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Sample records for waste policy act

  1. Nuclear Waste Policy Act | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Waste Policy Act Nuclear Waste Policy Act Document on the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 An Act to provide for the development of repositories for the disposal of ...

  2. Nuclear Waste Policy Act Signed | National Nuclear Security Administra...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Waste Policy Act Signed Nuclear Waste Policy Act Signed Washington, DC President Reagan signs the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, the Nation's first comprehensive nuclear waste ...

  3. Nuclear Waste Policy Act.doc

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Washington, D.C. 20585 March 2004 i THE NUCLEAR WASTE POLICY ACT OF 1982 1 An Act to provide for the development of repositories for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel, to establish a program of research, development, and demonstration regarding the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel, and for other purposes. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of

  4. The Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended with appropriations acts appended

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 provides for the development of repositories for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel, to establish a program of research, development and demonstration regarding the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. Titles 1 and 2 cover these subjects. Also included in this Act are: Title 3: Other provisions relating to radioactive waste; Title 4: Nuclear waste negotiation; Title 5: Nuclear waste technical review board; and Title 6: High-level radioactive waste. An appendix contains excerpts from appropriations acts from fiscal year 1984--1994.

  5. Science, society, and America's nuclear waste: Unit 3, The Nuclear Waste Policy Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This is the 3rd unit, (The Nuclear Waste Policy Act) a four-unit secondary curriculum. It is intended to provide information about scientific and societal issues related to the management of spent nuclear fuel from generation of electricity at nuclear powerplants and high-level radioactive waste from US national defense activities. The curriculum, supporting classroom activities, and teaching materials present a brief discussion of energy and electricity generation, including that produced at nuclear powerplants; information on sources, amounts, location, and characteristics of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste; sources, types and effects of radiation; US policy for managing and disposing of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste and what other countries are doing; and the components of the nuclear waste management system.

  6. Science, society, and America`s nuclear waste: Unit 3, The Nuclear Waste Policy Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    This is the 3rd unit, (The Nuclear Waste Policy Act) a four-unit secondary curriculum. It is intended to provide information about scientific and societal issues related to the management of spent nuclear fuel from generation of electricity at nuclear powerplants and high-level radioactive waste from US national defense activities. The curriculum, supporting classroom activities, and teaching materials present a brief discussion of energy and electricity generation, including that produced at nuclear powerplants; information on sources, amounts, location, and characteristics of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste; sources, types and effects of radiation; US policy for managing and disposing of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste and what other countries are doing; and the components of the nuclear waste management system.

  7. Science, society, and America's nuclear waste: Unit 3, The Nuclear Waste Policy Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This teachers guide is unit 3, the nuclear waste policy act, in a four-unit secondary curriculum. It is intended to provide information about scientific and societal issues related to the management of spent nuclear fuel from generation of electricity at nuclear powerplants and high-level radioactive waste from US national defense activities. The curriculum, supporting classroom activities, and teaching materials present a brief discussion of energy and electricity generation, including that produced at nuclear power plants; information on sources, amounts, location, and characteristics of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste; sources, types and effects of radiation; US policy for managing and disposing of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste and what other countries are doing; and the components of the nuclear waste management system.

  8. Science, society, and America`s nuclear waste: Unit 3, The Nuclear Waste Policy Act. Teacher guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    This teachers guide is unit 3, the nuclear waste policy act, in a four-unit secondary curriculum. It is intended to provide information about scientific and societal issues related to the management of spent nuclear fuel from generation of electricity at nuclear powerplants and high-level radioactive waste from US national defense activities. The curriculum, supporting classroom activities, and teaching materials present a brief discussion of energy and electricity generation, including that produced at nuclear power plants; information on sources, amounts, location, and characteristics of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste; sources, types and effects of radiation; US policy for managing and disposing of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste and what other countries are doing; and the components of the nuclear waste management system.

  9. National Environmental Policy Act Support for EIS and Environmental Assessments in Nuclear Waste Disposal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administration Home National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) The NNSA Office of General Counsel's Privacy Act, Freedom of Information Act, and National Environmental Policy Act (PA/FOIA and NEPA) Division provides NEPA services to the Office of the Administrator, including all organizations within NNSA. The PA/FOIA and NEPA Division provides guidance on matters of policy and execution throughout the NNSA complex. NEPA Compliance Officer Support In addition to providing direct NEPA Compliance

  10. Recommendation by the Secretary of Energy Regarding the Suitability of the Yucca Mountain Site for a Repository Under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recommendation by the Secretary of Energy Regarding the Suitability of the Yucca Mountain Site for a Repository Under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982

  11. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1988-01-01

    Chapter six describes the basis for facility design, the completed facility conceptual design, the completed analytical work relating to the resolution of design issues, and future design-related work. The basis for design and the conceptual design information presented in this chapter meet the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, for a conceptual repository design that takes into account site-specific requirements. This information is presented to permit a critical evaluation of planned site characterization activities. Chapter seven describes waste package components, emplacement environment, design, and status of research and development that support the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) Project. The site characterization plan (SCP) discussion of waste package components is contained entirely within this chapter. The discussion of emplacement environment in this chapter is limited to considerations of the environment that influence, or which may influence, if perturbed, the waste packages and their performance (particularly hydrogeology, geochemistry, and borehole stability). The basis for conceptual waste package design as well as a description of the design is included in this chapter. The complete design will be reported in the advanced conceptual design (ACD) report and is not duplicated in the SCP. 367 refs., 173 figs., 68 tabs.

  12. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1988-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain site in Neavada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended and approved for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package;and to present the plans for obtaining hte geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare and environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and developing a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing principles, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed.

  13. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1988-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site; to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. Chapter 3 summarizes present knowledge of the regional and site hydrologic systems. The purpose of the information presented is to (1) describe the hydrology based on available literature and preliminary site-exploration activities that have been or are being performed and (2) provide information to be used to develop the hydrologic aspects of the planned site characterization program. Chapter 4 contains geochemical information about the Yucca Mountain site. The chapter references plan for continued collection of geochemical data as a part of the site characterization program. Chapter 4 describes and evaluates data on the existing climate and site meterology, and outlines the suggested procedures to be used in developing and validating methods to predict future climatic variation. 534 refs., 100 figs., 72 tabs.

  14. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1988-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended by the Secretary of Energy and approved by the President for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with the requirements of the Nulcear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package;and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and developing a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing principles, and organization of the site characterization plan are oulined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed.

  15. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1988-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in acordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and eveloping a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing prinicples, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed. 880 refs., 130 figs., 25 tabs.

  16. National Environmental Policy Act RM

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... EA Environmental Assessment EIS Environmental Impact Statement EM The Office of Environmental ... at 10 CFR Part 1021, National Environmental Policy Act Implementing Procedures. ...

  17. WIPP Documents - National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Adoption of Environmental Assessment DOI-BLM-NM-P020-11-1414 Double Eagle Water System DOE/EA-1905 October 2011 This document examines the potential environmental impacts associated with providing DOE funding for the proposed improvements to the City of Carlsbad Double Eagle Water System Amendment to the Record of Decision for the Department of Energy's Waste Management Program: Treatment and Storage of Transuranic Waste This Federal Register Notice

  18. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) projects are reviewed under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 – 42 U.S.C. Section 4321 et seq. The Department of Energy regulations that implement NEPA require OE to determine whether a proposal requires preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), an Environmental Assessment (EA), or a Categorical Exclusion (CX).

  19. Farmland Protection Policy Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Farmland Protection Policy Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Farmland Protection Policy ActLegal Abstract...

  20. National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Strategy for the Remote-Handled Low-level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peggy Hinman

    2010-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) needs to have disposal capability for remote-handled low level waste (LLW) generated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) at the time the existing disposal facility is full or must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the INL Subsurface Disposal Area in approximately the year 2017.

  1. YUCCA MOUNTAIN PROJECT RECOMMENDATION BY THE SECRETARY OF ENERGY REGARDING THE SUITABILITY OF THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE FOR A REPOSITORY UNDER THE NUCLEAR WASTE POLICY ACT OF 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NA

    2002-03-26

    For more than half a century, since nuclear science helped us win World War II and ring in the Atomic Age, scientists have known that !he Nation would need a secure, permanent facility in which to dispose of radioactive wastes. Twenty years ago, when Congress adopted the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA or ''the Act''), it recognized the overwhelming consensus in the scientific community that the best option for such a facility would be a deep underground repository. Fifteen years ago, Congress directed the Secretary of Energy to investigate and recommend to the President whether such a repository could be located safely at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Since then, our country has spent billions of dollars and millions of hours of research endeavoring to answer this question. I have carefully reviewed the product of this study. In my judgment, it constitutes sound science and shows that a safe repository can be sited there. I also believe that compelling national interests counsel in favor of proceeding with this project. Accordingly, consistent with my responsibilities under the NWPA, today I am recommending that Yucca Mountain be developed as the site for an underground repository for spent fuel and other radioactive wastes. The first consideration in my decision was whether the Yucca Mountain site will safeguard the health and safety of the people, in Nevada and across the country, and will be effective in containing at minimum risk the material it is designed to hold. Substantial evidence shows that it will. Yucca Mountain is far and away the most thoroughly researched site of its kind in the world. It is a geologically stable site, in a closed groundwater basin, isolated on thousands of acres of Federal land, and farther from any metropolitan area than the great majority of less secure, temporary nuclear waste storage sites that exist in the country today. This point bears emphasis. We are not confronting a hypothetical problem. We have a staggering amount of radioactive waste in this country--nearly 100,000,000 gallons of high-level nuclear waste and more than 40,000 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel with more created every day. Our choice is not between, on the one hand, a disposal site with costs and risks held to a minimum, and, on the other, a magic disposal system with no costs or risks at all. Instead, the real choice is between a single secure site, deep under the ground at Yucca Mountain, or making do with what we have now or some variant of it--131 aging surface sites, scattered across 39 states. Every one of those sites was built on the assumption that it would be temporary. As time goes by. every one is closer to the limit of its safe life span. And every one is at least a potential security risk--safe for today, but a question mark in decades to come.

  2. Evaluation of Groundwater Impacts to Support the National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Assessment for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annette Schafer, Arthur S. Rood, A. Jeffrey Sondrup

    2011-12-23

    Groundwater impacts have been analyzed for the proposed remote-handled low-level waste disposal facility. The analysis was prepared to support the National Environmental Policy Act environmental assessment for the top two ranked sites for the proposed disposal facility. A four-phase screening and analysis approach was documented and applied. Phase I screening was site independent and applied a radionuclide half-life cut-off of 1 year. Phase II screening applied the National Council on Radiation Protection analysis approach and was site independent. Phase III screening used a simplified transport model and site-specific geologic and hydrologic parameters. Phase III neglected the infiltration-reducing engineered cover, the sorption influence of the vault system, dispersion in the vadose zone, vertical dispersion in the aquifer, and the release of radionuclides from specific waste forms. These conservatisms were relaxed in the Phase IV analysis which used a different model with more realistic parameters and assumptions. Phase I screening eliminated 143 of the 246 radionuclides in the inventory from further consideration because each had a half-life less than 1 year. An additional 13 were removed because there was no ingestion dose coefficient available. Of the 90 radionuclides carried forward from Phase I, 57 radionuclides had simulated Phase II screening doses exceeding 0.4 mrem/year. Phase III and IV screening compared the maximum predicted radionuclide concentration in the aquifer to maximum contaminant levels. Of the 57 radionuclides carried forward from Phase II, six radionuclides were identified in Phase III as having simulated future aquifer concentrations exceeding maximum contaminant limits. An additional seven radionuclides had simulated Phase III groundwater concentrations exceeding 1/100th of their respective maximum contaminant levels and were also retained for Phase IV analysis. The Phase IV analysis predicted that none of the thirteen remaining radionuclides would exceed the maximum contaminant levels for either site location. The predicted cumulative effective dose equivalent from all 13 radionuclides also was less than the dose criteria set forth in Department of Energy Order 435.1 for each site location. An evaluation of composite impacts showed one site is preferable over the other based on the potential for commingling of groundwater contamination with other facilities.

  3. Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) -List of Covered Electric Utilities - 2006 Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the Energy Policy Act ...

  4. Energy Policy Act of 2005 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon Energy Policy Act of 2005 More Documents & Publications ENERGY POLICY ACT OF 2005 Title XVII Incentives for Innovative Technologies Intelligence Reform and Terrorism ...

  5. DOE Secretarial Notice: National Environmental Policy Act (February...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Notice: National Environmental Policy Act (February 5, 1990, status: cancelled) DOE Secretarial Notice: National Environmental Policy Act (February 5, 1990, status: cancelled) This...

  6. Washington State Environmental Policy Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Washington State Environmental Policy ActLegal Abstract The Washington State Environmental Policy Act...

  7. Template for Expedited National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review of Certain State Energy Program Projects Template for Expedited National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review of Certain State...

  8. Montana Environmental Policy Act Guide | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Environmental Policy Act Guide Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Montana Environmental Policy Act...

  9. National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-10-26

    The purpose of this Order is to establish DOE internal requirements and responsibilities for implementing the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations Implementing the Procedural Provisions of NEPA (40 CFR Parts 1500-1508), and the DOE NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR Part 1021). Change 1 has been added to this Order 9/28/2001.

  10. Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 2005

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Sfmt 6579 E:PUBLAWPUBL058.109 APPS10 PsN: PUBL058 PUBLIC LAW 109-58-AUG. 8, 2005 ENERGY POLICY ACT OF 2005 VerDate 14-DEC-2004 09:31 Sep 08, 2005 Jkt 039139 PO 00058 Frm...

  11. State Assistance for Recovery Act Related Electricity Policies: Awards |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Assistance for Recovery Act Related Electricity Policies: Awards State Assistance for Recovery Act Related Electricity Policies: Awards List of State Energy Policy Awards under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act including State, Agency, and Recovery Act funding amounts. PDF icon State Energy Policy Awards 2011 11 09.pdf More Documents & Publications "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA)

  12. National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-10-26

    This Order establishes DOE internal requirements and responsibilities for implementing the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations Implementing the Procedural Provisions of NEPA (40 CFR Parts 1500-1508), and the DOE NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR Part 1021). Chg 1 (9-28-01) reflects the Under Secretary/Administrator of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) approval of certain NNSA environmental impact statements. 9/28/2001. Chg 2 (6-25-10) reflects changes to Deputy Secretary Policy and DOE organization. Superseded by DOE O 451.1B Admin Chg 3.

  13. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Process

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Process ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Steps to SWEIS Development Notice of Intent to Prepare SWEIS Public Scoping Period Opportunities for Public Input Preparation of Draft SWEIS Notice of Availability for Draft SWEIS Public Comment Period Preparation of Final SWEIS Notice of Availability of Final SWEIS Published in the Federal Register 30-Day Waiting Period Record of Decision Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by

  14. National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-09-26

    The purpose of this Order is to establish DOE internal requirements and responsibilities for implementing the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations Implementing the Procedural Provisions of NEPA (40 CFR Parts 1500-1508), and the DOE NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR Part 1021). (Hereinafter, the latter two will be referred to as "the Regulations.") Cancels DOE O 451.1A.

  15. National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-11-10

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) responsibilities and procedures to implement the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) Cancels DOE O 5440.1D. Canceled by DOE O 451.1 of 9-11-1995 and by DOE N 251.4 & Para. 5b(1) and 6a(23) is canceled by DOE O 231.1 of 9-30-1995.

  16. National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-10-26

    The order establishes DOE internal requirements and responsibilities for implementing the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations Implementing the Procedural Provisions of NEPA (40 CFR Parts 1500-1508), and the DOE NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR Part 1021). Chg 1, dated 9-28-01; Chg 2, dated 6-25-10; Admin Chg 3, dated 1-19-12, supersedes DOE O 451.1B Chg 2.

  17. Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 (FLPMA) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal Regulation: Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 (FLPMA)Legal Abstract FLPMA, also called the BLM Organic Act,...

  18. POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM #08 DOE Fair Labor Standards Act ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8 DOE Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) ExemptNon-Exempt Status Determination POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM 08 DOE Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) ExemptNon-Exempt Status ...

  19. Mining and Minerals Policy Act of 1970 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Act, this statute encompasses both hard rock mining and oil and gas and established modern federal policy regarding mineral resources in the United States. The Act articulates a...

  20. ENERGY POLICY ACT OF 2005 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Energy Policy Act of 2005 Title XVII Incentives for Innovative Technologies Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act - December 17, 2004

  1. Draft Report to Congress: Energy Policy Act of 2005, Section...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report to Congress: Energy Policy Act of 2005, Section 1813, Indian Land Rights-of-Way Study Draft Report to Congress: Energy Policy Act of 2005, Section 1813, Indian Land ...

  2. Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (DOE, 1994) Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (DOE, 1994) The purpose of this ...

  3. The National Environmental Policy Act process | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The National Environmental Policy Act process The National Environmental Policy Act process The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) established a national environmental policy that protects and maintains the environment, and the legislation helped create a process to implement these goals within federal agencies. NEPA's directs agencies to: * consider the environmental consequences of a proposed action * act as an environmental trustee for future generations * attain the most beneficial

  4. Environmental Justice: Guidance Under the National Environmental Policy Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Environmental JusticeGuidance Under the National Environmental Policy ActCouncil on Environmental Quality (December 1997) 

  5. The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 Full text of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, available as a download. NEPA established a national policy for the environment, to provide for the establishment of a Council on Environmental Quality, and for other purposes. The stated purposes of NEPA is: To declare a national policy which will encourage productive and enjoyable harmony between man and his environment; to

  6. DOE Policy Re Recovery Act Recipient Use of Recovery Act Logos on Signage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy (“DOE”) policy regarding use of the Recovery Act logo by Recovery Act recipients and subgrantees.

  7. National Environmental Policy Act Postings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Environmental Policy Act Postings National Environmental Policy Act Postings To further transparency and openness in its implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established a policy and, subsequently, requirements under the Department's NEPA regulations (10 CFR Part 1021) and NEPA Order (DOE Order 451.1B) to document and post online its categorical exclusion (CX) determinations involving classes of actions listed in

  8. Energy Policy Act of 2005 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Policy Act of 2005 Energy Policy Act of 2005 The U.S. Senate resolved on June 28, 2005 that the bill from the House of Representatives (H.R. 6) entitled ''An Act to ensure jobs for our future with secure, affordable, and reliable energy" pass with this amendment. PDF icon Energy Policy Act of 2005 More Documents & Publications E:\BILLS\H6.PP In the Senate of the United States,June 28, 2005. Energy Policy Act of 2005

  9. 10 CFR 1021: National Environmental Policy Act Implementing Procedures

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (DOE, 2011) | Department of Energy 10 CFR 1021: National Environmental Policy Act Implementing Procedures (DOE, 2011) 10 CFR 1021: National Environmental Policy Act Implementing Procedures (DOE, 2011) The purpose of Part 10 CFR 1021 is to establish procedures that the Department of Energy (DOE) shall use to comply with section 102(2) of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4332(2)) and the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations for implementing the

  10. Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental Policy Act

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (CEQ, 1997) | Department of Energy Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental Policy Act (CEQ, 1997) Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental Policy Act (CEQ, 1997) This handbook presents the results of research and consultations by the Council on Environmental Quality concerning the consideration of cumulative effects in analyses prepared under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). It introduces the NEPA practitioner and other interested

  11. Template for Expedited National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Certain State Energy Program Projects | Department of Energy National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review of Certain State Energy Program Projects Template for Expedited National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review of Certain State Energy Program Projects National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), expedited review for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) State Energy Program (SEP) in the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. PDF icon template_nepa_review.pdf More

  12. Aligning National Environmental Policy Act Process with Environmental

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Management Systems (CEQ, 2007) | Department of Energy Aligning National Environmental Policy Act Process with Environmental Management Systems (CEQ, 2007) Aligning National Environmental Policy Act Process with Environmental Management Systems (CEQ, 2007) Aligning National Environmental Policy Act Process with Environmental Management Systems (EMS) This is a guidebook for NEPA and EMS practitioners that identifies elements of an EMS that can improve NEPA implementation. Alignment of NEPA and

  13. Site characterization progress report: Yucca Mountain, Nevada, October 1, 1994--March 31, 1995, Number 12. Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 113)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    During the first half of fiscal year 1995, most activities at the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project were directed at implementing the Program Plan developed by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The Plan is designed to enable the Office to make measurable and significant progress toward key objectives over the next five years within the financial resources that can be realistically expected. Activities this period focused on the immediate goal of determining by 1998 whether Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is technically suitable as a possible site for a geologic repository for the permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Work on the Project advanced in several critical areas, including programmatic activities such as issuing the Program Plan, completing the first technical basis report to support the assessment of three 10 CFR 960 guidelines, developing the Notice of Intent for the Environmental Impact Statement, submitting the License Application Annotated Outline, and beginning a rebaselining effort to conform with the goals of the Program Plan. Scientific investigation and analysis of the site and design and construction activities to support the evaluation of the technical suitability of the site also advanced. Specific details relating to all Project activities and reports generated are presented in this report.

  14. GAO Report -- National Environmental Policy Act: Little Information...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    GAO Report -- National Environmental Policy Act: Little Information Exists on NEPA Analyses A report by the United States Government Accountability Office (GAO) on the costs, time ...

  15. Policy Flash 2014-04 Continuing Appropriations Act, 2014 -- Congressio...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2014 -- Congressional Notification of Pending Contract or Financial Assistance Actions Policy Flash 2014-04 Continuing Appropriations Act, 2014 -- Congressional Notification of...

  16. Title 10 CFR 1021 National Environmental Policy Act Implementing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1021 National Environmental Policy Act Implementing Procedures Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal...

  17. Cancelled- DOE Secretarial Notice: National Environmental Policy Act (1990)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Secretarial Notice announced revisions of DOE compliance procedures under the National Environmental Policy Act. This notice has been cancelled and is for historical use only.

  18. National Energy Policy Act Guide for State Energy Program and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Projects National Energy Policy Act Guide for State Energy Program and Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Projects U.S. ...

  19. U.S. Department Of Energy National Environmental Policy Act ...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Of Energy National Environmental Policy Act - Environmental Checklist Shiprock ... or CERCLA-excluded petroleum and natural gas products that preexist in the environment ...

  20. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents | U.S. DOE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) NBL Home About Programs Certified Reference Materials (CRMs) Training NEPA Documents Categorical ...

  1. Title 36 CFR 220 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    0 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal Regulation: Title...

  2. Statement of Work-National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Support...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Statement of Work-National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Support Services Acquisition: Preparation and Review of Environmental Impact Statements, Environmental Assessments, ...

  3. Farmland Protection Policy Act Manual | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Farmland Protection Policy Act Manual Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Permitting...

  4. Cancelled- DOE Secretarial Notice: National Environmental Policy Act (DOE, 1990)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Secretarial Notice announced revisions of DOE compliance procedures under the National Environmental Policy Act. This notice has been cancelled and is for historical use only.

  5. Policy Flash 2014-05 Continuing Appropriations Act, 2014 -- Implementa...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Act, 2014 -- Implementation of Division F, Title I, Title II, and Title III, and Division G, Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2013, Pub. L. No. 113-6 Policy...

  6. Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) Subtitle E contains three sections (secs. 1251, 1252, and 1254) that add additional “States-must-consider” standards to the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA). Specifically, EPACT 2005 adds five new Federal standards to PURPA Section 111(d).

  7. National Environmental Policy Act compliance guide. Volume II (reference book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-09-01

    This document (Volume II of the National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Guide) contains current copies of regulations and guidance from the Council on Environmental Quality, the Department of Energy, the Department of State, and the Environmental Protection Agency, related to compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA).

  8. Recovery Act: State Assistance for Recovery Act Related Electricity Policies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    State public utility commissions (PUCs), which regulate and oversee electricity projects in their states, will be receiving more than $44.2 million in Recovery Act funding to hire new staff and retrain existing employees to ensure they have the capacity to quickly and effectively review proposed electricity projects. The funds will help the individual state PUCs accelerate reviews of the large number of electric utility requests that are expected under the Recovery Act.

  9. National Environmental Policy Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NEPA established a national policy to encourage productive and enjoyable harmony between man and his environment and to promote the prevention and elimination of damage to the...

  10. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Regulations and Links DOE NEPA Website NEPA Compliance Program (DOE O 451.1B) Council on Environmental Quality Citizen's Guide to the NEPA ...

  11. Policy Flash 2014-05 Continuing Appropriations Act, 2014 -- Implementa...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    L. No. 113-6 Policy Flash 2014-05 Continuing Appropriations Act, 2014 -- Implementation of Division F, Title I, Title II, and Title III, and Division G, Consolidated and Further ...

  12. Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    from the Secretary of the Interior to the Director of the BLM, including oversight of oil and gas leases. References Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 19761 The...

  13. Title 7 CFR 658 Farmland Protection Policy Act | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CFR 658 Farmland Protection Policy Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal Regulation: Title 7 CFR 658...

  14. Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    released by DOE in August 2006 for review and comment by state public utility commissions. PDF icon Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the ...

  15. Questions and Answers about National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Questions and answers about National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance for state and local projects funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) State Energy Program (SEP) in the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  16. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorically Excluded Actions |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy NEPA » National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorically Excluded Actions National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorically Excluded Actions Categorical Exclusions (CX) - Categorical exclusions are categories of actions that DOE has determined, by regulation, do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment and for which neither an environmental assessment nor an environmental impact statement is typically required. Title

  17. NREL: Technology Deployment - Fleets Regulated by the Energy Policy Act

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fleets Regulated by the Energy Policy Act NREL supports the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) regulatory activities involving requirements under the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) for federal, state, and alternative fuel provider fleets. Congress passed EPAct in 1992 to reduce U.S. petroleum consumption through the use of alternative fuels, alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs), and other petroleum-displacement methods. DOE's primary means of achieving this goal in the transportation sector has been to

  18. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Management System » National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Regulations and Links DOE NEPA Website NEPA Compliance Program (DOE O 451.1B) Council on Environmental Quality Citizen's Guide to the NEPA Recent NEPA Actions and Determinations Categorically Excluded Actions Environmental Assessments (EA) None in Progress Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic EIS Record of Decision (ROD) issued in May 2014

  19. WIPP Uses Recovery Act Funding to Reduce Nuclear Waste Footprint

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    CARLSBAD, N.M., August 1, 2011 The U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) reduced the nuclear waste footprint by using American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds to expedite the clean up of five transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites and to make important infrastructure improvements at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP).

  20. Annual National Environmental Policy Act Planning Summaries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Guidance to assist DOE programs in meeting the Annual NEPA Planning Summary reporting requirements, to promote continuous improvement of the summaries as a tool to facilitate field and headquarters compliance with NEPA, and to provide senior DOE managers with information to support key decisionmaking and policy development.

  1. Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) -List of Covered Electric Utilities - 2006 | Department of Energy Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) -List of Covered Electric Utilities - 2006 Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) -List of Covered Electric Utilities - 2006 Under Title I of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA), the

  2. Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) - List of Covered Electric Utilities. | Department of Energy Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) - List of Covered Electric Utilities. Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) - List of Covered Electric Utilities. Under Title I of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA), the U.S.

  3. Draft Guidance for Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Policy Act of 2005 - Hydroelectric Production Incentive Program - July 2014 Draft Guidance for Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 - Hydroelectric Production Incentive ...

  4. Questions and Answers about National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Answers about NEPA Compliance 1. Can State environmental regulations (e.g., New York's State Environmental Quality Review Act) be used in place of NEPA? Or, can DOE delegate NEPA authority to States with their own governmental bodies designed to conduct their own environmental impact assessments? Answer: NEPA is a federal statute and a federal obligation. State processes cannot substitute for the Federal NEPA process, and the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 does not authorize DOE

  5. October 24, 1992: Energy Policy Act of 1992 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4, 1992: Energy Policy Act of 1992 October 24, 1992: Energy Policy Act of 1992 October 24, 1992: Energy Policy Act of 1992 October 24,1992 President Bush signs the Energy Policy Act of 1992, which assists the implementation of the National Energy Strategy

  6. DOE Secretarial Notice: National Environmental Policy Act (February 5, 1990, status: cancelled)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This Secretarial Notice announced revisions of DOE compliance procedures under the National Environmental Policy Act.

  7. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Guide, Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, R.P.

    1995-08-01

    This report contains a comprehensive National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Guide for the Sandia National Laboratories. It is based on the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) NEPA regulations in 40 CFR Parts 1500 through 1508; the US Department of Energy (DOE) N-EPA implementing procedures in 10 CFR Part 102 1; DOE Order 5440.1E; the DOE ``Secretarial Policy Statement on the National Environmental Policy Act`` of June 1994- Sandia NEPA compliance procedures-, and other CEQ and DOE guidance. The Guide includes step-by-step procedures for preparation of Environmental Checklists/Action Descriptions Memoranda (ECL/ADMs), Environmental Assessments (EAs), and Environmental Impact Statements (EISs). It also includes sections on ``Dealing With NEPA Documentation Problems`` and ``Special N-EPA Compliance Issues.``

  8. Fifty years of federal radioactive waste management: Policies and practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, R.G.

    1997-04-01

    This report provides a chronological history of policies and practices relating to the management of radioactive waste for which the US Atomic Energy Commission and its successor agencies, the Energy Research and Development Administration and the Department of Energy, have been responsible since the enactment of the Atomic Energy Act in 1946. The defense programs and capabilities that the Commission inherited in 1947 are briefly described. The Commission undertook a dramatic expansion nationwide of its physical facilities and program capabilities over the five years beginning in 1947. While the nuclear defense activities continued to be a major portion of the Atomic Energy Commission`s program, there was added in 1955 the Atoms for Peace program that spawned a multiplicity of peaceful use applications for nuclear energy, e.g., the civilian nuclear power program and its associated nuclear fuel cycle; a variety of industrial applications; and medical research, diagnostic, and therapeutic applications. All of these nuclear programs and activities generated large volumes of radioactive waste that had to be managed in a manner that was safe for the workers, the public, and the environment. The management of these materials, which varied significantly in their physical, chemical, and radiological characteristics, involved to varying degrees the following phases of the waste management system life cycle: waste characterization, storage, treatment, and disposal, with appropriate transportation linkages. One of the benefits of reviewing the history of the waste management program policies and practices if the opportunity it provides for identifying the lessons learned over the years. Examples are summarized at the end of the report and are listed in no particular order of importance.

  9. MENTAL POLICY ACT IMPLE- MENTING PROCEDURES Subpart A-General

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    59 Department of Energy § 1021.102 PART 1021-NATIONAL ENVIRON- MENTAL POLICY ACT IMPLE- MENTING PROCEDURES Subpart A-General Sec. 1021.100 Purpose. 1021.101 Policy. 1021.102 Applicability. 1021.103 Adoption of CEQ NEPA regulations. 1021.104 Definitions. 1021.105 Oversight of Agency NEPA activi- ties. Subpart B-DOE Decisionmaking 1021.200 DOE planning. 1021.210 DOE decisionmaking. 1021.211 Interim actions: Limitations on ac- tions during the NEPA process. 1021.212 Research, development,

  10. National Environmental Policy Act guidance: A model process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angle, B.M.; Lockhart, V.A.T.; Sema, B.; Tuott, L.C.; Irving, J.S.

    1995-04-01

    The ``Model National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Process`` includes: References to regulations, guidance documents, and plans; training programs; procedures; and computer databases. Legislative Acts and reference documents from Congress, US Department of Energy, and Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company provide the bases for conducting NEPA at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) NEPA / Permitting Department, the Contractor Environmental Organization (CEO) is responsible for developing and maintaining LITCO NEPA and permitting policies, guidance, and procedures. The CEO develops procedures to conduct environmental evaluations based on NEPA, Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations, and DOE guidance. This procedure includes preparation or support of environmental checklists, categorical exclusion determinations, environmental assessment determinations, environmental assessments, and environmental impact statements. In addition, the CEO uses this information to train personnel conducting environmental evaluations at the INEL. Streamlining these procedures fosters efficient use of resources, quality documents, and better decisions on proposed actions.

  11. Tank waste remediation system characterization project quality policies. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trimble, D.J.

    1995-10-02

    These Quality Policies (QPs) describe the Quality Management System of the Tank Waste Characterization Project (hereafter referred to as the Characterization Project), Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS), Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The Quality Policies and quality requirements described herein are binding on all Characterization Project organizations. To achieve quality, the Characterization Project management team shall implement this Characterization Project Quality Management System.

  12. The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires that Federal agencies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires that Federal agencies determine the impact of their actions on the natural and human environments and disclose those impacts to the public Requested by stakeholders in 2008 Driven by current missions and proposed changes in Nevada National Security Site activities Updates the environmental baseline Log No. 2011-308 Prepare DRAFT SWEIS Prepare Final SWEIS Public Comment Period Public Comment Period Minimum 30-day Waiting Period Record of Decision No ce of

  13. Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental Policy Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This handbook presents the results of research and consultations by the Council on Environmental Quality concerning the consideration of cumulative effects in analyses prepared under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). It introduces the NEPA practitioner and other interested parties to the complex issue of cumulative effects, outlines general principles, presents useful steps, and provides information on methods of cumulative effects analysis and data sources.

  14. The Impacts of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 on Industrial End...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Impacts of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 on Industrial End Users of Electric Motor-Driven Systems The Impacts of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 on Industrial End Users of ...

  15. Energy Policy Act of 2005, Section 1813, Draft Report to Congress...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Policy Act of 2005, Section 1813, Draft Report to Congress: Federal Register Notice ... Notice of publication of draft report to Congress: Section 1813 of the Energy Policy Act ...

  16. Draft Guidance for Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Draft Guidance for Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 - Hydroelectric Production Incentive Program - July 2014 Draft Guidance for Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of ...

  17. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Eschbach, Tara O.; Fowler, Richard A.; Fritz, Brad G.; Goodwin, Shannon M.; Harvey, David W.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Hoitink, Dana J.; Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Prendergast-Kennedy, Ellen L.; Rohay, Alan C.; Scott, Michael J.; Thorne, Paul D.

    2002-09-01

    This document describes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents being prepared by DOE contractors. No statements of significance or environmental consequences are provided. This year's report is the thirteenth revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the fourteenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is typically presented in environmental impact statements (Weiss) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological, and historical resources, socioeconomics, occupational safety, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to the NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities.

  18. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Antonio, Ernest J.; Eschbach, Tara O.; Fowler, Richard A.; Goodwin, Shannon M.; Harvey, David W.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Hoitink, Dana J.; Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Prendergast, Ellen L.; Rohay, Alan C.; Thorne, Paul D.

    2001-09-01

    This document describes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents being prepared by DOE contractors. No statements of significance or environmental consequences are provided. This year's report is the thirteenth revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the fourteenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is typically presented in environmental impact statements (Weiss) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological, and historical resources, socioeconomics, occupational safety, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to the NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities.

  19. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Cannon, Sandra D.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Fowler, Richard A.; Fritz, Brad G.; Harvey, David W.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Hoitink, Dana J.; Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Prendergast-Kennedy, Ellen L.; Reidel, Steve P.; Rohay, Alan C.; Scott, Michael J.; Thorne, Paul D.

    2004-09-22

    This document describes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents being prepared by DOE contractors. No statements of significance or environmental consequences are provided. This year's report is the sixteenth revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the seventeenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is typically presented in environmental impact statements (Weiss) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological, and historical resources, socioeconomics, occupational safety and health, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to the NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities.

  20. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization, Revision 15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Burk, Kenneth W.; Cannon, Sandra D.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Fowler, Richard A.; Fritz, Brad G.; Harvey, David W.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Prendergast-Kennedy, Ellen L.; Reidel, Steve P.; Scott, Michael J.; Thorne, Paul D.; Woody, Dave M.

    2003-09-01

    This document describes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents being prepared by DOE contractors. No statements of significance or environmental consequences are provided. This year's report is the thirteenth revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the fourteenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is typically presented in environmental impact statements (Weiss) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological, and historical resources, socioeconomics, occupational safety, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to the NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities.

  1. Energy Policy Act 2005 Summary (released in AEO2006)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. House of Representatives passed H.R. 6 EH, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, on April 21, 2005, and the Senate passed H.R. 6 EAS on June 28, 2005. A conference committee was convened to resolve differences between the two bills, and a report was approved and issued on July 27, 2005. The House approved the conference report on July 28, 2005, and the Senate followed on July 29, 2005. EPACT2005 was signed into law by President Bush on August 8, 2005, and became Public Law 109-058.

  2. Transportation Project Development and the National Environmental Policy Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanthrum, J.G.

    2006-07-01

    This paper explores the nexus between project management and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) activities for developing the Nevada Rail Line to Yucca Mountain. In many federal agencies, the responsibility for project management is completely separate from the responsibility for NEPA implementation; however, each Department of Energy (DOE) Departmental Element has a NEPA Compliance Officer. This ensures effective integration between NEPA and project management activities. As the project management and NEPA activities are implemented, it becomes clear that they are very complimentary processes. This paper will describe the integration of NEPA and project management activities for development of a rail line to the Yucca Mountain geologic repository in Nye County, Nevada. (authors)

  3. 42 U.S.C. 6901 - Solid Waste Disposal Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    6901 - Solid Waste Disposal Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: 42 U.S.C. 6901 - Solid Waste Disposal ActLegal...

  4. Recovery Act Funding Leads to Record Year for Transuranic Waste Shipments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With the help of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) received the most transuranic waste shipments in a single year since waste operations began...

  5. The First Recovery Act Funded Waste Shipment depart from the Advanced Mixed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Waste Treatment Facility The First Recovery Act Funded Waste Shipment departs from the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Facility A shipment of mixed low-level waste left DOE�s Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project on May 6, years earlier than originally planned, due to funding received through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The 36.5 cubic meter shipment consisted of radioactive and chemically contaminated waste that had been retrieved, characterized, packaged and shipped from

  6. National Environmental Policy Act Hazards Assessment for the TREAT Alternative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd D. Christensen; Annette L. Schafer

    2013-11-01

    This document provides an assessment of hazards as required by the National Environmental Policy Act for the alternative of restarting the reactor at the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) facility by the Resumption of Transient Testing Program. Potential hazards have been identified and screening level calculations have been conducted to provide estimates of unmitigated dose consequences that could be incurred through this alternative. Consequences considered include those related to use of the TREAT Reactor, experiment assembly handling, and combined events involving both the reactor and experiments. In addition, potential safety structures, systems, and components for processes associated with operating TREAT and onsite handling of nuclear fuels and experiments are listed. If this alternative is selected, a safety basis will be prepared in accordance with 10 CFR 830, “Nuclear Safety Management,” Subpart B, “Safety Basis Requirements.”

  7. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, D.A.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Fosmire, C.J.

    1997-08-01

    This ninth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Chapters 4 and 6 in Hanford Site-related NEPA documents. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) includes information on climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological and historical resources, socioeconomics, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE directives and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site. Not all of the sections have been updated for this revision. The following lists the updated sections: climate and meteorology; ecology (threatened and endangered species section only); culture, archaeological, and historical resources; socioeconomics; all of Chapter 6.

  8. National Environmental Policy Act Hazards Assessment for the TREAT Alternative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd D. Christensen; Annette L. Schafer

    2014-02-01

    This document provides an assessment of hazards as required by the National Environmental Policy Act for the alternative of restarting the reactor at the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) facility by the Resumption of Transient Testing Program. Potential hazards have been identified and screening level calculations have been conducted to provide estimates of unmitigated dose consequences that could be incurred through this alternative. Consequences considered include those related to use of the TREAT Reactor, experiment assembly handling, and combined events involving both the reactor and experiments. In addition, potential safety structures, systems, and components for processes associated with operating TREAT and onsite handling of nuclear fuels and experiments are listed. If this alternative is selected, a safety basis will be prepared in accordance with 10 CFR 830, “Nuclear Safety Management,” Subpart B, “Safety Basis Requirements.”

  9. Handbook on procedures for implementing the National Environmental Policy Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orellana, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    This handbook establishes and presents for the Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement (OSM) a comprehensive, logical set of procedures for implemeting the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). (a) the legal framework with which OSM must comply is detailed in title I of NEPA, as amended. This handbook discusses responsibilities under title I and the following additional requirements resulting from NEPA; Section 2 of Executive Order 11514, Protection and Enhancement of Environmental Quality, as amended by Executive Order 11991; The regulations of the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) for implementing the procedural provisions of NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508); The final procedures of the Department of the Interior (DOI) implementing NEPA (516 DM 1-7); and OSM's draft appendix to the above DOI procedures. (b) OSM is responsible for the implementation of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA), (30 U.S.C. 1201 et seq.). SMCRA has specific environmental protection performance standards designed to protect society and the environment from the adverse effects of surface coal mining operations and to reclaim mined areas left without adequate reclamation within these standards. As a Federal agency making decisions that affect the human environment, OSM must comply with NEPA.

  10. FSH 1909.15 - National Environmental Policy Act Handbook: Chapter...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    handbook in conjunction with FSM 1950, Environmental Policy and Procedures, which sets forth the broad Forest Service objectives, policy, and responsibilities for meeting the...

  11. BLM - Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: BLM - Federal Land Policy and...

  12. P.L. 109-58, "Energy Policy Act of 2005", 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-08-08

    The Energy Policy Act of 2005 set forth an energy agenda covering a wide range of energy technology research and implementation activities with provisions applicable to AMO activities.

  13. The Impacts of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 on Industrial End Users of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Motor-Driven Systems | Department of Energy The Impacts of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 on Industrial End Users of Electric Motor-Driven Systems The Impacts of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 on Industrial End Users of Electric Motor-Driven Systems Answers to frequently asked questions about the impacts of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 on industrial end users of electric motor-driven systems. PDF icon The Impacts of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 on Industrial End Users of Electric

  14. Presidential Proclamation on the 40th Anniversary of the National Environmental Policy Act (2009)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Proclamation of President Obama to "call upon all executive branch agencies to promote public involvement and transparency in their implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act."

  15. P.L. 102-486, "Energy Policy Act of 1992", 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-10-05

    The Energy Policy Act of 1992 established numerous requirements for industrial efficiency, including those listed under Title I, Subtitle D, and several sections under Title XXI.

  16. Presidential Proclamation on the 40th Anniversary of the National Environmental Policy Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Proclamation of President Obama to "call upon all executive branch agencies to promote public involvement and transparency in their implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act."

  17. Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (42 U.S.C 16421...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (42 U.S.C 16421) Pursuant to Section 1222 of EPAct (42 U.S.C. 16421), the Secretary of Energy, acting through the Southwestern Power ...

  18. Using the National Environmental Policy Act to facilitate the transfer of federal lands for economic development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ladino, A.G.

    1997-06-01

    In order to evaluate the transfer of certain Federal lands at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the US Department of Energy (DOE) determined that the proposed action had the potential to result in environmental impacts and required the preparation of an Environmental Assessment under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The specific proposed action evaluated by DOE with support from LANL was the transfer of approximately 28 contiguous acres of underutilized Federal land to the County. This tract was locally referred to as the DP Road tract. Although the land was underutilized, it functioned as part of a larger buffer area between potentially hazardous operations at LANL and the general public. The tract was covered with scrub vegetation. There were no government buildings located on the site. The tract of land had two Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) located within the tract boundary as well as a buried but active liquid radioactive waste pipeline that crossed the site. The tract of land was adjacent to several other DOE SWMUs as well as a public road. In addition, there were ownership issues pertaining to the transfer of the land to persons and agencies other than the County. This particular tract of land was being considered for transfer to the County at the same time DOE and LANL began evaluating another large Federal land tract for lease to the County to be developed as a private research park.

  19. EPA-- Addressing Children's Health through Reviews Conducted Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act and Section 309 of the Clean Air Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Addressing Children's Health through Reviews Conducted Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act and Section 309 of the Clean Air Act

  20. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, D.A.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Fosmire, C.J.; Fowler, R.A.

    1996-08-01

    This eighth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Chapters 4 and 6 in Hanford Site-related NEPA documents. Chapter 4 (Affected Environment) includes information on climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, historical, archaeological and cultural resources, socioeconomics, and noise. Chapter 6 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE directives and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site. The following sections were updated in this revision: climate and meteorology; ecology (threatened and endangered species section only); historical; archaeological and cultural resources; and all of chapter 6. No conclusions or recommendations are given in this report. Rather, it is a compilation of information on the Hanford Site environment that can be used directly by Site contractors. This information can also be used by any interested individual seeking baseline data on the hanford Site and its past activities by which to evaluate projected activities and their impacts.

  1. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Joanne P.; Burk, Kenneth W.; Chamness, Mickie A.; Fowler, Richard A.; Fritz, Brad G.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Kennedy, Ellen P.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Scott, Michael J.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Thorne, Paul D.

    2007-09-27

    This document describes the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site for the many environmental documents being prepared by DOE contractors concerning the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). No statements regarding significance or environmental consequences are provided. This years report is the eighteen revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the nineteenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. Two chapters are included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6), numbered to correspond to chapters typically presented in environmental impact statements (EISs) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology; air quality; geology; hydrology; ecology; cultural, archaeological, and historical resources; socioeconomics; noise; and occupational health and safety. Sources for extensive tabular data related to these topics are provided in the chapter. When possible, subjects are divided into a general description of the characteristics of the Hanford Site, followed by site-specific information, where available, for the 100, 200, 300 and other areas. This division allows the reader to go directly to those sections of particular interest. When specific information on each of these separate areas is not complete or available, the general Hanford Site description should be used. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities. Information in Chapter 6 can be adapted and supplemented with specific information covering statutory and regulatory requirements for use in an environmental assessment or environmental impact statement. When preparing environmental assessments and EISs, authors should consult Recommendations for the Preparation of Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements published by the DOE Office of NEPA Oversight (DOE 2004). Additional direction and guidance on the preparation of DOE NEPA documents can be found at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/nepa/guidance.html. Individuals seeking baseline data on the Hanford Site and its past activities may also use the information contained in this document to evaluate projected activities and their impacts. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff prepared individual sections of this document, with input from other Hanford Site contractors with the best available information through May 2007. More detailed data are available from reference sources cited or from the authors. For this 2007 revision, the following sections of the document were reviewed by the authors and updated with the best available information through May 2005: Climate and Meteorology Air Quality Geology Seismicity section only Hydrology Flow charts for the Columbia and Yakima rivers only Ecology Threatened and Endangered Species subsection only Socioeconomics Occupational Safety All of Chapter 6.

  2. Policy Flash 2014-04 Continuing Appropriations Act, 2014 -- Congressio...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Barbara Binney at (202) 287-1340 or barbara.binney@hq.doe.gov. Policy flash 2014- Section 311 FY2014.pdf More Documents...

  3. I.C. 39-44 - Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    44 - Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: I.C. 39-44 - Idaho Hazardous Waste...

  4. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushing, C.E.

    1988-09-01

    This document describes the Hanford Site environment (Chapter 4) and contains data in Chapter 5 and 6 which will guide users in the preparation of National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA)-related documents. Many NEPA compliance documents have been prepared and are being prepared by site contractors for the US Department of Energy, and examination of these documents reveals inconsistencies in the amount of detail presented and the method of presentation. Thus, it seemed necessary to prepare a consistent description of the Hanford environment to be used in preparing Chapter 4 of environmental impact statements and other site-related NEPA documentation. The material in Chapter 5 is a guide to the models used, including critical assumptions incorporated in these models, in previous Hanford NEPA documents. The users will have to select those models appropriate for the proposed action. Chapter 6 is essentially a definitive NEPA Chapter 6, which describes the applicable laws, regulations, and DOE and state orders. In this document, a complete description of the environment is presented in Chapter 4 without excessive tabular data. For these data, sources are provided. Most subjects are divided into a general description of the characteristics of the Hanford Site, followed by site-specific information where it is available on the 100, 200, 300, and other Areas. This division will allow a person requiring information to go immediately to those sections of particular interest. However, site-specific information on each of these separate areas is not always complete or available. In this case, the general Hanford Site description should be used. 131 refs., 19 figs., 32 tabs.

  5. Guidelines Establishing Criteria for Excluding Buildings from the Energy Performance Requirements of Section 543 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act as Amended by the Energy Policy Act of 2005

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document contains the Guidelines Establishing Criteria for Excluding Buildings from the Energy Performance Requirements of Section 543 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act as Amended by the Energy Policy Act of 2005

  6. Draft Report to Congress: Energy Policy Act of 2005, Section 1813, Indian

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Land Rights-of-Way Study | Department of Energy Report to Congress: Energy Policy Act of 2005, Section 1813, Indian Land Rights-of-Way Study Draft Report to Congress: Energy Policy Act of 2005, Section 1813, Indian Land Rights-of-Way Study The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (Departments) provide this report to Congress pursuant to Section 1813 of Public Law (Pub. L.) 109-58, the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct). PDF icon Draft Report to Congress:

  7. Draft Guidance for Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005- Hydroelectric Production Incentive Program- July 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document contains draft guidance for Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, the "Hydroelectric Production Incentive Program"

  8. RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Carlsbad, NM - The recent completion of transuranic (TRU) waste cleanup at Vallecitos Nuclear Center (VNC) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 in California brings the total number of sites cleared of TRU waste to 17.

  9. Title 7 CFR 1b National Environmental Policy Act | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    b National Environmental Policy Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: Title 7 CFR 1b National Environmental...

  10. M.C.A. 75-1-101 - Montana Environmental Policy Act | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    M.C.A. 75-1-101 - Montana Environmental Policy Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: M.C.A. 75-1-101 - Montana...

  11. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents | U.S. DOE Office of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science (SC) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Ames Site Office (AMSO) AMSO Home About Projects Contract Management NEPA Documents Categorical Exclusion Determinations Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Resources Contact Information Ames Site Office U.S. Department of Energy 9800 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439 P: (630) 252-6167 F: (630) 252-2855 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Related

  12. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents | U.S. DOE Office of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science (SC) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Argonne Site Office (ASO) ASO Home About Projects Contract Management NEPA Documents Categorical Exclusion Determinations Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Resources Contact Information Argonne Site Office U.S. Department of Energy 9800 South Cass Avenue Building 201 Argonne, IL 60439 P: (630) 252-8637 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Related

  13. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents | U.S. DOE Office of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science (SC) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Brookhaven Site Office (BHSO) BHSO Home About Projects Contract Management NEPA Documents Categorical Exclusion Determinations Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Resources Contact Information Brookhaven Site Office U.S. Department of Energy PO Box 5000 Upton, NY 11973 P: (631) 344-3425 E: Email Us National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Related Links

  14. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents | U.S. DOE Office of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science (SC) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Berkeley Site Office (BSO) BSO Home About Projects Contract Management NEPA Documents Categorical Exclusion Determinations Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Resources Contact Information Berkeley Site Office U.S. Department of Energy One Cyclotron Road Berkeley, CA 94720 P: (510) 486-5784 E: Email Us National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Related

  15. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents | U.S. DOE Office of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science (SC) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Fermi Site Office (FSO) FSO Home About Projects Contract Management NEPA Documents Categorical Exclusion Determinations Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Resources Contact Information Fermi Site Office U.S. Department of Energy MS 118 P.O. Box 2000 Kirk Road and Pine Street Batavia, IL 60510 P: (630) 840-3281 F: (630) 840-3285 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Print Text Size: A A A

  16. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents | U.S. DOE Office of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science (SC) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Oak Ridge National Laboratory Site Office (OSO) OSO Home About Projects Contract Management NEPA Documents Categorical Exclusion Determinations Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Contact Information Oak Ridge National Laboratory Site Office U.S. Department of Energy Post Office Box 2008 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6269 P: (865) 576-0710 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Print Text Size: A A A

  17. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents | U.S. DOE Office of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science (SC) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) PNSO Home About Projects Contract Management NEPA Documents Categorical Exclusion Determinations Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Resources Contact Information Pacific Northwest Site Office U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 350, MS K9-42 Richland, WA 99352 P: (509) 372-4005 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare

  18. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents | U.S. DOE Office of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science (SC) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Princeton Site Office (PSO) PSO Home About Projects Contract Management NEPA Documents Categorical Exclusion Determinations Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Contact Information Princeton Site Office U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 102 Princeton, NJ 08543 P: (609) 243-3700 F: (609) 243-2032 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Related Links

  19. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents | U.S. DOE Office of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science (SC) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents SLAC Site Office (SSO) SSO Home About Projects Contract Management NEPA Documents Categorical Exclusion Determinations Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Contact Information SLAC Site Office U.S. Department of Energy Bldg 41, M/S 08A 2575 Sand Hill Road Menlo Park, CA 94025 P: (650) 926-2505 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Related Links

  20. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents | U.S. DOE Office of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science (SC) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Thomas Jefferson Site Office (TJSO) TJSO Home About Projects Contract Management NEPA Documents Categorical Exclusion Determinations Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Resources Contact Information Thomas Jefferson Site Office U.S. Department of Energy 12000 Jefferson Avenue Newport News, VA 23606 P: (757) 269-7140 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare

  1. Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (DOE,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1994) | Department of Energy Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (DOE, 1994) Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (DOE, 1994) The purpose of this guidance memorandum is to describe potential benefits of conducting a site-wide NEPA review (environmental impact statement orenvironmental assessment). Site-wide reviews can aid the Department of Energy (DOE) in meeting its goals to streamline the NEPA process, to make that process

  2. An economic evaluation of waste flow control policies in municipal solid waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greco, J.

    1995-12-01

    The transport of municipal solid waste through legal means is commonly known as waste flow control. Flow control ordinances prohibit the export of locally generated solid waste to disposal sites outside of a jurisdiction, requiring delivery to a locally designated facility for disposal or processing. Local governments use flow control to support public facilities and to comply with federal and state mandates. A decision by Supreme Court in May, 1994 invalidated the use of flow control by local governments raising important policy questions concerning balances between providing low-cost service to rate-payers, the value of conserving disposal capacity be developing expensive waste management programs, and the protection of the environment from the dangers of poor solid waste management. Since Congress is currently considering passage of federal legislation which would restore flow control authority to local government, there is a need to evaluate waste flow control from economic, environmental, political and social perspectives. This analysis attempts to evaluate flow control policies within an interdisciplinary framework. It examines not only the economic consequences of flow control policies, but also the social and environmental objectives that local governments claim are achieved via use of flow control. The analysis reveals that flow control introduces economic distortions into a highly competitive market for solid waste services, a market which consistently produces lower costs than flow-controlled, publicly-sponsored facilities. Important questions are raised concerning the allocation of risk in capital investments made by municipalities that use flow control to insulate investors and themselves from financial liability. Controlling waste flow helps local governments fulfill regulatory responsibilities that may not be met by reliance on competitive market forces.

  3. P.L. 102-486, "Energy Policy Act" (1992)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-12-13

    Amends the Energy Conservation and Production Act to set a deadline by which each State must certify to the Secretary of Energy whether its energy efficiency standards with respect to residential and commercial building codes meet or exceed those of the Council of American Building Officials (CABO) Model Energy Code, 1992, and of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers, respectively.

  4. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents | U.S. DOE Office of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science (SC) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Integrated Support Center (ISC) ISC Home About Services Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Privacy Act NEPA Documents ISC-Chicago Office Categorical Exclusion Determinations ISC-Oak Ridge Office Categorical Exclusion Determinations ISC-Chicago Office Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements ISC-Oak Ridge Office Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Contact Information Integrated

  5. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushing, C.E.

    1992-12-01

    This fifth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. Information is presented on climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels, prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. Models are described that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclide transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. Federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable for the NEPA documents at the Hanford Site, are provided.

  6. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization. Revision 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushing, C.E.

    1992-12-01

    This fifth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. Information is presented on climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels, prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. Models are described that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclide transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. Federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable for the NEPA documents at the Hanford Site, are provided.

  7. Clean Air Act General Conformity Requirements and the National Environmental Policy Act Process (DOE, 2000)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This DOE guidance has three parts. The first part discusses how to coordinate the conformity and NEPA processes. The second part provides greater detail on the Clean Air Act conformity requirements, the conformity review process, and the conformity determination process. The third part provides related references.

  8. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushing, C.E. ed.; Baker, D.A.; Chamness, M.A. and others

    1995-09-01

    This seventh revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. Chapter 4.0 summarizes up-to-date information on climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, environmental monitoring, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. More detailed data are available from reference sources cited or from the authors. Chapter 5.0 was not updated from the sixth revision (1994). It describes models, including their principal underlying assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclide transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. The updated Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE Orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site, following the structure of Chapter 4.0. No conclusions or recommendations are given in this report. Rather, it is a compilation of information on the Hanford Site environment that can be used directly by Site contractors. This information can also be used by any interested individual seeking baseline data on the Hanford Site and its past activities by which to evaluate projected activities and their impacts.

  9. Hanford Site National Evnironmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushing, C.E.

    1991-12-01

    This fourth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. In Chapter 4.0 are presented summations of up-to-date information about climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels. Chapter 5.0 describes models, including their principal assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclides transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable for environmental impact statements for the Hanford Site, following the structure Chapter 4.0. NO conclusions or recommendations are given in this report.

  10. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushing, C.E.; Baker, D.A.; Chamness, M.A.

    1994-08-01

    This sixth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. Chapter 4.0 summarizes up-to-date information on climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. More detailed data are available from reference sources cited or from the authors; Chapter 5.0 has been significantly updated from the fifth revision. It describes models, including their principal underlying assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclide transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions; The updated Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site, following the structure of Chapter 4.0. No conclusions or recommendations are given in this report. Rather, it is a compilation of information on the Hanford Site environment that can be utilized directly by Site contractors. This information can also be used by any interested individual seeking baseline data on the Hanford Site and its past activities by which to evaluate projected activities and their impacts.

  11. Hanford Site National Evnironmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushing, C.E.

    1991-12-01

    This fourth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. In Chapter 4.0 are presented summations of up-to-date information about climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels. Chapter 5.0 describes models, including their principal assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclides transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable for environmental impact statements for the Hanford Site, following the structure Chapter 4.0. NO conclusions or recommendations are given in this report.

  12. DOE Secretarial Policy Statement on the National Environmental Policy Act (DOE, 1994)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this policy statement, the Secretary of Energy directed a number of actions to streamline the NEPA process, minimize the cost and time for document preparation and review, emphasize teamwork, and make the process more useful to decision makers and the public. The Policy Statement requires continuing evaluation of the outcomes of these reforms and allows for additional changes where necessary.

  13. Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    technologies. A video of the revegetation is available at the DOE-Richland Operations YouTube site at www.youtube.comHanfordSite. Left Photo: Recovery Act workers with CH2M HILL...

  14. Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Cold War Footprint | Department of Energy Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce Cold War Footprint Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce Cold War Footprint The Hanford Site is looking greener these days after American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers revegetated 166 acres across 12 waste sites, planting over 1,100 pounds of seeds and about 280,000 pounds of mulch. The largest of the sites, known as the BC Control Area, is an

  15. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, T.A.; Hansen, R.P.

    1998-08-01

    This report on National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) chronicles past and current compliance activities and includes a recommended strategy that can be implemented for continued improvement. This report provides a list of important references. Attachment 1 contains the table of contents for SAND95-1648, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Guide Sandia National Laboratories (Hansen, 1995). Attachment 2 contains a list of published environmental assessments (EAs) and environmental impact statements (EISs) prepared by SNL/NM. Attachment 3 contains abstracts of NEPA compliance papers authored by SNL/NM and its contractors.

  16. DOE National Environmental Policy Act Implementing Procedures (10 CFR Part 1021) [DOE][2012]

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    10 CFR PART 1021 - NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT IMPLEMENTING PROCEDURES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Authority: 42 U.S.C. 7101 et seq.; 42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.; 50 U.S.C. 2401 et seq. Subpart A-General § 1021.100 Purpose. The purpose of this part is to establish procedures that the Department of Energy (DOE) shall use to comply with section 102(2) of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4332(2)) and the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations for implementing

  17. Energy Secretary Highlights One-Year Anniversary of the Energy Policy Act

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of 2005 at Iowa Wind Turbine Facility | Department of Energy One-Year Anniversary of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 at Iowa Wind Turbine Facility Energy Secretary Highlights One-Year Anniversary of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 at Iowa Wind Turbine Facility August 2, 2006 - 8:36am Addthis CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today visited a wind turbine manufacturer to reinforce DOE's commitment to diversifying America's sources of renewable energy

  18. Order Module--DOE O 451.1B, NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT COMPLIANCE PROGRAM

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE O 451.1B, National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Program, replacesDOE O 451.1A of the same name. DOE O 451.1B is ten pages long. Due to the concise nature of this Order, this module...

  19. Reporting Cooperating Agencies in Implementing the Procedural Requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (CEQ, 2004)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this Council on Environmental Quality Memorandum is to establish a revised report to ensure that all Federal agencies are consistently reporting designation of Federal and non-federal cooperating agencies in the preparation of analyses and documentation required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).

  20. 10 CFR 1021: National Environmental Policy Act Implementing Procedures (DOE, 2011)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of Part 10 CFR 1021 is to establish procedures that the Department of Energy (DOE) shall use to comply with section 102(2) of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42 U...

  1. Order Module--DOE O 451.1B, NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE O 451.1B, National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Program, replaces DOE O 451.1A of the same name. DOE O 451.1B is ten pages long. Due to the concise nature of this Order, ...

  2. S ENERGY POLICY ACT OF 2005 SECTION 242 HYDROELECTRIC INCENTIVE PROGRAM

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    S ENERGY POLICY ACT OF 2005 SECTION 242 HYDROELECTRIC INCENTIVE PROGRAM CALENDAR YEAR 2013 INCENTIVE PAYMENTS Payee (Applicant) Hydro Facility Albany Engineering Corporation (AEC) Mechanicville Hydroelectric Project Albany Engineering Corporation (AEC) Stuyvesant Falls Hydroelectric Project Barton (VT) Village, Inc., Electric Department Barton Hydro Bell Mountain Hydro LLC Bell Mountain Hydro Facility Bowersock Mills & Power Company Expanded Kansas River Hydropower Project-North Powerhouse

  3. P.L. 94-163, "Energy Policy and Conservation Act" (EPCA) (1975)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-12-13

    Energy Policy and Conservation Act. Bill Summary & Status 94th Congress. Issue orders prohibiting power plants and major fuel burning installations from using natural gas or petroleum products as fuel if they had been capable on June 22, 1974, of burning coal.

  4. Energy Policy Act Transportation Rate Study: Final Report on Coal Transportation

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    This is the final in a series of reports prepared for the U.S. Congress by the Secretary of Energy on coal distribution and transportation rates as mandated by Title XIII, Section 1340, Establishment of Data Base and Study of Transportation Rates, of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486).

  5. Cooperating Agencies in Implementing the Procedural Requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (CEQ, 2002)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this Council on Environmental Quality Memorandum is to ensure that all Federal agencies are actively considering the designation of Federal and non-federal cooperating agencies in the preparation of analyses and documentation required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), and to ensure that Federal agencies actively participate as cooperating agencies in other agency’s NEPA processes.

  6. Recovery Act: Waste Energy Project at AK Steel Corporation Middletown

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joyce, Jeffrey

    2012-06-30

    In 2008, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products) began development of a project to beneficially utilize waste blast furnace topgas generated in the course of the iron-making process at AK Steel Corporations Middletown, Ohio works. In early 2010, Air Products was awarded DOE Assistance Agreement DE-EE002736 to further develop and build the combined-cycle power generation facility. In June 2012, Air Products and AK Steel Corporation terminated work when it was determined that the project would not be economically viable at that time nor in the foreseeable future. The project would have achieved the FOA-0000044 Statement of Project Objectives by demonstrating, at a commercial scale, the technology to capture, treat, and convert blast furnace topgas into electric power and thermal energy.

  7. DOE Completes Annual Determination of the Adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund Fee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), DOE has completed its annual review of the adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund fee.

  8. Idaho Workers Complete Last of Transuranic Waste Transfers Funded by Recovery Act

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    August 29, 2011 IDAHO FALLS, Idaho - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers successfully transferred 130 containers of remote-handled transuranic waste - each weighing up to 15 tons - to a facility for repackaging and shipment to a permanent disposal location. As part of a project funded by $90 million from the Recovery Act, the final shipment of the containers from the Materials and Fuels Com- plex recently arrived at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). Each of

  9. Energy Policy Act transportation rate study: Availability of data and studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-13

    Pursuant to Section 1340(c) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT), this report presents the Secretary of Energy`s review of data collected by the Federal Government on rates for rail and pipeline transportation of domestic coal, oil, and gas for the years 1988 through 1997, and proposals to develop an adequate data base for each of the fuels, based on the data availability review. This report also presents the Energy Information Administration`s findings regarding the extent to which any Federal agency is studying the impacts of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90) and other Federal policies on the transportation rates and distribution patterns of domestic coal, oil, and gas.

  10. Impacts of Modeled Provisions of H.R. 6 EH: The Energy Policy Act of 2005

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    This report responds to a May 2, 2005, request by Chairman Pete Domenici and Ranking Member Jeff Bingaman of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources for an assessment of the energy supply, consumption, import, price, and macroeconomic impacts of H.R. 6 EH, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, as passed by the U.S. House of Representatives on April 21, 2005.

  11. Template for Expedited National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review of Certain State Energy Program Projects

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Enclosure 2 Template for Expedited NEPA Review of Certain State Energy Program Projects Purpose: This document provides an optional approach/Template that a State may use to help the Department of Energy (DOE) expedite National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review of certain activities (Projects) contained in the State's energy and conservation plan for which the State requests State Energy Program (SEP) funding. This optional approach/Template builds on the August 21, 2009, draft guidance

  12. Materials and Fuels Complex Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Storage and Treatment Permit Reapplication, Environmental Protection Agency Number ID4890008952

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holzemer, Michael J.; Hart, Edward

    2015-04-01

    Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Storage and Treatment Permit Reapplication for the Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Partial Permit, PER-116. This Permit Reapplication is required by the PER-116 Permit Conditions I.G. and I.H., and must be submitted to the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality in accordance with IDAPA 58.01.05.012 [40 CFR §§ 270.10 and 270.13 through 270.29].

  13. Energy policy act transportation study: Interim report on natural gas flows and rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-17

    This report, Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Interim Report on Natural Gas Flows and Rates, is the second in a series mandated by Title XIII, Section 1340, ``Establishment of Data Base and Study of Transportation Rates,`` of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102--486). The first report Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Availability of Data and Studies, was submitted to Congress in October 1993; it summarized data and studies that could be used to address the impact of legislative and regulatory actions on natural gas transportation rates and flow patterns. The current report presents an interim analysis of natural gas transportation rates and distribution patterns for the period from 1988 through 1994. A third and final report addressing the transportation rates and flows through 1997 is due to Congress in October 2000. This analysis relies on currently available data; no new data collection effort was undertaken. The need for the collection of additional data on transportation rates will be further addressed after this report, in consultation with the Congress, industry representatives, and in other public forums.

  14. Chapter 19 - Nuclear Waste Fund

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9. Nuclear Waste Fund 19-1 CHAPTER 19 NUCLEAR WASTE FUND 1. INTRODUCTION. a. Purpose. This chapter establishes the financial, accounting, and budget policies and procedures for civilian and defense nuclear waste activities, as authorized in Public Law 97-425, the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended, referred to hereafter as the Act. b. Applicability. This chapter applies to all Departmental elements, including the National Nuclear Security Administration, and activities that are funded by the

  15. DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE O 451.1B National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Orders Self-Study Program DOE O 451.1B NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT COMPLIANCE PROGRAM ALBUQUERQUE OPERATIONS OFFICE Change No: 1 DOE O 451.1B Level: Familiar Date: 6/15/01 1 DOE O 451.1B NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) COMPLIANCE PROGRAM FAMILIAR LEVEL _________________________________________________________________________ OBJECTIVES Given DOE O 451.1B, you will be able to do the following: 1. List the objectives of DOE O 451.1B, National Environmental Policy Act Compliance

  16. Summary of Interim Policy on CERCLA Settlements Involving Municipalities and Municipal Wastes. Fact sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-05-01

    The Fact Sheet addresses a consistent agency-wide approach for addressing municipalities and municipal wastes in the Superfund settlement process. The policy also addresses settlements with private generators and transporters of hazardous waste trash derived from a commercial, institutional, or industrial process or activity.

  17. Solid waste landfills under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    This document provides guidance for meeting: (1) Guidelines for the Land Disposal of Solid Waste (40 CFR 241); (2) Criteria for Classification of Solid Waste Disposal Facilities and Practices (40 CFR 257); and (3) Criteria for Municipal Solid Waste Landfills (MSWLFs) (40 CFR Part 258). Revisions to 40 CFR 257 and a new Part 258 were published in the Federal Register (56 FR 50978, 10/9/91). The Guidelines for the Land Disposal of Solid Waste set requirements and recommended procedures to ensure that the design, construction, and operation of land disposal sites is done in a manner that will protect human health and the environment. These regulations are applicable to MSWLFs and non-MSWLFs (e.g., landfills used only for the disposal of demolition debris, commercial waste, and/or industrial waste). These guidelines are not applicable to the, land disposal of hazardous, agricultural, and/or mining wastes. These criteria are to be used under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) in determining which solid waste disposal facilities pose a reasonable possibility of adversely affecting human health or the environment. Facilities failing to satisfy these criteria will be considered to be open dumps which are prohibited under Section 4005 of RCRA. The Criteria for MSWLFs are applicable only to MSWLFs, including those MSWLFs in which sewage sludge is co-disposed with household waste. Based on specific criteria, certain MSWLFs are exempt from some, or all, of the regulations of 40 CFR 258. MSWLFs that fail to satisfy the criteria specified in 40 CFR 258 are also considered open dumps for the purposes of Section 4005 of RCRA. Through the use of a series of interrelated flow diagrams, this guidance document directs the reader to each design, operation, maintenance, and closure activity that must be performed for MSWLFs and non-MSWLFs.

  18. National Energy Policy Act Guide for State Energy Program and Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) guidance for the state projects funded under the State Energy Program regarding the National Energy Policy Act (NEPA).

  19. Annotated bibliography National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents for Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, J.M.

    1995-04-01

    The following annotated bibliography lists documents prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE), and predecessor agencies, to meet the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) for activities and facilities at Sandia National Laboratories sites. For each NEPA document summary information and a brief discussion of content is provided. This information may be used to reduce the amount of time or cost associated with NEPA compliance for future Sandia National Laboratories projects. This summary may be used to identify model documents, documents to use as sources of information, or documents from which to tier additional NEPA documents.

  20. Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978. Annual report to Congress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None,

    1980-05-01

    Titles I and III of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) establish retail regulatory policies for electric and natural gas utilities, respectively, aimed at achieving three purposes: conservation of energy supplied by electric and gas utilities; efficiency in the use of facilities and resources by these utilities; equitable rates to electricity and natural gas consumers. PURPA also continues the pilot utility implementation program, authorized under Title II of the Energy Conservation and Production ACT (ECPA), to encourage adoption of cost-based rates and efficient energy-management practices. The purpose of this report is twofold: (1) to summarize and analyze the progress that state regulatory authorities and certain nonregulated utilities have made in their consideration of the PURPA standards; and (2) to summarize the Department of Energy (DOE) activities relating to PURPA and ECPA. The report provides a broad overview and assessment of the status of electric and gas regulation nationwide, and thus helps provide the basis for congressional and DOE actions targeted on the utility industry to address pressing national energy problems.

  1. Savannah River Site, Liquid Waste Program, Savannah River Remediation American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Benefits and Lessons Learned - 12559

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitz, Mark A.; Crouse, Thomas N.

    2012-07-01

    Utilizing funding provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), the Liquid Waste Program at Savannah River site successfully executed forty-one design, procurement, construction, and operating activities in the period from September 2009 through December 2011. Project Management of the program included noteworthy practices involving safety, integrated project teams, communication, and cost, schedule and risk management. Significant upgrades to plant capacity, progress toward waste tank closure and procurement of needed infrastructure were accomplished. Over 1.5 million hours were worked without a single lost work day case. Lessons Learned were continually identified and applied to enhance the program. Investment of Recovery Act monies into the Liquid Waste Program has ensured continued success in the disposition of radioactive wastes and the closure of high level waste tanks at SRS. The funding of a portion of the Liquid Waste Program at SRS by ARRA was a major success. Significant upgrades to plant capacity, progress toward waste tank closure and procurement of needed infrastructure was accomplished. Integrated Project Teams ensured quality products and services were provided to the Operations customers. Over 1.5 million hours were worked without a single lost work day case. Lessons Learned were continually reviewed and reapplied to enhance the program. Investment of Recovery Act monies into the Liquid Waste Program has ensured continued success in the disposition of radioactive wastes and the closure of high level waste tanks at SRS. (authors)

  2. Waste Disposal and Recovery Act Efforts at the Oak Ridge Reservation,OAS-RA-L-12-01

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Inspection Report Waste Disposal and Recovery Act Efforts at the Oak Ridge Reservation INS-RA-L-12-01 December 2011 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 December 16, 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, OAK RIDGE OFFICE FROM: Sandra D. Bruce Assistant Inspector General for Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Inspection Report on "Waste Disposal and Recovery Act Efforts at the Oak Ridge Reservation" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy's (Department) expends

  3. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CLOSURE AND WASTE MANAGEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT FOR THE HANFORD SITE, RICHLAND, ... Department of Energy, "National Environmental Policy Act Implementing Procedures...

  4. Tank waste remediation system characterization project quality policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trible, T.C., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-31

    This quality plan describes the system used by Characterization Project management to achieve quality. This plan is comprised on eleven quality policies which, when taken together, form a management system deployed to achieve quality. This quality management system is based on the customer`s quality requirements known as the `RULE`, 10 CFR 830.120, Quality Assurance.

  5. Policy Flash 2013-48 OMB memorandum M-13-10, Antideficiency Act...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Kevin M. Smith, of the Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division, at Kevin.M.Smith@hq.doe.gov or at (202) 287-1614. PDF icon Policy Flash 2013-48.pdf PDF icon AttachPolicy ...

  6. Report to Congress on the Progress of the Federal Government in Meeting the Renewable Goals of the Energy Policy Act of 2005

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document reports on the fiscal year 2008 compliance activities of federal agencies with Section 203 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005.

  7. Policy Flash 2013-28 Implementation of Indian Energy Preference Provision in EP Act 2005 and Acquisition Letter 2013-02

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is Policy Flash 2013-28 Implementation of Indian Energy Preference Provision in EP Act 2005 and Acquisition Letter 2013-02

  8. Policies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are in .pdf format) After Hours Access Policy Booking and Login Policy Cleanroom Policy Equipment Use Policy Two-Person Rule Cleanroom Chemical List Experimental Hall Policy...

  9. Voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holt, E. Jr.; Vernet, J.E. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    DOE is developing guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gas emissions and their reductions, under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. The establishment of this voluntary program should encourage the reduction of greenhouse gases while providing the opportunity to share innovative approaches to achieving such reductions. This social learning aspect is an important element of the program. In addition to greenhouse gas reductions achieved during a given year, reporters are encouraged to also report their actual emissions of such gases for 1987 through 1990. Due to the voluntary nature of this program, and the myriad differences among the potential reporting entities and possible uses for the data reported, the guidelines will need to be structured so as to maximize participation without compromising the usefulness of the data collected. Through a broad notice of inquiry, published in the Federal Register on July 27, 1993, the Department began seeking input into development of the guidelines. Subsequently, to gain a better understanding of the various sectors of the economy, six public workshops were held during the 1993. One workshop addressed institutional issues of potential interest to all sectors of the economy, with the other five workshops focusing more on matters of concern to specific sectors. These meetings were structured so as to provide broad representation from potential reporting entities along with public interest organizations. It is clear that there are significant variations among those reporting greenhouse information. Presently voluntary, the program will need flexibility to encourage broad participation.

  10. Lessons learned and new challenges for integrated assessment under the National Environmental Policy Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carnes, S.A.; Reed, R.M.

    1995-12-31

    One of the first government-sponsored demands for integrated assessment to support decision making in the United States is embodied in the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Over the past 25 years, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has supported federal agencies` in evaluating health and environmental impacts as required by NEPA. Many of ORNL`s efforts have focused on complex, programmatic assessments that break new ground and require and integrate expertise from a wide range of technical disciplines. Examples of ORNL projects that illustrate the use of integrated assessment approaches include environmental documentation for: (1) the Department of the Army`s Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program, (2) the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s licensing activities related to the Owens River Basin in eastern California and along a 500-mile reach of the upper Ohio River, and (3) the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s decision regarding restart of the undamaged reactor (Unit 1) at Three Mile Island. Our discussion of these examples illustrates successful integrated assessment approaches and identifies new challenges facing integrated assessment activities.

  11. RISKIND: An enhanced computer code for National Environmental Policy Act transportation consequence analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J.; Chen, S.Y.

    1996-03-01

    The RISKIND computer program was developed for the analysis of radiological consequences and health risks to individuals and the collective population from exposures associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or other radioactive materials. The code is intended to provide scenario-specific analyses when evaluating alternatives for environmental assessment activities, including those for major federal actions involving radioactive material transport as required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). As such, rigorous procedures have been implemented to enhance the code`s credibility and strenuous efforts have been made to enhance ease of use of the code. To increase the code`s reliability and credibility, a new version of RISKIND was produced under a quality assurance plan that covered code development and testing, and a peer review process was conducted. During development of the new version, the flexibility and ease of use of RISKIND were enhanced through several major changes: (1) a Windows{sup {trademark}} point-and-click interface replaced the old DOS menu system, (2) the remaining model input parameters were added to the interface, (3) databases were updated, (4) the program output was revised, and (5) on-line help has been added. RISKIND has been well received by users and has been established as a key component in radiological transportation risk assessments through its acceptance by the U.S. Department of Energy community in recent environmental impact statements (EISs) and its continued use in the current preparation of several EISs.

  12. Defining the no-action alternative for National Environmental Policy Act analyses of continuing actions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCold, L.N.; Saulsbury, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations for implementing the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) do not define the no-action alternative, stating only that EPA analyses shall include the alternative of no action. The definition of the no-action alternative for newly proposed actions seems clear. However, for continuing actions, the meaning of the no-action alternative is ambiguous. This article examines the overall function of the no-action alternative for NEPA analyses of continuing actions. It begins with a discussion of the conflicting definitions of the no-action alternative for continuing activities, including CEQ regulations and guidelines related to the no-action alternative and legal decisions that have helped establish precedence for defining no action. A review of NEPA regulations and guidelines of 10 federal agencies shows how different agencies define no-action for continuing actions. Review of six recent NEPA documents on continuing actions reveals how their definition of the no-action alternative promote or impede informed decision-making.

  13. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Source Guide for the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JANSKY, M.T.

    2000-09-01

    This Source Guide will assist those working with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 to become more familiar with the environmental assessments (EA) and environmental impact statements (EIS) that apply to specific activities and facilities on the Hanford Site. This document should help answer questions concerning NEPA coverage, history, processes, and the status of many of the buildings and units on and related to the Hanford Site. This document summarizes relevant EAs and EISs by briefly outlining the proposed action of each document and the decision made by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) or its predecessor agencies, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA). The summary includes the proposed action alternatives and current status of the proposed action. If a decision officially was stated by the DOE, as in a finding of no significant impact (FONSI) or a record of decision (ROD), and the decision was located, a summary is provided. Not all federal decisions, such as FONSIs and RODs, can be found in the Federal Register (FR). For example, although significant large-action FONSIs can be found in the FR, some low-interest FONSIs might have been published elsewhere (i.e., local newspapers).

  14. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Program -- FY 2010 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weeks, Regan S.

    2011-04-20

    During fiscal year (FY) 2010, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Environmental Protection and Regulatory Programs Division (before March 1, 2011 known as the Environmental Management Services Department) staff performed a number of activities as part of PNNLs National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance program. These activities helped to verify U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) and Richland Operations Office (RL) compliance with NEPA requirements and streamline the NEPA process for federal activities conducted at PNNL. Self-assessments were performed to address NEPA compliance and cultural and biological resource protection. The NEPA self-assessments focused on implementation within the PNNL Energy and Environment Directorate and routine maintenance activities conducted during the previous calendar year. The cultural and biological resource self-assessments were conducted in accordance with the PNSO Cultural and Biological Resources Management Plan, which specifies annual monitoring of important resources to assess and document the status of the resources and the associated protective mechanisms in place to protect sensitive resources.

  15. The NEPA mandate and federal regulation of the natural gas industry. [NEPA (National Environmental Policy Act)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoecker, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    Utility regulators increasingly take responsibility for the [open quotes]extemalities[close quotes] associated with their decisions, meaning the economic and social costs related to rate decisions or other kinds of authorizations. Yet, when Congress adopted the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), it intervened to ensure protection of the natural environment, not from abuses by the citizenry but from the activities of the federal government itself. Comprised of action forcing procedures, NEPA was designed to infuse the decisional processes of federal agencies with a broad awareness of the environmental consequences of their actions. NEPA encourages decisionmakers to counterbalance the organic statutory and political missions of their departments or agencies with a sensitivity to the ecological consequences of their directives and authorizations. This paper examines how the requirements of NEPA have fared in the environment of classical public utility regulation at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. Commission proceedings did not evidence any widely held opinion that economic regulation of the gas industry is hostile to the NEPA process.

  16. Guidelines for Hanford Site implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, S.E.

    1989-03-01

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) environmental review process is mandatory for federal agencies. Understanding and complying with NEPA is extremely important to successfully planning and implementing programs at the Hanford Site. This report is intended to help planners and decision makers understand NEPA by describing the NEPA process as it is outlined in NEPA, in regulations, and in guidance information. The requirements and guidance documents that set forth the NEPA process are discussed. Some of the major NEPA concepts and issues are also addressed. This report is intended to be used as a general road map through the maze of NEPA requirements and guidance to ensure that Hanford Site activities are conducted in compliance with NEPA. Enhanced knowledge of the NEPA process is expected to increase the ability of the Hanford Site to work with regulators, interested parties and the public to ensure that the potential environmental impacts of DOE activities are fully considered at the Hanford Site. In addition, an enhanced understanding of NEPA will help project and program managers to integrate NEPA compliance requirements with program planning. 43 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Addressing environmental justice under the National Environment Policy Act at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, T.M.; Bleakly, D.R.

    1997-04-01

    Under Executive Order 12898, Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations, the Department of Energy (DOE) and Sandia National Laboratories New Mexico (SNL) are required to identify and address, as appropriate, disproportionately high, adverse human health or environmental effects of their activities on minority and low-income populations. The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) also requires that environmental justice issues be identified and addressed. This presents a challenge for SNL because it is located in a culturally diverse area. Successfully addressing potential impacts is contingent upon accurately identifying them through objective analysis of demographic information. However, an effective public participation process, which is necessarily subjective, is also needed to understand the subtle nuances of diverse populations that can contribute to a potential impact, yet are not always accounted for in a strict demographic profile. Typically, there is little or no coordination between these two disparate processes. This report proposes a five-step method for reconciling these processes and uses a hypothetical case study to illustrate the method. A demographic analysis and community profile of the population within 50 miles of SNL were developed to support the environmental justice analysis process and enhance SNL`s NEPA and public involvement programs. This report focuses on developing a methodology for identifying potentially impacted populations. Environmental justice issues related to worker exposures associated with SNL activities will be addressed in a separate report.

  18. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization Report, Revision 17

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Cannon, Sandra D.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Fowler, Richard A.; Fritz, Brad G.; Harvey, David W.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Hoitink, Dana J.; Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Prendergast-Kennedy, Ellen L.; Reidel, Steve P.; Rohay, Alan C.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Scott, Michael J.; Thorne, Paul D.

    2005-09-30

    This document describes the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many environmental documents being prepared by DOE contractors concerning the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). No statements about significance or environmental consequences are provided. This year’s report is the seventeenth revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the eighteenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is typically presented in environmental impact statements (EISs) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology; air quality; geology; hydrology; ecology; cultural, archaeological, and historical resources; socioeconomics; noise; and occupational health and safety. Sources for extensive tabular data related to these topics are provided in the chapter. Most subjects are divided into a general description of the characteristics of the Hanford Site, followed by site-specific information, where available, of the 100, 200, 300, and other areas. This division allows the reader to go directly to those sections of particular interest. When specific information on each of these separate areas is not complete or available, the general Hanford Site description should be used. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to the NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities. Information in Chapter 6 of this document can be adapted and supplemented with specific information for a chapter covering statutory and regulatory requirements in an environmental assessment or environmental impact statement. When preparing environmental assessments and EISs, authors should also be cognizant of the document titled Recommendations for the Preparation of Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements published by the DOE Office of NEPA Oversight (DOE 2004). Additional guidance on preparing DOE NEPA documents can be found at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/nepa/guidance.html. Any interested individual seeking baseline data on the Hanford Site and its past activities may also use the information contained in this document to evaluate projected activities and their impacts. For this 2005 revision, the following sections of the document were reviewed by the authors and updated with the best available information through May 2005: Climate and Meteorology Air Quality Geology – Seismicity section only Hydrology – Flow charts for the Columbia and Yakima rivers only Ecology – Threatened and Endangered Species subsection only Socioeconomics Occupational Safety All of Chapter 6.

  19. POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM #08 DOE Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) Exempt/Non-Exempt Status Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum provides guidance on determining an employee's Fair Labor Standards Act status within the Department.

  20. Nuclear Waste Fund Activities Management Team | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Waste Fund Activities Management Team Nuclear Waste Fund Activities Management Team The Nuclear Waste Fund Activities Management Team has responsibility to: Manage the investments and expenditures of the Nuclear Waste Fund; Support correspondence regarding Nuclear Waste Policy Act issues raised by congressional, Inspector General, Government Accounting Office and Freedom of Information Act inquiries; and, Manage the annual fee adequacy assessment process. Applicable Documents Nuclear Waste

  1. Policy Flash 2013-48 OMB memorandum M-13-10, Antideficiency Act...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Kevin M. Smith, of the Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division, at Kevin.M.Smith@hq.doe.gov or at (202) ...

  2. Impacts of policy and market incentives for solid waste recycling in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matter, Anne; Ahsan, Mehedi; Zurbrügg, Christian

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Bangladesh’s industry and population are growing rapidly, producing more urban waste. • Recycling reduces the solid waste management burden of Municipalities. • A wide array of informal and formal actors is involved in collection and recycling. • Demand for recycled materials and renewable energy creates market incentives. • Policy incentives exist, but they only reach the formal industry. - Abstract: Solid waste mismanagement in Dhaka, Bangladesh, illustrates a well-known market failure which can be summarized as: waste is a resource in the wrong place. Inorganic materials such as plastic or paper can be used to feed the demand for recycled materials in the industrial sector. Organic materials can be converted and used in the nutrient-starved agricultural sector which is currently heavily depending on chemical fertilizers. They are also a feedstock to generate renewable energy in the form of biogas for this energy-starved country relying on diminishing natural gas reserves and increasing import of coal. Reality however does not capitalize on this potential; instead the waste is a burden for municipal authorities who spend large portions of their budgets attempting to transport it out of the city for discharge into landfills. The major part of these materials still remains uncollected in the residential areas and is discarded indiscriminately in open spaces, polluting the residents’ living environment including water, soil and air resources, in the city and beyond. Bangladeshi authorities have, to some extent, recognized this market failure and have developed policies to encourage the development of waste recycling activities. It is also important to note that this market failure is only partial: a large, mostly informal recycling sector has developed in Bangladesh, focusing on inorganic recyclables of market value. The fact that this sector remains largely informal means that these actors perceive significant barriers to formalization. Comparatively, the organic waste recycling sector is less driven by market mechanisms. Competition from chemical fertilizers and fossil fuels is fierce and hinders the development of market opportunities for compost and renewable energy. Nevertheless commercial production of compost and biogas from organic municipal waste is formalized and benefiting from policy incentives.

  3. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents | U.S. DOE Office of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science (SC) Documents Safety and Security Policy (SSP) SSP Home About Frequently Used Resources NEPA Documents Categorical Exclusion Determinations Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Continuity of Operations (COOP) Implementation Plan Contact Information Safety and Security Policy U.S. Department of Energy SC-31/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-6800 F: (301) 903-7047 More Information » National Environmental Policy

  4. Policy Flash 2014-35 Rescission of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Reporting Requirements.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For DOE questions concerning the policy flash or FAL, please contact Richard Bonnell at (202) 287-1747 or richard.bonnell@hq.doe.gov.

  5. € National Energy Policy Act Guide for State Energy Program and Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Projects

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    STATE ENERGY PROGRAM NOTICE (10-001) AND ENERGY EFFICIENCY CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM NOTICE (10-003) EFFECTIVE DATE: December 17, 2009 SUBJECT: NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT GUIDE FOR STATE ENERGY PROGRAM AND ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANT PROJECTS PURPOSE: This guidance is designed to help applicants for or recipients of funds from DOE's State Energy Program (SEP) and Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) program (Grantees). Grantees may not spend

  6. H. R. 2670: A bill to amend the Solid Waste Disposal Act to regulate ash from municipal solid waste incinerators as a hazardous waste, introduced in the US House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, June 18, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This bill was introduced into the US House of Representatives on June 18, 1991 to amend the Solid Waste disposal Act to regulate ash from municipal solid waste incinerators as a hazardous waste. When garbage is burned, toxic materials are concentrated in the ash. If the ash is disposed of in a landfill, these toxic materials can contaminate the ground water or surface water by leaching toxic materials from the ash. In addition, disposing of contaminated ash improperly can pose a health hazard. New authority is provided for regulating incinerator ash as a hazardous waste.

  7. Energy Policy Act of 2005, Section 1813, Indian Land Rights-of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Affairs BLM Bureau of Land Management BOR Bureau of ... Act of 2005 EPNG El Paso Natural Gas Company FERC Federal Energy ... and regulatory requirements of tribal consent in ...

  8. P.L. 95-619, "National Energy Supply Policy Act" (NECPA) (1978)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-12-13

    The purposes of this Act are to provide for the regulation of interstate commerce, to reduce the growth in demand for energy, and to conserve non-renewable energy resources without inhibiting beneficial economic growth.

  9. Energy Policy Act of 2005, Section 1813, Draft Report to Congress: Federal Register Notice Volume 71, No. 153- Aug. 9, 2006

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Notice of publication of draft report to Congress: Section 1813 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Pub. L. 109–58) requires the Department of the Interior and the Department of Energy (Departments)...

  10. Final Guidance on Improving the Process for Preparing Efficient and Timely Environmental Reviews Under the National Environmental Policy Act (CEQ, 2012)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Council on Environmental Quality is issuing its final guidance on Improving the Process for Preparing Efficient and Timely Environmental Reviews under the National Environmental Policy Act. The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and CEQ Regulations implementing NEPA provide numerous techniques for preparing efficient and timely environmental reviews. CEQ is issuing this guidance for Federal departments and agencies to emphasize and clarify that these techniques are available for all NEPA Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements.

  11. The Public Utilities Regulatory Policy Act (PURPA) and US Geothermal Industry: Current controversies and trends in federal and state implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    This report is an analysis of the issues confronting US energy policymakers and the US geothermal industry as the result of the implementation and interpretation of the 1978 Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act, commonly known as PURPA. It seeks to answer four sets of questions about PURPA: (1) What has the existence of PURPA meant to the US geothermal industry. (2) How has the interpretation of PURPA evolved over the past decade. (3) What particular portions of PURPA rule making have been most crucial to the growth and development of the geothermal industry. (4) What aspects of PURPA have been most troubling to utilities purchasing or developing geothermal energy.

  12. The National Environmental Policy Act net (NEPAnet) and DOE NEPA Web: What they bring to environmental impact assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jessee, L.

    1998-01-01

    The US National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) requires agencies to use a systematic, interdisciplinary approach to ensure integrated use of natural and social sciences and the environmental design arts in planning and decision-making. Numerous environmental analyses have been prepared that contain valuable information about regions and ecosystems, but these data were not stored in a retrievable manner. In 1993 and 1994, agency-specific NEPA and related datasets were consolidated into the US Department of Energy NEPA Web and NEPAnet. These improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the environmental impact assessment/NEPA process in the US.

  13. DOE Reaches Recovery Act Goal With Cleanup of All Legacy Transuranic Waste at Sandia National Laboratories

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CARLSBAD, N.M., May 3, 2012 –The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) completed cleanup of the Cold War legacy transuranic (TRU) waste at Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) in Albuquerque, New Mexico when four shipments of remote-handled (RH) TRU waste from Sandia arrived at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, N.M. for permanent disposal on May 2, 2012.

  14. 2011 SECRETARIAL DETERMINATION OF THE ADEQUACY OF THE NUCLEAR WASTE FUND FEE

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), DOE has completed its annual review of the adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund fee. Based on that review, the Office of Standard Contract...

  15. Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (42 U.S.C 16421)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pursuant to Section 1222 of EPAct (42 U.S.C. 16421), the Secretary of Energy, acting through the Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern) or the Western Area Power Administration (Western), has the authority to design, develop, construct, operate, own, or participate with other entities in designing, developing, constructing, operating, maintaining, or owning two types of projects.

  16. Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB)/Radioactive Waste Annual Inventory for Calendar Year 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    no author on report

    2014-06-01

    The Toxic Substances Control Act, 40 CFR 761.65(a)(1) provides an exemption from the one year storage time limit for PCB/radioactive waste. PCB/radioactive waste may exceed the one year time limit provided that the provisions at 40 CFR 761.65(a)(2)(ii) and 40 CFR 761.65(a)(2)(iii) are followed. These two subsections require, (ii) "A written record documenting all continuing attempts to secure disposal is maintained until the waste is disposed of" and (iii) "The written record required by subsection (ii) of this section is available for inspection or submission if requested by EPA." EPA Region 10 has requested the Department of Energy (DOE) to submit an inventory of radioactive-contaminated PCB waste in storage at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the previous calendar year. The annual inventory is separated into two parts, INL without Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) (this includes Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC, and the Naval Reactors Facility), and AMWTP.

  17. Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB)/Radioactive Waste Annual Inventory for Calendar Year 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layton, Deborah L.

    2015-06-01

    The Toxic Substances Control Act, 40 CFR 761.65(a)(1) provides an exemption from the one year storage time limit for PCB/radioactive waste. PCB/radioactive waste may exceed the one year time limit provided that the provisions at 40 CFR 761.65(a)(2)(ii) and 40 CFR 761.65(a)(2)(iii) are followed. These two subsections require, (ii) "A written record documenting all continuing attempts to secure disposal is maintained until the waste is disposed of" and (iii) "The written record required by subsection (ii) of this section is available for inspection or submission if requested by EPA." EPA Region 10 has requested the Department of Energy (DOE) to submit an inventory of radioactive-contaminated PCB waste in storage at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the previous calendar year. The annual inventory is separated into two parts, INL without Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) (this includes Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC, and the Naval Reactors Facility), and AMWTP.

  18. Implementation of Section 180(c) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Award | Department of Energy Illinois Rural Electric Cooperative Wins DOE Wind Cooperative of the Year Award Illinois Rural Electric Cooperative Wins DOE Wind Cooperative of the Year Award February 17, 2006 - 12:02pm Addthis WASHINGTON , DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that Illinois Rural Electric Cooperative (IREC) will receive the 2005 Wind Cooperative of the Year Award. The utility was cited for its leadership, demonstrated success, and innovation in its wind

  19. Draft environmental assessment: Richton Dome site, Mississippi. Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 112). [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy identified the Richton dome site as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geo

  20. Preparation of waste analysis plans under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (Interim guidance)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    This document is organized to coincide with the suggested structure of the actual Waste Analysis Plans (WAP) discussed in the previous section. The contents of the remaining eleven chapters and appendices that comprise this document are described below: Chapter 2 addresses waste streams, test parameters, and rationale for sampling and analytical method selection; test methods for analyzing parameters; proceduresfor collecting representative samples; and frequency of sample collection and analyses. These are the core WAP requirements. Chapter 3 addresses analysis requirements for waste received from off site. Chapter 4addresses additional requirements for ignitable, reactive, or incompatible wastes. Chapter 5 addresses unit-specific requirements. Chapter 6 addresses special procedures for radioactive mixed waste. Chapter 7 addresses wastes subject to the land disposal restrictions. Chapter 8 addresses QA/QC procedures. Chapter 9 compares the waste analysis requirements of an interim status facility with those of a permitted facility. Chapter 10 describes the petition process required for sampling and analytical procedures to deviate from accepted methods, such as those identified in promulgated regulations. Chapter 11 reviews the process for modification of WAPs as waste type or handling practices change at a RCRA permitted TSDF. Chapter 12 is the list of references that were used in the preparation of this guidance. Appendix A is a sample WAP addressing physical/chemical treatment and container storage. Appendix B is a sample WAP addressing an incinerator and tank systems. Appendix C discusses the relationship of the WAP to other permitting requirements and includes specific examples of how waste analysis is used to comply with certain parts of a RCRA permit. Appendix D contains the exact wording for the notification/certification requirements under theland disposal restrictions.

  1. Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Services » Environment » Environmental Policy and Assistance » Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Congress passed the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA or commonly known as Superfund) in response to a growing national concern about the release of hazardous substances from abandoned waste sites. Under CERCLA Congress gave

  2. Management of hazardous waste containers and container storage areas under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    DOE`s Office of Environmental Guidance, RCRA/CERCLA Division, has prepared this guidance document to assist waste management personnel in complying with the numerous and complex regulatory requirements associated with RCRA hazardous waste and radioactive mixed waste containers and container management areas. This document is designed using a systematic graphic approach that features detailed, step-by-step guidance and extensive references to additional relevant guidance materials. Diagrams, flowcharts, reference, and overview graphics accompany the narrative descriptions to illustrate and highlight the topics being discussed. Step-by-step narrative is accompanied by flowchart graphics in an easy-to-follow, ``roadmap`` format.

  3. Small Business Awarded Contract for Recovery Act Work at DOE Waste Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Louisiana small business to provide geosynthetic materials and installation services for expansion of the Department of Energy’s Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  4. Energy Policy Act transportation rate study: Interim report on coal transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    The primary purpose of this report is to examine changes in domestic coal distribution and railroad coal transportation rates since enactment of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90). From 1988 through 1993, the demand for low-sulfur coal increased, as a the 1995 deadline for compliance with Phase 1 of CAAA90 approached. The shift toward low-sulfur coal came sooner than had been generally expected because many electric utilities switched early from high-sulfur coal to ``compliance`` (very low-sulfur) coal. They did so to accumulate emissions allowances that could be used to meet the stricter Phase 2 requirements. Thus, the demand for compliance coal increased the most. The report describes coal distribution and sulfur content, railroad coal transportation and transportation rates, and electric utility contract coal transportation trends from 1979 to 1993 including national trends, regional comparisons, distribution patterns and regional profiles. 14 figs., 76 tabs.

  5. Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978: Natural Gas Rate Design Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-05-01

    First, the comments on May 3, 1979 Notice of Inquiry of DOE relating to the Gas Utility Rate Design Study Required by Section 306 of PURPA are presented. Then, comments on the following are included: (1) ICF Gas Utility Model, Gas Utility Model Data Outputs, Scenario Design; (2) Interim Model Development Report with Example Case Illustrations; (3) Interim Report on Simulation of Seven Rate Forms; (4) Methodology for Assessing the Impacts of Alternative Rate Designs on Industrial Energy Use; (5) Simulation of Marginal-Cost-Based Natural Gas Rates; and (6) Preliminary Discussion Draft of the Gas Rate Design Study. Among the most frequent comments expressed were the following: (a) the public should be given the opportunity to review the final report prior to its submission to Congress; (b) results based on a single computer model of only four hypothetical utility situations cannot be used for policy-making purposes for individual companies or the entire gas industry; (c) there has been an unobjective treatment of traditional and economic cost rate structures; the practical difficulties and potential detrimental consequences of economic cost rates are not fully disclosed; and (d) it is erroneous to assume that end users, particularly residential customers, are influenced by price signals in the rate structure, as opposed to the total bill.

  6. Rules implementing Sections 201 and 210 of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978: a regulatory history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danziger, R.N.; Caples, P.W.; Huning, J.R.

    1980-09-15

    An analysis is made of the rules implementing Sections 201 and 210 of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA). The act provides that utilities must purchase power from qualifying producers of electricity at nondiscriminatory rates, and it exempts private generators from virtually all state and Federal utility regulations. Most of the analysis presented is taken from the perspective of photovoltaics (PV) and solar thermal electric point-focusing distributed receivers (pfdr). It is felt, however, that the analysis is applicable both to cogeneration and other emerging technologies. Chapters presented are: The FERC Response to Oral Comments on the Proposed Rules Implementing Sections 201 and 210 of PURPA; Additional Changes Made or Not Made That Were Addressed in Other Than Oral Testimony; View on the Proposed Rules Implementing Sections 201 and 210 of PURPA; Response to Comments on the Proposed 201 and 210 Rules; and Summary Analysis of the Environmental Assessment of the Rules. Pertinent reference material is provided in the Appendices, including the text of the rules. (MCW)

  7. 1996 annual report on low-level radioactive waste management progress. Report to Congress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-11-01

    This report is prepared in response to the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act (the Act), Public Law 96-573, 1980, as amended by the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, Public Law 99-240. The report summarizes the activities during calendar year 1996 related to the establishment of new disposal facilities for commercially-generated low-level radioactive waste. The report emphasizes significant issues and events that have affected progress in developing new disposal facilities, and also includes an introduction that provides background information and perspective on US policy for low-level radioactive waste disposal.

  8. Strategies for the municipal waste management system to take advantage of carbon trading under competing policies: The role of energy from waste in Sydney

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El Hanandeh, Ali El-Zein, Abbas

    2009-07-15

    Climate change is a driving force behind some recent environmental legislation around the world. Greenhouse gas emission reduction targets have been set in many industrialised countries. A change in current practices of almost all greenhouse-emitting industrial sectors is unavoidable, if the set targets is to be achieved. Although, waste disposal contributes around 3% of the total greenhouse gas emissions in Australia (mainly due to fugitive methane emissions from landfills), the carbon credit and trading scheme set to start in 2010 presents significant challenges and opportunities to municipal solid waste practitioners. Technological advances in waste management, if adopted properly, allow the municipal solid waste sector to act as carbon sink, hence earning tradable carbon credits. However, due to the complexity of the system and its inherent uncertainties, optimizing it for carbon credits may worsen its performance under other criteria. We use an integrated, stochastic multi-criteria decision-making tool that we developed earlier to analyse the carbon credit potential of Sydney municipal solid waste under eleven possible future strategies. We find that the changing legislative environment is likely to make current practices highly non-optimal and increase pressures for a change of waste management strategy.

  9. Standard Compliance: Guidelines to Help State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets Meet Their Energy Policy Act Requirements, 10 CFR Part 490 (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-04-01

    This guidebook addresses the primary requirements of the Alternative Fuel Transportation Program to help state and alternative fuel provider fleets comply with the Energy Policy Act via the Standard Compliance option. It also addresses the topics that covered fleets ask about most frequently.

  10. Standard Compliance: Guidelines to Help State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets Meet Their Energy Policy Act Requirements, 10 CFR Part 490 (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-03-01

    This guidebook addresses the primary requirements of the Alternative Fuel Transportation Program to help state and alternative fuel provider fleets comply with the Energy Policy Act via the Standard Compliance option. It also addresses the topics that covered fleets ask about most frequently.

  11. Impacts Analyses Supporting the National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Assessment for the Resumption of Transient Testing Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annette L. Schafer; Lloyd C. Brown; David C. Carathers; Boyd D. Christensen; James J. Dahl; Mark L. Miller; Cathy Ottinger Farnum; Steven Peterson; A. Jeffrey Sondrup; Peter V. Subaiya; Daniel M. Wachs; Ruth F. Weiner

    2013-11-01

    Environmental and health impacts are presented for activities associated with transient testing of nuclear fuel and material using two candidate test reactors. Transient testing involves irradiation of nuclear fuel or materials for short time-periods under high neutron flux rates. The transient testing process includes transportation of nuclear fuel or materials inside a robust shipping cask to a hot cell, removal from the shipping cask, pre-irradiation examination of the nuclear materials, assembly of an experiment assembly, transportation of the experiment assembly to the test reactor, irradiation in the test reactor, transport back to the hot cell, and post-irradiation examination of the nuclear fuel or material. The potential for environmental or health consequences during the transportation, examination, and irradiation actions are assessed for normal operations, off-normal (accident) scenarios, and transportation. Impacts to the environment (air, soil, and groundwater), are assessed during each phase of the transient testing process. This report documents the evaluation of potential consequences to the general public. This document supports the Environmental Assessment (EA) required by the U.S. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) (42 USC Subsection 4321 et seq.).

  12. Economic and regulatory aspects of cogeneration: the implementation of Section 210 of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vincent, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    In February of 1980 the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) promulgated a set of rules that were to commence the implementation process of Section 210 of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA). Of particular interest to economists are the pricing provisions in the rules that pertain to integrating dispersed sources of electric power generation into conventional electric utility systems. The full avoided cost pricing provision couples a utility mandate to purchase power from qualified dispersed facilities (cogenerators, wind power, small hydro facilities, etc., hereafter denoted QFs) with the requirement that the price the utility pays for such purchases be equal to the full extent of the cost it avoids by not generating the power itself. The simultaneous purchase and sale billing scheme requires a utility to purchase the gross power output of a QF at the full avoided cost rate and simultaneously sell back to the QF its power requirement on the applicable retail tariff. Theoretical investigation of these two provisions reveals that, properly defined, they are consistent with improving economic signals with respect to electricity generation.

  13. Recovery Act: Brea California Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galowitz, Stephen

    2012-12-31

    The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill near Brea, California. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting Project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives: • Meeting the environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas • Utilizing proven and reliable technology and equipment • Maximizing electrical efficiency • Maximizing electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill • Maximizing equipment uptime • Minimizing water consumption • Minimizing post-combustion emissions • The Project produced and will produce a myriad of beneficial impacts. o The Project created 360 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 15 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. o By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). o The Project will annually produce 280,320 MWh’s of clean energy o By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO2 equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 27.4 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

  14. Recovery Act: Johnston Rhode Island Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galowitz, Stephen

    2013-06-30

    The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill in Johnston, Rhode Island. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives. 1) Meet environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas. 2) Utilize proven and reliable technology and equipment. 3) Maximize electrical efficiency. 4) Maximize electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill. 5) Maximize equipment uptime. 6) Minimize water consumption. 7) Minimize post-combustion emissions. To achieve the Project Objective the project consisted of several components. 1) The landfill gas collection system was modified and upgraded. 2) A State-of-the Art gas clean up and compression facility was constructed. 3) A high pressure pipeline was constructed to convey cleaned landfill gas from the clean-up and compression facility to the power plant. 4) A combined cycle electric generating facility was constructed consisting of combustion turbine generator sets, heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. 5) The voltage of the electricity produced was increased at a newly constructed transformer/substation and the electricity was delivered to the local transmission system. The Project produced a myriad of beneficial impacts. 1) The Project created 453 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 25 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. 2) By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). 3) The Project will annually produce 365,292 MWh�s of clean energy. 4) By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO{sub 2} equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 28.3 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

  15. policy

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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    Page Name:
    policysystem

    The NNSA's Policy...

  16. Geothermal Development and the Use of Categorical Exclusions Under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levine, A.; Young, K. R.

    2014-09-01

    The federal environmental review process under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) can be complex and time consuming. Currently, a geothermal developer may have to complete the NEPA process multiple times during the development of a geothermal project. One mechanism to reduce the timeframe of the federal environmental review process for activities that do not have a significant environmental impact is the use of Categorical Exclusions (CXs), which can exempt projects from having to complete an Environmental Assessment or Environmental Impact Statement. This study focuses primarily on the CX process and its applicability to geothermal exploration. In this paper, we: Provide generalized background information on CXs, including previous NEPA reports addressing CXs, the process for developing CXs, and the role of extraordinary circumstances; Examine the history of the Bureau of Land Management's (BLM) geothermal CXs; Compare current CXs for oil, gas, and geothermal energy; Describe bills proposing new statutory CXs; Examine the possibility of standardizing geothermal CXs across federal agencies; and Present analysis from the Geothermal NEPA Database and other sources on the potential for new geothermal exploration CXs. As part of this study, we reviewed Environmental Assessments (EAs) conducted in response to 20 geothermal exploration drilling permit applications (Geothermal Drilling Permits or Notices of Intents) since the year 2001, the majority of which are from the last 5 years. All 20 EAs reviewed for this study resulted in a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). While many of these FONS's involved proponent proposed or federal agency required mitigation, this still suggests it may be appropriate to create or expand an exploration drilling CX for geothermal, which would have a significant impact on reducing geothermal exploration timelines and up-front costs. Ultimately, federal agencies tasked with permitting and completing environmental reviews for geothermal exploration drilling activities and/or legislative representatives are the responsible parties to discuss the merits and implementation of new or revised CXs for geothermal development.

  17. Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PIONEERING NUCLEAR WASTE DISPOSAL U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Area Office February 2000 DOE/CAO-00-3124 T h e W a s t e I s o l a t i o n P i l o t P l a n t ii Table of Contents Closing the Circle on Transuranic Waste 1 The Long Road to the WIPP 3 The need for the WIPP The National Academy of Sciences Community leaders suggest Carlsbad as the site for the WIPP Construction of the WIPP The WIPP Land Withdrawal Act Certification by the EPA The National Environmental Policy Act The Resource

  18. Report to Congress: 1995 Annual report on low-level radioactive waste management progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    This report is prepared in response to the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act, Public Law 96-573, 1980, as amended by the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, Public Law 99-240. The report summarizes the progress of states and compact regions during calendar year 1995 in establishing new disposal facilities for commercially-generated low-level radioactive waste. The report emphasizes significant issues and events that have affected progress, and also includes an introduction that provides background information and perspective on United States policy for low-level radioactive waste disposal.

  19. Policy Flash 2013-61 The Whistleblower Protection Enhancement Act of 2012 and How It Affects Federal Employee Non-Disclosure Policies, Forms, Certificates, Agreements and Acknowledgments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For questions concerning the Whistleblower Protection Enhancement Act of 2012 or the April 24, 2013 DOECAST, contact Beth Kelly, Deputy Assistant General Counsel for Procurement and Financial...

  20. Policy Flash 2014-04 Continuing Appropriations Act, 2014-- Congressional Notification of Pending Contract or Financial Assistance Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Barbara Binney at (202) 287-1340 or barbara.binney@hq.doe.gov.

  1. Policies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Job Logs & Statistics Application Performance Training & Tutorials Software Policies Acknowledge NERSC Allocation Eligibility Allocation Management Computer Security Computer Use Data Management Passwords Queue Scheduling Usage Charges System Outages Service Levels User Surveys NERSC Users Group User Announcements Help Staff Blogs Request Repository Mailing List Operations for: Passwords & Off-Hours Status 1-800-66-NERSC, option 1 or 510-486-6821 Account Support

  2. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 1, Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    This volume includes the following chapters: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant RCRA A permit application; facility description; waste analysis plan; groundwater monitoring; procedures to prevent hazards; RCRA contingency plan; personnel training; corrective action for solid waste management units; and other Federal laws.

  3. POLICY

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    November 13, 2013 POLICY  Successful execution of this research and development (R&D) program will materially contribute to U.S. supply of oil and gas both today and beyond the 10 year R&D horizon. It is the consensus of this Committee that the resource potential impacted by this technology program is significant and of major importance to the Nation. There is a critical need for a sustainable and consistent approach to the technology challenges facing unconventional resource

  4. A Novel Fuel/Reactor Cycle to Implement the 300 Years Nuclear Waste Policy Approach - 12377

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carelli, M.D.; Franceschini, F.; Lahoda, E.J.; Petrovic, B.

    2012-07-01

    A thorium-based fuel cycle system can effectively burn the currently accumulated commercial used nuclear fuel and move to a sustainable equilibrium where the actinide levels in the high level waste are low enough to yield a radiotoxicity after 300 years lower than that of the equivalent uranium ore. The second step of the Westinghouse approach to solving the waste 'problem' has been completed. The thorium fuel cycle has indeed the potential of burning the legacy TRU and achieve the waste objective proposed. Initial evaluations have been started for the third step, development and selection of appropriate reactors. Indications are that the probability of show-stoppers is rather remote. It is, therefore, believed that development of the thorium cycle and associated technologies will provide a permanent solution to the waste management. Westinghouse is open to the widest collaboration to make this a reality. (authors)

  5. Recovery Act: State Assistance for Recovery Act Related Electricity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Policies | Department of Energy Information Center » Recovery Act » Recovery Act: State Assistance for Recovery Act Related Electricity Policies Recovery Act: State Assistance for Recovery Act Related Electricity Policies $44 Million for State Public Utility Commissions State public utility commissions (PUCs), which regulate and oversee electricity projects in their states, will be receiving more than $44.2 million in Recovery Act funding to hire new staff and retrain existing employees to

  6. A Look Back at the Long Path to Mandating Electric Reliability Standards through the Energy Policy Act of 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, Ellen Swyler

    2006-07-15

    The Act was the culmination of more than eight years of legislative effort in Congress. During this period, the nation saw the Western electricity crisis of 2000-01, the Sept. 11 attacks, the collapse of Enron, the growth of RTOs, and the August 2003 blackout. Each of these influenced the dynamics of the debate. (author)

  7. Michael R. Maraya (Acting) | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    R. Maraya (Acting) About Us Michael R. Maraya (Acting) - Deputy CIO for Enterprise Policy, Portfolio Management & Governance Mike Maraya is the Acting Deputy CIO for Enterprise...

  8. Internal Policy Library

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    230-1 Monitoring and Recording Conversations BPA Policy 230-2 Reporting Incidents of Fraud, Waste and Abuse BPA Policy 231-2 Power Transacting Risk Management BPA Policy 231-3...

  9. Directions in low-level radioactive waste management: A brief history of commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    This report presents a history of commercial low-level radioactive waste management in the United States, with emphasis on the history of six commercially operated low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The report includes a brief description of important steps that have been taken during the 1980s to ensure the safe disposal of low-level waste in the 1990s and beyond. These steps include the issuance of Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 61, Licensing Requirements for the Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, and steps taken by states and regional compacts to establish additional disposal sites. 42 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  10. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF CIVILIAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    MANAGEMENT Annual Financial Report Years Ended September 30, 2009 and 2008 | Department of Energy UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF CIVILIAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT Annual Financial Report Years Ended September 30, 2009 and 2008 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF CIVILIAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT Annual Financial Report Years Ended September 30, 2009 and 2008 As required by Section 304(c) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) of 1982, as amended, Public Law

  11. 1989 Annual report on low-level radioactive waste management progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    This report summarizes the progress during 1989 of states and compacts in establishing new low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. It also provides summary information on the volume of low-level waste received for disposal in 1989 by commercially operated low-level waste disposal facilities. This report is in response to Section 7(b) of Title I of Public Law 99--240, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985. 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Radioactive Waste Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1984-02-06

    To establish policies and guidelines by which the Department of Energy (DOE) manages tis radioactive waste, waste byproducts, and radioactively contaminated surplus facilities.

  13. Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GREAGER, T.M.

    2000-12-01

    As a generator of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the Hanford Site must ensure that its TRU waste meets the requirements of US. Department of Energy (DOE) 0 435.1, ''Radioactive Waste Management,'' and the Contact-Handled (CH) Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP-WAC). WIPP-WAC requirements are derived from the WIPP Technical Safety Requirements, WIPP Safety Analysis Report, TRUPACT-II SARP, WIPP Land Withdrawal Act, WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 191/194 Compliance Certification Decision. The WIPP-WAC establishes the specific physical, chemical, radiological, and packaging criteria for acceptance of defense TRU waste shipments at WIPP. The WPP-WAC also requires that participating DOE TRU waste generator/treatment/storage sites produce site-specific documents, including a certification plan, that describe their program for managing TRU waste and TRU waste shipments before transferring waste to WIPP. Waste characterization activities provide much of the data upon which certification decisions are based. Waste characterization requirements for TRU waste and TRU mixed waste that contains constituents regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) are established in the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Waste Analysis Plan (WAP). The Hanford Site Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) (HNF-2599) implements the applicable requirements in the WAP and includes the qualitative and quantitative criteria for making hazardous waste determinations. The Hanford Site must also ensure that its TRU waste destined for disposal at WPP meets requirements for transport in the Transuranic Package Transporter-11 (TRUPACT-11). The US. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) establishes the TRUPACT-11 requirements in the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package (TRUPACT-11 SARP). In addition, a TRU waste is eligible for disposal at WIPP only if it has been generated in whole or in part by one or more of the activities listed in Section 10101(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. DOE sites must determine that each waste stream to be disposed of at WIPP is ''defense'' TRU waste. (See also the definition of ''defense'' TRU waste.). Only CH TRU wastes meeting the requirements of the QAPjP, WIPP-WAP, WPP-WAC, and other requirements documents described above will be accepted for transportation and disposal at WIPP.

  14. Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GREAGER, T.M.

    2000-12-06

    As a generator of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the Hanford Site must ensure that its TRU waste meets the requirements of US. Department of Energy (DOE) 0 435.1, ''Radioactive Waste Management,'' and the Contact-Handled (CH) Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP-WAC). WIPP-WAC requirements are derived from the WIPP Technical Safety Requirements, WIPP Safety Analysis Report, TRUPACT-II SARP, WIPP Land Withdrawal Act, WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 191/194 Compliance Certification Decision. The WIPP-WAC establishes the specific physical, chemical, radiological, and packaging criteria for acceptance of defense TRU waste shipments at WIPP. The WPP-WAC also requires that participating DOE TRU waste generator/treatment/storage sites produce site-specific documents, including a certification plan, that describe their program for managing TRU waste and TRU waste shipments before transferring waste to WIPP. Waste characterization activities provide much of the data upon which certification decisions are based. Waste characterization requirements for TRU waste and TRU mixed waste that contains constituents regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) are established in the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Waste Analysis Plan (WAP). The Hanford Site Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) (HNF-2599) implements the applicable requirements in the WAP and includes the qualitative and quantitative criteria for making hazardous waste determinations. The Hanford Site must also ensure that its TRU waste destined for disposal at WPP meets requirements for transport in the Transuranic Package Transporter-11 (TRUPACT-11). The US. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) establishes the TRUPACT-11 requirements in the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package (TRUPACT-11 SARP). In addition, a TRU waste is eligible for disposal at WIPP only if it has been generated in whole or in part by one or more of the activities listed in Section 10101(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. DOE sites must determine that each waste stream to be disposed of at WIPP is ''defense'' TRU waste. (See also the definition of ''defense'' TRU waste.). Only CH TRU wastes meeting the requirements of the QAPjP, WIPP-WAP, WPP-WAC, and other requirements documents described above will be accepted for transportation and disposal at WIPP.

  15. The Whistleblower Protection Enhancement Act of 2012 and How It Affects Federal Employee Non-Disclosure Policies, Forms, Certificates, Agreements and Acknowledgments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Acquisition Letter (AL) 2013-08 and Financial Assistance Letter (FAL) 2013-05 provide Contracting Officers with notice of the recently passed, Whistleblower Protection Enhancement Act of 2012 (WPEA), Pub.L. 112-199, and the DOECAST issued in response on April 24, 2013. This AL/FAL informs DOE/NNSA Contracting Officers to update any Non-Disclosure Policies, Forms, Certificates, Agreements, and Acknowledgements (collectively "NDAs") to be used with Federal employees participating in proposal or application evaluations, source selection situations as well as in merit review situations, to conform to the new requirements of this law. It also informs DOE/NNSA Contracting Officers on how to document the notification to Federal employees of the new protections stated in the WPEA if they have signed NDAs without the new statement as required by the WPEA.

  16. Hazardous and Radioactive Mixed Waste Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1989-02-22

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) hazardous and radioactive mixed waste policies and requirements and to implement the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) within the framework of the environmental programs established under DOE O 5400.1. This directive does not cancel any directives.

  17. Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste and GTCC-Like Waste

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON – The Department of Energy (DOE) has issued a Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) and GTCC-Like Waste (DOE/EIS-0375D, Draft EIS) as required under the National Environmental Policy Act for public review and comment.

  18. Impacts Analyses Supporting the National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Assessment for the Resumption of Transient Testing Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annette L. Schafer; LLoyd C. Brown; David C. Carathers; Boyd D. Christensen; James J. Dahl; Mark L. Miller; Cathy Ottinger Farnum; Steven Peterson; A. Jeffrey Sondrup; Peter V. Subaiya; Daniel M. Wachs; Ruth F. Weiner

    2014-02-01

    This document contains the analysis details and summary of analyses conducted to evaluate the environmental impacts for the Resumption of Transient Fuel and Materials Testing Program. It provides an assessment of the impacts for the two action alternatives being evaluated in the environmental assessment. These alternatives are (1) resumption of transient testing using the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and (2) conducting transient testing using the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratory in New Mexico (SNL/NM). Analyses are provided for radiologic emissions, other air emissions, soil contamination, and groundwater contamination that could occur (1) during normal operations, (2) as a result of accidents in one of the facilities, and (3) during transport. It does not include an assessment of the biotic, cultural resources, waste generation, or other impacts that could result from the resumption of transient testing. Analyses were conducted by technical professionals at INL and SNL/NM as noted throughout this report. The analyses are based on bounding radionuclide inventories, with the same inventories used for test materials by both alternatives and different inventories for the TREAT Reactor and ACRR. An upper value on the number of tests was assumed, with a test frequency determined by the realistic turn-around times required between experiments. The estimates provided for impacts during normal operations are based on historical emission rates and projected usage rates; therefore, they are bounding. Estimated doses for members of the public, collocated workers, and facility workers that could be incurred as a result of an accident are very conservative. They do not credit safety systems or administrative procedures (such as evacuation plans or use of personal protective equipment) that could be used to limit worker doses. Doses estimated for transportation are conservative and are based on transport of the bounding radiologic inventory that will be contained in any given test. The transportation analysis assumes all transports will contain the bounding inventory.

  19. Extending the antitrust exemption in the Energy Policy and Conservation Act. Hearing before the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, United States Senate, Ninety-Seventh Congress, First Session on S. 573, a bill to extend the expiration date of section 252 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, March 2, 1981. [Publication No. 97-7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    A proposed amendmnt (S. 573) to section 252 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act extending the antitrust exemption expiration date from March 15 to December 31, 1981 is intended to protect US oil companies that are participating in an International Energy Agency program to reduce dependence on imported oil. If the exemption expires, the oil companies could withdraw from the oil-sharing network. The text of S. 573 is followed by statements of four witnesses, including one from the Justice Department to the effect that no adverse impacts on competition or small businesses were discerned. (DCK)

  20. An integrated analytical framework for quantifying the LCOE of waste-to-energy facilities for a range of greenhouse gas emissions policy and technical factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townsend, Aaron K.; Webber, Michael E.

    2012-07-15

    This study presents a novel integrated method for considering the economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities with priced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions based upon technical and economic characteristics of the WTE facility, MSW stream, landfill alternative, and GHG emissions policy. The study demonstrates use of the formulation for six different policy scenarios and explores sensitivity of the results to ranges of certain technical parameters as found in existing literature. The study shows that details of the GHG emissions regulations have large impact on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of WTE and that GHG regulations can either increase or decrease the LCOE of WTE depending on policy choices regarding biogenic fractions from combusted waste and emissions from landfills. Important policy considerations are the fraction of the carbon emissions that are priced (i.e. all emissions versus only non-biogenic emissions), whether emissions credits are allowed due to reducing fugitive landfill gas emissions, whether biogenic carbon sequestration in landfills is credited against landfill emissions, and the effectiveness of the landfill gas recovery system where waste would otherwise have been buried. The default landfill gas recovery system effectiveness assumed by much of the industry yields GHG offsets that are very close to the direct non-biogenic GHG emissions from a WTE facility, meaning that small changes in the recovery effectiveness cause relatively larger changes in the emissions factor of the WTE facility. Finally, the economics of WTE are dependent on the MSW stream composition, with paper and wood being advantageous, metal and glass being disadvantageous, and plastics, food, and yard waste being either advantageous or disadvantageous depending upon the avoided tipping fee and the GHG emissions price.

  1. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B Permit Application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Chapter E, Appendix E1, Chapter L, Appendix L1: Volume 12, Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project was authorized by the US Department of Energy 5 (DOE) National Security and Military Applications of the Nuclear Energy Authorization Act of 1980 (Public Law 96-164). Its legislative mandate is to provide a research and development facility to demonstrate the safe disposal of radioactive waste resulting from national defense programs and activities. To fulfill this mandate, the WIPP facility has been designed to perform scientific investigations of the behavior of bedded salt as a repository medium and the interactions between the soft and radioactive wastes. In 1991, DOE proposed to initiate a experimental Test Phase designed to demonstrate the performance of the repository. The Test Phase activities involve experiments using transuranic (TRU) waste typical of the waste planned for future disposal at the WIPP facility. Much of this TRU waste is co-contaminated with chemical constituents which are defined as hazardous under HWMR-7, Pt. II, sec. 261. This waste is TRU mixed waste and is the subject of this application. Because geologic repositories, such as the WIPP facility, are defined under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as land disposal facilities, the groundwater monitoring requirements of HWMR-7, PLV, Subpart X, must be addressed. HWMR-7, Pt. V, Subpart X, must be addressed. This appendix demonstrates that groundwater monitoring is not needed in order to demonstrate compliance with the performance standards; therefore, HWMR-7, Pt.V, Subpart F, will not apply to the WIPP facility.

  2. California Environmental Quality Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    passed the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), to institute a statewide policy of environmental protection. CEQA does not directly regulate land uses, but instead requires...

  3. Low-level Waste Forum meeting report. Fall meeting, October 20--22, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-12-31

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of representatives of states and compacts established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies. The Forum participants include representatives from regional compacts, designated host states, unaffiliated states, and states with currently-operating low-level radioactive waste facilities. This report contains information synthesizing the accomplishments of the Forum, as well as any new advances that have been made in the management of low-level radioactive wastes.

  4. Energy Policy Act of 2005

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Public Law of the 109th Congress: To ensure jobs for our future with secure, affordable, and reliable energy.

  5. National Environmental Policy Act RM

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This NEPA Review Module (RM) is a tool to assist the Office of Environmental Management’s (EM) projects review teams, and managers in complying with the provisions of The Department of Energy’s ...

  6. National Environmental Policy Act Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the March 12, 2014 Committee meeting Karen Oden DOE, Provided Information on NEPA, What it is and How it is Implemented.

  7. Energy transport corridors: the potential role of Federal lands in states identified by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, section 368(b).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krummel, J.; Hlohowskyj, I.; Kuiper, J.; Kolpa, R.; Moore, R.; May, J.; VanKuiken, J.C.; Kavicky, J.A.; McLamore, M.R.; Shamsuddin, S.

    2011-09-01

    On August 8, 2005, the President signed the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct) into law. In Subtitle F of EPAct, Congress set forth various provisions that would change the way certain federal agencies (Agencies) coordinate to authorize the use of land for a variety of energy-related purposes. As part of Subtitle F of EPAct, Section 368 addresses the issue of energy transportation corridors on federal land for oil, gas, and hydrogen pipelines, as well as electricity transmission and distribution facilities. Because of the critical importance of improving the nation's electrical transmission grid, Congress recognized that electricity transmission issues should receive added attention when the Agencies address corridor location and analysis issues. In Section 368, Congress specifically directed the Agencies to consider the need for upgraded and new facilities to deliver electricity: In carrying out [Section 368], the Secretaries shall take into account the need for upgraded and new electricity transmission and distribution facilities to (1) improve reliability; (2) relieve congestion; and (3) enhance capability of the national grid to deliver electricity. Section 368 does not require the Agencies to consider or approve specific projects, applications for rights-of-way (ROWs), or other permits within designated energy corridors. Importantly, Section 368 does not direct, license, or otherwise permit any on-the-ground activity of any sort. If an applicant is interested in obtaining an authorization to develop a project within any corridor designated under Section 368, the applicant would have to apply for a ROW authorization and applicable permits. The Agencies would consider each application by applying appropriate project-specific reviews under requirements of laws and related regulations, including, but not limited to, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act, Section 7 of the Endangered Species Act (ESA), and Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA). Under Section 368, Congress divided the United States into two groups of states: the 11 contiguous western states and the remaining states. Direction for energy transportation corridor analysis and selection in the 11 western states was addressed in Section 368(a) of EPAct, while direction for energy transportation corridor analysis and selection in all other states was addressed under Section 368(b) of EPAct. It was clearly the priority of Congress to conduct corridor location studies and designation first on federal lands in the western states. Under Section 368(a), the Agencies produced a programmatic environmental impact statement (EIS), Designation of Energy Corridors on Federal Land in the 11 Western States (DOE and DOI 2008), that was used in part as the basis for designating more than 6,000 mi (9,656 km) of energy transportation corridors on federal land in 11 western states. Under Section 368(a) of EPAct, Congress clearly stated the Agencies needed to (1) designate energy transportation corridors on federal land, (2) conduct the necessary environmental review of the designated corridors, and (3) incorporate the designated corridors into the appropriate land use plans. Congressional direction under Section 368(b) of EPAct differs from that provided under Section 368(a). Specifically, Section 368(b) requires the secretaries of the Agencies, in consultation with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), affected utility industries, and other interested persons, to jointly: (1) Identify corridors for oil, gas, and hydrogen pipelines and electricity transmission and distribution facilities on federal land in states other than the 11 western states identified under Section 368(a) of EPAct, and (2) Schedule prompt action to identify, designate, and incorporate the corridors into the applicable land use plans. While Section 368(a) clearly directs designation as a necessary first step for energy transportation corridors in the 11 western states, Section 368(b) directs the Agencies to first identify corridors and then schedule prompt action to identify, designate, and incorporate the corridors into applicable land use plans. To comply with the congressional direction provided in Section 368(b), the Agencies investigated corridor identification issues in the Section 368(b) states; this report to Congress provides information that could be relevant to possible future designation of energy corridors. Future designations, if appropriate and necessary, would occur when the Agencies undertake revisions and/or updates to land use plans that guide management decisions on lands located within individual administrative units, such as specific National Forests, National Parks, or Wildlife Refuges. At this time, the Agencies are not proposing any actions or decisions related directly or indirectly to designating energy corridors on federal land under Section 368(b) of EPAct.

  8. Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act Download ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act Download Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act Download PDF icon Attachment-1-1-Non-Retaliation-Policy-Internal.pdf ...

  9. Microsoft Word - Solid Waste at Hanford

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Use of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Funds on Solid Waste Project ... Reinvestment Act of 2009 Funds on Solid Waste Project Activities at the Department of ...

  10. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    APPENDIX B CONTRACTOR AND SUBCONTRACTOR NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT DISCLOSURE STATEMENTS NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT DISCLOSURE STATEMENT FOR PREPARATION OF THE TANK CLOSURE AND WASTE MANAGEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT FOR THE HANFORD SITE, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON The Council of Environmental Quality regulations at Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulatiolls (CFR), Section 1506.5(c), which have been adopted by the U.S. Department of Energy (10 CFR 1021), require contractors and

  11. WIPP Privacy Policy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WIPP Privacy Policy and Disclaimers NOTICE: The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Internet Server is provided as a service of the Department of Energy (DOE) for distribution of...

  12. Policy Flash 2013-48 OMB memorandum M-13-10, Antideficiency Act Implications of Certain Online Terms of Service Agreements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Kevin M. Smith, of the Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division, at Kevin.M.Smith@hq.doe.gov or at (202) 287-1614.

  13. 1992 annual report on low-level radioactive waste management progress; Report to Congress in response to Public Law 99-240

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-11-01

    This report summarizes the progress States and compact regions made during 1992 in establishing new low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. It also provides summary information on the volume of low-level radioactive waste received for disposal in 1992 by commercially operated low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. This report is in response to section 7 (b) of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act.

  14. Capturing the Invisible Resource. Analysis of Waste Heat Potential in Chinese Industry and Policy Options for Waste Heat to Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Hongyou

    2015-05-01

    This study analyzed the theoretical maximum potential and practical potential of waste heat in the cement, iron, and steel, and glass sectors in China, based on thermal energy modeling, expert interviews, and literature reviews.

  15. Clean Air Act, Section 309

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CLEAN AIR ACT 309* 7609. Policy review (a) The Administrator shall review and comment in writing on the environmental impact of any matter relating to duties and ...

  16. Need to Consider Intentional Destructive Acts in NEPA Documents...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Need to Consider Intentional Destructive Acts in NEPA Documents Need to Consider Intentional Destructive Acts in NEPA Documents DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) ...

  17. SUMMARY OF REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTING FEDERAL POWER ACT SECTION...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SUMMARY OF REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTING FEDERAL POWER ACT SECTION 216 SUMMARY OF REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTING FEDERAL POWER ACT SECTION 216 The Energy Policy Act of 2005 added section ...

  18. Clean Air Act General Conformity Requirements and the National...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Clean Air Act General Conformity Requirements and the National Environmental Policy Act Process (DOE, 2000) Clean Air Act General Conformity Requirements and the National ...

  19. Superfund Policy Statements and Guidance Regarding Disposition of Radioactive Waste in Non-NRC Licensed Disposal Facilities - 13407

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Stuart

    2013-07-01

    This talk will discuss EPA congressional testimony and follow-up letters, as well as letters to other stakeholders on EPA's perspectives on the disposition of radioactive waste outside of the NRC licensed disposal facility system. This will also look at Superfund's historical practices, and emerging trends in the NRC and agreement states on waste disposition. (author)

  20. The Office of Minority Economic Impact (MI) was established in Fiscal Year 1979 pursuant to Section 641 Title V1, Part 3 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (Public Law 95-619), dated November 9, 1978

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office of Minority Economic Impact (MI) was established in Fiscal Year 1979 pursuant to Section 641 Title V1, Part 3 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (Public Law 95- 619), dated November 9, 1978. The following is MI's legislative mandate. PART 3 - - MINORITY ECONOMIC IMPACT SEC. 641. MINORITY ECONOMIC IMPACT. "(a) Establishment of Office of Minority Economic Impact -- Title II of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7131 - - 7139) is amended by adding at the

  1. Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Alternatives Implementation Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles M. Barnes; James B. Bosley; Clifford W. Olsen

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to discuss issues related to the implementation of each of the five down-selected INEEL/INTEC radioactive liquid waste (sodium-bearing waste - SBW) treatment alternatives and summarize information in three main areas of concern: process/technical, environmental permitting, and schedule. Major implementation options for each treatment alternative are also identified and briefly discussed. This report may touch upon, but purposely does not address in detail, issues that are programmatic in nature. Examples of these include how the SBW will be classified with respect to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA), status of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) permits and waste storage availability, available funding for implementation, stakeholder issues, and State of Idaho Settlement Agreement milestones. It is assumed in this report that the SBW would be classified as a transuranic (TRU) waste suitable for disposal at WIPP, located in New Mexico, after appropriate treatment to meet transportation requirements and waste acceptance criteria (WAC).

  2. Policy Flash 2014-05 Continuing Appropriations Act, 2014-- Implementation of Division F, Title I, Title II, and Title III, and Division G, Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2013, Pub. L. No. 113-6

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Questions concerning the policy flash should be directed to Barbara Binney at (202) 287-1340 or barbara.binney@hq.doe.gov for the AL or Richard Bonnell at (202) 287-1747 or at richard.bonnell@hq...

  3. Fermilab | Director's Policy Manual | Home

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Financial Management Freedom of Information Act Requests Inclement Weather and Snow Policy Interactions with Legislators Issues Management Maintenance MOUs Between...

  4. Website Policies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Website Policies NETL Website Policies Accessibility NETL is committed to providing access to its website pages for individuals with disabilities. To meet this commitment, this site is built to comply with the requirements of Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act. Section 508 requires that individuals with disabilities, who are members of the public seeking information or services from NETL, have access to and use of information and data that is comparable to that provided to the public who are

  5. NOTIFICATION AND FEDERAL EMPLOYEE ANTIDISCRIMINATION AND RETALIATION ACT OF

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2002 | Department of Energy NOTIFICATION AND FEDERAL EMPLOYEE ANTIDISCRIMINATION AND RETALIATION ACT OF 2002 NOTIFICATION AND FEDERAL EMPLOYEE ANTIDISCRIMINATION AND RETALIATION ACT OF 2002 Public Law PDF icon NOTIFICATION AND FEDERAL EMPLOYEE ANTIDISCRIMINATION AND RETALIATION ACT OF 2002 More Documents & Publications ENERGY POLICY ACT OF 2005 Energy Policy Act of 2005 Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act - December 17, 2004

  6. Microfabrication Policies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Polcies Booking Login Policy Cleanroom Policy Equipment Use Policy 2 Person Rule Experimental Hall Policy After Hours Policy...

  7. DWPF waste form compliance plan (Draft Revision)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plodinec, M.J.; Marra, S.L.

    1991-01-01

    The Department of Energy currently has over 100 million liters of high-level radioactive waste in storage at the Savannah River Site (SRS). In the late 1970's, the Department of Energy recognized that there were significant safety and cost advantages associated with immobilizing the high-level waste in a stable solid form. Several alternative waste forms were evaluated in terms of product quality and reliability of fabrication. This evaluation led to a decision to build the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at SRS to convert the easily dispersed liquid waste to borosilicate glass. In accordance with the NEPA (National Environmental Policy Act) process, an Environmental Impact Statement was prepared for the facility, as well as an Environmental Assessment of the alternative waste forms, and issuance of a Record of Decision (in December, 1982) on the waste form. The Department of Energy, recognizing that start-up of the DWPF would considerably precede licensing of a repository, instituted a Waste Acceptance Process to ensure that these canistered waste forms would be acceptable for eventual disposal at a federal repository. This report is a revision of the DWPF compliance plan.

  8. DWPF waste form compliance plan (Draft Revision)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plodinec, M.J.; Marra, S.L.

    1991-12-31

    The Department of Energy currently has over 100 million liters of high-level radioactive waste in storage at the Savannah River Site (SRS). In the late 1970`s, the Department of Energy recognized that there were significant safety and cost advantages associated with immobilizing the high-level waste in a stable solid form. Several alternative waste forms were evaluated in terms of product quality and reliability of fabrication. This evaluation led to a decision to build the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at SRS to convert the easily dispersed liquid waste to borosilicate glass. In accordance with the NEPA (National Environmental Policy Act) process, an Environmental Impact Statement was prepared for the facility, as well as an Environmental Assessment of the alternative waste forms, and issuance of a Record of Decision (in December, 1982) on the waste form. The Department of Energy, recognizing that start-up of the DWPF would considerably precede licensing of a repository, instituted a Waste Acceptance Process to ensure that these canistered waste forms would be acceptable for eventual disposal at a federal repository. This report is a revision of the DWPF compliance plan.

  9. Summary report. Low-level radioactive waste management activities in the states and compacts. Volume 4, No. 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    `Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Activities in the States and Compacts` is a supplement to `LLW Notes` and is distributed periodically by Afton Associates, Inc. to state, compact and federal officials that receive `LLW Notes`. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low- Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

  10. Summary report, low-level radioactive waste management activities in the states and compacts. Vol. 4. No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    `Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Activities in the States and Compacts` is a supplement to `LLW Notes` and is distributed periodically by Afton Associates, Inc. to state, compact and federal officials that receive `LLW Notes`. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low- Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

  11. Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management in the United States: What Have We Wrought? The Richard S. Hodes, M.D. Honor Lecture Award - 12222

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobi, Lawrence R.

    2012-07-01

    In 1979, radioactive waste disposal was an important national issue. State governors were closing the gates on the existing low-level radioactive waste disposal sites and the ultimate disposition of spent fuel was undecided. A few years later, the United States Congress thought they had solved both problems by passing the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1981, which established a network of regional compacts for low-level radioactive waste disposal, and by passing the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 to set out how a final resting place for high-level waste would be determined. Upon passage of the acts, State, Regional and Federal officials went to work. Here we are some 30 years later with little to show for our combined effort. The envisioned national repository for high-level radioactive waste has not materialized. Efforts to develop the Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste disposal facility were abandoned after spending $13 billion on the failed project. Recently, the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future issued its draft report that correctly concludes the existing policy toward high-level nuclear waste is 'all but completely broken down'. A couple of new low-level waste disposal facilities have opened since 1981, but neither were the result of efforts under the act. What the Act has done is interject a system of interstate compacts with a byzantine interstate import and export system to complicate the handling of low-level radioactive waste, with attendant costs. As this paper is being written in the fourth-quarter of 2011, after 30 years of political and bureaucratic turmoil, a new comprehensive low-level waste disposal facility at Andrews Texas is approaching its initial operating date. The Yucca Mountain project might be completed or it might not. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is commencing a review of their 1981 volume reduction policy statement. The Department of Energy after 26 years has yet to figure out how to implement its obligations under the 1985 amendments to the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act. But, the last three decades have not been a total loss. A great deal has been learned about radioactive waste disposal since 1979 and the efforts of the public and private sector have shaped and focused the work to be done in the future. So, this lecturer asks the question: 'What have we wrought?' to which he provides his perspective and his recommendations for radioactive waste management policy for the next 30 years. (author)

  12. Questions and Answers on the Secretarial Policy Statement on...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Answers on the DOE Secretarial Policy Statement on NEPA. QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS on the SECRETARIAL POLICY STATEMENT on the NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT More Documents &...

  13. POLICY FLASH 2016-17 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7 POLICY FLASH 2016-17 DATE: March 16, 2016 TO: Procurement DirectorsContracting Officers FROM: Acting Chief Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division Office of Policy ...

  14. POLICY FLASH 2016-14 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    POLICY FLASH 2016-14 POLICY FLASH 2016-14 DATE: February 17, 2016 TO: Procurement DirectorsContracting Officers FROM: Acting Chief Contract and Financial Assistance Policy ...

  15. National Energy Policy Plan; A Report to Congress Required by Title VIII of the Department of Energy Organization Act (Public Law 95-91)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This plan report is divided into the following chapters: the course ahead, currently predominant fuels (oil, gas), America's energy triad, sources of diversity and long-term supply, sources of uncertainty, summary of current projections, and public comments on the nation's policy toward energy. (DLC)

  16. Small Business First Policy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. Department of Energy POLICY Washington, D.C. DOE P 547.1 Approved: 12-14-2012 SUBJECT: SMALL BUSINESS FIRST POLICY PURPOSE AND SCOPE To establish a Small Business First Policy that: (1) Enforces compliance with the Small Business Act (Public Law 85-536, as amended), Small Business Jobs Act of 2010, and other applicable laws, Executive Orders, regulations and best business practices. (2) Ensures prime contracting opportunities are available to the maximum extent practicable to small

  17. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act: Part B, Permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 1, Revison 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This report contains information related to the permit application for the WIPP facility. Information is presented on solid waste management; personnel safety; emergency plans; site characterization; applicable regulations; decommissioning; and ground water monitoring requirements.

  18. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 7: Revision 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This permit application (Vol. 7) for the WIPP facility contains appendices related to the following information: Ground water protection; personnel; solid waste management; and memorandums concerning environmental protection standards.

  19. WIPP - Freedom of Information Act (FOIA)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Mission Statement The mission of the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) is to protect human health and the environment by operating the Waste...

  20. Lab completes first Recovery Act cleanup project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    waste landfill. "The Recovery Act has been a huge boost to our overall cleanup efforts," said Michael Graham, LANL's associate director of environmental programs. "Completing...

  1. Reporting Fraud, Waste, and Abuse to the Office of Inspector General

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-03-22

    To establish policies and procedures for reporting fraud, waste, abuse, misuse, corruption, criminal acts, or mismanagement to the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Inspector General (OIG). Cancels DOE 2030.4B. Canceled by DOE O 221.1A, 8-19-08.

  2. Nuclear waste package fabricated from concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfeiffer, P.A.; Kennedy, J.M.

    1987-03-01

    After the United States enacted the Nuclear Waste Policy Act in 1983, the Department of Energy must design, site, build and operate permanent geologic repositories for high-level nuclear waste. The Department of Energy has recently selected three sites, one being the Hanford Site in the state of Washington. At this particular site, the repository will be located in basalt at a depth of approximately 3000 feet deep. The main concern of this site, is contamination of the groundwater by release of radionuclides from the waste package. The waste package basically has three components: the containment barrier (metal or concrete container, in this study concrete will be considered), the waste form, and other materials (such as packing material, emplacement hole liners, etc.). The containment barriers are the primary waste container structural materials and are intended to provide containment of the nuclear waste up to a thousand years after emplacement. After the containment barriers are breached by groundwater, the packing material (expanding sodium bentonite clay) is expected to provide the primary control of release of radionuclide into the immediate repository environment. The loading conditions on the concrete container (from emplacement to approximately 1000 years), will be twofold; (1) internal heat of the high-level waste which could be up to 400/sup 0/C; (2) external hydrostatic pressure up to 1300 psi after the seepage of groundwater has occurred in the emplacement tunnel. A suggested container is a hollow plain concrete cylinder with both ends capped. 7 refs.

  3. National Energy Policy Plan; A Report to the Congress Required by Title VIII of the Department of Energy Organization Act (Public Law 95-91)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-10-01

    Since the third National Energy Plan in 1981 total energy efficiency has increased, domestic energy resources are being developed more effectively, oil prices have declined, US dependence on foreign energy sources has diminished, and the nation's vulnerability to energy supply disruptions has been reduced markedly. The policy goal is an adequate supply of energy at reasonable costs. Strategies include minimizing federal control and involvement in energy markets while maintaining public health and safety and environmental quality and promoting a balanced and mixed energy resource system. Federal programs and actions in energy are reviewed.

  4. Unfunded Mandates Reform Act; Intergovernmental Consultation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    consultation under the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995. The policy reflects the guidelines and instructions that the Director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) ...

  5. OE Recovery Act Blog | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the recommendations were incorporated into law passed by Congress and enacted in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and the Energy Infrastructure Security Act of 2007. July 11, 2013...

  6. Evaluation of Groundwater Impacts to Support the National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Assessment for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annette Schafer; Arthur S. Rood; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

    2011-12-01

    The groundwater impacts have been analyzed for the proposed RH-LLW disposal facility. A four-step analysis approach was documented and applied. This assessment compared the predicted groundwater ingestion dose to the more restrictive of either the 25 mrem/yr all pathway dose performance objective, or the maximum contaminant limit performance objective. The results of this analysis indicate that the groundwater impacts for either proposed facility location are expected to be less than the performance objectives. The analysis was prepared to support the NEPA-EA for the top two ranking of the proposed RH-LLW sites. As such, site-specific conditions were incorporated for each set of results generated. These site-specific conditions were included to account for the transport of radionuclides through the vadose zone and through the aquifer at each site. Site-specific parameters included the thickness of vadose zone sediments and basalts, moisture characteristics of the sediments, and aquifer velocity. Sorption parameters (Kd) were assumed to be very conservative values used in Track II analysis of CERCLA sites at INL. Infiltration was also conservatively assumed to represent higher rates corresponding to disturbed soil conditions. The results of this analysis indicate that the groundwater impacts for either proposed facility location are expected to be less than the performance objectives.

  7. Evaluation of Groundwater Impacts to Support the National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Assessment for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annette Schafer; Arthur S. Rood; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

    2010-08-01

    The groundwater impacts have been analyzed for the proposed RH-LLW disposal facility. A four-step analysis approach was documented and applied. This assessment compared the predicted groundwater ingestion dose to the more restrictive of either the 25 mrem/yr all pathway dose performance objective, or the maximum contaminant limit performance objective. The results of this analysis indicate that the groundwater impacts for either proposed facility location are expected to be less than the performance objectives. The analysis was prepared to support the NEPA-EA for the top two ranking of the proposed RH-LLW sites. As such, site-specific conditions were incorporated for each set of results generated. These site-specific conditions were included to account for the transport of radionuclides through the vadose zone and through the aquifer at each site. Site-specific parameters included the thickness of vadose zone sediments and basalts, moisture characteristics of the sediments, and aquifer velocity. Sorption parameters (Kd) were assumed to be very conservative values used in Track II analysis of CERCLA sites at INL. Infiltration was also conservatively assumed to represent higher rates corresponding to disturbed soil conditions. The results of this analysis indicate that the groundwater impacts for either proposed facility location are expected to be less than the performance objectives.

  8. Evaluation of Groundwater Impacts to Support the National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Assessment for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annette Schafer; Arthur S. Rood; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

    2011-08-01

    The groundwater impacts have been analyzed for the proposed RH-LLW disposal facility. A four-step analysis approach was documented and applied. This assessment compared the predicted groundwater ingestion dose to the more restrictive of either the 25 mrem/yr all pathway dose performance objective, or the maximum contaminant limit performance objective. The results of this analysis indicate that the groundwater impacts for either proposed facility location are expected to be less than the performance objectives. The analysis was prepared to support the NEPA-EA for the top two ranking of the proposed RH-LLW sites. As such, site-specific conditions were incorporated for each set of results generated. These site-specific conditions were included to account for the transport of radionuclides through the vadose zone and through the aquifer at each site. Site-specific parameters included the thickness of vadose zone sediments and basalts, moisture characteristics of the sediments, and aquifer velocity. Sorption parameters (Kd) were assumed to be very conservative values used in Track II analysis of CERCLA sites at INL. Infiltration was also conservatively assumed to represent higher rates corresponding to disturbed soil conditions. The results of this analysis indicate that the groundwater impacts for either proposed facility location are expected to be less than the performance objectives.

  9. Section 175 report: Secretary of Energy report to the Congress pursuant to Section 175 of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1988-12-01

    This report contributes to, but does not supplant, ongoing studies being conducted by DOE to ensure that potentially significant adverse effects that may result from the repository program are minimized to the maximum extent practicable. As indicated in the Environmental Assessment for the Yucca Mountain site (US DOE, 1986) DOE does not believe significant adverse effects will result from site characterization activities. Nevertheless, DOE is conducting a variety of studies to determine if this conclusion is valid. These studies include, but are not limited to, monitoring of air and water quality and other environmental factors; monitoring the number of immigrating repository program workers and their residential locations; identifying cultural resources in the Yucca Mountain area and traditional culture and religious values of American Indian people associated with those resources; evaluating possible rail access routes to the Yucca Mountain site; and evaluating possible highway routes. These studies have been implemented after consultation with affected parties in Nevada. As part of the determination of suitability, and Environmental Impact Statement will be written and will include an analysis of potential impacts associated with constructing, operating, closing, and decommissioning a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. 59 refs., 33 figs., 12 tabs.

  10. Regulations, Policies and Strategies for LLRW Management in Bangladesh - 12368

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mollah, A.S.

    2012-07-01

    Low level radioactive waste (LLW) is generated from various nuclear applications in Bangladesh. The major sources of radioactive waste in the country are at present: (a) the 3 MW TRIGA Mark-II research reactor; (b) the radioisotope production facility; (c) the medical, industrial and research facilities that use radionuclides; and (d) the industrial facility for processing monazite sands. Radioactive waste needs to be safely managed because it is potentially hazardous to human health and the environment. According to Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control Act-93, the Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC) is the governmental body responsible for the receipt and final disposal of radioactive wastes in the whole country. Waste management policy has become an important environmental, social, and economical issue for LLW in Bangladesh. Policy and strategies will serve as a basic guide for radioactive waste management in Bangladesh. The waste generator is responsible for on-site collection, conditioning and temporary storage of the waste arising from his practice. The Central Waste Processing and Storage Unit (CWPSU) of BAEC is the designated national facility with the requisite facility for the treatment, conditioning and storage of radioactive waste until a final disposal facility is established and becomes operational. The Regulatory Authority is responsible for the enforcement of compliance with provisions of the waste management regulation and other relevant requirements by the waste generator and the CWPSU. The objective of this paper is to present, in a concise form, basic information about the radioactive waste management infrastructure, regulations, policies and strategies including the total inventory of low level radioactive waste in the country. For improvement and strengthening in terms of operational capability, safety and security of RW including spent radioactive sources and overall security of the facility (CWPSF), the facility is expected to serve waste management need in the country and, in the course of time, the facility may be turned into a regional level training centre. It is essential for safe conduction and culture of research and application in nuclear science and technology maintaining the relevant safety of man and environment and future generations to come. (authors)

  11. Potential dispositioning flowsheets for ICPP SNF and wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, A.L.; Anderson, P.A.; Bendixsen, C.L.

    1995-11-01

    The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INEL), has reprocessed irradiated nuclear fuels for the US Department of Energy (DOE) since 1953. This activity resulted mainly in the recovery of uranium and the management of the resulting wastes. The acidic radioactive high-level liquid waste was routinely stored in stainless steel tanks and then calcined to form a dry granular solid. The calcine is stored in stainless steel bins that are housed in underground concrete vaults. In April 1992, the DOE discontinued the practice of reprocessing irradiated nuclear fuels. This decision has left a legacy of 1.8 million gallons of radioactive liquid wastes (1.5 million gallons of radioactive sodium-bearing liquid wastes and 0.3 million gallons of high-level liquid waste), 3800 cubic meters of calcine waste, and 289 metric tons of heavy metal within unprocessed spent nuclear fuel (SNF) left in inventory at the ICPP. The nation`s radioactive waste policy has been established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA), which requires the final disposal of SNF and radioactive waste in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) standards. In accordance with these regulations and other legal agreements between the State of Idaho and the DOE, the DOE must, among other requirements, (1) complete a final Environmental Impact Statement by April 30, 1995, (2) evaluate and test sodium-bearing waste pre-treatment technologies, (3) select the sodium-bearing and calcine waste pre-treatment technology, if necessary, by June 1, 1995, and (4) select a technology for converting calcined waste into an appropriate disposal form by June 1, 1995.

  12. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B Permit Application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 2, Chapter C, Appendix C1--Chapter C, Appendix C3 (beginning), Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    This volume contains appendices for the following: Rocky Flats Plant and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory waste process information; TRUPACT-II content codes (TRUCON); TRUPACT-II chemical list; chemical compatibility analysis for Rocky Flats Plant waste forms; chemical compatibility analysis for waste forms across all sites; TRU mixed waste characterization database; hazardous constituents of Rocky Flats Transuranic waste; summary of waste components in TRU waste sampling program at INEL; TRU waste sampling program; and waste analysis data.

  13. Policy Flash 2005-53

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Transmission Line Projects Under Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 | Department of Energy Project Proposal for New or Upgraded Transmission Line Projects Under Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Plains & Eastern Clean Line Project Proposal for New or Upgraded Transmission Line Projects Under Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 PDF icon Plains & Eastern Clean Line Project Proposal for New or Upgraded Transmission Line Projects Under Section 1222 of the

  14. Policy Memoranda | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    an employee's Fair Labor Standards Act status within the Department. March 31, 2010 POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM 07 Current Appropriations Law and Compensation of Foreign...

  15. Development of low-level radioactive waste disposal capacity in the United States - progress or stalemate?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devgun, J.S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Larson, G.S. [Midwest Low-Level Radioactive Waste Commission, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    It has been fifteen years since responsibility for the disposal of commercially generated low-level radioactive waste (LLW) was shifted to the states by the United States Congress through the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 (LLRWPA). In December 1985, Congress revisited the issue and enacted the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (LLRWPAA). No new disposal sites have opened yet, however, and it is now evident that disposal facility development is more complex, time-consuming, and controversial than originally anticipated. For a nation with a large nuclear power industry, the lack of availability of LLW disposal capacity coupled with a similar lack of high-level radioactive waste disposal capacity could adversely affect the future viability of the nuclear energy option. The U.S. nuclear power industry, with 109 operating reactors, generates about half of the LLW shipped to commercial disposal sites and faces dwindling access to waste disposal sites and escalating waste management costs. The other producers of LLW - industries, government (except the defense related research and production waste), academic institutions, and medical institutions that account for the remaining half of the commercial LLW - face the same storage and cost uncertainties. This paper will summarize the current status of U.S. low-level radioactive waste generation and the status of new disposal facility development efforts by the states. The paper will also examine the factors that have contributed to delays, the most frequently suggested alternatives, and the likelihood of change.

  16. Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Act of 2005: A Summary for State Officials | Department of Energy Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy Act of 2005: A Summary for State Officials Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy Act of 2005: A Summary for State Officials This report represents a review of policy developments on demand response and other related areas such as smart meters and smart grid. It has been prepared by the Demand Response Coordinating

  17. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B Permit Application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 5, Chapter D, Appendix D1 (conclusion), Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, Neville G.W.; Heuze, Francois E.; Miller, Hamish D.S.; Thoms, Robert L.

    1993-03-01

    The reference design for the underground facilities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant was developed using the best criteria available at initiation of the detailed design effort. These design criteria are contained in the US Department of Energy document titled Design Criteria, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Revised Mission Concept-IIA (RMC-IIA), Rev. 4, dated February 1984. The validation process described in the Design Validation Final Report has resulted in validation of the reference design of the underground openings based on these criteria. Future changes may necessitate modification of the Design Criteria document and/or the reference design. Validation of the reference design as presented in this report permits the consideration of future design or design criteria modifications necessitated by these changes or by experience gained at the WIPP. Any future modifications to the design criteria and/or the reference design will be governed by a DOE Standard Operation Procedure (SOP) covering underground design changes. This procedure will explain the process to be followed in describing, evaluating and approving the change.

  18. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B Permit Application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 4, Chapter D, Appendix D1 (beginning), Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lappin, A. R.

    1993-03-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which is designed for receipt, handling, storage, and permanent isolation of defense-generated transuranic wastes, is being excavated at a depth of approximately 655 m in bedded halites of the Permian Salado Formation of southeastern New Mexico. Site-characterization activities at the present WIPP site began in 1976. Full construction of the facility began in 1983, after completion of ``Site and Preliminary Design Validation`` (SPDV) activities and reporting. Site-characterization activities since 1983 have had the objectives of updating or refining the overall conceptual model of the geologic, hydrologic, and structural behavior of the WIPP site and providing data adequate for use in WIPP performance assessment. This report has four main objectives: 1. Summarize the results of WIPP site-characterization studies carried out since the spring of 1983 as a result of specific agreements between the US Department of Energy and the State of New Mexico. 2. Summarize the results and status of site-characterization and facility-characterization studies carried out since 1983, but not specifically included in mandated agreements. 3. Compile the results of WIPP site-characterization studies into an internally consistent conceptual model for the geologic, hydrologic, geochemical, and structural behavior of the WIPP site. This model includes some consideration of the effects of the WIPP facility and shafts on the local characteristics of the Salado and Rustler Formations. 4. Discuss the present limitations and/or uncertainties in the conceptual geologic model of the WIPP site and facility. The objectives of this report are limited in scope, and do not include determination of whether or not the WIPP Project will comply with repository-performance criteria developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (40CFR191).

  19. Real ID Act in brief

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Real Estate Approvals Real Estate Approvals Real Estate Approvals Policy Flash 2011-61, Acquisition Guide Chapter 17.3, Acquisition, Use, and Disposal of Real Estate (attachment)

    Visitors » Badging, Badge Office » Real ID Act in brief Real ID Act in brief Effective Nov. 3, 2014, the Lab will implement requirements of the REAL ID Act. Contact Badge Office (505) 667-6901 Email REAL ID Act in brief REAL ID is a coordinated effort by the states and the Federal Government to improve the

  20. Recovery Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recovery Act and Energy Department programs were designed to stimulate the economy while creating new power sources, conserving resources and aligning the nation to once again lead the global energy economy.

  1. H.R. 1443: A Bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to provide a tax credit to businesses which mine metallurgical coal and are required to make contributions to the UMWA Combined Benefit Fund created by the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, March 24, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-12-31

    The report H.R. 1143 is a bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to provide a tax credit to businesses which mine metallurgical coal and are required to make contributions to the UMWA Combined Benefit Fund created by the Energy Policy Act of 1992. The proposed legislative text is included.

  2. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 3, Chapter C, Appendix C3 (conclusion)--Chapter C, Appendix C9: Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roggenthen, D. K.; McFeeters, T. L.; Nieweg, R. G.; Blakeslee, J. J.

    1993-03-01

    This volume contains appendices for the following: results of extraction procedure (EP) toxicity data analyses; summary of headspace gas analysis in Rocky Flats Plant sampling program-FY 1988; waste drum gas generation sampling program at Rocky Flats Plant during FY 1988; TRU waste sampling program waste characterization; summary of headspace gas analyses in TRU waste sampling program; summary of volatile organic compounds analyses in TRU waste sampling program; totals analysis versus toxicity characteristic leaching procedure; Waste Isolation Pilot Plant waste characterization sampling and analysis methods; Waste Isolation Pilot Plant waste characterization analytical methods; data reduction, validation and reporting; examples of waste screening checklists; and Waste Isolation Pilot Plant generator/storage site waste screening and acceptance audit program.

  3. Policy Flash 2016-08 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DATE: December 29, 2015 TO: Procurement DirectorsHeads of Contracting Activities FROM: Acting Chief Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division Office of Policy Office of ...

  4. Policy Flash 2016-06 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DATE: December 29, 2015 TO: Procurement Directors and Heads of Contracting Activities FROM: Acting Chief Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division Office of Policy Office ...

  5. POLICY FLASH 2016-21 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    POLICY FLASH 2016-21 DATE: April 7, 2016 TO: Procurement Directors Heads of Contracting Activities FROM: Acting Chief Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division Office of ...

  6. POLICY FLASH 2016-07 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    POLICY FLASH 2016-07 POLICY FLASH 2016-07 DATE: December 31, 2015 TO: Procurement DirectorsContracting Officers FROM: Acting Division Chief Contract and Financial Assistance ...

  7. NEPA/CERCLA/RCRA integration: Policy vs. practice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, R.P. ); Wolff, T.A. )

    1993-01-01

    Overwhelmed with environmental protection documentation requirements, a number of Federal agencies are grappling with the complexities of attempting to integrate'' the documentation requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). While there is some overlap between the general environmental policy objectives of NEPA, and the much more specific waste cleanup objectives of CERCLA and RCRA, there are also major differences and outright conflicts. This paper identifies both problems and opportunities associated with implementing emerging and evolving Federal agency policy regarding integration of the procedural and documentation requirements of NEPA, CERCLA, and RCRA. The emphasis is on NEPA/CERCLA/RCRA integration policy and practice at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The paper provides a comparative analysis of NEPA, CERCLA, and RCRA processes and discusses special integration issues including scoping, development and analysis of alternatives, risk assessment, tiering, scheduling, and the controversy surrounding applicability of NEPA to CERCLA or RCRA cleanup activities. Several NEPA/CERCLA/RCRA integration strategy options are evaluated and an annotated outline of an integrated NEPA/CERCLA document is included.

  8. National Environmental Policy Act: Little Information Exists...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    been a focus of litigation. Author U.S. Government Accountability Office Organization U.S.G.O.A. Published U.S.G.O.A., 2014 Report Number GAO - 14 - 369 DOI Not Provided Check for...

  9. Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 2005

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... 8, 2005 42 USC 16231. techniques for power flow through ... the Secretary of Agri- culture, shall demonstrate the use ... combustion engines or fuel cell-powered vehicles; (2) ...

  10. DOE National Environmental Policy Act Implementing Procedures...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... as unnecessary because DOE actions would only apply to its own transmission system. ... B4.12. (DOE also proposes a similar change to EA class of actions C4.) B4.1 Contracts, ...

  11. National Environmental Policy Act - Categorical Exclusions |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Categorical Exclusion - Site Characterization Activities PDF icon Portsmouth... of Polychlorinated Biphenyl Containing Materials PDF icon Portsmouth Categorical ...

  12. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorically Excluded...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... B1.24, B3.1, B6.1 LM 28-14 Aerial Photography and Topographic Mapping of the Weldon ... 08262014 B3.1(c) LM 13-14 Aerial photography and mapping of the Gunnison, Colorado, ...

  13. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorical Exclusions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Lab A19 Cleanroom Construction - 75 Kb 07102015 DOE-ID-15-035 Assessment of Aging Degradation Mechanisms of Alloy 709 for Sodium Fast Reactors Colorado School of Mines - ...

  14. Preamble - National Environmental Policy Act Implementing Procedures...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    states that it believes this is consistent with the order language. The Department does not believe that the Board's recommendation would be consistent with the order language. ...

  15. Fifteenth annual U.S. Department of Energy low-level radioactive waste management conference: Agenda and abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-12-31

    The goal of the conference was to give the opportunity to identify and discuss low-level radioactive waste management issues, share lessons learned, and hear about some of the latest advances in technology. Abstracts of the presentations are arranged into the following topical sections: (1) Performance Management Track: Performance assessment perspectives; Site characterization; Modeling and performance assessment; and Remediation; (2) Technical Track: Strategic planning; Tools and options; Characterization and validation; Treatment updates; Technology development; and Storage; (3) Institutional Track: Orders and regulatory issues; Waste management options; Legal, economic, and social issues; Public involvement; Siting process; and Low-level radioactive waste policy amendment acts.

  16. Safe interim storage of Hanford tank wastes, draft environmental impact statement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This Draft EIS is prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Washington State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA). DOE and Ecology have identified the need to resolve near-term tank safety issues associated with Watchlist tanks as identified pursuant to Public Law (P.L.) 101-510, Section 3137, ``Safety Measures for Waste Tanks at Hanford Nuclear Reservation,`` of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1991, while continuing to provide safe storage for other Hanford wastes. This would be an interim action pending other actions that could be taken to convert waste to a more stable form based on decisions resulting from the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) EIS. The purpose for this action is to resolve safety issues concerning the generation of unacceptable levels of hydrogen in two Watchlist tanks, 101-SY and 103-SY. Retrieving waste in dilute form from Tanks 101-SY and 103-SY, hydrogen-generating Watchlist double shell tanks (DSTs) in the 200 West Area, and storage in new tanks is the preferred alternative for resolution of the hydrogen safety issues.

  17. Waste Management | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Management Waste Management Nuclear Materials Disposition Nuclear Materials Disposition In fulfilling its mission, EM frequently manages and completes disposition of surplus nuclear materials and spent nuclear fuel. These are not waste. They are nuclear materials no longer needed for national security or other purposes, including spent nuclear fuel, special nuclear materials (as defined by the Atomic Energy Act) and other Nuclear Materials. Read more Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste

  18. WIPP WASTE MINIMIZATION PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carlsbad, New Mexico 8822 1 NOV 2 3 2011 Mr. John Kieling , Acting Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environme nt Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Waste Minimization Report Dear Mr. Kieling: This letter provides the submittal of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Waste Minimization Report. This report is required by and has bee n prepared in accordance with the WIPP

  19. Transuranic (TRU) Waste | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Defined by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act as "waste containing more than 100 nanocuries of alpha-emitting transuranic isotopes per gram of waste with half-lives greater than 20 years, except for (A) high-level radioactive waste, (B) waste that the Secretary of Energy has determined, with concurrence of the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, does not need the degree of isolation required by the disposal

  20. Construction and operation of replacement hazardous waste handling facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0423, for the construction and operation of a replacement hazardous waste handling facility (HWHF) and decontamination of the existing HWHF at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), Berkeley, California. The proposed facility would replace several older buildings and cargo containers currently being used for waste handling activities and consolidate the LBL`s existing waste handling activities in one location. The nature of the waste handling activities and the waste volume and characteristics would not change as a result of construction of the new facility. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 USC. 4321 et seq. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required.

  1. Final environmental impact statement. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this document as environmental input to future decisions regarding the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which would include the disposal of transuranic waste, as currently authorized. The alternatives covered in this document are the following: (1) Continue storing transuranic (TRU) waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) as it is now or with improved confinement. (2) Proceed with WIPP at the Los Medanos site in southeastern New Mexico, as currently authorized. (3) Dispose of TRU waste in the first available repository for high-level waste. The Los Medanos site would be investigated for its potential suitability as a candidate site. This is administration policy and is the alternative preferred by the DOE. (4) Delay the WIPP to allow other candidate sites to be evaluated for TRU-waste disposal. This environmental impact statement is arranged in the following manner: Chapter 1 is an overall summary of the analysis contained in the document. Chapters 2 and 4 set forth the objectives of the national waste-management program and analyze the full spectrum of reasonable alternatives for meeting these objectives, including the WIPP. Chapter 5 presents the interim waste-acceptance criteria and waste-form alternatives for the WIPP. Chapters 6 through 13 provide a detailed description and environmental analysis of the WIPP repository and its site. Chapter 14 describes the permits and approvals necessary for the WIPP and the interactions that have taken place with Federal, State, and local authorities, and with the general public in connection with the repository. Chapter 15 analyzes the many comments received on the DEIS and tells what has been done in this FEIS in response. The appendices contain data and discussions in support of the material in the text.

  2. Domestic and international nuclear waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, J.

    1994-12-31

    Passage of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act in 1982, and subsequent 1987 amendments, allowed Congress to establish the plan to manage the nation`s spent nuclear fuel and other high-level radioactive waste. The principal elements in the waste management system include waste acceptance, storage, disposal, and transportation. Interim storage of spent fuel is proposed to be in a Monitored Retrievable Storage facility. The Department has been relying on a voluntary siting processes for the temporary storage of spent fuel. A potential repository site is located at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Site characterizations are currently being conducted. Underground construction has started for the Exploratory Studies Facility; surface based activities, including drilling and trenching, are currently under way to acquire additional data. The United States is involved in cooperative studies with other countries. Most of these studies emphasize assessment of long-term performance. By participating in international activities, the United States has been involved in transfer of technological developments and information exchange. There are currently over 400 nuclear power reactors operating in 25 countries. Most countries producing electricity with nuclear power plan to dispose of the spent fuel within their own countries. This paper will provide the status of the US program in the storage and disposal of its nuclear waste.

  3. EPA Redesigns Conversion Certification Policies

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    EPA Redesigns Conversion Certification Policies At a recent meeting held in Washington, DC, officials from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) opened dialogue about proposed changes to its emission certification policies that affect alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). "We are trying to accommo- date the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) and Executive Order requirements while trying to change enforce- ment policies and guidance with respect to conversions," said Rich Ackerman of EPA's

  4. "TRU" Success: SRS Recovery Act Prepares to Complete Shipment...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    With the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding, Savannah River Site (SRS) continues ... EIS-0026-SA-06: Supplement Analysis Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Update Transuranic ...

  5. Partnerships for technology introduction -- Putting the technologies of tomorrow into the marketplace of today. Report to Congress on Sections 127 and 128 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    This report to Congress was prepared on behalf of the Secretary of the US Department of Energy (DOE) in response to Sections 127 and 128 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), Pub. L. 102-486. In preparing the report to the Congress, DOE has assessed the national and regional energy savings potential of products already on the market and those that will be available to consumers by the late 1990s. The Department has also examined the present cost-effectiveness of these emerging appliances as mature technologies. To help in its assessment, DOE organized eight workshops at which representatives from manufacturing and building industries, utilities, retailers and wholesalers, public interest groups and Federal and state government agencies could express their views. The information derived from these workshops was key to the formulation of the report`s general and specific recommendations. DOE has concluded that the Federal Government can effectively stimulate the market for emerging technologies by forming partnerships with the appliance industry and other interested parties promoting the use of highly efficient appliances. Based on the interaction with industry at the eight workshops and through direct contact, DOE has concluded that Federal action and technical assistance is not only desired by industry, but crucial to the expansion of these markets. Section 128 of EPAct requires an assessment of the energy savings and environmental benefits of replacing older, less efficient appliances with more efficient products than currently required by Federal law. Since early replacement of appliances is but one possible market-stimulating action, DOE has elected to include its discussion as part of the overall report to the Congress.

  6. Workers at Hanford Site Achieve Recovery Act Legacy Cleanup Goals Ahead of Schedule

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Hanford Site recently surpassed American Recovery and Reinvestment Act goals to accelerate the cleanup of legacy waste and fuels.

  7. Potential Outline of Section 180(c) Policy and Procedures

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    E Pass-Through of Funds I. Introduction Version 22 1 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 Since local officials cannot apply directly to DOE for grants, the question is whether DOE should require a pass-through of funds from state to local officials. A pass-through of funds from the state to local public officials might meet the intent of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act - to train public safety officials of appropriate units of local government. However, in some states, the emergency response

  8. H. R. 5916: A Bill to require the President of the United States to use the Strategic Petroleum Reserve in the event of a domestic energy supply shortage, to amend the Energy Policy and Conservation Act and the Export Administration Act of 1979 to prohibit the exportation of refined petroleum products except under certain circumstances, and for other purposes, introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred First Congress, Second Session, October 24, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The bill amends the Energy Policy and Conservation Act by making mandatory the use of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve in the event of a domestic energy supply shortage. The restriction on the export of refined petroleum products refers to gasoline, kerosene, heating oils, jet fuel, diesel fuel, residual fuel oil, propane, butane, and any natural liquid or natural gas liquid product refined within the US or entered for consumption within the US. The bill also describes the appointment of special investigator to investigate possible gouging and market manipulation by oil companies and the sense of Congress concerning the cost of deployment and maintenance of United States troops in Saudi Arabia.

  9. Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) | Department of Energy Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Purpose This Policy establishes the approach agreed upon by the Department of Energy (DOE) and

  10. Policy Flash 2012-62 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Policy Flash 2012-62 Policy Flash 2012-62 Attached is Policy Flash 2012-62 Class Deviation DEAR 950.7006AL 2012-10, Implementation of the Price-Anderson Act of 2005 Questions...

  11. Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014 DIVISION E-FINANCIAL SERVICES...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Public Law 113-76 Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014 DIVISION E-FINANCIAL SERVICES AND ... Subpart B-Policy 170.200 Requirements for program announcements, regulations, and ...

  12. Enforcement Policy Statement: Compliance Period for Regional...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA), 42 U.S.C. 6291-6309, which set forth amended energy conservation standards for residential furnaces, central air...

  13. Initial performance assessment of the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste stored at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 2: Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rechard, R.P.

    1993-12-01

    This performance assessment characterized plausible treatment options conceived by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for its spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste and then modeled the performance of the resulting waste forms in two hypothetical, deep, geologic repositories: one in bedded salt and the other in granite. The results of the performance assessment are intended to help guide INEL in its study of how to prepare wastes and spent fuel for eventual permanent disposal. This assessment was part of the Waste Management Technology Development Program designed to help the US Department of Energy develop and demonstrate the capability to dispose of its nuclear waste, as mandated by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. The waste forms comprised about 700 metric tons of initial heavy metal (or equivalent units) stored at the INEL: graphite spent fuel, experimental low enriched and highly enriched spent fuel, and high-level waste generated during reprocessing of some spent fuel. Five different waste treatment options were studied; in the analysis, the options and resulting waste forms were analyzed separately and in combination as five waste disposal groups. When the waste forms were studied in combination, the repository was assumed to also contain vitrified high-level waste from three DOE sites for a common basis of comparison and to simulate the impact of the INEL waste forms on a moderate-sized repository, The performance of the waste form was assessed within the context of a whole disposal system, using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes, 40 CFR 191, promulgated in 1985. Though the waste form behavior depended upon the repository type, all current and proposed waste forms provided acceptable behavior in the salt and granite repositories.

  14. Bubblers Speed Nuclear Waste Processing at SRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-11-14

    At the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site, American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding has supported installation of bubbler technology and related enhancements in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The improvements will accelerate the processing of radioactive waste into a safe, stable form for storage and permit expedited closure of underground waste tanks holding 37 million gallons of liquid nuclear waste.

  15. Bubblers Speed Nuclear Waste Processing at SRS

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-08-06

    At the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site, American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding has supported installation of bubbler technology and related enhancements in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The improvements will accelerate the processing of radioactive waste into a safe, stable form for storage and permit expedited closure of underground waste tanks holding 37 million gallons of liquid nuclear waste.

  16. NO FEAR Act Notice | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NO FEAR Act Notice NO FEAR Act Notice The Department of Energy's notice for the No FEAR Act. To learn more about the No FEAR Act, visit this page. PDF icon No FEAR Act Annual Notice_0.pdf More Documents & Publications Policy Statement on Equal Employment Opportunity, Harassment, and Retaliation Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan 2012 - 2015 ADR in the Federal EEO Process: What We Need to Know about Revised MD-110 ADR LUNCHTIME PROGRAM: ADR in the Federal EEO Process: What We Need to Know

  17. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2005 Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

    2006-10-13

    The purpose of this report is to provide information needed by the DOE to assess WIPP's environmental performance and to make WIPP environmental information available to stakeholders and members of the public. This report has been prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A and DOE guidance. This report documents WIPP's environmental monitoring programs and their results for 2004. The WIPP Project is authorized by the DOE National Security and Military Applications of Nuclear Energy Authorization Act of 1980 (Pub. L. 96-164). After more than 20 years of scientific study and public input, WIPP received its first shipment of waste on March 26, 1999. Located in southeastern New Mexico, WIPP is the nation's first underground repository permitted to safely and permanently dispose of TRU radioactive and mixed waste (as defined in the WIPP LWA) generated through defense activities and programs. TRU waste is defined, in the WIPP LWA, as radioactive waste containing more than 100 nanocuries (3,700 becquerels [Bq]) of alpha-emitting TRU isotopes per gram of waste, with half-lives greater than 20 years except for high-level waste, waste that has been determined not to require the degree of isolation required by the disposal regulations, and waste the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has approved for disposal. Most TRU waste is contaminated industrial trash, such as rags and old tools; sludges from solidified liquids; glass; metal; and other materials from dismantled buildings. TRU waste is eligible for disposal at WIPP if it has been generated in whole or in part by one or more of the activities listed in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (42 United States Code [U.S.C.] 10101, et seq.), including naval reactors development, weapons activities, verification and control technology, defense nuclear materials production, defense nuclear waste and materials by-products management,defense nuclear materials security and safeguards and security investigations, and defense research and development. The waste must also meet the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria. When TRU waste arrives at WIPP, it is transported into the Waste Handling Building. The waste containers are removed from the shipping containers, placed on the waste hoist, and lowered to the repository level of 655 m (2,150 ft; approximately 0.5 mi) below the surface. Next, the containers of waste are removed from the hoist and placed in excavated disposal rooms in the Salado Formation, a thick sequence of evaporite beds deposited approximately 250 million years ago (Figure 1.1). After each panel of seven rooms has been filled with waste, specially designed closures are emplaced. When all of WIPP's panels have been filled, at the conclusion of WIPP operations, seals will be placed in the shafts. One of the main attributes of salt, as a rock formation in which to isolate radioactive waste, is the ability of the salt to creep, that is, to deform continuously over time. Excavations into which the waste-filled drums are placed will close eventually, flowing around the drums and sealing them within the formation.

  18. 1994 annual report on low-level radioactive waste management progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    This report for calendar year 1994 summarizes the progress that states and compact regions made during the year in establishing new low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. Although events that have occurred in 1995 greatly alter the perspective in terms of storage versus disposal, the purpose of this report is to convey the concerns as evidenced during calendar year 1994. Significant developments occurring in 1995 are briefly outlined in the transmittal letter and will be detailed in the report for calendar year 1995. The report also provides summary information on the volume of low-level radioactive waste received for disposal in 1994 by commercially operated low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities, and is prepared is in response to Section 7(b) of Title I of Public Law 99-240, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985.

  19. Transuranic (TRU) Waste | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Defined by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act as "waste containing more than 100 nanocuries of alpha-emitting transuranic isotopes per gram of waste with half-lives greater than 20 ...

  20. Clean Air Act | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Services » Environment » Environmental Policy and Assistance » Clean Air Act Clean Air Act The primary law governing the Department of Energy (DOE) air pollution control activities is the Clean Air Act (CAA). This law defines the role of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state, local and tribal air programs in protecting and improving the nation's air quality and stratospheric ozone layer by regulating emissions from mobile and stationary sources. The CAA contains titles

  1. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- Privacy Act Exemptions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Privacy Act > Exemptions NNSA/NFO Language Options U.S. DOE/NNSA - Nevada Field Office Privacy Act Exemptions subject to the provisions of section 552(b)(1) of the Freedom of Information Act (information properly classified in the interest of national security or foreign policy); investigatory material compiled for law enforcement purposes other than those spelled out in the general exemption; maintained in connection with providing protective services to the President of the United States or

  2. Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    Mixed and low-level wastes generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are required to be managed according to applicable State and Federal regulations, and Department of Energy Orders that provide for the protection of human health and the environment. The Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project was chartered in 1991, by the Department of Energy to provide treatment capability for these mixed and low-level waste streams. The first project task consisted of conducting engineering studies to identify the waste streams, their potential treatment strategies, and the requirements that would be imposed on the waste streams and the facilities used to process them. This report, Appendix A, Environmental Regulatory Planning Documentation, identifies the regulatory requirements that would be imposed on the operation or construction of a facility designed to process the INEL's waste streams. These requirements are contained in five reports that discuss the following topics: (1) an environmental compliance plan and schedule, (2) National Environmental Policy Act requirements, (3) preliminary siting requirements, (4) regulatory justification for the project, and (5) health and safety criteria.

  3. Security Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Security Policy analyzes, develops and interprets safeguards and security policy governing national security functions and the protection of related critical assets entrusted to the...

  4. Policy FLash 2014-21AL 2014-04 and FAL 2014-01 Implementation of Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title VII of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    For DOE questions concerning the policy flash or AL, please contact Jason Taylor at (202) 287-1560 or jason.taylor@hq.doe.gov or Richard Bonnell at (202) 287-1747 or richard.bonnell@hq.doe.gov ...

  5. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2003 Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

    2005-09-03

    The purpose of this report is to provide information needed by the DOE to assess WIPP's environmental performance and to convey that performance to stakeholders and members of the public. This report has been prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A and DOE guidance. This report documents WIPP's environmental monitoring programs and their results for 2003. The WIPP Project is authorized by the DOE National Security and Military Applications of Nuclear Energy Authorization Act of 1980 (Pub. L. 96-164). After more than 20 years of scientific study and public input, WIPP received its first shipment of waste on March 26, 1999. Located in southeastern New Mexico, WIPP is the nation's first underground repository permitted to safely and permanently dispose of TRU radioactive and mixed waste (as defined in the WIPP LWA) generated through the research and production of nuclear weapons and other activities related to the national defense of the United States. TRU waste is defined in the WIPP LWA as radioactive waste containing more than 100 nanocuries (3,700 becquerels [Bq]) of alpha-emitting transuranic isotopes per gram of waste, with half-lives greater than 20 years. Exceptions are noted as high-level waste, waste that has been determined not to require the degree of isolation required by the disposal regulations, and waste the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has approved for disposal. Most TRU waste is contaminated industrial trash, such as rags and old tools, and sludges from solidified liquids; glass; metal; and other materials from dismantled buildings. A TRU waste is eligible for disposal at WIPP if it has been generated in whole or in partby one or more of the activities listed in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (42 United States Code [U.S.C.] 10101, et seq.), including naval reactors development, weapons activities, verification and control technology, defense nuclear materials production, defense nuclear waste and materials by-products management, defense nuclear materials security and safeguards and security investigations, and defense research and development. The waste must also meet the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria. When TRU waste arrives at WIPP, it is transported into the Waste Handling Building. The waste containers are removed from the shipping containers, placed on the waste hoist, and lowered to the repository level of 655 m (2,150 ft; approximately 0.5 mi) below the surface. Next, the containers of waste are removed from the hoist and placed in excavated storage rooms in the Salado Formation, a thick sequence of evaporite beds deposited approximately 250 million years ago (Figure 1.1). After each panel has been filled with waste, specially designed closures are emplaced. When all of WIPP's panels have been filled, at the conclusion of WIPP operations, seals will be placed in the shafts. Salt under pressure is relatively plastic, and mine openings will be allowed to creep closed for final disposal, encapsulating and isolating the waste.

  6. Systems approaches to integrated solid waste management in developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, Rachael E.; Farahbakhsh, Khosrow

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ? Five drivers led developed countries to current solid waste management paradigm. ? Many unique factors challenge developing country solid waste management. ? Limited transferability of developed country approaches to developing countries. ? High uncertainties and decision stakes call for post-normal approaches. ? Systems thinking needed for multi-scale, self-organizing eco-social waste systems. - Abstract: Solid waste management (SWM) has become an issue of increasing global concern as urban populations continue to rise and consumption patterns change. The health and environmental implications associated with SWM are mounting in urgency, particularly in the context of developing countries. While systems analyses largely targeting well-defined, engineered systems have been used to help SWM agencies in industrialized countries since the 1960s, collection and removal dominate the SWM sector in developing countries. This review contrasts the history and current paradigms of SWM practices and policies in industrialized countries with the current challenges and complexities faced in developing country SWM. In industrialized countries, public health, environment, resource scarcity, climate change, and public awareness and participation have acted as SWM drivers towards the current paradigm of integrated SWM. However, urbanization, inequality, and economic growth; cultural and socio-economic aspects; policy, governance, and institutional issues; and international influences have complicated SWM in developing countries. This has limited the applicability of approaches that were successful along the SWM development trajectories of industrialized countries. This review demonstrates the importance of founding new SWM approaches for developing country contexts in post-normal science and complex, adaptive systems thinking.

  7. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B permit application [of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 11, Chapter D, Appendix D4--Chapter D, Appendix D17: Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    This volume contains appendices D4 through D17 which cover the following: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site environmental report; ecological monitoring program at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant; site characterization; regional and site geology and hydrology; general geology; dissolution features; ground water hydrology; typical carbon sorption bed efficiency; VOC monitoring plan for bin-room tests; chemical compatibility analysis of waste forms and container materials; probable maximum precipitation; WHIP supplementary roof support system room 1, panel 1; and corrosion risk assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant ``humid`` test bins.

  8. Civilian radioactive waste management program plan. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-07-01

    This revision of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Plan describes the objectives of the Civilian Radioactive Waste management Program (Program) as prescribed by legislative mandate, and the technical achievements, schedule, and costs planned to complete these objectives. The Plan provides Program participants and stakeholders with an updated description of Program activities and milestones for fiscal years (FY) 1998 to 2003. It describes the steps the Program will undertake to provide a viability assessment of the Yucca Mountain site in 1998; prepare the Secretary of Energy`s site recommendation to the President in 2001, if the site is found to be suitable for development as a repository; and submit a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in 2002 for authorization to construct a repository. The Program`s ultimate challenge is to provide adequate assurance to society that an operating geologic repository at a specific site meets the required standards of safety. Chapter 1 describes the Program`s mission and vision, and summarizes the Program`s broad strategic objectives. Chapter 2 describes the Program`s approach to transform strategic objectives, strategies, and success measures to specific Program activities and milestones. Chapter 3 describes the activities and milestones currently projected by the Program for the next five years for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project; the Waste Acceptance, Storage and Transportation Project; ad the Program Management Center. The appendices present information on the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended, and the Energy Policy Act of 1992; the history of the Program; the Program`s organization chart; the Commission`s regulations, Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Wastes in geologic Repositories; and a glossary of terms.

  9. Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance, Staff Directory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance, Staff Directory including phone number and areas of responsibility for the  Energy and Waste Management Unit, Western Energy and Waste Management Unit, and the...

  10. Forty Most Asked Questions Concerning CEQ's National Environmental Policy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Act Regulations (CEQ, 1986) | Department of Energy Forty Most Asked Questions Concerning CEQ's National Environmental Policy Act Regulations (CEQ, 1986) Forty Most Asked Questions Concerning CEQ's National Environmental Policy Act Regulations (CEQ, 1986) The Council on Environmental Quality, as part of its oversight of implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act, held meetings in the ten Federal regions with Federal, State, and local officials to discuss administration of the

  11. LLNL Waste Minimization Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-02-14

    This document is the February 14, 1990 version of the LLNL Waste Minimization Program Plan (WMPP). The Waste Minimization Policy field has undergone continuous changes since its formal inception in the 1984 HSWA legislation. The first LLNL WMPP, Revision A, is dated March 1985. A series of informal revision were made on approximately a semi-annual basis. This Revision 2 is the third formal issuance of the WMPP document. EPA has issued a proposed new policy statement on source reduction and recycling. This policy reflects a preventative strategy to reduce or eliminate the generation of environmentally-harmful pollutants which may be released to the air, land surface, water, or ground water. In accordance with this new policy new guidance to hazardous waste generators on the elements of a Waste Minimization Program was issued. In response to these policies, DOE has revised and issued implementation guidance for DOE Order 5400.1, Waste Minimization Plan and Waste Reduction reporting of DOE Hazardous, Radioactive, and Radioactive Mixed Wastes, final draft January 1990. This WMPP is formatted to meet the current DOE guidance outlines. The current WMPP will be revised to reflect all of these proposed changes when guidelines are established. Updates, changes and revisions to the overall LLNL WMPP will be made as appropriate to reflect ever-changing regulatory requirements. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Network Policies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Acceptable Use Policy About ESnet Our Mission The Network ESnet History Governance & Policies ESnet Policy Board ESCC Acceptable Use Policy Data Privacy Policy Facility Data Policy Career Opportunities ESnet Staff & Org Chart Contact Us Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net ESnet Acceptable Use Policy The

  13. Extended storage of low-level radioactive waste: potential problem areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siskind, B.; Dougherty, D.R.; MacKenzie, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    If a state or state compact does not have adequate disposal capacity for low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) by 1986 as required by the Low-Level Waste Policy Act, then extended storage of certain LLRW may be necessary. The issue of extended storage of LLRW is addressed in order to determine for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission the areas of concern and the actions recommended to resolve these concerns. The focus is on the properties and behavior of the waste form and waste container. Storage alternatives are considered in order to characterize the likely storage environments for these wastes. The areas of concern about extended storage of LLRW are grouped into two categories: 1. Behavior of the waste form and/or container during storage, e.g., radiolytic gas generation, radiation-enhanced degradation of polymeric materials, and corrosion. 2. Effects of extended storage on the properties of the waste form and/or container that are important after storage (e.g., radiation-induced oxidative embrittlement of high-density polyethylene and the weakening of steel containers resulting from corrosion by the waste). The additional information and actions required to address these concerns are discussed and, in particular, it is concluded that further information is needed on the rates of corrosion of container material by Class A wastes and on the apparent dose-rate dependence of radiolytic processes in Class B and C waste packages. Modifications to the guidance for solidified wastes and high-integrity containers in NRC's Technical Position on Waste Form are recommended. 27 references.

  14. Biomass Research and Development Act of 2000 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Act of 2000 Biomass Research and Development Act of 2000 Conversion of biomass into biobased industrial products offers outstanding potential for benefit to the national interest. PDF icon biomass_rd_act_2000.pdf More Documents & Publications Biomass Research and Development Act Notice of Reestablishment of the Electricity Advisory Committee: Federal Register Notice Volume 75, No. 135 - Jul. 15, 2010 Energy Policy Act of 2005

  15. Federal Facilities Compliance Act, Conceptual Site Treatment Plan. Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-10-29

    This Conceptual Site Treatment Plan was prepared by Ames Laboratory to meet the requirements of the Federal Facilities Compliance Act. Topics discussed in this document include: general discussion of the plan, including the purpose and scope; technical aspects of preparing plans, including the rationale behind the treatability groupings and a discussion of characterization issues; treatment technology needs and treatment options for specific waste streams; low-level mixed waste options; TRU waste options; and future waste generation from restoration activities.

  16. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The objective of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan is to compile and to consolidate information annually on how the ORNL Waste Management Program is conducted, which waste management facilities are being used to manage wastes, what forces are acting to change current waste management systems, what activities are planned for the forthcoming fiscal year (FY), and how all of the activities are documented.

  17. Mixed Waste Working Group report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-09

    The treatment of mixed waste remains one of this country`s most vexing environmental problems. Mixed waste is the combination of radioactive waste and hazardous waste, as defined by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The Department of Energy (DOE), as the country`s largest mixed waste generator, responsible for 95 percent of the Nation`s mixed waste volume, is now required to address a strict set of milestones under the Federal Facility Compliance Act of 1992. DOE`s earlier failure to adequately address the storage and treatment issues associated with mixed waste has led to a significant backlog of temporarily stored waste, significant quantities of buried waste, limited permanent disposal options, and inadequate treatment solutions. Between May and November of 1993, the Mixed Waste Working Group brought together stakeholders from around the Nation. Scientists, citizens, entrepreneurs, and bureaucrats convened in a series of forums to chart a course for accelerated testing of innovative mixed waste technologies. For the first time, a wide range of stakeholders were asked to examine new technologies that, if given the chance to be tested and evaluated, offer the prospect for better, safer, cheaper, and faster solutions to the mixed waste problem. In a matter of months, the Working Group has managed to bridge a gap between science and perception, engineer and citizen, and has developed a shared program for testing new technologies.

  18. Vitrification treatment options for disposal of greater-than-Class-C low-level waste in a deep geologic repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fullmer, K.S.; Fish, L.W.; Fischer, D.K.

    1994-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), in keeping with their responsibility under Public Law 99-240, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, is investigating several disposal options for greater-than-Class C low-level waste (GTCC LLW), including emplacement in a deep geologic repository. At the present time vitrification, namely borosilicate glass, is the standard waste form assumed for high-level waste accepted into the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System. This report supports DOE`s investigation of the deep geologic disposal option by comparing the vitrification treatments that are able to convert those GTCC LLWs that are inherently migratory into stable waste forms acceptable for disposal in a deep geologic repository. Eight vitrification treatments that utilize glass, glass ceramic, or basalt waste form matrices are identified. Six of these are discussed in detail, stating the advantages and limitations of each relative to their ability to immobilize GTCC LLW. The report concludes that the waste form most likely to provide the best composite of performance characteristics for GTCC process waste is Iron Enriched Basalt 4 (IEB4).

  19. Environmental Quality Improvement Act of 1970 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Quality Improvement Act of 1970 Environmental Quality Improvement Act of 1970 The Congress declares that there is a national policy for the environment which provides for the enhancement of environmental quality. This policy is evidenced by statutes heretofore enacted relating to the prevention, abatement, and control of environmental pollution, water and land resources, transportation, and economic and regional development. PDF icon Environmental Quality Improvement Act of 1970

  20. Mr. J . Kieling, Acting Chief Ha

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mr. J . Kieling, Acting Chief Ha zardous Waste Bureau Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad , New Mexico 88221 DEC 1 6 2011 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe , New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Notification of Class 1 Permit Modification to the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, Number: NM4890139088-TSDF Dear Mr. Kieling : Enclosed is the following Class 1 Permit Modification Notification: * Continuing Training Tim eframe We

  1. Extension of the expiration date of Section 252 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act. Hearing before the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, United States Senate, Ninety-Seventh Congress, First Session on S. 1475, July 20, 1981. [International system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The text of S. 1475 to extend Section 252 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act from September 30, 1981 to June 30, 1985 is followed by the statements of four administration witnesses and answers to questions posed to DOE by the committee. Testimony focused on the need for an extension and its duration. Section 252 authorizes the participation of US oil companies in an international oil-allocation system in the event of a supply disruption and limits antitrust actions against participating companies. The administration spokesmen supported the extension. (DCK)

  2. WIPP WASTE MINIMIZATION PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Mexico 8822 1 NOV 2 3 2011 Mr. John Kieling , Acting Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environme nt Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa...

  3. On Going TRU Waste Disposition

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2012-06-14

    The ongoing effort to contain dangerous, radioactive TRU waste. Under the Recovery Act, the Savannah River Site is able to safely test and transport these items to WIPP in Carlsbad, New Mexico.

  4. Policy Flash 2014-27 Implementation of Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title VII of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014,Pub. L. No. 113-76. (AL) 2014-04 and (FAL) 2014-01 revised

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    SUMMARY: Acquisition Letter (AL) 2014-04 and Financial Assistance Letter (FAL) 2014-01 have been revised to remove language from Section 502 that was not carried forward from previous appropriation acts. FAL 2014-01was also revised to update the Corporate Felony Conviction and Federal Tax Liability Representations and Assurances and the Conference Spending term. As a result, AL 2014-04 (Rev 1) and FAL 2014-01 (Rev 1) provide implementing instructions and guidance for Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title VII of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014, Pub. L. No. 113-76.

  5. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B Permit Application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 6, Chapter D, Appendices D4--D13: Revision 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    This report (Vol. 6) for the WIPP facility contains appendices on the following information: Site characterization; general geology; ecological monitoring; and chemical compatibility of waste forms and container materials.

  6. User Policy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Policy User Policy Print 1. Guiding Principles The aim of User Policy at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is to provide a framework for establishing a challenging yet congenial environment where talented scientists from different backgrounds can work together in pursuit of the new scientific opportunities presented by the availability of this innovative facility. User policy must address a variety of user needs and sensitivities. On one hand, the qualified researcher with little financial backing

  7. ARM - ARM Safety Policy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safety Policy About Become a User Recovery Act Mission FAQ Outreach Displays History Organization Participants Facility Statistics Forms Contacts Facility Documents ARM Management Plan (PDF, 1.3MB) Field Campaign Guidelines (PDF, 574KB) ARM Climate Research Facility Expansion Workshop (PDF, 1.46MB) Facility Activities ARM and the Recovery Act Contributions to International Polar Year Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send ARM Safety

  8. NNSA POLICY LETTER

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Approved: 12-13-12 Admin Change 1: 2-9-15 ATOMIC ENERGY ACT CONTROL OF IMPORT AND EXPORT ACTIVITIES NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Office of Defense Programs NAP-23 CONTROLLED DOCUMENT OFFICE OF PRIMARY INTEREST (OPI): AVAILABLE ON-LINE AT: Office of Defense Programs http://nnsa.energy.gov printed copies are uncontrolled THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK NAP-23 1 12-13-12 ATOMIC ENERGY ACT CONTROL OF IMPORT AND EXPORT ACTIVITIES 1. PURPOSE. To establish NNSA policy and procedures for

  9. ADR Policy Federal Register | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ADR Policy Federal Register ADR Policy Federal Register SUMMARY: On October 24, 1995, the Department of Energy (DOE) published an interim Statement of Policy on Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) (60 FR 54482) to further its commitment to the use of ADR for resolving issues in controversy in a fair, timely, and cost efficient manner, and to comply with the Administrative Dispute Resolution Act (ADRA), 5 U.S.C. 571 et seq. Today, DOE issues a revised Statement of Policy on Alternative Dispute

  10. NNSA Policies | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Policies Review the various NNSA and Department of Energy policies for additional information. Review the various NNSA and Department of Energy policies for additional information. Website Policy Accessibility The U.S. Department of Energy is committed to providing access to our Web pages for individuals with disabilities. To meet this commitment, this site is built to comply with the requirements of Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act. Section 508 requires that individuals with disabilities,

  11. Oil and gas leasing in proposed wilderness areas: the Wyoming District Court's interpretation of Section 603 of the Federal Land Policy Management Act of 1976 - Rocky Mountain Oil and Gas Association v. Andrus, 500 F. Supp. 1338 (D. Wyo. 1980), appeal docketed, No. 81-1040 (10th Cir. Jan. 5, 1981)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corbett, H.E.

    1982-01-01

    Plaintiff Rocky Mountain Oil and Gas Association, a non-profit trade association, brought suit against the Secretary of the Interior, challenging land management policies of the Department of the Interior which plaintiff contended have effectively prohibited oil and gas exploration in areas proposed as wilderness under the Federal Land Policy Management Act of 1976 (FLPMA). The principal issue at trial was Interior's interpretation of the wilderness study provisions contained in Section 603 of the Act, which directed that activities on oil and gas leases in proposed wilderness areas be managed so as to prevent impairment of wilderness values. The United States Court for the District of Wyoming, Kerr, J., held that strict application of the non-impairment standard of Section 603, FLPMA, by the Department of the Interior virtually halted oil and gas exploration in proposed wilderness areas, and is therefore statutorily erroneous, clearly contrary to Congressional intent, and counter-productive to public interest. The Trial Court's decision is being appealed to the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals under the title Rocky Mountain Oil and Gas Association v. Watt. 91 references.

  12. Low-level radioactive-waste compacts. Status report as of July 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-07-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act (P.L. 96-573), enacted in December 1980, established as federal policy that states take responsibility for providing disposal capacity for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated within their borders, except for defense waste and Federal R and D. At the request of Senator James A. McClure, Chairman of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, DOE has documented the progress of states individually and collectively in fulfilling their responsibilities under the Public Law. Regionalization through formation of low-level waste compacts has been the primary vehicle by which many states are assuming this responsibility. To date seven low-level waste compacts have been drafted and six have been enacted by state legislatures or ratified by a governor. As indicated by national progress to date, DOE considers the task of compacting achievable by the January 1, 1986, exclusionary date set in law, although several states and NRC questioned this.

  13. Oak Ridge Reservation Waste Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, J.W.

    1995-02-01

    This report presents the waste management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation facilities. The primary purpose is to convey what facilities are being used to manage wastes, what forces are acting to change current waste management systems, and what plans are in store for the coming fiscal year.

  14. S. 1089: A Bill to amend to the National Environmental Policy Act. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, Second Session, June 1, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    A bill, S.1089, was introduced in the Senate of the United States on June 1, 1989. The bill focuses on authorizing appropriations for the Office of Environmental Quality for fiscal years 1989, 1990, 1990, 1992, and 1993. There is an attempt to clarify National Environmental Policy, as well as reporting to congress the President's strategy for environmental progress. One million dollars is appropriated for each of the fiscal years 1989 and 1990, and three million dollars for each of the fiscal years 1991 and 1992.

  15. Statement of Vernon Daub, Acting Manager of DOEs Carlsbad Field Office, Regarding New Mexico Environment Departments Issuance of a Draft Hazardous Waste Facility Permit for WIPP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neile L. Miller Acting Undersecretary for Nuclear Security and Acting Administrator National Nuclear Security Administration U.S. Department of Energy on the Fiscal Year 2014 President's Budget Request Before the Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development Senate Committee on Appropriations April 24, 2013 INTRODUCTION Chairman Feinstein, Ranking Member Alexander, and distinguished members of the Subcommittee, thank you for having me here to discuss the President's Fiscal Year 2014 budget

  16. Policy Flash 2013-28 Implementation of Indian Energy Preference...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Policy Flash 2013-28 Implementation of Indian Energy Preference Provision in EP Act 2005 and Acquisition Letter 2013-02 Attached is Policy Flash 2013-28 Implementation of Indian ...

  17. Guidance for State Energy Program Recipients on Policy and Procedures

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Pursuant to the Closeout of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Grants | Department of Energy for State Energy Program Recipients on Policy and Procedures Pursuant to the Closeout of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Grants Guidance for State Energy Program Recipients on Policy and Procedures Pursuant to the Closeout of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Grants This document provides guidance for State Energy Program Recipients on Policy and Procedures Pursuant to the Closeout of

  18. Scientific Solutions to Nuclear Waste Environmental Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Bradley R.

    2014-01-30

    The Hidden Cost of Nuclear Weapons The Cold War arms race drove an intense plutonium production program in the U.S. This campaign produced approximately 100 tons of plutonium over 40 years. The epicenter of plutonium production in the United States was the Hanford site, a 586 square mile reservation owned by the Department of Energy and located on the Colombia River in Southeastern Washington. Plutonium synthesis relied on nuclear reactors to convert uranium to plutonium within the reactor fuel rods. After a sufficient amount of conversion occurred, the rods were removed from the reactor and allowed to cool. They were then dissolved in an acid bath and chemically processed to separate and purify plutonium from the rest of the constituents in the used reactor fuel. The acidic waste was then neutralized using sodium hydroxide and the resulting mixture of liquids and precipitates (small insoluble particles) was stored in huge underground waste tanks. The byproducts of the U.S. plutonium production campaign include over 53 million gallons of high-level radioactive waste stored in 177 large underground tanks at Hanford and another 34 million gallons stored at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. This legacy nuclear waste represents one of the largest environmental clean-up challenges facing the world today. The nuclear waste in the Hanford tanks is a mixture of liquids and precipitates that have settled into sludge. Some of these tanks are now over 60 years old and a small number of them are leaking radioactive waste into the ground and contaminating the environment. The solution to this nuclear waste challenge is to convert the mixture of solids and liquids into a durable material that won't disperse into the environment and create hazards to the biosphere. What makes this difficult is the fact that the radioactive half-lives of some of the radionuclides in the waste are thousands to millions of years long. (The half-life of a radioactive substance is the amount of time it takes for one-half of the material to undergo radioactive decay.) In general, the ideal material would need to be durable for approximately 10 half-lives to allow the activity to decay to negligible levels. However, the potential health effects of each radionuclide vary depending on what type of radiation is emitted, the energy of that emission, and the susceptibility for the human body to accumulate and concentrate that particular element. Consequently, actual standards tend to be based on limiting the dose (energy deposited per unit mass) that is introduced into the environment. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has the responsibility to establish standards for nuclear waste disposal to protect the health and safety of the public. For example, the Energy Policy Act of 1992 directed the EPA to establish radiation protection standards for the Yucca Mountain geologic repository for nuclear wastes. The standards for Yucca Mountain were promulgated in 2008, and limit the dose to 15 millirem per year for the first 10,000 years, and 100 milirem per year between 10,000 years and 1 million years (40 CFR Part 197; http://www.epa.gov/radiation/yucca/2008factsheet.html). So, the challenge is two-fold: (1) develop a material (a waste form) that is capable of immobilizing the waste over geologic time scales, and (2) develop a process to convert the radioactive sludge in the tanks into this durable waste form material. Glass: Hard, durable, inert, and with infinite chemical versatility Molten glass is a powerful solvent liquid, which can be designed to dissolve almost anything. When solidified, it can be one of the most chemically inert substances known to man. Nature's most famous analogue to glass is obsidian, a vitreous product of volcanic activity; formations over 17 million years old have been found. Archaeologists have found man-made glass specimens that are five thousand years old.

  19. LANL selects local small business for post-Recovery Act cleanup...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of underground waste pipes, excavation of contaminated soil, and demolition of concrete slabs where buildings once stood. "This work picks up where the Recovery Act leaves off,"...

  20. Electric Consumers Protection Act of 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Echeverria, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    An overview of the Electric Consumers Protection Act of 1986 identifies it as the most important federal legislation dealing with hydroelectric development standards since the Federal Water Power Act of 1920. The author summarizes its major components, and identifies some of the existing and potential issues relation to its implementation. The most controversial issue is the selection of a new licensee for a project once the original licensee's term has expired. Other issues concern environmental criteria, comprehensive planning, amendments to the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act, and enforcement procedures. The article concludes with a summary of miscellaneous provisions, including antitrust, modifications and time calculations of projects, wheeling, and other concerns.

  1. Guidance for State Energy Program Recipients on Policy and Procedures...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    State Energy Program Recipients on Policy and Procedures Pursuant to the Closeout of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Grants sepcloseoutguidance.pdf More Documents &...

  2. User Policy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Policy Print 1. Guiding Principles The aim of User Policy at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is to provide a framework for establishing a challenging yet congenial environment where talented scientists from different backgrounds can work together in pursuit of the new scientific opportunities presented by the availability of this innovative facility. User policy must address a variety of user needs and sensitivities. On one hand, the qualified researcher with little financial backing needs

  3. User Policy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Policy Print 1. Guiding Principles The aim of User Policy at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is to provide a framework for establishing a challenging yet congenial environment where talented scientists from different backgrounds can work together in pursuit of the new scientific opportunities presented by the availability of this innovative facility. User policy must address a variety of user needs and sensitivities. On one hand, the qualified researcher with little financial backing needs

  4. User Policy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Policy Print 1. Guiding Principles The aim of User Policy at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is to provide a framework for establishing a challenging yet congenial environment where talented scientists from different backgrounds can work together in pursuit of the new scientific opportunities presented by the availability of this innovative facility. User policy must address a variety of user needs and sensitivities. On one hand, the qualified researcher with little financial backing needs

  5. User Policy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Policy Print 1. Guiding Principles The aim of User Policy at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is to provide a framework for establishing a challenging yet congenial environment where talented scientists from different backgrounds can work together in pursuit of the new scientific opportunities presented by the availability of this innovative facility. User policy must address a variety of user needs and sensitivities. On one hand, the qualified researcher with little financial backing needs

  6. Energy Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department is focusing on an all-of-the-above energy policy, investing in all sources of American energy.

  7. User Policy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE pricing policy will apply for experiments whose results are not intended for the open literature. In addition, experimenters will be required to open operating or equipment...

  8. ARRA875D Recovery Act - Recip Reporting Summary by Project Website

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ...t",14775000,13525840,1.35 ,"Liquid Waste Tank Infrastructure",199851822,119735773,300 ,"Moab Recovery Act Project",108350000,70185067,244.6 ,"Mound Operable Unit 1 Recovery Act ...

  9. Recovery Act Begins Box Remediation Operations at F Canyon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AIKEN, S.C. – The F Canyon box remediation program, an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project at Savannah River Site (SRS), has come online to process legacy transuranic (TRU) waste for off-site shipment and permanent disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a geological repository in New Mexico.

  10. Hanford site tank waste remediation system programmatic environmental review report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haass, C.C.

    1998-09-03

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) committed in the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) Record of Decision (ROD) to perform future National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) analysis at key points in the Program. Each review will address the potential impacts that new information may have on the environmental impacts presented in the TWRS EIS and support an assessment of whether DOE`s plans for remediating the tank waste are still pursuing the appropriate plan for remediation or whether adjustments to the program are needed. In response to this commitment, DOE prepared a Supplement Analysis (SA) to support the first of these reevaluations. Subsequent to the completion of the SA, the Phase IB negotiations process with private contractors resulted in several changes to the planned approach. These changes along with other new information regarding the TWRS Program have potential implications for Phase 1 and Phase 2 of tank waste retrieval and waste storage and/or disposal that may influence the environmental impacts of the Phased Implementation alternative. This report focuses on identifying those potential environmental impacts that may require NEPA analysis prior to authorization to begin facility construction and operations.

  11. Guidance on EIS Review and Recovery Act Loan Guarantee Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE must complete NEPA review before it may provide financial assistance in the form of loan guarantees.  Projects seeking such assistance under Section 1705 of Title XVII of the Energy Policy Act...

  12. Enforcement Policy Statement: Regional Standards Enforcement...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA), 42 U.S.C. 6291-6309, which set forth amended energy conservation standards for central air conditioners and heat pumps,...

  13. Treatment of M-area mixed wastes at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Department of Energy has prepared this environmental assessment, DOE/EA-0918, to assess the potential environmental impacts of the treatment of mixed wastes currently stored in the M-Area at the Savannah River Site, near Aiken, South Carolina. DOE is proposing to treat and stabilize approximately 700,000 gallons of mixed waste currently stored in the Interim Treatment/Storage Facility (IT/SF) and Mixed Waste Storage Shed (MWSS). This waste material is proposed to be stabilized using a vitrification process and temporarily stored until final disposal is available by the year 2005. This document has been prepared to assess the potential environmental impacts attributable to the treatment and stabilization of M-area mixed wastes, the closure of the interim storage area, and storage of the vitrified waste until disposal in onsite RCRA vaults. Based on the analyses in the environmental assessment, the Department of Energy has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and the Department of Energy is issuing this finding of no significant impact.

  14. Sector-specific issues and reporting methodologies supporting the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Volume 2: Part 4, Transportation sector; Part 5, Forestry sector; Part 6, Agricultural sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    This volume, the second of two such volumes, contains sector-specific guidance in support of the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gas emissions and carbon sequestration. This voluntary reporting program was authorized by Congress in Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. The General Guidelines, bound separately from this volume, provide the overall rationale for the program, discuss in general how to analyze emissions and emission reduction/carbon sequestration projects, and address programmatic issues such as minimum reporting requirements, time parameters, international projects, confidentiality, and certification. Together, the General Guidelines and the guidance in these supporting documents will provide concepts and approaches needed to prepare the reporting forms. This second volume of sector-specific guidance covers the transportation sector, the forestry sector, and the agricultural sector.

  15. Federal Facilities Compliance Act, Draft Site Treatment Plan: Background Volume, Part 2, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-08-31

    This Draft Site Treatment Plan was prepared by Ames Laboratory to meet the requirements of the Federal Facilities Compliance Act. Topics discussed include: purpose and scope of the plan; site history and mission; draft plant organization; waste minimization; waste characterization; preferred option selection process; technology for treating low-level radioactive wastes and TRU wastes; future generation of mixed waste streams; funding; and process for evaluating disposal issues in support of the site treatment plan.

  16. P.L. 95-91, "Department of Energy Organization Act" (1977)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-12-13

    The purpose of this Act to establish a permanent Department of Energy in the executive branch to assist in the development of a coordinated national energy policy.

  17. PLUTONIUM/HIGH-LEVEL VITRIFIED WASTE BDBE DOSE CALCULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.C. Richardson

    2003-03-19

    In accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, Yucca Mountain was designated as the site to be investigated as a potential repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The Yucca Mountain site is an undeveloped area located on the southwestern edge of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), about 100 miles northwest of Las Vegas. The site currently lacks rail service or an existing right-of-way. If the Yucca Mountain site is found suitable for the repository, rail service is desirable to the Office of Civilian Waste Management (OCRWM) Program because of the potential of rail transportation to reduce costs and to reduce the number of shipments relative to highway transportation. A Preliminary Rail Access Study evaluated 13 potential rail spur options. Alternative routes within the major options were also developed. Each of these options was then evaluated for potential land use conflicts and access to regional rail carriers. Three potential routes having few land use conflicts and having access to regional carriers were recommended for further investigation. Figure 1-1 shows these three routes. The Jean route is estimated to be about 120 miles long, the Carlin route to be about 365 miles long, and Caliente route to be about 365 miles long. The remaining ten routes continue to be monitored and should any of the present conflicts change, a re-evaluation of that route will be made. Complete details of the evaluation of the 13 routes can be found in the previous study. The DOE has not identified any preferred route and recognizes that the transportation issues need a full and open treatment under the National Environmental Policy Act. The issue of transportation will be included in public hearings to support development of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) proceedings for either the Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility or the Yucca Mountain Project or both.

  18. Waste Determination Equivalency - 12172

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, Rebecca D.

    2012-07-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a Department of Energy (DOE) facility encompassing approximately 800 square kilometers near Aiken, South Carolina which began operations in the 1950's with the mission to produce nuclear materials. The SRS contains fifty-one tanks (2 stabilized, 49 yet to be closed) distributed between two liquid radioactive waste storage facilities at SRS containing carbon steel underground tanks with storage capacities ranging from 2,800,000 to 4,900,000 liters. Treatment of the liquid waste from these tanks is essential both to closing older tanks and to maintaining space needed to treat the waste that is eventually vitrified or disposed of onsite. Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal Year 2005 (NDAA) provides the Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), a methodology to determine that certain waste resulting from prior reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel are not high-level radioactive waste if it can be demonstrated that the waste meets the criteria set forth in Section 3116(a) of the NDAA. The Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the NRC, signed a determination in January 2006, pursuant to Section 3116(a) of the NDAA, for salt waste disposal at the SRS Saltstone Disposal Facility. This determination is based, in part, on the Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Salt Waste Disposal at the Savannah River Site and supporting references, a document that describes the planned methods of liquid waste treatment and the resulting waste streams. The document provides descriptions of the proposed methods for processing salt waste, dividing them into 'Interim Salt Processing' and later processing through the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). Interim Salt Processing is separated into Deliquification, Dissolution, and Adjustment (DDA) and Actinide Removal Process/Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (ARP/MCU). The Waste Determination was signed by the Secretary of Energy in January of 2006 based on proposed processing techniques with the expectation that it could be revised as new processing capabilities became viable. Once signed, however, it became evident that any changes would require lengthy review and another determination signed by the Secretary of Energy. With the maturation of additional salt removal technologies and the extension of the SWPF start-up date, it becomes necessary to define 'equivalency' to the processes laid out in the original determination. For the purposes of SRS, any waste not processed through Interim Salt Processing must be processed through SWPF or an equivalent process, and therefore a clear statement of the requirements for a process to be equivalent to SWPF becomes necessary. (authors)

  19. A compound power-law model for volcanic eruptions: Implications for risk assessment of volcanism at the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, Chih-Hsiang

    1994-10-17

    Much of the ongoing debate on the use of nuclear power plants in U.S.A. centers on the safe disposal of the radioactive waste. Congress, aware of the importance of the waste issue, passed the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, requiring the federal government to develop a geologic repository for the permanent disposal of high level radioactive wastes from civilian nuclear power plants. The Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) in 1983 to identify potential sites. When OCRWM had selected three potential sites to study, Congress enacted the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, which directed the DOE to characterize only one of those sites, Yucca Mountain, in southern Nevada. For a site to be acceptable, theses studies must demonstrate that the site could comply with regulations and guidelines established by the federal agencies that will be responsible for licensing, regulating, and managing the waste facility. Advocates and critics disagree on the significance and interpretation of critical geological features which bear on the safety and suitability of Yucca Mountain as a site for the construction of a high-level radioactive waste repository. Recent volcanism in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain is readily recognized as an important factor in determining future public and environmental safety because of the possibility of direct disruption of a repository site by volcanism. In particular, basaltic volcanism is regarded as direct and unequivocal evidence of deep-seated geologic instability. In this paper, statistical analysis of volcanic hazard assessment at the Yucca Mountain site is discussed, taking into account some significant geological factors raised by experts. Three types of models are considered in the data analysis. The first model assumes that both past and future volcanic activities follow a homogeneous Poisson process (HPP).

  20. CAMD Policy Files

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lists: Caretakers, Accelerator Operators, Shift Operators Building Security: Policy Crane: Directive, Use, Procedure Emergency: Policy, Procedure Experimental Hall: Policy...

  1. Waste Hoist

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Disposal Waste Disposal Trucks transport debris from Oak Ridge’s cleanup sites to the onsite CERCLA disposal area, the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility. Trucks transport debris from Oak Ridge's cleanup sites to the onsite CERCLA disposal area, the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility. The low-level radiological and hazardous wastes generated from Oak Ridge's cleanup projects are disposed in the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF). The

  2. Panelists Update Workshop Participants on Waste Isolation Pilot...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    left, and EM Associate Deputy Assistant Secretary for Waste Management Christine Gelles also served as panelists. EM Acting Associate Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary...

  3. Intergovernmental Personnel Act Assignments

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-08-24

    This Manual implements provisions of the Intergovernmental Personnel Act (IPA) within the Department of Energy (DOE) and establishes requirements, responsibilities, and authority for effecting assignments under the Act. Does not cancel other directives.

  4. Recovery Act Milestones

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rogers, Matt

    2013-05-29

    Every 100 days, the Department of Energy is held accountable for a progress report on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Update at 200 days, hosted by Matt Rogers, Senior Advisor to Secretary Steven Chu for Recovery Act Implementation.

  5. Quality Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Quality Policy It is the policy of the Department of Energy to establish quality requirements to ensure that risks and environmental impacts are minimized and that safety, reliability, and performance are maximized through the application of effective management systems commensurate with the risks posed by the facility or activity and its work. The Department implements this policy through the QA Order and the QA rule directives to ensure quality assurance requirements are clearly specified for the broad spectrum of work performed by DOE and its contractors.

  6. Privacy Act of 1974; Publication of Compilation of Privacy Act...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Privacy Act of 1974; Publication of Compilation of Privacy Act Systems of Records Privacy Act of 1974; Publication of Compilation of Privacy Act Systems of Records Privacy Act of ...

  7. DOE Media Advisory- DOE extends public comment period on Draft Environmental Assessment for Replacement Capability for Disposal of Remote-Handled Low-Level Radioactive Waste Generated at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Idaho Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In response to requests from people interested in National Environmental Policy Act activities occurring at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Idaho Operations Office, the department has extended the public comment period that began September 1 on the Draft Environmental Assessment for Replacement Capability for Disposal of Remote-Handled Low-Level Radioactive Waste Generated at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Idaho Site.

  8. ACT-ARA

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003092IBMPC00 ACT-ARA: Code System for the Calculation of Changes in Radiological Source Terms with Time

  9. Catalog of documents produced by the Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winberg, M.R.

    1995-03-01

    This catalog provides a ready reference for documents prepared by the Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Waste (GTCC LLW) Management Program. The GTCC LLW Management Program is part of the National Low-Level Waste Management Program (NLLWMP). The NLLWMP is sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and is responsible for assisting the DOE in meeting its obligations under Public Law 99-240, The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985. This law assigns DOE the responsibility of ensuring the safe disposal of GTCC LLW in a facility licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The NLLWMP is managed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL).

  10. TO: Procurement Directors/Contracting Officers FROM: Acting Division Chief

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    POLICY FLASH 2016-07 DATE: December 31, 2015 TO: Procurement Directors/Contracting Officers FROM: Acting Division Chief Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division Office of Policy Office of Acquisition Management SUBJECT: Reporting and Use of Information Concerning Recipient Integrity and Performance SUMMARY: Beginning on January 1, 2016, DOE COs are required to include the attached FOA and Award Term and Condition for Recipient Integrity and Performance Matters and review FAPIIS as part

  11. Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Programs Lizana K. Pierce, Senior Engineer and Program Manager Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs 2 Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs Authorized under Title V of the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) to provide, direct, foster, coordinate, and implement energy planning, education, management, conservation, and delivery programs of the Department that- 1) Promote Indian tribal energy development, efficiency, and use; 2) Reduce or stabilize energy costs; 3) Enhance and strengthen

  12. Statute - Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Status Status PDF icon Status More Documents & Publications ICAM Workshop Audit Report: IG-0860 PIA - HSPD-12 Physical and Logical Access System

    Services » Waste Management » Waste Disposition » Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury is in the Planning Stages » Statute - Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 Statute - Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 Public Law 110-414, 110th Congress - Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 to prohibit the sale, distribution, transfer, and export of

  13. Recovery Act Workers Demolish Facility Tied to Project Pluto History |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Demolish Facility Tied to Project Pluto History Recovery Act Workers Demolish Facility Tied to Project Pluto History Workers recently razed a facility used in the historic Project Pluto, the latest American Recovery and Reinvestment Act accomplishment helping clean up traces of past nuclear testing at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Recovery Act workers safely hauled the last demolition waste from the Pluto Disassembly Facility to disposal facilities Jan. 11.

  14. Governance & Policies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net Governance & Policies ESnet is operated by the ESnet staff...

  15. Policy Overview and Options for Maximizing the Role of Policy in Geothermal Electricity Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doris, E.; Kreycik, C.; Young, K.

    2009-09-01

    Geothermal electricity production capacity has grown over time because of multiple factors, including its renewable, baseload, and domestic attributes; volatile and high prices for competing technologies; and policy intervention. Overarching federal policies, namely the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA), provided certainty to project investors in the 1980s, leading to a boom in geothermal development. In addition to market expansion through PURPA, research and development policies provided an investment of public dollars toward developing technologies and reducing costs over time to increase the market competitiveness of geothermal electricity. Together, these efforts are cited as the primary policy drivers for the currently installed capacity. Informing policy decisions depends on the combined impacts of policies at the federal and state level on geothermal development. Identifying high-impact suites of policies for different contexts, and the government levels best equipped to implement them, would provide a wealth of information to both policy makers and project developers.

  16. Privacy Policy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    privacy policy Privacy Policy The National Energy Technology Laboratory strives to protect the privacy of website visitors. Information collected is strictly limited to the following: Information Collected and Stored Automatically The IP address, a number that is automatically assigned to each computer that connects to the World Wide Web Date and time of website access Pages browsed NETL reviews this information to help make the website more useful and informative. This information is used

  17. Web Policies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources » Web Policies /about/_assets/images/icon-70th.jpg Web Policies LANL places a high degree of emphasis on user experience and thus all webspaces are designed, developed, and tested thoroughly for usability and accessibility. Accessibility» Usability» Copyright, Legal» STC Summit Award» TOP STORIES - highlights of our science, people, technologies close Connections Laboratory helps Ohkay Owingeh find math, science tutors; giving students a chance to work, learn and earn; Los Alamos,

  18. Web Policies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Web Policies Web Policies Accessibility The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is part of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), which is operated by the University of California on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy. The University of California and Berkeley Lab endeavor to make information available to all interested parties. We attempt to maintain the primary Berkeley Lab web site, and other sources of information intended for the general

  19. The clean water act -- (Federal Water Pollution Control Act), what it means to utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talt, L.A.

    1996-10-01

    Departing from previous policy, in August 1993 the USEPA`s Water Office recommended that the agency regulate a proposed electric power plant`s cooling pond as a water of the US. At issue was a proposal by Florida Power corp. to build a new electric power plant in Polk County, Florida. A 2,600 acre cooling pond to collect heated and discharged water was included in the proposal. Region 4 USEPA staff asked USEPA Headquarters in Washington, DC to decide whether the pond was exempt from the CWA or a water of the US. The pond could be a habitat for migratory birds according to a memo prepared by Region 4 staff. The USEPA Water Office used the presence of migratory birds to claim a nexus to interstate commerce and therefore concluded that the pond should be regulated under the CWA. Electric power industry proponents have argued that an overly expansive definition of waters of the US may result in any new power plant being required to construct cooling towers. Cooling towers are said to be a more expensive and wasteful method to cool heated water. Region 4 ultimately recanted its earlier position after considerable discussions with various other Environmental Protection Agency offices and, no doubt industry pressure. Florida Power Corp. was not required to obtain an NPDES permit for the cooling pond. The lesson of Florida Power Corp. is that the regulatory environment for utilities can be uncertain under the Clean Water Act even in the face of a relatively straightforward exemption from regulation.

  20. Federal Facility Compliance Act, Proposed Site Treatment Plan: Background Volume. Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-24

    This Federal Facility Compliance Act Site Treatment Plan discusses the options of radioactive waste management for Ames Laboratory. This is the background volume which discusses: site history and mission; framework for developing site treatment plans; proposed plan organization and related activities; characterization of mixed waste and waste minimization; low level mixed waste streams and the proposed treatment approach; future generation of TRU and mixed wastes; the adequacy of mixed waste storage facilities; and a summary of the overall DOE activity in the area of disposal of mixed waste treatment residuals.

  1. Tank Waste and Waste Processing | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing The Defense Waste Processing Facility set a record by producing 267 canisters filled ...

  2. NATIONAL POLICY ASSURANCES

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    TO BE INCLUDED AS AWARD TERMS 1. Nondiscrimination - By signing or accepting funds under the agreement, the recipient agrees that it will comply with applicable provisions of the following national policies prohibiting discrimination: Applies to: Required by: Additional Requirements: Discrimination on the basis of race, color, or national origin Grants, cooperative agreements, and subawards (10 C.F.R. § 600.3) 10 C.F.R. Part 600, App. A; 10 C.F.R. Part 1040; Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of

  3. Public Utility Holding Company Act of 1935: 1935-1992

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1993-01-01

    This report provides an economic and legislative history and analysis of the Public Utilities Holding Company Act (PUHCA) of 1935. This Act was substantially amended for the first time in 1992 by passage of the Energy Policy Act (EPACT). The report also includes a discussion of the issues which led to the amendment of PUHCA and projections of the impact of these changes on the electric industry.

  4. Policies and Procedures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Policies and Procedures Guidelines Safety Computer Security Conduct of Operations JLF Forms Publication Policy

  5. Hanford Site waste minimization and pollution prevention awareness program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Place, B.G.

    1998-09-24

    This plan, which is required by US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400. 1, provides waste minimization and pollution prevention guidance for all Hanford Site contractors. The plan is primary in a hierarchical series that includes the Hanford Site Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program Plan, Prime contractor implementation plans, and the Hanford Site Guide for Preparing and Maintaining Generator Group Pollution Prevention Program Documentation (DOE-RL, 1997a) describing programs required by Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) 3002(b) and 3005(h) (RCRA and EPA, 1994). Items discussed include the pollution prevention policy and regulatory background, organizational structure, the major objectives and goals of Hanford Site`s pollution prevention program, and an itemized description of the Hanford Site pollution prevention program. The document also includes US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office`s (RL`s) statement of policy on pollution prevention as well as a listing of regulatory drivers that require a pollution prevention program.

  6. NDAA Section 3116 Waste Determinations with Related Disposal Performance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessments | Department of Energy NDAA Section 3116 Waste Determinations with Related Disposal Performance Assessments NDAA Section 3116 Waste Determinations with Related Disposal Performance Assessments Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005 authorizes the Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, to reclassify certain waste from reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from high-level waste to low-level waste

  7. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2008, Final Planning ReportEnvironmental Impact Statement, Yakima River Basin Water Storage ... Policy Act Implementing Procedures." 40 CFR 61, U.S. Environmental ...

  8. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2, Part B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    Two types of projects in the spent nuclear fuel and environmental restoration and waste management activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are described. These are: foreseeable proposed projects where some funding for preliminary planning and/or conceptual design may already be authorized, but detailed design or planning will not begin until the Department of Energy (DOE) has determined that the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act process for the project have been completed; planned or ongoing projects not yet completed but whose National Environmental Policy Act documentation is already completed or is expected to be completed before the Record of Decision for this Envirorunental Impact Statement (EIS) is issued. The section on project summaries describe the projects (both foreseeable proposed and ongoing).They provide specific information necessary to analyze the environmental impacts of these projects. Chapter 3 describes which alternative(s) each project supports. Summaries are included for (a) spent nuclear fuel projects, (b) environmental remediation projects, (c) the decontamination and decommissioning of surplus INEL facilities, (d) the construction, upgrade, or replacement of existing waste management facilities, (e) infrastructure projects supporting waste management activities, and (f) research and development projects supporting waste management activities.

  9. Reduced waste generation technical work plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy has established policies for avoiding plutonium losses to the waste streams and minimizing the generation of wastes produced at its nuclear facilities. This policy is evidenced in DOE Order 5820.2, which states Technical and administrative controls shall be directed towards reducing the gross volume of TRU waste generated and the amount of radioactivity in such waste.'' To comply with the DOE directive, the Defense Transuranic Waste Program (DTWP) supports and provides funding for specific research and development tasks at the various DOE sites to reduce the generation of waste. This document has been prepared to give an overview of current and past Reduced Waste Generation task activities which are to be based on technical and cost/benefit factors. The document is updated annually, or as needed, to reflect the status of program direction. Reduced Waste Generation (RWG) tasks encompass a wide range of goals which are basically oriented toward (1) avoiding the generation of waste, (2) changing processes or operations to reduce waste, (3) converting TRU waste into LLW by sorting or decontamination, and (4) reducing volumes through operations such as incineration or compaction.

  10. Federal Register Notice for the Waste Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005 (NDAA) provides that certain waste from reprocessing spent nuclear fuel is not considered high-level...

  11. Classification Policy, Guidance & Reports | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Classification Policy, Guidance & Reports Classification Policy, Guidance & Reports Statutes, Regulations, Executive Orders, DOE Directives and Bulletins Atomic Energy Act of 1954 - Establishes Government-wide policies for classifying, safeguarding, and declassifying Restricted Data information. 10 CFR Part 1045 - establishes responsiblities and requirements for classifying and declassifying RD and FRD. Executive Order 13526, Classified National Security Information - Prescribes the

  12. POLICY FLASH 2016-02 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2 POLICY FLASH 2016-02 DATE: October 16, 2015 TO: Procurement Directors/Contracting Officers FROM: Director Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division Office of Policy Office of Acquisition Management SUBJECT: Continuing Appropriations Act, 2016, Pub. L. No. 114-53 -- Implementation of Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title VII of the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2015, Pub. L. No. 113-235. SUMMARY: Section 101(a) of the Continuing Appropriations

  13. Recovery Act Open House

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    light snacks for those attending. DOE ID Manager Rick Provencher discusses the non-cleanup work that was accomplished with Recovery Act funding. Editorial Date November 15, 2010...

  14. Price-Anderson Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Price-Anderson Act (PAA) provides a system of indemnification for legal liability resulting from a nuclear incident in connection with contractual activity for DOE.

  15. EM Recovery Act Performance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Environmental Management's (EM) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Program recently achieved 74 percent footprint reduction, exceeding the originally established goal of 40...

  16. Recovery Act | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Learn More Risk Management Assessment Tool Recovery Act Top Line Messages EM Recovery Act Lessons Learned Report to Congress EM Recovery Act Videos News Flashes January 29, 2013 ...

  17. CHALLENGES WITH RETRIEVING TRANSURANIC WASTE FROM THE HANFORD BURIAL GROUNDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SWAN, R.J.; LAKES, M.E.

    2007-08-06

    The U.S. DOE's Hanford Reservation produced plutonium and other nuclear materials for the nation's defense starting in World War II. The defense mission generated wastes that were either retrievably stored (i.e. retrievably stored waste) and/or disposed of in burial grounds. Challenges have emerged from retrieving suspect TRU waste including adequacy of records, radiological concerns, container integrity, industrial hygiene and safety issues, the lack of processing/treatment facilities, and the integration of regulatory requirements. All retrievably stored waste is managed as mixed waste and assumed to be TRU waste, unless documented otherwise. Mixed waste is defined as radioactive waste that contains hazardous constituents. The Atomic Energy Act governs waste with radionuclides, and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) governs waste with hazardous constituents. Waste may also be governed by the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), and a portion may be managed under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). In 1970, TRU waste was required to be placed in 20-year retrievable storage and segregated from other Waste. Prior to that date, segregation did not occur. Because of the changing definition of TRU over the years, and the limitations of early assay equipment, all retrievably stored waste in the burial grounds is managed as suspect TRU. Experience has shown that some of this waste will be characterized as low-level (non-TRU) waste after assay. The majority of the retrieved waste is not amenable to sampling due to waste type and/or radiological issues. Key to waste retrieval and disposition are characterization, historical investigation and research, knowledge of past handling and packaging, as well as a broad understanding and application of the regulations.

  18. Deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Brady, Patrick Vane; Swift, Peter N.; Rechard, Robert Paul; Arnold, Bill Walter; Kanney, Joseph F.; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2009-07-01

    Preliminary evaluation of deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel indicates the potential for excellent long-term safety performance at costs competitive with mined repositories. Significant fluid flow through basement rock is prevented, in part, by low permeabilities, poorly connected transport pathways, and overburden self-sealing. Deep fluids also resist vertical movement because they are density stratified. Thermal hydrologic calculations estimate the thermal pulse from emplaced waste to be small (less than 20 C at 10 meters from the borehole, for less than a few hundred years), and to result in maximum total vertical fluid movement of {approx}100 m. Reducing conditions will sharply limit solubilities of most dose-critical radionuclides at depth, and high ionic strengths of deep fluids will prevent colloidal transport. For the bounding analysis of this report, waste is envisioned to be emplaced as fuel assemblies stacked inside drill casing that are lowered, and emplaced using off-the-shelf oilfield and geothermal drilling techniques, into the lower 1-2 km portion of a vertical borehole {approx}45 cm in diameter and 3-5 km deep, followed by borehole sealing. Deep borehole disposal of radioactive waste in the United States would require modifications to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act and to applicable regulatory standards for long-term performance set by the US Environmental Protection Agency (40 CFR part 191) and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (10 CFR part 60). The performance analysis described here is based on the assumption that long-term standards for deep borehole disposal would be identical in the key regards to those prescribed for existing repositories (40 CFR part 197 and 10 CFR part 63).

  19. Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility project. Appendix A, Environmental and regulatory planning and documentation: Draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    Mixed and low-level wastes generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are required to be managed according to applicable State and Federal regulations, and Department of Energy Orders that provide for the protection of human health and the environment. The Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project was chartered in 1991, by the Department of Energy to provide treatment capability for these mixed and low-level waste streams. The first project task consisted of conducting engineering studies to identify the waste streams, their potential treatment strategies, and the requirements that would be imposed on the waste streams and the facilities used to process them. This report, Appendix A, Environmental & Regulatory Planning & Documentation, identifies the regulatory requirements that would be imposed on the operation or construction of a facility designed to process the INEL`s waste streams. These requirements are contained in five reports that discuss the following topics: (1) an environmental compliance plan and schedule, (2) National Environmental Policy Act requirements, (3) preliminary siting requirements, (4) regulatory justification for the project, and (5) health and safety criteria.

  20. Mixed Waste Management Options: 1995 Update. National Low-Level Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirner, N.; Kelly, J.; Faison, G.; Johnson, D.

    1995-05-01

    In the original mixed Waste Management Options (DOE/LLW-134) issued in December 1991, the question was posed, ``Can mixed waste be managed out of existence?`` That study found that most, but not all, of the Nation`s mixed waste can theoretically be managed out of existence. Four years later, the Nation is still faced with a lack of disposal options for commercially generated mixed waste. However, since publication of the original Mixed Waste Management Options report in 1991, limited disposal capacity and new technologies to treat mixed waste have become available. A more detailed estimate of the Nation`s mixed waste also became available when the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published their comprehensive assessment, titled National Profile on Commercially Generated Low-Level Radioactive Mixed Waste (National Profile). These advancements in our knowledge about mixed waste inventories and generation, coupled with greater treatment and disposal options, lead to a more applied question posed for this updated report: ``Which mixed waste has no treatment option?`` Beyond estimating the volume of mixed waste requiring jointly regulated disposal, this report also provides a general background on the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). It also presents a methodical approach for generators to use when deciding how to manage their mixed waste. The volume of mixed waste that may require land disposal in a jointly regulated facility each year was estimated through the application of this methodology.

  1. Recovery Act State Summaries | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recovery Act State Summaries Recovery Act State Summaries Alabama Recovery Act State Memo Alaska Recovery Act State Memo American Samoa Recovery Act State Memo Arizona Recovery Act ...

  2. Policy Flash

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Use the table below to search and filter by Year and/or by Attachment Type.  Previous year Policy Flashes not posted below can be located in the Archive Search File and requested through DOE...

  3. IPP RH-TRU Waste Study - Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary This study was prepared by the Department in fulfillment of a congressional mandate specified in Public Law 102-579, referred to as the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Land Withdrawal Act. In addition, the Department considers the preparation of the study to be a prudent element in the compliance certification process for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The study includes an analysis of the impact of remote-handled Transuranic waste on the performance assessment of the WIPP and a

  4. Integrated Waste Feed Delivery Plan - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Documents Integrated Waste Feed Delivery Plan Documents Documents Hanford Site Cleanup Completion Framework Tri-Party Agreement Freedom of Information and Privacy Act Hanford Site Budget Hanford Site Safety Standards DOE - ORP Contracts/Procurements DOE - RL Contracts/Procurements Integrated Waste Feed Delivery Plan Single-Shell Tank Evaluations Deep Vadose Zone 100-F RI/FS Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis Environmental Integrated Waste Feed Delivery Plan Email Email Page | Print

  5. Web Policies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy.gov » Web Policies Web Policies Accessibility The U.S. Department of Energy is committed to providing access to our web pages for individuals with disabilities. To meet this commitment, this site is built to comply with the requirements of Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act. Section 508 requires that individuals with disabilities, who are members of the public seeking information or services from us, have access to and use of information and data that is comparable to that provided to

  6. OMB Policies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    OMB Policies OMB Policies motherboard-857100_960_720.jpg Cybersecurity & Privacy OMB M-00-07, Incorporating and Funding Security in Information Systems Investments (02-28-2000) OMB M-02-01, Guidance for Preparing and Submitting Security Plans of Action and Milestones(10-19-2001) OMB M-02-09, Reporting Instructions for the Government Information Security Reform Act and Updated Guidance on Security Plans of Action and Milestones (07-02-2002) (pdf) OMB M-03-04, Determination Orders Organizing

  7. National Policy Assurances - August 2008

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    August 2008) To the extent that a term does not apply to a particular type of activity or award, it is self- deleting. I. Nondiscrimination Policies You must comply with applicable provisions of the following national policies prohibiting discrimination: 1 On the basis of race, color, or national origin, in Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000d et seq.), as implemented by DOE regulations at 10 CFR part 1040; 2 On the basis of sex or blindness, in Title IX of the Education

  8. National Policy Assurances - September 2007

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SEPTEMBER 2007) To the extent that a term does not apply to a particular type of activity or award, it is self- deleting. I. Nondiscrimination Policies You must comply with applicable provisions of the following national policies prohibiting discrimination: 1 On the basis of race, color, or national origin, in Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000d et seq.), as implemented by DOE regulations at 10 CFR part 1040; 2 On the basis of sex or blindness, in Title IX of the Education

  9. Need to Consider Intentional Destructive Acts in NEPA Documents (CEQ, 2006)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    | Department of Energy Need to Consider Intentional Destructive Acts in NEPA Documents (CEQ, 2006) Need to Consider Intentional Destructive Acts in NEPA Documents (CEQ, 2006) DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents, including environmental impact statements (EISs) and environmental assessments (EAs), should explicitly address potential environmental consequences of intentional destructive acts (i.e., acts of sabotage or terrorism). PDF icon Need to Consider Intentional

  10. Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act Section 120(e)(5). Annual report to Congress for Fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to conducting its operations in a safe and environmentally sound manner. High priorities for the Department are identifying and correcting environmental problems at DOE facilities that resulted from past operations, and preventing environmental problems from occurring during present and future operations. In this regard, the Department is committed to clean up the 1989 inventory of sites in the Environmental Restoration Program by the year 2019. DOE has issued an Order and guidance establishing policy and procedures for activities conducted under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA), and has developed a Five-Year Plan, updated annually, that integrates planning for corrective activities, environmental restoration and waste management operations at its facilities. DOE also continues to conduct assessments (e.g., Management Audits, Environmental Safety and Health (ES & H) Progress Assessments, Internal Self Assessments) at its operating facilities to provide the Secretary of Energy with information on current environmental compliance status and follow-up on findings.

  11. Managing America's Defense Nuclear Waste | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Managing America's Defense Nuclear Waste Managing America's Defense Nuclear Waste PDF icon Managing America's Defense Nuclear Waste More Documents & Publications Reorganization of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy: Preliminary Observations National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005, Information Request, Mission & Functions Statement for the Office of Environmental Management

  12. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, Waste Analysis Plan The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, Waste Analysis Plan This ...

  13. Policy Flash 2016-20 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Policy Flash 2016-20 Policy Flash 2016-20 DATE: March 29, 2016 TO: Procurement Directors / Heads of Contracting Activities FROM: Acting Chief Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division Office of Policy Office of Acquisition Management SUBJECT: DOE/NNSA Senior Procurement Executives Memorandum - Requirements to Use Existing Strategic Sourcing Agreements SUMMARY: The purpose of this memorandum is to provide guidance to Contracting Officers (CO) on the requirement to consider use of existing

  14. DOE Policy on Decommissioning DOE Facilities Under CERCLA | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy DOE Policy on Decommissioning DOE Facilities Under CERCLA DOE Policy on Decommissioning DOE Facilities Under CERCLA In May 1995, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a policy in collaboration with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for decommissioning surplus DOE facilities consistent with the requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). This policy ensures protection of the environment, worker health and public health,

  15. State and regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    out by electric and gas utilities | Department of Energy and regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried out by electric and gas utilities State and regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried out by electric and gas utilities A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to section 139 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. March 2007 PDF icon State and regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried out by electric and gas

  16. State and Regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    out by electric and gas utilities | Department of Energy and Regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried out by electric and gas utilities State and Regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried out by electric and gas utilities A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to section 139 of the energy policy act of 2005. March 2007 PDF icon State and Regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried out by electric and gas

  17. SRS Liquid Waste Program Partnering Agreement | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Liquid Waste Program Partnering Agreement SRS Liquid Waste Program Partnering Agreement We the members of the SRS Liquid Waste Partnering Team do hereby mutually agree to work in a collaborative and cooperative manner through open communication and coordination with team members, and consistent and complimentary existing defined policies and practices, to develop and reinforce the partnering process, which will result in accomplishing the mission and realizing the vision of the SRS Liquid Waste

  18. Publication Policy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Publication Policy Publication of work performed at JLF JLF encourages dissemination of results of experiments performed at the Facility. Vehicles for the publication may include: Journal articles Conference proceedings articles Books or book chapters Technical reports Dissertations Published patents Published abstracts Invited or contributed talks Popular articles Press reports The decision whether to publish and in what form(s) is the responsibility of the Principal Investigator and/or the

  19. Natural resource damages: A legal, economic and policy overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connaughton, J.L.

    1995-12-31

    Natural resource damages liability is a major development in environmental law. Government authorities are increasingly seeking damage claims for injury to natural resources, invoking the natural resource damages (NRD) provisions of the federal Superfund statute and the Oil Pollution Act. The number of Claims asserted is increasing, and the amounts sought range to hundreds of millions of dollars, with some claims exceeding $1 billion. Some assert that the federal NRD program is an awakening sleeping giant that could threaten to rival the Superfund cleanup program in cost and the potential for imposing far-reaching liabilities on a wide range of businesses as well as the federal government. Lawyers, economists, and other experts on NRD have become fully engaged in comprehensive analyses of the legal, economic and policy issues presented by NRD claims, including a full review of the NRD litigating record. Many critics find that existing NRD law and practice is flawed; produces excessive liability claims, skewed incentives and economic waste; and urgently needs reform. Changes have been recommended to improve the law and refocus the NRD program on achieving cost-effective restoration of injured natural resources. These analytical endeavors are especially timely because Congress is currently considering significant changes in NRD law. This overview will provide a brief background summary of the NRD program and highlight some of the central legal and scientific issues facing government policy makers and litigants in NRD cases.

  20. Federal-Contractor Partnership Allows Continued Waste Processing in Oak

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ridge | Department of Energy Federal-Contractor Partnership Allows Continued Waste Processing in Oak Ridge Federal-Contractor Partnership Allows Continued Waste Processing in Oak Ridge July 29, 2015 - 12:00pm Addthis Employees at Oak Ridge discuss with EM Acting Assistant Secretary Mark Whitney, upper right, the steps involved in processing remote-handled waste and transporting it to UCOR’s storage facilities. Employees at Oak Ridge discuss with EM Acting Assistant Secretary Mark

  1. American Recovery & Reinvestment Act Newsletter - Issue 21

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    With American Recovery and Reinvestment Act work now two-thirds of the way complete at Hanford's tank farms, the DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) is engaged in essential projects that will reduce the risk posed to the environment by more than 53 million gallons of radioactive and chemical waste stored in 177 un- derground tanks. The waste is left over from decades of Cold War plutonium production. ORP and its prime contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), have spent $209

  2. GAO-14-369, NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT: Little Information...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... (EA) or a more detailed Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), assuming no Categorical ... specify requirements and procedures-such as providing the public with ...

  3. National Environmental Policy Act | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Energy's Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021). There are three types of NEPA documents, an Environmental Impact Statement, and Environmental Assessment, and a ...

  4. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    audits, and reviews of programs, procedures, processes (including Performance ... substantial support to the environmental impact statement (EIS) process, including ...

  5. Improving (NEPA) the National Environmental Policy Act through ISO 14001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkinson, C H

    1999-02-25

    Federal application of ISO 14001 and / or the EPA Code of Environmental Management Principles (CEMP) could substantially improve the mitigation and monitoring aspects of the NEPA process. In addition, application of those management systems could also enhance fulfillment of Section 101 goals of NEPA. An ISO 14001 Environmental Management System would provide for a plan to continually address and improve environmental aspects and impacts. The strong feedback and improvement loops in both CEMP and ISO 14001 would help strengthen this weakness of NEPA by providing a mechanism to foster excellent environmental action, not just more dusty paperwork.

  6. FSH 1909.15 - National Environmental Policy Act Handbook: Chapter...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    20, Environmental Impact Statements and Related Documents Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: FSH...

  7. FSH 1909.15 - National Environmental Policy Act Handbook: Chapter...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    40, Environmental Assessments and Related Documents Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: FSH 1909.15...

  8. 10 CFR 1021 -- National Environmental Policy Act Implementing Procedures

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy 0 C.F.R. Part 820 - Procedural Rules for DOE Nuclear Activities 10 C.F.R. Part 820 - Procedural Rules for DOE Nuclear Activities April 24, 2010 This part sets forth the procedures to govern the conduct of persons involved in DOE nuclear activities and, in particular, to achieve compliance with the DOE Nuclear Safety Requirements by all persons subject to those requirements. PDF icon 10 C.F.R. Part 820 - Procedural Rules for DOE Nuclear Activities More Documents &

  9. Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Site-wide reviews can aid the Department of Energy (DOE) in meeting its goals to streamline the NEPA process, to make that process more useful to decision makers and thepublic,...

  10. Energy Policy Act of 2005 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    products. Updates federal green building standards with emphasis on energy efficiency and sustainable design principles (to be determined). Mandates a variety of...

  11. FSH 1909.15 - National Environmental Policy Act Handbook: Chapter...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (sec. 12) to developing alternatives (sec. 14) and estimating effects (sec. 15). Once the analysis is underway, the type of environmental documentation can be determined...

  12. Aligning National Environmental Policy Act Process with Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    which humans and nature can exist in productive harmony, that permit fulfilling the social, economic, and other requirements of the present and future generations of Americans." ...

  13. NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT Management Review Team Conc...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    transmittal to the external stakeholders. DOE-GJO ocumen&anaer ' D. Metzler WE-& NCO J. Robbins - @% DOE-GJO gnvironmendal Specialist DOE-GJO Legal Counsel C. Wayman A. Berry...

  14. FSH 1909.15 - National Environmental Policy Act Handbook: Chapter...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of actions that do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment. Based on the Agency's experience and knowledge, the responsible official...

  15. S ENERGY POLICY ACT OF 2005 SECTION 242 HYDROELECTRIC INCENTIVE...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2013 INCENTIVE PAYMENTS Payee (Applicant) Hydro Facility Albany Engineering Corporation ... Village, Inc., Electric Department Barton Hydro Bell Mountain Hydro LLC Bell Mountain ...

  16. Draft Report to Congress: Energy Policy Act of 2005, Section...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... of Energy ROWs on Tribal Land......44 5.5.2. Interstate Natural Gas Association of America ... and service requirements for each type of energy ...

  17. Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is to encourage: (1) conservation of energy supplied by electric utilities; (2) the optimization of the efficiency of use of facilities and resources by electric utilities; and (3)...

  18. Questions and Answers about National Environmental Policy Act...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy (DOE) State Energy Program (SEP) in the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. PDF icon sepnepafaqs.pdf More Documents & Publications ...

  19. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohay, A.C.; Fosmire, C.J.; Neitzel, D.A.; Hoitink, D.J.; Harvey, D.W.; Antonio, E.J.; Wright, M.K.; Thorne, P.D.; Hendrickson, P.L.; Fowler, R.A.; Goodwin, S.M.; Poston, T.M.

    1999-09-28

    This document describes the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many NEPA documents being prepared by DOE contractors. No conclusions or recommendations are provided. This year's report is the eleventh revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the 12th revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA; SEPA and CERCLA documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is presented in environmental impact statements (EISs) and other Site-related NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological and historical resources, socioeconomic; occupational safety, and noise. Sources for extensive tabular data related to these topics are provided in the chapter. Most subjects are divided into a general description of the characteristics of the Hanford Site, followed by site-specific information, where available, of the 100,200,300, and other Areas. This division allows the reader to go directly to those sections of particular interest. When specific information on each of these separate areas is not complete or available, the general Hanford Site description should be used. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) is essentially a definitive NEPA Chapter 6.0, which describes applicable federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site. People preparing environmental assessments and EISs should also be cognizant of the document entitled ''Recommendations for the Preparation of Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements'' published by the DOE Office of NEPA Oversight. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff prepared individual sections of this document, with input from other Site contractors. More detailed data are available from reference sources cited or from the authors. The following sections of the document were reviewed by the authors and updated with the best available information through June 1999: Climate and Meteorology; Ecology; Cultural, Archaeological, and Historical Resources; Socioeconomics; and All of Chapter 6.

  20. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, D.A.; Fosmire, C.J.; Fowler, R.A.

    1998-09-01

    This document describes the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site environment and is numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is presented in Hanford Site NEPA related documents. The document is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many NEPA documents that are being prepared by contractors. The two chapters in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered this way to correspond to the chapters where such information is presented in environmental impact statements (EISs) and other Site-related NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes the Hanford Site environment, and includes information on climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological and historical resources, socioeconomics, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes applicable federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site.