy 5170, Reimbursement of Travel Expenses. II. POLICY: It is extremely important to establish clearly the status of aliens so that they may

  13. Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The status of the following programs is reported: high-level waste immobilization; alternative waste forms; Nuclear Waste Materials Characterization Center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton solidification; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; mobility of organic complexes of fission products in soils; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology; systems study on engineered barriers; criteria for defining waste isolation; spent fuel and fuel pool component integrity program; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; and development of backfill material.

  14. Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, October through December 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chikalla, T.D.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress reports and summaries are presented under the following headings: high-level waste process development; alternative waste forms; nuclear waste materials characterization center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton solidification; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; mobility of organic complexes of radionuclides in soils; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology; high level waste form preparation; development of backfill material; development of structural engineered barriers; ONWI disposal charge analysis; spent fuel and fuel component integrity program; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; analysis of postulated criticality events in a storage array of spent LWR fuel; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium tailings; liner evaluation for uranium mill tailings; multilayer barriers for sealing of uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; revegetation of inactive uranium tailing sites; verification instrument development.

  15. Quality Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Quality Policy It is the policy of the Department of Energy to establish quality requirements to ensure that risks and environmental impacts are minimized and that safety, reliability, and performance are maximized through the application of effective management systems commensurate with the risks posed by the facility or activity and its work. The Department implements this policy through the QA Order and the QA rule directives to ensure quality assurance requirements are clearly specified for the broad spectrum of work performed by DOE and its contractors.

  16. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Waste Management Program is the protection of workers, the public, and the environment. A vital aspect of this goal is to comply with all applicable state, federal, and DOE requirements. Waste management requirements for DOE radioactive wastes are detailed in DOE Order 5820.2A, and the ORNL Waste Management Program encompasses all elements of this order. The requirements of this DOE order and other appropriate DOE orders, along with applicable Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules and regulations, provide the principal source of regulatory guidance for waste management operations at ORNL. The objective of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan is to compile and to consolidate information annually on how the ORNL Waste Management is to compile and to consolidate information annually on how the ORNL Waste Management Program is conducted, which waste management facilities are being used to manage wastes, what forces are acting to change current waste management systems, what activities are planned for the forthcoming fiscal year (FY), and how all of the activities are documented.

  17. ADMINISTRATIVE UNIVERSITY POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ADMINISTRATIVE UNIVERSITY POLICY FACULTY UNIVERSITY POLICY STUDENT UNIVERSITY POLICY Issue stakeholder list "Log-In" of Proposed University Policy with the University Compliance Committee (UCC) UCC identifies which track (i.e., Administrative, Faculty, or Student) the proposed University Policy

  18. Mississippi Public Utility Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Mississippi Public Utility Act is relevant to any project that plans to generate energy. It requires that a utility must first obtain a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity (CPCN)...

  19. Forest Conservation Act (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The main purpose of Maryland's Forest Conservation Act is to minimize the loss of Maryland's forest resources during land development by making the identification and protection of forests and...

  20. Environmental Protection Act (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act states general provisions for the protection of the environment. It also states specific regulations for air, water and land pollution as well as atomic radiation, toxic chemical and oil...

  1. High Voltage Safety Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the High Voltage Safety Act is to prevent injury to persons and property and interruptions of utility service resulting from accidental or inadvertent contact with high-voltage...

  2. Healthy Air Act (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Maryland Healthy Air Act was developed with the purpose of bringing Maryland into attainment with the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ozone and fine particulate matter by the...

  3. Radiation Management Act (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act establishes The Department of Environmental Quality as the designated official agency of the State of Oklahoma for all regulatory activities for the use of atomic energy and sources of...

  4. Public Utilities Act (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act aims to make energy services in the state reliable and efficient, while preserving the quality if the environment. It states the duties of public utilities in terms of accounts and reports...

  5. Wind Energy Act (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Maine Wind Energy Act is a summary of legislative findings that indicate the state's strong interest in promoting the development of wind energy and establish the state's desire to ease the...

  6. Policy Flash 2015-14 Acquisition Letter 2015-03/Financial Acquisition...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Subject to Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 201 Policy Flash 2015-14 Acquisition Letter 2015-03Financial Acquisition Letter 2015-02...

  7. Solid Waste Management and Land Protection (North Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The policy of the State of North Dakota is to encourage and provide for environmentally acceptable and economical solid waste management practices, and the Department of Health may promulgate...

  8. Tank Waste Remediation System fiscal year 1996 multi-year program plan WBS 1.1. Revision 1, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1995 Hanford Mission Plan specifically addresses the tank waste issue and clarifies the link with other initiatives, such as improving management practices and the Hanford Site Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program Plan (DOE/RL-91-31). This document captures the results of decision making regarding the application of systems engineering at the Hanford Site, external involvement policy, and site end-state goals. Section 3.5 of the Hanford Mission Plan on Decisions and Directives provides an integrating discussion of the actions of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), and DOE policy, guidance, and decisions associated with binding agreements such as the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). Two significant components of the Hanford Mission Plan 1994 planning basis are (1) the decisions regarding the disposition of onsite material inventory, and the key programs and interfaces to accomplish this; and (2) the Program Interface Issues section, which identified issues that stretch across program boundaries.

  9. Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magee, J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The long-term environmental effects of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 address the public health hazards of radioactive wastes and recognize the significance of this issue to public acceptance of nuclear energy. Title I of the Act deals with stabilizing and controlling mill tailings at inactive sites and classifies the sites by priority. It represents a major Federal commitment. Title II changes and strengthens Nuclear Regulatory Commission authority, but it will have little overall impact. It is not possible to assess the Act's effect because there is no way to know if current technology will be adequate for the length of time required. 76 references. (DCK)

  10. 222-S radioactive liquid waste line replacement and 219-S secondary containment upgrade, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to: (1) replace the 222-S Laboratory (222-S) radioactive liquid waste drain lines to the 219-S Waste Handling Facility (219-S); (2) upgrade 219-S by replacing or upgrading the waste storage tanks and providing secondary containment and seismic restraints to the concrete cells which house the tanks; and (3) replace the transfer lines from 219-S to the 241-SY Tank Farm. This environmental assessment (EA) has been prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Provisions of NEPA (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 1500-1508), and the DOE Implementing Procedures for NEPA (10 CFR 1021). 222-S is used to perform analytical services on radioactive samples in support of the Tank Waste Remediation System and Hanford Site environmental restoration programs. Activities conducted at 222-S include decontamination of analytical processing and support equipment and disposal of nonarchived radioactive samples. These activities generate low-level liquid mixed waste. The liquid mixed waste is drained through pipelines in the 222-S service tunnels and underground concrete encasements, to two of three tanks in 219-S, where it is accumulated. 219-S is a treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) unit, and is therefore required to meet Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303, Dangerous Waste Regulations, and the associated requirements for secondary containment and leak detection. The service tunnels are periodically inspected by workers and decontaminated as necessary to maintain as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) radiation levels. Although no contamination is reaching the environment from the service tunnels, the risk of worker exposure is present and could increase. 222-S is expected to remain in use for at least the next 30 years to serve the Hanford Site environmental cleanup mission.

  11. Environmental Assessment for the construction and operation of the Three Rivers Solid Waste Authority regional waste management center at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to assess the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of a landfill and technology center for regionally-generated municipal solid waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. The facility would serve the municipal solid waste disposal needs for SRS and at least nine of the surrounding counties who currently comprise the Three Rivers Solid Waste Authority (TRSWA). Additional counties could become included in the proposed action at some future date. Current Federal and state requirements do not afford individual counties and municipalities within the region encompassing SRS the ability to efficiently or economically operate modern waste management facilities. In addition, consolidation of regional municipal solid waste at one location would have the benefit of reducing the duplicity of environmental consequences associated with the construction and operation of county-level facilities. The option to seek a combined disposal and technology development facility based on a regionally-cooperative effort was selected as a viable alternative to the existing individual SRS or county disposal activities. This document was prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, the requirements of the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations for Implementing NEPA (40 CFR Part 1021). NEPA requires the assessment of environmental consequences of Federal actions that may affect the quality of the human environment. Based on the potential for impacts described for impacts described herein, DOE will either publish a Finding of No Significant Impact or prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS).

  12. Hazardous and Radioactive Mixed Waste

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1982-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish hazardous waste management procedures for facilities operated under authority of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (AEA). The procedures will follow. to the extent practicable, regulations issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). Although Department of Energy (DOE) operations conducted under authority other than the AEA are subject to EPA or State regulations conforming with RCRA, facilities administered under the authority of the AEA are not bound by such requirements.

  13. The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, L.L.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF) will provide permanent Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage, treatment, and disposal for hazardous and mixed waste generated at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) that cannot be disposed of in existing or planned SRS facilities. Final design is complete for Phase I of the project, the Disposal Vaults. The Vaults will provide RCRA permitted, above-grade disposal capacity for treated hazardous and mixed waste generated at the SRS. The RCRA Part B Permit application was submitted upon approval of the Permit application, the first Disposal Vault is scheduled to be operational in mid 1994. The technical baseline has been established for Phase II, the Treatment Building, and preliminary design work has been performed. The Treatment Building will provide RCRA permitted treatment processes to handle a variety of hazardous and mixed waste generated at SRS in preparation for disposal. The processes will treat wastes for disposal in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). A RCRA Part B Permit application has not yet been submitted to SCDHEC for this phase of the project. The Treatment Building is currently scheduled to be operational in late 1996.

  14. The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, L.L.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF) will provide permanent Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage, treatment, and disposal for hazardous and mixed waste generated at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) that cannot be disposed of in existing or planned SRS facilities. Final design is complete for Phase I of the project, the Disposal Vaults. The Vaults will provide RCRA permitted, above-grade disposal capacity for treated hazardous and mixed waste generated at the SRS. The RCRA Part B Permit application was submitted upon approval of the Permit application, the first Disposal Vault is scheduled to be operational in mid 1994. The technical baseline has been established for Phase II, the Treatment Building, and preliminary design work has been performed. The Treatment Building will provide RCRA permitted treatment processes to handle a variety of hazardous and mixed waste generated at SRS in preparation for disposal. The processes will treat wastes for disposal in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). A RCRA Part B Permit application has not yet been submitted to SCDHEC for this phase of the project. The Treatment Building is currently scheduled to be operational in late 1996.

  15. Recovery Act Funds at Work

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) are being put to work to improve safety, reliability, and service in systems across the country. Here are case studies from a variety of Recovery Act programs.

  16. Wasted Wind

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    why turbulent airflows are causing power losses and turbine failures in America's wind farms-and what to do about it April 1, 2014 Wasted Wind This aerial photo of Denmark's Horns...

  17. Environmental assessment for liquid waste treatment at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This environmental assessment (EA) examines the potential impacts to the environment from treatment of low-level radioactive liquid and low-level mixed liquid and semi-solid wastes generated at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The potential impacts of the proposed action and alternative actions are discussed herein in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended in Title 42 U.S.C. (4321), and the US Department of Energy (DOE) policies and procedures set forth in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 1021 and DOE Order 451.1, ``NEPA Compliance Program.`` The potential environmental impacts of the proposed action, construction and operation of a centralized liquid waste treatment facility, were addressed in the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Nevada Test Site and Off-Site Locations in the State of Nevada. However, DOE is reevaluating the need for a centralized facility and is considering other alternative treatment options. This EA retains a centralized treatment facility as the proposed action but also considers other feasible alternatives.

  18. Massachusetts Clean Air Act (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Act contains regulations to prevent the pollution and contamination of the atmosphere. The Act establishes a contiguous metropolitan pollution control district, comprised of towns in the...

  19. Coastal Marshlands Protection Act (Georgia

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Coastal Marshlands Protection Act provides the Coastal Resources Division with the authority to protect tidal wetlands. The Coastal Marshlands Protection Act limits certain activities and...

  20. Policy Iteration / Optimistic Policy Iteration Least-Squares Policy Iteration Experiments Least Squares Policy Iteration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scherrer, Bruno

    Policy Iteration / Optimistic Policy Iteration Least-Squares Policy Iteration Experiments Least Squares Policy Iteration Bias-Variance Trade-o in Control Problems Christophe Thiéry and Bruno Scherrer/27 #12; Policy Iteration / Optimistic Policy Iteration Least-Squares Policy Iteration Experiments Markov

  1. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides highlights from the spring meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics of discussion included: state and compact reports; New York`s challenge to the constitutionality of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Amendments Act of 1985; DOE technical assistance for 1993; interregional import/export agreements; Department of Transportation requirements; superfund liability; nonfuel bearing components; NRC residual radioactivity criteria.

  2. Some Materials Degradation Issues in the U.S. High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository Study (The Yucca Mountain Project)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. Hua; P. Pasupathi; N. Brown; K. Mon

    2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The safe disposal of radioactive waste requires that the waste be isolated from the environment until radioactive decay has reduced its toxicity to innocuous levels for plants, animals, and humans. All of the countries currently studying the options for disposing of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) have selected deep geologic formations to be the primary barrier for accomplishing this isolation. In U.S.A., the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended in 1987) designated Yucca Mountain in Nevada as the potential site to be characterized for high-level nuclear waste (HLW) disposal. Long-term containment of waste and subsequent slow release of radionuclides into the geosphere will rely on a system of natural and engineered barriers including a robust waste containment design. The waste package design consists of a highly corrosion resistant Ni-based Alloy 22 cylindrical barrier surrounding a Type 316 stainless steel inner structural vessel. The waste package is covered by a mailbox-shaped drip shield composed primarily of Ti Grade 7 with Ti Grade 24 structural support members. The U.S. Yucca Mountain Project has been studying and modeling the degradation issues of the relevant materials for some 20 years. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art understanding of the degradation processes based on the past 20 years studies on Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) materials degradation issues with focus on interaction between the in-drift environmental conditions and long-term materials degradation of waste packages and drip shields within the repository system during the 10,000 years regulatory period. This paper provides an overview of the current understanding of the likely degradation behavior of the waste package and drip shield in the repository after the permanent closure of the facility. The degradation scenario discussed in this paper include aging and phase instability, dry oxidation, general and localized corrosion, stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen induced cracking of Alloy 22 and titanium alloys. The effects of microbial activity and radiation on degradation of Alloy 22 and titanium alloys are also discussed. Further, for titanium alloys, the effects of fluorides, bromides, calcium ions, and galvanic coupling to less noble metals are further considered. It is concluded that, as far as materials degradation is concerned, the materials and design adopted in the U.S. Yucca Mountain Project will provide sufficient safety margins within the 10,000-years regulatory period.

  3. Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book: Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act and Marine Mammal Protection Act. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Two laws governing activities in the marine environment are considered in this Reference Book. The Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act (MPRSA, P.L. 92-532) regulates ocean dumping of waste, provides for a research program on ocean dumping, and provides for the designation and regulation of marine sanctuaries. The Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA, P.L. 92-522) establishes a federal program to protect and manage marine mammals. The Fishery Conservation and Management Act (FCMA, P.L. 94-265) establishes a program to regulate marine fisheries resources and commercial marine fishermen. Because the Department of Energy (DOE) is not engaged in any activities that could be classified as fishing under FCMA, this Act and its regulations have no implications for the DOE; therefore, no further consideration of this Act is given within this Reference Book. The requirements of the MPRSA and the MMPA are discussed in terms of their implications for the DOE.

  4. Trends and Opportunities in Industrial Hazardous Waste Minimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atlas, M.

    This paper describes trends and opportunities in Resource Conservation and Recovery Act hazardous waste minimization. It uses U.S. Environmental Protection Agency data gathered since 1989 from over 20,000 facilities that account for almost all...

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - act rcra contingency Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RCRA PERMITS Summary: 's policy regarding signatures on permits under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Whereas... Contract No. DE-AC05-96OR22464 APPENDIX D...

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - act rcra rcra Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RCRA PERMITS Summary: 's policy regarding signatures on permits under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Whereas... Contract No. DE-AC05-96OR22464 APPENDIX D...

  7. CRSP Act of 1956

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route BTRICGEGR-N Goods PO6,Act of 1956 An act to

  8. Mixed waste disposal facilities at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, M.N.; Bailey, L.L.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a key installation of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The site is managed by DOE's Savannah River Field Office and operated under contract by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). The Site's waste management policies reflect a continuing commitment to the environment. Waste minimization, recycling, use of effective pre-disposal treatments, and repository monitoring are high priorities at the site. One primary objective is to safely treat and dispose of process wastes from operations at the site. To meet this objective, several new projects are currently being developed, including the M-Area Waste Disposal Project (Y-Area) which will treat and dispose of mixed liquid wastes, and the Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF), which will store, treat, and dispose of solid mixed and hazardous wastes. This document provides a description of this facility and its mission.

  9. Mixed waste disposal facilities at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, M.N.; Bailey, L.L.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a key installation of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The site is managed by DOE`s Savannah River Field Office and operated under contract by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). The Site`s waste management policies reflect a continuing commitment to the environment. Waste minimization, recycling, use of effective pre-disposal treatments, and repository monitoring are high priorities at the site. One primary objective is to safely treat and dispose of process wastes from operations at the site. To meet this objective, several new projects are currently being developed, including the M-Area Waste Disposal Project (Y-Area) which will treat and dispose of mixed liquid wastes, and the Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF), which will store, treat, and dispose of solid mixed and hazardous wastes. This document provides a description of this facility and its mission.

  10. Policy on Export Controls Export Control Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    Policy on Export Controls 8/5/2014 Export Control Policy I. Purpose and Scope Northeastern.S. national security, economic interests, and foreign policy goals. The export laws and regulations address exceptions to the university's Policy on Openness in Research. This policy applies to all members

  11. Policy Procedure Administrative Directive Policy No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Policy ­ Procedure ­ Administrative Directive Title: Policy No.: Effective Date or Date of Last President See also: Related Policies, Procedures and Agreements: Relevant Legislation and Regulations: Background and Purpose: CLEAR DATA #12;Policy *A University Policy is a principle-based statement with broad

  12. Stakeholder Engagement on the Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste -12565

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, Christine; Joyce, James; Edelman, Arnold [Office of Environmental Management, Office of Disposal Operations-EM-43 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Disposal Operations is responsible for developing a permanent disposal capability for a small volume, but highly radioactive, class of commercial low-level radioactive waste, known as Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste. DOE has issued a draft environmental impact statement (EIS) and will be completing a final EIS under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) that evaluates a range of disposal alternatives. Like other classes of radioactive waste, proposing and evaluating disposal options for GTCC waste is highly controversial, presents local and national impacts, and generates passionate views from stakeholders. Recent national and international events, such as the cancellation of the Yucca Mountain project and the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident, have heighten stakeholder awareness of everything nuclear, including disposal of radioactive waste. With these challenges, the Office of Disposal Operations recognizes that informed decision-making that will result from stakeholder engagement and participation is critical to the success of the GTCC EIS project. This paper discusses the approach used by the Office of Disposal Operations to engage stakeholders on the GTCC EIS project, provides advice based on our experiences, and proffers some ideas for future engagements in today's open, always connected cyber environment. (authors)

  13. Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    employment of resources, connected to the main aspects, such as water, energy and waste management as well and the other involved parties must cooperate, as much as possible, to improve the Environmental ManagementLaboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY The Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS

  14. Waste minimization and pollution prevention awareness plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this plan is to document the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program. The plan specifies those activities and methods that are or will be employed to reduce the quantity and toxicity of wastes generated at the site. The intent of this plan is to respond to and comply with (DOE's) policy and guidelines concerning the need for pollution prevention. The Plan is composed of a LLNL Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program Plan and, as attachments, Program- and Department-specific waste minimization plans. This format reflects the fact that waste minimization is considered a line management responsibility and is to be addressed by each of the Programs and Departments. 14 refs.

  15. American Disabilities Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Americans with Disabilities Act prohibits private employers, state and local governments, employment agencies and labor unions from discriminating against qualified individuals with disabilities in job application procedures, hiring, firing, advancement, compensation, job training, and other terms, conditions, and privileges of employment.

  16. Small Business Administration Recovery Act Implementation | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Small Business Administration Recovery Act Implementation Small Business Administration Recovery Act Implementation Small Business Administration Recovery Act Implementation Small...

  17. Study of thermal conductivity in organic solid wastes before composting J. HUET, C. Druilhe, G. Debenest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Study of thermal conductivity in organic solid wastes before composting J. HUET, C. Druilhe, G. Debenest ORBIT2012 1 STUDY OF THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY IN ORGANIC SOLID WASTES BEFORE COMPOSTING J. Huet, as illustrated by current EU waste policy and its five main priorities: prevention, reuse, recycling, recovery

  18. Deep Geologic Nuclear Waste Disposal - No New Taxes - 12469

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conca, James [RJLee Group, Inc., Pasco WA 509.205.7541 (United States); Wright, Judith [UFA Ventures, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To some, the perceived inability of the United States to dispose of high-level nuclear waste justifies a moratorium on expansion of nuclear power in this country. Instead, it is more an example of how science yields to social pressure, even on a subject as technical as nuclear waste. Most of the problems, however, stem from confusion on the part of the public and their elected officials, not from a lack of scientific knowledge. We know where to put nuclear waste, how to put it there, how much it will cost, and how well it will work. And it's all about the geology. The President's Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future has drafted a number of recommendations addressing nuclear energy and waste issues (BRC 2011) and three recommendations, in particular, have set the stage for a new strategy to dispose of high-level nuclear waste and to manage spent nuclear fuel in the United States: 1) interim storage for spent nuclear fuel, 2) resumption of the site selection process for a second repository, and 3) a quasi-government entity to execute the program and take control of the Nuclear Waste Fund in order to do so. The first two recommendations allow removal and storage of spent fuel from reactor sites to be used in the future, and allows permanent disposal of actual waste, while the third controls cost and administration. The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NPWA 1982) provides the second repository different waste criteria, retrievability, and schedule, so massive salt returns as the candidate formation of choice. The cost (in 2007 dollars) of disposing of 83,000 metric tons of heavy metal (MTHM) high-level waste (HLW) is about $ 83 billion (b) in volcanic tuff, $ 29 b in massive salt, and $ 77 b in crystalline rock. Only in salt is the annual revenue stream from the Nuclear Waste Fund more than sufficient to accomplish this program without additional taxes or rate hikes. The cost is determined primarily by the suitability of the geologic formation, i.e., how well it performs on its own for millions of years with little engineering assistance from humans. It is critical that the states most affected by this issue (WA, SC, ID, TN, NM and perhaps others) develop an independent multi-state agreement in order for a successful program to move forward. Federal approval would follow. Unknown to most, the United States has a successful operating deep permanent geologic nuclear repository for high and low activity waste, called the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. Its success results from several factors, including an optimal geologic and physio-graphic setting, a strong scientific basis, early regional community support, frequent interactions among stakeholders at all stages of the process, long-term commitment from the upper management of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) over several administrations, strong New Mexico State involvement and oversight, and constant environmental monitoring from before nuclear waste was first emplaced in the WIPP underground (in 1999) to the present. WIPP is located in the massive bedded salts of the Salado Formation, whose geological, physical, chemical, redox, thermal, and creep-closure properties make it an ideal formation for long-term disposal, long-term in this case being greater than 200 million years. These properties also mean minimal engineering requirements as the rock does most of the work of isolating the waste. WIPP has been operating for twelve years, and as of this writing, has disposed of over 80,000 m{sup 3} of nuclear weapons waste, called transuranic or TRU waste (>100 nCurie/g but <23 Curie/1000 cm{sup 3}) including some high activity waste from reprocessing of spent fuel from old weapons reactors. All nuclear waste of any type from any source can be disposed in this formation better, safer and cheaper than in any other geologic formation. At the same time, it is critical that we complete the Yucca Mountain license application review so as not to undermine the credibility of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the scientific commun

  19. National Environmenal Policy Act Contracting Reform Guidance: Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NEPA Contracting Quality Improvement Team identified several contracting improvements to reduce the cost and time for the NEPA process. The team`s February 1995 report recommended a series of steps to achieve the improvements, including issuance of contracting guidance. The guidance will be issued in three phases. This Phase I guidance implements the team`s short-term recommendations. It provides model statements of work and a sample schedule of contractor deliverables, establishes a pilot program for evaluating performance of NEPA support contractors, and describes information resources available on the DOE NEPA Web.

  20. Questions and Answers about National Environmental Policy Act...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (DOE) State Energy Program (SEP) in the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. sepnepafaqs.pdf More Documents & Publications Questions and Answers on the...

  1. FSH 1909.15 - National Environmental Policy Act Handbook: Chapter...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    10, Environmental AnalysisPermittingRegulatory GuidanceGuideHandbook Author USFS Published USFS, 2014 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online...

  2. JWSpensley@aol.com! (National Environmental Policy Act of 1969)!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    /Measures of Success Y Roles & Responsibilities Y Communication Protocols Y Boundary Conditions Y Resolution ! Team Critical Success Factors! Y ! Goals/Measures of Success! Y ! Roles & Responsibilities! Y ! Communication Protocols! Y ! Boundary Conditions! Y ! Resolution of Conflicts! Project Charter! What

  3. U.S. Department of Energy National Environmental Policy Act ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    materials; and purchase of equipment and materials to enhance and expand the existing solid wasterecycling program. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: B3.6,...

  4. Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1975, and before the immediately preceding calendar year. SEC. 102(b) EXCLUSION OF WHOLESALE SALES -The requirements of this title do not apply to the operations of an electric...

  5. ENERGY POLICY ACT OF 2005 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergy DOEDealingVehicle1:EnergyDecember 10,of Energy3,Energy

  6. Policy Flash 2014-04 Continuing Appropriations Act, 2014 -- Congressional

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15, 2010Energy6 FronteraMarijuanaand HowNotification of Pending

  7. Policy Flash 2014-05 Continuing Appropriations Act, 2014 -- Implementation

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15, 2010Energy6 FronteraMarijuanaand HowNotification of Pendingof

  8. GAO Report -- National Environmental Policy Act: Little Information Exists

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | Department of Energy Freeport LNGEnergy Research |G-8on NEPA Analyses |

  9. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) | National Nuclear Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  10. Questions and Answers about National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA)

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  11. Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  12. Aligning National Environmental Policy Act Process with Environmental

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  13. Annual National Environmental Policy Act Planning Summaries | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  14. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorically Excluded Actions |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  15. National Environmental Policy Act - Categorical Exclusions | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  16. POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM #08 DOE Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  17. DOE Secretarial Notice: National Environmental Policy Act (February 5,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

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  18. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  19. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartment ofJaredOak Ridge’s EM programAFlyingNationalRegulationsAll

  20. National Environmental Policy Act Postings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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