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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draft Programmaticof ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. Depart~on Ocean TherUial Energy Conversion, June 18, 1979. Ocean

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Report about the Ocean Thermal...

3

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar radiation, and the geothermal energy. [16] Fig. 1.1.thermal energy, geothermal energy, wasted heat from athermal energy, geothermal energy, ocean thermal energy,

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A pertinent question, however, is: what is the worldwide power resource that could be extracted with OTEC plants without affecting the thermohaline ocean circulation? The estimate is that the maximum steady-state...

Dr. Luis A. Vega Ph.D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A pertinent question, however, is: what is the worldwide power resource that could be extracted with OTEC plants without affecting the thermohaline ocean circulation? The estimate is that the maximum steady-state...

Dr. Luis A. Vega Ph.D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Countermeasures to Microbiofouling in Simulated Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Heat Exchangers with Surface and Deep Ocean Waters in Hawaii  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...thermal energy from warm ocean waters. A small fraction...converted to electrical power and waste heat is rejected...water pumped from the ocean depth. Solar energy absorbed by the ocean surface provides the heat...Thermal losses, the power requirements to pump large...

Leslie Ralph Berger; Joyce A. Berger

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Draft ProgrammaticPlan. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE Assistantl OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. DOE.ocean thermal energy conversion. A preliminary engineeringCompany. Ocean thermal energy conversion mission analysis

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants byFifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference, February1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot plant

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants byfield of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference. June 19-

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Philadelphians protest ocean burning of waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Philadelphians protest ocean burning of waste ... A raucous, hostile crowd of Philadelphia residents shouted down Environmental Protection Agency officials last week at a public hearing on the agency's tentative decision to issue a research permit for an ocean burn of chemical wastes. ...

1986-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

12

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion LUIS A. VEGA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion LUIS A. VEGA Hawaii Natural Energy Institute, School of Ocean depths of 20 m (surface water) and 1,000 m. OTEC Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion, the process Energy Conversion. At first, OTEC plantships providing electricity, via submarine power cables, to shore

13

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited OCEAN THERMAL EXTRACTABLE ENERGY VISUALIZATION Award DE-EE0002664 October 28, 2012 Final Technical Report Prepared by...

14

List of Ocean Thermal Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Incentives Thermal Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 96 Ocean Thermal Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 96) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Business Energy Investment Tax Credit (ITC) (Federal) Corporate Tax Credit United States Agricultural Commercial Industrial Utility Anaerobic Digestion Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Fuel Cells Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Direct Use Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Hydroelectric energy Landfill Gas Microturbines Municipal Solid Waste Ocean Thermal Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Small Wind Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat Tidal Energy Wave Energy Wind energy Yes CCEF - Project 150 Initiative (Connecticut) State Grant Program Connecticut Commercial Solar Thermal Electric

15

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Report about the Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization project, which focuses on assessing the Maximum Practicably Extractable Energy from the world’s ocean thermal resources.

16

Assessment of ocean thermal energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a promising renewable energy technology to generate electricity and has other applications such as production of freshwater, seawater air-conditioning, marine culture and chilled-soil ...

Muralidharan, Shylesh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of an open cycle ocean thermal difference power plant. M.S.screens for ocean thermal energy conversion power plants.1958. Ocean cooling water system for 800 MW power station.

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment, Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) ProgramOcean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), U.S. Department offor Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plants. Argonne,

Sullivan, S.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

screens for ocean thermal energy conversion power plants.cold deep-ocean waters to produce electric power via eitherOffice of Solar Power Applications. Division of Ocean Energy

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

screens for ocean thermal energy conversion power plants.cold deep-ocean waters to produce electric power via eitherpower from the temperature differential between warm surface and cold deep-ocean

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Veto likely on ocean burning of toxic wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Veto likely on ocean burning of toxic wastes ... Ocean incineration of toxic wastes has been under study for some time, and EPA has authorized test burns as far back as 1974. ... (where more than 6000 people showed up), and Mobile, Ala., where the issues of transporting the waste safely to the burn site and what advantages ocean incineration has over land incineration were hotly debated. ...

1984-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

22

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Recycling of Wasted Energy : ThermalOF THE DISSERTATION Recycling of Wasted Energy : Thermal to

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Mostly about USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion History Mostly about USA 1980's to 1990's and bias towards Vega or other energy carriers to be delivered to shore... 13luisvega@hawaii.edu #12;US Federal Government OTEC period estimated at 3 to 4 years. #12;luisvega@hawaii.edu 20 Energy Carriers · OTEC energy could

24

Thermal processing systems for TRU mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents preliminary ex situ thermal processing system concepts and related processing considerations for remediation of transuranic (TRU)-contaminated wastes (TRUW) buried at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Anticipated waste stream components and problems are considered. Thermal processing conditions required to obtain a high-integrity, low-leachability glass/ceramic final waste form are considered. Five practical thermal process system designs are compared. Thermal processing of mixed waste and soils with essentially no presorting and using incineration followed by high temperature melting is recommended. Applied research and development necessary for demonstration is also recommended.

Eddy, T.L.; Raivo, B.D.; Anderson, G.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Thermal processing systems for TRU mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents preliminary ex situ thermal processing system concepts and related processing considerations for remediation of transuranic (TRU)-contaminated wastes (TRUW) buried at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Anticipated waste stream components and problems are considered. Thermal processing conditions required to obtain a high-integrity, low-leachability glass/ceramic final waste form are considered. Five practical thermal process system designs are compared. Thermal processing of mixed waste and soils with essentially no presorting and using incineration followed by high temperature melting is recommended. Applied research and development necessary for demonstration is also recommended.

Eddy, T.L.; Raivo, B.D.; Anderson, G.L.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermal Energy Conversion Basics Thermal Energy Conversion Basics Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:22pm Addthis A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in the Earth's oceans to generate electricity. OTEC works best when the temperature difference between the warmer, top layer of the ocean and the colder, deep ocean water is about 36°F (20°C). These conditions exist in tropical coastal areas, roughly between the Tropic of Capricorn and the Tropic of Cancer. To bring the cold water to the surface, ocean thermal energy conversion plants require an expensive, large-diameter intake pipe, which is submerged a mile or more into the ocean's depths. Some energy experts believe that if ocean thermal energy conversion can become cost-competitive with conventional power technologies, it could be

27

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermal Energy Conversion Basics Thermal Energy Conversion Basics Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:22pm Addthis A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in the Earth's oceans to generate electricity. OTEC works best when the temperature difference between the warmer, top layer of the ocean and the colder, deep ocean water is about 36°F (20°C). These conditions exist in tropical coastal areas, roughly between the Tropic of Capricorn and the Tropic of Cancer. To bring the cold water to the surface, ocean thermal energy conversion plants require an expensive, large-diameter intake pipe, which is submerged a mile or more into the ocean's depths. Some energy experts believe that if ocean thermal energy conversion can become cost-competitive with conventional power technologies, it could be

28

Chapter 4 - Ocean Thermal Energy Converters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary The most plentiful renewable energy source on the planet is solar radiation. Harvesting this energy is difficult because of its dilute and erratic nature. Large collecting areas and large storage capacities are needed. These two requirements are satisfied by the tropical oceans. Oceans cover 71% of Earth's surface. In the tropics, they absorb sunlight, and the top layers heat up to some 25°C. Warm surface waters from the equatorial belt flow poleward, melting both the Arctic and the Antarctic ice. The resulting cold waters return to the equator at great depth, completing a huge planetary thermosyphon. Two basic configurations have been proposed for ocean thermal energy converters (OTECs)—those using hydraulic turbines and those using vapor turbines. The first uses the temperature difference between the surface and bottom waters to create a hydraulic head that drives a conventional water turbine. The advantages of this proposal include the absence of heat exchangers. It is easier to find warm surface water than sufficiently cool abyssal waters, which are not readily available in continental shelf regions. This limits the possible sitings of ocean thermal energy converters.

Aldo Vieira da Rosa

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Thermal Pretreatment For TRU Waste Sorting  

SciTech Connect

Japan Atomic Energy Agency conducted a study on thermal treatment of TRU waste to develop a removal technology for materials that are forbidden for disposal. The thermal pretreatment in which hot nitrogen and/or air is introduced to the waste is a process of removing combustibles, liquids, and low melting point metals from PVC wrapped TRU waste. In this study, thermal pretreatment of simulated waste was conducted using a desktop thermal treatment vessel and a laboratory scale thermal pretreatment system. Combustibles and low melting point metals are effectively separated from wastes by choosing appropriate temperature of flowing gases. Combustibles such as papers, PVC, oil, etc. were removed and low melting point metals such as zinc, lead, and aluminum were separated from the simulated waste by the thermal pretreatment. (authors)

Sasaki, T.; Aoyama, Y.; Miyamoto, Y.; Yamaguchi, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki (Japan)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power plants, solar thermal energy, geothermal energy, oceanpower plants, distributed solar thermal energy, geo/ocean-power plants [59]. Other LGH sources include solar thermal energy, geo-thermal energy, ocean

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Lockheed Testing the Waters for Ocean Thermal Energy System ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

today, according to Lockheed Martin. The technology in play: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC). Lockheed Martin is developing a design for an OTEC system that would produce...

32

Thermal power plant efficiency enhancement with Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In addition to greenhouse gas emissions, coastal thermal power plants would gain further opposition due to their heat rejection distressing the local ecosystem. Therefore, these plants need to enhance their thermal efficiency while reducing their environmental offense. In this study, a hybrid plant based on the principle of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion was coupled to a 740 MW coal-fired power plant project located at latitude 28°S where the surface to deepwater temperature difference would not suffice for regular OTEC plants. This paper presents the thermodynamical model to assess the overall efficiency gained by adopting an ammonia Rankine cycle plus a desalinating unit, heated by the power plant condenser discharge and refrigerated by cold deep seawater. The simulation allowed us to optimize a system that would finally enhance the plant power output by 25–37 MW, depending on the season, without added emissions while reducing dramatically the water temperature at discharge and also desalinating up to 5.8 million tons per year. The supplemental equipment was sized and the specific emissions reduction was estimated. We believe that this approach would improve the acceptability of thermal and nuclear power plant projects regardless of the plant location.

Rodrigo Soto; Julio Vergara

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanoporous Thermal-to-Electrical Energy Conversion System (of Wasted Energy : Thermal to Electrical Energy Conversion AArticles: 1. “ Thermal to electrical energy conversion” , Yu

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Discharge to Ocean  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Discharge to Ocean Discharge to Ocean Fact Sheet - Discharge to Ocean Past Practices In early offshore oil and gas development, drilling wastes were generally discharged from the platforms directly to the ocean. Until several decades ago, the oceans were perceived to be limitless dumping grounds. During the 1970s and 1980s, however, evidence mounted that some types of drilling waste discharges could have undesirable effects on local ecology, particularly in shallow water. When water-based muds (WBMs) were used, only limited environmental harm was likely to occur, but when operators employed oil-based muds (OBMs) on deeper sections of wells, the resulting cuttings piles created impaired zones beneath and adjacent to the platforms. At some North Sea locations, large piles of oil-based cuttings remain on the sea floor near the platforms. Piles of oil-based cuttings can affect the local ecosystem in three ways: by smothering organisms, by direct toxic effect of the drilling waste, and by anoxic conditions caused by microbial degradation of the organic components in the waste. Current regulatory controls minimize the impacts of permitted discharges of cuttings.

35

The effects of ocean-dumped wastes on marine phytoplankto  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Major Subject: Oceanography THE EFFECTS OF OCEAN-DUMPED WASTES ON MARINE PHYTOPLANKTON A Thesis by CLAUDE RAYMOND SCHWAB Approved as to style and content by: (Co-C a rman of Co ttee) (C airman of ommittee) ( ber) (Member) (He of De...Partment) August 1980 ABSTRACT The Effects of Ocean-Dumped Wastes on Marine Phytoplankton, (August 1980) Claude Raymond Schwab, B. S, , Texas A&M University Co-Chairmen of Advisory Committee: Dz. William M. Sackett Dr. James M. Brooks Man's increasing...

Schwab, Claude Raymond

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Assessment and evaluation of a safety factor with respect to ocean disposal of waste materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the oceans is essential if ocean dumping is to be continued. The author has surveyed the available literature, bioassay studies, and pertinent research concerning chronic effects and the risk they impose on the marine ecosystem. The main purpose... OPERATIONS 10 History of Ocean Dumping Corps of Engineers' Letters of No Objection 10 12 Types of Materials Dumped Dredge Spoils Industrial Wastes Municipal Wastes Radioactive Wastes Solid Wastes Military Wastes Construction Debris 13 13 15 15...

Zapatka, Thomas Francis

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Energy from the Oceans: A Small Land Based Ocean Thermal Energy Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes a small land based closed cycle Ocean Thermal Energy Plant which is being designed ... aquaculture facility and to produce a net electric power output of up to 300 kW. In...

Dr. F. A. Johnson

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biological thermal energy, geothermal energy, wasted heatpower plants, solar thermal energy, geothermal energy, oceansolar radiation, and the geothermal energy. [16] Fig. 1.1.

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Thermodynamic Optimization in Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As alternative energy sources to oil and uranium, we can consider well known alternative sources such as solar power, geothermal power and wind power. However when we consider the 21st century energy sources, ocean

Y. Ikegami; H. Uehara

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Ocean Thermal Power for Hydrogen Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Roughly three-fourths of the earth’s surface is covered by the oceans and thus receives the major share of the Sun’s radiant energy falling on the planet. Allowing for the loss of part of this energy income by...

M. V. C. Sastri

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT FOR THE NOVEMBER 1977 GOTEC-02 CRUISE TO THE GULF OF MEXICO MOBILE SITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

02 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARY DATA REPORTto potential Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites inOcean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites: Puerto Rico,

Commins, M.L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Assessment of Microbial Fouling in an Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Press Inc., New York. 14. Hirshman...Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion...Press Inc., New York. 24. Mathis...Ocean thermal energy: the biggest...Department of Energy, part II. U...Pergamon Press, New York. 28. Perrigo...

R. Paul Aftring; Barrie F. Taylor

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

2007 Survey of Energy Resources World Energy Council 2007 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion COUNTRY NOTES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007 Survey of Energy Resources World Energy Council 2007 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion 573 and personal communication. Valuable inputs were provided by Don Lennard of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion in the technology. #12;2007 Survey of Energy Resources World Energy Council 2007 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion 574

44

Assessment of Microbial Fouling in an Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Proceedings of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion...Claude, G. 1930. Power from the tropical seas...Metz, W. D. 1977. Ocean thermal energy: the biggest gamble in solar power. Science 198:178-180...studies, p. 1-53. In Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion...

R. Paul Aftring; Barrie F. Taylor

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

THERMAL IMPACT OF WASTE EMPLACEMENT AND SURFACE COOLING ASSOCIATED WITH GEOLOGIC DISPOSAL OF NUCLEAR WASTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

waste repository design AERE-R--9343 Atomic Energy Researchof the thermal s t r e s s field. AERE R-8999, Atomic Energy

Wang, J.S.Y.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Thermal processing system concepts and considerations for RWMC buried waste  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a preliminary determination of ex situ thermal processing system concepts and related processing considerations for application to remediation of transuranic (TRU)-contaminated buried wastes (TRUW) at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Beginning with top-level thermal treatment concepts and requirements identified in a previous Preliminary Systems Design Study (SDS), a more detailed consideration of the waste materials thermal processing problem is provided. Anticipated waste stream elements and problem characteristics are identified and considered. Final waste form performance criteria, requirements, and options are examined within the context of providing a high-integrity, low-leachability glass/ceramic, final waste form material. Thermal processing conditions required and capability of key systems components (equipment) to provide these material process conditions are considered. Information from closely related companion study reports on melter technology development needs assessment and INEL Iron-Enriched Basalt (IEB) research are considered. Five potentially practicable thermal process system design configuration concepts are defined and compared. A scenario for thermal processing of a mixed waste and soils stream with essentially no complex presorting and using a series process of incineration and high temperature melting is recommended. Recommendations for applied research and development necessary to further detail and demonstrate the final waste form, required thermal processes, and melter process equipment are provided.

Eddy, T.L.; Kong, P.C.; Raivo, B.D.; Anderson, G.L.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

THERMAL ANALYSIS OF WASTE GLASS MELTER FEED Pavel Hrma,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

THERMAL ANALYSIS OF WASTE GLASS MELTER FEED Pavel Hrma, (a,b) David A. Pierce, (b) Richard Pokorn (b,c) (a) Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science...

48

Assessment of Microbial Fouling in an Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...publication 23 July 1979 A project to investigate biofouling...to ocean thermal energy conversion heat exchangers...in ocean thermal energy conversion heat exchangers...for man to harvest solar energy involves exploitation...exchanger units. The project was conducted from...

R. Paul Aftring; Barrie F. Taylor

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) A New Secure Renewable Energy Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) A New Secure Renewable Energy Source For Defense Water Temperature Delta 2 A New Clean Renewable 24/7 Energy Source #12;Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion and Commercial Applications 1 Dr. Ted Johnson Director of Alternative Energy Programs Development Lockheed Martin

50

Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters

51

Thermal and chemical remediation of mixed wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for treating organic waste materials without venting gaseous emissions to the atmosphere which includes oxidizing the organic waste materials at an elevated temperature not less than about 500 C with a gas having an oxygen content in the range of from about 20% to about 70% to produce an oxidation product containing CO{sub 2} gas. The gas is then filtered to remove particulates, and then contacted with an aqueous absorbent solution of alkali metal carbonates or alkanolamines to absorb a portion of the CO{sub 2} gas from the particulate-free oxidation product. The CO{sub 2} absorbent is thereafter separated for further processing. A process and system are also disclosed in which the waste materials are contacted with a reactive medium such as lime and product treatment as described. 8 figs.

Nelson, P.A.; Swift, W.M.

1997-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

52

Thermal and chemical remediation of mixed wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for treating organic waste materials without venting gaseous emissions to the atmosphere which includes oxidizing the organic waste materials at an elevated temperature not less than about 500.degree. C. with a gas having an oxygen content in the range of from about 20% to about 70% to produce an oxidation product containing CO.sub.2 gas. The gas is then filtered to remove particulates, and then contacted with an aqueous absorbent solution of alkali metal carbonates or alkanolamines to absorb a portion of the CO.sub.2 gas from the particulate-free oxidation product. The CO.sub.2 absorbent is thereafter separated for further processing. A process and system are also disclosed in which the waste materials are contacted with a reactive medium such as lime and product treatment as described.

Nelson, Paul A. (Wheaton, IL); Swift, William M. (Downers Grove, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Surrogate formulations for thermal treatment of low-level mixed waste, Part II: Selected mixed waste treatment project waste streams  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the formulation of surrogate waste packages, representing the major bulk constituent compositions for 12 waste stream classifications selected by the US DOE Mixed Waste Treatment Program. These waste groupings include: neutral aqueous wastes; aqueous halogenated organic liquids; ash; high organic content sludges; adsorbed aqueous and organic liquids; cement sludges, ashes, and solids; chloride; sulfate, and nitrate salts; organic matrix solids; heterogeneous debris; bulk combustibles; lab packs; and lead shapes. Insofar as possible, formulation of surrogate waste packages are referenced to authentic wastes in inventory within the DOE; however, the surrogate waste packages are intended to represent generic treatability group compositions. The intent is to specify a nonradiological synthetic mixture, with a minimal number of readily available components, that can be used to represent the significant challenges anticipated for treatment of the specified waste class. Performance testing and evaluation with use of a consistent series of surrogate wastes will provide a means for the initial assessment (and intercomparability) of candidate treatment technology applicability and performance. Originally the surrogate wastes were intended for use with emerging thermal treatment systems, but use may be extended to select nonthermal systems as well.

Bostick, W.D.; Hoffmann, D.P.; Chiang, J.M.; Hermes, W.H.; Gibson, L.V. Jr.; Richmond, A.A. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)] [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mayberry, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Frazier, G. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)] [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

THERMAL ANALYSIS OF WASTE GLASS MELTER FEEDS  

SciTech Connect

Melter feeds for high-level nuclear waste (HLW) typically contain a large number of constituents that evolve gas on heating, Multiple gas-evolving reactions are both successive and simultaneous, and include the release of chemically bonded water, reactions of nitrates with organics, and reactions of molten salts with solid silica. Consequently, when a sample of a HLW feed is subjected to thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), the rate of change of the sample mass reveals multiple overlapping peaks. In this study, a melter feed, formulated for a simulated high-alumina HLW to be vitrified in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, currently under construction at the Hanford Site in Washington State, USA, was subjected to TGA. In addition, a modified melter feed was prepared as an all-nitrate version of the baseline feed to test the effect of sucrose addition on the gas-evolving reactions. Activation energies for major reactions were determined using the Kissinger method. The ultimate aim of TGA studies is to obtain a kinetic model of the gas-evolving reactions for use in mathematical modeling of the cold cap as an element of the overall model of the waste-glass melter. In this study, we focused on computing the kinetic parameters of individual reactions without identifying their actual chemistry, The rough provisional model presented is based on the first-order kinetics.

KRUGER AA; HRMA PR; POKORNY R; PIERCE DA

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

55

Low temperature thermal treatment for petroleum refinery waste sludges  

SciTech Connect

Treatment requirements for waste sludges generated by petroleum refinery operations and designated as waste codes K048, K049, K050, K051 and K052 under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) became effective in November, 1990 under the Landban regulations. An experimental program evaluated low temperature thermal treatment of filter cakes produced from these sludges using laboratory and pilot-scale equipment. One set of experiments on waste samples from two different refineries demonstrated the effective removal of organics of concern from the sludges to meet the RCRA Best Demonstrated Available Technology (BDAT) treatment standards. Cyanides were also within the acceptable limit. Combined with stabilization of heavy metals in the treatment residues, low temperature thermal treatment therefore provides an effective and efficient means of treating refinery sludges, with most hydrocarbons recovered and recycled to the refinery. A milder thermal treatment was used to remove the bulk of the water from a previously filtered waste sludge, providing effective waste minimization through a 40% decrease in the mass of sludge to be disposed. The heating value of the sludge was increased simultaneously by one-third, thereby producing a residue of greater value in an alternative fuels program. A process based on this approach was successfully designed and commercialized.

Ayen, R.J.; Swanstrom, C.P. (Geneva Research Center, IL (United States))

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Response of oceanic hydrate-bearing sediments to thermal stresses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are often observed in unconsolidated oceanic sediments11.wellbore assembly if a weak unconsolidated porous medium isevidence, because of the unconsolidated, unlithified nature

Moridis, G.J.; Kowalsky, M.B.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Waste Gasification by Thermal Plasma: A Review Frdric Fabry*, Christophe Rehmet, Vandad Rohani, Laurent Fulcheri  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12 Waste Gasification by Thermal Plasma: A Review Frédéric Fabry*, Christophe Rehmet, Vandad Rohani proposes an overview of waste-to-energy conversion by gasification processes based on thermal plasma, of various waste gasification processes based on thermal plasma (DC or AC plasma torches) at lab scale versus

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

58

Thermal impact of waste emplacement and surface cooling associated with geologic disposal of high-level nuclear waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article is a study of the thermal effects associated with the emplacement of aged radioactive high-level wastes in a geologic repository, with emphasis on the following subjects: waste characteristics, re...

J. S. Y. Wang; D. C. Mangold; C. F. Tsang

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Potential environmental consequences of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants. A workshop  

SciTech Connect

The concept of generating electrical power from the temperature difference between surface and deep ocean waters was advanced over a century ago. A pilot plant was constructed in the Caribbean during the 1920's but commercialization did not follow. The US Department of Energy (DOE) earlier planned to construct a single operational 10MWe Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plant by 1986. However, Public Law P.L.-96-310, the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Research, Development and Demonstration Act, and P.L.-96-320, the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Act of 1980, now call for acceleration of the development of OTEC plants, with capacities of 100 MWe in 1986, 500 MWe in 1989, and 10,000 MWe by 1999 and provide for licensing and permitting and loan guarantees after the technology has been demonstrated.

Walsh, J.J. (ed.)

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Comparative environmental analysis of waste brominated plastic thermal treatments  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this research activity is to investigate the environmental impact of different thermal treatments of waste electric and electronic equipment (WEEE), applying a life cycle assessment methodology. Two scenarios were assessed, which both allow the recovery of bromine: (A) the co-combustion of WEEE and green waste in a municipal solid waste combustion plant, and (B) the staged-gasification of WEEE and combustion of produced syngas in gas turbines. Mass and energy balances on the two scenarios were set and the analysis of the life cycle inventory and the life cycle impact assessment were conducted. Two impact assessment methods (Ecoindicator 99 and Impact 2002+) were slightly modified and then used with both scenarios. The results showed that scenario B (staged-gasification) had a potentially smaller environmental impact than scenario A (co-combustion). In particular, the thermal treatment of staged-gasification was more energy efficient than co-combustion, and therefore scenario B performed better than scenario A, mainly in the impact categories of 'fossil fuels' and 'climate change'. Moreover, the results showed that scenario B allows a higher recovery of bromine than scenario A; however, Br recovery leads to environmental benefits for both the scenarios. Finally the study demonstrates that WEEE thermal treatment for energy and matter recovery is an eco-efficient way to dispose of this kind of waste.

Bientinesi, M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Materials Science (DICCISM), University of Pisa, Via Diotisalvi 2, 56126 Pisa (Italy)], E-mail: matteo.bientinesi@ing.unipi.it; Petarca, L. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Materials Science (DICCISM), University of Pisa, Via Diotisalvi 2, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Parametric Thermal Analysis for Codisposal Waste Package Canister  

SciTech Connect

The engineering viability of disposal of aluminum-clad, aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (Al-SNF) in a geologic repository requires a thermal analysis to provide the temperature history of the waste form. Calculated temperatures are used to demonstrate compliance with criteria for waste acceptance into the Mined Geologic Disposal System and as input to assess the chemical and physical behavior of the waste form within the waste package (WP).A thermal analysis methodology was developed to calculate peak temperatures and temperature profiles of Al-SNF in the DOE spent nuclear fuel canister within a codisposal WP. A two-dimensional baseline model with conduction and radiation coupled heat transport was developed to evaluate the thermal performance of Al-SNF directly stored in a canister in a codisposal WP over the range of possible heat loads and boundary conditions. In addition, a conduction model and a detailed model which includes convection were developed to identify the dominant cooling mechanism under the present WP configuration, to investigate physical cooling mechanism in detail, and to estimate the conservatism imbedded in the baseline model.The results of the baseline model showed that the direct disposal configuration with a helium-filled WP satisfied the present waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for the WP design in terms of the peak temperature criterion, Tmax {lt} 350 degrees C, under the reference boundary conditions. A period of 10 years` cooling time for the decay heat loads of the SNF and the High-level Waste Glass Log (HWGL) regions was used as one of the reference design conditions.

Lee, S.Y.; Sindelar, R.L.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Economics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Luis A. Vega, Ph.D.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) by Luis A. Vega, Ph.D. Published and 100 MW Plants 15 Co-Products of OTEC 16 OTEC Energy Carriers 19 Externalities in the Production Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Luis A. Vega, Ph.D.1, 2 Abstract A straightforward analytical model

63

Composition of Municipal Solid Waste-Need for Thermal Treatment in the present Indian context  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Composition of Municipal Solid Waste- Need for Thermal Treatment in the present Indian context of estimating heat value of municipal wastes, from the view point of assessing the waste's amenability for thermal treatment in the Indian context at the present juncture. The paper also seeks to reason out

Columbia University

64

Energy implications of the thermal recovery of biodegradable municipal waste materials in the United Kingdom  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: > Energy balances were calculated for the thermal treatment of biodegradable wastes. > For wood and RDF, combustion in dedicated facilities was the best option. > For paper, garden and food wastes and mixed waste incineration was the best option. > For low moisture paper, gasification provided the optimum solution. - Abstract: Waste management policies and legislation in many developed countries call for a reduction in the quantity of biodegradable waste landfilled. Anaerobic digestion, combustion and gasification are options for managing biodegradable waste while generating renewable energy. However, very little research has been carried to establish the overall energy balance of the collection, preparation and energy recovery processes for different types of wastes. Without this information, it is impossible to determine the optimum method for managing a particular waste to recover renewable energy. In this study, energy balances were carried out for the thermal processing of food waste, garden waste, wood, waste paper and the non-recyclable fraction of municipal waste. For all of these wastes, combustion in dedicated facilities or incineration with the municipal waste stream was the most energy-advantageous option. However, we identified a lack of reliable information on the energy consumed in collecting individual wastes and preparing the wastes for thermal processing. There was also little reliable information on the performance and efficiency of anaerobic digestion and gasification facilities for waste.

Burnley, Stephen, E-mail: s.j.burnley@open.ac.uk [Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Phillips, Rhiannon, E-mail: rhiannon.jones@environment-agency.gov.uk [Strategy Unit, Welsh Assembly Government, Ty Cambria, 29 Newport Road, Cardiff CF24 0TP (United Kingdom); Coleman, Terry, E-mail: terry.coleman@erm.com [Environmental Resources Management Ltd, Eaton House, Wallbrook Court, North Hinksey Lane, Oxford OX2 0QS (United Kingdom); Rampling, Terence, E-mail: twa.rampling@hotmail.com [7 Thurlow Close, Old Town Stevenage, Herts SG1 4SD (United Kingdom)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

Chapter 7 - Geothermal and ocean-thermal energy conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary Geothermal heat sources are utilized by means of thermodynamic engines such as Brayton cycles, in cases where the geothermal heat is in the form of steam. In some regions, geothermal sources exist that provide a mixture of water and steam, including suspended soil and rock particles, such that conventional turbines cannot be used. In most regions the geothermal resources are in the form of heat-containing rock or sediments, with little possibility of direct use. If an aquifer passes through the region, it may collect heat from the surrounding layers and allow a substantial rate of heat extraction such as by drilling two holes from the surface to the aquifer, separated from each other. If no aquifer is present to establish a heat exchange surface in the heat-containing rock, it may be feasible to create suitable fractures artificially. Downward gradients of temperature exist in most oceans, and they are particularly stable in the tropical oceans. The utilization of such temperature gradients for electricity generation such as by use of a Rankine cycle, are considered several times. The temperature differences available over the first 500-1000 m of water depth are only about 25?C. Considering a closed Rankine cycle, with a working fluid such as ammonia, which evaporates and condenses at convenient temperatures, placed near the ocean surface, it will be required to pump colder water through a pipe from the depth to a heat exchanger for condensation of the working fluid. A warm water heat exchanger is required for evaporating the working fluid. The converters must be placed in strong currents such as the Gulf Stream in order to save energy to pump the hot water through the heat exchanger.

Bent Sørensen

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Heart transport by currents and thermal balance of the south-eastern Indian Ocean active layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper shows that, by virtue of the specific water circulation in the south-eastern Indian Ocean, thermal influx within the 0–200 m layer exceeds the efflux by 13.5×1015 MJ per year, which, being recalculated ...

V. F. Sukhovey; B. V. Baskaran

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Primer L. A. Vega, Ph.D.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

source and the heat sink required for a heat engine. A practical application is found in a system (heat engine) designed to transform the thermal energy into electricity. This is referred to as OTEC for Ocean seawater is flash-evaporated in a vacuum chamber. The resulting low-pressure steam is used to drive

68

Standard guide for characterization of radioactive and/or hazardous wastes for thermal treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This guide identifies methods to determine the physical and chemical characteristics of radioactive and/or hazardous wastes before a waste is processed at high temperatures, for example, vitrification into a homogeneous glass ,glass-ceramic, or ceramic waste form. This includes waste forms produced by ex-situ vitrification (ESV), in-situ vitrification (ISV), slagging, plasma-arc, hot-isostatic pressing (HIP) and/or cold-pressing and sintering technologies. Note that this guide does not specifically address high temperature waste treatment by incineration but several of the analyses described in this guide may be useful diagnostic methods to determine incinerator off-gas composition and concentrations. The characterization of the waste(s) recommended in this guide can be used to (1) choose and develop the appropriate thermal treatment methodology, (2) determine if waste pretreatment is needed prior to thermal treatment, (3) aid in development of thermal treatment process control, (4) develop surrogate wa...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Thermal-Response Evaluation of Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Thermal-Response Evaluation of Yucca Mountain During the Preclosure and Postclosure Phases July 2008 #12;Thermal Response Evaluation of Yucca Mountain July 2008 Page of the thermal response of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository for various thermal loadings. The U. S. Nuclear

70

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat source can be solar thermal energy, biological thermaland concentrated solar thermal energy farms. They demandsources include solar thermal energy, geo-thermal energy,

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

EA-1189: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed 9: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste, Richland, Washington EA-1189: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to demonstrate the feasibility of commercial treatment of contact-handled low-level mixed waste to meet existing Federal and State regulatory standards for eventual land disposal at the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 29, 1998 EA-1189: Finding of No Significant Impact Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste September 29, 1998 EA-1189: Final Environmental Assessment Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste

72

Ocean thermal plantships for production of ammonia as the hydrogen carrier.  

SciTech Connect

Conventional petroleum, natural gas, and coal are the primary sources of energy that have underpinned modern civilization. Their continued availability in the projected quantities required and the impacts of emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) on the environment are issues at the forefront of world concerns. New primary sources of energy are being sought that would significantly reduce the emissions of GHGs. One such primary source that can help supply energy, water, and fertilizer without GHG emissions is available in the heretofore unexploited thermal gradients of the tropical oceans. The world's oceans are the largest natural collector and reservoir of solar energy. The potential of ocean energy is limitless for producing base-load electric power or ammonia as the hydrogen carrier and fresh water from seawater. However, until now, ocean energy has been virtually untapped. The general perception is that ocean thermal energy is limited to tropical countries. Therefore, the full potential of at-sea production of (1) ammonia as a hydrogen carrier and (2) desalinated water has not been adequately evaluated. Using ocean thermal plantships for the at-sea co-production of ammonia as a hydrogen carrier and desalinated water offer potential energy, environmental, and economic benefits that support the development of the technology. The introduction of a new widespread solution to our projected energy supply requires lead times of a decade or more. Although continuation of the ocean thermal program from the 1970s would likely have put us in a mitigating position in the early 2000s, we still have a window of opportunity to dedicate some of our conventional energy sources to the development of this renewable energy by the time new sources would be critically needed. The primary objective of this project is to evaluate the technical and economic viability of ocean thermal plantships for the production of ammonia as the hydrogen carrier. This objective is achieved by completing project tasks that consist of updating the John Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) pilot plantship design and extrapolating it to commercial plantships, evaluating a new energy-efficient ammonia synthesis process, evaluating the co-production of desalinated water on plantships, and developing a conceptual design of a satellite plantships system for commercial-scale ammonia production. In addition, an industrial workshop was organized to present the results and develop future goals for commercialization of ocean thermal plantships by 2015. The following goals, arranged in chronological order, were examined at the workshop: (1) Global displacement of petroleum-fuel-based (diesel, fuel oil, naphtha) power generation for freeing up these fuels for transportation, chemical feedstock, and other high-valued uses; (2) At-sea production of desalinated water for regions of critical water shortages; (3) Displacement of carbon-based feed stocks and energy for production of ammonia fertilizers; (4) Development of hydrogen supply to allow economic processing of heavy crude oils and upgrading oil sands; (5) Development of ammonia-fueled distributed energy to displace natural-gas fueled power generation to free up natural gas for higher-value uses and the mitigation of issues associated with imported liquefied natural gas (LNG); and (6) Use of ammonia as a hydrogen carrier for transportation.

Panchal, C.B.; Pandolfini, P. P.; Kumm, W. H.; Energy Systems; Johns Hopkins Univ.; Arctic Energies, Ltd.

2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

73

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

density, making direct thermal energy storage methods, e.g.reduced. Conventional thermal energy harvesting and storageharvesting, storage, and utilization of thermal energy has

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Other LGH sources include solar thermal energy, geo-thermalThe heat source can be solar thermal energy, biologicalsources include the coolants in coal and nuclear power plants, solar thermal energy,

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Advanced thermal processing alternatives for solid waste management  

SciTech Connect

The 1990`s have seen a resurgence of interest in the development of new thermal processing alternatives for municipal solid waste (MSW). Sparked by increasingly stringent environmental regulations, much of this creative energy has been applied to technologies for the gasification of MSW: converting the solid, hard to handle material into a clean, medium to high-Btu fuel gas. Other developers have focussed on full combustion technology but with a {open_quotes}twist{close_quotes} that lowers emissions or reduces cost. A comprehensive study of these new technologies was recently completed under the sponsorship of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy. The study characterized the state-of-the-art among emerging MSW thermal processing technologies that have reached the point of `incipient commercialization.` More than 45 technologies now under development were screened to develop a short list of seven processes that have passed through the idea stage, laboratory and benchscale testing, and have been prototyped at an MSW feed rate of at least several tons per hour. In-depth review of these seven included inspections of operating pilot or prototype units and a detailed analysis of technical, environmental and economic feasibility issues. No attempt was made to select `the best` technology since best can only be defined in the context of the constraints, aspirations and circumstances of a specific, local situation. The basic flowsheet, heat and material balances and available environmental data were summarized to help the reader grasp the underlying technical concepts and their embodiment in hardware. Remaining development needs, as seen by the study team are presented. Economic analysis shows the general balance of capital and operating costs.

Niessen, W.R. [Camp Dresser & McKee Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Projected ocean dumping rates for municipal and industrial wastes in the year 2000. Report for 26 March 1984-26 August 1985  

SciTech Connect

The amounts of coal ash, flue gas desulfurization (FGD) sludge, sewage sludge, industrial waste, and seafood-processing wastes currently ocean dumped were determined, and ocean dumping of these wastes was projected for the year 2000. The projected rates were made using three different scenarios: Scenario I assumed continued ocean dumping only by current permittees, Scenario II assumed some relaxation of ocean dumping regulation, and Scenario III, to provide a maximum estimate, assumed that future ocean-dumping would be based solely on economic considerations. Coal ash and FGD sludge are projected to be the most voluminous waste dumped under Scenarios II and III, and the East coast of the U.S. would produce the greatest amounts to be dumped.

Cura, J.; Menzie, C.; Borchardt, J.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Use of Thermal Energy Storage to Enhance the Recovery and Utilization of Industrial Waste Heat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

evaluation involving process data from 12 industrial plants to determine if thermal energy storage (TES) systems can be used with commercially available energy management equipment to enhance the recovery and utilization of industrial waste heat. Results...

McChesney, H. R.; Bass, R. W.; Landerman, A. M.; Obee, T. N.; Sgamboti, C. T.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Effective thermal conductivity measurements relevant to deep borehole nuclear waste disposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this work was to measure the effective thermal conductivity of a number of materials (particle beds, and fluids) proposed for use in and around canisters for disposal of high level nuclear waste in deep ...

Shaikh, Samina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Assessment of ocean waste disposal. Task 5. Human-health impacts of waste constituents. 2. Pathogens and antibiotic- and heavy-metal-resistant bacteria. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Disposal of wastes in the ocean has been practiced by coastal nations for many decades. All areas of the ocean have been subject to disposal use, including estuaries, nearshore, open shelf, and deep ocean sites. Until recently, it was believed that pathogenic bacteria did not survive for any significant period of time in estuarine and marine environments. Scientists and public-health workers never bothered to ask the question could viable, virulent pathogens be present in water samples even though they could not be detected by conventional plating methods. This laboratory answered this question in the affirmative for several bacterial pathogens, and this is discussed in detail. What follows in the report is a description of potentially harmful constituents of wastes, ways in which those constituents could reach humans, known incidents of human disease contracted from wastes, detection of waste-borne disease agents, management technologies, and monitoring and predictive technologies. Since the report is not just a review of the literature, not all known literature has been discussed. However, every attempt is made to include very relevant material, regardless of its age. What follows then is both a literature review and a position paper.

Grimes, D.J.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Life Cycle Cost Assessment, Final Technical Report, 30 May 2012  

SciTech Connect

The Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Life Cycle Cost Assessment (OLCCA) is a study performed by members of the Lockheed Martin (LM) OTEC Team under funding from the Department of Energy (DOE), Award No. DE-EE0002663, dated 01/01/2010. OLCCA objectives are to estimate procurement, operations and maintenance, and overhaul costs for two types of OTEC plants: -Plants moored to the sea floor where the electricity produced by the OTEC plant is directly connected to the grid ashore via a marine power cable (Grid Connected OTEC plants) -Open-ocean grazing OTEC plant-ships producing an energy carrier that is transported to designated ports (Energy Carrier OTEC plants) Costs are developed using the concept of levelized cost of energy established by DOE for use in comparing electricity costs from various generating systems. One area of system costs that had not been developed in detail prior to this analysis was the operations and sustainment (O&S) cost for both types of OTEC plants. Procurement costs, generally referred to as capital expense and O&S costs (operations and maintenance (O&M) costs plus overhaul and replacement costs), are assessed over the 30 year operational life of the plants and an annual annuity calculated to achieve a levelized cost (constant across entire plant life). Dividing this levelized cost by the average annual energy production results in a levelized cost of electricity, or LCOE, for the OTEC plants. Technical and production efficiency enhancements that could result in a lower value of the OTEC LCOE were also explored. The thermal OTEC resource for Oahu, Hawai�¢����i and projected build out plan were developed. The estimate of the OTEC resource and LCOE values for the planned OTEC systems enable this information to be displayed as energy supplied versus levelized cost of the supplied energy; this curve is referred to as an Energy Supply Curve. The Oahu Energy Supply Curve represents initial OTEC deployment starting in 2018 and demonstrates the predicted economies of scale as technology and efficiency improvements are realized and larger more economical plants deployed. Utilizing global high resolution OTEC resource assessment from the Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project (an independent DOE project), Global Energy Supply Curves were generated for Grid Connected and Energy Carrier OTEC plants deployed in 2045 when the predicted technology and efficiencies improvements are fully realized. The Global Energy Supply Curves present the LCOE versus capacity in ascending order with the richest, lowest cost resource locations being harvested first. These curves demonstrate the vast ocean thermal resource and potential OTEC capacity that can be harvested with little change in LCOE.

Martel, Laura; Smith, Paul; Rizea, Steven; Van Ryzin, Joe; Morgan, Charles; Noland, Gary; Pavlosky, Rick; Thomas, Michael

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

THERMAL IMPACT OF WASTE EMPLACEMENT AND SURFACE COOLING ASSOCIATED WITH GEOLOGIC DISPOSAL OF NUCLEAR WASTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

released by the buried wastes and heat remain­ ing in theOF 10-YEAR-OLD WASTES Waste Heat Source C h a r a c t e r ia t e r s e c t i o n s . WASTE HEAT SOURCE CHARACTERIZATION

Wang, J.S.Y.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Thermal Predictions of the Cooling of Waste Glass Canisters  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive liquid waste from five decades of weapons production is slated for vitrification at the Hanford site. The waste will be mixed with glass forming additives and heated to a high temperature, then poured into canisters within a pour cave where the glass will cool and solidify into a stable waste form for disposal. Computer simulations were performed to predict the heat rejected from the canisters and the temperatures within the glass during cooling. Four different waste glass compositions with different thermophysical properties were evaluated. Canister centerline temperatures and the total amount of heat transfer from the canisters to the surrounding air are reported.

Donna Post Guillen

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Performance analysis of an absorption power cycle for ocean thermal energy conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An absorption power cycle with two ejectors is proposed for ocean thermal energy conversion. The ammonia–water is used as the working fluid. The ejectors are driven by vapor and solution from the sub-generator. Based on the first and second law, the mathematical model for this cycle is developed and theoretical analysis is conducted to evaluate the effects of thermodynamic parameters on the performance of this cycle. Results show that the absorption temperature is increased by 2.0–6.5 °C by employing the two-stage ejector sub-cycle, which indicates that this proposed cycle can be driven with a lower temperature difference. Further, the thermal efficiency, net thermal efficiency and exergy efficiency of this cycle can reach to 4.17%, 3.10% and 39.92% respectively. Besides, the generation pressure, the heating source temperature, the solution concentration, and the expansion ratio, as well as the entrainment ratio of the first stage ejector have significant effects on the absorption temperature, the thermal efficiency, the exergy efficiency and the exergy loss of this cycle. In addition, 49.80% of exergy loss in this proposed cycle occurs in the generators and reheater, followed by the ejectors of 36.12%.

Han Yuan; Ning Mei; Peilin Zhou

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

THERMAL IMPACT OF WASTE EMPLACEMENT AND SURFACE COOLING ASSOCIATED WITH GEOLOGIC DISPOSAL OF NUCLEAR WASTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

d long-term storage and even methods for centralized waste •long-term storage of spent fuel, interim storage of high levei wastestorage of solid wastes of IAEA categories 3 and 4. 5) studies of long-term

Wang, J.S.Y.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Non-Thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-Level Mixed Waste  

SciTech Connect

DOE proposes to transport contact-handled LLMW from the Hanford Site to the Allied Technology Group (ATG) Mixed Waste Facility (MWF) in Richland, Washington, for non-thermal treatment and to return the treated waste to the Hanford Site for eventual land disposal. Over a 3-year period the waste would be staged to the ATG MWF, and treated waste would be returned to the Hanford Site. The ATG MWF would be located on an 18 hectare (ha) (45 acre [at]) ATG Site adjacent to ATG's licensed low-level waste processing facility at 2025 Battelle Boulevard. The ATG MWF is located approximately 0.8 kilometers (km) (0.5 miles [mi]) south of Horn Rapids Road and 1.6 km (1 mi) west of Stevens Drive. The property is located within the Horn Rapids triangle in northern Richland (Figure 2.1). The ATG MWF is to be located on the existing ATG Site, near the DOE Hanford Site, in an industrial area in the City of Richland. The effects of siting, construction, and overall operation of the MWF have been evaluated in a separate State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) EIS (City of Richland 1998). The proposed action includes transporting the LLMW from the Hanford Site to the ATG Facility, non-thermal treatment of the LLMW at the ATG MWF, and transporting the waste from ATG back to the Hanford Site. Impacts fi-om waste treatment operations would be bounded by the ATG SEPA EIS, which included an evaluation of the impacts associated with operating the non-thermal portion of the MWF at maximum design capacity (8,500 metric tons per year) (City of Richland 1998). Up to 50 employees would be required for non-thermal treatment portion of the MWF. This includes 40 employees that would perform waste treatment operations and 10 support staff. Similar numbers were projected for the thermal treatment portion of the MWF (City of Richland 1998).

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

The Use of Thermal Solar Energy to Treat Waste Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The processes employed in the various production sectors of trade and industry give rise to waste materials containing substances that can harm the environment to a greater or lesser extent. The volume of such...

H. Effelsberg; B. Barbknecht

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Thermal energy recovery of low grade waste heat in hydrogenation process; Återvinning av lågvärdig spillvärme från en hydreringsprocess.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The waste heat recovery technologies have become very relevant since many industrial plants continuously reject large amounts of thermal energy during normal operation which… (more)

Hedström, Sofia

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Computer code input for thermal hydraulic analysis of Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility Title II design  

SciTech Connect

The input files to the P/Thermal computer code are documented for the thermal hydraulic analysis of the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility Title II design analysis.

Cramer, E.R.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

On the thermal impact on the excavation damaged zone around deep radioactive waste disposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Clays and claystones are considered in some countries (including Belgium, France and Switzerland) as a potential host rock for high activity long lived radioactive waste disposal at great depth. One of the aspects to deal with in performance assessment is related to the effects on the host rock of the temperature elevation due to the placement of exothermic wastes. The potential effects of the thermal impact on the excavated damaged zone in the close field are another important issue that was the goal of the TIMODAZ European research project. In this paper, some principles of waste disposal in clayey host rocks at great depth are first presented and a series of experimental investigations carried out on specific equipment specially developed to face the problem are presented. Both drained and undrained tests have been developed to investigate the drained thermal volume changes of clays and claystone and the thermal pressurization occurring around the galleries. This importance of proper initial saturation (un...

Delage, Pierre

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Thermal conversion of municipal solid waste via hydrothermal carbonization: Comparison of carbonization products to products from current waste management techniques  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a novel thermal conversion process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HTC converts wastes into value-added resources. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbonization integrates majority of carbon into solid-phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbonization results in a hydrochar with high energy density. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using hydrochar as an energy source may be beneficial. - Abstract: Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a novel thermal conversion process that may be a viable means for managing solid waste streams while minimizing greenhouse gas production and producing residual material with intrinsic value. HTC is a wet, relatively low temperature (180-350 Degree-Sign C) thermal conversion process that has been shown to convert biomass to a carbonaceous residue referred to as hydrochar. Results from batch experiments indicate HTC of representative waste materials is feasible, and results in the majority of carbon (45-75% of the initially present carbon) remaining within the hydrochar. Gas production during the batch experiments suggests that longer reaction periods may be desirable to maximize the production of energy-favorable products. If using the hydrochar for applications in which the carbon will remain stored, results suggest that the gaseous products from HTC result in fewer g CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions than the gases associated with landfilling, composting, and incineration. When considering the use of hydrochar as a solid fuel, more energy can be derived from the hydrochar than from the gases resulting from waste degradation during landfilling and anaerobic digestion, and from incineration of food waste. Carbon emissions resulting from the use of the hydrochar as a fuel source are smaller than those associated with incineration, suggesting HTC may serve as an environmentally beneficial alternative to incineration. The type and extent of environmental benefits derived from HTC will be dependent on hydrochar use/the purpose for HTC (e.g., energy generation or carbon storage).

Lu Xiaowei; Jordan, Beth [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of South Carolina, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Berge, Nicole D., E-mail: berge@cec.sc.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of South Carolina, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

Two-stage thermal/nonthermal waste treatment process  

SciTech Connect

An innovative waste treatment technology is being developed in Los Alamos to address the destruction of hazardous organic wastes. The technology described in this report uses two stages: a packed bed reactor (PBR) in the first stage to volatilize and/or combust liquid organics and a silent discharge plasma (SDP) reactor to remove entrained hazardous compounds in the off-gas to even lower levels. We have constructed pre-pilot-scale PBR-SDP apparatus and tested the two stages separately and in combined modes. These tests are described in the report.

Rosocha, L.A.; Anderson, G.K.; Coogan, J.J.; Kang, M.; Tennant, R.A.; Wantuck, P.J.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Calculation of the Naval Long and Short Waste Package Three-Dimensional Thermal Interface Temperatures  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this calculation is to evaluate the thermal performance of the Naval Long and Naval Short spent nuclear fuel (SNF) waste packages (WP) in the repository emplacement drift. The scope of this calculation is limited to the determination of the temperature profiles upon the surfaces of the Naval Long and Short SNF waste package for up to 10,000 years of emplacement. The temperatures on the top of the outside surface of the naval canister are the thermal interfaces for the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program (NNPP). The results of this calculation are intended to support Licensing Application design activities.

H. Marr

2006-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

93

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization- Final Technical Report on Award DE-EE0002664. October 28, 2012  

SciTech Connect

The Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project focuses on assessing the Maximum Practicably Extractable Energy (MPEE) from the world's ocean thermal resources. MPEE is defined as being sustainable and technically feasible, given today's state-of-the-art ocean energy technology. Under this project the OTEEV team developed a comprehensive Geospatial Information System (GIS) dataset and software tool, and used the tool to provide a meaningful assessment of MPEE from the global and domestic U.S. ocean thermal resources. The OTEEV project leverages existing NREL renewable energy GIS technologies and integrates extractable energy estimated from quality-controlled data and projected optimal achievable energy conversion rates. Input data are synthesized from a broad range of existing in-situ measurements and ground-truthed numerical models with temporal and spatial resolutions sufficient to reflect the local resource. Energy production rates are calculated for regions based on conversion rates estimated for current technology, local energy density of the resource, and sustainable resource extraction. Plant spacing and maximum production rates are then estimated based on a default plant size and transmission mechanisms. The resulting data are organized, displayed, and accessed using a multi-layered GIS mapping tool, http://maps.nrel.gov/mhk_atlas with a user-friendly graphical user interface.

Ascari, Matthew B.; Hanson, Howard P.; Rauchenstein, Lynn; Van Zwieten, James; Bharathan, Desikan; Heimiller, Donna; Langle, Nicholas; Scott, George N.; Potemra, James; Nagurny, N. John; Jansen, Eugene

2012-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

94

E. Guilyardi G. Madec L. Terray The role of lateral ocean physics in the upper ocean thermal balance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. As this gradient is proportional to the isopycnal gradient of salinity, this con®rms the strong role of salinity of diusion and to the sign of the isopycnal gradients of temperature at the base of the bowl to the existence of a salinity structure. The lateral ocean physics is shown to be a signi®cant contributor

Guilyardi, Eric

95

Ocean | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Related Links List of Ocean Thermal Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleOcean&oldid273467" Categories: Articles with outstanding TODO tasks Sectors...

96

Thermal Energy Storage/Waste Heat Recovery Applications in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and the Portland Cement Association have studied the potential benefits of using waste heat recovery methods and thermal energy storage systems in the cement manufacturing process. This work was performed under DOE Contract No. EC-77-C-01-50S4. The study has been...

Beshore, D. G.; Jaeger, F. A.; Gartner, E. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Waste Package Neutron Absorber, Thermal Shunt, and Fill Gas Selection Report  

SciTech Connect

Materials for neutron absorber, thermal shunt, and fill gas for use in the waste package were selected using a qualitative approach. For each component, selection criteria were identified; candidate materials were selected; and candidates were evaluated against these criteria. The neutron absorber materials evaluated were essentially boron-containing stainless steels. Two candidates were evaluated for the thermal shunt material. The fill gas candidates were common gases such as helium, argon, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and dry air. Based on the performance of each candidate against the criteria, the following selections were made: Neutron absorber--Neutronit A978; Thermal shunt--Aluminum 6061 or 6063; and Fill gas--Helium.

V. Pasupathi

2000-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

98

Limits on the thermal energy release from radioactive wastes in a mined geologic repository  

SciTech Connect

The theraml energy release of nuclear wastes is a major factor in the design of geologic repositories. Thermal limits need to be placed on various aspets of the geologic waste disposal system to avoid or retard the degradation of repository performance because of increased temperatures. The thermal limits in current use today are summarized in this report. These limits are placed in a hierarchial structure of thermal criteria consistent with the failure mechanism they are trying to prevent. The thermal criteria hierarchy is used to evaluate the thermal performance of a sample repository design. The design consists of disassembled BWR spent fuel, aged 10 years, close packed in a carbon steel canister with 15 cm of crushed salt backfill. The medium is bedded salt. The most-restrictive temperature for this design is the spent-fuel centerline temperature limit of 300/sup 0/C. A sensitivity study on the effects of additional cooling prior to disposal on repository thermal limits and design is performed.

Scott, J.A.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Ocean Energy Resource Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Hydropower Ocean Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy Ocean Resources Solar Wind Homes & Buildings Industry Vehicles & Fuels...

100

Solvated Electron Technology{sup TM}. Non-Thermal Alternative to Waste Incineration  

SciTech Connect

Solvated Electron Technology (SET{sup TM}) is a patented non-thermal alternative to incineration for treating Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and other mixed waste by destroying organic hazardous components. SET{sup TM} is a treatment process that destroys the hazardous components in mixed waste by chemical reduction. The residual material meets land disposal restriction (LDR) and TSCA requirements for disposal. In application, contaminated materials are placed into a treatment cell and mixed with the solvated electron solution. In the case of PCBs or other halogenated contaminants, chemical reactions strip the halogen ions from the chain or aromatic ring producing sodium chloride and high molecular weight hydrocarbons. At the end of the reaction, ammonia within the treatment cell is removed and recycled. The reaction products (such as sodium salts) produced in the process remain with the matrix. The SET{sup TM} process is 99.999% effective in destroying: polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs); trichloroethane (TCA) and trichloroethene (TCE); dioxins; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs); benzene, toluene, xylene (BTX); pesticides; fungicides; herbicides; chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs); hydro-chlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), explosives and chemical-warfare agents; and has successfully destroyed many of the wastes listed in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 261. In September 2007, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a Research and Development permit for SET for chemical destruction of 'pure' Pyranol, which is 60% PCBs. These tests were completed in November 2007. SET{sup TM} is recognized by EPA as a non-thermal process equivalent to incineration and three SET{sup TM} systems have been permitted by EPA as commercial mobile PCB destruction units. This paper describes in detail the results of select bench-, pilot-, and commercial-scale treatment of hazardous and mixed wastes for EPA, Department of Energy (DOE), and the Department of Defense(DoD), and the applicability of SET{sup TM} to currently problematic waste streams that have very limited treatment alternatives. In summary: SET{sup TM} operates as a non-thermal destruction process under low pressure. The process occurs in a closed system producing no hazardous off-gases and no regulated by-products such as dioxins or furans or their precursors. Advantages of SET{sup TM} include: - Organic contaminants are destroyed, not just removed, diluted or concentrated. - Operates as a closed system - produces no regulated secondary wastes. - Holds an EPA permit for PCB destruction. - Operates at ambient temperatures (70 deg. F). - Portable and sets up quickly in less than 4000 square feet of space. - Scalable to accommodate any size waste stream. - Requires minimal amounts of power, water and infrastructure. - Applicable to heterogeneous waste streams in all phases. The SET{sup TM} process is 99.9999% effective in destroying organic constituents of RCRA and TSCA waste, explosives and chemical-warfare agents; and has successfully destroyed many of the wastes listed in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 261. The residual material meets land disposal restriction (LDR) and TSCA requirements for disposal. In November 2007, Commodore completed a treatability study on Pyranol to determine the effectiveness of SET{sup TM} treatment on oil containing 600,000 PPM PCBs. Laboratory results proved destruction of PCBs to less than 1 PPM at low temperatures and pressures. SET{sup TM} is a proven, safe and cost-effective alternative to incineration for some of the most difficult waste treatment problems that exist today. (authors)

Foutz, W.L.; Rogers, J.E.; Mather, J.D. [Commodore Advanced Sciences, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Off-design performance analysis of a closed-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system with solar thermal preheating and superheating  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This article reports the off-design performance analysis of a closed-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) system when a solar thermal collector is integrated as an add-on preheater or superheater. Design-point analysis of a simple OTEC system was numerically conducted to generate a gross power of 100 kW, representing a base OTEC system. In order to improve the power output of the OTEC system, two ways of utilizing solar energy are considered in this study: (1) preheating of surface seawater to increase its input temperature to the cycle and (2) direct superheating of the working fluid before it enters a turbine. Obtained results reveal that both preheating and superheating cases increase the net power generation by 20–25% from the design-point. However, the preheating case demands immense heat load on the solar collector due to the huge thermal mass of the seawater, being less efficient thermodynamically. The superheating case increases the thermal efficiency of the system from 1.9% to around 3%, about a 60% improvement, suggesting that this should be a better approach in improving the OTEC system. This research provides thermodynamic insight on the potential advantages and challenges of adding a solar thermal collection component to OTEC power plants.

Hakan Aydin; Ho-Saeng Lee; Hyeon-Ju Kim; Seung Kyoon Shin; Keunhan Park

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Thermal modeling of core sampling in flammable gas waste tanks. Part 2: Rotary-mode sampling  

SciTech Connect

The radioactive waste stored in underground storage tanks at Hanford site includes mixtures of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite with organic compounds. The waste can produce undesired violent exothermic reactions when heated locally during the rotary-mode sampling. Experiments are performed varying the downward force at a maximum rotational speed of 55 rpm and minimum nitrogen purge flow of 30 scfm. The rotary drill bit teeth-face temperatures are measured. The waste is simulated with a low thermal conductivity hard material, pumice blocks. A torque meter is used to determine the energy provided to the drill string. The exhaust air-chip temperature as well as drill string and drill bit temperatures and other key operating parameters were recorded. A two-dimensional thermal model is developed. The safe operating conditions were determined for normal operating conditions. A downward force of 750 at 55 rpm and 30 scfm nitrogen purge flow was found to yield acceptable substrate temperatures. The model predicted experimental results reasonably well. Therefore, it could be used to simulate abnormal conditions to develop procedures for safe operations.

Unal, C.; Poston, D.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.O. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Nuclear Systems Design and Analysis Group; Witwer, K.S. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States). Engineering Testing Lab.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical Study of Pre-Closure Off-Normal Thermal Scenarios at the Proposed Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository  

SciTech Connect

The proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada currently includes a minimum of 50 years forced ventilation inside of emplacement drifts prior to repository closure. To regulate the heat generated from emplaced waste packages, the ventilation during the pre-closure period should be continuous. Off-normal thermal scenarios that consider temporary shutdown of the pre-closure ventilation are investigated to determine the impacts of ventilation shutdown on the thermal-hydrologic-mechanical behaviors of the emplacement drifts. In-drift heat transfer processes including radiation, convection, and conduction are studied. The analysis provides a ventilation heat removal ratio that varies on the drift location and the ventilation duration. The heat removal ratio is transferred and utilized in the NUFT thermal-hydrology software. The NUFT software is used to investigate the thermal-hydrologic impacts on the repository rock mass for the off-normal thermal scenarios with various shutdown durations at various pre-closure times. The predicted rock mass temperature evaluated from the thermal-hydrologic analysis is applied for the thermal-mechanical analysis of the off-normal thermal scenarios. The results show that degradation and rockfall of the emplacement drifts due to the off-normal thermal scenarios will be minimal, and it is concluded that the impacts of off-normal thermal scenarios on the stability of the emplacement drifts will be insignificant.

J. Leem; M. Lin; Y. Sun; D. Kicker

2005-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

104

Thermoeconomic optimization of sensible heat thermal storage for cogenerated waste-to-energy recovery  

SciTech Connect

This paper investigates the feasibility of employing thermal storage for cogenerated waste-to-energy recovery such as using mass-burning water-wall incinerators and topping steam turbines. Sensible thermal storage is considered in rectangular cross-sectioned channels through which is passed unused process steam at 1,307 kPa/250 C (175 psig/482 F) during the storage period and feedwater at 1,307 kPa/102 C (175 psig/216 F) during the recovery period. In determining the optimum storage configuration, it is found that the economic feasibility is a function of mass and specific heat of the material and surface area of the channel as well as cost of material and fabrication. Economic considerations included typical cash flows of capital charges, energy revenues, operation and maintenance, and income taxes. Cast concrete is determined to be a potentially attractive storage medium.

Abdul-Razzak, H.A. [Texas A and M Univ., Kingsville, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; Porter, R.W. [Illinois Inst. of Tech., chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Assessment of thermal analysis software for the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management  

SciTech Connect

This assessment uses several recent assessments and the more general code compilations that have been completed to produce a list of 116 codes that can be used for thermal analysis. This list is then compared with criteria prepared especially for the Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (DOE/OCRWM). Based on these criteria, fifteen codes are narrowed to three primary codes and four secondary codes for use by the OCRWM thermal analyst. The analyst is cautioned that since no single code is sufficient for all applications, a code must be selected based upon the predominate heat transfer mode of the problem to be solved, but the codes suggested in this report have been used successfully for a range of OCRWM applications. The report concludes with a series of recommendations for additional work of which the major points include the following: The codes suggested by this report must be benchmarked with the existing US and international problems and validated when possible; An interactive code selection tool could be developed or, perhaps even more useful, a users group could be supported to ensure the proper selection of thermal codes and dissemination of information on the latest version; The status of the 116 codes identified by this report should be verified, and methods for maintaining the still active codes must be established; and special capabilities of each code in phase change, convection and radiation should be improved to better enable the thermal analyst to model OCRWM applications. 37 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

Williams, P.T.; Graham, R.F.; Lagerberg, G.N.; Chung, T.C.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

THERMAL TREATMENT REVIEW . WTE I THERMAL TREATMENT Since the beginning of this century, global waste-to-energy capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of new waste-to gasification process at an industrial scale The Waste-To-Energy Research and Technology waste-to-energy capacity has increased steadily at the rate of about four million tonnes of MSW per year solid waste (MSW). Three dominant ,technologies _ those developed by The only true A global perspective

Columbia University

107

Life cycle assessment of thermal Waste-to-Energy technologies: Review and recommendations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been used extensively within the recent decade to evaluate the environmental performance of thermal Waste-to-Energy (WtE) technologies: incineration, co-combustion, pyrolysis and gasification. A critical review was carried out involving 250 individual case-studies published in 136 peer-reviewed journal articles within 1995 and 2013. The studies were evaluated with respect to critical aspects such as: (i) goal and scope definitions (e.g. functional units, system boundaries, temporal and geographic scopes), (ii) detailed technology parameters (e.g. related to waste composition, technology, gas cleaning, energy recovery, residue management, and inventory data), and (iii) modeling principles (e.g. energy/mass calculation principles, energy substitution, inclusion of capital goods and uncertainty evaluation). Very few of the published studies provided full and transparent descriptions of all these aspects, in many cases preventing an evaluation of the validity of results, and limiting applicability of data and results in other contexts. The review clearly suggests that the quality of LCA studies of WtE technologies and systems including energy recovery can be significantly improved. Based on the review, a detailed overview of assumptions and modeling choices in existing literature is provided in conjunction with practical recommendations for state-of-the-art LCA of Waste-to-Energy.

Thomas Fruergaard Astrup; Davide Tonini; Roberto Turconi; Alessio Boldrin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Challenges in Ocean Energy Utilization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ocean is a reservoir of energy. It is ... . Development of suitable cost effective technologies for power generation from different forms of ocean energy (like wave energy, tidal energy, Ocean Thermal Energy Conv...

S. Neelamani

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

An economic and environmental assessment of transporting bulk energy from a grazing ocean thermal energy conversion facility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) facility produces electrical power without generating carbon dioxide (CO2) by using the temperature differential between the reservoir of cold water at greater depths and the shallow mixed layer on the ocean surface. As some of the best sites are located far from shore, one option is to ship a high-energy carrier by tanker from these open-ocean or “grazing” OTEC platforms. We evaluate the economics and environmental attributes of producing and transporting energy using ammonia (NH3), liquid hydrogen (LH2) and methanol (CH3OH). For each carrier, we develop transportation pathways that include onboard production, transport via tanker, onshore conversion and delivery to market. We then calculate the difference between the market price and the variable cost for generating the product using the OTEC platform without and with a price on CO2 emissions. Finally, we compare the difference in prices to the capital cost of the OTEC platform and onboard synthesis equipment. For all pathways, the variable cost is lower than the market price, although this difference is insufficient to recover the entire capital costs for a first of a kind OTEC platform. With an onboard synthesis efficiency of 75%, we recover 5%, 25% and 45% of the capital and fixed costs for LH2, CH3OH and NH3, respectively. Improving the capital costs of the OTEC platform by up to 25% and adding present estimates for the damages from CO2 do not alter these conclusions. The near-term potential for the grazing OTEC platform is limited in existing markets. In the longer term, lower capital costs combined with improvements in onboard synthesis costs and efficiency as well as increases in CO2 damages may allow the products from OTEC platforms to enter into markets.

Elisabeth A. Gilmore; Andrew Blohm; Steven Sinsabaugh

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Energy from the Ocean [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...development among the ocean energy options, and other relatively...paper focuses on ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC). However, much of the paper's content has relevance to the use of the other ocean energy sources. Techniques of ocean...

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Evaluation of gasification and novel thermal processes for the treatment of municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect

This report identifies seven developers whose gasification technologies can be used to treat the organic constituents of municipal solid waste: Energy Products of Idaho; TPS Termiska Processor AB; Proler International Corporation; Thermoselect Inc.; Battelle; Pedco Incorporated; and ThermoChem, Incorporated. Their processes recover heat directly, produce a fuel product, or produce a feedstock for chemical processes. The technologies are on the brink of commercial availability. This report evaluates, for each technology, several kinds of issues. Technical considerations were material balance, energy balance, plant thermal efficiency, and effect of feedstock contaminants. Environmental considerations were the regulatory context, and such things as composition, mass rate, and treatability of pollutants. Business issues were related to likelihood of commercialization. Finally, cost and economic issues such as capital and operating costs, and the refuse-derived fuel preparation and energy conversion costs, were considered. The final section of the report reviews and summarizes the information gathered during the study.

Niessen, W.R.; Marks, C.H.; Sommerlad, R.E. [Camp Dresser and McKee, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)] [Camp Dresser and McKee, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

The Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity of Simulated Glass Forming Nuclear Waste Melts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-level nuclear waste is generated during reprocessing of nuclear reactor fuels. At present, these wastes are stored at various locations in the United States until a final waste form (i.e., glass, SYNROC, ......

James U. Derby; L. David Pye; M. J. Plodinec

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Ocean thermal energy conversion power system development. Final design report: PSD-I, Phase II  

SciTech Connect

The PSD-I program provides a heat exchanger sytem consisting of an evaporator, condenser and various ancillaries with ammonia used as a working fluid in a closed simulated Rankine cycle. It is to be installed on the Chepachet Research Vessel for test and evaluation of a number of OTEC concepts in a true ocean environment. It is one of several test articles to be tested. Primary design concerns include control of biofouling, corrosion and erosion of aluminum tubes, selection of materials, and the development of a basis for scale-up to large heat exchangers so as to ultimately demonstrate economic feasibility on a commercial scale. The PSD-I test article is devised to verify thermodynamic, environmental, and mechanical performance of basic design concepts. The detailed design, development, fabrication, checklist, delivery, installation support, and operation support for the Test Article Heat Exchangers are described. (WHK)

None

1980-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

114

Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Variations in eastern Indian Ocean upper-ocean thermal properties are assessed for the period 1970–2004, with a particular focus on asymmetric features related to opposite phases of Indian Ocean dipole events, using high-resolution ocean model ...

Caroline C. Ummenhofer; Franziska U. Schwarzkopf; Gary Meyers; Erik Behrens; Arne Biastoch; Claus W. Böning

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Isolation of metals from liquid wastes: Reactive scavenging in turbulent thermal reactors. 1998 annual progress report  

SciTech Connect

'The objective of this project is to develop the fundamental science base necessary to assess the utility of high-temperature processes to volatilize metals in DOE metal-bearing liquid wastes, so that they can be reactively scavenged by sorbents. The problem is addressed through a collaborative research program involving a team of five senior scientists and their respective laboratories, at four institutions. Specific goals are to: (1) Understand high-temperature reaction kinetics between sorbent substrates and certain volatile and semi-volatile metals in the DOE liquid waste inventory (e.g., Cs and Sr), using a laminar-flow reactor for which extraction of kinetic data is not complicated by turbulence; (2) Develop models to predict both trajectories of individual droplets in turbulent high-temperature reactors, and rates of metal evolution from droplets, and compare model predictions with experimental data from a pilot-scale turbulent thermal reactor; (3) Connect the reaction kinetic models with the droplet trajectory/mass evolution models, in order to predict and optimize metal scavenging processes in turbulent-flow reactors, and to test these combined models against data taken from a turbulent high temperature reactor. This report summarizes work at a point midway through the first year of a 3-year project. At the University of Arizona (UA), two tasks are underway. The first task is concerned with attempting to understand high-temperature reaction kinetics between sorbent substrates and certain volatile and semi-volatile metals. The second task is concerned with applying Kerstein''s One Dimensional Turbulence model to prediction of droplet trajectories in turbulent flow.'

Wendt, J.O.L. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (US); Linak, W.P. [Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (US); Kerstein, A.R. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (US); Pearlstein, A.J.; Scheeline, A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (US)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies | Department...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Several people are photographed standing on the barge. The Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion project at Hawaii's Natural Energy Lab was one of the first successful thermal ocean...

117

Energy and exergy analyses of hydrogen production via solar-boosted ocean thermal energy conversion and PEM electrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy and exergy analyses are reported of hydrogen production via an ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) system coupled with a solar-enhanced proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzer. This system is composed of a turbine, an evaporator, a condenser, a pump, a solar collector and a PEM electrolyzer. Electricity is generated in the turbine, which is used by the PEM electrolyzer to produce hydrogen. A simulation program using Matlab software is developed to model the PEM electrolyzer and OTEC system. The simulation model for the PEM electrolyzer used in this study is validated with experimental data from the literature. The amount of hydrogen produced, the exergy destruction of each component and the overall system, and the exergy efficiency of the system are calculated. To better understand the effect of various parameters on system performance, a parametric analysis is carried out. The energy and exergy efficiencies of the integrated OTEC system are 3.6% and 22.7% respectively, and the exergy efficiency of the PEM electrolyzer is about 56.5% while the amount of hydrogen produced by it is 1.2 kg/h.

Pouria Ahmadi; Ibrahim Dincer; Marc A. Rosen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Waste package degradation from thermal and chemical processes in performance assessments for the Yucca Mountain disposal system for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper summarizes modeling of waste container degradation in performance assessments conducted between 1984 and 2008 to evaluate feasibility, viability, and assess compliance of a repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. As understanding of the Yucca Mountain disposal system increased, modeling of container degradation evolved from a component of the source term in 1984 to a separate module describing both container and drip shield degradation in 2008. A thermal module for evaluating the influence of higher heat loads from more closely packed, large waste packages was also introduced. In addition, a module for evaluating drift chemistry was added in later \\{PAs\\} to evaluate the potential for localized corrosion of the outer barrier of the waste container composed of Alloy 22, a highly corrosion-resistant nickel–chromium–tungsten–molybdenum alloy. The uncertainty of parameters related to container degradation contributed significantly to the estimated uncertainty of performance measures (cumulative release in assessments prior to 1995 and individual dose, thereafter).

Rob P. Rechard; Joon H. Lee; Ernest L. Hardin; Charles R. Bryan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Determination of heat conductivity and thermal diffusivity of waste glass melter feed: Extension to high temperatures  

SciTech Connect

The heat conductivity ({lambda}) and the thermal diffusivity (a) of reacting glass batch, or melter feed, control the heat flux into and within the cold cap, a layer of reacting material floating on the pool of molten glass in an all-electric continuous waste glass melter. After previously estimating {lambda} of melter feed at temperatures up to 680 deg C, we focus in this work on the {lambda}(T) function at T > 680 deg C, at which the feed material becomes foamy. We used a customized experimental setup consisting of a large cylindrical crucible with an assembly of thermocouples, which monitored the evolution of the temperature field while the crucible with feed was heated at a constant rate from room temperature up to 1100°C. Approximating measured temperature profiles by polynomial functions, we used the heat transfer equation to estimate the {lambda}(T) approximation function, which we subsequently optimized using the finite-volume method combined with least-squares analysis. The heat conductivity increased as the temperature increased until the feed began to expand into foam, at which point the conductivity dropped. It began to increase again as the foam turned into a bubble-free glass melt. We discuss the implications of this behavior for the mathematical modeling of the cold cap.

Rice, Jarrett A.; Pokorny, Richard; Schweiger, Michael J.; Hrma, Pavel R.

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

120

THERMAL DESTRUCTION OF HIGHLY CHLORINATED MIXED WASTES WITHOUT GENERATING CORROSIVE OFF-GASES USING MOLTEN SALT OXIDATION (1,2)  

SciTech Connect

A pilot-scale MSO (Molten Salt Oxidation) system was used to process 45-gallons of a halogenated mixed waste that is difficult to treat with other thermal systems. The mixed waste was a halogenated solvent that consisted mostly of methylchloroform. The 80 weight percent of waste consisting of highly corrosive chlorine was captured in the first process vessel as sodium chloride. The sodium chloride leached chrome from that process vessel and the solidified salt exhibited the toxicity characteristic for chrome as measured by TCLP (Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure) testing. The operating ranges for parameters such as salt bed temperature, off-gas temperature, and feed rate that enable sustained operation were identified. At feed rates below the sustainable limit, both processing capacity and maintenance requirements increased with feed rate. Design and operational modifications to increase the sustainable feed rate limit and reduce maintenance requirements reduced both salt carryover and volumetric gas flows.

Smith, W.; Feizollahi, F.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Thermal treatment of historical radioactive solid and liquid waste into the CILVA incinerator  

SciTech Connect

Since the very beginning of the nuclear activities in Belgium, the incineration of radioactive waste was chosen as a suitable technique for achieving an optimal volume reduction of the produced waste quantities. Based on the 35 years experience gained by the operation of the old incinerator, a new industrial incineration plant started nuclear operation in May 1995, as a part of the Belgian Centralized Treatment/Conditioning Facility named CILVA. Up to the end of 2006, the CILVA incinerator has burnt 1660 tonne of solid waste and 419 tonne of liquid waste. This paper describes the type and allowable radioactivity of the waste, the incineration process, heat recovery and the air pollution control devices. Special attention is given to the treatment of several hundreds of tonne historical waste from former reprocessing activities such as alpha suspected solid waste, aqueous and organic liquid waste and spent ion exchange resins. The capacity, volume reduction, chemical and radiological emissions are also evaluated. BELGOPROCESS, a company set up in 1984 at Dessel (Belgium) where a number of nuclear facilities were already installed is specialized in the processing of radioactive waste. It is a subsidiary of ONDRAF/NIRAS, the Belgian Nuclear Waste Management Agency. According to its mission statement, the activities of BELGOPROCESS focus on three areas: treatment, conditioning and interim storage of radioactive waste; decommissioning of shut-down nuclear facilities and cleaning of contaminated buildings and land; operating of storage sites for conditioned radioactive waste. (authors)

Deckers, Jan; Mols, Ludo [Belgoprocess NV, Operations Department, Gravenstraat 73, B-2480 Dessel (Belgium)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Oceans '88  

SciTech Connect

These proceedings discuss the following papers: Solid waste disposal crisis; Plastics in Ocean; Continental shelf environmental research; Seafood technology advancements; Gulf of Mexico chemosynthetic petroleum seep communities; Water reuse on onshore mariculture and processing facilities; Oil and gas industry conflicts on the outer continental shelf; Cumulative environmental effects of the oil and gas leasing program; Oil and gas exploration; and Oil and gas resource management; Aids to navigation systems and equipment; and Surveillance experiments.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Preliminary one-dimensional thermal analysis of waste emplacement in tuffs  

SciTech Connect

One-dimensional calculations of near-field temperatures resulting from waste emplacement in a multiple-layered tuff stratigraphy are presented. Results indicate a marked sensitivity of peak temperatures to assignment of in-situ fluid pressure, geothermal-heat flux, waste type, and location of waste relative to a specific stratigraphic discontinuity. Under the criterion that allowable initial-power densities are limited by the occurrence of boiling at a distance of 10 m from emplaced waste, allowable power densities are calculated to range up to 150 kW/acre or more, depending upon geothermal heat flux and waste type.

Bulmer, B.M.; Lappin, A.R.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Salt Disposal Investigations to Study Thermally Hot Radioactive Waste In A Deep Geologic Repository in Bedded Rock Salt - 12488  

SciTech Connect

A research program is proposed to investigate the behavior of salt when subjected to thermal loads like those that would be present in a high-level waste repository. This research would build upon results of decades of previous salt repository program efforts in the US and Germany and the successful licensing and operation of a repository in salt for disposal of defense transuranic waste. The proposal includes a combination of laboratory-scale investigations, numerical simulations conducted to develop validated models that could be used for future repository design and safety case development, and a thermal field test in an underground salt formation with a configuration that replicates a small portion of a conceptual repository design. Laboratory tests are proposed to measure salt and brine properties across and beyond the range of possible repository conditions. Coupled numerical models will seek to describe phenomenology (thermal, mechanical, and hydrological) observed in the laboratory tests. Finally, the field test will investigate many phenomena that have been variously cited as potential issues for disposal of thermally hot waste in salt, including buoyancy effects and migration of pre-existing trapped brine up the thermal gradient (including vapor phase migration). These studies are proposed to be coordinated and managed by the Carlsbad Field Office of DOE, which is also responsible for the operation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) within the Office of Environmental Management. The field test portion of the proposed research would be conducted in experimental areas of the WIPP underground, far from disposal operations. It is believed that such tests may be accomplished using the existing infrastructure of the WIPP repository at a lower cost than if such research were conducted at a commercial salt mine at another location. The phased field test is proposed to be performed over almost a decade, including instrumentation development, several years of measurements during heating and then subsequent cooling periods, and the eventual forensic mining back of the test bed to determine the multi-year behavior of the simulated waste/rock environment. Funding possibilities are described, and prospects for near term start-up are discussed. Mining of the access drifts required to create the test area in the WIPP underground began in November 2011. Because this mining uses existing WIPP infrastructure and labor, it is estimated to take about two years to complete the access drifts. WIPP disposal operations and facility maintenance activities will take priority over the SDI field test area mining. Funding of the SDI proposal was still being considered by DOE's Offices of Environmental Management and Nuclear Energy at the time this paper was written, so no specific estimates of the progress in 2012 have been included. (authors)

Nelson, Roger A. [DOE, Carlsbad Field Office, Carlsbad NM (United States); Buschman, Nancy [DOE, Office of Environmental Management, Washington DC (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Use of thermal analysis techniques (TG-DSC) for the characterization of diverse organic municipal waste streams to predict biological stability prior to land application  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal analysis was used to assess stability and composition of organic matter in three diverse municipal waste streams. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results were compared with C mineralization during 90-day incubation, FTIR and {sup 13}C NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal analysis reflected the differences between the organic wastes before and after the incubation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The calculated energy density showed a strong correlation with cumulative respiration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conventional and thermal methods provide complimentary means of characterizing organic wastes. - Abstract: The use of organic municipal wastes as soil amendments is an increasing practice that can divert significant amounts of waste from landfill, and provides a potential source of nutrients and organic matter to ameliorate degraded soils. Due to the high heterogeneity of organic municipal waste streams, it is difficult to rapidly and cost-effectively establish their suitability as soil amendments using a single method. Thermal analysis has been proposed as an evolving technique to assess the stability and composition of the organic matter present in these wastes. In this study, three different organic municipal waste streams (i.e., a municipal waste compost (MC), a composted sewage sludge (CS) and a thermally dried sewage sludge (TS)) were characterized using conventional and thermal methods. The conventional methods used to test organic matter stability included laboratory incubation with measurement of respired C, and spectroscopic methods to characterize chemical composition. Carbon mineralization was measured during a 90-day incubation, and samples before and after incubation were analyzed by chemical (elemental analysis) and spectroscopic (infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance) methods. Results were compared with those obtained by thermogravimetry (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques. Total amounts of CO{sub 2} respired indicated that the organic matter in the TS was the least stable, while that in the CS was the most stable. This was confirmed by changes detected with the spectroscopic methods in the composition of the organic wastes due to C mineralization. Differences were especially pronounced for TS, which showed a remarkable loss of aliphatic and proteinaceous compounds during the incubation process. TG, and especially DSC analysis, clearly reflected these differences between the three organic wastes before and after the incubation. Furthermore, the calculated energy density, which represents the energy available per unit of organic matter, showed a strong correlation with cumulative respiration. Results obtained support the hypothesis of a potential link between the thermal and biological stability of the studied organic materials, and consequently the ability of thermal analysis to characterize the maturity of municipal organic wastes and composts.

Fernandez, Jose M., E-mail: joseman@sas.upenn.edu [Department of Earth and Environmental Science, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6316 (United States); Plaza, Cesar; Polo, Alfredo [Instituto de Ciencias Agrarias, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 115 dpdo., 28006 Madrid (Spain); Plante, Alain F. [Department of Earth and Environmental Science, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6316 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

Assessing the Power Generation Solution by Thermal-chemical Conversion of Meat Processing Industry Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The paper presents a waste to energy conversion solution using a pyro-air-gasification process applied to biodegradable residues from meat processing industry integrated with small scale thermodynamic cycle for power generation. The solution of air- gasification at atmospheric pressure is based on experimental research and engineering computation developed during the study. The input data, such as: waste chemical composition, low/high heating value and proximate analysis, correspond to real waste products, sampled directly from the industrial processing line. Separate drying as first stage pre-treatment and integrated partial drying inside the reactor was used. The syngas low heating value of about 4.3 MJ/Nm3 is insured by its combustible fraction (H2– 12.2%, CO – 19.2%, CH4 – 1.6%). According to syngas composition the thermodynamic cycle was chosen – Otto gas engine. For a given waste feed-in flow considered in our computation of about 110 kg/h the power output obtained is about 50 kWel. The global energy efficiency of the unit is about 15%. The results offer answers to energy recovery waste disposal for residues with characteristics that are not suitable for classic incineration or limit the energy efficiency of the process making it non-economical (the average humidity of the raw waste is about 42% in mass). The research focused on waste to energy conversion process energy efficiency, waste neutralization and power generation.

Cosmin Marculescu; Florin Alexe

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Thermal Conductivity of Certain Rock Types and its Relevance to the Storage of Nuclear Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nine rocks selected from the surface of three plutons have been examined petrographically and their thermal conductivities measured in the temperature range of 100° to 500°C. The thermal conductivities of differe...

V. V. Mirkovich; J. A. Soles

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Effects of thermal pollution on the soft-bottoms surrounding a power station in the Canary Islands (NE Atlantic ocean)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The spatial and temporal effects of hot seawater (60–70°C) from a power station on nearby soft-bottom communities were ... coast of Tenerife, Canary Islands, NE Atlantic Ocean). The samples were taken during summ...

Rodrigo Riera; Jorge Núñez; Daniel Martín

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Methods of reducing emissions of nitrogen oxides at thermal power plants burning solid domestic waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Essentially all the major methods of reducing the emissions of nitrogen oxides from flue gases employed in power generation have been tested on plants in Moscow which burn solid domestic waste for production of h...

A. N. Tugov; V. F. Moskvichev

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

EA-1135: Offsite Thermal Treatment of Low-level Mixed Waste, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to treat contact-handled low-level mixed waste, containing polychlorinated biphenyls and other organics, to meet existing regulatory...

131

Thermal treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal treatment can be regarded as either a pre-treatment of waste prior to final disposal, or as a means of valorising waste by recovering energy. It includes both the burning of mixed MSW in municipal inciner...

Dr. P. White; Dr. M. Franke; P. Hindle

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Instrumentation of the thermal/structural interactions in situ tests at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy has constructed the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to develop the technology for the disposal of radioactive waste from defense programs. Sandia National Laboratories had the responsibility for the experimental activities at the WIPP and fielded several large-scale Thermal/Structural Interactions (TSI) in situ tests to validate techniques used to predict repository performance. The instrumentation of these tests involved the placement of over 4,200 gages including room closure gages, borehole extensometers, stress gages, borehole inclinometers, fixed reference gages, borehole strain gages, thermocouples, thermal flux meters, heater power gages, environmental gages, and ventilation gages. Most of the gages were remotely read instruments that were monitored by an automated data acquisition system, but manually read instruments were also used to provide early deformation information and to provide a redundancy of measurement for the remote gages. Instruments were selected that could operate in the harsh environment of the test rooms and that could accommodate the ranges of test room responses predicted by pretest calculations. Instruments were tested in the field prior to installation at the WIPP site and were modified to improve their performance. Other modifications were made to gages as the TSI tests progressed using knowledge gained from test maintenance. Quality assurance procedures were developed for all aspects of instrumentation including calibration, installation, and maintenance. The instrumentation performed exceptionally well and has produced a large quantity of quality information.

Munson, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Repository Isolation Systems Div.; Hoag, D.L.; Blankenship, D.A.; DeYonge, W.F.; Schiermeister, D.M. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, R.L.; Baird, G.T. [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Effects of horizontal mixing on the upper ocean temperature in the equatorial Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of horizontal mixing on the thermal structure of the equatorial Pacific Ocean is examined based on a sigma coordinate ... on the upper thermal structure in the equatorial Pacific Ocean, while their ...

Chuanjiang Huang; Fangli Qiao

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Organic tank safety project: Preliminary results of energetics and thermal behavior studies of model organic nitrate and/or nitrite mixtures and a simulated organic waste  

SciTech Connect

As a result of years of production and recovery of nuclear defense materials and subsequent waste management at the Hanford Site, organic-bearing radioactive high-level wastes (HLW) are currently stored in large (up to 3. ML) single-shell storage tanks (SSTs). Because these wastes contain both fuels (organics) and the oxidants nitrate and nitrite, rapid energetic reactions at certain conditions could occur. In support of Westinghouse Hanford Company`s (WHC) efforts to ensure continued safe storage of these organic- and oxidant-bearing wastes and to define the conditions necessary for reactions to occur, we measured the thermal sensitivities and thermochemical and thermokinetic properties of mixtures of selected organics and sodium nitrate and/or nitrite and a simulated Hanford organic-bearing waste using thermoanalytical technologies. These thermoanalytical technologies are used by chemical reactivity hazards evaluation organizations within the chemical industry to assess chemical reaction hazards.

Scheele, R.D.; Sell, R.L.; Sobolik, J.L.; Burger, L.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Environmental Assessment Offsite Thermal Treatment of Low-Level Mixed Waste  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) needs to demonstrate the economics and feasibility of offsite commercial treatment of contact-handled low-level mixed waste (LLMW), containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBS) and other organics, to meet existing regulatory standards for eventual disposal.

N /A

1999-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

136

A Methodological Framework for Integrating Waste Biomass into a Portfolio of Thermal Energy Production Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The integration of Renewable Energy Sources (RES) within the contextual framework of existing thermal energy production systems has emerged as a promising ... and sustainable policy towards addressing the growing...

Eleftherios Iakovou; Dimitrios Vlachos; Agorasti Toka

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Determination of Thermal-Degradation Rates of Some Candidate Rankine-Cycle Organic Working Fluids for Conversion of Industrial Waste Heat Into Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DETERMINATION OF THERMAL-DEGRADATION RATES OF SOME CANDIDATE RANKINE-CYCLE ORGANIC WORKING FLUIDS FOR CONVERSION OF INDUSTRIAL WASTE HEAT INTO POWER Mohan L. Jain, Jack Demirgian, John L. Krazinski, and H. Bushby Argonne National Laboratory..., Argonne, Illinois Howard Mattes and John Purcell U.S. Department of Energy ABSTRACT Serious concerns over the long-term thermal In a previous study [1] based on systems stability of organic working fluids and its effect analysis and covering...

Jain, M. L.; Demirgian, J.; Krazinski, J. L.; Bushby, H.; Mattes, H.; Purcell, J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Chapter 16 - Ocean Engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary Ocean thermal energy converters (OTECs) took advantage of the ocean acting as an immense collector and storer of solar radiation, thus delivering a steady flow of low-grade thermal energy. The ocean plays a similar role in relation to the wind energy, which is transformed into waves far steadier than the air currents that created them. Nevertheless, waves are neither steady nor concentrated enough to constitute a highly attractive energy source notwithstanding their large total power. There is little net horizontal motion of water in a surface ocean wave. A floating object drifts in the direction of the wave with about 1% of the wave velocity. A given elementary cell of water will move in a vertical circle, surging forward near the crest of the wave but receding by an almost equal amount at the trough. Any system in which the wave velocity depends on wavelength is called dispersive; hence the deep ocean is dispersive.

Aldo Vieira da Rosa

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Effects of thermocline on performance of underwater glider’s power system propelled by ocean thermal energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The thermal glider’s changeable volume produces propelling force to power the glider’s descending and ascending through ... affect the working processes of the glider’s power system. Based on the enthalpy method,...

Hai Yang; Jie Ma

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Ocean Energy Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ocean Energy Technology Basics Ocean Energy Technology Basics Ocean Energy Technology Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:18pm Addthis Text Version Photo of low waves in the ocean. A dock is visible in the background. Oceans cover more than 70% of the Earth's surface. As the world's largest solar collectors, oceans contain thermal energy from the sun and produce mechanical energy from tides and waves. Even though the sun affects all ocean activity, the gravitational pull of the moon primarily drives tides, and wind powers ocean waves. Learn more about: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy Ocean Resources Addthis Related Articles Energy Department Releases New Energy 101 Video on Ocean Power A map generated by Georgia Tech's tidal energy resource database shows mean current speed of tidal streams. The East Coast, as shown above, has strong tides that could be tapped to produce energy. | Photo courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of polycarbonate and plastic waste to recover monomers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described using fast pyrolysis to convert a plastic waste feed stream containing polycarbonate and ABS to high value monomeric constituents prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituents prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting an acid or base catalysts and an oxide or carbonate support for treating the feed stream to affect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of the high value monomeric constituents of polycarbonate and ABS in the first temperature program range; differentially heating the feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituents prior to pyrolysis or other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents from the polycarbonate to cause pyrolysis to a different high value monomeric constituent of the plastic waste and differentially heating the feed stream at the second higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of different high value monomeric constituents; and separating the different high value monomeric constituents. 68 figs.

Evans, R.J.; Chum, H.L.

1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

142

Controlled catalystic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of polycarbonate and plastic waste to recover monomers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of using fast pyrolysis to convert a plastic waste feed stream containing polycarbonate and ABS to high value monomeric constituents prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituents prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting an acid or base catalysts and an oxide or carbonate support for treating the feed stream to affect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of the high value monomeric constituents of polycarbonate and ABS in the first temperature program range; differentially heating the feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituents prior to pyrolysis or other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents from the polycarbonate to cause pyrolysis to a different high value monomeric constituent of the plastic waste and differentially heating the feed stream at the second higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of different high value monomeric constituents; and separating the different high value monomeric constituents.

Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO); Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Guideline for benchmarking thermal treatment systems for low-level mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

A process for benchmarking low-level mixed waste (LLMW) treatment technologies has been developed. When used in conjunction with the identification and preparation of surrogate waste mixtures, and with defined quality assurance and quality control procedures, the benchmarking process will effectively streamline the selection of treatment technologies being considered by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for LLMW cleanup and management. Following the quantitative template provided in the benchmarking process will greatly increase the technical information available for the decision-making process. The additional technical information will remove a large part of the uncertainty in the selection of treatment technologies. It is anticipated that the use of the benchmarking process will minimize technology development costs and overall treatment costs. In addition, the benchmarking process will enhance development of the most promising LLMW treatment processes and aid in transferring the technology to the private sector. To instill inherent quality, the benchmarking process is based on defined criteria and a structured evaluation format, which are independent of any specific conventional treatment or emerging process technology. Five categories of benchmarking criteria have been developed for the evaluation: operation/design; personnel health and safety; economics; product quality; and environmental quality. This benchmarking document gives specific guidance on what information should be included and how it should be presented. A standard format for reporting is included in Appendix A and B of this document. Special considerations for LLMW are presented and included in each of the benchmarking categories.

Hoffman, D.P.; Gibson, L.V. Jr.; Hermes, W.H. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bastian, R.E. [Focus Environmental, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Davis, W.T. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Thermal Manikin Evaluation of Liquid Cooling Garments Intended for Use in Hazardous Waste Management  

SciTech Connect

Thermal manikins are valuable tools for quantitatively evaluating the performance of protective clothing ensembles and microclimate cooling systems. The goal of this investigation was to examine the performance of Coretech personal cooling systems, designed to reduce the effects of physiological and environmental heat stress, using a sweating thermal manikin. A sweating manikin takes into account the effective physiological evaporative heat transfer. Three tubesuits containing different densities of tubing were evaluated on the thermal manikin in conjunction with body armor and two Chemical-Biological suits (SPM and JSLIST). The experiments were carried out in an environmental chamber set at a temperature of 35 C with a relative humidity of 30%. For the tubesuits, two flow rates were tested and the heat removal rates were obtained by measuring the amount of power required to maintain the manikin's surface at a constant temperature of 35 C. The sweating rates were adjusted to maintain a fully wetted manikin surface at the above environmental conditions. For fluid flow rates ranging from approximately 250 to 750 ml/min, and inlet temperatures to the tubesuit ranging from 7 to 10 C, heat removal rates between 220 W to 284 W were measured, indicating the effectiveness of tubesuits at removing excessive body heat. This research was performed at the U.S. Army Soldier and Biological Chemical Command (SBCCOM) in Natick, Massachusetts.

Dionne, J. P.; Semeniuk, K.; Makris, A.; Teal, W.; Laprise, B.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

145

Feasibility study for thermal treatment of solid tire wastes in Bangladesh by using pyrolysis technology  

SciTech Connect

In this study on the basis of lab data and available resources in Bangladesh, feasibility study has been carried out for pyrolysis process converting solid tire wastes into pyrolysis oils, solid char and gases. The process considered for detailed analysis was fixed-bed fire-tube heating pyrolysis reactor system. The comparative techno-economic assessment was carried out in US$ for three different sizes plants: medium commercial scale (144 tons/day), small commercial scale (36 tons/day), pilot scale (3.6 tons/day). The assessment showed that medium commercial scale plant was economically feasible, with the lowest unit production cost than small commercial and pilot scale plants for the production of crude pyrolysis oil that could be used as boiler fuel oil and for the production of upgraded liquid-products.

Islam, M.R., E-mail: mrislam1985@yahoo.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Rajshahi University of Engineering and Technology, Rajshahi 6204 (Bangladesh); Joardder, M.U.H.; Hasan, S.M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Rajshahi University of Engineering and Technology, Rajshahi 6204 (Bangladesh); Takai, K.; Haniu, H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University Corporation Kitami Institute of Technology, 165 Koen-cho, Kitami City, Hokkaido 090-8507 (Japan)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

146

Thermal Performance of Deep-Burn Fusion-Fission Hybrid Waste in a Repository  

SciTech Connect

The Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE) Engine [1] combines a neutron-rich but energy-poor inertial fusion system with an energy-rich but neutron-poor subcritical fission blanket. Because approximately 80% of the LIFE Engine energy is produced from fission, the requirements for laser efficiency and fusion target performance are relaxed, compared to a pure-fusion system, and hence a LIFE Engine prototype can be based on target performance in the first few years of operation of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Similarly, because of the copious fusion neutrons, the fission blanket can be run in a subcritical, driven, mode, without the need for control rods or other sophisticated reactivity control systems. Further, because the fission blanket is inherently subcritical, fission fuels that can be used in LIFE Engine designs include thorium, depleted uranium, natural uranium, spent light water reactor fuel, highly enriched uranium, and plutonium. Neither enrichment nor reprocessing is required for the LIFE Engine fuel cycle, and burnups to 99% fraction of initial metal atoms (FIMA) being fissioned are envisioned. This paper discusses initial calculations of the thermal behavior of spent LIFE fuel following completion of operation in the LIFE Engine [2]. The three time periods of interest for thermal calculations are during interim storage (probably at the LIFE Engine site), during the preclosure operational period of a geologic repository, and after closure of the repository.

Blink, J A; Chipman, V; Farmer, J; Shaw, H; Zhao, P

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

147

Determination of temperature-dependent heat conductivity and thermal diffusivity of waste glass melter feed  

SciTech Connect

The cold cap is a layer of reacting glass batch floating on the surface of melt in an all-electric continuous glass melter. The heat needed for the conversion of the melter feed to molten glass must be transferred to and through the cold cap. Since the heat flux into the cold cap determines the rate of melting, the heat conductivity is a key property of the reacting feed. We designed an experimental setup consisting of a large cylindrical crucible with an assembly of thermocouples that monitors the evolution of the temperature field while the crucible is heated at a constant rate. Then we used two methods to calculate the heat conductivity and thermal diffusivity of the reacting feed: the approximation of the temperature field by polynomial functions and the finite-volume method coupled with least-squares analysis. Up to 680°C, the heat conductivity of the reacting melter feed was represented by a linear function of temperature.

Pokorny, Richard; Rice, Jarrett A.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Hrma, Pavel R.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Technical and philosophical aspects of ocean disposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Di sposai . Geological aspects Physical aspects Chemical aspects Biological aspects CHAPTER II. TECHNICAL ASPECTS OF OCEAN DISPOSAL Types of Waste Materials. Dredged materiais. Industrial wastes, DomestIc sewage wa tes Solid wastes Radloact..., can reduce the passage of light through the water column and cause damaging effects to the marine ecosystem. Each of five major oceans has pronounced gyral, or circular current motion (Fiaure 1. 1). The North Atlantic current system is comprised...

Zapatka, Marchi Charisse

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Proceedings of the ASME Heat Transfer Division. Volume 4: Natural convection within a horizontal circular cylinder heated from below and cooled from above; Numerical methods for coupled fluid-thermal-structural interaction; Thermal analysis in waste processing and disposal; Heat transfer in fire and combustion systems; HTD-Volume 335  

SciTech Connect

The first two sections as listed in the title contain 7 papers. The third section on thermal analysis contains 18 papers arranged into the following topical areas: Thermal treatment and municipal wastes; Thermal hydraulics in hazardous and nuclear waste processing and disposal; and Waste processing. Heat transfer in fire and combustion systems contains 17 papers arranged into the following topical sections: Soot/radiation; Combustion systems; Multiphase combustion; and Flames and fires. Most papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Pepper, D.W. [ed.] [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Douglass, R.W. [ed.] [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Heinrich, J.C. [ed.] [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

150

Thermal springs list for the United States; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Key to Geophysical Records Documentation No. 12  

SciTech Connect

The compilation has 1702 thermal spring locations in 23 of the 50 States, arranged alphabetically by State (Postal Service abbreviation) and degrees of latitude and longitude within the State. It shows spring name, surface temperature in degrees Fahrenheit and degrees Celsius; USGS Professional Paper 492 number, USGS Circular 790 number, NOAA number, north to south on each degree of latitude and longitude of the listed. USGS 1:250,000-scale (AMS) map; and the USGS topographic map coverage, 1:63360- or 1:62500-scale (15-minute) or 1:24000-scale (7.5-minute) quadrangle also included is an alphabetized list showing only the spring name and the State in which it is located. Unnamed springs are omitted. The list includes natural surface hydrothermal features: springs, pools, mud pots, mud volcanoes, geysers, fumaroles, and steam vents at temperature of 20{sup 0}C (68[sup 0}F) or greater. It does not include wells or mines, except at sites where they supplement or replace natural vents presently or recently active, or, in some places, where orifices are not distinguishable as natural or artificial. The listed springs are located on the USGS 1:250,000 (AMS) topographic maps. (MHR)

Berry, G.W.; Grim, P.J.; Ikelman, J.A. (comps.)

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

OceanEnergyMMS.p65  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minerals Management Service, U.S. Department of the Interior Ocean Energy PAGE 1 Minerals Management Service, U.S. Department of the Interior Ocean Energy PAGE 1 Teacher Guide .......................................................... 2 Related National Science Standards .......................... 3 Introduction to Ocean Energy .................................. 4 Petroleum & Natural Gas ......................................... 5 Natural Oil and Gas Seeps ........................................ 7 Methane Hydrates .................................................... 8 Solar Energy .............................................................. 9 Wind Energy ........................................................... 10 Wave Energy ........................................................... 11 OTEC: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion .............

152

Ocean Wave Converters: State of the Art and Current Status  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Wave Converters: State of the Art and Current Status M.S. Lagoun1,2 , A. Benalia2 and M in one of the following categories: wave energy, marine and tidal current energy, ocean thermal energy of energy exists in oceans. Ocean energy exists in many forms. Among these forms, significant opportunities

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

153

Flexible ocean upwelling pipe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, a cold water riser pipe is releasably supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. The pipe is substantially vertical and has its lower end far below the hull above the ocean floor. The pipe is defined essentially entirely of a material which has a modulus of elasticity substantially less than that of steel, e.g., high density polyethylene, so that the pipe is flexible and compliant to rather than resistant to applied bending moments. The position of the lower end of the pipe relative to the hull is stabilized by a weight suspended below the lower end of the pipe on a flexible line. The pipe, apart from the weight, is positively buoyant. If support of the upper end of the pipe is released, the pipe sinks to the ocean floor, but is not damaged as the length of the line between the pipe and the weight is sufficient to allow the buoyant pipe to come to a stop within the line length after the weight contacts the ocean floor, and thereafter to float submerged above the ocean floor while moored to the ocean floor by the weight. The upper end of the pipe, while supported by the hull, communicates to a sump in the hull in which the water level is maintained below the ambient water level. The sump volume is sufficient to keep the pipe full during heaving of the hull, thereby preventing collapse of the pipe.

Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Predictability of the Barents Sea ice in early winter: Remote effects of oceanic and atmospheric thermal conditions from the North Atlantic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Predictability of sea ice concentrations (SICs) in the Barents Sea in early winter (November–December) is studied using canonical correlation analysis with atmospheric and ocean anomalies from the NCEP Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (NCEP-CFSR)...

Takuya Nakanowatari; Kazutoshi Sato; Jun Inoue

155

ISWA commitments on waste and climate ISWA General Secretariat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of renewable energy. Incineration and other thermal processes for waste-to-energy, landfill gas recovery

156

Ocean Science, 1, 145157, 2005 www.ocean-science.net/os/1/145/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. On the other hand, the thermal forcing has a neg- ligible effect on the ocean currents. For sea ice, both of heat by the ocean current and advect also warmer air in the Weddell Sea and colder air in the Ross SeaOcean Science, 1, 145­157, 2005 www.ocean-science.net/os/1/145/ SRef-ID: 1812-0792/os/2005

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

157

HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT SENSITIVITY OF DOUBLE SHELL DYNAMIC RESPONSE TO THE WASTE ELASTIC PROPERTIES  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to determine the sensitivity of the dynamic response of the Hanford double-shell tanks (DSTs) to the assumptions regarding the constitutive properties of the contained waste. In all cases, the waste was modeled as a uniform linearly elastic material. The focus of the study was on the changes in the modal response of the tank and waste system as the extensional modulus (elastic modulus in tension and compression) and shear modulus of the waste were varied through six orders of magnitude. Time-history analyses were also performed for selected cases and peak horizontal reaction forces and axial stresses at the bottom of the primary tank were evaluated. Because the analysis focused on the differences in the responses between solid-filled and liquid-filled tanks, it is a comparative analysis rather than an analysis of record for a specific tank or set of tanks. The shear modulus was varied between 4 x 10{sup 3} Pa and 4.135 x 10{sup 9} Pa. The lowest value of shear modulus was sufficient to simulate the modal response of a liquid-containing tank, while the higher values are several orders of magnitude greater than the upper limit of expected properties for tank contents. The range of elastic properties used was sufficient to show liquid-like response at the lower values, followed by a transition range of semi-solid-like response to a clearly identifiable solid-like response. It was assumed that the mechanical properties of the tank contents were spatially uniform. Because sludge-like materials are expected only to exist in the lower part of the tanks, this assumption leads to an exaggeration of the effects of sludge-like materials in the tanks. The results of the study show that up to a waste shear modulus of at least 40,000 Pa, the modal properties of the tank and waste system are very nearly the same as for the equivalent liquid-containing tank. This suggests that the differences in critical tank responses between liquid-containing tanks and tanks containing sludge-like materials having a shear modulus not exceeding 40,000 Pa are unlikely to be greater than those due to the uncertainties involved in the definition of the design ground motion or in the properties of the tank-waste system. This is the fundamental conclusion of the study. The study also shows that increasing the waste extensional modulus and shear modulus does not lead to increased mass participation at the impulsive frequency of the liquid-containing system. Instead, increasing the waste stiffness eventually leads to fundamental changes in the modal properties including an increase in the fundamental system frequency.

MACKEY TC; ABATT FG; JOHNSON KI

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

158

Ocean Acidification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ocean Acidification ... The first assignment I give my students in Environmental Modeling class is to calculate the mass of the oceans versus the mass of the atmosphere and the “living” soil. ... As a young chemical engineer in the early 1970s, I remember discussing the horrors of sulfur and particulate pollution from steel mills, smelters, and power plants. ...

Jerald L. Schnoor

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

159

Investigations of Near-Field Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Models for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Clay/Shale Rock  

SciTech Connect

Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at the Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon and Volckaert, 2003) have all been under intensive scientific investigation (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relationships to flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of radioactive waste. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA.

Liu, H.H.; Li, L.; Zheng, L.; Houseworth, J.E.; Rutqvist, J.

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

160

Zero Waste, Renewable Energy & Environmental  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Dioxins & Furans · The `State of Waste' in the US · WTE Technologies · Thermal Recycling ­ Turnkey dangerous wastes in the form of gases and ash, often creating entirely new hazards, like dioxins and furans

Columbia University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

2, 299329, 2005 SAM: Role of thermal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. On the other hand, the thermal forcing has a negligible effect on the ocean currents. For sea ice, both Version Interactive Discussion EGU Ocean Science Discussions, 2, 299­329, 2005 www.ocean-science.net/osd/2/299/ SRef-ID: 1812-0822/osd/2005-2-299 European Geosciences Union Ocean Science Discussions Papers published

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

162

Review of Thermally Activated Technologies, July 2004 | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and waste-heat-fired applications of thermally-driven cooling systems, thermally-driven heat pumps, and thermally-driven bottoming cycles, primarily for use in commercial...

163

Ocean Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Some of these technologies are taking off from very low power capacities, although with an intense activity....4, 5] including La Rance tidal power station calculate a capacity of ocean energy facilities worldwid...

Ricardo Guerrero-Lemus; José Manuel Martínez-Duart

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic Tomography, Satellite Altimetry, and Modeling The ATOC to thermal expansion. Interpreting climate change signals from fluctuations in sea level is therefore in the advective heat flux. Changes in oceanic heat storage are a major expected element of future climate shifts

Frandsen, Jannette B.

165

Estimates of Cabbeling in the Global Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Owing to the larger thermal expansion coefficient at higher temperatures, more buoyancy is put into the ocean by heating than is removed by cooling at low temperatures. The authors show that, even with globally balanced ...

Schmitt, Raymond W.

166

Radioactive Waste Radioactive Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Radioactive Waste at UF Bldg 831 392-8400 #12;Radioactive Waste · Program is designed to;Radioactive Waste · Program requires · Generator support · Proper segregation · Packaging · labeling #12;Radioactive Waste · What is radioactive waste? · Anything that · Contains · or is contaminated

Slatton, Clint

167

Turning Ocean Water Into Rain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...an alternative method of desalination for mainland communities...Although thermally driven desalination may be a good option for...a good attempt, but the economics will have to be proved.” Kathiroli...are just starting out.” Desalination. Turning ocean water into...

Yudhijit Bhattacharjee

2007-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

168

Pump targets hydrogen risk in nuclear waste tank  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pump targets hydrogen risk in nuclear waste tank ... Researchers believe that thermal and radiolytic breakdown of organic compounds in the tank's wastes produces the hydrogen. ...

DEBORAH ILLMAN

1993-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

169

Simulation of thermal stress influence on the Boom Clay kerogen (Oligocene, Belgium) in relation to long-term storage of high activity nuclear waste: I. Study of generated soluble compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Closed pyrolyses were performed on the Boom Clay kerogen to simulate the weak thermal stress applied during the in situ CERBERUS heating experiment (80 °C for 5 a). Two stronger thermal stresses, encompassing the range generally considered for the long-term disposal of high-activity nuclear waste (80 °C for 1 ka and 120 °C for 3 ka), were also simulated. Quantitative and qualitative studies were carried out on the products thus generated with a focus on the C12+ fraction, especially on its polar components. It thus appeared that the soluble C12+ fractions generated during these simulation experiments comprise a wide variety of polar O- and/or N-containing compounds, including carboxylic acids and phenols. The nature and/or the relative abundance of these polar compounds exhibit strong variations, with the extent of the thermal stress, reflecting the primary cracking of different types of structures with different thermal stability and the occurrence of secondary degradation reactions. These observations support the idea that the compounds, generated upon exposure of the Boom Clay kerogen to a low to moderate thermal stress, may affect the effectiveness of the geological barrier upon long-term storage of high-activity nuclear waste.

I. Deniau; S. Derenne; C. Beaucaire; H. Pitsch; C. Largeau

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

V-TOUGH: An enhanced version of the TOUGH code for the thermal and hydrologic simulation of large-scale problems in nuclear waste isolation  

SciTech Connect

The TOUGH code developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is being extensively used to numerically simulate the thermal and hydrologic environment around nuclear waste packages in the unsaturated zone for the Yucca Mountain Project. At the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) we have rewritten approximately 80 percent of the TOUGH code to increase its speed and incorporate new options. The geometry of many problems requires large numbers of computational elements elements in order to realistically model detailed physical phenomena, and, as a result, large amounts of computer time are needed. In order to increase the speed of the code we have incorporated fast linear equation solvers, vectorization of substantial portions of code, improved automatic time stepping, and implementation of table look-up for the steam table properties. These enhancements have increased the speed of the code for typical problems by a factor of 20 on the Cray 2 computer. In addition to the increase in computational efficiency we have added several options: vapor pressure lowering; equivalent continuum treatments of fractures; energy and material volumetric, mass and flux accounting; and Stefan-Boltzmann radiative heat transfer. 5 refs.

Nitao, J.J.

1989-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

171

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1980  

SciTech Connect

Reported are: high-level waste immobilization, alternative waste forms, nuclear waste materials characterization, TRU waste immobilization, TRU waste decontamination, krypton solidification, thermal outgassing, iodine-129 fixation, unsaturated zone transport, well-logging instrumentation development, mobile organic complexes of fission products, waste management system and safety studies, assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems, waste/rock interactions, engineered barriers, criteria for defining waste isolation, and spent fuel and pool component integrity. (DLC)

Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Utilization of Common Automotive Three-Way NO{sub x} Reduction Catalyst for Managing Off- Gas from Thermal Treatment of High-Nitrate Waste - 13094  

SciTech Connect

Studsvik's Thermal Organic Reduction (THOR) steam reforming process has been tested and proven to effectively treat radioactive and hazardous wastes streams with high nitrate contents to produce dry, stable mineral products, while providing high conversion (>98%) of nitrates and nitrites directly to nitrogen gas. However, increased NO{sub x} reduction may be desired for some waste streams under certain regulatory frameworks. In order to enhance the NO{sub x} reduction performance of the THOR process, a common Three-Way catalytic NO{sub x} reduction unit was installed in the process gas piping of a recently completed Engineering Scale Technology Demonstration (ESTD). The catalytic DeNO{sub x} unit was located downstream of the main THOR process vessel, and it was designed to catalyze the reduction of residual NO{sub x} to nitrogen gas via the oxidation of the hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and volatile organic compounds that are inherent to the THOR process gas. There was no need for auxiliary injection of a reducing gas, such as ammonia. The unit consisted of four monolith type catalyst sections positioned in series with a gas mixing section located between each catalyst section. The process gas was monitored for NO{sub x} concentration upstream and downstream of the catalytic DeNO{sub x} unit. Conversion efficiencies ranged from 91% to 97% across the catalytic unit, depending on the composition of the inlet gas. Higher concentrations of hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the THOR process gas increased the NO{sub x} reduction capability of the catalytic DeNO{sub x} unit. The NO{sub x} destruction performance of THOR process in combination with the Three-Way catalytic unit resulted in overall system NO{sub x} reduction efficiencies of greater than 99.9% with an average NO{sub x} reduction efficiency of 99.94% for the entire demonstration program. This allowed the NO{sub x} concentration in the ESTD exhaust gas to be maintained at less than 40 parts per million (ppm), dry basis with an average concentration of approximately 17 ppm, dry basis. There were no signs of catalyst deactivation throughout the 6 day demonstration program, even under the high steam (>50%) content and chemically reducing conditions inherent to the THOR process. Utilization of the common Three-Way automotive catalyst may prove to be a cost effective method for improving NO{sub x} emissions from thermal treatment processes that utilize similar processing conditions. This paper will discuss the details of the implementation and performance of the Three-Way catalytic DeNO{sub x} unit at the THOR ESTD, as well as a discussion of future work to determine the long-term durability of the catalyst in the THOR process. (authors)

Foster, Adam L.; Ki Song, P.E. [Studsvik, Inc. 5605 Glenridge Drive Suite 705, Atlanta, GA 30342 (United States)] [Studsvik, Inc. 5605 Glenridge Drive Suite 705, Atlanta, GA 30342 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

re-use of thermal energy “waste heat” for building heating/and thermal energy “waste heat,” as well as purifiedare used to capture waste heat for productive purposes. Use

Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Ocean Observing Ocean Observing Systems (OOS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, national, and global scales. · Ocean Observing Systems serve: Fishing industry National security Coastal properties, such as salinity, temperature, and waves Satellite maps of sea surface temperature NATIONAL Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) 11 REGIONAL Systems, including: MANY LOCAL Systems

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

175

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1979  

SciTech Connect

Progress and activities are reported on the following: high-level waste immobilization, alternative waste forms, nuclear waste materials characterization, TRU waste immobilization programs, TRU waste decontamination, krypton solidification, thermal outgassing, iodine-129 fixation, monitoring of unsaturated zone transport, well-logging instrumentation development, mobile organic complexes of fission products, waste management system and safety studies, assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems, waste/rock interactions technology, spent fuel and fuel pool integrity program, and engineered barriers. (DLC)

Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

The Pacific Ocean’s Acidification Laboratory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Pacific Ocean’s Acidification Laboratory ... Five years ago, at the quadrennial International Coral Reef Symposium in Okinawa, Japan, a poll of the scientists and resource managers present ranked ocean acidification 38th out of a list of 39 possible threats facing reefs, recalls Rusty Brainard, head of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA’s) Coral Reef Ecosystem Division. ... As the oceans absorb CO2 from the atmosphere at the rate of one million tons per hour, the pH of the water is changing. ...

Christopher Pala

2009-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

177

GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 0, NO. 0, PAGES 0-0, M 0, 2001 On the Pacific Ocean regime shift  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 0, NO. 0, PAGES 0-0, M 0, 2001 On the Pacific Ocean regime shift variability of Pacific Ocean upper ocean heat content is examined for the 1948-1998 period using gridded-wide phenomenon affecting the thermal structure from 60 S to 70 N. EOF analysis of the Pacific Ocean heat content

178

Deep-Sea Research II 53 (2006) 3141 Decadal variability of wind-energy input to the world ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- tion is emerging. Although the ocean receives a huge amount of thermal energy, it cannot convert such thermal energy into mechanical energy very effi- ciently because the ocean is heated and cooled fromDeep-Sea Research II 53 (2006) 31­41 Decadal variability of wind-energy input to the world ocean

Huang, Rui Xin

179

Mixed waste characterization reference document  

SciTech Connect

Waste characterization and monitoring are major activities in the management of waste from generation through storage and treatment to disposal. Adequate waste characterization is necessary to ensure safe storage, selection of appropriate and effective treatment, and adherence to disposal standards. For some wastes characterization objectives can be difficult and costly to achieve. The purpose of this document is to evaluate costs of characterizing one such waste type, mixed (hazardous and radioactive) waste. For the purpose of this document, waste characterization includes treatment system monitoring, where monitoring is a supplement or substitute for waste characterization. This document establishes a cost baseline for mixed waste characterization and treatment system monitoring requirements from which to evaluate alternatives. The cost baseline established as part of this work includes costs for a thermal treatment technology (i.e., a rotary kiln incinerator), a nonthermal treatment process (i.e., waste sorting, macronencapsulation, and catalytic wet oxidation), and no treatment (i.e., disposal of waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)). The analysis of improvement over the baseline includes assessment of promising areas for technology development in front-end waste characterization, process equipment, off gas controls, and monitoring. Based on this assessment, an ideal characterization and monitoring configuration is described that minimizes costs and optimizes resources required for waste characterization.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerating waste removal Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SOLID WASTE IN CALIFORNIA: NEEDS AND CHALLENGES Alexander E. Helou... , such as gasification, pyrolysis, waste-to-energy (WTE), and advanced thermal ... Source: Columbia...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

ocean | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ocean ocean Dataset Summary Description This shapefile represents the seasonal winter depth profile to reach water at a temperature of 20ºC. Source NREL Date Released October 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords depth profile hydrokinetic ocean ocean energy ocean thermal energy conversion OTEC seawater cooling thermal Data application/zip icon OTEC Seawater Cooling 20ºC Depth Profile - Winter Average (zip, 1.1 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period March 2009 - February 2011 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment This GIS data was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ("NREL"), which is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE"). The user is granted the right, without any fee or cost, to use, copy, modify, alter, enhance and distribute this data for any purpose whatsoever, provided that this entire notice appears in all copies of the data. Further, the user of this data agrees to credit NREL in any publications or software that incorporate or use the data. Access to and use of the GIS data shall further impose the following obligations on the User. The names DOE/NREL may not be used in any advertising or publicity to endorse or promote any product or commercial entity using or incorporating the GIS data unless specific written authorization is obtained from DOE/NREL. The User also understands that DOE/NREL shall not be obligated to provide updates, support, consulting, training or assistance of any kind whatsoever with regard to the use of the GIS data. THE GIS DATA IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL DOE/NREL BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO CLAIMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOSS OF DATA OR PROFITS, WHICH MAY RESULT FROM AN ACTION IN CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTIOUS CLAIM THAT ARISES OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE ACCESS OR USE OF THE GIS DATA. The User acknowledges that access to the GIS data is subject to U.S. Export laws and regulations and any use or transfer of the GIS data must be authorized under those regulations. The User shall not use, distribute, transfer, or transmit GIS data or any products incorporating the GIS data except in compliance with U.S. export regulations. If requested by DOE/NREL, the User agrees to sign written assurances and other export-related documentation as may be required to comply with U.S. export regulations.

182

Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:29am Addthis Photo of water flowing from several openings in a hydropower dam. Hydropower produces 10% of the nation's energy, including power from the Ice Harbor Dam in Burbank, Washington. This page provides a brief overview of hydropower and ocean energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply these technologies within the Federal sector. Overview Hydropower has been used for centuries to power machinery, but the application most commonly associated with hydropower is electricity production through dams. Ocean energy refers to various forms of renewable energy harnessed from the ocean. There are two primary types of ocean energy: mechanical and thermal.

183

Cold Water Flow and Upper-Ocean Currents in the Bismarck Sea from December 2001 to January 2002  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors investigated the upper-ocean currents in the Bismarck Sea and related oceanic thermal changes in the western equatorial South Pacific for December 2001–January 2002; during this period, coastal upwelling occurred along the Papua New ...

Takuya Hasegawa; Kentaro Ando; Hideharu Sasaki

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Makai Ocean Engineering Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Makai Ocean Engineering Inc Makai Ocean Engineering Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Makai Ocean Engineering Inc Address PO Box 1206 Place Kailua Zip 96734-1206 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Year founded 1973 Number of employees 28 Phone number 808.259.8871 Website http://www.makai.com Region United States LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: Deep Water Pipelines This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it.

185

Gravitational Potential Energy Sinks in the Oceans R. X. Huang* and W. Wang+  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gravitational Potential Energy Sinks in the Oceans R. X. Huang* and W. Wang+ *Woods Hole conversion rate from internal energy to GPE through molecular diffusion. More relevant to the ocean in the ocean interior, only if the heating source is located below the cooling source. For Case 3, thermal

Huang, Rui Xin

186

Process for remediation of plastic waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A single step process for degrading plastic waste by converting the plastic waste into carbonaceous products via thermal decomposition of the plastic waste by placing the plastic waste into a reactor, heating the plastic waste under an inert or air atmosphere until the temperature of about 700.degree. C. is achieved, allowing the reactor to cool down, and recovering the resulting decomposition products therefrom. The decomposition products that this process yields are carbonaceous materials, and more specifically carbon nanotubes having a partially filled core (encapsulated) adjacent to one end of the nanotube. Additionally, in the presence of a transition metal compound, this thermal decomposition process produces multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

Pol, Vilas G; Thiyagarajan, Pappannan

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

187

Process for remediation of plastic waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A single step process for degrading plastic waste by converting the plastic waste into carbonaceous products via thermal decomposition of the plastic waste by placing the plastic waste into a reactor, heating the plastic waste under an inert or air atmosphere until the temperature of 700.degree. C. is achieved, allowing the reactor to cool down, and recovering the resulting decomposition products therefrom. The decomposition products that this process yields are carbonaceous materials, and more specifically egg-shaped and spherical-shaped solid carbons. Additionally, in the presence of a transition metal compound, this thermal decomposition process produces multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

Pol, Vilas G. (Westmont, IL); Thiyagarajan, Pappannan (Germantown, MD)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

188

Nuclear Waste: Knowledge Waste?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...4). Although disposal of HLW remains...for long-term disposal is through deep...successful waste-disposal program has eluded...geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Authorized...Administration withdrew funding for Yucca Mountain...

Eugene A. Rosa; Seth P. Tuler; Baruch Fischhoff; Thomas Webler; Sharon M. Friedman; Richard E. Sclove; Kristin Shrader-Frechette; Mary R. English; Roger E. Kasperson; Robert L. Goble; Thomas M. Leschine; William Freudenburg; Caron Chess; Charles Perrow; Kai Erikson; James F. Short

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

189

Ocean Thermal Gradient Hydraulic Power Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...for the probable life of the earth, only...low-pressure steam turbines pSrhaps hun-dreds...con-ventional hydraulic turbine under gravity flow...horizontally and the remaining available energy...through a hydraulic turbine to generatepower...between the liquid and gas-eous phases, with...

Earl J. Beck

1975-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

190

Causes of ocean currents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the foregoing analysis of the ocean and the atmosphere as two interacting subsystems, we have identified two major energy inputs into the ocean. These are the wind stress over the sea surface and heat fluxe...

David Tolmazin

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Novel green illumination energy for LED with ocean battery materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper launches novel materials of LED with ocean battery. Ocean battery employs sea water existing by the nature as energy materials to drive LED lamp lighting. The analysing methods are thermal-, electric- and illumination-performance experiments to discuss the novel green illumination techniques. Ocean battery and LED are all DC components, there is no energy loss of current converter between them, and the ocean battery has more electricity in LED illumination. Vapour chamber (VC) and aluminium (AL) materials are assigned to be the LED PCBs. Results show that the effective thermal conductivity of the VCPCB is many times higher than that of the ALPCB, proving that it can effectively reduce the temperature of the LED and obtain more uniform luminance. And the output voltage and LED lighting start unstable resulting from the air bubble of ocean battery slight vibration.

Jung-Chang Wang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Influence of the Iceland mantle plume on oceanic crust generation in the North Atlantic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......analogue-digital converter with a dynamic range...reverberation of seismic energy in the water column...the North Atlantic ocean. The change in morphology...support from the thermal anomaly in the mantle...margin and mantle thermal anomalies beneath...generation beneath mid-ocean ridges, Earth planet......

C. J. Parkin; R. S. White

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Laboratory creep and mechanical tests on salt data report (1975-1996): Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) thermal/structural interactions program  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility located in a bedded salt formation in Carlsbad, New Mexico, is being used by the U.S. Department of Energy to demonstrate the technology for safe handling and disposal of transuranic wastes produced by defense activities in the United States. In support of that demonstration, mechanical tests on salt were conducted in the laboratory to characterize material behavior at the stresses and temperatures expected for a nuclear waste repository. Many of those laboratory test programs have been carried out in the RE/SPEC Inc. rock mechanics laboratory in Rapid City, South Dakota; the first program being authorized in 1975 followed by additional testing programs that continue to the present. All of the WIPP laboratory data generated on salt at RE/SPEC Inc. over the last 20 years is presented in this data report. A variety of test procedures were used in performance of the work including quasi-static triaxial compression tests, constant stress (creep) tests, damage recovery tests, and multiaxial creep tests. The detailed data is presented in individual plots for each specimen tested. Typically, the controlled test conditions applied to each specimen are presented in a plot followed by additional plots of the measured specimen response. Extensive tables are included to summarize the tests that were performed. Both the tables and the plots contain cross-references to the technical reports where the data were originally reported. Also included are general descriptions of laboratory facilities, equipment, and procedures used to perform the work.

Mellegard, K.D. [RE/SPEC Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States); Munson, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Ocean | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Ocean Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean Welcome to our COMMUNITY This is the National Ocean Council's portal for data, information, and decision tools to support people engaged in regional marine planning for the future use of the ocean, our coasts, and the Great Lakes. Our goal is to enhance discovery of and access to data and information for planners, stakeholders, and the public. Please visit our Feedback page to tell us what would make the site most useful to you as we expand our content. Start Here! Previous Pause Next PacIOOS - Pacific Islands Voyager PacIOOS - Pacific Islands Voyager View More West Coast Governors Alliance - Regional Data Framework West Coast Governors Alliance - Regional Data Framework View More Mid-Atlantic Ocean Data Portal

195

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization |...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Summary Notes from 28 May 2008 Generic Technical Issue...

196

Nuclear Waste: Knowledge Waste?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...06520, USA. Nuclear power is re-emerging...proclaiming a “nuclear renaissance...example, plant safety...liabilities, terrorism at plants and in transport...high-level nuclear wastes (HLW...factor in risk perceptions...supporting nuclear power in the abstract...

Eugene A. Rosa; Seth P. Tuler; Baruch Fischhoff; Thomas Webler; Sharon M. Friedman; Richard E. Sclove; Kristin Shrader-Frechette; Mary R. English; Roger E. Kasperson; Robert L. Goble; Thomas M. Leschine; William Freudenburg; Caron Chess; Charles Perrow; Kai Erikson; James F. Short

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

197

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

waste (i.e, mixture of biohazardous and chemical or radioactive waste), call Environment, Health2/2009 Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 200 West Arbor Dr. San Diego, CA 92103 (619

Tsien, Roger Y.

198

Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonconventional Fluids," ASME Jour of Engineering for Power,fluids for Organic Rankine Cycles," Applied Thermal Engineering,fluid in waste heat recovery," Applied Thermal Engineering,

Ho, Tony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

ARM - Lesson Plans: Thermal Expansion of Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of sea water expands. It is this thermal expansion of the ocean water which makes the sea level rise. Recently, it was asked why a bunsen burner was heating the Erlenmeyer flask in...

200

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of mixed polymer waste streams to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents; selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent.

Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO); Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of mixed polymer waste streams to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents; selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent.

Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO); Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of mixed polymer waste streams to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents, selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent. 87 figures.

Evans, R.J.; Chum, H.L.

1994-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

203

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of mixed polymer waste streams to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents, selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent.

Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO); Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of mixed polymer waste streams to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents; selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent. 83 figs.

Evans, R.J.; Chum, H.L.

1994-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

205

Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste Heat Recovery Engineering and Materials for Automotive Thermoelectric Applications Electrical and Thermal Transport Optimization of High Efficient n-type Skutterudites...

206

The Mechanical Energy Input to the Ocean Induced by Tropical Cyclones LING LING LIU AND WEI WANG  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and environments. 1. Introduction Although oceans receive a huge amount of thermal energy, such energy cannot be efficiently converted into mechanical energy because the ocean is heated and cooled from the same geopotentialThe Mechanical Energy Input to the Ocean Induced by Tropical Cyclones LING LING LIU AND WEI WANG

Huang, Rui Xin

207

Air intake shaft performance tests (Shaft 5): In situ data report (May 1988--July 1995). Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Thermal/Structural Interactions Program  

SciTech Connect

Data are presented from the Air Intake Shaft Test, an in situ test fielded at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The construction of this shaft, well after the initial three access shafts, presented an unusual opportunity to obtain valuable detailed data on the mechanical response of a shaft for application to seal design. These data include selected fielding information, test configuration, instrumentation activities, and comprehensive results from a large number of gages. Construction of the test began in December 1987; gage data in this report cover the period from May 1988 through July 1995, with the bulk of the data obtained after obtaining access in November, 1989 and from the heavily instrumented period after remote gage installation between May, 1990, and October, 1991.

Munson, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Repository Isolation Systems Dept.; Hoag, D.L.; Ball, J.R. [RE/SPEC Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Baird, G.T.; Jones, R.L. [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of mixed polymer waste streams to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products  

SciTech Connect

A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a polyamide containing a plastic waste feed stream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polyamide and its high value monomeric constituent or derived high value products occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components is described therein comprising: (a) selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polyamide and its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; (b) selecting a catalyst and a support and treating said feed stream with said catalyst to affect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent or high value product of said polyamide in said first temperature program range; (c) differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of said high value monomeric constituent or high value product of said polyamide prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein; (d) separating said high value monomer constituent or derived high value product of said polyamide; (e) selecting a second higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis to a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating said feed stream of said higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said plastic into a different high value monomeric constituent or derived product; and (f) separating said different high value monomeric constituent or derived high value product.

Evans, R.J.; Chum, H.L.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

U.S. Considers Ocean Dumping of Radwastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to dump similar quantities in the Pacific at a point roughly midway between Japan and the Mariana Islands. Even these amounts...re-sumption of dumping low-level wastes is sure to engender a major battle, howev-er. "The oceans may seem to be politi-cally attractive...

COLIN NORMAN

1982-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

210

Firm sues to hasten burning of waste at sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In an effort to force a decision on its bid to perform a research burn of chemical wastes at sea, Chemical Waste Management is suing both the Environmental Protection Agency and the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration. The company wants the U.S. ...

1986-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

211

How ocean currents are studied  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

How infinite and boundless the ocean must have seemed to the first man to set foot upon its shore. Kind or stern, shallow or steep, the ocean’s shores have always held a peculiar fascination for man. The moist...

David Tolmazin

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Ocean General Circulation Models  

SciTech Connect

1. Definition of Subject The purpose of this text is to provide an introduction to aspects of oceanic general circulation models (OGCMs), an important component of Climate System or Earth System Model (ESM). The role of the ocean in ESMs is described in Chapter XX (EDITOR: PLEASE FIND THE COUPLED CLIMATE or EARTH SYSTEM MODELING CHAPTERS). The emerging need for understanding the Earth’s climate system and especially projecting its future evolution has encouraged scientists to explore the dynamical, physical, and biogeochemical processes in the ocean. Understanding the role of these processes in the climate system is an interesting and challenging scientific subject. For example, a research question how much extra heat or CO2 generated by anthropogenic activities can be stored in the deep ocean is not only scientifically interesting but also important in projecting future climate of the earth. Thus, OGCMs have been developed and applied to investigate the various oceanic processes and their role in the climate system.

Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

213

Impact of thermal barrier coating application on the combustion, performance and emissions of a diesel engine fueled with waste cooking oil biodiesel–diesel blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Biodiesel fuel was produced from waste cooking oil by transesterification process. B20 and B50 blends of biodiesel–petroleum diesel were prepared. These blends and D2 fuels were tested in a single cylinder CI engine. Performance, combustion and emission values of the engine running with the mentioned fuels were recorded. Then the piston and both exhaust and intake valves of the test engine were coated with layers of ceramic materials. The mentioned parts were coated with 100 ?m of NiCrAl as lining layer. Later the same parts were coated with 400 ?m material of coating that was the mixture of 88% of ZrO2, 4% of MgO and 8% of Al2O3. After the engine coating process, the same fuels were tested in the coated engine at the same operation condition. Finally, the same engine out parameters were obtained and compared with those of uncoated engine parameters in order to find out how this modification would change the combustion, performance and emission parameters. Results showed that the modification of the engine with coating process resulted in better performance, especially in considerably lower brake specific fuel consumption (Bsfc) values. Besides, emissions of the engine were lowered both through coating process and biodiesel usage excluding the nitrogen oxides (NOx) emission. In addition, the results of the coated engine are better than the uncoated one in terms of cylinder gas pressure, heat release rate (HRR) and heat release (HR).

Selman Ayd?n; Cenk Say?n

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Lab optimizes burning of hazardous wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new thermal destruction laboratory has gone into operation at Midwest Research Institute, Kansas City, Mo. The bench-scale facility, which can accommodate gram quantities of hazardous wastes in liquid, slurry, or solid forms, is used to determine ...

WARD WORTHY

1981-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

215

Sludge processors have wide choice of solutions for waste ammonia problems  

SciTech Connect

The Ocean Dumping Act of 1988 phased out dumping of sewage sludge into the ocean. To use sewage sludge beneficially, facilities treat and process it using such techniques as digestion, dewatering, composting, thermal drying and chemical stabilization. All of these processes create waste discharges containing high concentrations of nitrogen, mainly in the form of ammonia. When nitrification occurs in receiving waters, ammonia is oxidized to nitrate and can lower dissolved oxygen levels in the water. Excess ammonia also is toxic to fish and other aquatic life. Nitrogen reduction alternatives for sludge dewatering and processing waste discharges include the following: air stripping; steam stripping; breakpoint chlorination; selective ion exchange; reverse osmosis; and chemical precipitation. To remove wastewater nitrogen using biological processes, ammonia and organic nitrogen first are oxidized aerobically (nitrification) to nitrate nitrogen, which then is converted biologically to nitrogen gas (denitrification) under zero or low dissolved oxygen (anoxic) conditions. Because sludge treatment discharges contain valuable quantities of ammonia, they may be considered for reuse as supplemental fertilizer for land application or for reclamation through spraying or injection into soil. Such discharges also may be used in combustion processes.

Chen, Y.S.R.; Samela, D. (Stone and Webster Engineering Corp., Boston, MA (United States). Environmental Technology and Services Div.); Kaylor, F.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Selected biological investigations on deep sea disposal of industrial wastes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

found at an actual disposal site with respect to waste dilution with time. This technique was incorporated into the standard 96-hour bioassay test to afford a means of obtaining preliminary information regarding the bioaccumulation of each waste... with time from the 16 ocean dispose 1 study by Ball (1973) Laboratory dilution setup used to simulate conditions found at an actual disposal site with regard to waste dilution. 18 20 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Until recently man haS considered...

Page, Sandra Lea

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

217

Generating electricity from the oceans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ocean energy has many forms, encompassing tides, surface waves, ocean circulation, salinity and thermal gradients. This paper will considers two of these, namely those found in the kinetic energy resource in tidal streams or marine currents, driven by gravitational effects, and the resources in wind-driven waves, derived ultimately from solar energy. There is growing interest around the world in the utilisation of wave energy and marine currents (tidal stream) for the generation of electrical power. Marine currents are predictable and could be utilised without the need for barrages and the impounding of water, whilst wave energy is inherently less predictable, being a consequence of wind energy. The conversion of these resources into sustainable electrical power offers immense opportunities to nations endowed with such resources and this work is partially aimed at addressing such prospects. The research presented conveys the current status of wave and marine current energy conversion technologies addressing issues related to their infancy (only a handful being at the commercial prototype stage) as compared to others such offshore wind. The work establishes a step-by-step approach that could be used in technology and project development, depicting results based on experimental and field observations on device fundamentals, modelling approaches, project development issues. It includes analysis of the various pathways and approaches needed for technology and device or converter deployment issues. As most technology developments are currently UK based, the paper also discusses the UK's financial mechanisms available to support this area of renewable energy, highlighting the needed economic approaches in technology development phases. Examination of future prospects for wave and marine current ocean energy technologies are also discussed.

AbuBakr S. Bahaj

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al Qin Han,1 J. Keith Moore,1; accepted 7 December 2007; published 12 April 2008. [1] We use measurements of ocean surface dissolved Al (DEAD) model to constrain dust deposition to the oceans. Our Al database contains all available

Zender, Charles

219

Development of efficiency-enhanced cogeneration system utilizing high-temperature exhaust-gas from a regenerative thermal oxidizer for waste volatile-organic-compound gases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have developed a gas-turbine cogeneration system that makes effective use of the calorific value of the volatile organic compound (VOC) gases exhausted during production processes at a manufacturing plant. The system utilizes the high-temperature exhaust-gas from the regenerative thermal oxidizer (RTO) which is used for incinerating VOC gases. The high-temperature exhaust gas is employed to resuperheat the steam injected into the gasturbine. The steam-injection temperature raised in this way increases the heat input, resulting in the improved efficiency of the gas-turbine. Based on the actual operation of the system, we obtained the following results: • Operation with the steam-injection temperature at 300 °C (45 °C resuperheated from 255 °C) increased the efficiency of the gasturbine by 0.7%. • The system can enhance the efficiency by 1.3% when the steam-injection temperature is elevated to 340 °C (85 °C resuperheated). In this case, up to 6.6 million yen of the total energy cost and 400 tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions can be reduced annually. • A gas-turbine cogeneration and RTO system can reduce energy consumption by 23% and CO2 emission by 30.1% at the plant.

Masaaki Bannai; Akira Houkabe; Masahiko Furukawa; Takao Kashiwagi; Atsushi Akisawa; Takuya Yoshida; Hiroyuki Yamada

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

1 INSTRODUCTION In the concept of geological radioactive waste disposal,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 INSTRODUCTION In the concept of geological radioactive waste disposal, argillite is being of the radioactive waste disposal, the host rock will be subjected to various thermo-hydro-mechanical loadings, thermal solicitation comes from the heat emitting from the radioactive waste packages. On one hand

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Simple ocean carbon cycle models  

SciTech Connect

Simple ocean carbon cycle models can be used to calculate the rate at which the oceans are likely to absorb CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere. For problems involving steady-state ocean circulation, well calibrated ocean models produce results that are very similar to results obtained using general circulation models. Hence, simple ocean carbon cycle models may be appropriate for use in studies in which the time or expense of running large scale general circulation models would be prohibitive. Simple ocean models have the advantage of being based on a small number of explicit assumptions. The simplicity of these ocean models facilitates the understanding of model results.

Caldeira, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hoffert, M.I. [New York Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Earth System Sciences; Siegenthaler, U. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Physik

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Use of Ocean Energies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For converting the current of water for the production of electricity, there is a wide range of technological approaches. The Italian ocean current power plant named Kobold (Fig. 6.2) was the first commercial o...

Prof. Dr.-Ing Hermann-Josef Wagner…

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

ocean energy | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ocean energy ocean energy Dataset Summary Description This shapefile represents the seasonal winter depth profile to reach water at a temperature of 20ºC. Source NREL Date Released October 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords depth profile hydrokinetic ocean ocean energy ocean thermal energy conversion OTEC seawater cooling thermal Data application/zip icon OTEC Seawater Cooling 20ºC Depth Profile - Winter Average (zip, 1.1 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period March 2009 - February 2011 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment This GIS data was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ("NREL"), which is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE"). The user is granted the right, without any fee or cost, to use, copy, modify, alter, enhance and distribute this data for any purpose whatsoever, provided that this entire notice appears in all copies of the data. Further, the user of this data agrees to credit NREL in any publications or software that incorporate or use the data. Access to and use of the GIS data shall further impose the following obligations on the User. The names DOE/NREL may not be used in any advertising or publicity to endorse or promote any product or commercial entity using or incorporating the GIS data unless specific written authorization is obtained from DOE/NREL. The User also understands that DOE/NREL shall not be obligated to provide updates, support, consulting, training or assistance of any kind whatsoever with regard to the use of the GIS data. THE GIS DATA IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL DOE/NREL BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO CLAIMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOSS OF DATA OR PROFITS, WHICH MAY RESULT FROM AN ACTION IN CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTIOUS CLAIM THAT ARISES OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE ACCESS OR USE OF THE GIS DATA. The User acknowledges that access to the GIS data is subject to U.S. Export laws and regulations and any use or transfer of the GIS data must be authorized under those regulations. The User shall not use, distribute, transfer, or transmit GIS data or any products incorporating the GIS data except in compliance with U.S. export regulations. If requested by DOE/NREL, the User agrees to sign written assurances and other export-related documentation as may be required to comply with U.S. export regulations.

224

University of North Carolina at Charlotte Design and Construction Manual Section 3, Annex B Construction Waste Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

does not include burning, incinerating, or thermally destroying waste. Can be conducted on-site (as ­ Construction Waste Management ANNEX B WASTE REDUCTION & RECYCLING GUIDELINES #12;University of North Carolina at Charlotte Design and Construction Manual Section 3, Annex B ­ Construction Waste Management WASTE REDUCTION

Xie,Jiang (Linda)

225

Eects of convection instability due to incompatibility between ocean dynamics and surface forcings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- bility between a surface temperature climatology and a given ocean model, into which the climatology by thermal and wind forcing only. Initially, the temperature climatology is forcefully assimilated climatology. In areas characterized by sharp oceanic fronts and high convective activity, the OGCM, due

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

226

Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc.'s Recent OTEC Activities at NELHA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc.'s Recent OTEC Activities at NELHA Duke Hartman Vice President of the company and provide some details about one current project: Makai's OTEC demonstration plant, and operator of an Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plant and heat exchanger test facility at NELHA

Frandsen, Jannette B.

227

Improved irradiances for use in ocean heating, primary production, and photo-oxidation calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

computed by a radiative transfer code that can be used to convert above-surface values in either energy- plankton affect upper-ocean thermal structure via absorption of solar irradiance at visible wavelengthsImproved irradiances for use in ocean heating, primary production, and photo-oxidation calculations

Boss, Emmanuel S.

228

The Effects Of High Pressure-High Temperature On Some Physical Properties Of Ocean Sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A series of laboratory experiments was conducted with four ocean sediments, two biogenic oozes and two clays. Permeability and thermal conductivity were directly measured as a function of porosity and the testing program ...

Morin, Roger

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Zonal displacement of western Pacific warm pool and zonal wind anomaly over the Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The thermal condition anomaly of the western Pacific warm pool and its zonal displacement have ... impact of the zonal wind anomaly over the Pacific Ocean on zonal displacement of the warm pool ... to the zonal w...

Qilong Zhang ???; Qinghua Zhang ???…

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Solar thermal power generation: a bibliography with abstracts. Quarterly update, October-December 1979  

SciTech Connect

This annotated bibliography contains the following subjects: energy overviews, solar overviews, energy conservation, economics and law, solar thermal power, thermionic and thermoelectric, ocean thermal energy conversion, biomass and photochemical energy, and large-scale photovoltaics. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Technical and economic feasibility of a Thermal Gradient Utilization Cycle (TGUC) power plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

has grown in energy technologies that use renewable resources such as solar (thermal conversion, ocean thermal energy conversion, photovoltaics, wind and biomass conversion), geothermal and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) . A new concept that can...

Raiji, Ashok

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Infrasonic ambient ocean noise: Northeast Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements of ocean ambient noise were made at three widely separated deep?water bottom locations in the N. E. Pacific at eight frequencies in the range from 2.5–20.0 Hz for 40 consecutive days. Concurrent data on wind speed and wave height were collected. Analysis indicates that the spectrum level of infrasonicnoise is linearly related to the log of the wind speed above a threshold level. There is evidence that the noise can be directly associated with the wind rather than through the surface waves it produces. [Work supported by ONR.

Rudolph H. Nichols

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Incursion of the Pacific Ocean Water into the Indian Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using the data collected during the International Indian Ocean Expedition, maps showing the distribution of depth ... became clear that low-salinity water from the Pacific intrudes into the western Indian Ocean t...

G S Sharma; A D Gouveia…

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Ocean energy conversion systems annual research report  

SciTech Connect

Alternative power cycle concepts to the closed-cycle Rankine are evaluated and those that show potential for delivering power in a cost-effective and environmentally acceptable fashion are explored. Concepts are classified according to the ocean energy resource: thermal, waves, currents, and salinity gradient. Research projects have been funded and reported in each of these areas. The lift of seawater entrained in a vertical steam flow can provide potential energy for a conventional hydraulic turbine conversion system. Quantification of the process and assessment of potential costs must be completed to support concept evaluation. Exploratory development is being completed in thermoelectricity and 2-phase nozzles for other thermal concepts. Wave energy concepts are being evaluated by analysis and model testing with present emphasis on pneumatic turbines and wave focussing. Likewise, several conversion approaches to ocean current energy are being evaluated. The use of salinity resources requires further research in membranes or the development of membraneless processes. Using the thermal resource in a Claude cycle process as a power converter is promising, and a program of R and D and subsystem development has been initiated to provide confirmation of the preliminary conclusion.

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment waste characterization Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 > >> 41 Composition of Municipal Solid Waste-Need for Thermal Treatment in the present Indian context Summary: of estimating heat value of municipal wastes, from the view point...

236

Waste Hoist  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Primary Hoist: 45-ton Rope-Guide Friction Hoist Completely enclosed (for contamination control), the waste hoist at WIPP is a modern friction hoist with rope guides. With a 45-ton...

237

Nuclear Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear waste is radioactive material no longer considered valuable...238U, 235U, and 226Ra (where the latter decays to 222Rn gas by emitting an alpha particle) or formed through fission of fissile radioisotopes ...

Rob P. Rechard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Thermal plasmonic interconnects in graphene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As one emerging plasmonic material, graphene can support surface plasmons at infrared and terahertz frequencies with unprecedented properties due to the strong interactions between graphene and low-frequency photons. Since graphene surface plasmons exist in the infrared and terahertz regime, they can be thermally pumped (excited) by the infrared evanescent waves emitted from an object. Here we show that thermal graphene plasmons can be efficiently excited and have monochromatic and tunable spectra, thus paving a way to harness thermal energy for graphene plasmonic devices. We further demonstrate that “thermal information communication” via graphene surface plasmons can be potentially realized by effectively harnessing thermal energy from various heat sources, e.g., the waste heat dissipated from nanoelectronic devices. These findings open up an avenue of thermal plasmonics based on graphene for different applications ranging from infrared emission control, to information processing and communication, to energy harvesting.

Baoan Liu; Yongmin Liu; Sheng Shen

2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

239

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980  

SciTech Connect

The status of the following programs is reported: high-level waste immobilization; alternative waste forms; Nuclear Waste Materials Characterization Center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton solidification; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; mobility of organic complexes of fission products in soils; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology; systems study on engineered barriers; criteria for defining waste isolation; spent fuel and fuel pool component integrity program; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; and development of backfill material.

Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Ocean Circulation Lynne D Talley  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the topography, with low pressure in the center. Ocean currents transport heat from the tropics to the poles have gone to sea. As knowledge about ocean currents and capabilities to observe it below the surfaceOcean Circulation Lynne D Talley Volume 1, The Earth system: physical and chemical dimensions

Talley, Lynne D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource! energy forum Case Studies from Estonia, Switzerland, Germany Bossart,· ABB Waste-to-Energy Plants Edmund Fleck,· ESWET Marcel van Berlo,· Afval Energie Bedrijf From Waste to Energy To Energy from Waste #12;9.00-9.30: Registration 9.30-9.40: Chairman Ella Stengler opens

Columbia University

242

Integrated municipal solid waste scenario model using advanced pretreatment and waste to energy processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper an Integrated Municipal Solid Waste scenario model (IMSW-SM) with a potential practical application in the waste management sector is analyzed. The model takes into account quantification and characterization of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) streams from different sources, selective collection (SC), advanced mechanical sorting, material recovery and advanced thermal treatment. The paper provides a unique chain of advanced waste pretreatment stages of fully commingled waste streams, leading to an original set of suggestions and future contributions to a sustainable IMSWS, taking into account real data and EU principles. The selection of the input data was made on MSW management real case studies from two European regions. Four scenarios were developed varying mainly SC strategies and thermal treatment options. The results offer useful directions for decision makers in order to calibrate modern strategies in different realities.

Gabriela Ionescu; Elena Cristina Rada; Marco Ragazzi; Cosmin M?rculescu; Adrian Badea; Tiberiu Apostol

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Why Sequence Subarctic Pacific Ocean?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequence Subarctic Pacific Ocean? Sequence Subarctic Pacific Ocean? The subarctic Pacific Ocean is one of the areas considered particularly vulnerable to acidification, which could affect the ocean's ability to act as a carbon sink. Global warming affects the food webs and biodiversity in marine ecosystems, especially in regions known as oxygen minimum zones where key components of the global carbon cycle take place. Oxygen minimum zones are found between 200 and 1,000 meters below sea level in the subarctic Pacific, the eastern South Pacific Ocean, the northern parts of the Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea, and off southwestern Africa. As global warming continues, researchers believe the oxygen levels in the oceans will decrease, a change that will extend the boundaries of the oxygen minimum

244

8.01 - Generating Electrical Power from Ocean Resources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Ocean energy resources derived from wind, waves, tidal or marine currents can be utilized and converted to large scale sustainable electrical power. Conversion technologies are easily adaptable and can be integrated within the current utility infrastructure. However, ocean energy has many forms - tides, surface waves, ocean circulation, salinity, and thermal gradients. The focus of this chapter is dedicated to two of these, namely waves and tidal energy. The first are the result of wind-driven waves derived ultimately from solar energy and the latter represents those found in tidal or marine currents, driven by gravitational effects. This chapter also gives an analysis of the current state of art of generating electricity from wave and tidal currents (termed ocean energy). Section 8.01.1 provides an overview of ocean wave and marine current energy conversion with more emphasis on the latter; Sections 8.01.2, 8.01.3, 8.01.4, and 8.01.5 address respectively the history of wave energy, wave resource assessment, wave device development, and air turbines; and Section 8.01.6 gives a review of the economics of ocean energy as applied to wave and tidal energy conversion technologies.

A.S. Bahaj

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Waste Disposal (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article lays an outline of waste disposal regulations, permits and fees, hazardous waste management and underground storage tank requirements.

246

Neutron sources and transmutation of nuclear waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Intense neutron sources with different energy spectra are of interest for a variety of applications. In my presentation, after briefly touching on the situation of radioactive waste in Italy, I will try to give a broad picture of Italian existing or proposed neutron sources based on accelerators, ranging from thermal to fast neutrons. I will also describe a specific project for a low-power ADS, aimed at studying neutron spectra as well as at demonstrating incineration and transmutation of nuclear waste.

M. Ripani

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

List of Municipal Solid Waste Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste Incentives Waste Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 172 Municipal Solid Waste Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 172) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Advanced Clean Energy Project Grants (Texas) State Grant Program Texas Commercial Industrial Utility Biomass Municipal Solid Waste No Advanced Energy Fund (Ohio) Public Benefits Fund Ohio Commercial Industrial Institutional Residential Utility Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Fuel Cells Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Electric Hydroelectric energy Landfill Gas Microturbines Municipal Solid Waste Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes Alternative Energy Law (AEL) (Iowa) Renewables Portfolio Standard Iowa Investor-Owned Utility Anaerobic Digestion

248

Satellite-based assessment of cloud-free net radiative effect of dust aerosols over the Atlantic Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) data from the Terra satellite over the Atlantic Ocean [10W­60W, 0 Ocean Sundar A. Christopher1 and Thomas Jones1 Received 7 August 2006; revised 8 November 2006; accepted effect (+1.44 ± 0.57 Wm�2 ) indicating the importance of the dust aerosols in the thermal portion

Christopher, Sundar A.

249

Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pacific Oceans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .currents in the tropical Pacific Ocean. J. Phys. Oceanogr. ,in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean associated with the

Drushka, Kyla

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Analysis Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Analysis A disposal concept consists of three parts: waste inventory (7 waste types examined), geologic setting (e.g., clay/shale, salt, crystalline, other sedimentary), and the engineering concept of operations (range of generic operational concepts examined). Two major categories for waste package emplacement modes are identified: 1) "open" where extended ventilation can remove heat for many years following waste emplacement underground; and 2) "enclosed" modes for clay/shale and salt media where waste packages are emplaced in direct or close contact with natural or engineered materials which may have temperature limits that constrain thermal

251

Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Analysis Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Analysis A disposal concept consists of three parts: waste inventory (7 waste types examined), geologic setting (e.g., clay/shale, salt, crystalline, other sedimentary), and the engineering concept of operations (range of generic operational concepts examined). Two major categories for waste package emplacement modes are identified: 1) "open" where extended ventilation can remove heat for many years following waste emplacement underground; and 2) "enclosed" modes for clay/shale and salt media where waste packages are emplaced in direct or close contact with natural or engineered materials which may have temperature limits that constrain thermal

252

Spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics  

SciTech Connect

Current inventories and characteristics of commercial spent fuels and both commercial and US Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive wastes were compiled through December 31, 1983, based on the most reliable information available from government sources and the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. Future waste and spent fuel to be generated over the next 37 years and characteristics of these materials are also presented, consistent with the latest DOE/Energy Information Administration (EIA) or projection of US commercial nuclear power growth and expected defense-related and private industrial and institutional activities. Materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are: spent fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, airborne waste, remedial action waste, and decommissioning waste. For each category, current and projected inventories are given through the year 2020, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated, based on reported or calculated isotopic compositions. 48 figures, 107 tables.

Not Available

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility Full Document and Summary Versions...

254

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE January 2010 Prepared for the Interagency left intentionally blank.] #12;Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy PNNL-SA-69994 under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Waste Disposal Workshops: Anthrax-Contaminated Waste AM Lesperance JF Upton SL

255

ARM - Lesson Plans: Ocean Currents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Currents Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global...

256

Waste Processing | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Processing Waste Processing Workers process and repackage waste at the Transuranic Waste Processing Centers Cask Processing Enclosure. Workers process and repackage waste at...

257

Waste Hoist  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Primary Hoist: 45-ton Rope-Guide Friction Hoist Largest friction hoist in the world when it was built in 1985 Completely enclosed (for contamination control), the waste hoist at WIPP is a modern friction hoist with rope guides (uses a balanced counterweight and tail ropes). With a 45-ton capacity, it was the largest friction hoist in the world when it was built in 1986. Hoist deck footprint: 2.87m wide x 4.67m long Hoist deck height: 2.87m wide x 7.46m high Access height to the waste hoist deck is limited by a high-bay door at 4.14m high Nominal configuration is 2-cage (over/under), with bottom (equipment) cage interior height of 4.52m The photo, at left, shows the 4.14m high-bay doors at the top collar of the waste hoist shaft. The perpendicular cross section of the opening is 3.5m x 4.14m, but the bottom cage cross section is 2.87m x 4.5m (and 4.67m into the plane of the photo).

258

Immobilization of fission products in phosphate ceramic waste forms  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing chemically bonded phosphate ceramics (CBPCs) to treat low-level mixed wastes, particularly those containing volatiles and pyrophorics that cannot be treated by conventional thermal processes. This work was begun under ANL`s Laboratory Directed Research and Development funds, followed by further development with support from EM-50`s Mixed Waste Focus Area.

Singh, D.; Wagh, A.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Geoengineering Downwelling Ocean Currents: A Cost Assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Downwelling ocean currents carry carbon into the deep ocean (the solubility pump), and play a ... weakening of the NADW is modification of downwelling ocean currents, by an increase in carbon concentration or ......

S. Zhou; P. C. Flynn

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Legal Implications of CO2 Ocean Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, ocean currents may prevent stagnation or accumulatioLegal Implications of CO2 Ocean Storage Jason Heinrich Working Paper Laboratory for Energy #12;Introduction Ocean sequestration of CO2, a potentially significant technique to be used

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Ocean currents help explain population genetic structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...original work is properly cited. Ocean currents help explain population genetic...larval dispersal estimates based on ocean current observations, we demonstrate...Data-assimilated models of ocean currents for the study region were produced...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Configuration of a Southern Ocean Storm Track  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diagnostics of ocean variability that reflect and influence local transport properties of heat and chemical species vary by an order of magnitude along the Southern Ocean’s Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). Topographic “hotspots” are important ...

Tobias Bischoff; Andrew F. Thompson

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Pelagic Polychaetes of the Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polyc'kaetes of the Pacific Ocean CLAPARtDE,E. 1868. LesPolyc'haetes of the Pacific Ocean KINBERG, J. G. H. 1866.Polyc'kaetes of the Pacific Ocean TREADWELL, A. L. 1906.

Dales, K Phillips

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

The Plastic Ocean Michael Gonsior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Plastic Ocean Michael Gonsior Bonnie Monteleone, William Cooper, Jennifer O'Keefe, Pamela Seaton, and Maureen Conte #12;#12;#12;Plastic does not biodegrade it photo-degrades breaking down is the plastic cheese wrap? Unfortunately, marine creatures mistake plastics in the ocean for food #12

Boynton, Walter R.

265

GENERATING ELECTRICITY USING OCEAN WAVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GENERATING ELECTRICITY USING OCEAN WAVES A RENEWABLE SOURCE OF ENERGY REPORT FOR THE HONG KONG ELECTRIC COMPANY LIMITED Dr L F Yeung Mr Paul Hodgson Dr Robin Bradbeer July 2007 #12;Ocean Waves and construction of equipment that could measure and log wave conditions and tide levels at Hoi Ha Wan. Prototypes

Bradbeer, Robin Sarah

266

Disposal of Rocky Flats residues as waste  

SciTech Connect

Work is underway at the Rocky Flats Plant to evaluate alternatives for the removal of a large inventory of plutonium-contaminated residues from the plant. One alternative under consideration is to package the residues as transuranic wastes for ultimate shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Current waste acceptance criteria and transportation regulations require that approximately 1000 cubic yards of residues be repackaged to produce over 20,000 cubic yards of WIPP certified waste. The major regulatory drivers leading to this increase in waste volume are the fissile gram equivalent, surface radiation dose rate, and thermal power limits. In the interest of waste minimization, analyses have been conducted to determine, for each residue type, the controlling criterion leading to the volume increase, the impact of relaxing that criterion on subsequent waste volume, and the means by which rules changes may be implemented. The results of this study have identified the most appropriate changes to be proposed in regulatory requirements in order to minimize the costs of disposing of Rocky Flats residues as transuranic wastes.

Dustin, D.F.; Sendelweck, V.S. [EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Plant; Rivera, M.A. [Lamb Associates, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Disposal of Rocky Flats residues as waste  

SciTech Connect

Work is underway at the Rocky Flats Plant to evaluate alternatives for the removal of a large inventory of plutonium-contaminated residues from the plant. One alternative under consideration is to package the residues as transuranic wastes for ultimate shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Current waste acceptance criteria and transportation regulations require that approximately 1000 cubic yards of residues be repackaged to produce over 20,000 cubic yards of WIPP certified waste. The major regulatory drivers leading to this increase in waste volume are the fissile gram equivalent, surface radiation dose rate, and thermal power limits. In the interest of waste minimization, analyses have been conducted to determine, for each residue type, the controlling criterion leading to the volume increase, the impact of relaxing that criterion on subsequent waste volume, and the means by which rules changes may be implemented. The results of this study have identified the most appropriate changes to be proposed in regulatory requirements in order to minimize the costs of disposing of Rocky Flats residues as transuranic wastes.

Dustin, D.F.; Sendelweck, V.S. (EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Plant); Rivera, M.A. (Lamb Associates, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Ocean Navitas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Navitas Navitas Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean Navitas Address Nursery House Place United Kingdom Zip DN21 5BQ Sector Ocean Product Ocean Navitas was incorporated in May 2006 by experienced engineers, businessmen and sailing enthusiasts David Hunt, James McCague and Simon Condry. Website http://www.oceannavitas.com Region United Kingdom References Ocean NavitasUNIQ75db538f85b32404-ref-000014E2-QINU LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Ocean Navitas NaREC This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: Aegir Dynamo This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it.

269

Ocean - FAQ | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FAQ FAQ Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean Frequently Asked Questions Following are some Frequently Asked Questions, we hope to add to this list as we hear from you. Questions What is Ocean.data.gov? How can I use this resource? What data can I expect to find here? Where do these data come from? Can data from State and academic sources be included in this portal? Who can suggest data and information to be included in Ocean.data.gov? Who decides what data are included? How do I get involved? How does this differ from other data efforts such as regional data portals? Where do I find information about data standards, metadata standards, and formats? Can we provide feedback about a particular dataset?

270

Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat flux, and wind power input to the ocean. Geophys. Res.Powers and Stoelinga (2000). They developed a comprehensive atmosphere-ocean-

Seo, Hyodae

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat flux, and wind power input to the ocean. Geophys. Res.Powers and Stoelinga (2000). They developed a comprehensive atmosphere-ocean-

Seo, Hyodae

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Aspects of modeling the North Pacific Ocean.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Three aspects of the problem of modeling North Pacific Ocean climate are investigated: the effect of viscosity on effective model resolution, the effect of ocean… (more)

Dawe, Jordan Tyler

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

ELLEFSON, M.D.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Herzig, P.M., Humphris, S.E., Miller, D.J., and Zierenberg, R.A. (Eds.), 1998 Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Scientific Results, Vol. 158  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and related hydrothermal processes (RIDGE, 1992; Ocean Drilling Program [ODP], 1996). Conduction through of the Ocean Drilling Program, Scientific Results, Vol. 158 329 24. THERMAL PROPERTIES OF TAG HYDROTHERMAL hydrothermal field, located in the rift valley of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 26°N, 45°W. Thermal conductivity

275

Technologies for environmental cleanup: Toxic and hazardous waste management  

SciTech Connect

This is the second in a series of EUROCOURSES conducted under the title, ``Technologies for Environmental Cleanup.`` To date, the series consist of the following courses: 1992, soils and groundwater; 1993, Toxic and Hazardous Waste Management. The 1993 course focuses on recent technological developments in the United States and Europe in the areas of waste management policies and regulations, characterization and monitoring of waste, waste minimization and recycling strategies, thermal treatment technologies, photolytic degradation processes, bioremediation processes, medical waste treatment, waste stabilization processes, catalytic organic destruction technologies, risk analyses, and data bases and information networks. It is intended that this course ill serve as a resource of state-of-the-art technologies and methodologies for the environmental protection manager involved in decisions concerning the management of toxic and hazardous waste.

Ragaini, R.C.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Radioactive Waste Management (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section regulates the transportation and disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Minnesota, and establishes a Nuclear Waste Council to monitor the federal high-level radioactive waste...

277

Radioactive Waste Management  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish policies and guidelines by which the Department of Energy (DOE) manages tis radioactive waste, waste byproducts, and radioactively contaminated surplus facilities.

1984-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

278

Transuranic Waste Requirements  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The guide provides criteria for determining if a waste is to be managed in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter III, Transuranic Waste Requirements.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

279

Waste?to?Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Waste?to?Energy Roadmapping Workshop Waste?to?Energy Presentation by Jonathan Male, Director of the Bioenery Technolgies Office, Department of Energy

280

Nuclear Waste Disposal: Amounts of Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The term nuclear waste...embraces all residues from the use of radioactive materials, including uses in medicine and industry. The most highly radioactive of these are the spent fuel or reprocessed wastes from co...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

WasteTraining Booklet Waste & Recycling Impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WasteTraining Booklet #12;Waste & Recycling Impacts Environment: The majority of our municipal jobs while recycling 10,000 tons of waste creates 36 jobs. Environment: Recycling conserves resources. It takes 95% less energy to make aluminum from recycled aluminum than from virgin materials, 60% less

Saldin, Dilano

282

A REVIEW OF GLOBAL OCEAN TEMPERATURE OBSERVATIONS: IMPLICATIONS FOR OCEAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by taking an inventory of changes in energy storage. The main storage is in the ocean, the latest values, Energy Sustainable Economic, Earth's energy imbalance, and thermosteric sea level rise. Up-to-date estimates are provided

283

composition of putative oceans on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Results: Oceanic water composition · Oceanic water is a NaCl-CaCl2 solution · Large Cl mass · Cl in a "soda ocean" Temperature, o C 100 200 300 400 500 Concentration,mole/kgH2O 0.01 0.1 1 Cl- CaCl2 CaCl+ Na calcite · Quartz · Na-K feldspars · Anhydrite · Pyrite · Hematite/magnetite · Evaporites: NaCl+CaCl2 350o

Treiman, Allan H.

284

Melter development needs assessment for RWMC buried wastes  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a survey and initial assessment of the existing state-of-the-art melter technology necessary to thermally treat (stabilize) buried TRU waste, by producing a highly leach resistant glass/ceramic waste form suitable for final disposal. Buried mixed transuranic (TRU) waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) represents an environmental hazard requiring remediation. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) placed the INEL on the National Priorities List in 1989. Remediation of the buried TRU-contaminated waste via the CERCLA decision process is required to remove INEL from the National Priorities List. A Waste Technology Development (WTD) Preliminary Systems Design and Thermal Technologies Screening Study identified joule-heated and plasma-heated melters as the most probable thermal systems technologies capable of melting the INEL soil and waste to produce the desired final waste form (Iron-Enriched Basalt (IEB) glass/ceramic). The work reported herein then surveys the state of existing melter technology and assesses it within the context of processing INEL buried TRU wastes and contaminated soils. Necessary technology development work is recommended.

Donaldson, A.D.; Carpenedo, R.J.; Anderson, G.L.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Melter development needs assessment for RWMC buried wastes  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a survey and initial assessment of the existing state-of-the-art melter technology necessary to thermally treat (stabilize) buried TRU waste, by producing a highly leach resistant glass/ceramic waste form suitable for final disposal. Buried mixed transuranic (TRU) waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) represents an environmental hazard requiring remediation. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) placed the INEL on the National Priorities List in 1989. Remediation of the buried TRU-contaminated waste via the CERCLA decision process is required to remove INEL from the National Priorities List. A Waste Technology Development (WTD) Preliminary Systems Design and Thermal Technologies Screening Study identified joule-heated and plasma-heated melters as the most probable thermal systems technologies capable of melting the INEL soil and waste to produce the desired final waste form [Iron-Enriched Basalt (IEB) glass/ceramic]. The work reported herein then surveys the state of existing melter technology and assesses it within the context of processing INEL buried TRU wastes and contaminated soils. Necessary technology development work is recommended.

Donaldson, A.D.; Carpenedo, R.J.; Anderson, G.L.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Modeling Building Thermal Response to HVAC Zoning Virginia Smith  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling Building Thermal Response to HVAC Zoning Virginia Smith Department of Computer Science HVAC systems account for 38% of building energy usage. Studies have indicated at least 5-15% waste due to unoccu- pied spaces being conditioned. Our goal is to minimize this waste by retrofitting HVAC systems

Whitehouse, Kamin

287

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1979, Rosslyn, VA. U.S. Dept. of Energy and Argonne NationalLaboratory, Argonne, IL. ANL/OTEC- BCM-002. Bretschneider,Environmental Systems Division, Argonne National Laboratory.

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stored on the platform and these two chemicals will explodeChemical Categories Nutrients Dissolved Oxygen Biological Categories Phyto- plankton Zooplankton lchthyo- plankton Micro- nekton Nekton Hammals, Birds Benthos Issue Platform

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stored on the platform and these two chemicals will explodeplatform continuously releases chlorine along with its discharge waters at a concentration of 0.1 mg liter . Chemical

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stored on the platform and these two chemicals explode whenhandling chemical contaminants on OTEC platforms. The Coastof chemicals or processes used on OTEC platforms, there is a

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Division of Central Solar Technology, U.s. Dept. of Energy.Div. of Central Solar Technology. U.S. Dept. of Energy.Division of Central Solar Technology, u.s. Dept. of Energy.

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Div. of Central Solar Technology. U.S. Dept. of Energy.Division of Central Solar Technology. , U.S. Dept. ofDivision of Central Solar Technology. USDOE paper 7D-3/1.

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Div. of Central Solar Technology. U.S. Dept. of Energy.Division of Central Solar Technology, U.S. Dept. of Energy.Division of Central Solar Technology, U.S. Dept. of Energy.

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

delivered to the local power grid either directly (for Land-Oahu, Hawaii) • • • • Electrical Power Grid for Oahu,Hawaii Electrical Power Grid for Key West, Florida ••

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oahu, Hawaii) • . • • . Electrical Power Grid for Oahu,Hawaii • • • Electrical Power Grid for Key West,Florida • • . • . . Electrical Power Grid for Puerto

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) safety, and the Coast Guard covers mar1ne covers some offshore

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

This programmatic environmental analysis is an initial assessment of OTEC technology considering development, demonstration and commercialization; it is concluded that the OTEC development program should continue because the development, demonstration, and commercialization on a single-plant deployment basis should not present significant environmental impacts. However, several areas within the OTEC program require further investigation in order to assess the potential for environmental impacts from OTEC operation, particularly in large-scale deployments and in defining alternatives to closed-cycle biofouling control: (1) Larger-scale deployments of OTEC clusters or parks require further investigations in order to assess optimal platform siting distances necessary to minimize adverse environmental impacts. (2) The deployment and operation of the preoperational platform (OTEC-1) and future demonstration platforms must be carefully monitored to refine environmental assessment predictions, and to provide design modifications which may mitigate or reduce environmental impacts for larger-scale operations. These platforms will provide a valuable opportunity to fully evaluate the intake and discharge configurations, biofouling control methods, and both short-term and long-term environmental effects associated with platform operations. (3) Successful development of OTEC technology to use the maximal resource capabilities and to minimize environmental effects will require a concerted environmental management program, encompassing many different disciplines and environmental specialties.

Sands, M. D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mexico. Energy Research and Development Administration, Division of SolarMexico. Energy Research and Development Administration, Division of Solar

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

50 ing a turning basin in the bight. (See Notice to Marinersbasin to a basin in the SW part of the bight. In 1972. theturning basin just in- side the entrance of Garrison Bight.

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

upper turning basin off Key West Bight, and then 12 feet toso ing a turnmg basin in the bight. (See Nutice to :V1annersbasin to a basin in the SW part of the bight. ln 197 2. the

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

la. Supplies and repairs. - Bunker C. die-,el oib. and wateragricultur- Supplies. -No bunkers are available; in emergen·3, Vessel Arrival In- cies bunkers and lube oils may be

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

de Ratones. Supplies. -No bunkers are available; in emergen-and agricultur· cies bunkers and lube oils may be deliveredr'..:w h'>urs. Fr..:shwater. bunker C otl. and dtesd oil are

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aspects of siting OTEC plants offshore the United States ongas. phosgene Offshore ammonia plant-ships will presentan facility offshore may expose the plant to power outages

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fossil-fuel intake canals for withdrawing marine waters;Some marine supplies and water are available. Bunker fuels.marine ecosystem effects caused by Pilot Plant operation are associated with the seawater discharge and approximately fossil-fuel

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel or nuclear-powered plants use intake canals for withdrawing marineSome marine supplies and water are available. Uunker fuels.marine supplies are available at Key West. Gasoline and diesel fuel

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

seawater. produce can be generated electrolytically Producing chlorine on an OTEC plant eliminates storage

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity - Hawaii is almost totally dependent upon imported petroleum A natural energy source of geothermal

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W of Fort Taylor. the flood (NNE) and the ebb (SSW) currentswas available in the Largo; it floods S and ebbs NW. Islacurrents u: ~1aunalua Bav flood W and ebb E: slack watci'

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reported that a tidal current floods W and ebbs E along thethe authority for navigation, flood control, and productionW of Fort Taylor, the flood (NNE) and the ebb (SSW) currents

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ECONOMIC ISSUES Baseload Electricity Baseload electricity production in the Gulf Coast States relies primarily on oil, natural gas, and coal.

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

312

Heat Content Changes in the Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat Content Changes in the Pacific Ocean The Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Cli- mate (ATOC assimilating ocean observations and changes expected from surface heat fluxes as measured by the daily National are a result of advection of heat by ocean currents. We calculate that the most likely cause of the discrepancy

Frandsen, Jannette B.

313

Waste Acceptance Testing of Secondary Waste Forms: Cast Stone, Ceramicrete and DuraLith  

SciTech Connect

To support the selection of a waste form for the liquid secondary wastes from WTP, Washington River Protection Solutions has initiated secondary-waste-form testing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In anticipation of a down-selection process for a waste form for the Solidification Treatment Unit to be added to the ETF, PNNL is conducting tests on four candidate waste forms to evaluate their ability to meet potential waste acceptance criteria for immobilized secondary wastes that would be placed in the IDF. All three waste forms demonstrated compressive strengths above the minimum 3.45 MPa (500 psi) set as a target for cement-based waste forms. Further, none of the waste forms showed any significant degradation in compressive strength after undergoing thermal cycling (30 cycles in a 10 day period) between -40 C and 60 C or water immersion for 90 days. The three leach test methods are intended to measure the diffusion rates of contaminants from the waste forms. Results are reported in terms of diffusion coefficients and a leachability index (LI) calculated based on the diffusion coefficients. A smaller diffusion coefficient and a larger LI are desired. The NRC, in its Waste Form Technical Position (NRC 1991), provides recommendations and guidance regarding methods to demonstrate waste stability for land disposal of radioactive waste. Included is a recommendation to conduct leach tests using the ANS 16.1 method. The resulting leachability index (LI) should be greater than 6.0. For Hanford secondary wastes, the LI > 6.0 criterion applies to sodium leached from the waste form. For technetium and iodine, higher targets of LI > 9 for Tc and LI > 11 for iodine have been set based on early waste-disposal risk and performance assessment analyses. The results of these three leach tests conducted for a total time between 11days (ASTM C1308) to 90 days (ANS 16.1) showed: (1) Technetium diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that all the waste forms had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium; (2) Rhenium diffusivity: Cast Stone 2M specimens, when tested using EPA 1315 protocol, had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium based on rhenium as a surrogate for technetium. All other waste forms tested by ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 test methods had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 9 for Tc based on rhenium release. These studies indicated that use of Re(VII) as a surrogate for 99Tc(VII) in low temperature secondary waste forms containing reductants will provide overestimated diffusivity values for 99Tc. Therefore, it is not appropriate to use Re as a surrogate 99Tc in future low temperature waste form studies. (3) Iodine diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that the three waste forms had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 11 for iodine. Therefore, it may be necessary to use a more effective sequestering material than silver zeolite used in two of the waste forms (Ceramicrete and DuraLith); (4) Sodium diffusivity: All the waste form specimens tested by the three leach methods (ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315) exceeded the target LI value of 6; (5) All three leach methods (ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308 and EPA 1315) provided similar 99Tc diffusivity values for both short-time transient diffusivity effects as well as long-term ({approx}90 days) steady diffusivity from each of the three tested waste forms (Cast Stone 2M, Ceramicrete and DuraLith). Therefore, any one of the three methods can be used to determine the contaminant diffusivities from a selected waste form.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Lindberg, Michael J.; Parker, Kent E.

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

314

Ocean Sci., 3, 417427, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/417/2007/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deacon Cell. When the ocean currents are averaged zon- ally to produce a meridional overturningOcean Sci., 3, 417­427, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/417/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Ocean Science On the fast response of the Southern Ocean to changes

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

315

Silicic acid leakage from the Southern Ocean: Opposing effects of nutrient uptake and oceanic circulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the thermocline region of low latitudes. The power of Southern Ocean intermediate waters to affect phytoplanktonSilicic acid leakage from the Southern Ocean: Opposing effects of nutrient uptake and oceanic in formation rate of Southern Ocean intermediate waters. Comparison of d30 Si records from the Southern Ocean

Pahnke, Katharina

316

Modeling Thermal-Hydrologic Processes for a Heated Fractured Rock System: Impact of a Capillary-Pressure Maximum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

drift-scale thermal test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Lawrencemechanical analyses of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test–waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The modeling

Sun, Y.; Buscheck, T. A.; Lee, K. H.; Hao, Y.; James, S. C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Toward Energetically Consistent Ocean Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Possibilities to construct a realistic quasi-global ocean model in Boussinesq approximation with a closed energy cycle are explored in this study. In such a model, the energy related to the mean variables would interact with all parameterized ...

Carsten Eden; Lars Czeschel; Dirk Olbers

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Ocean Currents at Rocas Alijos  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The flow of oceanic water over and around an obstacle such as a seamount or island has the potential to profoundly affect the local biological community (Hamner and Hauri, 1986; Wolanski and Hamner, 1988). If ...

Shirley Vaughan; Ronald K. Skinner; Robert W. Schmieder; Brian McGuire

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Conference on oceans draws Clinton  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Against the tranquil backdrop of Monterey Bay, Calif., President Bill Clinton earlier this month signed a measure extending the U.S. ban on offshore oil drilling, and he proposed several sweeping initiatives to protect, restore, and explore the oceans....

ELIZABETH WILSON

1998-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

320

Pacific Ocean Islands – Editorial Introduction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Islands in the Pacific Ocean are of three kinds (Nunn 2005). ... Most of the islands lie in the SW Pacific, but the Galapagos, Clipperton, and Easter ... Island are volcanic islands rising from the East Pacific R...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Recycling of sodium waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recycling of sodium waste ... Methods for handling and recycling a dangerous and costly chemical. ...

Bettina Hubler-Blank; Michael Witt; Herbert W. Roesky

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source special nuclear and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this document. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge. This document has been revised to meet the interim status waste analysis plan requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173 303-300(5). When the final status permit is issued, permit conditions will be incorporated and this document will be revised accordingly.

ELLEFSON, M.D.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

323

Some aspects of low-level radioactive-waste disposal in the US  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the NRC supported Shallow Land Burial research program at Brookhaven National Laboraotry and its relationship to the proposed revised ruling on disposal of low level radioactive waste, 10 CFR Part 61. Section of the proposed regulation, which establish the new low level waste classification system and the performance objective placed on waste form, are described briefly. The report also summarizes the preliminary results obtained from the EPA program in which low level waste drums were retrieved from the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans.

Schweitzer, D.G.; Davis, R.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

DSM Will Acquire Ocean Nutrition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

DSM Will Acquire Ocean Nutrition ... Dutch chemical maker DSM will spend about $530 million to acquire Ocean Nutrition Canada, which calls itself the world’s largest supplier of omega-3 fatty acids to the dietary supplement and food manufacturing markets. ... DSM says the acquisition is the fifth purchase it has made in the nutrition field since September 2010, when it announced a corporate strategy to expand in the health, nutrition, and industrial materials markets. ...

MICHAEL MCCOY

2012-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

325

Infectious waste feed system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An infectious waste feed system for comminuting infectious waste and feeding the comminuted waste to a combustor automatically without the need for human intervention. The system includes a receptacle for accepting waste materials. Preferably, the receptacle includes a first and second compartment and a means for sealing the first and second compartments from the atmosphere. A shredder is disposed to comminute waste materials accepted in the receptacle to a predetermined size. A trough is disposed to receive the comminuted waste materials from the shredder. A feeding means is disposed within the trough and is movable in a first and second direction for feeding the comminuted waste materials to a combustor.

Coulthard, E. James (York, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

7-122 A solar pond power plant operates by absorbing heat from the hot region near the bottom, and rejecting waste heat to the cold region near the top. The maximum thermal efficiency that the power plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

calculated above. 7-123 A Carnot heat engine cycle is executed in a closed system with a fixed mass of steam can have is to be determined. Analysis The highest thermal efficiency a heat engine operating between transfer. Therefore, the maximum efficiency of the actual heat engine will be lower than the value

Bahrami, Majid

327

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

328

ARM - Field Campaign - Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TDCIMS) Thermal Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TDCIMS) Related Campaigns Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAMAZON 2014) 2014.01.01, Martin, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon: Thermal Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TDCIMS) 2014.01.01 - 2014.10.31 Lead Scientist : Jim Smith Description As part of both GoAmazon2014 IOPs, the Thermal Desorption Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TDCIMS) will perform measurements of the molecular composition of 10-50 nm diameter particles. TDCIMS observations will be used to address two objectives the GoAmazon. For studying the interactions between anthropogenic and biogenic emissions, the TDCIMS will

329

Ocean Barrier Layers’ Effect on Tropical Cyclone Intensification  

SciTech Connect

Improving a tropical cyclone's forecast and mitigating its destructive potential requires knowledge of various environmental factors that influence the cyclone's path and intensity. Herein, using a combination of observations and model simulations, we systematically demonstrate that tropical cyclone intensification is significantly affected by salinity-induced barrier layers, which are 'quasi-permanent' features in the upper tropical oceans. When tropical cyclones pass over regions with barrier layers, the increased stratification and stability within the layer reduce storm-induced vertical mixing and sea surface temperature cooling. This causes an increase in enthalpy flux from the ocean to the atmosphere and, consequently, an intensification of tropical cyclones. On average, the tropical cyclone intensification rate is nearly 50% higher over regions with barrier layers, compared to regions without. Our finding, which underscores the importance of observing not only the upper-ocean thermal structure but also the salinity structure in deep tropical barrier layer regions, may be a key to more skillful predictions of tropical cyclone intensities through improved ocean state estimates and simulations of barrier layer processes. As the hydrological cycle responds to global warming, any associated changes in the barrier layer distribution must be considered in projecting future tropical cyclone activity.

Balaguru, Karthik; Chang, P.; Saravanan, R.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xu, Zhao; Li, M.; Hsieh, J.

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

330

Upper-Ocean Processes under the Stratus Cloud Deck in the Southeast Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The annual mean heat budget of the upper ocean beneath the stratocumulus/stratus cloud deck in the southeast Pacific is estimated using Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) and an eddy-resolving Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM). Both are ...

Yangxing Zheng; George N. Kiladis; Toshiaki Shinoda; E. Joseph Metzger; Harley E. Hurlburt; Jialin Lin; Benjamin S. Giese

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Open ocean DMS air/sea fluxes over the eastern South Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

over the North Pacific Ocean, J. Geophys. Res. - Atmos. ,air/sea fluxes over S. Pacific Ocean References Asher, W.in the equa- torial Pacific Ocean ( 1982 to 1996): Evidence

Marandino, C. A; De Bruyn, W. J; Miller, S. D; Saltzman, E. S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Thermal Processes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Some thermal processes use the energy in various resources, such as natural gas, coal, or biomass, to release hydrogen, which is part of their molecular structure. In other processes, heat, in...

333

Survey of computer codes applicable to waste facility performance evaluations  

SciTech Connect

This study is an effort to review existing information that is useful to develop an integrated model for predicting the performance of a radioactive waste facility. A summary description of 162 computer codes is given. The identified computer programs address the performance of waste packages, waste transport and equilibrium geochemistry, hydrological processes in unsaturated and saturated zones, and general waste facility performance assessment. Some programs also deal with thermal analysis, structural analysis, and special purposes. A number of these computer programs are being used by the US Department of Energy, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and their contractors to analyze various aspects of waste package performance. Fifty-five of these codes were identified as being potentially useful on the analysis of low-level radioactive waste facilities located above the water table. The code summaries include authors, identification data, model types, and pertinent references. 14 refs., 5 tabs.

Alsharif, M.; Pung, D.L.; Rivera, A.L.; Dole, L.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of polymer waste comprising nylon 6 and a polyolefin or mixtures of polyolefins to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents; selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent. 83 figs.

Evans, R.J.; Chum, H.L.

1994-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

335

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of polymer waste comprising nylon 6 and a polyolefin or mixtures of polyolefins to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents; selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent.

Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO); Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Persistent Organic Pollutants in the Equatorial Atmosphere over the Open Indian Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Due to a 30% decline in the power of the air sampler, it was replaced by a 220-V AC H8400TE air sampler with a variable flow rate and a thermally protected motor for onward sample collection. ... Samples collected at Stations S1 and S2 originated from the northern and eastern coastal regions of Australia, but those collected at Station S3 and S5 are oceanic in origin, crossing the open ocean for 5 days prior to sampling. ... Concns. of organochlorines such as hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), DDTs, chlordanes, and PCBs were detd. in the air and surface water from various oceans in 1989-1990, to study their recent distribution and the function of the ocean in the long-range atm. ...

Oliver Wurl; John Robert Potter; Jeffrey Philip Obbard; Caroline Durville

2006-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

337

Study on thermal properties and crystallization behavior of electron beam irradiated ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA)/waste tyre dust (WTD) blends in the presence of polyethylene graft maleic anhydride (PEgMAH)  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this article is to show the effects of the electron beam irradiation dose and presence of a compatibiliser on the thermal properties and crystallinity of EVA/WTD blends. The purpose of applying electron beam radiation with doses range 50 to 200 kGy and adding a compatibiliser was to enhance the compatibility of the studied blends and at the same time to investigate the possibility of using this technique in the process of recycling polymeric materials. As the compatibilisers, the polyethylene grafted maleic anhydride (PEgMAH) was utilized, they were added at the amounts of 1-5 phr respectively. The enhancement of thermal properties was accompanied by the following effects, discussed in this article: i) an irradiated EVA/WTD blend at 200kGy was found to improve the thermal properties of EVA, ii) the addition of PEgMAH in EVA/WTD blends and the subsequent irradiation allowed prevention of degradation mechanism. iii) the ?H{sub f} and crystallinity percentage decrease at higher PEgMAH content.

Ramli, Syuhada; Ahmad, S. H. [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan (Malaysia); Ratnam, C. T. [Radiation Processing Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia), Bangi, 43000 Kajang (Malaysia); Athirah, Nurul [School of Materials and Mineral Resources, USM Engineering Campus (Malaysia)

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

338

Warm Bias and Parameterization of Boundary Upwelling in Ocean Models  

SciTech Connect

It has been demonstrated that Eastern Boundary Currents (EBC) are a baroclinic intensification of the interior circulation of the ocean due to the emergence of mesoscale eddies in response to the sharp buoyancy gradients driven by the wind-stress and the thermal surface forcing. The eddies accomplish the heat and salt transport necessary to insure that the subsurface flow is adiabatic, compensating for the heat and salt transport effected by the mean currents. The EBC thus generated occurs on a cross-shore scale of order 20-100 km, and thus this scale needs to be resolved in climate models in order to capture the meridional transport by the EBC. Our result indicate that changes in the near shore currents on the oceanic eastern boundaries are linked not just to local forcing, such as coastal changes in the winds, but depend on the basin-wide circulation as well.

Cessi, Paola; Wolfe, Christopher

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

339

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant simulated RH TRU waste experiments: Data and interpretation pilot  

SciTech Connect

The simulated, i.e., nonradioactive remote-handled transuranic waste (RH TRU) experiments being conducted underground in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) were emplaced in mid-1986 and have been in heated test operation since 9/23/86. These experiments involve the in situ, waste package performance testing of eight full-size, reference RH TRU containers emplaced in horizontal, unlined test holes in the rock salt ribs (walls) of WIPP Room T. All of the test containers have internal electrical heaters; four of the test emplacements were filled with bentonite and silica sand backfill materials. We designed test conditions to be ``near-reference`` with respect to anticipated thermal outputs of RH TRU canisters and their geometrical spacing or layout in WIPP repository rooms, with RH TRU waste reference conditions current as of the start date of this test program. We also conducted some thermal overtest evaluations. This paper provides a: detailed test overview; comprehensive data update for the first 5 years of test operations; summary of experiment observations; initial data interpretations; and, several status; experimental objectives -- how these tests support WIPP TRU waste acceptance, performance assessment studies, underground operations, and the overall WIPP mission; and, in situ performance evaluations of RH TRU waste package materials plus design details and options. We provide instrument data and results for in situ waste container and borehole temperatures, pressures exerted on test containers through the backfill materials, and vertical and horizontal borehole-closure measurements and rates. The effects of heat on borehole closure, fracturing, and near-field materials (metals, backfills, rock salt, and intruding brine) interactions were closely monitored and are summarized, as are assorted test observations. Predictive 3-dimensional thermal and structural modeling studies of borehole and room closures and temperature fields were also performed.

Molecke, M.A.; Argueello, G.J.; Beraun, R.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities July 24, 2014 9:00AM to 3:30PM EDT U.S....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Continental insulation, mantle cooling, and the surface area of oceans and continents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continental insulation, mantle cooling, and the surface area of oceans and continents A. Lenardica May 2005 Abstract It is generally assumed that continents, acting as thermal insulation above. The theory predicts that parameter regimes exist for which increased continental insulation has no effect

Manga, Michael

342

Physics of Atmospheres and Oceans: Class Question Sheets COMPARATIVE PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is the mass of Jupiter and R its radius. Assuming this is all converted to thermal energy, give a crudePhysics of Atmospheres and Oceans: Class Question Sheets COMPARATIVE PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES PLA.1 for discounting the less popular of these? Show that the energy liberated during the collapse of a sphere of mass

Read, Peter L.

343

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. - Allentown, PA A microbial reverse electrodialysis...

344

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(ex: organic Rankine cycle) High installed KW capital Low temperature waste heat (<100C) is not practicable Further efficiency loss in electrolytic conversion to...

345

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. The purpose of the Manual is to catalog those procedural requirements and existing practices that ensure that all DOE elements and contractors continue to manage DOE's radioactive waste in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety, and the environment. Does not cancel other directives.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

346

Ocean - Tools | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tools Tools Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean Decision-Support Tools (DSTs): Science and information are fundamental to effective marine planning. Marine planning involves inclusive discussion and analyses of the status and potential uses of 3-dimensional areas of coastal, marine and Great Lakes ecosystems (including the water column) and their potential changes over time. Relevant spatial data and derived interpretive and analytical products (i.e. decision-support tools) help inform all phases of the marine planning process. To date, several decision-support tools have been develop to support marine planning efforts. Marine planners should carefully evaluate which tools best apply to their region or specific issue or project. Below is a list of

347

Eco-efficient waste glass recycling: Integrated waste management and green product development through LCA  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new eco-efficient recycling route for post-consumer waste glass was implemented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrated waste management and industrial production are crucial to green products. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most of the waste glass rejects are sent back to the glass industry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recovered co-products give more environmental gains than does avoided landfill. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy intensive recycling must be limited to waste that cannot be closed-loop recycled. - Abstract: As part of the EU Life + NOVEDI project, a new eco-efficient recycling route has been implemented to maximise resources and energy recovery from post-consumer waste glass, through integrated waste management and industrial production. Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been used to identify engineering solutions to sustainability during the development of green building products. The new process and the related LCA are framed within a meaningful case of industrial symbiosis, where multiple waste streams are utilised in a multi-output industrial process. The input is a mix of rejected waste glass from conventional container glass recycling and waste special glass such as monitor glass, bulbs and glass fibres. The green building product is a recycled foam glass (RFG) to be used in high efficiency thermally insulating and lightweight concrete. The environmental gains have been contrasted against induced impacts and improvements have been proposed. Recovered co-products, such as glass fragments/powders, plastics and metals, correspond to environmental gains that are higher than those related to landfill avoidance, whereas the latter is cancelled due to increased transportation distances. In accordance to an eco-efficiency principle, it has been highlighted that recourse to highly energy intensive recycling should be limited to waste that cannot be closed-loop recycled.

Blengini, Gian Andrea, E-mail: blengini@polito.it [DISPEA - Department of Production Systems and Business Economics, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); CNR-IGAG, Institute of Environmental Geology and Geo-Engineering, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Busto, Mirko, E-mail: mirko.busto@polito.it [DISPEA - Department of Production Systems and Business Economics, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Fantoni, Moris, E-mail: moris.fantoni@polito.it [DITAG - Department of Land, Environment and Geo-Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Fino, Debora, E-mail: debora.fino@polito.it [DISMIC - Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is collected by the RSO. 2. Dry radioactive waste must be segregated by isotope. 3. Liquid radioactive waste must be separated by isotope. 4. Liquid frequently and change them if contaminated. 5. Use radioactive waste container to collect the waste. 6. Check

Jia, Songtao

349

CERAMIC WASTE FORM DATA PACKAGE  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this data package is to provide information about simulated crystalline waste forms that can be used to select an appropriate composition for a Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) proof of principle demonstration. Melt processing, viscosity, electrical conductivity, and thermal analysis information was collected to assess the ability of two potential candidate ceramic compositions to be processed in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) CCIM and to guide processing parameters for the CCIM operation. Given uncertainties in the CCIM capabilities to reach certain temperatures throughout the system, one waste form designated 'Fe-MP' was designed towards enabling processing and another, designated 'CAF-5%TM-MP' was designed towards optimized microstructure. Melt processing studies confirmed both compositions could be poured from a crucible at 1600{degrees}C although the CAF-5%TM-MP composition froze before pouring was complete due to rapid crystallization (upon cooling). X-ray diffraction measurements confirmed the crystalline nature and phase assemblages of the compositions. The kinetics of melting and crystallization appeared to vary significantly between the compositions. Impedance spectroscopy results indicated the electrical conductivity is acceptable with respect to processing in the CCIM. The success of processing either ceramic composition will depend on the thermal profiles throughout the CCIM. In particular, the working temperature of the pour spout relative to the bulk melter which can approach 1700{degrees}C. The Fe-MP composition is recommended to demonstrate proof of principle for crystalline simulated waste forms considering the current configuration of INL's CCIM. If proposed modifications to the CCIM can maintain a nominal temperature of 1600{degrees}C throughout the melter, drain, and pour spout, then the CAF-5%TM-MP composition should be considered for a proof of principle demonstration.

Amoroso, J.; Marra, J.

2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

350

Marine disposal of radioactive wastes. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning radioactive waste disposal in seas, oceans, and coastal regions. Models, standards and regulations, government policy, and evaluations are covered. High-level and low-level nuclear wastes from nuclear power plants and ship propulsion reactors are discussed. References cover radionuclide migration, environmental exposure pathway, ecosystems, radiation dosages, carcinogens and neoplasms, and the effects on food chains. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from tank waste. * Decreases the volume of water to create room in double-shell tanks, allowing them to accept waste from noncompliant single- shell tanks. * Treats up to 1...

352

Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

trucks for scale. The DSTs have limited capacity and are aging. Maintaining these tanks is important to ensure that waste is ready to supply the Waste Treatment Plant. The...

353

Hazardous Waste Management (Oklahoma)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article states regulations for the disposal of hazardous waste. It also provides information about permit requirements for the transport, treatment and storage of such waste. It also mentions...

354

Nuclear waste solids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Glass and polycrystalline materials for high-level radioactive waste immobilization are discussed. Borosilicate glass has been selected as the waste form for defence high-level radwaste in the US. Since releas...

L. L. Hench; D. E. Clark; A. B. Harker

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Ocean Color Web | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Color Web Ocean Color Web Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean » Data Ocean Color Web Dataset Summary Description A comprehensive image analysis package for the processing, display, analysis, and quality control of ocean color data. Tags {Ocean,"water color",spectrometer,"sea viewing",MODIS,"marine biology",NASA,GSFC,"Goddard Space Flight Center"} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet Ease of Access 0 No votes yet Dataset Additional Information Last Updated 15-Jan-2010 Publisher National Aeronautics and Space Administration Contact Name Contact Email Gene.C.Feldman@nasa.gov Unique Identifier NASA-1547

356

On Rayleigh Waves Across the Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Articles On Rayleigh Waves Across the Pacific Ocean K. E. Bullen University College, Auckland, N. Z. ON RAYLEIGH WAVES ACROSS THE PACIFIC OCEAN K. E. Bullen (Received 1939November 9) The Bering......

K. E. Bullen

1939-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Green Ocean Wave Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Wave Air Piston This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGreenOceanWaveEnergy&oldid769161...

358

Ocean Data Impacts in Global HYCOM  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The impact of the assimilation of ocean observations on reducing global Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) 48-h forecast errors is presented. The assessment uses an adjoint-based data impact procedure that characterizes the forecast impact of ...

James A. Cummings; Ole Martin Smedstad

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Energy from the Ocean [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...October 1982 research-article Energy from the Ocean [and Discussion...Lennard J. H. Turner P. Wadhams Renewable ocean energy sources can eventually supply a large fraction of man's energy needs, starting in the 1990s...

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Oceanic nutrient and oxygen transports and bounds on export production during the World Ocean Circulation Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of intense climate interest. A large fraction of the carbon fixed in the oceanic surface waters is recycledOceanic nutrient and oxygen transports and bounds on export production during the World Ocean are estimated from selected hydrographic sections from the World Ocean Circulation Experiment spanning the world

Wunsch, Carl

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Ocean Mixing and Climate ChangeOcean Mixing and Climate Change Factors inducing seawater mixing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the reverse current created when the fluid flows past an obstacle. Ocean Eddies range: cm-100 km. When two energy drives global winds ­ Latitudinal wind belts produce ocean currents · Determine circulation layer depth ~100 m · Heat transfer from equator to pole by ocean currents · Oceans redistribute about

Russell, Lynn

362

Ocean Sci., 4, 1529, 2008 www.ocean-sci.net/4/15/2008/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is everywhere perpendicular to the local direction of gravity. If there were no waves or currents in the oceanOcean Sci., 4, 15­29, 2008 www.ocean-sci.net/4/15/2008/ © Author(s) 2008. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Ocean Science An Oceanographer's Guide to GOCE and the Geoid C. W

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

363

Ocean Sci., 3, 363377, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/363/2007/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

currents and water mass properties intriguing texture. In the upper ocean observational evidenceOcean Sci., 3, 363­377, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/363/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Ocean Science Variability of Antarctic intermediate Water properties

Boyer, Edmond

364

Indian Ocean Surface Circulations and Their Connection To Indian Ocean Dipole, Identified  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Surface Currents Analysis Realtime (OSCAR) Data Advisor : Peter C Chu Second Reader : Charles Sun Aldisrupting Al--QaidaQaida''s networks network IraqIraq''s Instabilitys Instability #12;Ocean Surface Currents Analysis ­ Realtime (OSCAR) Data Base Ocean Surface currents data available for whole world' oceans at www

Chu, Peter C.

365

Ocean Science, 1, 97112, 2005 www.ocean-science.net/os/1/97/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oceanic currents by reducing the shears between them (Hansen and Paul, 1984; Weisberg, 1984Ocean Science, 1, 97­112, 2005 www.ocean-science.net/os/1/97/ SRef-ID: 1812-0792/os/2005-1-97 European Geosciences Union Ocean Science Multi-year satellite observations of instability waves

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

366

Ocean Sci., 3, 223228, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/223/2007/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and regional sea level changes associated with changing currents and mass distribution in the ocean. The studyOcean Sci., 3, 223­228, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/223/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Ocean Science Towards measuring the meridional overturning circulation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

367

Constraining Oceanic dust deposition using surface 1 ocean dissolved Al 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constraining Oceanic dust deposition using surface 1 ocean dissolved Al 2 Qin Han, J. Keith Moore, Charles Zender, Chris Measures, David Hydes 3 Abstract 4 We use measurements of ocean surface dissolved Al and Deposition 6 (DEAD) model, to constrain dust deposition to the oceans. Our Al database contains 7 all

Zender, Charles

368

Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C. UMMENHOFER*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C is restricted to the Indian or Pacific Ocean only, support the interpretation of forcing mechanisms for large Indian Ocean atmospheric forcing versus remote influences from Pacific wind forcing: low events develop

Ummenhofer, Caroline C.

369

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Oceans and Human Health Initiative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. We receive many benefits from the oceans from seafood, recreation and transportation industriesNational Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Oceans and Human Health Initiative (OHHI) is taking a new look at how the health of our ocean impacts our own health and well- being, and in turn how

370

Oceans and ClimateOceans and Climate PeterPeter RhinesRhines 11  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

say, the ocean is a great thermometer/thermometer/halometerhalometer Levitus, Antonov, Boyer+ Stephens

371

Coupling Mineral Carbonation and Ocean Liming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

systems suggests that, unless air capture significantly outperforms these systems, it is likely to require more than 400 kJ of work per mol of CO2, requiring it to be powered by CO2-neutral power sources in order to be CO2 neg. ... by the oceans at an increased rate if ocean alky. ... Oceanic uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) is altering the seawater chem. of the world's oceans with consequences for marine biota. ...

P. Renforth; T. Kruger

2013-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

372

Waste disposal package  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This is a claim for a waste disposal package including an inner or primary canister for containing hazardous and/or radioactive wastes. The primary canister is encapsulated by an outer or secondary barrier formed of a porous ceramic material to control ingress of water to the canister and the release rate of wastes upon breach on the canister. 4 figs.

Smith, M.J.

1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

373

Solid low-level radioactive waste radiation stability studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

properties and condition; on the other, on the specific features of thermal and radiation influences on it (Spitsyn et al. 1983). For the average composition of the fission products going to wastes repositories, the mean energy of irradiation may vary from... to the container determines, in part, the life of the container. Cormsion studies of containers by solidified wastes has indicated no problem areas in limited measurements to date; however very long-term effects have not been evaluated. The useful life...

Williams, Arnold Andre?

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Forcing of the Indian Ocean Dipole on the Interannual Variations of the Tropical Pacific Ocean: Roles of the Indonesian Throughflow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Controlled numerical experiments using ocean-only and ocean–atmosphere coupled general circulation models show that interannual sea level depression in the eastern Indian Ocean during the Indian Ocean dipole (IOD) events forces enhanced Indonesian ...

Dongliang Yuan; Jing Wang; Tengfei Xu; Peng Xu; Zhou Hui; Xia Zhao; Yihua Luan; Weipeng Zheng; Yongqiang Yu

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Ocean viscosity and climate M. Jochum,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean viscosity and climate M. Jochum,1 G. Danabasoglu,1 M. Holland,1 Y.-O. Kwon,1 and W. G. Large1] The impacts of parameterized lateral ocean viscosity on climate are explored using three 120-year integrations of a fully coupled climate model. Reducing viscosity leads to a generally improved ocean circulation

Jochum, Markus

376

ACR 891 (?) Ocean Policy: Current Issues seminar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACR 891 (?) Ocean Policy: Current Issues seminar Fall, 2013 (2 cr, + 1 cr optional) Professor of a common pool resource than the world's oceans it can only be the atmosphere. The latter is currently neglected. This seminar is intended to introduce students to some of the current issues in ocean policy

377

Introducing Research College of Oceanic & Atmospheric Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.coas.oregonstate.edu WECOMA WECOMA Coll ege of Oceanic & Atmospheric Scie nces OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY in the O cean currents, to the south in summer and generally to the north in winter, create ocean currents. The strong summertime and the topography of the ocean floor influence the east-west cross-shelf currents. Understanding and being able

Pierce, Stephen

378

Ocean Surface Currents From Geostationary Satellite SST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Surface Currents From Geostationary Satellite SST -We are implementing and evaluating a feature tracking approach to estimate ocean surface currents. - This approach allows us to estimate://cioss.coas.oregonstate.edu/ Ocean surface currents (vectors) derived from SST (background) modeled fields along the west coast of U

Kurapov, Alexander

379

Ocean indicators Current knowledge and future directions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean indicators Current knowledge and future directions Brian Burke, NOAA Fisheries Brian.Burke@noaa.gov #12;· Review of ocean indicator work · Forecasting · Indicator gaps and the importance of mechanistic understanding · Plugging in to management #12;Haeseker et al. 2012 Ocean survival is low and variable #12;-10 -5

380

Aluminium in an ocean general circulation model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;Forcing: currents Figure: Velocity (m/s) at ocean surface, average of an OPA climatology Marco van Hulten: Aluminium in an ocean general circulation model 5 #12;Forcing: currents Figure: Atlantic OverturningAluminium in an ocean general circulation model Marco van Hulten November 15, 2011 This research

Haak, Hein

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Introducing Research College of Oceanic & Atmospheric Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WECOMA Coll ege of Oceanic & Atmospheric Scie nces OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY in the O cean currents introduced by man (e.g., pollutants). Knowledge of upper-ocean currents is important for navigation and for search and rescue. The ocean currents off Oregon vary seasonally and can also vary from year to year

Barth, Jack

382

Including Ocean Model Uncertainties in Climate Predictions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Including Ocean Model Uncertainties in Climate Predictions Chris Brierley, Alan Thorpe, Mat Collins's to perform the integrations Currently uses a `slab' ocean #12;An Ocean Model Required to accurately model transient behaviour Will have its own uncertainties Requires even more computing power Create new models

Jones, Peter JS

383

Gravimetric geoid in the Northwest Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Gravimetric geoid in the Northwest Pacific Ocean A. B. Watts A. R. Leeds...gravimetric geoid of the Northwest Pacific Ocean. The 1 1 averages are based on...observations of gravity in the northwest Pacific Ocean, Tr. Intern. Okeanol., AN......

A. B. Watts; A. R. Leeds

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Anthropogenic modification of the oceans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...calcification in the coralline alga Hydrolithon decreased following...concentration. Epiphytic coralline algae are much less abundant in low-pH...that, like corals, coralline algae will be highly susceptible to...currently very little fossil fuel CO2 in the deep ocean. However...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

ScienceMatters Arctic Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into the ocean. The growth of marine algae is highest at the ice edge during the brief summer period when the ice of the marine food web, providing the main source of nourishment for fish and marine mammals. Algae also remove at molecular-level manufacturing as attempts to assemble LEGO pieces while wearing boxing gloves

Pedersen, Tom

386

Internal Waves in the Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Salinity temperature and pressure gradients all cause the density of sea water to vary with depth in the ocean and the density gradient affects the motion of the waters. A quantity N having the units radians per second can be defined using the density gradient the velocity of sound and the acceleration of gravity.

Carl Eckart

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Tabular icebergs in ocean waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... in ocean waves. Two field seasons have been carried out by SPRI in cooperation with Norsk Polarinstitutt, and Foldvik et a/.11 have reported some measurements which took place during ... officers and the crew of the ship for their patience and help. We thank the Norsk Polarinstitutt (NP) and the Radio Echo Group at SPRI for loan of equipment, ...

Monica Kristensen; Vernon A. Squire; Stuart C. Moore

1982-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

388

PACIFIC OCEAN SOUTH BAY HARBOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PACIFIC OCEAN LONG BEACH SOUTH BAY HARBOR GATEWAY NORWALK PASADENA EAST LA DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES W illow P Pacific CoastHw y Anaheim 5th St 1stSt P©$ P©$ Transit Mall P©$ Pacific Long Beach P Lakew

Weinreb, Sander

389

February 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

February 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 204 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING GAS HYDRATES ON HYDRATE 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA -------------------------------- Dr. Carl Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA #12;PUBLISHER'S NOTES Material in this publication may be copied

390

Identifying Mixed Chemical and Radioactive Waste Mixed waste is: any waste material containing both radioactive materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Identifying Mixed Chemical and Radioactive Waste Mixed waste is: any waste material containing both as noted on the list, you do not have a mixed waste and it may be managed as a normal radioactive waste radioactive waste after initially dating the container, the hold for decay time is extended, but you cannot

Straight, Aaron

391

Second Generation Waste Package Design Study  

SciTech Connect

The following describes the objectives of Project Activity 023 “Second Generation Waste Package Design Study” under DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC28-04RW12232. The objectives of this activity are: to review the current YMP baseline environment and establish corrosion testenvironments representative of the range of dry to intermittently wet conditions expected in the drifts as a function of time; to demonstrate the oxidation and corrosion resistance of A588 weathering steel and reference Alloy 22 samples in the representative dry to intermittently dry conditions; and to evaluate backfill and design features to improve the thermal performance analyses of the proposed second-generation waste packages using existing models developed at the University of Nevada, Reno(UNR). The work plan for this project activity consists of three major tasks: Task 1. Definition of expected worst-case environments (humidity, liquid composition and temperature) at waste package outer surfaces as a function of time, and comparison with environments defined in the YMP baseline; Task 2. Oxidation and corrosion tests of proposed second-generation outer container material; and Task 3. Second Generation waste package thermal analyses. Full funding was not provided for this project activity.

Armijo, J.S.; Misra, M.; Kar, Piyush

2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

392

ARM - Field Campaign - Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Semi-Volatile Thermal desorption Aerosol Gas chromatograph (SVTAG) Semi-Volatile Thermal desorption Aerosol Gas chromatograph (SVTAG) Related Campaigns Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAMAZON 2014) 2014.01.01, Martin, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon: Semi-Volatile Thermal desorption Aerosol Gas chromatograph (SVTAG) 2014.02.01 - 2014.10.15 Lead Scientist : Allen Goldstein Description In areas where biogenic emissions are oxidized in the presence of anthropogenic pollutants such as SO2, NOx and black carbon, it has become increasingly apparent that secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is substantially enhanced. Research is urgently needed to elucidate fundamental processes of natural

393

Secondary waste form testing : ceramicrete phosphate bonded ceramics.  

SciTech Connect

The cleanup activities of the Hanford tank wastes require stabilization and solidification of the secondary waste streams generated from the processing of the tank wastes. The treatment of these tank wastes to produce glass waste forms will generate secondary wastes, including routine solid wastes and liquid process effluents. Liquid wastes may include process condensates and scrubber/off-gas treatment liquids from the thermal waste treatment. The current baseline for solidification of the secondary wastes is a cement-based waste form. However, alternative secondary waste forms are being considered. In this regard, Ceramicrete technology, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, is being explored as an option to solidify and stabilize the secondary wastes. The Ceramicrete process has been demonstrated on four secondary waste formulations: baseline, cluster 1, cluster 2, and mixed waste streams. Based on the recipes provided by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the four waste simulants were prepared in-house. Waste forms were fabricated with three filler materials: Class C fly ash, CaSiO{sub 3}, and Class C fly ash + slag. Optimum waste loadings were as high as 20 wt.% for the fly ash and CaSiO{sub 3}, and 15 wt.% for fly ash + slag filler. Waste forms for physical characterizations were fabricated with no additives, hazardous contaminants, and radionuclide surrogates. Physical property characterizations (density, compressive strength, and 90-day water immersion test) showed that the waste forms were stable and durable. Compressive strengths were >2,500 psi, and the strengths remained high after the 90-day water immersion test. Fly ash and CaSiO{sub 3} filler waste forms appeared to be superior to the waste forms with fly ash + slag as a filler. Waste form weight loss was {approx}5-14 wt.% over the 90-day immersion test. The majority of the weight loss occurred during the initial phase of the immersion test, indicative of washing off of residual unreacted binder components from the waste form surface. Waste forms for ANS 16.1 leach testing contained appropriate amounts of rhenium and iodine as radionuclide surrogates, along with the additives silver-loaded zeolite and tin chloride. The leachability index for Re was found to range from 7.9 to 9.0 for all the samples evaluated. Iodine was below detection limit (5 ppb) for all the leachate samples. Further, leaching of sodium was low, as indicated by the leachability index ranging from 7.6-10.4, indicative of chemical binding of the various chemical species. Target leachability indices for Re, I, and Na were 9, 11, and 6, respectively. Degradation was observed in some of the samples post 90-day ANS 16.1 tests. Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) results showed that all the hazardous contaminants were contained in the waste, and the hazardous metal concentrations were below the Universal Treatment Standard limits. Preliminary scale-up (2-gal waste forms) was conducted to demonstrate the scalability of the Ceramicrete process. Use of minimal amounts of boric acid as a set retarder was used to control the working time for the slurry. Flexibility in treating waste streams with wide ranging compositional make-ups and ease of process scale-up are attractive attributes of Ceramicrete technology.

Singh, D.; Ganga, R.; Gaviria, J.; Yusufoglu, Y. (Nuclear Engineering Division); ( ES)

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

394

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07. Admin Chg 2, dated 6-8-11, cancels DOE M 435.1-1 Chg 1.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

395

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

F. J. Molz. Subsurface Waste Heat Storage, Experimentalfor land disposal of waste heat and waste water. Inst. forfor land disposal of waste heat and waste water. Inst. for

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Characterization of the MVST waste tanks located at ORNL  

SciTech Connect

During the fall of 1996 there was a major effort to sample and analyze the Active Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) tanks at ORNL which include the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) and the Bethel Valley Evaporator Service Tanks (BVEST). The characterization data summarized in this report was needed to address waste processing options, address concerns of the performance assessment (PA) data for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), evaluate the characteristics with respect to the waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for WIPP and Nevada Test Site (NTS), address criticality concerns, and meet DOT requirements for transporting the waste. This report only discusses the analytical characterization data for the MVST waste tanks. The isotopic data presented in this report support the position that fissile isotopes of uranium and plutonium were ``denatured`` as required by administrative controls. In general, MVST sludge was found to be both hazardous by RCRA characteristics and the transuranic alpha activity was well about the limit for TRU waste. The characteristics of the MVST sludge relative to the WIPP WAC limits for fissile gram equivalent, plutonium equivalent activity, and thermal power from decay heat, were estimated from the data in this report and found to be far below the upper boundary for any of the remote-handled transuranic waste requirements for disposal of the waste in WIPP.

Keller, J.M.; Giaquinto, J.M.; Meeks, A.M.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Mixed Waste Salt Encapsulation Using Polysiloxane - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

A proof-of-concept experimental study was performed to investigate the use of Orbit Technologies polysiloxane grouting material for encapsulation of U.S. Department of Energy mixed waste salts leading to a final waste form for disposal. Evaporator pond salt residues and other salt-like material contaminated with both radioactive isotopes and hazardous components are ubiquitous in the DOE complex and may exceed 250,000,000 kg of material. Current treatment involves mixing low waste percentages (less than 10% by mass salt) with cement or costly thermal treatment followed by cementation to the ash residue. The proposed technology involves simple mixing of the granular salt material (with relatively high waste loadings-greater than 50%) in a polysiloxane-based system that polymerizes to form a silicon-based polymer material. This study involved a mixing study to determine optimum waste loadings and compressive strengths of the resultant monoliths. Following the mixing study, durability testing was performed on promising waste forms. Leaching studies including the accelerated leach test and the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure were also performed on a high nitrate salt waste form. In addition to this testing, the waste form was examined by scanning electron microscope. Preliminary cost estimates for applying this technology to the DOE complex mixed waste salt problem is also given.

Miller, C.M.; Loomis, G.G.; Prewett, S.W.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

High-Performance Thermoelectric Devices Based on Abundant Silicide Materials for Vehicle Waste Heat Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Development of high-performance thermoelectric devices for vehicle waste heat recovery will include fundamental research to use abundant promising low-cost thermoelectric materials, thermal management and interfaces design, and metrology

400

Ocean noise in the tropical and subtropical Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ocean ambient noise is well studied in the North Pacific and North Atlantic but is poorly described for most of the worlds' oceans. Calibrated passive acoustic recordings were collected during 2009–2010 at seven locations in the central and western tropical and subtropical Pacific. Monthly and hourly mean power spectra (15–1000?Hz) were calculated in addition to their skewness kurtosis and percentile distributions. Overall ambient noise at these seven sites was 10–20?dB lower than reported recently for most other locations in the North Pacific. At frequencies 200?Hz with higher levels recorded in the winter than in the summer. Several species of baleen whales humpback (Megaptera novaeangliae) blue (Balaenoptera musculus) and fin (B. physalus) whales also contributed seasonally to ambient noise in characteristic frequency bands.

Ana Širovi?; Sean M. Wiggins; Erin M. Oleson

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Solar thermal power generation: a bibliography with abstracts. Quarterly update, July-September 1979  

SciTech Connect

This annotated bibliography covers the following subjects: energy overviews, solar overviews, energy conservation, economics and law, solar thermal power, thermionic and thermoelectric, ocean thermal energy conversion, wind power, biomass and photochemical energy, and large scale photovoltaics. An author index and a keyword index are included. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Solar thermal power generation: a bibliography with abstracts. Quarterly update, April-June 1980  

SciTech Connect

This annotated bibliography covers the following subjects: energy overviews; solar overviews; energy conservation; environment, law, and policy; total energy systems; solar thermal power and energy storage; thermoelectric, thermionic, and thermolysis; Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion; wind energy; biomass; bioconversion, and photochemical; satellite power systems; and photovoltaic applications. (MHR)

Sparkman, T.; Bozman, W.R. (eds.)

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Solar thermal power generation: a bibliography with abstracts. Quarterly update, January-March 1980  

SciTech Connect

This annotated bibliography contains the following: energy overviews, solar overviews, energy conservation, economics and law, total energy systems, solar thermal power, thermionic and thermoelectric, ocean thermal energy conversion, wind power, biomass and photochemical energy, satellite power stations, and large-scale photovoltaics. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda More Documents &...

405

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security More Documents &...

406

Chapter 2 - The History of Measuring Ocean Currents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter begins with a brief mention of the contributions made by the ancient mariners in the “discovery” of oceanic currents. Subsequent efforts made by several investigators in this direction, toward development of various devices for measurements of oceanic currents, are then addressed. These include technologies for measurement of surface currents, subsurface and abyssal currents, seafloor boundary layer currents, and vertical profiling of horizontal currents. Surface current measurement technologies include the application of drifting surface bodies; imaging of surface water motion trajectories and patterns with the support of aerial photography, radiometry, and active microwave radar systems; and vector mapping based on current-driven sea-surface wave transport. This is followed by discussion of technologies developed for subsurface and abyssal current measurements. These include spatially integrated measurements based on earth’s magnetism and oceanic sound speed, Lagrangian measurements based on motion of drifting subsurface floats, and Eulerian measurements with the support of a multitude of devices such as suspended drag, propeller revolution registration by mechanical counters, unidirectional impeller current meters, Savonius rotor current meters, ultrasonic acoustic methods, thermal sensors for measurements of turbulent motions, laser Doppler sensors, and acoustic Doppler current meters. This chapter further addresses an important topic of seafloor boundary layer current measurements using mechanical devices and nonmechanical devices such as BASS and MAVS. The chapter concludes with a discussion of technologies developed for vertical profiling of horizontal currents.

Antony Joseph

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Tank Waste and Waste Processing | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing The Defense Waste Processing Facility set a record by producing 267 canisters filled with glassified waste in a year. New bubbler technology and other enhancements will increase canister production in the future. The Defense Waste Processing Facility set a record by producing 267 canisters filled with glassified waste in a year. New bubbler technology and other enhancements will increase canister production in the future. A Savannah River Remediation employee uses a manipulator located inside a shielded enclosure at the Defense Waste Processing Facility where the melter is pouring molten glass inside a canister. A Savannah River Remediation employee uses a manipulator located inside a

408

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

electrolytic cell, designed to integrate waste heat recovery (i.e a microbial heat recovery cell or MHRC), can operate as a fuel cell and convert effluent streams into...

409

New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the issues of conducting debris treatment in the New Waste Calcine Facility (NWCF) decontamination area and the methods currently being used to decontaminate material at the NWCF.

K. E. Archibald

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Solid Waste Management Plan. Revision 4  

SciTech Connect

The waste types discussed in this Solid Waste Management Plan are Municipal Solid Waste, Hazardous Waste, Low-Level Mixed Waste, Low-Level Radioactive Waste, and Transuranic Waste. The plan describes for each type of solid waste, the existing waste management facilities, the issues, and the assumptions used to develop the current management plan.

NONE

1995-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

411

Waste Confidence Discussion | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Confidence Discussion Waste Confidence Discussion Long-Term Waste Confidence Update. Waste Confidence Discussion More Documents & Publications Status Update: Extended Storage...

412

EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation DOE's Radioactive Waste Management Priorities: Continue to manage waste...

413

Transuranic (TRU) Waste | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Defined by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act as "waste containing more than 100 nanocuries of alpha-emitting...

414

Ferrocyanide tank waste stability  

SciTech Connect

Ferrocyanide wastes were generated at the Hanford Site during the mid to late 1950s as a result of efforts to create more tank space for the storage of high-level nuclear waste. The ferrocyanide process was developed to remove [sup 137]CS from existing waste and newly generated waste that resulted from the recovery of valuable uranium in Hanford Site waste tanks. During the course of research associated with the ferrocyanide process, it was recognized that ferrocyanide materials, when mixed with sodium nitrate and/or sodium nitrite, were capable of violent exothermic reaction. This chemical reactivity became an issue in the 1980s, when safety issues associated with the storage of ferrocyanide wastes in Hanford Site tanks became prominent. These safety issues heightened in the late 1980s and led to the current scrutiny of the safety issues associated with these wastes, as well as current research and waste management programs. Testing to provide information on the nature of possible tank reactions is ongoing. This document supplements the information presented in Summary of Single-Shell Tank Waste Stability, WHC-EP-0347, March 1991 (Borsheim and Kirch 1991), which evaluated several issues. This supplement only considers information particular to ferrocyanide wastes.

Fowler, K.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

6 - Nuclear Waste Regulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The most influential national and international bodies providing recommendations on radiation protection are described, including the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Protection philosophies and the ICRP general principles of radiation protection are discussed. Radioactive material regulations and sources of radiation are explained. Criteria of exemption from regulatory control are discussed with examples of exemption levels for naturally occurring and radioactive waste radionuclides. Clearance of both moderate and bulk amounts of materials from regulatory control is also explained, including examples of EU and the UK regulations. Dose limits recommended by the ICRP are given, as well as the main principles of control of radiation hazards. Nuclear waste classification schemes are outlined, including the IAEA classification scheme. A brief explanation of nuclear waste classes including exempt waste, very short-lived waste, very low-level waste, low-level waste, intermediate-level waste and high-level waste is given. Examples of waste classification schemes are given, including that of the UK.

M.I. Ojovan; W.E. Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Hanford Tank Waste Information Enclosure 1 Hanford Tank Waste Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hanford Tank Waste Information Enclosure 1 1 Hanford Tank Waste Information 1.0 Summary This information demonstrates the wastes in the twelve Hanford Site tanks meet the definition of transuranic (TRU. The wastes in these twelve (12) tanks are not high-level waste (HLW), and contain more than 100 nanocuries

417

Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste Read more overleaf Introduction Energy from waste provides us with an opportunity for a waste solution and a local source of energy rolled,itcan onlyaddressaportionofthewastestream andisnotsufficientonitsown. Energy obtained from the combustion of residual waste (Energy from

418

Stabilization of compactible waste  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of series of experiments performed to determine the feasibility of stabilizing compacted or compactible waste with polymers. The need for this work arose from problems encountered at disposal sites attributed to the instability of this waste in disposal. These studies are part of an experimental program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) investigating methods for the improved solidification/stabilization of DOE low-level wastes. The approach taken in this study was to perform a series of survey type experiments using various polymerization systems to find the most economical and practical method for further in-depth studies. Compactible dry bulk waste was stabilized with two different monomer systems: styrene-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and polyester-styrene, in laboratory-scale experiments. Stabilization was accomplished by wetting or soaking compactible waste (before or after compaction) with monomers, which were subsequently polymerized. Three stabilization methods are described. One involves the in-situ treatment of compacted waste with monomers in which a vacuum technique is used to introduce the binder into the waste. The second method involves the alternate placement and compaction of waste and binder into a disposal container. In the third method, the waste is treated before compaction by wetting the waste with the binder using a spraying technique. A series of samples stabilized at various binder-to-waste ratios were evaluated through water immersion and compression testing. Full-scale studies were conducted by stabilizing two 55-gallon drums of real compacted waste. The results of this preliminary study indicate that the integrity of compacted waste forms can be readily improved to ensure their long-term durability in disposal environments. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Waste Inspection Tomography (WIT)  

SciTech Connect

Waste Inspection Tomography (WIT) provides mobile semi-trailer mounted nondestructive examination (NDE) and assay (NDA) for nuclear waste drum characterization. WIT uses various computed tomography (CT) methods for both NDE and NDA of nuclear waste drums. Low level waste (LLW), transuranic (TRU), and mixed radioactive waste can be inspected and characterized without opening the drums. With externally transmitted x-ray NDE techniques, WIT has the ability to identify high density waste materials like heavy metals, define drum contents in two- and three-dimensional space, quantify free liquid volumes through density and x-ray attenuation coefficient discrimination, and measure drum wall thickness. With waste emitting gamma-ray NDA techniques, WIT can locate gamma emitting radioactive sources in two- and three-dimensional space, identify gamma emitting isotopic species, identify the external activity levels of emitting gamma-ray sources, correct for waste matrix attenuation, provide internal activity approximations, and provide the data needed for waste classification as LLW or TRU. The mobile feature of WIT allows inspection technologies to be brought to the nuclear waste drum storage site without the need to relocate drums for safe, rapid, and cost-effective characterization of regulated nuclear waste. The combination of these WIT characterization modalities provides the inspector with an unprecedented ability to non-invasively characterize the regulated contents of waste drums as large as 110 gallons, weighing up to 1,600 pounds. Any objects that fit within these size and weight restrictions can also be inspected on WIT, such as smaller waste bags and drums that are five and thirty-five gallons.

Bernardi, R.T.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Distribution of oceanic 137Cs from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant simulated numerically by a regional ocean model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radioactive materials were released to the environment from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant as a result of the reactor accident after the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami of 11 March 2011. The measured 137Cs concentration in a seawater sample near the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant site reached 68 kBq L?1 (6.8 × 104 Bq L?1) on 6 April. The two major likely pathways from the accident site to the ocean existed: direct release of high radioactive liquid wastes to the ocean and the deposition of airborne radioactivity to the ocean surface. By analysis of the 131I/137Cs activity ratio, we determined that direct release from the site contributed more to the measured 137Cs concentration than atmospheric deposition did. We then used a regional ocean model to simulate the 137Cs concentrations resulting from the direct release to the ocean off Fukushima and found that from March 26 to the end of May the total amount of 137Cs directly released was 3.5 ± 0.7 PBq ((3.5 ± 0.7) × 1015 Bq). The simulated temporal change in 137Cs concentrations near the Fukushima Daini Nuclear Power Plant site agreed well with observations. Our simulation results showed that (1) the released 137Cs advected southward along the coast during the simulation period; (2) the eastward-flowing Kuroshio and its extension transported 137C during May 2011; and (3) 137Cs concentrations decreased to less than 10 Bq L?1 by the end of May 2011 in the whole simulation domain as a result of oceanic advection and diffusion. We compared the total amount and concentration of 137Cs released from the Fukushima Dai-ichi reactors to the ocean with the 137Cs released to the ocean by global fallout. Even though the measured 137Cs concentration from the Fukushima accident was the highest recorded, the total released amount of 137Cs was not very large. Therefore, the effect of 137Cs released from the Fukushima Dai-ichi reactors on concentration in the whole North Pacific was smaller than that of past release events such as global fallout, and the amount of 137Cs expected to reach other oceanic basins is negligible comparing with the past radioactive input.

Daisuke Tsumune; Takaki Tsubono; Michio Aoyama; Katsumi Hirose

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Measuring Ocean Acidification: New Technology for a New Era of Ocean Chemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CO2 system changes in the upper ocean (wind-mixed layer) at stations in the Pacific (HOT) and Atlantic (BATS) oceans: the carbonate:bicarbonate concentration ratio and pH. ... Ocean alkalinity buffers the effects of oceanic CO2 uptake, but slowing and eventually reversing the trend of increasing ocean acidity will require increased continental weathering and dissolution of ocean carbonate sediments. ... (80) Each platform imposes different constraints on instrument design and performance in terms of measurement frequency, accuracy, and precision, as well as sensor size, power requirements, and endurance. ...

Robert H. Byrne

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

422

Impact of the Southern ocean winds on sea-ice - ocean interaction and its associated global ocean circulation in a warming world  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation discusses a linkage between the Southern Ocean (SO) winds and the global ocean circulation in the framework of a coarse-resolution global ocean general circulation model coupled to a sea-ice model. In addition to reexamination...

Cheon, Woo Geunn

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

423

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

18 18 19 T he WIPP's first waste receipt, 11 years later than originally planned, was a monumental step forward in the safe management of nuclear waste. Far from ending, however, the WIPP story has really just begun. For the next 35 years, the DOE will face many challenges as it manages a complex shipment schedule from transuranic waste sites across the United States and continues to ensure that the repository complies with all regulatory requirements. The DOE will work to maintain the highest level of safety in waste handling and trans- portation. Coordination with sites Disposal operations require coordination with sites that will ship transuranic waste to the WIPP and include periodic certification of waste characterization and handling practices at those facilities. During the WIPP's

424

SRS - Programs - Waste Solidification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Solidification Waste Solidification The two primary facilities operated within the Waste Solidification program are Saltstone and the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Each DWPF canister is 10 feet tall and 2 feet in diameter, and typically takes a little over a day to fill. Each DWPF canister is 10 feet tall and 2 feet in diameter, and typically takes a little over a day to fill. The largest radioactive waste glassification plant in the world, DWPF converts the high-level liquid nuclear waste currently stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) into a solid glass form suitable for long-term storage and disposal. Scientists have long considered this glassification process, called "vitrification," as the preferred option for immobilizing high-level radioactive liquids into a more stable, manageable form until a federal

425

High level nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect

The DOE Division of Waste Products through a lead office at Savannah River is developing a program to immobilize all US high-level nuclear waste for terminal disposal. DOE high-level wastes include those at the Hanford Plant, the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, and the Savannah River Plant. Commercial high-level wastes, for which DOE is also developing immobilization technology, include those at the Nuclear Fuel Services Plant and any future commercial fuels reprocessing plants. The first immobilization plant is to be the Defense Waste Processing Facility at Savannah River, scheduled for 1983 project submission to Congress and 1989 operation. Waste forms are still being selected for this plant. Borosilicate glass is currently the reference form, but alternate candidates include concretes, calcines, other glasses, ceramics, and matrix forms.

Crandall, J L

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Underground waste barrier structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an underground waste barrier structure that consists of waste material, a first container formed of activated carbonaceous material enclosing the waste material, a second container formed of zeolite enclosing the first container, and clay covering the second container. The underground waste barrier structure is constructed by forming a recessed area within the earth, lining the recessed area with a layer of clay, lining the clay with a layer of zeolite, lining the zeolite with a layer of activated carbonaceous material, placing the waste material within the lined recessed area, forming a ceiling over the waste material of a layer of activated carbonaceous material, a layer of zeolite, and a layer of clay, the layers in the ceiling cojoining with the respective layers forming the walls of the structure, and finally, covering the ceiling with earth.

Saha, Anuj J. (Hamburg, NY); Grant, David C. (Gibsonia, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Synthesizing Optimal Waste Blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vitrification of tank wastes to form glass is a technique that will be used for the disposal of high-level waste at Hanford. ... Durability restrictions ensure that the resultant glass meets the quantitative criteria for disposal/long-term storage in a repository. ... If glasses are formulated to minimize the volume of glass that would be produced, then the cost of processing the waste and storing the resultant glass would be greatly reduced. ...

Venkatesh Narayan; Urmila M. Diwekar; Mark Hoza

1996-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

428

Waste Confidence Discussion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-Term Long-Term Waste Confidence Update Christine Pineda Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission National Transportation Stakeholders Forum May 2012 ♦ Knoxville, Tennessee Long-Term Update Draft Report, "Background and Preliminary Assumptions for an Environmental Impact Statement- Long-Term Waste Confidence Update" Elements of the Long-Term Update - Draft environmental impact statement - Draft Waste Confidence Decision - Proposed Waste Confidence Rule based on the EIS and Decision, if applicable 2 Overview of Draft Report Background and assumptions report is first step in process. Basic topics in the report are:

429

Norcal Waste Systems, Inc.  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet describes the LNG long-haul heavy-duty trucks at Norcal Waste Systems Inc.'s Sanitary Fill Company.

Not Available

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Section 24: Waste Characterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy (DOE). 1995b. Transuranic Waste Baseline Inventory Report (Revision 2, December). DOECAO-95-1121. ERMS 531643. Carlsbad Area Office, Carlsbad, NM. PDF Author U.S....

431

Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

training, security) * Closure plan Tank-Related Permit Units New * 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) * 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs) Existing * 242-A Evaporator * Waste Treatment...

432

Waste Heat Recovery  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

DRAFT - PRE-DECISIONAL - DRAFT 1 Waste Heat Recovery 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the TechnologySystem ......

433

Electronic Waste Transformation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electronic Waste Transformation ... Instead, entrepreneurial individuals and small businesses recover valuable metals such as copper from obsolete equipment through activities such as burning. ...

CHERYL HOGUE

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Waste minimization assessment procedure  

SciTech Connect

Perry Nuclear Power Plant began developing a waste minimization plan early in 1991. In March of 1991 the plan was documented following a similar format to that described in the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual. Initial implementation involved obtaining management's commitment to support a waste minimization effort. The primary assessment goal was to identify all hazardous waste streams and to evaluate those streams for minimization opportunities. As implementation of the plan proceeded, non-hazardous waste streams routinely generated in large volumes were also evaluated for minimization opportunities. The next step included collection of process and facility data which would be useful in helping the facility accomplish its assessment goals. This paper describes the resources that were used and which were most valuable in identifying both the hazardous and non-hazardous waste streams that existed on site. For each material identified as a waste stream, additional information regarding the materials use, manufacturer, EPA hazardous waste number and DOT hazard class was also gathered. Once waste streams were evaluated for potential source reduction, recycling, re-use, re-sale, or burning for heat recovery, with disposal as the last viable alternative.

Kellythorne, L.L. (Centerior Energy, Cleveland, OH (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300 C to 800 C to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100 C to 1400 C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, G.G.

1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

436

Avoidable waste management costs  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the activity based costing method used to acquire variable (volume dependent or avoidable) waste management cost data for routine operations at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Waste volumes from environmental restoration, facility stabilization activities, and legacy waste were specifically excluded from this effort. A core team consisting of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, and Oak Ridge Reservation developed and piloted the methodology, which can be used to determine avoidable waste management costs. The method developed to gather information was based on activity based costing, which is a common industrial engineering technique. Sites submitted separate flow diagrams that showed the progression of work from activity to activity for each waste type or treatability group. Each activity on a flow diagram was described in a narrative, which detailed the scope of the activity. Labor and material costs based on a unit quantity of waste being processed were then summed to generate a total cost for that flow diagram. Cross-complex values were calculated by determining a weighted average for each waste type or treatability group based on the volume generated. This study will provide DOE and contractors with a better understanding of waste management processes and their associated costs. Other potential benefits include providing cost data for sites to perform consistent cost/benefit analysis of waste minimization and pollution prevention (WMIN/PP) options identified during pollution prevention opportunity assessments and providing a means for prioritizing and allocating limited resources for WMIN/PP.

Hsu, K.; Burns, M.; Priebe, S.; Robinson, P.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September 19, 2014 - No second release at WIPP September 12, 2014 - Waste hoist transformer replacement September 09, 2014 - Additional areas cleared in WIPP underground...

438

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300.degree. C. to 800.degree. C. to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100.degree. C. to 1400.degree. C. at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Method for solidification of radioactive and other hazardous waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Solidification of liquid radioactive waste, and other hazardous wastes, is accomplished by the method of the invention by incorporating the waste into a porous glass crystalline molded block. The porous block is first loaded with the liquid waste and then dehydrated and exposed to thermal treatment at 50-1,000.degree. C. The porous glass crystalline molded block consists of glass crystalline hollow microspheres separated from fly ash (cenospheres), resulting from incineration of fossil plant coals. In a preferred embodiment, the porous glass crystalline blocks are formed from perforated cenospheres of grain size -400+50, wherein the selected cenospheres are consolidated into the porous molded block with a binder, such as liquid silicate glass. The porous blocks are then subjected to repeated cycles of saturating with liquid waste, and drying, and after the last cycle the blocks are subjected to calcination to transform the dried salts to more stable oxides. Radioactive liquid waste can be further stabilized in the porous blocks by coating the internal surface of the block with metal oxides prior to adding the liquid waste, and by coating the outside of the block with a low-melting glass or a ceramic after the waste is loaded into the block.

Anshits, Alexander G. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Vereshchagina, Tatiana A. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Voskresenskaya, Elena N. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Kostin, Eduard M. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Pavlov, Vyacheslav F. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Revenko, Yurii A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Tretyakov, Alexander A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Sharonova, Olga M. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Aloy, Albert S. (Saint-Petersburg, RU); Sapozhnikova, Natalia V. (Saint-Petersburg, RU); Knecht, Dieter A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Macheret, Yevgeny (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Small boiler uses waste coal  

SciTech Connect

Burning coal waste in small boilers at low emissions poses considerable problem. While larger boiler suppliers have successfully installed designs in the 40 to 80 MW range for some years, the author has been developing small automated fluid bed boiler plants for 25 years that can be applied in the range of 10,000 to 140,000 lbs/hr of steam. Development has centered on the use of an internally circulating fluid bed (CFB) boiler, which will burn waste fuels of most types. The boiler is based on the traditional D-shaped watertable boiler, with a new type of combustion chamber that enables a three-to-one turndown to be achieved. The boilers have all the advantages of low emissions of the large fluid boilers while offering a much lower height incorporated into the package boiler concept. Recent tests with a waste coal that had a high nitrogen content of 1.45% demonstrated a NOx emission below the federal limit of 0.6 lbs/mm Btu. Thus a NOx reduction on the order of 85% can be demonstrate by combustion modification alone. Further reductions can be made by using a selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) system and sulfur absorption of up to 90% retention is possible. The article describes the operation of a 30,000 lbs/hr boiler at the Fayette Thermal LLC plant. Spinheat has installed three ICFB boilers at a nursing home and a prison, which has been tested on poor-grade anthracite and bituminous coal. 2 figs.

Virr, M.J. [Spinheat Ltd. (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

On the World-wide Circulation of the Deeper Waters of the World Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

circulation of the Pacific Ocean: Flow patterns, tracers,in preparing the figures. Fig. 1 Pacific Ocean winds Fig.2 Pacific Ocean circulation Fig. 4 Pacific Ocean potential

Reid, Joseph L

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Indian Ocean surface circulations and their connection to Indian Ocean dipole, identified from Ocean Surface Currents Analysis Real Time (OSCAR) data .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ocean surface circulation is an essential component of the world climate system. In this study, the Ocean Surface Currents Analysis - Real Time (OSCAR) data,… (more)

Rana, Haris Sarwar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Ocean - Regional Planning Efforts | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Planning Efforts Regional Planning Efforts Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean Regional Planning Efforts Marine planning is a science-based process that provides transparent information about ocean use and guarantees the public and stakeholders a voice early on in decisions affecting the uses of the marine environment. It is an inclusive, bottom-up approach that gives the Federal Government, States, and Tribes, with input from local communities, stakeholders, and the public, the ability to make informed decisions on how best to optimize the use of and protect the ocean, coasts, and Great Lakes. Under the National Ocean Policy, the United States is subdivided into nine regional planning areas. Within each region, Federal, State, and Tribal

444

Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earth, Space Sciences » Earth, Space Sciences » Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) The COSIM project develops advanced ocean and ice models for evaluating the role of ocean and ice in high-latitude climate change and projecting the impacts of high-latitude change on regions throughout the globe. Get Expertise Phil Jones COSIM Email Matthew Hecht COSIM Email Elizabeth Hunke COSIM Email Mat Maltrud COSIM Email Bill Lipscomb COSIM Email Scott Elliott COSIM Email Todd Ringler COSIM Email We are also developing a set of next-generation ocean and ice models with variable resolution horizontal grids to focus resolution on regions of interest or regions where specific processes (like eddies) need to be resolved. Summary The COSIM project develops advanced ocean and ice models for evaluating the

445

Waste Loading Enhancements for Hanford Low-Activity Waste Glasses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WASTE LOADING ENHANCEMENTS FOR HANFORD LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE GLASSES Albert A. Kruger, Glass Scientist DOE-WTP Project Office Engineering Division US Department of Energy Richland,...

446

Fuel Cycle Potential Waste Inventory for Disposition Rev 5 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Cycle Potential Waste Inventory for Disposition Rev 5 Fuel Cycle Potential Waste Inventory for Disposition Rev 5 Fuel Cycle Potential Waste Inventory for Disposition Rev 5 The United States currently utilizes a once-through fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel is stored onsite in either wet pools or in dry storage systems with ultimate disposal envisioned in a deep mined geologic repository. This report provides an estimate of potential waste inventory and waste form characteristics for the DOE used nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste and a variety of commercial fuel cycle alternatives in order to support subsequent system-level evaluations of disposal system performance. Fuel Cycle Potential Waste Inventory for Disposition R5a.docx More Documents & Publications Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Analysis

447

Annual report on the development and characterization of solidified forms for nuclear wastes, 1979  

SciTech Connect

Development and characterization of solidified nuclear waste forms is a major continuing effort at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Contributions from seven programs directed at understanding chemical composition, process conditions, and long-term behaviors of various nuclear waste forms are included in this report. The major findings of the report are included in extended figure captions that can be read as brief technical summaries of the research, with additional information included in a traditional narrative format. Waste form development proceeded on crystalline and glass materials for high-level and transuranic (TRU) wastes. Leaching studies emphasized new areas of research aimed at more basic understanding of waste form/aqueous solution interactions. Phase behavior and thermal effects research included studies on crystal phases in defense and TRU waste glasses and on liquid-liquid phase separation in borosilicate waste glasses. Radiation damage effects in crystals and glasses from alpha decay and from transmutation are reported.

Chick, L.A.; McVay, G.L.; Mellinger, G.B.; Roberts, F.P.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Current inventories and characteristics of commercial spent fuels and both commercial and US Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive wastes were compiled through December 31, 1984, based on the most reliable information available from government sources and the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. Future waste and spent fuel to be generated through the year 2020 and characteristics of these materials are also presented. The information forecasted is consistent with the expected defense-related and private industrial and institutional activities and the latest DOE/Energy Information Administration (EIA) projections of US commercial nuclear power growth. Materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are: spent fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, remedial action waste, and decommissioning waste. For each category, current and projected inventories are given through the year 2020, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated, based on reported or calculated isotopic compositions.

Not Available

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Tank Waste Committee Page 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of a PA is to examine the final waste disposition at Hanford, such as waste in the tanks at C-Farm. Vince said the quest is to model waste movement over 10,000 years,...

450

Evaluation of OSCAR ocean surface current product in the tropical Indian Ocean using in situ data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The OSCAR (ocean surface current analysis real-time), which is a ... , has been evaluated in the tropical Indian Ocean (TIO) in two different ways. First ... capture the variabilities of the well-known surface current

RAJESH SIKHAKOLLI; RASHMI SHARMA; SUJIT BASU; B S GOHIL…

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Short Communication Three ocean state indices implemented in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and currents at various resolutions. We briefly present the OFS, then describe three currently available oceanShort Communication Three ocean state indices implemented in the Mercator-Ocean operational suite L., and Soulat, F. 2008. Three ocean state indices implemented in the Mercator-Ocean operational suite. ­ ICES

Ribes, Aurélien

452

Ocean Sci., 8, 227248, 2012 www.ocean-sci.net/8/227/2012/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In the Arabian Sea, the surface oceanic currents form a cyclonic gyre in January, which weakens in March (KindleOcean Sci., 8, 227­248, 2012 www.ocean-sci.net/8/227/2012/ doi:10.5194/os-8-227-2012 © Author(s) 2012. CC Attribution 3.0 License. Ocean Science Mesoscale variability of water masses in the Arabian

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

453

Combined Thermal and Power Energy Management Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 'various types of prime movers (e.g. boilers, waste heat recovery, steam and gas turbines, etc.), and varying requirements for process heat and electrical power, particularly if bulk power is being dispatched to a utility grid. The ability...) maintaining the operating security of the energy supply system and equipment, and 3) optimization of energy use to meet given loads and constraints at the lowest costs. The thermal dispatch of power system boilers and turbines is the key function which...

Ahner, D. J.; Priestley, R. R.

454

Inherent optical properties of the ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico, and Monterey Bay, and includes Gulf Stream, Loop Current, slope, shelf, and ... The solar-induced fluorescence of CDOM ...

1999-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

455

Ocean Currents Produced by Evaporation and Precipitation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 September 1933 research-article Ocean Currents Produced by Evaporation and Precipitation G. R. Goldsbrough The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve...

1933-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

On Ocean Currents Produced by Winds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 January 1935 research-article On Ocean Currents Produced by Winds G. R. Goldsbrough The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve, and extend access...

1935-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Intermediate Waters of the Pacific Ocean.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

BOOK REVIEWS. 313. REID, J. L., JR. 1965. Intermediate. Waters of the Pacific Ocean. Johns Hopkins Oceano- graphic. Studies,. No. 2. Johns Hopkins. Press ...

1999-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

458

Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This page provides a brief overview of hydropower and ocean energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply these technologies within the Federal sector.

459

Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is notorious for its high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll...

460

Analysis of variations in ocean color  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aug 9, 1976 ... mote sensing values of the color of the ocean .... its spectral variations, we must first study ... tering can be expressed in terms of a power.

2000-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Integrated thermal treatment system study -- Phase 2 results. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the second phase of a study on thermal treatment technologies. The study consists of a systematic assessment of nineteen thermal treatment alternatives for the contact-handled mixed low-level waste (MLLW) currently stored in the US Department of Energy complex. The treatment alternatives consist of widely varying technologies for safely destroying the hazardous organic components, reducing the volume, and preparing for final disposal of the MLLW. The alternatives considered in Phase 2 were innovative thermal treatments with nine types of primary processing units. Other variations in the study examined the effect of combustion gas, air pollution control system design, and stabilization technology for the treatment residues. The Phase 1 study examined ten initial thermal treatment alternatives. The Phase 2 systems were evaluated in essentially the same manner as the Phase 1 systems. The alternatives evaluated were: rotary kiln, slagging kiln, plasma furnace, plasma gasification, molten salt oxidation, molten metal waste destruction, steam gasification, Joule-heated vitrification, thermal desorption and mediated electrochemical oxidation, and thermal desorption and supercritical water oxidation. The quantities, and physical and chemical compositions, of the input waste used in the Phase 2 systems differ from those in the Phase 1 systems, which were based on a preliminary waste input database developed at the onset of the Integrated Thermal Treatment System study. The inventory database used in the Phase 2 study incorporates the latest US Department of Energy information. All systems, both primary treatment systems and subsystem inputs, have now been evaluated using the same waste input (2,927 lb/hr). 28 refs., 88 figs., 41 tabs.

Feizollahi, F.; Quapp, W.J.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DESCRIPTION DETAILS * Radioactive Waste Source Reduction 1,500 Radioactive Waste $6,000 $2,500 $6,000 Waste Yard Sorting Table surveying to sort clean waste from radioactive waste Radioactive Emissions Emission lives. Radioactive Waste generated through wet chemistry Waste Minimization 30 Mixed waste / Liquid

463

Chapter 19 - Nuclear Waste Fund  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Waste Fund 19-1 Nuclear Waste Fund 19-1 CHAPTER 19 NUCLEAR WASTE FUND 1. INTRODUCTION. a. Purpose. This chapter establishes the financial, accounting, and budget policies and procedures for civilian and defense nuclear waste activities, as authorized in Public Law 97-425, the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended, referred to hereafter as the Act. b. Applicability. This chapter applies to all Departmental elements, including the National Nuclear Security Administration, and activities that are funded by the Nuclear Waste Fund (NWF) or the Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal appropriation. c. Background. The Act established the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) and assigned it responsibility for the management

464

Solid Waste Rules (New Hampshire)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The solid waste statute applies to construction and demolition debris, appliances, recyclables, and the facilities that collect, process, and dispose of solid waste. DES oversees the management of...

465

Solid Waste Management (North Carolina)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Solid Waste Program regulates safe management of solid waste through guidance, technical assistance, regulations, permitting, environmental monitoring, compliance evaluation and enforcement....

466

Waste Management | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Management Waste Management Oak Ridge has an onsite CERCLA disposal facility, the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility, that reduces cleanup and transportation costs....

467

Municipal Waste Combustion (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This rule establishes requirements for emissions from, and design and operation of, municipal waste combustion units. "Municipal waste" means all materials and substances discarded from residential...

468

Waste Disposal | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Disposal Waste Disposal Trucks transport debris from Oak Ridges cleanup sites to the onsite CERCLA disposal area, the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility....

469

22 - Radioactive waste disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter discusses the disposal of radioactive wastes that arise from a great variety of sources, including the nuclear fuel cycle, beneficial uses of isotopes, and radiation by institutions. Spent fuel contains uranium, plutonium, and highly radioactive fission products. The spent fuel is accumulating, awaiting the development of a high-level waste repository. It is anticipated that a multi-barrier system involving packaging and geologic media will provide protection of the public over the centuries. The favored method of disposal is in a mined cavity deep underground. In some countries, reprocessing the fuel assemblies permits recycling of materials and disposal of smaller volumes of solidified waste. Transportation of wastes is done by casks and containers designed to withstand severe accidents. Low-level wastes come from research and medical procedures and from a variety of activation and fission sources at a reactor site. They generally can be given near-surface burial. Isotopes of special interest are cobalt-60 and cesium-137. Transuranic wastes are being disposed of in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Decommissioning of reactors in the future will contribute a great deal of low-level radioactive waste.

Raymond L. Murray

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Radioactive waste disposal package  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

Lampe, Robert F. (Bethel Park, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Nuclear waste solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High efficiency removal of technetium values from a nuclear waste stream is achieved by addition to the waste stream of a precipitant contributing tetraphenylphosphonium cation, such that a substantial portion of the technetium values are precipitated as an insoluble pertechnetate salt.

Walker, Darrel D. (1684 Partridge Dr., Aiken, SC 29801); Ebra, Martha A. (129 Hasty Rd., Aiken, SC 29801)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Radioactive waste storage issues  

SciTech Connect

In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state`s boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected.

Kunz, D.E.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

473

Variability, interaction and change in the atmosphere–ocean–ecology system of the Western Indian Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...all. In a symposium on the Indian Ocean over 30 years ago, David...sea level? Why do most modern Indian Ocean reefs only thinly veneer...survival over long time-scales) point to the importance of long-term...regeneration. In the Western Indian Ocean, studies are in place...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Atmosphere–ocean dynamics in the Western Indian Ocean recorded in corals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Atmosphere-ocean-ecology dynamics in the Western Indian Ocean organized by Tom Spencer...18 O (dashed line) and 11-point moving average (solid line...Parker et al. 1995) and 11-point moving average (solid line...to the wind- driven southern Indian Ocean gyre (Allan et al. 1995...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Author's personal copy A novel ocean color index to detect oating algae in the global oceans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Author's personal copy A novel ocean color index to detect oating algae in the global oceans December 2008 Received in revised form 15 May 2009 Accepted 23 May 2009 Keywords: Floating Algae Index (FAI Remote sensing Ocean color Climate data record Various types of oating algae have been reported in open

Meyers, Steven D.

476

Persistent Ocean Monitoring with Underwater Gliders: Towards Accurate Reconstruction of Dynamic Ocean Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to ocean currents. The speed control algorithm then optimizes the speed along the planned path so waters of large magnitude ocean currents, and is length constrained. Secondly, we develop a velocityPersistent Ocean Monitoring with Underwater Gliders: Towards Accurate Reconstruction of Dynamic

Smith, Ryan N.

477

Summer Courses in Ocean Optics and Biogeochemistry: "Monitoring the Oceans with Coastal Observatories" and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summer Courses in Ocean Optics and Biogeochemistry: "Monitoring the Oceans with Coastal integration of optical approaches into oceanographic research in general. OBJECTIVES These two courses created and optical oceanography and ocean color remote sensing to learn the fundamentals of optics in a coastal

Boss, Emmanuel S.

478

TELECONNECTIONS BETWEEN NORTHEASTERN PACIFIC OCEAN AND THE GULF OF MEXICO AND NORTHWESTERN ATLANTIC OCEAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TELECONNECTIONS BETWEEN NORTHEASTERN PACIFIC OCEAN AND THE GULF OF MEXICO AND NORTHWESTERN ATLANTIC-scale interactions in the tropical Pacific Ocean, especially, processes associated with the EI Nino phenomena. He has of ocean temperatures. He suggests that an anomalously high heat supply in the equatorial Pacific

479

Ocean Sci., 3, 299310, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/299/2007/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and industrial fisheries, are experiencing a constant increase, significantly affecting the marine ecosystemOcean Sci., 3, 299­310, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/299/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Ocean Science Observing the Mediterranean Sea from space: 21 years

Boyer, Edmond

480

THE ECONOMIST The waste industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

currents cause flotsam from around the world to accumulate in a vast becalmed patch of ocean. In places

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Integrated thermal treatment system sudy: Phase 2, Results  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the second phase of a study on thermal treatment technologies. The study consists of a systematic assessment of nineteen thermal treatment alternatives for the contact-handled mixed low-level waste (MLLW) currently stored in the US Department of Energy complex. The treatment alternatives consist of widely varying technologies for safely destroying the hazardous organic components, reducing the volume, and preparing for final disposal of the MLLW. The alternatives considered in Phase 2 were innovative thermal treatments with nine types of primary processing units. Other variations in the study examined the effect of combustion gas, air pollution control system design, and stabilization technology for the treatment residues. The Phase 1 study, the results of which have been published as an interim report, examined ten initial thermal treatment alternatives. The Phase 2 systems were evaluated in essentially the same manner as the Phase 2 systems. The assumptions and methods were the same as for the Phase 1 study. The quantities, and physical and chemical compositions, of the input waste used in he Phase 2 systems differ from those in the Phase 1 systems, which were based on a preliminary waste input database developed at the onset of the Integrated Thermal Treatment System study. The inventory database used in the Phase 2 study incorporates the latest US Department of Energy information. All systems, both primary treatment systems and subsystem inputs, have now been evaluated using the same waste input (2,927 lb/hr).

Feizollahi, F.; Quapp, W.J.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

T h e W a s t e I s o l a t i o n P i l o t P l a n t DOE 1980. Final Environmental Impact Statement, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. DOE/EIS-0026, Washington, DC, Office of Environmental Management, U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1981. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP): Record of Decision. Federal Register, Vol. 46, No. 18, p. 9162, (46 Federal Register 9162), January 28, 1981. U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1990. Final Supplement Environmental Impact Statement, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. DOE/EIS-0026-FS, Washington, DC, Office of Environmental Management, U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1990. Record of Decision: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Federal Register, Vol. 55, No. 121, 25689-25692, U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1994. Comparative Study of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Transportation Alternatives.

483

Salt Waste Processing Initiatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Patricia Suggs Patricia Suggs Salt Processing Team Lead Assistant Manager for Waste Disposition Project Office of Environmental Management Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Initiatives 2 Overview * Current SRS Liquid Waste System status * Opportunity to accelerate salt processing - transformational technologies - Rotary Microfiltration (RMF) and Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) - Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (ARP/MCU) extension with next generation extractant - Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) performance enhancement - Saltstone enhancements * Life-cycle impacts and benefits 3 SRS Liquid Waste Total Volume >37 Million Gallons (Mgal) Total Curies 183 MCi (51% ) 175 MCi (49% ) >358 Million Curies (MCi) Sludge 34.3 Mgal (92% ) 3.0 Mgal (8%)

484

HLW Glass Waste Loadings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HLW HLW Glass Waste Loadings Ian L. Pegg Vitreous State Laboratory The Catholic University of America Washington, DC Overview Overview  Vitrification - general background  Joule heated ceramic melter (JHCM) technology  Factors affecting waste loadings  Waste loading requirements and projections  WTP DWPF  DWPF  Yucca Mountain License Application requirements on waste loading  Summary Vitrification  Immobilization of waste by conversion into a glass  Internationally accepted treatment for HLW  Why glass?  Amorphous material - able to incorporate a wide spectrum of elements over wide ranges of composition; resistant to radiation damage  Long-term durability - natural analogs Relatively simple process - amenable to nuclearization at large  Relatively simple process - amenable to nuclearization at large scale  There

485

Seal welded cast iron nuclear waste container  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention identifies methods and articles designed to circumvent metallurgical problems associated with hermetically closing an all cast iron nuclear waste package by welding. It involves welding nickel-carbon alloy inserts which are bonded to the mating plug and main body components of the package. The welding inserts might be bonded in place during casting of the package components. When the waste package closure weld is made, the most severe thermal effects of the process are restricted to the nickel-carbon insert material which is far better able to accommodate them than is cast iron. Use of nickel-carbon weld inserts should eliminate any need for pre-weld and post-weld heat treatments which are a problem to apply to nuclear waste packages. Although the waste package closure weld approach described results in a dissimilar metal combination, the relative surface area of nickel-to-iron, their electrochemical relationship, and the presence of graphite in both materials will act to prevent any galvanic corrosion problem.

Filippi, Arthur M. (Pittsburgh, PA); Sprecace, Richard P. (Murrysville, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layer stability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009 Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layer1 May 2009. [ 1 ] Global ocean wind power has recently beenincreases mean global ocean wind power by +58% and À4%,

Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Tidal triggering of earthquakes in the Northeast Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......of earthquakes in the Northeast Pacific Ocean William S. D. Wilcock School...of earthquakes in the Northeast Pacific Ocean, a region of high-amplitude...interaction|forecasting|prediction|Pacific Ocean| Introduction For more than a......

William S. D. Wilcock

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository in Salt Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository in Salt This report summarizes efforts to simulate coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes occurring within a generic hypothetical high-level waste (HLW) repository in bedded salt; chemical processes of the system allow precipitation and dissolution of salt with elevated temperatures that drive water and water vapor flow around hot waste packages. Characterizing salt backfill processes is an important objective of the exercise. An evidence-based algorithm for mineral dehydration is also applied in the modeling. The Finite Element Heat and Mass transfer code (FEHM) is used to simulate coupled thermal,

489

Corrosion of Chromium-Rich Oxide Refractories in Molten Waste Glasses  

SciTech Connect

The DOE is faced with a wide variety of waste treatment problems throughout the complex. The diversity in physical, chemical, and radiological characteristics of these waste streams will necessitate an array of treatment technologies since, at present, there exists no single solution. Thermal treatment technologies have an important, but by no means singular, role to play in addressing this problem since they generally offer the potential for significant volume reductions, leach resistant waste forms, considerable versatility, and are relatively well developed. In particular, DOE has made significant investments in the development and deployment of vitrification technologies for the treatment of high-level nuclear wastes and, more recently, for mixed wastes. The general area of materials of construction is especially important for thermal processes due to the inherently high-temperature and the often-corrosive environments involved. The performance of these materials directly impacts treatment costs since this determines maintenance downtime and the useful service life of the treatment unit.

Hao Gan; Xiaodong Lu; Andrew C. Buechele; M. Catherine Paul; Ian L. Pegg

2002-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

490

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile Abstracts database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile abstracts). NewSearch  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile Abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Timothy D. Stark, F.ASCE1 landfills may contain aluminum from residential and commercial solid waste, industrial waste, and aluminum, may react with liquid in a landfill and cause uncontrolled temperature increases, significant changes

497

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 360: Solid Waste Management Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Solid Waste Management 0: Solid Waste Management Facilities (New York) Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 360: Solid Waste Management Facilities (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations apply to all solid wastes with the exception of hazardous or radioactive waste. Proposed solid waste processing facilities are required to obtain permits prior to construction, and the regulations provide details about permitting, construction, registration, and operation requirements. The regulations contain specific guidance for land

498

TRU Waste Sampling Program: Volume I. Waste characterization  

SciTech Connect

Volume I of the TRU Waste Sampling Program report presents the waste characterization information obtained from sampling and characterizing various aged transuranic waste retrieved from storage at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The data contained in this report include the results of gas sampling and gas generation, radiographic examinations, waste visual examination results, and waste compliance with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant-Waste Acceptance Criteria (WIPP-WAC). A separate report, Volume II, contains data from the gas generation studies.

Clements, T.L. Jr.; Kudera, D.E.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Dynamics of a Snowball Earth ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... a model that couples ice flow and ocean circulation, and is driven by a weak geothermal heat flux under a global ice cover about a kilometre thick. Compared with the ... studies accounted for the combined effects of thick ice cover and flow, and driving by geothermal heating, yet ref. 11 simulated an ocean under a 200-m-thick ice cover ...

Yosef Ashkenazy; Hezi Gildor; Martin Losch; Francis A. Macdonald; Daniel P. Schrag; Eli Tziperman

2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

500

Automated Sensor Networks to Advance Ocean Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

satellite telecom- munications. A regional cabled observa- tory will "wire" a single region in the north- eastern Pacific Ocean with a high-speed optical and power grid. The coastal com- ponent will expand ocean- observing network in the Mid-Atlantic Bight waters (MAB, spanning offshore regions from