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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geo-thermal energy, ocean thermal energy, wasted heat ingeothermal energy, ocean thermal energy, wasted heat inthermal energy, geo/ocean-thermal energy, wasted heat in

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Report about the Ocean Thermal...

3

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draftin Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology haveThe Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) 2rogrammatic

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solar radiation, and the geothermal energy. [16] Fig. 1.1.thermal energy, geothermal energy, wasted heat from athermal energy, geothermal energy, ocean thermal energy,

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draftof ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. Depart~June 1-11, 1980 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draftr:he comnercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionJune 1-11, 1980 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sands, M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)r:he comnercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionJune 1-11, 1980 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference, Februarythe Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference. OceanSixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference. June 19-

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion LUIS A. VEGA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion LUIS A. VEGA Hawaii Natural Energy Institute, School of Ocean depths of 20 m (surface water) and 1,000 m. OTEC Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion, the process of converting the ocean thermal energy into electricity. OTEC transfer function The relationship between

10

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants byand M.D. Sands. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilotfield of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. DOE.Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. A preliminaryof the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilotCommercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants byof the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference, FebruarySixth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference, June 19-Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference, February

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference, FebruaryFifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference, FebruarySixth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference. June 19-

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1980 :. i l OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTALM.D. (editor). 1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion DraftDevelopment Plan. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants byof the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. DOE.Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. A preliminaryCompany. Ocean thermal energy conversion mission analysis

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Potential Environmental Impacts and Fisheries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Potential Environmental Impacts and Fisheries Christina M Comfort Institute #12;Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) · Renewable energy ­ ocean thermal gradient · Large

Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

19

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants byfield of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.II of the Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference.

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants bySands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilotof the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Biofouling,

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Biofouling,development of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plant-impact assessment ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants bySands. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot plantof the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Biofouling,

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC)field of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.II of the Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference.

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)of the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M.D. (editor). 1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Draft1980 :. i l OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTALDevelopment Plan. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the commercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionE. Hathaway. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. AElectric Company. Ocean thermal energy conversion mission

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC)the intermediate field of ocean thermal energy conversionII of the Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference.

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)of the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,and M.D. Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Ocean Thermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico:CommunityNorthwest BasinOahu, Hawaii:EnergyOpenTheOceanThermal

30

Ocean Thermal Resource and Site Selection Criteria (January 2011) luisvega@hawaii.edu Ocean Thermal Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Thermal Resource and Site Selection Criteria (January 2011) luisvega@hawaii.edu 1 Ocean Thermal Resources The vast size of the ocean thermal resource and the baseload capability of OTEC systems of Hawaii throughout the year and at all times of the day. This is an indigenous renewable energy resource

31

Assessment of ocean thermal energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a promising renewable energy technology to generate electricity and has other applications such as production of freshwater, seawater air-conditioning, marine culture and chilled-soil ...

Muralidharan, Shylesh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the commercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionOpen cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. A preliminary1978. 'Open cycle thermal energy converS1on. A preliminary

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

COMMERCIAL FISHERY DATA FROM A PROPOSED OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) SITE IN PUERTO RICO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites toassessment: ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) program;operation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power

Ryan, Constance J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment, Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) ProgramAssessment Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), U.S.recommendations for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

Sullivan, S.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment, Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) ProgramAssessment Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), U.S.for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plants. Argonne,

Sullivan, S.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

COMMERCIAL FISHERY DATA FROM A PROPOSED OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) SITE IN PUERTO RICO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

assessment: ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) program;proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites tooperation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power

Ryan, Constance J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nental Assessment, Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)Impact Assessment Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC),Intake Screens for Ocean Thermal Energy M.S. Thesis. Oregon

Sullivan, S.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

COMMERCIAL FISHERY DATA FROM A PROPOSED OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) SITE IN PUERTO RICO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at several proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)Environmental assessment: ocean thermal energy conversion (The operation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

Ryan, Constance J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Recycling of Wasted Energy : ThermalOF THE DISSERTATION Recycling of Wasted Energy : Thermal to

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Ocean Thermal Resources off the Hawaiian Islands luisvega@hawaii.edu Ocean Thermal Resources off the Hawaiian Islands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

information to assist developers of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) systems in site selection Energy Conversion The immense size of the ocean thermal resource and the baseload capability of OTECOcean Thermal Resources off the Hawaiian Islands luisvega@hawaii.edu 1 Ocean Thermal Resources off

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Mostly about USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion History Mostly about USA 1980's to 1990's and bias towards Vega Structures (Plantships) · Bottom-Mounted Structures · Model Basin Tests/ At-Sea Tests · 210 kW OC-OTEC) #12;#12;Claude's Off Rio de Janeiro (1933) · Floating Ice Plant: 2.2 MW OC- OTEC to produce 2000

42

NAVFAC Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NAVFAC Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Project Contract Number N62583-09-C-0083 CDRL A014 OTEC Mini-Spar Pilot Plant 9 December 2011 OTEC-2011-001-4 Prepared for: Naval Facilities; distribution is unlimited. #12; Configuration Report and Development Plan Volume 4 Site Specific OTEC

43

August 2011 Environmental Assessment of Ocean Thermal Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

August 2011 1 Environmental Assessment of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion in Hawaii Available data prompted ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) technology to be re-considered for use in Hawaii for OTEC development. Keywords- Ocean thermal energy conversion, OTEC, renewable energy, Hawaii

44

Thermal processing systems for TRU mixed waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents preliminary ex situ thermal processing system concepts and related processing considerations for remediation of transuranic (TRU)-contaminated wastes (TRUW) buried at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Anticipated waste stream components and problems are considered. Thermal processing conditions required to obtain a high-integrity, low-leachability glass/ceramic final waste form are considered. Five practical thermal process system designs are compared. Thermal processing of mixed waste and soils with essentially no presorting and using incineration followed by high temperature melting is recommended. Applied research and development necessary for demonstration is also recommended.

Eddy, T.L.; Raivo, B.D.; Anderson, G.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Thermal processing systems for TRU mixed waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents preliminary ex situ thermal processing system concepts and related processing considerations for remediation of transuranic (TRU)-contaminated wastes (TRUW) buried at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Anticipated waste stream components and problems are considered. Thermal processing conditions required to obtain a high-integrity, low-leachability glass/ceramic final waste form are considered. Five practical thermal process system designs are compared. Thermal processing of mixed waste and soils with essentially no presorting and using incineration followed by high temperature melting is recommended. Applied research and development necessary for demonstration is also recommended.

Eddy, T.L.; Raivo, B.D.; Anderson, G.L.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system including a flash evaporator for vaporizing relatively warm ocean surface water and an axial flow, elastic fluid turbine having a vertical shaft and axis of rotation. The warm ocean water is transmitted to the evaporator through a first prestressed concrete skirt-conduit structure circumferentially situated about the axis of rotation. The unflashed warm ocean water exits the evaporator through a second prestressed concrete skirt-conduit structure located circumferentially about and radially within the first skirt-conduit structure. The radially inner surface of the second skirt conduit structure constitutes a cylinder which functions as the turbine's outer casing and obviates the need for a conventional outer housing. The turbine includes a radially enlarged disc element attached to the shaft for supporting at least one axial row of radially directed blades through which the steam is expanded. A prestressed concrete inner casing structure of the turbine has upstream and downstream portions respectively situated upstream and downstream from the disc element. The radially outer surfaces of the inner casing portions and radially outer periphery of the axially interposed disc cooperatively form a downwardly radially inwardly tapered surface. An annular steam flowpath of increasing flow area in the downward axial direction is radially bounded by the inner and outer prestressed concrete casing structures. The inner casing portions each include a transversely situated prestressed concrete circular wall for rotatably supporting the turbine shaft and associated structure. The turbine blades are substantially radially coextensive with the steam flowpath and receive steam from the evaporator through an annular array of prestressed concrete stationary vanes which extend between the inner and outer casings to provide structural support therefor and impart a desired flow direction to the steam.

Wittig, J. Michael (West Goshen, PA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

The effects of ocean-dumped wastes on marine phytoplankto  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

became widespread. With the new environmental consciousness of recent years, and as the character of the wastes dumped became more hazardous, ocean dumping has been increasingly criticised and more closely monitored. The practice is likely to continue... by jurisdicti. on under the Refuse Act of 1899 with a ay. , tern of "Letters of No Objection. " Some information on the proposed quantity and charactezistics of the wastes was required, and there was some review of the applications by various state...

Schwab, Claude Raymond

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Assessment and evaluation of a safety factor with respect to ocean disposal of waste materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the oceans is essential if ocean dumping is to be continued. The author has surveyed the available literature, bioassay studies, and pertinent research concerning chronic effects and the risk they impose on the marine ecosystem. The main purpose... OPERATIONS 10 History of Ocean Dumping Corps of Engineers' Letters of No Objection 10 12 Types of Materials Dumped Dredge Spoils Industrial Wastes Municipal Wastes Radioactive Wastes Solid Wastes Military Wastes Construction Debris 13 13 15 15...

Zapatka, Thomas Francis

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biological thermal energy, geothermal energy, wasted heatpower plants, solar thermal energy, geothermal energy, oceansolar radiation, and the geothermal energy. [16] Fig. 1.1.

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

E. Guilyardi G. Madec L. Terray The role of lateral ocean physics in the upper ocean thermal balance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

inertia and to its opacity, the ocean stores vast amounts of energy, away from a direct contactE. Guilyardi á G. Madec á L. Terray The role of lateral ocean physics in the upper ocean thermal balance of a coupled ocean-atmosphere GCM Received: 24 January 2000 / Accepted: 11 September 2000 Abstract

Guilyardi, Eric

51

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICAL DATA REPORT FROM 0. S. S. RESEARCHER IN GULF OF MEXICO, JULY 12-23, 1977.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBL-8945 GOTEC-01 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICALThree Proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites:an operating Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion plant were in-

Quinby-Hunt, M.S.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT FOR THE NOVEMBER 1977 GOTEC-02 CRUISE TO THE GULF OF MEXICO MOBILE SITE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9437 GOTEC-02 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARYto potential Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites inThree Proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites:

Commins, M.L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT FOR THE NOVEMBER 1977 GOTEC-02 CRUISE TO THE GULF OF MEXICO MOBILE SITE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9437 GOTEC-02 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARYThree Proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites:al. , (1979) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion, Eco- logical

Commins, M.L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICAL DATA REPORT FROM 0. S. S. RESEARCHER IN GULF OF MEXICO, JULY 12-23, 1977.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBL-8945 GOTEC-01 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICALat Three Proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)effect of an operating Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion plant

Quinby-Hunt, M.S.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT FOR THE NOVEMBER 1977 GOTEC-02 CRUISE TO THE GULF OF MEXICO MOBILE SITE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9437 GOTEC-02 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARYcruises to potential Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)at Three Proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

Commins, M.L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

RF Thermal Plasma Synthesis of Ferrite Nanopowders from Metallurgical Wastes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RF Thermal Plasma Synthesis of Ferrite Nanopowders from Metallurgical Wastes J.Szépvölgyi1 , I Department of General Physics, Eötvös University H-1518 Budapest, P.O.B. 32 Hungary Keywords: zinc ferrite, thermal plasma, waste, XRD Abstract. RF thermal plasma synthesis of zinc-ferrite nanopowders has been

Gubicza, Jenõ

57

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT FOR THE NOVEMBER 1977 GOTEC-02 CRUISE TO THE GULF OF MEXICO MOBILE SITE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to potential Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites inThree Proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites:

Commins, M.L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

2007 Survey of Energy Resources World Energy Council 2007 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion COUNTRY NOTES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007 Survey of Energy Resources World Energy Council 2007 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion 573 and personal communication. Valuable inputs were provided by Don Lennard of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion organisation. Australia At an ocean energy workshop held in Townsville, northern Queensland in September 2005

59

THERMAL IMPACT OF WASTE EMPLACEMENT AND SURFACE COOLING ASSOCIATED WITH GEOLOGIC DISPOSAL OF NUCLEAR WASTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waste repository design AERE-R--9343 Atomic Energy Researchof the thermal s t r e s s field. AERE R-8999, Atomic Energy

Wang, J.S.Y.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Thermal processing system concepts and considerations for RWMC buried waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a preliminary determination of ex situ thermal processing system concepts and related processing considerations for application to remediation of transuranic (TRU)-contaminated buried wastes (TRUW) at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Beginning with top-level thermal treatment concepts and requirements identified in a previous Preliminary Systems Design Study (SDS), a more detailed consideration of the waste materials thermal processing problem is provided. Anticipated waste stream elements and problem characteristics are identified and considered. Final waste form performance criteria, requirements, and options are examined within the context of providing a high-integrity, low-leachability glass/ceramic, final waste form material. Thermal processing conditions required and capability of key systems components (equipment) to provide these material process conditions are considered. Information from closely related companion study reports on melter technology development needs assessment and INEL Iron-Enriched Basalt (IEB) research are considered. Five potentially practicable thermal process system design configuration concepts are defined and compared. A scenario for thermal processing of a mixed waste and soils stream with essentially no complex presorting and using a series process of incineration and high temperature melting is recommended. Recommendations for applied research and development necessary to further detail and demonstrate the final waste form, required thermal processes, and melter process equipment are provided.

Eddy, T.L.; Kong, P.C.; Raivo, B.D.; Anderson, G.L.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Ocean thermal energy conversion plants : experimental and analytical study of mixing and recirculation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a method of generating power using the vertical temperature gradient of the tropical ocean as an energy source. Experimental and analytical studies have been carried out to determine ...

Jirka, Gerhard H.

62

Near-inertial and thermal to atmospheric forcing in the North Atlantic Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observational and modeling techniques are employed to investigate the thermal and inertial upper ocean response to wind and buoyancy forcing in the North Atlantic Ocean. First, the seasonal kinetic energy variability of ...

Silverthorne, Katherine E

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Carbon dioxide release from ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of recent measurements of CO{sub 2} release from an open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) experiment. Based on these data, the rate of short-term CO{sub 2} release from future open-cycle OTEC plants is projected to be 15 to 25 times smaller than that from fossil-fueled electric power plants. OTEC system that incorporate subsurface mixed discharge are expected to result in no long-term release. OTEC plants can significantly reduce CO{sub 2} emissions when substituted for fossil-fueled power generation. 12 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Green, H.J. (Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA)); Guenther, P.R. (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

COMMERCIAL FISHERY DATA FROM A PROPOSED OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) SITE IN PUERTO RICO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites to identify thefishery resources at potential OTEC sites. At this time, thethermal energy conversion (OTEC) program; preoperational

Ryan, Constance J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Thermal treatment of organic radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The organic radioactive waste which is generated in nuclear and isotope facilities (power plants, research centers and other) must be treated in order to achieve a waste form suitable for long term storage and disposal. Therefore the resulting waste treatment products should be stable under influence of temperature, time, radioactivity, chemical and biological activity. Another reason for the treatment of organic waste is the volume reduction with respect to the storage costs. For different kinds of waste, different treatment technologies have been developed and some are now used in industrial scale. The paper gives process descriptions for the treatment of solid organic radioactive waste of low beta/gamma activity and alpha-contaminated solid organic radioactive waste, and the pyrolysis of organic radioactive waste.

Chrubasik, A.; Stich, W. [NUKEM GmbH, Alzenau (Germany)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

66

Thermal Treatment of Solid Wastes Using the Electric Arc Furnace  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thermal waste treatment facility has been developed at the Albany Research Center (ARC) over the past seven years to process a wide range of heterogeneous mixed wastes, on a scale of 227 to 907 kg/h (500 to 2,000 lb/h). The current system includes a continuous feed system, a 3-phase AC, 0.8 MW graphite electrode arc furnace, and a dedicated air pollution control system (APCS) which includes a close-coupled thermal oxidizer, spray cooler, baghouse, and wet scrubber. The versatility of the complete system has been demonstrated during 5 continuous melting campaigns, ranging from 11 to 25 mt (12 to 28 st) of treated wastes per campaign, which were conducted on waste materials such as (a) municipal incinerator ash, (b) simulated low-level radioactive, high combustible-bearing mixed wastes, (c) simulated low-level radioactive liquid tank wastes, (d) heavy metal contaminated soils, and (e) organic-contaminated dredging spoils. In all cases, the glass or slag products readily passed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxicity Characteristic Leachability Program (TCLP) test. Additional studies are currently under way on electric utility wastes, steel and aluminum industry wastes, as well as zinc smelter residues. Thermal treatment of these solid waste streams is intended to produce a metallic product along with nonhazardous glass or slag products.

O'Connor, W.K.; Turner, P.C.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Economics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Luis A. Vega, Ph.D.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) by Luis A. Vega, Ph.D. Published by the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Chapter 7 of "Ocean Energy Recovery: The State of the Art" 1992 #12;Published in Ocean Energy Recovery, pp 152-181, ASCE (1992) ii Table of Contents Tables /Figures

68

Technical resource document for assured thermal processing of wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a concise compendium of resource material covering assured thermal processing of wastes (ATPW), an area in which Sandia aims to develop a large program. The ATPW program at Sandia is examining a wide variety of waste streams and thermal processes. Waste streams under consideration include municipal, chemical, medical, and mixed wastes. Thermal processes under consideration range from various incineration technologies to non-incineration processes such as supercritical water oxidation or molten metal technologies. Each of the chapters describes the element covered, discusses issues associated with its further development and/or utilization, presents Sandia capabilities that address these issues, and indicates important connections to other ATPW elements. The division of the field into elements was driven by the team`s desire to emphasize areas where Sandia`s capabilities can lead to major advances and is therefore somewhat unconventional. The report will be valuable to Sandians involved in further ATPW program development.

Farrow, R.L.; Fisk, G.A.; Hartwig, C.M.; Hurt, R.H.; Ringland, J.T.; Swansiger, W.A.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters

70

Thermal and chemical remediation of mixed waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process and system for treating organic waste materials without venting gaseous emissions to the atmosphere. A fluidized bed including lime particles is operated at a temperature of at least 500 C by blowing gas having 20%/70% oxygen upwardly through the bed particles at a rate sufficient to fluidize same. A toxic organic waste material is fed into the fluidized bed where the organic waste material reacts with the lime forming CaCO[sub 3]. The off gases are filtered and cooled to condense water which is separated. A portion of the calcium carbonate formed during operation of the fluidized bed is replaced with lime particles. The off gases from the fluidized bed after drying are recirculated until the toxic organic waste material in the bed is destroyed. 3 figs.

Nelson, P.A.; Swift, W.M.

1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

71

Thermal and chemical remediation of mixed wastes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for treating organic waste materials without venting gaseous emissions to the atmosphere which includes oxidizing the organic waste materials at an elevated temperature not less than about 500.degree. C. with a gas having an oxygen content in the range of from about 20% to about 70% to produce an oxidation product containing CO.sub.2 gas. The gas is then filtered to remove particulates, and then contacted with an aqueous absorbent solution of alkali metal carbonates or alkanolamines to absorb a portion of the CO.sub.2 gas from the particulate-free oxidation product. The CO.sub.2 absorbent is thereafter separated for further processing. A process and system are also disclosed in which the waste materials are contacted with a reactive medium such as lime and product treatment as described.

Nelson, Paul A. (Wheaton, IL); Swift, William M. (Downers Grove, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Thermal and chemical remediation of mixed wastes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for treating organic waste materials without venting gaseous emissions to the atmosphere which includes oxidizing the organic waste materials at an elevated temperature not less than about 500 C with a gas having an oxygen content in the range of from about 20% to about 70% to produce an oxidation product containing CO{sub 2} gas. The gas is then filtered to remove particulates, and then contacted with an aqueous absorbent solution of alkali metal carbonates or alkanolamines to absorb a portion of the CO{sub 2} gas from the particulate-free oxidation product. The CO{sub 2} absorbent is thereafter separated for further processing. A process and system are also disclosed in which the waste materials are contacted with a reactive medium such as lime and product treatment as described. 8 figs.

Nelson, P.A.; Swift, W.M.

1997-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

73

Draft environmental assessment: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, for the deployment and operation of a commercial 40-Megawatt (MW) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plant (hereafter called the Pilot Plant). A description of the proposed action is presented, and a generic environment typical of the candidate Pilot Plant siting regions is described. An assessment of the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed action is given, and the risk of credible accidents and mitigating measures to reduce these risks are considered. The Federal and State plans and policies the proposed action will encompass are described. Alternatives to the proposed action are presented. Appendix A presents the navigation and environmental information contained in the US Coast Pilot for each of the candidate sites; Appendix B provides a brief description of the methods and calculations used in the EA. It is concluded that environmental disturbances associated with Pilot Plant activities could potentially cause significant environmental impacts; however, the magnitude of these potential impacts cannot presently be assessed, due to insufficient engineering and environmental information. A site- and design-specific OTEC Pilot Plant Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is required to resolve the potentially significant environmental effects associated with Pilot Plant deployment and operation. (WHK)

Sullivan, S.M.; Sands, M.D.; Donat, J.R.; Jepsen, P.; Smookler, M.; Villa, J.F.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Programmatic Environmental Analysis--Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The programmatic environmental analysis is an initial assessment of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology considering development, demonstration and commercialization. It is concluded that the OTEC development program should continue because the development, demonstration, and commercialization on a single-plant deployment basis should not present significant environmental impacts. However, several areas within the OTEC program require further investigation in order to assess the potential for environmental impacts from OTEC operation, particularly in large-scale deployments and in defining alternatives to closed-cycle biofouling control: (1) Larger-scale deployments of OTEC clusters or parks require further investigations in order to assess optimal platform siting distances necessary to minimize adverse environmental impacts. (2) The deployment and operation of the preoperational platform (OTEC-1) and future demonstration platforms must be carefully monitored to refine environmental assessment predictions, and to provide design modifications which may mitigate or reduce environmental impacts for larger-scale operations. These platforms will provide a valuable opportunity to fully evaluate the intake and discharge configurations, biofouling control methods, and both short-term and long-term environmental effects associated with platform operations. (3) Successful development of OTEC technology to use the maximal resource capabilities and to minimize environmental effects will require a concerted environmental management program, encompassing many different disciplines and environmental specialties. This volume contains these appendices: Appendix A -- Deployment Scenario; Appendix B -- OTEC Regional Characterization; and Appendix C -- Impact and Related Calculations.

Authors, Various

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

THERMAL ANALYSIS OF WASTE GLASS MELTER FEEDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Melter feeds for high-level nuclear waste (HLW) typically contain a large number of constituents that evolve gas on heating, Multiple gas-evolving reactions are both successive and simultaneous, and include the release of chemically bonded water, reactions of nitrates with organics, and reactions of molten salts with solid silica. Consequently, when a sample of a HLW feed is subjected to thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), the rate of change of the sample mass reveals multiple overlapping peaks. In this study, a melter feed, formulated for a simulated high-alumina HLW to be vitrified in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, currently under construction at the Hanford Site in Washington State, USA, was subjected to TGA. In addition, a modified melter feed was prepared as an all-nitrate version of the baseline feed to test the effect of sucrose addition on the gas-evolving reactions. Activation energies for major reactions were determined using the Kissinger method. The ultimate aim of TGA studies is to obtain a kinetic model of the gas-evolving reactions for use in mathematical modeling of the cold cap as an element of the overall model of the waste-glass melter. In this study, we focused on computing the kinetic parameters of individual reactions without identifying their actual chemistry, The rough provisional model presented is based on the first-order kinetics.

KRUGER AA; HRMA PR; POKORNY R; PIERCE DA

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

76

Low temperature thermal treatment for petroleum refinery waste sludges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Treatment requirements for waste sludges generated by petroleum refinery operations and designated as waste codes K048, K049, K050, K051 and K052 under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) became effective in November, 1990 under the Landban regulations. An experimental program evaluated low temperature thermal treatment of filter cakes produced from these sludges using laboratory and pilot-scale equipment. One set of experiments on waste samples from two different refineries demonstrated the effective removal of organics of concern from the sludges to meet the RCRA Best Demonstrated Available Technology (BDAT) treatment standards. Cyanides were also within the acceptable limit. Combined with stabilization of heavy metals in the treatment residues, low temperature thermal treatment therefore provides an effective and efficient means of treating refinery sludges, with most hydrocarbons recovered and recycled to the refinery. A milder thermal treatment was used to remove the bulk of the water from a previously filtered waste sludge, providing effective waste minimization through a 40% decrease in the mass of sludge to be disposed. The heating value of the sludge was increased simultaneously by one-third, thereby producing a residue of greater value in an alternative fuels program. A process based on this approach was successfully designed and commercialized.

Ayen, R.J.; Swanstrom, C.P. (Geneva Research Center, IL (United States))

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Surrogate formulations for thermal treatment of low-level mixed waste, Part II: Selected mixed waste treatment project waste streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the formulation of surrogate waste packages, representing the major bulk constituent compositions for 12 waste stream classifications selected by the US DOE Mixed Waste Treatment Program. These waste groupings include: neutral aqueous wastes; aqueous halogenated organic liquids; ash; high organic content sludges; adsorbed aqueous and organic liquids; cement sludges, ashes, and solids; chloride; sulfate, and nitrate salts; organic matrix solids; heterogeneous debris; bulk combustibles; lab packs; and lead shapes. Insofar as possible, formulation of surrogate waste packages are referenced to authentic wastes in inventory within the DOE; however, the surrogate waste packages are intended to represent generic treatability group compositions. The intent is to specify a nonradiological synthetic mixture, with a minimal number of readily available components, that can be used to represent the significant challenges anticipated for treatment of the specified waste class. Performance testing and evaluation with use of a consistent series of surrogate wastes will provide a means for the initial assessment (and intercomparability) of candidate treatment technology applicability and performance. Originally the surrogate wastes were intended for use with emerging thermal treatment systems, but use may be extended to select nonthermal systems as well.

Bostick, W.D.; Hoffmann, D.P.; Chiang, J.M.; Hermes, W.H.; Gibson, L.V. Jr.; Richmond, A.A. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)] [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mayberry, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Frazier, G. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)] [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sheet] map I - 732). General Electric Company. Ocean thermalby Washom et al. General Electric (1977), Francis (1977),selected is based on General Electric estimated the ammonia

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Response of oceanic hydrate-bearing sediments to thermal stresses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are often observed in unconsolidated oceanic sediments11.wellbore assembly if a weak unconsolidated porous medium isevidence, because of the unconsolidated, unlithified nature

Moridis, G.J.; Kowalsky, M.B.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Waste Gasification by Thermal Plasma: A Review Frdric Fabry*, Christophe Rehmet, Vandad Rohani, Laurent Fulcheri  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

12 Waste Gasification by Thermal Plasma: A Review Frédéric Fabry*, Christophe Rehmet, Vandad Rohani proposes an overview of waste-to-energy conversion by gasification processes based on thermal plasma, of various waste gasification processes based on thermal plasma (DC or AC plasma torches) at lab scale versus

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

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81

Comparative environmental analysis of waste brominated plastic thermal treatments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of this research activity is to investigate the environmental impact of different thermal treatments of waste electric and electronic equipment (WEEE), applying a life cycle assessment methodology. Two scenarios were assessed, which both allow the recovery of bromine: (A) the co-combustion of WEEE and green waste in a municipal solid waste combustion plant, and (B) the staged-gasification of WEEE and combustion of produced syngas in gas turbines. Mass and energy balances on the two scenarios were set and the analysis of the life cycle inventory and the life cycle impact assessment were conducted. Two impact assessment methods (Ecoindicator 99 and Impact 2002+) were slightly modified and then used with both scenarios. The results showed that scenario B (staged-gasification) had a potentially smaller environmental impact than scenario A (co-combustion). In particular, the thermal treatment of staged-gasification was more energy efficient than co-combustion, and therefore scenario B performed better than scenario A, mainly in the impact categories of 'fossil fuels' and 'climate change'. Moreover, the results showed that scenario B allows a higher recovery of bromine than scenario A; however, Br recovery leads to environmental benefits for both the scenarios. Finally the study demonstrates that WEEE thermal treatment for energy and matter recovery is an eco-efficient way to dispose of this kind of waste.

Bientinesi, M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Materials Science (DICCISM), University of Pisa, Via Diotisalvi 2, 56126 Pisa (Italy)], E-mail: matteo.bientinesi@ing.unipi.it; Petarca, L. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Materials Science (DICCISM), University of Pisa, Via Diotisalvi 2, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

Potential environmental consequences of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants. A workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept of generating electrical power from the temperature difference between surface and deep ocean waters was advanced over a century ago. A pilot plant was constructed in the Caribbean during the 1920's but commercialization did not follow. The US Department of Energy (DOE) earlier planned to construct a single operational 10MWe Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plant by 1986. However, Public Law P.L.-96-310, the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Research, Development and Demonstration Act, and P.L.-96-320, the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Act of 1980, now call for acceleration of the development of OTEC plants, with capacities of 100 MWe in 1986, 500 MWe in 1989, and 10,000 MWe by 1999 and provide for licensing and permitting and loan guarantees after the technology has been demonstrated.

Walsh, J.J. (ed.)

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

USE OF MIXTURES AS WORKING FLUIDS IN OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION CYCLES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mixtures offer potential advantages over pure compounds as working fluids in ocean thermal energy conversion cycles. Power plant capital costs per unit of energy output can be reduced using mixtures because of increased thermal efficiency and/or decreased heat exchanger size requirements. Mixtures

Khan Zafar Iqbal; Kenneth E. Starling

84

Low level mixed waste thermal treatment technical basis report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed characterization of the existing and projected Hanford Site Radioactive Mixed Waste (RMW) inventory was initiated in 1993 (Place 1993). This report presents an analysis of the existing and projected RMW inventory. The subject characterization effort continues to be in support of the following engineering activities related to thermal treatment of Hanford Site RMW: (1) Contracting for commercial thermal treatment; (2) Installation and operation of an onsite thermal treatment facility (Project W-242); (3) Treatment at another Department of Energy (DOE) site. The collation of this characterization information (data) has emphasized the establishment of a common data base for the entire existing RMW inventory so that the specification of feed streams destined for different treatment facilities can be coordinated.

Place, B.G.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Study of thermal conductivity in organic solid wastes before composting J. HUET, C. Druilhe, G. Debenest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Study of thermal conductivity in organic solid wastes before composting J. HUET, C. Druilhe, G. Debenest ORBIT2012 1 STUDY OF THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY IN ORGANIC SOLID WASTES BEFORE COMPOSTING J. Huet, as illustrated by current EU waste policy and its five main priorities: prevention, reuse, recycling, recovery

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

86

Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Thermal-Response Evaluation of Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Thermal-Response Evaluation of Yucca Mountain During of the thermal response of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository for various thermal loadings. The U. S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board (NWTRB) staff has developed calculation tools that allow performing

87

Energy implications of the thermal recovery of biodegradable municipal waste materials in the United Kingdom  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: > Energy balances were calculated for the thermal treatment of biodegradable wastes. > For wood and RDF, combustion in dedicated facilities was the best option. > For paper, garden and food wastes and mixed waste incineration was the best option. > For low moisture paper, gasification provided the optimum solution. - Abstract: Waste management policies and legislation in many developed countries call for a reduction in the quantity of biodegradable waste landfilled. Anaerobic digestion, combustion and gasification are options for managing biodegradable waste while generating renewable energy. However, very little research has been carried to establish the overall energy balance of the collection, preparation and energy recovery processes for different types of wastes. Without this information, it is impossible to determine the optimum method for managing a particular waste to recover renewable energy. In this study, energy balances were carried out for the thermal processing of food waste, garden waste, wood, waste paper and the non-recyclable fraction of municipal waste. For all of these wastes, combustion in dedicated facilities or incineration with the municipal waste stream was the most energy-advantageous option. However, we identified a lack of reliable information on the energy consumed in collecting individual wastes and preparing the wastes for thermal processing. There was also little reliable information on the performance and efficiency of anaerobic digestion and gasification facilities for waste.

Burnley, Stephen, E-mail: s.j.burnley@open.ac.uk [Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Phillips, Rhiannon, E-mail: rhiannon.jones@environment-agency.gov.uk [Strategy Unit, Welsh Assembly Government, Ty Cambria, 29 Newport Road, Cardiff CF24 0TP (United Kingdom); Coleman, Terry, E-mail: terry.coleman@erm.com [Environmental Resources Management Ltd, Eaton House, Wallbrook Court, North Hinksey Lane, Oxford OX2 0QS (United Kingdom); Rampling, Terence, E-mail: twa.rampling@hotmail.com [7 Thurlow Close, Old Town Stevenage, Herts SG1 4SD (United Kingdom)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the external fluid mechanics of OTEC plants: report coveringocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants by mid-1980's.1980. A baseline design of a 40-MW OTEC Pilot Johns Hopkins

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartment of Energy(National1 -OSSGasof Energy Ocean EnergyRenewable

90

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartment of Energy(National1 -OSSGasof Energy Ocean

91

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Primer L. A. Vega, Ph.D.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

source and the heat sink required for a heat engine. A practical application is found in a system (heat engine) designed to transform the thermal energy into electricity. This is referred to as OTEC for Ocean seawater is flash-evaporated in a vacuum chamber. The resulting low-pressure steam is used to drive

92

Standard guide for characterization of radioactive and/or hazardous wastes for thermal treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This guide identifies methods to determine the physical and chemical characteristics of radioactive and/or hazardous wastes before a waste is processed at high temperatures, for example, vitrification into a homogeneous glass ,glass-ceramic, or ceramic waste form. This includes waste forms produced by ex-situ vitrification (ESV), in-situ vitrification (ISV), slagging, plasma-arc, hot-isostatic pressing (HIP) and/or cold-pressing and sintering technologies. Note that this guide does not specifically address high temperature waste treatment by incineration but several of the analyses described in this guide may be useful diagnostic methods to determine incinerator off-gas composition and concentrations. The characterization of the waste(s) recommended in this guide can be used to (1) choose and develop the appropriate thermal treatment methodology, (2) determine if waste pretreatment is needed prior to thermal treatment, (3) aid in development of thermal treatment process control, (4) develop surrogate wa...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A generally mushroom-shaped, open cycle OTEC system and distilled water producer which has a skirt-conduit structure extending from the enlarged portion of the mushroom to the ocean. The enlarged part of the mushroom houses a toroidal casing flash evaporator which produces steam which expands through a vertical rotor turbine, partially situated in the center of the blossom portion and partially situated in the mushroom's stem portion. Upon expansion through the turbine, the motive steam enters a shell and tube condenser annularly disposed about the rotor axis and axially situated beneath the turbine in the stem portion. Relatively warm ocean water is circulated up through the radially outer skirt-conduit structure entering the evaporator through a radially outer portion thereof, flashing a portion thereof into motive steam, and draining the unflashed portion from the evaporator through a radially inner skirt-conduit structure. Relatively cold cooling water enters the annular condenser through the radially inner edge and travels radially outwardly into a channel situated along the radially outer edge of the condenser. The channel is also included in the radially inner skirt-conduit structure. The cooling water is segregated from the potable, motive steam condensate which can be used for human consumption or other processes requiring high purity water. The expansion energy of the motive steam is partially converted into rotational mechanical energy of the turbine rotor when the steam is expanded through the shaft attached blades. Such mechanical energy drives a generator also included in the enlarged mushroom portion for producing electrical energy. Such power generation equipment arrangement provides a compact power system from which additional benefits may be obtained by fabricating the enclosing equipment, housings and component casings from low density materials, such as prestressed concrete, to permit those casings and housings to also function as a floating support vessel.

Wittig, J. Michael (West Goshen, PA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Composition of Municipal Solid Waste-Need for Thermal Treatment in the present Indian context  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Composition of Municipal Solid Waste- Need for Thermal Treatment in the present Indian context of an eternally inherent low heating value on the other. Current status of Solid Waste Management The MSW Rules front in India17 . None of the major metros have any projects of significant scale of Solid Waste

Columbia University

95

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

density, making direct thermal energy storage methods, e.g.reduced. Conventional thermal energy harvesting and storageharvesting, storage, and utilization of thermal energy has

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermally-Chargeable Supercapacitor Fluctuating Low-GradeThermally-Chargeable Supercapacitor for Fluctuating Low-Thermally-Chargeable Supercapacitor for Fluctuating Low-

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the portion of thermal energy that can be converted toof high-performance thermal energy harvesting systems, butreferred to as the thermal energy from low- temperature heat

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Ocean thermal plantships for production of ammonia as the hydrogen carrier.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventional petroleum, natural gas, and coal are the primary sources of energy that have underpinned modern civilization. Their continued availability in the projected quantities required and the impacts of emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) on the environment are issues at the forefront of world concerns. New primary sources of energy are being sought that would significantly reduce the emissions of GHGs. One such primary source that can help supply energy, water, and fertilizer without GHG emissions is available in the heretofore unexploited thermal gradients of the tropical oceans. The world's oceans are the largest natural collector and reservoir of solar energy. The potential of ocean energy is limitless for producing base-load electric power or ammonia as the hydrogen carrier and fresh water from seawater. However, until now, ocean energy has been virtually untapped. The general perception is that ocean thermal energy is limited to tropical countries. Therefore, the full potential of at-sea production of (1) ammonia as a hydrogen carrier and (2) desalinated water has not been adequately evaluated. Using ocean thermal plantships for the at-sea co-production of ammonia as a hydrogen carrier and desalinated water offer potential energy, environmental, and economic benefits that support the development of the technology. The introduction of a new widespread solution to our projected energy supply requires lead times of a decade or more. Although continuation of the ocean thermal program from the 1970s would likely have put us in a mitigating position in the early 2000s, we still have a window of opportunity to dedicate some of our conventional energy sources to the development of this renewable energy by the time new sources would be critically needed. The primary objective of this project is to evaluate the technical and economic viability of ocean thermal plantships for the production of ammonia as the hydrogen carrier. This objective is achieved by completing project tasks that consist of updating the John Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) pilot plantship design and extrapolating it to commercial plantships, evaluating a new energy-efficient ammonia synthesis process, evaluating the co-production of desalinated water on plantships, and developing a conceptual design of a satellite plantships system for commercial-scale ammonia production. In addition, an industrial workshop was organized to present the results and develop future goals for commercialization of ocean thermal plantships by 2015. The following goals, arranged in chronological order, were examined at the workshop: (1) Global displacement of petroleum-fuel-based (diesel, fuel oil, naphtha) power generation for freeing up these fuels for transportation, chemical feedstock, and other high-valued uses; (2) At-sea production of desalinated water for regions of critical water shortages; (3) Displacement of carbon-based feed stocks and energy for production of ammonia fertilizers; (4) Development of hydrogen supply to allow economic processing of heavy crude oils and upgrading oil sands; (5) Development of ammonia-fueled distributed energy to displace natural-gas fueled power generation to free up natural gas for higher-value uses and the mitigation of issues associated with imported liquefied natural gas (LNG); and (6) Use of ammonia as a hydrogen carrier for transportation.

Panchal, C.B.; Pandolfini, P. P.; Kumm, W. H.; Energy Systems; Johns Hopkins Univ.; Arctic Energies, Ltd.

2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

99

Near and far field models of external fluid mechanics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The world is facing the challenge of finding new renewable sources of energy - first, in response to fossil fuel reserve depletion, and second, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) can ...

Rodrguez Buo, Mariana

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Research on the external fluid mechanics of ocean thermal energy conversion plants : report covering experiments in a current  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report describes a set of experiments in a physical model study to explore plume transport and recirculation potential for a range of generic Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plant designs and ambient conditions. ...

Fry, David J. (David James)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Other LGH sources include solar thermal energy, geo-thermalThe heat source can be solar thermal energy, biologicalsources include the coolants in coal and nuclear power plants, solar thermal energy,

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

The 1996 meeting of the national technical workgroup on mixed waste thermal treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Technical Workgroup on Mixed Waste Thermal Treatment held its annual meeting in Atlanta Georgia on March 12-14, 1996. The National Technical Workgroup (NTW) and this meeting were sponsored under an interagency agreement between EPA and DOE. The 1996 Annual Meeting was hosted by US DOE Oak Ridge Operations in conjunction with Lockheed Martin Energy Systems - Center for Waste Management. A new feature of the annual meeting was the Permit Writer Panel Session which provided an opportunity for the state and federal permit writers to discuss issues and potential solutions to permitting mixed waste treatment systems. In addition, there was substantial discussion on the impacts of the Waste Combustion Performance Standards on mixed waste thermal treatment which are expected to proposed very soon. The 1996 meeting also focussed on two draft technical resource documents produced by NTW on Waste Analysis Plans and Compliance Test Procedures. Issues discussed included public involvement, waste characterization, and emission issues.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

103

Advanced thermal processing alternatives for solid waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1990`s have seen a resurgence of interest in the development of new thermal processing alternatives for municipal solid waste (MSW). Sparked by increasingly stringent environmental regulations, much of this creative energy has been applied to technologies for the gasification of MSW: converting the solid, hard to handle material into a clean, medium to high-Btu fuel gas. Other developers have focussed on full combustion technology but with a {open_quotes}twist{close_quotes} that lowers emissions or reduces cost. A comprehensive study of these new technologies was recently completed under the sponsorship of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy. The study characterized the state-of-the-art among emerging MSW thermal processing technologies that have reached the point of `incipient commercialization.` More than 45 technologies now under development were screened to develop a short list of seven processes that have passed through the idea stage, laboratory and benchscale testing, and have been prototyped at an MSW feed rate of at least several tons per hour. In-depth review of these seven included inspections of operating pilot or prototype units and a detailed analysis of technical, environmental and economic feasibility issues. No attempt was made to select `the best` technology since best can only be defined in the context of the constraints, aspirations and circumstances of a specific, local situation. The basic flowsheet, heat and material balances and available environmental data were summarized to help the reader grasp the underlying technical concepts and their embodiment in hardware. Remaining development needs, as seen by the study team are presented. Economic analysis shows the general balance of capital and operating costs.

Niessen, W.R. [Camp Dresser & McKee Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Computational Efficient Upscaling Methodology for Predicting Thermal Conductivity of Nuclear Waste forms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study evaluated different upscaling methods to predict thermal conductivity in loaded nuclear waste form, a heterogeneous material system. The efficiency and accuracy of these methods were compared. Thermal conductivity in loaded nuclear waste form is an important property specific to scientific researchers, in waste form Integrated performance and safety code (IPSC). The effective thermal conductivity obtained from microstructure information and local thermal conductivity of different components is critical in predicting the life and performance of waste form during storage. How the heat generated during storage is directly related to thermal conductivity, which in turn determining the mechanical deformation behavior, corrosion resistance and aging performance. Several methods, including the Taylor model, Sachs model, self-consistent model, and statistical upscaling models were developed and implemented. Due to the absence of experimental data, prediction results from finite element method (FEM) were used as reference to determine the accuracy of different upscaling models. Micrographs from different loading of nuclear waste were used in the prediction of thermal conductivity. Prediction results demonstrated that in term of efficiency, boundary models (Taylor and Sachs model) are better than self consistent model, statistical upscaling method and FEM. Balancing the computation resource and accuracy, statistical upscaling is a computational efficient method in predicting effective thermal conductivity for nuclear waste form.

Li, Dongsheng; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2011-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

105

Effective thermal conductivity measurements relevant to deep borehole nuclear waste disposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this work was to measure the effective thermal conductivity of a number of materials (particle beds, and fluids) proposed for use in and around canisters for disposal of high level nuclear waste in deep ...

Shaikh, Samina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chargeable Double-Layer Supercapacitors to be submitted toon Thermally-Chargeable Double- Layer Supercapacitors 2.1.of Thermally-Chargeable Supercapacitors in Various Solvents

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

PART I. THERMAL BREAKDOWN CHARACTERISTICS OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE COMPONENTS IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering Columbia University in the City of New York - 3 - waste is an area of deep concern both within and Environmental Engineering Columbia University in the City of New York - 2 - Thermal Breakdown Characteristics to the increasing use of and investment in waste- to-energy technologies in Asia, these two realms of knowledge

Columbia University

108

Subseabed Radioactive Waste Disposal Feasibility Program: ocean engineering challenges for the 80's  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the Subseabed Disposal Program is to assess the feasibility of disposing of high-level radioactive wastes or spent fuel in suitable geologic formations beneath the deep ocean floor. The program is entering a phase which will address engineering feasibility. While the current phase of the program to determine the scientific and environmental feasibility of the concept is not yet complete, activities to assess the engineering aspects are being initiated in parallel to facilitate the development of the concept on a time scale commensurate with other related programs both in the United States and abroad. It is anticipated that engineering aspects will become the central focus of the program during the early 80's and will continue so through the establishment of a pilot-plant level activity which could occur by the mid-90's.

Talbert, D. M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

THERMAL IMPACT OF WASTE EMPLACEMENT AND SURFACE COOLING ASSOCIATED WITH GEOLOGIC DISPOSAL OF NUCLEAR WASTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

released by the buried wastes and heat remain ing in theOF 10-YEAR-OLD WASTES Waste Heat Source C h a r a c t e r ia t e r s e c t i o n s . WASTE HEAT SOURCE CHARACTERIZATION

Wang, J.S.Y.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Life Cycle Cost Assessment, Final Technical Report, 30 May 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Life Cycle Cost Assessment (OLCCA) is a study performed by members of the Lockheed Martin (LM) OTEC Team under funding from the Department of Energy (DOE), Award No. DE-EE0002663, dated 01/01/2010. OLCCA objectives are to estimate procurement, operations and maintenance, and overhaul costs for two types of OTEC plants: -Plants moored to the sea floor where the electricity produced by the OTEC plant is directly connected to the grid ashore via a marine power cable (Grid Connected OTEC plants) -Open-ocean grazing OTEC plant-ships producing an energy carrier that is transported to designated ports (Energy Carrier OTEC plants) Costs are developed using the concept of levelized cost of energy established by DOE for use in comparing electricity costs from various generating systems. One area of system costs that had not been developed in detail prior to this analysis was the operations and sustainment (O&S) cost for both types of OTEC plants. Procurement costs, generally referred to as capital expense and O&S costs (operations and maintenance (O&M) costs plus overhaul and replacement costs), are assessed over the 30 year operational life of the plants and an annual annuity calculated to achieve a levelized cost (constant across entire plant life). Dividing this levelized cost by the average annual energy production results in a levelized cost of electricity, or LCOE, for the OTEC plants. Technical and production efficiency enhancements that could result in a lower value of the OTEC LCOE were also explored. The thermal OTEC resource for Oahu, Hawai?¢????i and projected build out plan were developed. The estimate of the OTEC resource and LCOE values for the planned OTEC systems enable this information to be displayed as energy supplied versus levelized cost of the supplied energy; this curve is referred to as an Energy Supply Curve. The Oahu Energy Supply Curve represents initial OTEC deployment starting in 2018 and demonstrates the predicted economies of scale as technology and efficiency improvements are realized and larger more economical plants deployed. Utilizing global high resolution OTEC resource assessment from the Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project (an independent DOE project), Global Energy Supply Curves were generated for Grid Connected and Energy Carrier OTEC plants deployed in 2045 when the predicted technology and efficiencies improvements are fully realized. The Global Energy Supply Curves present the LCOE versus capacity in ascending order with the richest, lowest cost resource locations being harvested first. These curves demonstrate the vast ocean thermal resource and potential OTEC capacity that can be harvested with little change in LCOE.

Martel, Laura; Smith, Paul; Rizea, Steven; Van Ryzin, Joe; Morgan, Charles; Noland, Gary; Pavlosky, Rick; Thomas, Michael

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

111

Thermal Predictions of the Cooling of Waste Glass Canisters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive liquid waste from five decades of weapons production is slated for vitrification at the Hanford site. The waste will be mixed with glass forming additives and heated to a high temperature, then poured into canisters within a pour cave where the glass will cool and solidify into a stable waste form for disposal. Computer simulations were performed to predict the heat rejected from the canisters and the temperatures within the glass during cooling. Four different waste glass compositions with different thermophysical properties were evaluated. Canister centerline temperatures and the total amount of heat transfer from the canisters to the surrounding air are reported.

Donna Post Guillen

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT FOR THE NOVEMBER 1977 GOTEC-02 CRUISE TO THE GULF OF MEXICO MOBILE SITE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites in the Gulf ofBiofoul- ing and Corrosion of OTEC plants ~ Selected Sites.Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites: Puerto Rico, St.

Commins, M.L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Non-Thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-Level Mixed Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE proposes to transport contact-handled LLMW from the Hanford Site to the Allied Technology Group (ATG) Mixed Waste Facility (MWF) in Richland, Washington, for non-thermal treatment and to return the treated waste to the Hanford Site for eventual land disposal. Over a 3-year period the waste would be staged to the ATG MWF, and treated waste would be returned to the Hanford Site. The ATG MWF would be located on an 18 hectare (ha) (45 acre [at]) ATG Site adjacent to ATG's licensed low-level waste processing facility at 2025 Battelle Boulevard. The ATG MWF is located approximately 0.8 kilometers (km) (0.5 miles [mi]) south of Horn Rapids Road and 1.6 km (1 mi) west of Stevens Drive. The property is located within the Horn Rapids triangle in northern Richland (Figure 2.1). The ATG MWF is to be located on the existing ATG Site, near the DOE Hanford Site, in an industrial area in the City of Richland. The effects of siting, construction, and overall operation of the MWF have been evaluated in a separate State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) EIS (City of Richland 1998). The proposed action includes transporting the LLMW from the Hanford Site to the ATG Facility, non-thermal treatment of the LLMW at the ATG MWF, and transporting the waste from ATG back to the Hanford Site. Impacts fi-om waste treatment operations would be bounded by the ATG SEPA EIS, which included an evaluation of the impacts associated with operating the non-thermal portion of the MWF at maximum design capacity (8,500 metric tons per year) (City of Richland 1998). Up to 50 employees would be required for non-thermal treatment portion of the MWF. This includes 40 employees that would perform waste treatment operations and 10 support staff. Similar numbers were projected for the thermal treatment portion of the MWF (City of Richland 1998).

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electrode surfaces, and electric energy is stored as surfacetemperature end and electric energy is generated, thermalbeing the generated electric energy and the consumed thermal

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Computer code input for thermal hydraulic analysis of Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility Title II design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The input files to the P/Thermal computer code are documented for the thermal hydraulic analysis of the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility Title II design analysis.

Cramer, E.R.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

On the thermal impact on the excavation damaged zone around deep radioactive waste disposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Clays and claystones are considered in some countries (including Belgium, France and Switzerland) as a potential host rock for high activity long lived radioactive waste disposal at great depth. One of the aspects to deal with in performance assessment is related to the effects on the host rock of the temperature elevation due to the placement of exothermic wastes. The potential effects of the thermal impact on the excavated damaged zone in the close field are another important issue that was the goal of the TIMODAZ European research project. In this paper, some principles of waste disposal in clayey host rocks at great depth are first presented and a series of experimental investigations carried out on specific equipment specially developed to face the problem are presented. Both drained and undrained tests have been developed to investigate the drained thermal volume changes of clays and claystone and the thermal pressurization occurring around the galleries. This importance of proper initial saturation (un...

Delage, Pierre

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Bentonite alteration due to thermal-hydro-chemical processes during the early thermal period in a nuclear waste repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After closure of an underground nuclear waste repository, the decay of radionuclides will raise temperature in the repository, and the bentonite buffer will resaturate by water inflow from the surrounding host rock. The perturbations from these thermal and hydrological processes are expected to dissipate within hundreds to a few thousand years. Here, we investigate coupled thermal-hydro-chemical processes and their effects on the short-term performance of a potential nuclear waste repository located in a clay formation. Using a simplified geometric configuration and abstracted hydraulic parameters of the clayey formation, we examine geochemical processes, coupled with thermo-hydrologic phenomena, and potential changes in porosity near the waste container during the early thermal period. The developed models were used for evaluating the mineral alterations and potential changes in porosity of the buffer, which can affect the repository performance. The results indicate that mineral alteration and associated changes in porosity induced by early thermal and hydrological processes are relatively small and are expected to not significantly affect flow and transport properties. Chlorite precipitation was obtained in all simulation cases. A maximum of one percent volume fraction of chlorite could be formed, whose process may reduce swelling and sorption capacity of bentonite clay, affecting the performance of the repository. llitisation process was not obtained from the present simulations.

Xu, T.; Senger, R.; Finsterle, S.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Mercury emissions control technologies for mixed waste thermal treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EPA has identified wet scrubbing at low mercury feedrates, as well as carbon adsorption via carbon injection into the offgas or via flow through fixed carbon beds, as control technologies that can be used to meet the proposed Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) rule limit for mercury emissions from hazardous waste incinerators. DOE is currently funding demonstrations of gold amalgamation that may also control mercury to the desired levels. Performance data from a variety of sources was reviewed to determine ranges of achievable mercury control. Preliminary costs were estimated for using these technologies to control mercury emissions from mixed waste incineration. Mercury emissions control for mixed waste incineration may need to be more efficient than for incineration of other hazardous wastes because of higher mercury concentrations in some mixed waste streams. However, mercury control performance data for wet scrubbing and carbon adsorption is highly variable. More information is needed to demonstrate control efficiencies that are achievable under various design and operating conditions for wet scrubbing, carbon adsorption, and gold amalgamation technologies. Given certain assumptions made in this study, capital costs, operating costs, and lifecycle costs for carbon injection, carbon beds, and gold amalgamation generally vary for different assumed mercury feedrates and for different offgas flowrates. Assuming that these technologies can in fact provide the necessary mercury control performance, each of these technologies may be less costly than the others for certain mercury feedrates and the offgas flowrates.

Chambers, A.; Knecht, M.; Soelberg, N.; Eaton, D. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.; Roberts, D.; Broderick, T. [ADA Technologies, Englewood, CO (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

119

Two-stage thermal/nonthermal waste treatment process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An innovative waste treatment technology is being developed in Los Alamos to address the destruction of hazardous organic wastes. The technology described in this report uses two stages: a packed bed reactor (PBR) in the first stage to volatilize and/or combust liquid organics and a silent discharge plasma (SDP) reactor to remove entrained hazardous compounds in the off-gas to even lower levels. We have constructed pre-pilot-scale PBR-SDP apparatus and tested the two stages separately and in combined modes. These tests are described in the report.

Rosocha, L.A.; Anderson, G.K.; Coogan, J.J.; Kang, M.; Tennant, R.A.; Wantuck, P.J.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Calculation of the Naval Long and Short Waste Package Three-Dimensional Thermal Interface Temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this calculation is to evaluate the thermal performance of the Naval Long and Naval Short spent nuclear fuel (SNF) waste packages (WP) in the repository emplacement drift. The scope of this calculation is limited to the determination of the temperature profiles upon the surfaces of the Naval Long and Short SNF waste package for up to 10,000 years of emplacement. The temperatures on the top of the outside surface of the naval canister are the thermal interfaces for the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program (NNPP). The results of this calculation are intended to support Licensing Application design activities.

H. Marr

2006-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Thermal reactivity of mixtures of VDDT lubricant and simulated Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To predict whether the Polywater G lubricant residue remaining in the velocity, density, and temperature tree (VDTT) and the waste in Tank 241-SY-101 (101SY) will be chemically compatible with wastes in 101SY when two VDTTs are removed from 101SY, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory measured the thermal reaction sensitivity of the lubricant residue. This residue is a simulated 101SY waste containing the organic surrogate trisodium hydroxyethyl-ethylenediaminetriacetate (Na{sub 3}HEDTA) and two simulated potential waste and lubricant residue mixtures containing 10 and 90 percent lubricant residue. These studies using accelerating rate calorimetry found that the residue did not react at a rate exceeding 0.1 J/min/g mixture up to 190 degrees C with simulated 101SY waste containing Na{sub 3}HEDTA as the organic surrogate. Also, the dried lubricant residue did not decompose exothermically at a rate exceeding 0.1 J/min/g. Using guidelines used by the chemical industry, these results indicate that the lubricant residue should not react as a significant rate with the waste in 101SY when added to the waste at 60 degrees C or when the mixture cools to the waste`s temperature of 48 degrees C.

Scheele, R.D.; Panisko, F.E.; Sell, R.L.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Expected near-field thermal performance for nuclear waste repositories at potential salt sites: Technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal analyses were made for the environmental assessments of seven potential salt sites for a nuclear waste repository. These analyses predicted that potential repository sites in domal salts located in the Gulf Coast will experience higher temperature than those in bedded salts of Paradox and Palo Duro Basins, mainly because of higher ambient temperatures at depth. The TEMPV5 code, a semi-analytical heat transfer code for finite line sources, calculated temperatures for commercial high-level waste (CHLW) and spent fuel from pressurized-water reactors (SFPWR). Benchmarks with HEATING6, THAC-SIP-3D, STEALTH, and SPECTROM-41 showed that TEMPV5 agreed closely in the very near field around the waste package and approximately in the near-field and far-field regions of the repository. The analyses used site-specific thermal conductivities that were increased by 40% to compensate for reductions caused by testing technique, salt impurities, and other heterogeneities, and sampling disturbance. Analyses showed peak salt temperatures of 236/sup 0/C (CHLW) and 134/sup 0/C (SFPWR) for the bedded salt and 296/sup 0/C (CHLW) and 180/sup 0/C (SFPWR) for the domal salt. Analyses with uncorrected laboratory thermal conductivities would increase peak salt temperatures by about 120/sup 0/C for CHLW and about 60/sup 0/C for SFPWR. These temperature increases would increase the thermally induced flow of brine and accelerate corrosion of the waste package. 30 refs., 35 figs., 48 tabs.

McNulty, E.G.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Thermal Energy Storage/Waste Heat Recovery Applications in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and the Portland Cement Association have studied the potential benefits of using waste heat recovery methods and thermal energy storage systems in the cement manufacturing process. This work was performed under DOE Contract No. EC-77-C-01-50S4. The study has been...

Beshore, D. G.; Jaeger, F. A.; Gartner, E. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization- Final Technical Report on Award DE-EE0002664. October 28, 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project focuses on assessing the Maximum Practicably Extractable Energy (MPEE) from the world's ocean thermal resources. MPEE is defined as being sustainable and technically feasible, given today's state-of-the-art ocean energy technology. Under this project the OTEEV team developed a comprehensive Geospatial Information System (GIS) dataset and software tool, and used the tool to provide a meaningful assessment of MPEE from the global and domestic U.S. ocean thermal resources. The OTEEV project leverages existing NREL renewable energy GIS technologies and integrates extractable energy estimated from quality-controlled data and projected optimal achievable energy conversion rates. Input data are synthesized from a broad range of existing in-situ measurements and ground-truthed numerical models with temporal and spatial resolutions sufficient to reflect the local resource. Energy production rates are calculated for regions based on conversion rates estimated for current technology, local energy density of the resource, and sustainable resource extraction. Plant spacing and maximum production rates are then estimated based on a default plant size and transmission mechanisms. The resulting data are organized, displayed, and accessed using a multi-layered GIS mapping tool, http://maps.nrel.gov/mhk_atlas with a user-friendly graphical user interface.

Ascari, Matthew B.; Hanson, Howard P.; Rauchenstein, Lynn; Van Zwieten, James; Bharathan, Desikan; Heimiller, Donna; Langle, Nicholas; Scott, George N.; Potemra, James; Nagurny, N. John; Jansen, Eugene

2012-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

125

Waste Package Neutron Absorber, Thermal Shunt, and Fill Gas Selection Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Materials for neutron absorber, thermal shunt, and fill gas for use in the waste package were selected using a qualitative approach. For each component, selection criteria were identified; candidate materials were selected; and candidates were evaluated against these criteria. The neutron absorber materials evaluated were essentially boron-containing stainless steels. Two candidates were evaluated for the thermal shunt material. The fill gas candidates were common gases such as helium, argon, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and dry air. Based on the performance of each candidate against the criteria, the following selections were made: Neutron absorber--Neutronit A978; Thermal shunt--Aluminum 6061 or 6063; and Fill gas--Helium.

V. Pasupathi

2000-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

126

Volume reduction and vitrification of nuclear waste with thermal plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process for efficient and safe destruction of organics and vitrification of low/medium level radioactive waste is presented. A transferred arc plasma torch is employed as the heat source. The process handles several types of feed: combustibles, inorganic materials and metals. A non-leaching glassy solid which can be stored without further treatment is obtained as the final product. High volume-reduction factors can be achieved with this process. A wet gas cleaning system leads to extremely clean off-gas.

Hoffelner, W. [Moser-Glaser and Co., Muttenz (Switzerland); Chrubasik, A. [NUKEM GmbH, Alzenau (Germany); Eschenbach, R.C. [RETECH Inc., Ukiah, CA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

127

Probative Investigation of the Thermal Stability of Wastes Involved in  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015 | Department ofThat SavePrice-AndersonFebruary 2014 Waste

128

Waste Heat Recovery System: Lightweight Thermal Energy Recovery (LIGHTER) System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: GM is using shape memory alloys that require as little as a 10C temperature difference to convert low-grade waste heat into mechanical energy. When a stretched wire made of shape memory alloy is heated, it shrinks back to its pre-stretched length. When the wire cools back down, it becomes more pliable and can revert to its original stretched shape. This expansion and contraction can be used directly as mechanical energy output or used to drive an electric generator. Shape memory alloy heat engines have been around for decades, but the few devices that engineers have built were too complex, required fluid baths, and had insufficient cycle life for practical use. GM is working to create a prototype that is practical for commercial applications and capable of operating with either air- or fluid-based heat sources. GMs shape memory alloy based heat engine is also designed for use in a variety of non-vehicle applications. For example, it can be used to harvest non-vehicle heat sources, such as domestic and industrial waste heat and natural geothermal heat, and in HVAC systems and generators.

None

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Limits on the thermal energy release from radioactive wastes in a mined geologic repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The theraml energy release of nuclear wastes is a major factor in the design of geologic repositories. Thermal limits need to be placed on various aspets of the geologic waste disposal system to avoid or retard the degradation of repository performance because of increased temperatures. The thermal limits in current use today are summarized in this report. These limits are placed in a hierarchial structure of thermal criteria consistent with the failure mechanism they are trying to prevent. The thermal criteria hierarchy is used to evaluate the thermal performance of a sample repository design. The design consists of disassembled BWR spent fuel, aged 10 years, close packed in a carbon steel canister with 15 cm of crushed salt backfill. The medium is bedded salt. The most-restrictive temperature for this design is the spent-fuel centerline temperature limit of 300/sup 0/C. A sensitivity study on the effects of additional cooling prior to disposal on repository thermal limits and design is performed.

Scott, J.A.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

THERMAL IMPACT OF WASTE EMPLACEMENT AND SURFACE COOLING ASSOCIATED WITH GEOLOGIC DISPOSAL OF NUCLEAR WASTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cnalk R i v e r , Ontar o, AECL-b308, 46 p . Tnomas, R. K. ,with a radioactive waste vault. AECL--6308, Atomic Energys t u d y . P a r t 2. AECL-6188-2, Atomic Energy of Canada,

Wang, J.S.Y.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Operating cost guidelines for benchmarking DOE thermal treatment systems for low-level mixed waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents guidelines for estimating operating costs for use in benchmarking US Department of Energy (DOE) low-level mixed waste thermal treatment systems. The guidelines are based on operating cost experience at the DOE Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) mixed waste incinerator at the K-25 Site at Oak Ridge. In presenting these guidelines, it should be made clear at the outset that it is not the intention of this report to present operating cost estimates for new technologies, but only guidelines for estimating such costs.

Salmon, R.; Loghry, S.L.; Hermes, W.H.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Thermal-mechanical modeling of deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disposal of high-level radioactive waste, including spent nuclear fuel, in deep (3 to 5 km) boreholes is a potential option for safely isolating these wastes from the surface and near-surface environment. Existing drilling technology permits reliable and cost-effective construction of such deep boreholes. Conditions favorable for deep borehole disposal in crystalline basement rocks, including low permeability, high salinity, and geochemically reducing conditions, exist at depth in many locations, particularly in geologically stable continental regions. Isolation of waste depends, in part, on the effectiveness of borehole seals and potential alteration of permeability in the disturbed host rock surrounding the borehole. Coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrologic processes induced by heat from the radioactive waste may impact the disturbed zone near the borehole and borehole wall stability. Numerical simulations of the coupled thermal-mechanical response in the host rock surrounding the borehole were conducted with three software codes or combinations of software codes. Software codes used in the simulations were FEHM, JAS3D, Aria, and Adagio. Simulations were conducted for disposal of spent nuclear fuel assemblies and for the higher heat output of vitrified waste from the reprocessing of fuel. Simulations were also conducted for both isotropic and anisotropic ambient horizontal stress in the host rock. Physical, thermal, and mechanical properties representative of granite host rock at a depth of 4 km were used in the models. Simulation results indicate peak temperature increases at the borehole wall of about 30 C and 180 C for disposal of fuel assemblies and vitrified waste, respectively. Peak temperatures near the borehole occur within about 10 years and decline rapidly within a few hundred years and with distance. The host rock near the borehole is placed under additional compression. Peak mechanical stress is increased by about 15 MPa (above the assumed ambient isotropic stress of 100 MPa) at the borehole wall for the disposal of fuel assemblies and by about 90 MPa for vitrified waste. Simulated peak volumetric strain at the borehole wall is about 420 and 2600 microstrain for the disposal of fuel assemblies and vitrified waste, respectively. Stress and volumetric strain decline rapidly with distance from the borehole and with time. Simulated peak stress at and parallel to the borehole wall for the disposal of vitrified waste with anisotropic ambient horizontal stress is about 440 MPa, which likely exceeds the compressive strength of granite if unconfined by fluid pressure within the borehole. The relatively small simulated displacements and volumetric strain near the borehole suggest that software codes using a nondeforming grid provide an adequate approximation of mechanical deformation in the coupled thermal-mechanical model. Additional modeling is planned to incorporate the effects of hydrologic processes coupled to thermal transport and mechanical deformation in the host rock near the heated borehole.

Arnold, Bill Walter; Hadgu, Teklu

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Solvated Electron Technology{sup TM}. Non-Thermal Alternative to Waste Incineration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solvated Electron Technology (SET{sup TM}) is a patented non-thermal alternative to incineration for treating Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and other mixed waste by destroying organic hazardous components. SET{sup TM} is a treatment process that destroys the hazardous components in mixed waste by chemical reduction. The residual material meets land disposal restriction (LDR) and TSCA requirements for disposal. In application, contaminated materials are placed into a treatment cell and mixed with the solvated electron solution. In the case of PCBs or other halogenated contaminants, chemical reactions strip the halogen ions from the chain or aromatic ring producing sodium chloride and high molecular weight hydrocarbons. At the end of the reaction, ammonia within the treatment cell is removed and recycled. The reaction products (such as sodium salts) produced in the process remain with the matrix. The SET{sup TM} process is 99.999% effective in destroying: polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs); trichloroethane (TCA) and trichloroethene (TCE); dioxins; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs); benzene, toluene, xylene (BTX); pesticides; fungicides; herbicides; chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs); hydro-chlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), explosives and chemical-warfare agents; and has successfully destroyed many of the wastes listed in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 261. In September 2007, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a Research and Development permit for SET for chemical destruction of 'pure' Pyranol, which is 60% PCBs. These tests were completed in November 2007. SET{sup TM} is recognized by EPA as a non-thermal process equivalent to incineration and three SET{sup TM} systems have been permitted by EPA as commercial mobile PCB destruction units. This paper describes in detail the results of select bench-, pilot-, and commercial-scale treatment of hazardous and mixed wastes for EPA, Department of Energy (DOE), and the Department of Defense(DoD), and the applicability of SET{sup TM} to currently problematic waste streams that have very limited treatment alternatives. In summary: SET{sup TM} operates as a non-thermal destruction process under low pressure. The process occurs in a closed system producing no hazardous off-gases and no regulated by-products such as dioxins or furans or their precursors. Advantages of SET{sup TM} include: - Organic contaminants are destroyed, not just removed, diluted or concentrated. - Operates as a closed system - produces no regulated secondary wastes. - Holds an EPA permit for PCB destruction. - Operates at ambient temperatures (70 deg. F). - Portable and sets up quickly in less than 4000 square feet of space. - Scalable to accommodate any size waste stream. - Requires minimal amounts of power, water and infrastructure. - Applicable to heterogeneous waste streams in all phases. The SET{sup TM} process is 99.9999% effective in destroying organic constituents of RCRA and TSCA waste, explosives and chemical-warfare agents; and has successfully destroyed many of the wastes listed in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 261. The residual material meets land disposal restriction (LDR) and TSCA requirements for disposal. In November 2007, Commodore completed a treatability study on Pyranol to determine the effectiveness of SET{sup TM} treatment on oil containing 600,000 PPM PCBs. Laboratory results proved destruction of PCBs to less than 1 PPM at low temperatures and pressures. SET{sup TM} is a proven, safe and cost-effective alternative to incineration for some of the most difficult waste treatment problems that exist today. (authors)

Foutz, W.L.; Rogers, J.E.; Mather, J.D. [Commodore Advanced Sciences, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Thermal modeling of core sampling in flammable gas waste tanks. Part 2: Rotary-mode sampling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radioactive waste stored in underground storage tanks at Hanford site includes mixtures of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite with organic compounds. The waste can produce undesired violent exothermic reactions when heated locally during the rotary-mode sampling. Experiments are performed varying the downward force at a maximum rotational speed of 55 rpm and minimum nitrogen purge flow of 30 scfm. The rotary drill bit teeth-face temperatures are measured. The waste is simulated with a low thermal conductivity hard material, pumice blocks. A torque meter is used to determine the energy provided to the drill string. The exhaust air-chip temperature as well as drill string and drill bit temperatures and other key operating parameters were recorded. A two-dimensional thermal model is developed. The safe operating conditions were determined for normal operating conditions. A downward force of 750 at 55 rpm and 30 scfm nitrogen purge flow was found to yield acceptable substrate temperatures. The model predicted experimental results reasonably well. Therefore, it could be used to simulate abnormal conditions to develop procedures for safe operations.

Unal, C.; Poston, D.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.O. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Nuclear Systems Design and Analysis Group; Witwer, K.S. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States). Engineering Testing Lab.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Lyapunov Exponents of a Simple Stochastic Model of the Thermally and Wind-Driven Ocean Circulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

August 8, 2002 Present Address: School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055 STN CSC,Victoria BC, Canada, V8P 5C2 0 #12;Abstract A reformulation of the simple model

Monahan, Adam Hugh

136

Development of the fluidized bed thermal treatment process for treating mixed waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fluidized bed system is being developed at Rocky Flats for the treatment of mixed waste (a mixture of radioactive and chemically hazardous waste). The current program builds on experience gained in the 1970`s and 1980`s in tests with bench-scale, pilot-scale, and demonstration-scale fluidized bed systems. The system operates at low temperatures ({approx} 525--600{degree}C) which eliminates many of the disadvantages associated with high temperature thermal treatment processes. The process has shown the ability to destroy polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB`s) with 99.9999% (``six-nines``) destruction efficiency in tests monitored by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The bed makes use of in situ neutralization of acidic off-gases by incorporating sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) in the bed media. This eliminates using wet scrubbers to treat the off-gas; these produce a high volume of secondary waste. Once in operation, it is expected that the fluidized bed process will yield up to a 40:1 reduction in the volume of the waste.

Semones, G.B.; Williams, P.M.; Stiefvater, S.P.; Mitchell, D.L.; Roecker, B.D.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Program PreoperationalThermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), U.S. Department of Energy,aspects of the screens for OTEC intake systems. U.S. Energy

Sullivan, S.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Thermoeconomic optimization of sensible heat thermal storage for cogenerated waste-to-energy recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper investigates the feasibility of employing thermal storage for cogenerated waste-to-energy recovery such as using mass-burning water-wall incinerators and topping steam turbines. Sensible thermal storage is considered in rectangular cross-sectioned channels through which is passed unused process steam at 1,307 kPa/250 C (175 psig/482 F) during the storage period and feedwater at 1,307 kPa/102 C (175 psig/216 F) during the recovery period. In determining the optimum storage configuration, it is found that the economic feasibility is a function of mass and specific heat of the material and surface area of the channel as well as cost of material and fabrication. Economic considerations included typical cash flows of capital charges, energy revenues, operation and maintenance, and income taxes. Cast concrete is determined to be a potentially attractive storage medium.

Abdul-Razzak, H.A. [Texas A and M Univ., Kingsville, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; Porter, R.W. [Illinois Inst. of Tech., chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Comparison of Different Upscaling Methods for Predicting Thermal Conductivity of Complex Heterogeneous Materials System: Application on Nuclear Waste Forms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To develop a strategy in thermal conductivity prediction of a complex heterogeneous materials system, loaded nuclear waste forms, the computational efficiency and accuracy of different upscaling methods have been evaluated. The effective thermal conductivity, obtained from microstructure information and local thermal conductivity of different components, is critical in predicting the life and performance of waste form during storage. Several methods, including the Taylor model, Sachs model, self-consistent model, and statistical upscaling method, were developed and implemented. Microstructure based finite element method (FEM) prediction results were used to as benchmark to determine the accuracy of the different upscaling methods. Micrographs from waste forms with varying waste loadings were used in the prediction of thermal conductivity in FEM and homogenization methods. Prediction results demonstrated that in term of efficiency, boundary models (e.g., Taylor model and Sachs model) are stronger than the self-consistent model, statistical upscaling method, and finite element method. However, when balancing computational efficiency and accuracy, statistical upscaling is a useful method in predicting effective thermal conductivity for nuclear waste forms.

Li, Dongsheng; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2012-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

140

Assessment of thermal analysis software for the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This assessment uses several recent assessments and the more general code compilations that have been completed to produce a list of 116 codes that can be used for thermal analysis. This list is then compared with criteria prepared especially for the Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (DOE/OCRWM). Based on these criteria, fifteen codes are narrowed to three primary codes and four secondary codes for use by the OCRWM thermal analyst. The analyst is cautioned that since no single code is sufficient for all applications, a code must be selected based upon the predominate heat transfer mode of the problem to be solved, but the codes suggested in this report have been used successfully for a range of OCRWM applications. The report concludes with a series of recommendations for additional work of which the major points include the following: The codes suggested by this report must be benchmarked with the existing US and international problems and validated when possible; An interactive code selection tool could be developed or, perhaps even more useful, a users group could be supported to ensure the proper selection of thermal codes and dissemination of information on the latest version; The status of the 116 codes identified by this report should be verified, and methods for maintaining the still active codes must be established; and special capabilities of each code in phase change, convection and radiation should be improved to better enable the thermal analyst to model OCRWM applications. 37 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

Williams, P.T.; Graham, R.F.; Lagerberg, G.N.; Chung, T.C.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

THERMAL TREATMENT REVIEW . WTE I THERMAL TREATMENT Since the beginning of this century, global waste-to-energy capacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of new waste-to gasification process at an industrial scale The Waste-To-Energy Research and Technology waste-to-energy capacity has increased steadily at the rate of about four million tonnes of MSW per year solid waste (MSW). Three dominant ,technologies _ those developed by The only true A global perspective

Columbia University

142

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmosphere-ocean thermal contrast Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

thermal orbits at two contrasting grid locations in the millennial simulation of the ECHO-G coupled... Characterizing land surface processes: A quantitative analysis using...

143

Economics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC): Luis A. Vega Ph.D., National Marine Renewable Energy Center at the University of Hawai'i  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OTC 21016 Economics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC): An Update Luis A. Vega Ph and we will face a steadily diminishing petroleum supply. This situation justifies re-evaluating OTEC should begin to implement the first generation of OTEC plantships providing electricity, via submarine

144

Evaluation of gasification and novel thermal processes for the treatment of municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report identifies seven developers whose gasification technologies can be used to treat the organic constituents of municipal solid waste: Energy Products of Idaho; TPS Termiska Processor AB; Proler International Corporation; Thermoselect Inc.; Battelle; Pedco Incorporated; and ThermoChem, Incorporated. Their processes recover heat directly, produce a fuel product, or produce a feedstock for chemical processes. The technologies are on the brink of commercial availability. This report evaluates, for each technology, several kinds of issues. Technical considerations were material balance, energy balance, plant thermal efficiency, and effect of feedstock contaminants. Environmental considerations were the regulatory context, and such things as composition, mass rate, and treatability of pollutants. Business issues were related to likelihood of commercialization. Finally, cost and economic issues such as capital and operating costs, and the refuse-derived fuel preparation and energy conversion costs, were considered. The final section of the report reviews and summarizes the information gathered during the study.

Niessen, W.R.; Marks, C.H.; Sommerlad, R.E. [Camp Dresser and McKee, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)] [Camp Dresser and McKee, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Ocean thermal energy conversion power system development. Final design report: PSD-I, Phase II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The PSD-I program provides a heat exchanger sytem consisting of an evaporator, condenser and various ancillaries with ammonia used as a working fluid in a closed simulated Rankine cycle. It is to be installed on the Chepachet Research Vessel for test and evaluation of a number of OTEC concepts in a true ocean environment. It is one of several test articles to be tested. Primary design concerns include control of biofouling, corrosion and erosion of aluminum tubes, selection of materials, and the development of a basis for scale-up to large heat exchangers so as to ultimately demonstrate economic feasibility on a commercial scale. The PSD-I test article is devised to verify thermodynamic, environmental, and mechanical performance of basic design concepts. The detailed design, development, fabrication, checklist, delivery, installation support, and operation support for the Test Article Heat Exchangers are described. (WHK)

None

1980-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

146

Ocean and Resources Engineering is the application of ocean science and engineering to the challenging conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

engineering, mixing and transport, water quality, ocean thermal energy conversion, hydrogen. GENO PAWLAK

Frandsen, Jannette B.

147

A review of global ocean temperature observations: Implications for ocean heat content estimates and climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oceans; their extensive total volume and large thermal capacity require a larger injection of energy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Study of domestic social and economic impacts of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) commercial development. Volume II. Industry profiles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Econoimc profiles of the industries most affected by the construction, deployment, and operation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) powerplants are presented. Six industries which will contribute materials and/or components to the construction of OTEC plants have been identified and are profiled here. These industries are: steel industry, concrete industry, titanium metal industry, fabricated structural metals industry, fiber glass-reinforced plastics industry, and electrical transmission cable industry. The economic profiles for these industries detail the industry's history, its financial and economic characteristics, its technological and production traits, resource constraints that might impede its operation, and its relation to OTEC. Some of the historical data collected and described in the profile include output, value of shipments, number of firms, prices, employment, imports and exports, and supply-demand forecasts. For most of the profiled industries, data from 1958 through 1980 were examined. In addition, profiles are included on the sectors of the economy which will actualy construct, deploy, and supply the OTEC platforms.

None

1981-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

149

Conceptual design of an open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion net power-producing experiment (OC-OTEC NPPE)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the conceptual design of an experiment to investigate heat and mass transfer and to assess the viability of open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC). The experiment will be developed in two stages, the Heat- and Mass-Transfer Experimental Apparatus (HMTEA) and the Net Power-Producing Experiment (NPPE). The goal for the HMTEA is to test heat exchangers. The goal for the NPPE is to experimentally verify OC-OTEC's feasibility by installing a turbine and testing the power-generating system. The design effort met the goals of both the HMTEA and the NPPE, and duplication of hardware was minimal. The choices made for the design resource water flow rates are consistent with the availability of cold and warm seawater as a result of the seawater systems upgrade carried out by the US Department of Energy (DOE), the state of Hawaii, and the Pacific International Center for High Technology Research. The choices regarding configuration of the system were made based on projected performance, degree of technical risk, schedule, and cost. The cost for the future phase of the design and the development of the HMTEA/NPPE is consistent with the projected future program funding levels. The HMTEA and NPPE were designed cooperatively by PICHTR, Argonne National Laboratory, and Solar Energy Research Institute under the guidance of DOE. The experiment will be located at the DOE's Seacoast Test Facility at the Natural Energy Laboratory of Hawaii, Kailua-Kona, Hawaii. 71 refs., 41 figs., 34 tabs.

Bharathan, D.; Green, H.J.; Link, H.F.; Parsons, B.K.; Parsons, J.M.; Zangrando, F.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Determination of heat conductivity and thermal diffusivity of waste glass melter feed: Extension to high temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The heat conductivity ({lambda}) and the thermal diffusivity (a) of reacting glass batch, or melter feed, control the heat flux into and within the cold cap, a layer of reacting material floating on the pool of molten glass in an all-electric continuous waste glass melter. After previously estimating {lambda} of melter feed at temperatures up to 680 deg C, we focus in this work on the {lambda}(T) function at T > 680 deg C, at which the feed material becomes foamy. We used a customized experimental setup consisting of a large cylindrical crucible with an assembly of thermocouples, which monitored the evolution of the temperature field while the crucible with feed was heated at a constant rate from room temperature up to 1100C. Approximating measured temperature profiles by polynomial functions, we used the heat transfer equation to estimate the {lambda}(T) approximation function, which we subsequently optimized using the finite-volume method combined with least-squares analysis. The heat conductivity increased as the temperature increased until the feed began to expand into foam, at which point the conductivity dropped. It began to increase again as the foam turned into a bubble-free glass melt. We discuss the implications of this behavior for the mathematical modeling of the cold cap.

Rice, Jarrett A.; Pokorny, Richard; Schweiger, Michael J.; Hrma, Pavel R.

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

151

THERMAL DESTRUCTION OF HIGHLY CHLORINATED MIXED WASTES WITHOUT GENERATING CORROSIVE OFF-GASES USING MOLTEN SALT OXIDATION (1,2)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot-scale MSO (Molten Salt Oxidation) system was used to process 45-gallons of a halogenated mixed waste that is difficult to treat with other thermal systems. The mixed waste was a halogenated solvent that consisted mostly of methylchloroform. The 80 weight percent of waste consisting of highly corrosive chlorine was captured in the first process vessel as sodium chloride. The sodium chloride leached chrome from that process vessel and the solidified salt exhibited the toxicity characteristic for chrome as measured by TCLP (Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure) testing. The operating ranges for parameters such as salt bed temperature, off-gas temperature, and feed rate that enable sustained operation were identified. At feed rates below the sustainable limit, both processing capacity and maintenance requirements increased with feed rate. Design and operational modifications to increase the sustainable feed rate limit and reduce maintenance requirements reduced both salt carryover and volumetric gas flows.

Smith, W.; Feizollahi, F.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

152

Thermal treatment of historical radioactive solid and liquid waste into the CILVA incinerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the very beginning of the nuclear activities in Belgium, the incineration of radioactive waste was chosen as a suitable technique for achieving an optimal volume reduction of the produced waste quantities. Based on the 35 years experience gained by the operation of the old incinerator, a new industrial incineration plant started nuclear operation in May 1995, as a part of the Belgian Centralized Treatment/Conditioning Facility named CILVA. Up to the end of 2006, the CILVA incinerator has burnt 1660 tonne of solid waste and 419 tonne of liquid waste. This paper describes the type and allowable radioactivity of the waste, the incineration process, heat recovery and the air pollution control devices. Special attention is given to the treatment of several hundreds of tonne historical waste from former reprocessing activities such as alpha suspected solid waste, aqueous and organic liquid waste and spent ion exchange resins. The capacity, volume reduction, chemical and radiological emissions are also evaluated. BELGOPROCESS, a company set up in 1984 at Dessel (Belgium) where a number of nuclear facilities were already installed is specialized in the processing of radioactive waste. It is a subsidiary of ONDRAF/NIRAS, the Belgian Nuclear Waste Management Agency. According to its mission statement, the activities of BELGOPROCESS focus on three areas: treatment, conditioning and interim storage of radioactive waste; decommissioning of shut-down nuclear facilities and cleaning of contaminated buildings and land; operating of storage sites for conditioned radioactive waste. (authors)

Deckers, Jan; Mols, Ludo [Belgoprocess NV, Operations Department, Gravenstraat 73, B-2480 Dessel (Belgium)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Salt Disposal Investigations to Study Thermally Hot Radioactive Waste In A Deep Geologic Repository in Bedded Rock Salt - 12488  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A research program is proposed to investigate the behavior of salt when subjected to thermal loads like those that would be present in a high-level waste repository. This research would build upon results of decades of previous salt repository program efforts in the US and Germany and the successful licensing and operation of a repository in salt for disposal of defense transuranic waste. The proposal includes a combination of laboratory-scale investigations, numerical simulations conducted to develop validated models that could be used for future repository design and safety case development, and a thermal field test in an underground salt formation with a configuration that replicates a small portion of a conceptual repository design. Laboratory tests are proposed to measure salt and brine properties across and beyond the range of possible repository conditions. Coupled numerical models will seek to describe phenomenology (thermal, mechanical, and hydrological) observed in the laboratory tests. Finally, the field test will investigate many phenomena that have been variously cited as potential issues for disposal of thermally hot waste in salt, including buoyancy effects and migration of pre-existing trapped brine up the thermal gradient (including vapor phase migration). These studies are proposed to be coordinated and managed by the Carlsbad Field Office of DOE, which is also responsible for the operation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) within the Office of Environmental Management. The field test portion of the proposed research would be conducted in experimental areas of the WIPP underground, far from disposal operations. It is believed that such tests may be accomplished using the existing infrastructure of the WIPP repository at a lower cost than if such research were conducted at a commercial salt mine at another location. The phased field test is proposed to be performed over almost a decade, including instrumentation development, several years of measurements during heating and then subsequent cooling periods, and the eventual forensic mining back of the test bed to determine the multi-year behavior of the simulated waste/rock environment. Funding possibilities are described, and prospects for near term start-up are discussed. Mining of the access drifts required to create the test area in the WIPP underground began in November 2011. Because this mining uses existing WIPP infrastructure and labor, it is estimated to take about two years to complete the access drifts. WIPP disposal operations and facility maintenance activities will take priority over the SDI field test area mining. Funding of the SDI proposal was still being considered by DOE's Offices of Environmental Management and Nuclear Energy at the time this paper was written, so no specific estimates of the progress in 2012 have been included. (authors)

Nelson, Roger A. [DOE, Carlsbad Field Office, Carlsbad NM (United States); Buschman, Nancy [DOE, Office of Environmental Management, Washington DC (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

THERMAL EVALUATION OF THE USE OF BWR MOX SNF IN THE WASTE PACKAGE DESIGN (SCPB: N/A)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis is prepared by the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Waste Package Development Department (WPDD) as specified in the Waste Package Implementation Plan (pp. 4-8,4-11,4-24, 5-1, and 5-13; Ref. 5.10) and Waste Package Plan (pp. 3-15,3-17, and 3-24; Ref. 5.9). The design data request addressed herein is: (1) Characterize the conceptual 40 BWR and 24 BWR Multi-Purpose Canister (MPC) Waste Package (WP) design to show that the design is feasible for use in the MGDS environment when loaded with BWR MOX SNF. (2) Characterize the conceptual 44 BWR and 24 BWR Uncanistered Fuel (UCF) Waste Package (WP) design to show that the design is feasible for use in the MGDS environment when loaded with BWR MOX SNF. The purpose of this analysis is to respond to a concern that the long-term disposal thermal issues for the WP Design, if used with SNF designed for a MOX fuel cycle, do not preclude WP compatibility with the MGDS. The objective of this analysis is to provide thermal parameter information for the conceptual WP design with disposal container which is loaded with BWR MOX SNF under nominal MGDS repository conditions. The results are intended to show that the design has a reasonable chance to meet the MGDS design requirements for normal MGDS operation, and to provide the required guidance to determining the major design issues for future design efforts, and to show that the BWR MOX SNF loaded WP performance is similar to an WP loaded with commercial BWR SNF.

H. Wang

1997-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

155

Use of thermal analysis techniques (TG-DSC) for the characterization of diverse organic municipal waste streams to predict biological stability prior to land application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal analysis was used to assess stability and composition of organic matter in three diverse municipal waste streams. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results were compared with C mineralization during 90-day incubation, FTIR and {sup 13}C NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal analysis reflected the differences between the organic wastes before and after the incubation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The calculated energy density showed a strong correlation with cumulative respiration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conventional and thermal methods provide complimentary means of characterizing organic wastes. - Abstract: The use of organic municipal wastes as soil amendments is an increasing practice that can divert significant amounts of waste from landfill, and provides a potential source of nutrients and organic matter to ameliorate degraded soils. Due to the high heterogeneity of organic municipal waste streams, it is difficult to rapidly and cost-effectively establish their suitability as soil amendments using a single method. Thermal analysis has been proposed as an evolving technique to assess the stability and composition of the organic matter present in these wastes. In this study, three different organic municipal waste streams (i.e., a municipal waste compost (MC), a composted sewage sludge (CS) and a thermally dried sewage sludge (TS)) were characterized using conventional and thermal methods. The conventional methods used to test organic matter stability included laboratory incubation with measurement of respired C, and spectroscopic methods to characterize chemical composition. Carbon mineralization was measured during a 90-day incubation, and samples before and after incubation were analyzed by chemical (elemental analysis) and spectroscopic (infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance) methods. Results were compared with those obtained by thermogravimetry (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques. Total amounts of CO{sub 2} respired indicated that the organic matter in the TS was the least stable, while that in the CS was the most stable. This was confirmed by changes detected with the spectroscopic methods in the composition of the organic wastes due to C mineralization. Differences were especially pronounced for TS, which showed a remarkable loss of aliphatic and proteinaceous compounds during the incubation process. TG, and especially DSC analysis, clearly reflected these differences between the three organic wastes before and after the incubation. Furthermore, the calculated energy density, which represents the energy available per unit of organic matter, showed a strong correlation with cumulative respiration. Results obtained support the hypothesis of a potential link between the thermal and biological stability of the studied organic materials, and consequently the ability of thermal analysis to characterize the maturity of municipal organic wastes and composts.

Fernandez, Jose M., E-mail: joseman@sas.upenn.edu [Department of Earth and Environmental Science, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6316 (United States); Plaza, Cesar; Polo, Alfredo [Instituto de Ciencias Agrarias, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 115 dpdo., 28006 Madrid (Spain); Plante, Alain F. [Department of Earth and Environmental Science, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6316 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

The potential of biomass and animal waste of Turkey and the possibilities of these as fuel in thermal generating stations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, the potential of important biomass energy sources and animal solid wastes of Turkey were determined and the potential of these as a source of fuel in thermal generating stations to produce electricity was studied. The effects of biomass and lignite coal usage on the environment were reported comparatively. Considering total cereal products and fatty seed plants, approximately 50--65 million tons per year of biomass and 11,051 million tons of solid matter animal waste are produced, and 60% of biomass is seen as possible to use for energy. The primary energy of applicable biomass was evaluated as 467--623 Peta Joule (PJ) and the energy of animal residues as 50,172 PJ. This amount of energy is equal to 22--27% of Turkey`s annual primary energy consumption, (6,308 million tons of oil equivalent).

Acaroglu, M. [Selcuk Univ. Technical Coll., Konya (Turkey). Dept. of Agricultural Machinery; Aksoy, A.S. [Ege Univ. Solar Energy Inst., Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Energy Sources; Oeguet, H. [Selcuk Univ. Faculty of Agriculture, Konya (Turkey). Dept. of Agricultural Machinery

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Construction of the thermal/structural interactions in situ tests at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy has constructed the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to develop the technology for the disposal of radioactive waste from defense programs. Sandia National Laboratories has the responsibility for experimental activities at the WIPP and has emplaced several large-scale Thermal/Structural Interactions (TSI) in situ tests to validate techniques used to predict repository performance. The construction of the tests relied heavily on earlier excavations at the WIPP site to provide a basis for selecting excavation, surveying, and instrumentation methods, and achievable construction tolerances. The tests were constructed within close tolerances to provide consistent room dimensions and accurate placement of gages. This accuracy has contributed to the high quality of data generated which in turn has facilitated the comparison of test results to numerical predictions. The purpose of this report is to detail the construction activities of the TSI tests.

Munson, D.E.; Matalucci, R.V. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hoag, D.L.; Blankenship D.A. [RE/SPEC Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others] [RE/SPEC Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); and others

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Thermal and Radiolytic Gas Generation in Hanford High-Level Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site has 177 underground storage tanks containing radioactive wastes that are complex mixes of radioactive and chemical products. Some of these wastes are known to generate and retain large quantities of flammable gases consisting of hydrogen, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, and ammonia. Because these gases are flammable and have the potential for rapid release, the gas generation rate for each tank must be determined to establish the flammability hazard (Johnson et al. 1997). An understanding of gas generation is important to operation of the waste tanks for several reasons. First, knowledge of the overall rate of generation is needed to verify that any given tank has sufficient ventilation to ensure that flammable gases are maintained at a safe level within the dome space. Understanding the mechanisms for production of the various gases is important so that future waste operations do not create conditions that promote the production of hydrogen, ammonia, and nitrous oxide. Studying the generation of gases also provides important data for the composition of the gas mixture, which in turn is needed to assess the flammability characteristics. Finally, information about generation of gases, including the influence of various chemical constituents, temperature, and dose, would aid in assessing the future behavior of the waste during interim storage, implementation of controls, and final waste treatment. This paper summarizes the current knowledge of gas generation pathways and discusses models used in predicting gas generation rates from actual Hanford radioactive wastes. A comparison is made between measured gas generation rates and rates by the predictive models.

Bryan, Samuel A.; Pederson, Larry R.; King, C. M.

2000-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

159

EA-1135: Offsite Thermal Treatment of Low-level Mixed Waste, Richland, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to treat contact-handled low-level mixed waste, containing polychlorinated biphenyls and other organics, to meet existing regulatory...

160

EA-1189: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste, Richland, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to demonstrate the feasibility of commercial treatment of contact-handled low-level mixed waste to meet existing Federal and State...

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161

Measurements of gas sorption from seawater and the influence of gas release on open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) system performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technical community has questioned the validity and cost-effectiveness of open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) systems because of the unknown effect of noncondensable gas on heat exchanger performance and the power needed to run vacuum equipment to remove this gas. To date, studies of seawater gas desorption have not been prototypical for system level analysis. This study gives preliminary gas desorption data on a vertical spout, direct contact evaporator and multiple condenser geometries. Results indicate that dissolved gas can be substantially removed before the seawater enters the heat exchange process, reducing the uncertainty and effect of inert gas on heat exchanger performance.

Penney, T.R.; Althof, J.A.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Instrumentation of the thermal/structural interactions in situ tests at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy has constructed the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to develop the technology for the disposal of radioactive waste from defense programs. Sandia National Laboratories had the responsibility for the experimental activities at the WIPP and fielded several large-scale Thermal/Structural Interactions (TSI) in situ tests to validate techniques used to predict repository performance. The instrumentation of these tests involved the placement of over 4,200 gages including room closure gages, borehole extensometers, stress gages, borehole inclinometers, fixed reference gages, borehole strain gages, thermocouples, thermal flux meters, heater power gages, environmental gages, and ventilation gages. Most of the gages were remotely read instruments that were monitored by an automated data acquisition system, but manually read instruments were also used to provide early deformation information and to provide a redundancy of measurement for the remote gages. Instruments were selected that could operate in the harsh environment of the test rooms and that could accommodate the ranges of test room responses predicted by pretest calculations. Instruments were tested in the field prior to installation at the WIPP site and were modified to improve their performance. Other modifications were made to gages as the TSI tests progressed using knowledge gained from test maintenance. Quality assurance procedures were developed for all aspects of instrumentation including calibration, installation, and maintenance. The instrumentation performed exceptionally well and has produced a large quantity of quality information.

Munson, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Repository Isolation Systems Div.; Hoag, D.L.; Blankenship, D.A.; DeYonge, W.F.; Schiermeister, D.M. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, R.L.; Baird, G.T. [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Organic tank safety project: Preliminary results of energetics and thermal behavior studies of model organic nitrate and/or nitrite mixtures and a simulated organic waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a result of years of production and recovery of nuclear defense materials and subsequent waste management at the Hanford Site, organic-bearing radioactive high-level wastes (HLW) are currently stored in large (up to 3. ML) single-shell storage tanks (SSTs). Because these wastes contain both fuels (organics) and the oxidants nitrate and nitrite, rapid energetic reactions at certain conditions could occur. In support of Westinghouse Hanford Company`s (WHC) efforts to ensure continued safe storage of these organic- and oxidant-bearing wastes and to define the conditions necessary for reactions to occur, we measured the thermal sensitivities and thermochemical and thermokinetic properties of mixtures of selected organics and sodium nitrate and/or nitrite and a simulated Hanford organic-bearing waste using thermoanalytical technologies. These thermoanalytical technologies are used by chemical reactivity hazards evaluation organizations within the chemical industry to assess chemical reaction hazards.

Scheele, R.D.; Sell, R.L.; Sobolik, J.L.; Burger, L.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Use of Thermal Energy Storage to Enhance the Recovery and Utilization of Industrial Waste Heat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recovery and reuse of industrial waste heat may be limited if an energy source cannot be fully utilized in an otherwise available out of phase or unequal capacity end-use process. This paper summarizes the results of a technical and economic...

McChesney, H. R.; Bass, R. W.; Landerman, A. M.; Obee, T. N.; Sgamboti, C. T.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Environmental Assessment Offsite Thermal Treatment of Low-Level Mixed Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) needs to demonstrate the economics and feasibility of offsite commercial treatment of contact-handled low-level mixed waste (LLMW), containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBS) and other organics, to meet existing regulatory standards for eventual disposal.

N /A

1999-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

166

Isolation of Metals from Liquid Wastes: Reactive Scavenging in Turbulent Thermal Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Overall project demonstrated that toxic metals (cesium Cs and strontium Sr) in aqueous and organic wastes can be isolated from the environment through reaction with kaolinite based sorbent substrates in high temperature reactor environments. In addition, a state-of-the art laser diagnostic tool to measure droplet characteristic in practical 'dirty' laboratory environments was developed, and was featured on the cover of a recent edition of the scientific journal ''applied Spectroscopy''. Furthermore, great strides have been made in developing a theoretical model that has the potential to allow prediction of the position and life history of every particle of waste in a high temperature, turbulent flow field, a very challenging problem involving as it does, the fundamentals of two phase turbulence and of particle drag physics.

Jost O.L. Wendt; Alan R. Kerstein; Alexander Scheeline; Arne Pearlstein; William Linak

2003-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

167

Ocean thermal energy conversion preliminary data report for the November 1977 GOTEC-02 cruise to the Gulf of Mexico Mobile Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the second in a series of preliminary data reports from cruises to potential Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites in the Gulf of Mexico. The data are from the GOTEC-02 cruise to a site at approximately 29/sup 0/N, 88/sup 0/W, the Mobile Site. Twelve oceanographic stations were visited. Due to bad weather, the results are scanty. The reader will note that much of the data is questionable. Current meter results are presented elsewhere (Molinari, Hazelworth and Ortman, 1979). Determinations of the biomass indicators - chlorophyll a, phaeophytins and adenosine triphosphate - and zooplankton, are presented. Results were generally those that might have been predicted from previous studies in the area.

Commins, M. L; Duncan, C. P.; Estrella, D. J.; Frisch, J. D.; Horne, A. J.; Jones, K.; Johnson, P. W.; Oldson, J. C.; Quinby-Hunt, M. S.; Ryan, C. J.; Sandusky, J. C.; Tatro, M.; Wilde, P.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of polycarbonate and plastic waste to recover monomers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described using fast pyrolysis to convert a plastic waste feed stream containing polycarbonate and ABS to high value monomeric constituents prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituents prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting an acid or base catalysts and an oxide or carbonate support for treating the feed stream to affect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of the high value monomeric constituents of polycarbonate and ABS in the first temperature program range; differentially heating the feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituents prior to pyrolysis or other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents from the polycarbonate to cause pyrolysis to a different high value monomeric constituent of the plastic waste and differentially heating the feed stream at the second higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of different high value monomeric constituents; and separating the different high value monomeric constituents. 68 figs.

Evans, R.J.; Chum, H.L.

1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

169

Controlled catalystic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of polycarbonate and plastic waste to recover monomers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of using fast pyrolysis to convert a plastic waste feed stream containing polycarbonate and ABS to high value monomeric constituents prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituents prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting an acid or base catalysts and an oxide or carbonate support for treating the feed stream to affect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of the high value monomeric constituents of polycarbonate and ABS in the first temperature program range; differentially heating the feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituents prior to pyrolysis or other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents from the polycarbonate to cause pyrolysis to a different high value monomeric constituent of the plastic waste and differentially heating the feed stream at the second higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of different high value monomeric constituents; and separating the different high value monomeric constituents.

Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO); Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Isolation of Metals from Liquid Wastes: Reactive Scavenging in Turbulent Thermal Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sorption of cesium and strontium on kaolinite powders was investigated as a means to minimize the emissions of these metals during certain high temperature processes currently being developed to isolate and dispose of radiological and mixed wastes. In this work, non-radioactive aqueous cesium acetate or strontium acetate was atomized down the center of a natural gas flame supported on a variable-swirl burner in a refractory-lined laboratory-scale combustion facility. Kaolinite powder was injected at a post-flame location in the combustor. Cesium readily vaporizes in the high temperature regions of the combustor, but was reactively scavenged onto dispersed kaolinite. Global sorption mechanisms of cesium vapor on kaolinite were quantified, and are related to those available in the literature for sodium and lead. Both metal adsorption and substrate deactivation steps are important, and so there is an optimum temperature, between 1400 and 1500 K, at which maximum sorption occurs. The presence of chlorine inhibits cesium sorption. In contrast to cesium, and in the absence of chlorine, strontium was only partially vaporized and was, therefore, only partially scavengeable. The strontium data did not allow quantification of global kinetic mechanisms of interaction, although equilibrium arguments provided insight into the effects of chlorine on strontium sorption. These results have implications for the use of sorbents to control cesium and strontium emissions during high temperature waste processing including incineration and vitrification.

William Linak

2004-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

171

Thermal Manikin Evaluation of Liquid Cooling Garments Intended for Use in Hazardous Waste Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal manikins are valuable tools for quantitatively evaluating the performance of protective clothing ensembles and microclimate cooling systems. The goal of this investigation was to examine the performance of Coretech personal cooling systems, designed to reduce the effects of physiological and environmental heat stress, using a sweating thermal manikin. A sweating manikin takes into account the effective physiological evaporative heat transfer. Three tubesuits containing different densities of tubing were evaluated on the thermal manikin in conjunction with body armor and two Chemical-Biological suits (SPM and JSLIST). The experiments were carried out in an environmental chamber set at a temperature of 35 C with a relative humidity of 30%. For the tubesuits, two flow rates were tested and the heat removal rates were obtained by measuring the amount of power required to maintain the manikin's surface at a constant temperature of 35 C. The sweating rates were adjusted to maintain a fully wetted manikin surface at the above environmental conditions. For fluid flow rates ranging from approximately 250 to 750 ml/min, and inlet temperatures to the tubesuit ranging from 7 to 10 C, heat removal rates between 220 W to 284 W were measured, indicating the effectiveness of tubesuits at removing excessive body heat. This research was performed at the U.S. Army Soldier and Biological Chemical Command (SBCCOM) in Natick, Massachusetts.

Dionne, J. P.; Semeniuk, K.; Makris, A.; Teal, W.; Laprise, B.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

172

Feasibility study for thermal treatment of solid tire wastes in Bangladesh by using pyrolysis technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study on the basis of lab data and available resources in Bangladesh, feasibility study has been carried out for pyrolysis process converting solid tire wastes into pyrolysis oils, solid char and gases. The process considered for detailed analysis was fixed-bed fire-tube heating pyrolysis reactor system. The comparative techno-economic assessment was carried out in US$ for three different sizes plants: medium commercial scale (144 tons/day), small commercial scale (36 tons/day), pilot scale (3.6 tons/day). The assessment showed that medium commercial scale plant was economically feasible, with the lowest unit production cost than small commercial and pilot scale plants for the production of crude pyrolysis oil that could be used as boiler fuel oil and for the production of upgraded liquid-products.

Islam, M.R., E-mail: mrislam1985@yahoo.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Rajshahi University of Engineering and Technology, Rajshahi 6204 (Bangladesh); Joardder, M.U.H.; Hasan, S.M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Rajshahi University of Engineering and Technology, Rajshahi 6204 (Bangladesh); Takai, K.; Haniu, H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University Corporation Kitami Institute of Technology, 165 Koen-cho, Kitami City, Hokkaido 090-8507 (Japan)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the modeling work by Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. to simulate the biochemical effects of of the nutrient-enhanced seawater plumes that are discharged by one or several 100 megawatt OTEC plants. The modeling is needed to properly design OTEC plants that can operate sustainably with acceptably low biological impact. In order to quantify the effect of discharge configuration and phytoplankton response, Makai Ocean Engineering implemented a biological and physical model for the waters surrounding O`ahu, Hawai`i, using the EPA-approved Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC). Each EFDC grid cell was approximately 1 square kilometer by 20 meters deep, and used a time step of three hours. The biological model was set up to simulate the biochemical response for three classes of organisms: Picoplankton (< 2 um) such as prochlorococccus, nanoplankton (2-20 um), and microplankton (> 20 um) e.g., diatoms. The dynamic biological phytoplankton model was calibrated using chemical and biological data collected for the Hawaii Ocean Time Series (HOTS) project. Peer review of the biological modeling was performed. The physical oceanography model uses boundary conditions from a surrounding Hawai'i Regional Ocean Model, (ROM) operated by the University of Hawai`i and the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration. The ROM provided tides, basin scale circulation, mesoscale variability, and atmospheric forcing into the edges of the EFDC computational domain. This model is the most accurate and sophisticated Hawai'ian Regional Ocean Model presently available, assimilating real-time oceanographic observations, as well as model calibration based upon temperature, current and salinity data collected during 2010 near the simulated OTEC site. The ROM program manager peer-reviewed Makai's implementation of the ROM output into our EFDC model. The supporting oceanographic data was collected for a Naval Facilities Engineering Command / Makai project. Results: The model was run for a 100 MW OTEC Plant consisting of four separate ducts, discharging a total combined flow rate of 420 m3/s of warm water and 320 m3/s of cold water in a mixed discharge at 70 meters deep. Each duct was assumed to have a discharge port diameter of 10.5m producing a downward discharge velocity of about 2.18 m/s. The natural system, as measured in the HOTS program, has an average concentration of 10-15 mgC/m3. To calibrate the biological model, we first ran the model with no OTEC plant and varied biological parameters until the simulated data was a good match to the HOTS observations. This modeling showed that phytoplankton concentration were patchy and highly dynamic. The patchiness was a good match with the data variability observed within the HOTS data sets. We then ran the model with simulated OTEC intake and discharge flows and associated nutrients. Directly under the OTEC plant, the near-field plume has an average terminal depth of 172 meters, with a volumetric dilution of 13:1. The average terminal plume temperature was 19.8oC. Nitrate concentrations are 1 to 2 umol/kg above ambient. The advecting plume then further dilutes to less than 1 umol/kg above ambient within a few kilometers downstream, while remaining at depth. Because this terminal near-field plume is well below the 1% light limited depths (~120m), no immediate biological utilization of the nutrients occurs. As the nitrate is advected and dispersed downstream, a fraction of the deep ocean nutrients (< 0.5 umol/kg perturbation) mix upward where they are utilized by the ambient phytoplankton population. This occurs approximately twenty-five kilometers downstream from the plant at 110 - 70 meters depth. For pico-phytoplankton, modeling results indicate that this nutrient perturbation causes a phytoplankton perturbation of approximately 1 mgC/m3 (~10% of average ambient concentrations) that covers an area 10x5 km in size at the 70 to 90m depth. Thus, the perturbations are well within the natural variability of the system, generally corresponding to a 10 to 15% increase above the a

PAT GRANDELLI, P.E.; GREG ROCHELEAU; JOHN HAMRICK, Ph.D.; MATT CHURCH, Ph.D.; BRIAN POWELL, Ph.D.

2012-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

174

Non-Thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-Level Mixed Waste  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andDataNationalNewportBig Eddy ArcheologicalSolar Thermal Solar89

175

Thermal Performance of Deep-Burn Fusion-Fission Hybrid Waste in a Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE) Engine [1] combines a neutron-rich but energy-poor inertial fusion system with an energy-rich but neutron-poor subcritical fission blanket. Because approximately 80% of the LIFE Engine energy is produced from fission, the requirements for laser efficiency and fusion target performance are relaxed, compared to a pure-fusion system, and hence a LIFE Engine prototype can be based on target performance in the first few years of operation of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Similarly, because of the copious fusion neutrons, the fission blanket can be run in a subcritical, driven, mode, without the need for control rods or other sophisticated reactivity control systems. Further, because the fission blanket is inherently subcritical, fission fuels that can be used in LIFE Engine designs include thorium, depleted uranium, natural uranium, spent light water reactor fuel, highly enriched uranium, and plutonium. Neither enrichment nor reprocessing is required for the LIFE Engine fuel cycle, and burnups to 99% fraction of initial metal atoms (FIMA) being fissioned are envisioned. This paper discusses initial calculations of the thermal behavior of spent LIFE fuel following completion of operation in the LIFE Engine [2]. The three time periods of interest for thermal calculations are during interim storage (probably at the LIFE Engine site), during the preclosure operational period of a geologic repository, and after closure of the repository.

Blink, J A; Chipman, V; Farmer, J; Shaw, H; Zhao, P

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

176

Determination of temperature-dependent heat conductivity and thermal diffusivity of waste glass melter feed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cold cap is a layer of reacting glass batch floating on the surface of melt in an all-electric continuous glass melter. The heat needed for the conversion of the melter feed to molten glass must be transferred to and through the cold cap. Since the heat flux into the cold cap determines the rate of melting, the heat conductivity is a key property of the reacting feed. We designed an experimental setup consisting of a large cylindrical crucible with an assembly of thermocouples that monitors the evolution of the temperature field while the crucible is heated at a constant rate. Then we used two methods to calculate the heat conductivity and thermal diffusivity of the reacting feed: the approximation of the temperature field by polynomial functions and the finite-volume method coupled with least-squares analysis. Up to 680C, the heat conductivity of the reacting melter feed was represented by a linear function of temperature.

Pokorny, Richard; Rice, Jarrett A.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Hrma, Pavel R.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. Otec Plume Biochemical Simulation of a 100MW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent

178

Development and Demonstration of a Relocatable Ocean OSSE System: Optimizing Ocean Observations for Hurricane Forecast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

forecasts for individual storms and improved seasonal forecast of the ocean thermal energy availableDevelopment and Demonstration of a Relocatable Ocean OSSE System: Optimizing Ocean Observations in the Gulf of Mexico is being extended to provide NOAA the ability to evaluate new ocean observing systems

179

Short Communication Three ocean state indices implemented in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), the tropical cyclone heat potential, showing the thermal energy available in the ocean to enhance or decreaseShort Communication Three ocean state indices implemented in the Mercator-Ocean operational suite L., and Soulat, F. 2008. Three ocean state indices implemented in the Mercator-Ocean operational suite. ­ ICES

Ribes, Aurélien

180

Waste Heat Recovery and Recycling in Thermal Separation Processes: Distillation, Multi-Effect Evaporation (MEE) and Crystallization Processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaporation and crystallization are key thermal separation processes for concentrating and purifying inorganic and organic products with energy consumption over 1,000 trillion Btu/yr. This project focused on a challenging task of recovering low-temperature latent heat that can have a paradigm shift in the way thermal process units will be designed and operated to achieve high-energy efficiency and significantly reduce the carbon footprint as well as water footprint. Moreover, this project has evaluated the technical merits of waste-heat powered thermal heat pumps for recovery of latent heat from distillation, multi-effect evaporation (MEE), and crystallization processes and recycling into the process. The Project Team has estimated the potential energy, economics and environmental benefits with the focus on reduction in CO2 emissions that can be realized by 2020, assuming successful development and commercialization of the technology being developed. Specifically, with aggressive industry-wide applications of heat recovery and recycling with absorption heat pumps, energy savings of about 26.7 trillion Btu/yr have been estimated for distillation process. The direct environmental benefits of this project are the reduced emissions of combustible products. The estimated major reduction in environmental pollutants in the distillation processes is in CO2 emission equivalent to 3.5 billion lbs/year. Energy consumption associated with water supply and treatments can vary between 1,900 kWh and 23,700 kWh per million-gallon water depending on sources of natural waters [US DOE, 2006]. Successful implementation of this technology would significantly reduce the demand for cooling-tower waters, and thereby the use and discharge of water treatment chemicals. The Project Team has also identified and characterized working fluid pairs for the moderate-temperature heat pump. For an MEE process, the two promising fluids are LiNO3+KNO3+NANO3 (53:28:19 ) and LiNO3+KNO3+NANO2(53:35:12). And for an H2O2 distillation process, the two promising fluids are Trifluoroethanol (TFE) + Triethylene Glycol Dimethyl ether (DMETEG) and Ammonia+ Water. Thermo-physical properties calculated by Aspen+ are reasonably accurate. Documentation of the installation of pilot-plants or full commercial units were not found in the literature for validating thermo-physical properties in an operating unit. Therefore, it is essential to install a pilot-scale unit to verify thermo-physical properties of working fluid pairs and validate the overall efficiency of the thermal heat pump at temperatures typical of distillation processes. For an HO2 process, the ammonia-water heat pump system is more compact and preferable than the TFE-DMETEG heat pump. The ammonia-water heat pump is therefore recommended for the H2O2 process. Based on the complex nature of the heat recovery system, we anticipated that capital costs could make investments financially unattractive where steam costs are low, especially where co-generation is involved. We believe that the enhanced heat transfer equipment has the potential to significantly improve the performance of TEE crystallizers, independent of the absorption heat-pump recovery system. Where steam costs are high, more detailed design/cost engineering will be required to verify the economic viability of the technology. Due to the long payback period estimated for the TEE open system, further studies on the TEE system are not warranted unless there are significant future improvements to heat pump technology. For the H2O2 distillation cycle heat pump waste heat recovery system, there were no significant process constraints and the estimated 5 years payback period is encouraging. We therefore recommend further developments of application of the thermal heat pump in the H2O2 distillation process with the focus on the technical and economic viability of heat exchangers equipped with the state-of-the-art enhancements. This will require additional funding for a prototype unit to validate enhanced thermal performances of heat transfer equipment, evaluat

Emmanuel A. Dada; Chandrakant B. Panchal; Luke K. Achenie; Aaron Reichl; Chris C. Thomas

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Technical and philosophical aspects of ocean disposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Di sposai . Geological aspects Physical aspects Chemical aspects Biological aspects CHAPTER II. TECHNICAL ASPECTS OF OCEAN DISPOSAL Types of Waste Materials. Dredged materiais. Industrial wastes, DomestIc sewage wa tes Solid wastes Radloact..., can reduce the passage of light through the water column and cause damaging effects to the marine ecosystem. Each of five major oceans has pronounced gyral, or circular current motion (Fiaure 1. 1). The North Atlantic current system is comprised...

Zapatka, Marchi Charisse

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Thermal springs list for the United States; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Key to Geophysical Records Documentation No. 12  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The compilation has 1702 thermal spring locations in 23 of the 50 States, arranged alphabetically by State (Postal Service abbreviation) and degrees of latitude and longitude within the State. It shows spring name, surface temperature in degrees Fahrenheit and degrees Celsius; USGS Professional Paper 492 number, USGS Circular 790 number, NOAA number, north to south on each degree of latitude and longitude of the listed. USGS 1:250,000-scale (AMS) map; and the USGS topographic map coverage, 1:63360- or 1:62500-scale (15-minute) or 1:24000-scale (7.5-minute) quadrangle also included is an alphabetized list showing only the spring name and the State in which it is located. Unnamed springs are omitted. The list includes natural surface hydrothermal features: springs, pools, mud pots, mud volcanoes, geysers, fumaroles, and steam vents at temperature of 20{sup 0}C (68[sup 0}F) or greater. It does not include wells or mines, except at sites where they supplement or replace natural vents presently or recently active, or, in some places, where orifices are not distinguishable as natural or artificial. The listed springs are located on the USGS 1:250,000 (AMS) topographic maps. (MHR)

Berry, G.W.; Grim, P.J.; Ikelman, J.A. (comps.)

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

DCNS, OTEC roadmap May 2013 DCNSDCNS -Ocean Energy Business Unit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

© DCNS, OTEC roadmap ­ May 2013 © DCNSDCNS - Ocean Energy Business Unit Emmanuel BROCHARD, VP OTEC positioning for DCNS on Ocean Energy Provider of added-value · On Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion, Floating #12;© DCNS, OTEC roadmap ­ May 2013 4 DNCS invests in 4 ocean energy technologies Keypoints OTEC

184

Flexible ocean upwelling pipe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, a cold water riser pipe is releasably supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. The pipe is substantially vertical and has its lower end far below the hull above the ocean floor. The pipe is defined essentially entirely of a material which has a modulus of elasticity substantially less than that of steel, e.g., high density polyethylene, so that the pipe is flexible and compliant to rather than resistant to applied bending moments. The position of the lower end of the pipe relative to the hull is stabilized by a weight suspended below the lower end of the pipe on a flexible line. The pipe, apart from the weight, is positively buoyant. If support of the upper end of the pipe is released, the pipe sinks to the ocean floor, but is not damaged as the length of the line between the pipe and the weight is sufficient to allow the buoyant pipe to come to a stop within the line length after the weight contacts the ocean floor, and thereafter to float submerged above the ocean floor while moored to the ocean floor by the weight. The upper end of the pipe, while supported by the hull, communicates to a sump in the hull in which the water level is maintained below the ambient water level. The sump volume is sufficient to keep the pipe full during heaving of the hull, thereby preventing collapse of the pipe.

Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

BRUCE HOWE Chair and Professor , PhD 1986, UC San Diego. Ocean observatories, ocean acoustic tomography, sensor webs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. NIHOUS Associate Professor, PhD 1983, UC Berkeley. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), marineFaculty BRUCE HOWE Chair and Professor , PhD 1986, UC San Diego. Ocean observatories, ocean in the ocean, atmospheric and ionospheric tomography. KWOK FAI CHEUNG Professor , PhD 1991, British Columbia

Frandsen, Jannette B.

186

Estimation of OTEC Global Resources with an Ocean General Circulation Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) relies on the availability of temperature differencesEstimation of OTEC Global Resources with an Ocean General Circulation Model Krishnakumar Rajagopalan Postdoctoral Fellow Department of Ocean and Resources Engineering University of Hawai'i Abstract

Frandsen, Jannette B.

187

Independent peer review panel report on the integrated nonthermal treatment systems study and the comparison of integrated thermal and integrated nonthermal treatment systems for mixed low level waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) Office of Science and Technology (OST) has conducted studies of integrated thermal treatment systems and integrated nonthermal treatment systems (INTS) for treating contact handled, alpha and non-alpha mixed low level radioactive waste (MLLW). The MLLW in the DOE complex consists of a wide variety of organic and inorganic solids and liquids contaminated with radioactive substances. Treatment systems are needed to destroy organic material and stabilize residues prior to land disposal. In May 1996 the Deputy Assistant Secretary for OST appointed an Independent Peer Review Panel to: (1) review and comment on the INTS Study; (2) make recommendations on the most promising thermal and nonthermal treatment systems; (3) make recommendations on research and development necessary to prove the performance of nonthermal and thermal technologies; and (4) review and comment on the preliminary draft of the ITTS/INTS Comparison Report. This report presents the primary conclusions and recommendations based on the review of the INTS study and the comparison report. System selection, overviews, comparisons, cost estimations and sensitivity analyses, and recommended R and D engineering needs are then described and discussed.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT SENSITIVITY OF DOUBLE SHELL DYNAMIC RESPONSE TO THE WASTE ELASTIC PROPERTIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to determine the sensitivity of the dynamic response of the Hanford double-shell tanks (DSTs) to the assumptions regarding the constitutive properties of the contained waste. In all cases, the waste was modeled as a uniform linearly elastic material. The focus of the study was on the changes in the modal response of the tank and waste system as the extensional modulus (elastic modulus in tension and compression) and shear modulus of the waste were varied through six orders of magnitude. Time-history analyses were also performed for selected cases and peak horizontal reaction forces and axial stresses at the bottom of the primary tank were evaluated. Because the analysis focused on the differences in the responses between solid-filled and liquid-filled tanks, it is a comparative analysis rather than an analysis of record for a specific tank or set of tanks. The shear modulus was varied between 4 x 10{sup 3} Pa and 4.135 x 10{sup 9} Pa. The lowest value of shear modulus was sufficient to simulate the modal response of a liquid-containing tank, while the higher values are several orders of magnitude greater than the upper limit of expected properties for tank contents. The range of elastic properties used was sufficient to show liquid-like response at the lower values, followed by a transition range of semi-solid-like response to a clearly identifiable solid-like response. It was assumed that the mechanical properties of the tank contents were spatially uniform. Because sludge-like materials are expected only to exist in the lower part of the tanks, this assumption leads to an exaggeration of the effects of sludge-like materials in the tanks. The results of the study show that up to a waste shear modulus of at least 40,000 Pa, the modal properties of the tank and waste system are very nearly the same as for the equivalent liquid-containing tank. This suggests that the differences in critical tank responses between liquid-containing tanks and tanks containing sludge-like materials having a shear modulus not exceeding 40,000 Pa are unlikely to be greater than those due to the uncertainties involved in the definition of the design ground motion or in the properties of the tank-waste system. This is the fundamental conclusion of the study. The study also shows that increasing the waste extensional modulus and shear modulus does not lead to increased mass participation at the impulsive frequency of the liquid-containing system. Instead, increasing the waste stiffness eventually leads to fundamental changes in the modal properties including an increase in the fundamental system frequency.

MACKEY TC; ABATT FG; JOHNSON KI

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

189

Investigations of Near-Field Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Models for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Clay/Shale Rock  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at the Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon and Volckaert, 2003) have all been under intensive scientific investigation (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relationships to flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of radioactive waste. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA.

Liu, H.H.; Li, L.; Zheng, L.; Houseworth, J.E.; Rutqvist, J.

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

190

Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc.'s Recent OTEC Activities at NELHA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and operator of an Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plant and heat exchanger test facility at NELHA

Frandsen, Jannette B.

191

Zero Waste, Renewable Energy & Environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Dioxins & Furans · The `State of Waste' in the US · WTE Technologies · Thermal Recycling ­ Turnkey dangerous wastes in the form of gases and ash, often creating entirely new hazards, like dioxins and furans

Columbia University

192

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICAL DATA REPORT FROM 0. S. S. RESEARCHER IN GULF OF MEXICO, JULY 12-23, 1977.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biofouling and Corrosion of OTEC Plants at Selected Sites.the Placement of a Moored OTEC Plant. Atlantic OceanographicThermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites: Puerto Rico, St.

Quinby-Hunt, M.S.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Final Technical Report Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters DOE AWARD NO. DE sustainably with acceptably low biological impact. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) uses large flowsFinal Technical Report Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy

194

Comprehensive Ocean Drilling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comprehensive Ocean Drilling Bibliography containing citations related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, and International Ocean Discovery Program Last updated: May 2014 #12;Comprehensive Bibliography Comprehensive Ocean Drilling Bibliography

195

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of phenolic resin containing waste streams to sequentially recover monomers and chemicals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a waste phenolic resin containing feedstreams in a manner such that pyrolysis of said resins and a given high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolyses of the resins in other monomeric components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said resin and a given high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other monomeric components; selecting, if desired, a catalyst and a support and treating said feedstreams with said catalyst to effect acid or basic catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said first temperature program range to utilize reactive gases such as oxygen and steam in the pyrolysis process to drive the production of specific products; differentially heating said feedstreams at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantity of said high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other monomeric components therein; separating said high value monomeric constituent; selecting a second higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said phenolic resins waste and differentially heating said feedstreams at said higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said different high value monomeric constituent; and separating said different high value monomeric constituent.

Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO); Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of phenolic resin containing waste streams to sequentially recover monomers and chemicals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a waste phenolic resin containing feedstreams in a manner such that pyrolysis of said resins and a given high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolyses of the resins in other monomeric components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said resin and a given high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other monomeric components; selecting, if desired, a catalyst and a support and treating said feedstreams with said catalyst to effect acid or basic catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said first temperature program range to utilize reactive gases such as oxygen and steam in the pyrolysis process to drive the production of specific products; differentially heating said feedstreams at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantity of said high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other monomeric components therein; separating said high value monomeric constituent; selecting a second higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said phenolic resins waste and differentially heating said feedstreams at said higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said different high value monomeric constituent; and separating said different high value monomeric constituent. 11 figs.

Chum, H.L.; Evans, R.J.

1992-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

197

Radioactive Waste Radioactive Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Radioactive Waste at UF Bldg 831 392-8400 #12;Radioactive Waste · Program is designed to;Radioactive Waste · Program requires · Generator support · Proper segregation · Packaging · labeling #12;Radioactive Waste · What is radioactive waste? · Anything that · Contains · or is contaminated

Slatton, Clint

198

Estimates of Cabbeling in the Global Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Owing to the larger thermal expansion coefficient at higher temperatures, more buoyancy is put into the ocean by heating than is removed by cooling at low temperatures. The authors show that, even with globally balanced ...

Schmitt, Raymond W.

199

Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic Tomography, Satellite Altimetry, and Modeling The ATOC to thermal expansion. Interpreting climate change signals from fluctuations in sea level is therefore in the advective heat flux. Changes in oceanic heat storage are a major expected element of future climate shifts

Frandsen, Jannette B.

200

The Energetics of Ocean Heat Transport ANAND GNANADESIKAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

between mechanical energy supply and thermal energy transport associated with the ocean circulation modeling studies of ocean tide generation and energy conversion (Simmons et al. 2004; Arbic et al. 2004a of recent papers have argued that the mechanical energy budget of the ocean places constraints on how

Vallis, Geoff

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Transport across 48N in the Atlantic Ocean RICK LUMPKIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Introduction The partition of energy and freshwater flux between the ocean and the atmosphere and among various decomposition of ocean heat transport into thermal wind, gyre, and Ekman components for a rough estimateTransport across 48°N in the Atlantic Ocean RICK LUMPKIN NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic

202

A literature review of coupled thermal-hydrologic-mechanical-chemical processes pertinent to the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A literature review has been conducted to determine the state of knowledge available in the modeling of coupled thermal (T), hydrologic (H), mechanical (M), and chemical (C) processes relevant to the design and/or performance of the proposed high-level waste (HLW) repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The review focuses on identifying coupling mechanisms between individual processes and assessing their importance (i.e., if the coupling is either important, potentially important, or negligible). The significance of considering THMC-coupled processes lies in whether or not the processes impact the design and/or performance objectives of the repository. A review, such as reported here, is useful in identifying which coupled effects will be important, hence which coupled effects will need to be investigated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in order to assess the assumptions, data, analyses, and conclusions in the design and performance assessment of a geologic reposit``. Although this work stems from regulatory interest in the design of the geologic repository, it should be emphasized that the repository design implicitly considers all of the repository performance objectives, including those associated with the time after permanent closure. The scope of this review is considered beyond previous assessments in that it attempts with the current state-of-knowledge) to determine which couplings are important, and identify which computer codes are currently available to model coupled processes.

Manteufel, R.D.; Ahola, M.P.; Turner, D.R.; Chowdhury, A.H. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

V-TOUGH: An enhanced version of the TOUGH code for the thermal and hydrologic simulation of large-scale problems in nuclear waste isolation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The TOUGH code developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is being extensively used to numerically simulate the thermal and hydrologic environment around nuclear waste packages in the unsaturated zone for the Yucca Mountain Project. At the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) we have rewritten approximately 80 percent of the TOUGH code to increase its speed and incorporate new options. The geometry of many problems requires large numbers of computational elements elements in order to realistically model detailed physical phenomena, and, as a result, large amounts of computer time are needed. In order to increase the speed of the code we have incorporated fast linear equation solvers, vectorization of substantial portions of code, improved automatic time stepping, and implementation of table look-up for the steam table properties. These enhancements have increased the speed of the code for typical problems by a factor of 20 on the Cray 2 computer. In addition to the increase in computational efficiency we have added several options: vapor pressure lowering; equivalent continuum treatments of fractures; energy and material volumetric, mass and flux accounting; and Stefan-Boltzmann radiative heat transfer. 5 refs.

Nitao, J.J.

1989-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

204

Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Thermal Load Management Analysis A disposal concept consists of three parts: waste inventory (7 waste types examined), geologic setting (e.g., clayshale, salt, crystalline,...

205

786 IEEE JOURNAL OF OCEANIC ENGINEERING, VOL. 32, NO. 4, OCTOBER 2007 Peer-Reviewed Technical Communication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

acknowledged as a vast renewable energy source. The energy is stored in oceans partly as thermal energy, partly: wave energy, marine and tidal current energy, ocean thermal energy, energy from salinity gradients have been suggested. Ocean thermal energy conversion is possible in locations with large temperature

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

206

Mixed waste: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains the peer-reviewed and edited versions of papers submitted for presentation a the Second International Mixed Waste Symposium. Following the tradition of the First International Mixed Waste Symposium, these proceedings were prepared in advance of the meeting for distribution to participants. The symposium was organized by the Mixed Waste Committee of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The topics discussed at the symposium include: stabilization technologies, alternative treatment technologies, regulatory issues, vitrification technologies, characterization of wastes, thermal technologies, laboratory and analytical issues, waste storage and disposal, organic treatment technologies, waste minimization, packaging and transportation, treatment of mercury contaminated wastes and bioprocessing, and environmental restoration. Individual abstracts are catalogued separately for the data base.

Moghissi, A.A.; Blauvelt, R.K.; Benda, G.A.; Rothermich, N.E. [eds.] [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Safety and Health

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

207

Improving Ocean Model Initialization for Coupled Tropical Cyclone Forecast Models Using GODAE Nowcasts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in available thermal energy associated with energetic boundary currents and ocean eddies require their accurate temperature (SST) cooling. The potential for the ocean to support intensification depends on the thermal energy available to the storm, which in turn depends on both the temperature and thickness of the upper-ocean

Shay, Lynn K. "Nick"

208

Warm ocean anomaly, air sea fluxes, and the rapid intensification of tropical cyclone Nargis (2008)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's coasts great danger. As ocean is the energy source for intensification [Emanuel, 1999; Shay et al., 2000; Lin et al., 2005, 2008; Wu et al., 2007; I.-I. Lin et al., Upper ocean thermal structure to Monthly Weather Review, 2008], in this work we investigate the role of upper ocean thermal structure (UOTS

Texas at Austin. University of

209

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reported are: high-level waste immobilization, alternative waste forms, nuclear waste materials characterization, TRU waste immobilization, TRU waste decontamination, krypton solidification, thermal outgassing, iodine-129 fixation, unsaturated zone transport, well-logging instrumentation development, mobile organic complexes of fission products, waste management system and safety studies, assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems, waste/rock interactions, engineered barriers, criteria for defining waste isolation, and spent fuel and pool component integrity. (DLC)

Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

re-use of thermal energy waste heat for building heating/and thermal energy waste heat, as well as purifiedare used to capture waste heat for productive purposes. Use

Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress and activities are reported on the following: high-level waste immobilization, alternative waste forms, nuclear waste materials characterization, TRU waste immobilization programs, TRU waste decontamination, krypton solidification, thermal outgassing, iodine-129 fixation, monitoring of unsaturated zone transport, well-logging instrumentation development, mobile organic complexes of fission products, waste management system and safety studies, assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems, waste/rock interactions technology, spent fuel and fuel pool integrity program, and engineered barriers. (DLC)

Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Ocean Observing Ocean Observing Systems (OOS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, national, and global scales. · Ocean Observing Systems serve: Fishing industry National security Coastal properties, such as salinity, temperature, and waves Satellite maps of sea surface temperature NATIONAL Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) 11 REGIONAL Systems, including: MANY LOCAL Systems

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

213

Mixed waste characterization reference document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste characterization and monitoring are major activities in the management of waste from generation through storage and treatment to disposal. Adequate waste characterization is necessary to ensure safe storage, selection of appropriate and effective treatment, and adherence to disposal standards. For some wastes characterization objectives can be difficult and costly to achieve. The purpose of this document is to evaluate costs of characterizing one such waste type, mixed (hazardous and radioactive) waste. For the purpose of this document, waste characterization includes treatment system monitoring, where monitoring is a supplement or substitute for waste characterization. This document establishes a cost baseline for mixed waste characterization and treatment system monitoring requirements from which to evaluate alternatives. The cost baseline established as part of this work includes costs for a thermal treatment technology (i.e., a rotary kiln incinerator), a nonthermal treatment process (i.e., waste sorting, macronencapsulation, and catalytic wet oxidation), and no treatment (i.e., disposal of waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)). The analysis of improvement over the baseline includes assessment of promising areas for technology development in front-end waste characterization, process equipment, off gas controls, and monitoring. Based on this assessment, an ideal characterization and monitoring configuration is described that minimizes costs and optimizes resources required for waste characterization.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Improving simulations of the upper ocean by inclusion of surface waves in the MellorYamada turbulence scheme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mixing. Surface waves can enhance turbulence kinetic energy and mixing of the upper ocean via wave interaction on the MellorYamada scheme and upper ocean thermal structure are examined and compared with each scheme. The behaviors of the MellorYamada scheme, as well as the simulated upper ocean thermal structure

Ezer,Tal

215

E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerating waste removal Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SOLID WASTE IN CALIFORNIA: NEEDS AND CHALLENGES Alexander E. Helou... , such as gasification, pyrolysis, waste-to-energy (WTE), and advanced thermal ... Source: Columbia...

216

GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 0, NO. 0, PAGES 0-0, M 0, 2001 On the Pacific Ocean regime shift  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 0, NO. 0, PAGES 0-0, M 0, 2001 On the Pacific Ocean regime shift variability of Pacific Ocean upper ocean heat content is examined for the 1948-1998 period using gridded-wide phenomenon affecting the thermal structure from 60 S to 70 N. EOF analysis of the Pacific Ocean heat content

217

Process for remediation of plastic waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A single step process for degrading plastic waste by converting the plastic waste into carbonaceous products via thermal decomposition of the plastic waste by placing the plastic waste into a reactor, heating the plastic waste under an inert or air atmosphere until the temperature of about 700.degree. C. is achieved, allowing the reactor to cool down, and recovering the resulting decomposition products therefrom. The decomposition products that this process yields are carbonaceous materials, and more specifically carbon nanotubes having a partially filled core (encapsulated) adjacent to one end of the nanotube. Additionally, in the presence of a transition metal compound, this thermal decomposition process produces multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

Pol, Vilas G; Thiyagarajan, Pappannan

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

218

Process for remediation of plastic waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A single step process for degrading plastic waste by converting the plastic waste into carbonaceous products via thermal decomposition of the plastic waste by placing the plastic waste into a reactor, heating the plastic waste under an inert or air atmosphere until the temperature of 700.degree. C. is achieved, allowing the reactor to cool down, and recovering the resulting decomposition products therefrom. The decomposition products that this process yields are carbonaceous materials, and more specifically egg-shaped and spherical-shaped solid carbons. Additionally, in the presence of a transition metal compound, this thermal decomposition process produces multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

Pol, Vilas G. (Westmont, IL); Thiyagarajan, Pappannan (Germantown, MD)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

219

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

l l,eve l Ventil.u:ion ( el OTEC H . . ard Level (f) Type ofW.E. and R.N. Manley, 1979. OTEC Commercialization Analysis.Assessment for Operational OTEC Platforms A Progress Report.

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Mostly about USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-OTEC Experimental Plant · Designs/ Lessons Learned/ EIA · Economics/Updated Resource Data · Revival (New Century) 2 offshore end 4th Attempt: CWP working some thermodynamic data obtained 5luisvega@hawaii.edu #12;#12;#12;Claude's Off Rio de Janeiro (1933) · Floating Ice Plant: 2.2 MW OC- OTEC to produce 2000 tonnes of Ice

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Waste Heat Energy Harvesting Using Olsen Cycle on PZN-5.5PT Single Crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010. Thermal energy harvesting through pyroelectricity.Pilon, L. , 2010. Harvesting nanoscale thermal radiationfor waste heat energy harvesting using co-polymer P(VDF-

McKinley, Ian Meeker; Kandilian, Razmig; Pilon, Laurent

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Recover heat from waste incineration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using these guidelines, engineers can address critical design problems associated with burning process-waste streams and select cost-effective waste-heat boilers. Incinerating contaminant streams is a win-win situation: (1) complete destruction of pollutant(s) is attained and (2) valuable thermal energy is recovered as steam and returned to process, thus conserving energy. However, recovering thermal energy from incinerated flue-gas streams contains some caveats. This treatment method creates a large high-temperature flue gas from which valuable thermal energy is recovered as saturated or superheated steam. Unfortunately, because a process-waste stream is used as feed, this stream will have variations in contaminant and component concentrations which influence the load on the boiler. Also, burning contaminants may create acid gases which will accelerate corrosion problems for the boiler at elevated temperatures. The following guidelines and checklist clarify the do`s and don`ts when designing waste-heat boilers.

Ganapathy, V. [ABCO Industries, Abilene, TX (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Laboratory creep and mechanical tests on salt data report (1975-1996): Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) thermal/structural interactions program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility located in a bedded salt formation in Carlsbad, New Mexico, is being used by the U.S. Department of Energy to demonstrate the technology for safe handling and disposal of transuranic wastes produced by defense activities in the United States. In support of that demonstration, mechanical tests on salt were conducted in the laboratory to characterize material behavior at the stresses and temperatures expected for a nuclear waste repository. Many of those laboratory test programs have been carried out in the RE/SPEC Inc. rock mechanics laboratory in Rapid City, South Dakota; the first program being authorized in 1975 followed by additional testing programs that continue to the present. All of the WIPP laboratory data generated on salt at RE/SPEC Inc. over the last 20 years is presented in this data report. A variety of test procedures were used in performance of the work including quasi-static triaxial compression tests, constant stress (creep) tests, damage recovery tests, and multiaxial creep tests. The detailed data is presented in individual plots for each specimen tested. Typically, the controlled test conditions applied to each specimen are presented in a plot followed by additional plots of the measured specimen response. Extensive tables are included to summarize the tests that were performed. Both the tables and the plots contain cross-references to the technical reports where the data were originally reported. Also included are general descriptions of laboratory facilities, equipment, and procedures used to perform the work.

Mellegard, K.D. [RE/SPEC Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States); Munson, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Ocean Engineering Development Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Engineering Hydrofoil Development Team Justin Eickmeier Mirela Dalanaj Jason Gray Matt test bed for future hydrofoil designs. 5) To create future student interest in the Ocean Engineering Efficiency and Acceleration. #12;Design Team Justin Eickmeier Team Leader Major: Ocean Engineering, Junior

Wood, Stephen L.

225

doi: 10.3176/oil.2008.2.02 2008 Estonian Academy Publishers THERMAL PROCESSING OF POLYVINYLCHLORIDE WASTE WITH OIL SHALE ASH TO CAPTURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study is concerned with thermal processing of polyvinylchloride (PVC) in the presence of alkaline oil shale ash. Solid heat carrier (Galoter process)-type oil shale retorting units, where the feedstock is heated by mixing with ash from retorted feed-stock combustion, are potentially an

V. Oja; A. Elenurm; I. Rohtla; E. Tearo; E. Tali

226

Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nonconventional Fluids," ASME Jour of Engineering for Power,fluids for Organic Rankine Cycles," Applied Thermal Engineering,fluid in waste heat recovery," Applied Thermal Engineering,

Ho, Tony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Arctic ocean long-term acoustic monitoring : ambient noise, environmental correlates, and transients north of Barrow, Alaska  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean namely the thickness and concentration of perennial ice coverage is crucial in allowing the water column to retain thermal energy

Roth, Ethan H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Improving simulations of the upper-ocean by inclusion of4 surface waves in the Mellor-Yamada turbulence scheme5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

kinetic energy and mixing of the upper ocean33 via wave breaking and non-breaking wave35 upper-ocean thermal structure are examined and compared with each other using36 one. The behaviors of the Mellor-Yamada39 scheme, as well as the simulated upper-ocean thermal structure

Ezer,Tal

229

SOLAR ENERGY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT ANNUAL REPORT 1978  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy sources such as solar heated industrial waste heat, geothermal water, brines, and ocean thermal

authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

SOLAR ENERGY PROGRAM: CHAPTER FROM THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT ANNUAL REPORT 1979  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy sources such as solar heated water, indus- trial waste heat, geothermal brines, and ocean thermal

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waste (i.e, mixture of biohazardous and chemical or radioactive waste), call Environment, Health2/2009 Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 200 West Arbor Dr. San Diego, CA 92103 (619

Tsien, Roger Y.

232

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of mixed polymer waste streams to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents; selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent.

Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO); Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of mixed polymer waste streams to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents; selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent.

Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO); Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of mixed polymer waste streams to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents, selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent. 87 figures.

Evans, R.J.; Chum, H.L.

1994-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

235

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of mixed polymer waste streams to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents, selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent.

Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO); Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of mixed polymer waste streams to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents; selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent. 83 figs.

Evans, R.J.; Chum, H.L.

1994-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

237

Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste Heat Recovery Engineering and Materials for Automotive Thermoelectric Applications Electrical and Thermal Transport Optimization of High Efficient n-type Skutterudites...

238

Air intake shaft performance tests (Shaft 5): In situ data report (May 1988--July 1995). Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Thermal/Structural Interactions Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data are presented from the Air Intake Shaft Test, an in situ test fielded at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The construction of this shaft, well after the initial three access shafts, presented an unusual opportunity to obtain valuable detailed data on the mechanical response of a shaft for application to seal design. These data include selected fielding information, test configuration, instrumentation activities, and comprehensive results from a large number of gages. Construction of the test began in December 1987; gage data in this report cover the period from May 1988 through July 1995, with the bulk of the data obtained after obtaining access in November, 1989 and from the heavily instrumented period after remote gage installation between May, 1990, and October, 1991.

Munson, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Repository Isolation Systems Dept.; Hoag, D.L.; Ball, J.R. [RE/SPEC Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Baird, G.T.; Jones, R.L. [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM 2011 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM 2011 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT covering citations related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from Geo Drilling Program Publication Services September 2011 #12;OVERVIEW OF THE OCEAN DRILLING CITATION DATABASE

240

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of mixed polymer waste streams to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a polyamide containing a plastic waste feed stream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polyamide and its high value monomeric constituent or derived high value products occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components is described therein comprising: (a) selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polyamide and its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; (b) selecting a catalyst and a support and treating said feed stream with said catalyst to affect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent or high value product of said polyamide in said first temperature program range; (c) differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of said high value monomeric constituent or high value product of said polyamide prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein; (d) separating said high value monomer constituent or derived high value product of said polyamide; (e) selecting a second higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis to a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating said feed stream of said higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said plastic into a different high value monomeric constituent or derived product; and (f) separating said different high value monomeric constituent or derived high value product.

Evans, R.J.; Chum, H.L.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Influence of upper-ocean stratification on tropical cyclone-induced surface cooling in the Bay of Bengal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in oceanic stratification rather than to differences in TC wind energy input. During the postmonsoon season, a deeper thermal stratification combined with a considerable upper-ocean freshening strongly inhibits that TCs primarily draw their energy from evaporation at the ocean surface [Riehl, 1950]. TCs generally

242

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 534) and identity of liquid waste Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 534

Tsien, Roger Y.

243

Thermal Fluids  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thermal Fluids The Thermal Fluids and Heat Transfer program works on thermal hydraulic reactor safety code development and experimental heat transferthermal hydraulics. The...

244

Arnold Schwarzenegger CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE ENERGY ASSESSMENT Prepared For: California this report as follows: Previsic, Mirko. 2006. California Ocean Wave Energy Assessment. California Energy Systems Integration · Transportation California Ocean Wave Energy Assessment is the final report

245

High Density Thermal Energy Storage with Supercritical Fluids...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

concept using supercritical fluids - Enhanced penetration of solar thermal for baseload power - Waste heat capture * Presents feasibility looking at thermodynamics of...

246

Energy Conversion and Thermal Efficiency Sales Tax Exemption  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Ohio may provide a sales and use tax exemption for certain tangible personal property used in energy conversion, solid waste energy conversion, or thermal efficiency improvement facilities designed...

247

Sludge processors have wide choice of solutions for waste ammonia problems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ocean Dumping Act of 1988 phased out dumping of sewage sludge into the ocean. To use sewage sludge beneficially, facilities treat and process it using such techniques as digestion, dewatering, composting, thermal drying and chemical stabilization. All of these processes create waste discharges containing high concentrations of nitrogen, mainly in the form of ammonia. When nitrification occurs in receiving waters, ammonia is oxidized to nitrate and can lower dissolved oxygen levels in the water. Excess ammonia also is toxic to fish and other aquatic life. Nitrogen reduction alternatives for sludge dewatering and processing waste discharges include the following: air stripping; steam stripping; breakpoint chlorination; selective ion exchange; reverse osmosis; and chemical precipitation. To remove wastewater nitrogen using biological processes, ammonia and organic nitrogen first are oxidized aerobically (nitrification) to nitrate nitrogen, which then is converted biologically to nitrogen gas (denitrification) under zero or low dissolved oxygen (anoxic) conditions. Because sludge treatment discharges contain valuable quantities of ammonia, they may be considered for reuse as supplemental fertilizer for land application or for reclamation through spraying or injection into soil. Such discharges also may be used in combustion processes.

Chen, Y.S.R.; Samela, D. (Stone and Webster Engineering Corp., Boston, MA (United States). Environmental Technology and Services Div.); Kaylor, F.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Ocean General Circulation Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

1. Definition of Subject The purpose of this text is to provide an introduction to aspects of oceanic general circulation models (OGCMs), an important component of Climate System or Earth System Model (ESM). The role of the ocean in ESMs is described in Chapter XX (EDITOR: PLEASE FIND THE COUPLED CLIMATE or EARTH SYSTEM MODELING CHAPTERS). The emerging need for understanding the Earths climate system and especially projecting its future evolution has encouraged scientists to explore the dynamical, physical, and biogeochemical processes in the ocean. Understanding the role of these processes in the climate system is an interesting and challenging scientific subject. For example, a research question how much extra heat or CO2 generated by anthropogenic activities can be stored in the deep ocean is not only scientifically interesting but also important in projecting future climate of the earth. Thus, OGCMs have been developed and applied to investigate the various oceanic processes and their role in the climate system.

Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

249

Hazardous Waste Program (Alabama)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This rule states criteria for identifying the characteristics of hazardous waste and for listing hazardous waste, lists of hazardous wastes, standards for the management of hazardous waste and...

250

Space Science: Atmosphere Thermal Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Space Science: Atmosphere Part -2 Thermal Structure Review tropospheres Absorption of Radiation Adiabatic Lapse Rate ~ 9 K/km Slightly smaller than our estimate Pressure ~3000ft under ocean surface thickness (positive up) is the solar zenith angle Fs is the solar energy flux at frequency (when

Johnson, Robert E.

251

Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waste heat reclamation and solar thermal energy," Energy [K Lovegrove and M Dennis, "Solar thermal energy systems inK Lovegrove and M Dennis, "Solar thermal energy systems in

Ho, Tony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

MHRC System Concept ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy Conversion, and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with...

253

1 INSTRODUCTION In the concept of geological radioactive waste disposal,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 INSTRODUCTION In the concept of geological radioactive waste disposal, argillite is being of the radioactive waste disposal, the host rock will be subjected to various thermo-hydro-mechanical loadings, thermal solicitation comes from the heat emitting from the radioactive waste packages. On one hand

Boyer, Edmond

254

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al Qin Han,1 J. Keith Moore,1; accepted 7 December 2007; published 12 April 2008. [1] We use measurements of ocean surface dissolved Al (DEAD) model to constrain dust deposition to the oceans. Our Al database contains all available

Zender, Charles

255

A review of global ocean temperature observations: Implications for ocean heat content estimates and climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and communications, in Ocean Engineering Planning and Designmicropro?ler, Engineering in the Ocean Environment, Ocean engineering diagnostic data will be transmitted. 5. GLOBAL OCEAN

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Waste disposal options report. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 2 contains the following topical sections: estimates of feed and waste volumes, compositions, and properties; evaluation of radionuclide inventory for Zr calcine; evaluation of radionuclide inventory for Al calcine; determination of k{sub eff} for high level waste canisters in various configurations; review of ceramic silicone foam for radioactive waste disposal; epoxides for low-level radioactive waste disposal; evaluation of several neutralization cases in processing calcine and sodium-bearing waste; background information for EFEs, dose rates, watts/canister, and PE-curies; waste disposal options assumptions; update of radiation field definition and thermal generation rates for calcine process packages of various geometries-HKP-26-97; and standard criteria of candidate repositories and environmental regulations for the treatment and disposal of ICPP radioactive mixed wastes.

Russell, N.E.; McDonald, T.G.; Banaee, J.; Barnes, C.M.; Fish, L.W.; Losinski, S.J.; Peterson, H.K.; Sterbentz, J.W.; Wenzel, D.R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Texas facility treats, recycles refinery, petrochemical wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A US Gulf Coast environmental services company is treating refinery and petrochemical plant wastes to universal treatment standards (UTS). DuraTherm Inc.`s recycling center uses thermal desorption to treat a variety of refinery wastes and other hazardous materials. The plant is located in San Leon, Tex., near the major Houston/Texas City refining and petrochemical center. DuraTherm`s customers include major US refining companies, plus petrochemical, terminal, pipeline, transportation, and remediation companies. Examples of typical contaminant concentrations and treatment levels for refinery wastes are shown. The paper discusses thermal desorption, the process description and testing.

NONE

1996-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

258

Waste Generated from LMR-AMTEC Reactor Concept  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The candidate Liquid Metal Reactor-Alkali Metal Thermal -to- Electric Converter (LMR-AMTEC) is considered to be the first reactor that would use pure liquid potassium as a secondary coolant, in which potassium vapor aids in the conversion of thermal energy to electric energy. As with all energy production, the thermal generation of electricity produces wastes. These wastes must be managed in ways which safeguard human health and minimize their impact on the environment. Nuclear power is the only energy industry, which takes full responsibility for all its wastes. Based on the candidate design of the LMR-AMTEC components and the coolant types, different wastes will be generated from LMR. These wastes must be classified and characterized according to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulation, CFR. This paper defines the waste generation and waste characterization from LMR-AMTEC and reviews the applicable U.S. regulations that govern waste transportation, treatment, storage and final disposition. The wastes generated from LMR-AMTEC are characterized as: (1) mixed waste which is generated from liquid sodium contaminated by fission products and activated corrosion products; (2) hazardous waste which is generated from liquid potassium contaminated by corrosion products; (3) spent nuclear fuel; and (4) low-level radioactive waste which is generated from the packing materials (e.g. activated carbon in cold trap and purification units). The regulations and management of these wastes are summarized in this paper.

Hasan, Ahmed; Mohamed, Yasser, T.; Mohammaden, Tarek, F.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

259

Simple ocean carbon cycle models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simple ocean carbon cycle models can be used to calculate the rate at which the oceans are likely to absorb CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere. For problems involving steady-state ocean circulation, well calibrated ocean models produce results that are very similar to results obtained using general circulation models. Hence, simple ocean carbon cycle models may be appropriate for use in studies in which the time or expense of running large scale general circulation models would be prohibitive. Simple ocean models have the advantage of being based on a small number of explicit assumptions. The simplicity of these ocean models facilitates the understanding of model results.

Caldeira, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hoffert, M.I. [New York Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Earth System Sciences; Siegenthaler, U. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Physik

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of solid and liquid wastes generated at mushroom producing facilities. Environmental guidelines#12;MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT PHASE I: AUDIT OF CURRENT PRACTICE The Mushroom Waste Management Project (MWMP) was initiated by Environment Canada, the BC Ministry

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reports and summaries are presented for the following: high-level waste process development; alternative waste forms; TMI zeolite vitrification demonstration program; nuclear waste materials characterization center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton implantation; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; NWVP off-gas analysis; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; verification instrument development; mobility of organic complexes of radionuclides in soils; handbook of methods to decrease the generation of low-level waste; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology program; high-level waste form preparation; development of backfill materials; development of structural engineered barriers; disposal charge analysis; and analysis of spent fuel policy implementation.

Chikalla, T.D.; Powell, J.A.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

E-Print Network 3.0 - archean ocean analogue Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results for: archean ocean analogue Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Thermal history of the Earth and its petrological expression Claude Herzberg a, Summary: Earth, which may be why...

263

OBSERVING SYSTEM SIMULATION EXPERIMENTS ON THE OAH'U REGIONAL OCEAN MODEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) site off the south coast of Oah'u as well as the circulation of Mamala analyses of the observing systems were conducted at the outflow plume depth of a potential pilot Ocean

Luther, Douglas S.

264

The Effects Of High Pressure-High Temperature On Some Physical Properties Of Ocean Sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A series of laboratory experiments was conducted with four ocean sediments, two biogenic oozes and two clays. Permeability and thermal conductivity were directly measured as a function of porosity and the testing program ...

Morin, Roger

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Eects of convection instability due to incompatibility between ocean dynamics and surface forcings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- bility between a surface temperature climatology and a given ocean model, into which the climatology by thermal and wind forcing only. Initially, the temperature climatology is forcefully assimilated climatology. In areas characterized by sharp oceanic fronts and high convective activity, the OGCM, due

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

266

Direct numerical simulation of an iron rain in the magma ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

investigate the conversion of gravitational energy into viscous heating and the thermal equilibration betweenDirect numerical simulation of an iron rain in the magma ocean H. Ichikawa,1,2 S. Labrosse,1 and K of metal in a magma ocean. The model, using a fully Lagrangian approach called the moving particle semi

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

267

Ocean Heat Transport , Overturning Circulations, and some fine-resolution ASOF dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thermal agitation -internal energy of the fluid is typically 10 orders of magnitude greater thanOcean Heat Transport , Overturning Circulations, and some fine-resolution ASOF dynamics P.B. Rhines & S. Häkkinen #12;· Many basic tenets of ocean circulation are being challenged, and they relate

268

International program to study subseabed disposal of high-level radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the international program to study seabed disposal of nuclear wastes. Its purpose is to inform legislators, other policy makers, and the general public as to the history of the program, technological requirements necessary for feasibility assessment, legal questions involved, international coordination of research, national policies, and research and development activities. Each of these major aspects of the program is presented in a separate section. The objective of seabed burial, similar to its continental counterparts, is to contain and to isolate the wastes. The subseabed option should not be confuesed with past practices of ocean dumping which have introduced wastes into ocean waters. Seabed disposal refers to the emplacement of solidified high-level radioactive waste (with or without reprocessing) in certain geologically stable sediments of the deep ocean floor. Specially designed surface ships would transport waste canisters from a port facility to the disposal site. Canisters would be buried from a few tens to a few hundreds of meters below the surface of ocean bottom sediments, and hence would not be in contact with the overlying ocean water. The concept is a multi-barrier approach for disposal. Barriers, including waste form, canister, ad deep ocean sediments, will separate wastes from the ocean environment. High-level wastes (HLW) would be stabilized by conversion into a leach-resistant solid form such as glass. This solid would be placed inside a metallic canister or other type of package which represents a second barrier. The deep ocean sediments, a third barrier, are discussed in the Feasibility Assessment section. The waste form and canister would provide a barrier for several hundred years, and the sediments would be relied upon as a barrier for thousands of years. 62 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

Carlin, E.M.; Hinga, K.R.; Knauss, J.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Technical and economic feasibility of a Thermal Gradient Utilization Cycle (TGUC) power plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Conversion unit mass mass flow rate life of system Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion power pressure heat flow Rl R4 TGUC TP T2 total primary energy subsidy expressed as BTU input per 1000 BTU output thermal energy subsidy expressed... has grown in energy technologies that use renewable resources such as solar (thermal conversion, ocean thermal energy conversion, photovoltaics, wind and biomass conversion), geothermal and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) . A new concept that can...

Raiji, Ashok

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Lih thermal energy storage device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal energy storage device for use in a pulsed power supply to store waste heat produced in a high-power burst operation utilizes lithium hydride as the phase change thermal energy storage material. The device includes an outer container encapsulating the lithium hydride and an inner container supporting a hydrogen sorbing sponge material such as activated carbon. The inner container is in communication with the interior of the outer container to receive hydrogen dissociated from the lithium hydride at elevated temperatures.

Olszewski, Mitchell (Knoxville, TN); Morris, David G. (Knoxville, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Evaluation and Sensitivity Analysis of an Ocean Model Response to Hurricane Ivan G. R. HALLIWELL JR.,* L. K. SHAY, AND J. K. BREWSTER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

provides the thermal energy for intensification, errors and biases in the ocean compo- nent of coupled TCEvaluation and Sensitivity Analysis of an Ocean Model Response to Hurricane Ivan G. R. HALLIWELL JR December 2009) ABSTRACT An ocean model response to Hurricane Ivan (2004) over the northwest Caribbean Sea

272

Water and Climate 2. Circulation of ocean and atmosphere; climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to high latitude and part of that thermal energy is FW: latent heat Gill Atmosphere-Ocean Dynamics integrated vertically (annual mean) ERA40 Atlas ECMWF HIGH: ICTZ, monsoon regions, Amazon.... convergent March 2005 from satellite radiometer AMSR-E. Ranges up to 6.5 cm FW in tropics #12;#12;Relative humidity

273

Atmosphere and Ocean: Water (drought topic begins at slide 26)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atmosphere and Ocean: Water (drought topic begins at slide 26) UW Hon220c Energy & Environment in the atmosphere: 50-70% of the greenhouse effect; ½ the flow of thermal energy from laEtude (like SeaXle and its sister city, Bergen Norway. Meehl et al. Geophysical

274

ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT DIVISION. ANNUAL REPORT FY 1980  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MSW) and 40 MWe of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)ocean thermal, Ruderman wind, solar, and geothermal energy,energy sources, such as solar-heated water, indus- trial waste heat, geothermal brines, and ocean thermal

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Wasted Wind  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

why turbulent airflows are causing power losses and turbine failures in America's wind farms-and what to do about it April 1, 2014 Wasted Wind This aerial photo of Denmark's Horns...

276

Ocean energy conversion systems annual research report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alternative power cycle concepts to the closed-cycle Rankine are evaluated and those that show potential for delivering power in a cost-effective and environmentally acceptable fashion are explored. Concepts are classified according to the ocean energy resource: thermal, waves, currents, and salinity gradient. Research projects have been funded and reported in each of these areas. The lift of seawater entrained in a vertical steam flow can provide potential energy for a conventional hydraulic turbine conversion system. Quantification of the process and assessment of potential costs must be completed to support concept evaluation. Exploratory development is being completed in thermoelectricity and 2-phase nozzles for other thermal concepts. Wave energy concepts are being evaluated by analysis and model testing with present emphasis on pneumatic turbines and wave focussing. Likewise, several conversion approaches to ocean current energy are being evaluated. The use of salinity resources requires further research in membranes or the development of membraneless processes. Using the thermal resource in a Claude cycle process as a power converter is promising, and a program of R and D and subsystem development has been initiated to provide confirmation of the preliminary conclusion.

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The status of the following programs is reported: high-level waste immobilization; alternative waste forms; Nuclear Waste Materials Characterization Center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton solidification; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; mobility of organic complexes of fission products in soils; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology; systems study on engineered barriers; criteria for defining waste isolation; spent fuel and fuel pool component integrity program; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; and development of backfill material.

Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, October through December 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress reports and summaries are presented under the following headings: high-level waste process development; alternative waste forms; nuclear waste materials characterization center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton solidification; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; mobility of organic complexes of radionuclides in soils; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology; high level waste form preparation; development of backfill material; development of structural engineered barriers; ONWI disposal charge analysis; spent fuel and fuel component integrity program; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; analysis of postulated criticality events in a storage array of spent LWR fuel; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium tailings; liner evaluation for uranium mill tailings; multilayer barriers for sealing of uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; revegetation of inactive uranium tailing sites; verification instrument development.

Chikalla, T.D.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Massachusetts Ocean Management Plan (Massachusetts)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Massachusetts Ocean Act of 2008 required the states Secretary of Energy and Environmental Affairs to develop a comprehensive ocean management plan for the state by the end of 2009. That plan...

280

Ninth Annual Ocean Renewable Energy Conference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The future of clean, renewable ocean wave energy will be discussed in depth at the 2014 Ocean Renewable Energy Conference.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal waste treatment Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and economic analyses for new thermal waste treatment technologies and examined data... , Columbia University New York, NY Research Associate September 2009 - Present...

282

November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 208 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS EARLY CENOZOIC EXTREME CLIMATES -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

283

February 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

February 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 204 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING GAS HYDRATES ON HYDRATE -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Richter Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

284

December 2001 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

December 2001 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 203 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING AT THE EQUATORIAL -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Bauldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University. Acton Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

285

Accelerated carbonation treatment of industrial wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The disposal of industrial waste presents major logistical, financial and environmental issues. Technologies that can reduce the hazardous properties of wastes are urgently required. In the present work, a number of industrial wastes arising from the cement, metallurgical, paper, waste disposal and energy industries were treated with accelerated carbonation. In this process carbonation was effected by exposing the waste to pure carbon dioxide gas. The paper and cement wastes chemically combined with up to 25% by weight of gas. The reactivity of the wastes to carbon dioxide was controlled by their constituent minerals, and not by their elemental composition, as previously postulated. Similarly, microstructural alteration upon carbonation was primarily influenced by mineralogy. Many of the thermal wastes tested were classified as hazardous, based upon regulated metal content and pH. Treatment by accelerated carbonation reduced the leaching of certain metals, aiding the disposal of many as stable non-reactive wastes. Significant volumes of carbon dioxide were sequestrated into the accelerated carbonated treated wastes.

Gunning, Peter J., E-mail: gunning_peter@hotmail.co [Centre for Contaminated Land Remediation, University of Greenwich, Chatham Maritime (United Kingdom); Hills, Colin D.; Carey, Paula J. [Centre for Contaminated Land Remediation, University of Greenwich, Chatham Maritime (United Kingdom)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

286

Waste processing air cleaning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste processing and preparing waste to support waste processing relies heavily on ventilation. Ventilation is used at the Hanford Site on the waste storage tanks to provide confinement, cooling, and removal of flammable gases.

Kriskovich, J.R.

1998-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

287

Waste Disposal (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article lays an outline of waste disposal regulations, permits and fees, hazardous waste management and underground storage tank requirements.

288

Modelling of partially-resolved oceanic symmetric instability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the energy sources ? Corresponding author. Address: DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA, United Kingdom. Tel.: +44 01223 337030. E-mail address: J.R.Taylor@damtp.cam.ac.uk (J.R. Taylor). Ocean Modelling 82 (2014) 15... of the surface ocean at strong fronts. Energetically, SI can be described as a small-scale shear instabil- ity that extracts energy from the vertically-sheared thermal wind (Taylor and Ferrari, 2010; Thomas and Taylor, 2010) and acts as a mediator...

Bachman, S. D.; Taylor, J. R.

2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

289

The Coal-Waste Artificial Reef Program (C-WARP): A New Resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Coal-Waste Artificial Reef Program (C-WARP): A New Resource Potential for Fishing Reef ABSTRACT-Thefeasibility ofusing solid blocks of waste materialfrom coal:firedpower plantslor underwater (scrubber) sludge from coal-burning power stations. was constructed in the Atlantic Ocean offLong Island. N

290

Drilling deep through the ocean crust into the upper mantle Benot Ildefonse (1) and Mission Moho proponents (2)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drilling deep through the ocean crust into the upper mantle Benoît Ildefonse (1) and Mission Moho the inventory of global thermal, chemical and associated biological fluxes. Drilling an ultra-deep hole, and into the uppermost mantle is a long-standing goal of scientific ocean drilling; it remains critical to answer many

Demouchy, Sylvie

291

Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pacific Oceans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .currents in the tropical Pacific Ocean. J. Phys. Oceanogr. ,in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean associated with the

Drushka, Kyla

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean: National Science Foundation _______________________________ David L. Divins Director, Ocean Drilling

293

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Climate protection in light of the· Waste Framework Directive. The "energy package", e.g. the RenewablesWASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource! energy forum Case Studies from Estonia, Switzerland, Germany Bossart,· ABB Waste-to-Energy Plants Edmund Fleck,· ESWET Marcel van Berlo,· Afval Energie Bedrijf From

Columbia University

294

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean. ______________________________ David L. Divins Director, Ocean Drilling Programs Consortium for Ocean Leadership, Inc. Washington, D

295

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean. _______________________________ David L. Divins Director, Ocean Drilling Programs Consortium for Ocean Leadership, Inc. Washington, D

296

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean _______________________________ David L. Divins Director, Ocean Drilling Programs Consortium for Ocean Leadership, Inc. Washington, D

297

Dilution and dispersion of liquid wastes in the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4459924 ABSTRACT Dilution and Dispersion of Liouid Mastes in the Gulf of Nexico (December, 1974) Daniel Edward Beckett, B. S. , Texas ASM University Chairman of Advisory Comm1ttee: Dr. Tom D. Reynolds Ocean disposal of liquid industrial wastes has... of the wastes, barge speed, and discharge rate. The validity of using dye as a tracer in ocean dumping studies was in- vestigated through dye/waste d1fferential stud1es. Observat1ons and recommendations were made on the basis of the work conducted...

Beckett, Daniel Edward

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

298

Thermochemical conversion of waste materials to valuable products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential offered by a large variety of solid and liquid wastes for generating value added products is widely recognized. Extensive research and development has focused on developing technologies to recover energy and valuable products from waste materials. These treatment technologies include use of waste materials for direct combustion, upgrading the waste materials into useful fuel such as fuel gas or fuel oil, and conversion of waste materials into higher value products for the chemical industry. Thermal treatment in aerobic (with oxygen) conditions or direct combustion of waste materials in most cases results in generating air pollution and thereby requiring installation of expensive control devices. Thermochemical conversion in aerobic (without oxygen) conditions, referred to as thermal decomposition (destructive distillation) results in formation of usable liquid, solid, and gaseous products. Thermochemical conversion includes gasification, liquefaction, and thermal decomposition (pyrolysis). Each thermochemical conversion process yields a different range of products and this paper will discuss thermal decomposition in detail. This paper will also present results of a case study for recovering value added products, in the form of a liquid, solid, and gas, from thermal decomposition of waste oil and scrap tires. The product has a high concentration of benzene, xylene, and toluene. The solid product has significant amounts of carbon black and can be used as an asphalt modifier for road construction. The gas product is primarily composed of methane and is used for heating the reactor.

Saraf, S. [Engineering Technologies, Lombard, IL (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

299

MID-ATLANTIC REGIONAL OCEAN RESEARCH PLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

................................................................................. 24 #12;v ASMFC Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission BOEM Bureau of Ocean Energy Management BMPMID-ATLANTIC REGIONAL OCEAN RESEARCH PLAN SEPTEMBER 2012 Sea Grant Mid-Atlantic Ocean Research #12;MID-ATLANTIC REGIONAL OCEAN RESEARCH PLAN SEPTEMBER 2012 Sea Grant Mid-Atlantic Ocean Research

300

P h y s i c a l O c e a n o g r a p h y D i v i s i o n Optimizing Ocean Observations for Hurricane Forecast Improvement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

forecasts for individual storms and improved seasonal forecast of the ocean thermal energy availableP h y s i c a l O c e a n o g r a p h y D i v i s i o n Optimizing Ocean Observations for Hurricane to provide NOAA the ability to evaluate new ocean observing systems, and alternate deployments of existing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

ARM - Oceanic Properties  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearchWarmingMethane Background InformationNewsMediaAlaskaNewsOceanic

302

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 1, Part 1, Generator dangerous waste report, dangerous waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, weight, and waste designation.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

303

Ocean Engineering at UNH THE OCEAN ENGINEERING program at UNH provides students with hands-on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-on opportunities for research in ocean renewable energy, remotely operated vehicles, ocean mapping, ocean acousticsOcean Engineering at UNH THE OCEAN ENGINEERING program at UNH provides students with hands, and coastal processes. The Jere A. Chase Ocean Engineering Laboratory is equipped with state

Pringle, James "Jamie"

304

Thermal-spectrum recriticality energetics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large computer codes have been created in the past to predict the energy release in hypothetical core disruptive accidents (CDA), postulated to occur in liquid metal reactors (LMR). These codes, such as SIMMER, are highly specific to LMR designs. More recent attention has focused on thermal-spectrum criticality accidents, such as for fuel storage basins and waste tanks containing fissile material. This paper resents results from recent one-dimensional kinetics simulations, performed for a recriticality accident in a thermal spectrum. Reactivity insertion rates generally are smaller than in LMR CDAs, and the energetics generally are more benign. Parametric variation of input was performed, including reactivity insertion and initial temperature.

Schwinkendorf, K.N.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Modeling Ocean Ecosystems: The PARADIGM Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The role of the oceans in Earth systems ecology, and the effects of climate variability on the ocean and its ecosystems, can be understood only by observing, describing, and ultimately predicting the state of the ocean as ...

Rothstein, Lewis M.

306

Pelagic Polychaetes of the Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polyc'kaetes of the Pacific Ocean CLAPARtDE,E. 1868. LesPolyc'haetes of the Pacific Ocean KINBERG, J. G. H. 1866.Polyc'kaetes of the Pacific Ocean TREADWELL, A. L. 1906.

Dales, K Phillips

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 190 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

164 Japan __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling under the international Ocean Drilling Program, which is managed by Joint Oceanographic Institutions) Natural Environment Research Council (United Kingdom) European Science Foundation Consortium for the Ocean

308

California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy Resources IN SUPPORT OF THE 2005 INTEGRATED....................................................................................................................... 9 Ocean Wave Energy................................................................. 21 #12;ii List of Tables Table 1 California Small Hydropower And Ocean Wave Energy Resources Table 2

309

Thermal loading study for FY 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides the results of sensitivity analyses designed to assist the test planners in focusing their in-situ measurements on parameters that appear to be important to waste isolation. Additionally, the study provides a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of certain thermal management options. A decision on thermal loading is a critical part of the scientific and engineering basis for evaluating regulatory compliance of the potential repository for waste isolation. To show, with reasonable assurance, that the natural and engineered barriers will perform adequately under expected repository conditions (thermally perturbed) will require an integrated approach based on thermal testing (laboratory, and in-situ), natural analog observations, and analytic modeling. The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management needed input to assist in the planning of the thermal testing program. Additionally, designers required information on the viability of various thermal management concepts. An approximately 18-month Thermal Loading Study was conducted from March, 1994 until September 30, 1995 to address these issues. This report documents the findings of that study. 89 refs., 71 figs., 33 tabs.

NONE

1996-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

310

Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

ELLEFSON, M.D.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Nondestructive characterization of low-level transuranic waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods is proposed for characterization of transuranic (TRU) waste stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. These NDE methods include real-time x-ray radiography, real-time neutron radiography, x-ray and neutron computed tomography, thermal imaging, container weighing, visual examination, and acoustic measurements. An integrated NDE system is proposed for characterization and certification of TRU waste destined for eventual shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. Methods for automating both the classification waste and control of a complete nondestructive evaluation/nondestructive assay system are presented. Feasibility testing of the different NDE methods, including real-time x-ray radiography, and development of automated waste classification techniques are covered as part of a five year effort designed to yield a production waste characterization system.

Barna, B.A.; Reinhardt, W.W.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Tuning the Thermal Properties of Magnetic Tunnel Junctions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

magnetic field. This phenomenon potentially enables the controlled manipulation of temperature gradients, the recycling of wasted heat, and thermal spin-logic. Our calculations employ the Landauer-Buttiker scattering formalism, in conjunction...

Amin, Vivek Pravin

2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

313

Radioactive Waste Management (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section regulates the transportation and disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Minnesota, and establishes a Nuclear Waste Council to monitor the federal high-level radioactive waste...

314

November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 209 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING MANTLE PERIDOTITE ALONG Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA -------------------------------- Dr. D. Jay Miller Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University

315

January 2003 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

January 2003 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 210 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING THE NEWFOUNDLAND HALF OF THE NEWFOUNDLAND­IBERIA TRANSECT: THE FIRST CONJUGATE MARGIN DRILLING IN A NON-VOLCANIC RIFT Brian E. Tucholke Co Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

316

The Plastic Ocean Michael Gonsior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Plastic Ocean Michael Gonsior Bonnie Monteleone, William Cooper, Jennifer O'Keefe, Pamela Seaton, and Maureen Conte #12;#12;#12;Plastic does not biodegrade it photo-degrades breaking down is the plastic cheese wrap? Unfortunately, marine creatures mistake plastics in the ocean for food #12

Boynton, Walter R.

317

GENERATING ELECTRICITY USING OCEAN WAVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GENERATING ELECTRICITY USING OCEAN WAVES A RENEWABLE SOURCE OF ENERGY REPORT FOR THE HONG KONG ELECTRIC COMPANY LIMITED Dr L F Yeung Mr Paul Hodgson Dr Robin Bradbeer July 2007 #12;Ocean Waves and construction of equipment that could measure and log wave conditions and tide levels at Hoi Ha Wan. Prototypes

Bradbeer, Robin Sarah

318

Waste Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface.Laboratory30,WP-073.99 4.22PrimaryWaste

319

Herzig, P.M., Humphris, S.E., Miller, D.J., and Zierenberg, R.A. (Eds.), 1998 Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Scientific Results, Vol. 158  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and related hydrothermal processes (RIDGE, 1992; Ocean Drilling Program [ODP], 1996). Conduction through of the Ocean Drilling Program, Scientific Results, Vol. 158 329 24. THERMAL PROPERTIES OF TAG HYDROTHERMAL hydrothermal field, located in the rift valley of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 26°N, 45°W. Thermal conductivity

320

Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation gives regulatory authority to the Department of Environmental Management to monitor commercial sites for hazardous wastes; fees on waste received at such sites; hearings and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Waste Treatment Plant Overview  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the...

322

Salt Waste Processing Initiatives  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

1 Patricia Suggs Salt Processing Team Lead Assistant Manager for Waste Disposition Project Office of Environmental Management Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Initiatives...

323

Solid Waste (New Mexico)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The New Mexico Environment Department's Solid Waste Bureau manages solid waste in the state. The Bureau implements and enforces the rules established by the Environmental Improvement Board.

324

Nuclear Waste Reduction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Waste Reduction Pyroprocessing is a promising technology for recycling used nuclear fuel and improving the associated waste management options. The process...

325

Radioactive Waste Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish policies and guidelines by which the Department of Energy (DOE) manages tis radioactive waste, waste byproducts, and radioactively contaminated surplus facilities.

1984-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

326

Transuranic Waste Requirements  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The guide provides criteria for determining if a waste is to be managed in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter III, Transuranic Waste Requirements.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

327

Modeling Building Thermal Response to HVAC Zoning Virginia Smith  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Building Thermal Response to HVAC Zoning Virginia Smith Department of Computer Science HVAC systems account for 38% of building energy usage. Studies have indicated at least 5-15% waste due to unoccu- pied spaces being conditioned. Our goal is to minimize this waste by retrofitting HVAC systems

Whitehouse, Kamin

328

Radioactive and chemotoxic wastes: Only radioactive wastes?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive waste arising from Italian Nuclear Power Plants and Research Centers, classified as 1st and 2nd Category wastes, are managed only as radioactive wastes following the Technical Guide No. 26 issued by the Italian Regulatory Body: ENEA DISP on 1987. A very important Regulatory Regime revision for Italian Nuclear Activities started at the end of 1991. This paper considers the need to develop a new strategy dedicated to mixed waste in line with current international trends.

Eletti, G.F.; Tocci, M. [ENEA DISP, Rome (Italy)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

329

Solid Waste and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This chapter of the law that establishes the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency establishes the rules and regulations regarding solid waste.

330

Melter development needs assessment for RWMC buried wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a survey and initial assessment of the existing state-of-the-art melter technology necessary to thermally treat (stabilize) buried TRU waste, by producing a highly leach resistant glass/ceramic waste form suitable for final disposal. Buried mixed transuranic (TRU) waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) represents an environmental hazard requiring remediation. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) placed the INEL on the National Priorities List in 1989. Remediation of the buried TRU-contaminated waste via the CERCLA decision process is required to remove INEL from the National Priorities List. A Waste Technology Development (WTD) Preliminary Systems Design and Thermal Technologies Screening Study identified joule-heated and plasma-heated melters as the most probable thermal systems technologies capable of melting the INEL soil and waste to produce the desired final waste form (Iron-Enriched Basalt (IEB) glass/ceramic). The work reported herein then surveys the state of existing melter technology and assesses it within the context of processing INEL buried TRU wastes and contaminated soils. Necessary technology development work is recommended.

Donaldson, A.D.; Carpenedo, R.J.; Anderson, G.L.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Melter development needs assessment for RWMC buried wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a survey and initial assessment of the existing state-of-the-art melter technology necessary to thermally treat (stabilize) buried TRU waste, by producing a highly leach resistant glass/ceramic waste form suitable for final disposal. Buried mixed transuranic (TRU) waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) represents an environmental hazard requiring remediation. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) placed the INEL on the National Priorities List in 1989. Remediation of the buried TRU-contaminated waste via the CERCLA decision process is required to remove INEL from the National Priorities List. A Waste Technology Development (WTD) Preliminary Systems Design and Thermal Technologies Screening Study identified joule-heated and plasma-heated melters as the most probable thermal systems technologies capable of melting the INEL soil and waste to produce the desired final waste form [Iron-Enriched Basalt (IEB) glass/ceramic]. The work reported herein then surveys the state of existing melter technology and assesses it within the context of processing INEL buried TRU wastes and contaminated soils. Necessary technology development work is recommended.

Donaldson, A.D.; Carpenedo, R.J.; Anderson, G.L.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

WasteTraining Booklet Waste & Recycling Impacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WasteTraining Booklet #12;Waste & Recycling Impacts Environment: The majority of our municipal jobs while recycling 10,000 tons of waste creates 36 jobs. Environment: Recycling conserves resources. It takes 95% less energy to make aluminum from recycled aluminum than from virgin materials, 60% less

Saldin, Dilano

333

Alpha low-level stored waste systems design study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Stored Waste System Design Study (SWSDS), commissioned by the Waste Technology Development Department at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), examines relative life-cycle costs associated with three system concepts for processing the alpha low-level waste (alpha-LLW) stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex`s Transuranic Storage Area at the INEL. The three system concepts are incineration/melting; thermal treatment/solidification; and sort, treat, and repackage. The SWSDS identifies system functional and operational requirements and assesses implementability; effectiveness; cost; and demonstration, testing, and evaluation (DT&E) requirements for each of the three concepts.

Feizollahi, F.; Teheranian, B. [Morrison Knudson Corp., San Francisco, CA (United States). Environmental Services Div.; Quapp, W.J. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Alpha low-level stored waste systems design study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Stored Waste System Design Study (SWSDS), commissioned by the Waste Technology Development Department at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), examines relative life-cycle costs associated with three system concepts for processing the alpha low-level waste (alpha-LLW) stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex's Transuranic Storage Area at the INEL. The three system concepts are incineration/melting; thermal treatment/solidification; and sort, treat, and repackage. The SWSDS identifies system functional and operational requirements and assesses implementability; effectiveness; cost; and demonstration, testing, and evaluation (DT E) requirements for each of the three concepts.

Feizollahi, F.; Teheranian, B. (Morrison Knudson Corp., San Francisco, CA (United States). Environmental Services Div.); Quapp, W.J. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Assessment of incineration and melting treatment technologies for RWMC buried waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an identification, description, and ranking evaluation of the available thermal treatment technologies potentially capable of treating the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) buried mixed waste. The ranking evaluation focused separately upon incinerators for treatment of combustible wastes and melters for noncombustible wastes. The highest rank incinerators are rotary kilns and controlled air furnaces, while the highest rank melters are the hearth configuration plasma torch, graphite electrode arc, and joule-heated melters. 4 refs.

Geimer, R.; Hertzler, T.; Gillins, R. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Anderson, G.L. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Ocean thermal energy. Quarterly report, October-December 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report summarizes work on the following tasks: OTEC methanol; approaches for financing OTEC proof-of-concept experimental vessels; investigation of OTEC-ammonia as an alternative fuel; review of electrolyzer development programs and requirements; hybrid geothermal-OTEC power plants: single-cycle performance; estimates; and hybrid geothermal-OTEC power plants: dual-cycle performance estimates.

Not Available

1981-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

337

Response of oceanic hydrate-bearing sediments to thermal stresses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mass of water produced from the gravel pack (M W ).Wellbore designs with gravel packs that allow gas ventingattributed to a sand or gravel pack emplaced during drilling

Moridis, G.J.; Kowalsky, M.B.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

skipjack tuna, Katsuwonnus pelamis, in an offshore area oflittle tuna), Katsuwonus pelamis (skipj ack), spp. ,

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the external fluid mechanics of OTEC plants: report coveringthermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants by mid-1980 1 s.distributiion at potential OTEC sites. p. 7D-4/1-4/5. In

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Assessment OTEC Pilot Plant. Prepared forDraft Environmental Assessment Mini-OTEC Second Deployment.matic EA are within the OTEC technology and include the

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SCENARIO . . . . . . . . . . OTEC RESOURCE REGIONALC-1 ILLUSTRATIONS Number Title OTEC Systems Development Gulfof Mexico Moored OTEC Resource Area . . . . . . . . . . .

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

industrial users. Costs and per kWh increased from to 2.7rf-30, 1978, the average cost per kWh was 6.09i for residential

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) safety, and the Coast Guard covers mar1ne covers some offshore

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This programmatic environmental analysis is an initial assessment of OTEC technology considering development, demonstration and commercialization; it is concluded that the OTEC development program should continue because the development, demonstration, and commercialization on a single-plant deployment basis should not present significant environmental impacts. However, several areas within the OTEC program require further investigation in order to assess the potential for environmental impacts from OTEC operation, particularly in large-scale deployments and in defining alternatives to closed-cycle biofouling control: (1) Larger-scale deployments of OTEC clusters or parks require further investigations in order to assess optimal platform siting distances necessary to minimize adverse environmental impacts. (2) The deployment and operation of the preoperational platform (OTEC-1) and future demonstration platforms must be carefully monitored to refine environmental assessment predictions, and to provide design modifications which may mitigate or reduce environmental impacts for larger-scale operations. These platforms will provide a valuable opportunity to fully evaluate the intake and discharge configurations, biofouling control methods, and both short-term and long-term environmental effects associated with platform operations. (3) Successful development of OTEC technology to use the maximal resource capabilities and to minimize environmental effects will require a concerted environmental management program, encompassing many different disciplines and environmental specialties.

Sands, M. D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

The Potential Impact of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The major responsibilities of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) are to monitor and assess the abundance and geographic distribution of fishery resources, to understand and predict fluctuations in the quantity and distribution of these resources, and to establish levels for their optimum use. NMFS is also charged with the development and implementation of policies for managing national fishing grounds, development and enforcemeJlt of domestic fisheries regulations, surveillance of foreign fishing off United States coastal waters, and the development and enforcement of international fishery agreements and policies. NMFS also assists the fishing industry through marketing service and economic analysis programs, and mortgage insurance and vessel cunstruction subsidies. It collects, analyzes, and publishes statistics on various phases of the industry.

On Fisheries; Edward P. Myers; Donald E. Hoss; Walter M. Matsumoto; David S. Peters; Michael P. Seki; Richard N. Uchida; John D. Ditmars; Robert A. Paddock

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aspects of siting OTEC plants offshore the United States ongas. phosgene Offshore ammonia plant-ships will presentan facility offshore may expose the plant to power outages

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electricity - Hawaii is almost totally dependent upon imported petroleum A natural energy source of geothermal

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by liquifaction and fractional distillation of air (EPA, Thefractional elements nitrogen pure form. Nitrogen \\'lill be extracted from the atmosphere by means of liquefaction and distillation,

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

List of Ocean Thermal Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place:KeystoneSolarList of GeothermalMethanol

350

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report |  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced ScorecardReactor TechnologyOFFICE: I Oak Ridge,8 8EnergyQ1

351

Response of oceanic hydrate-bearing sediments to thermal stresses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

c) aqueous, gas and hydrate phase saturations, (d) waterIntrinsic Rate of Methane Gas Hydrate Decomposition, Chem.Western Nankai Trough, in Gas Hydrates: Challenges for the

Moridis, G.J.; Kowalsky, M.B.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

NREL-Ocean Energy Thermal Conversion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3Informationof Energy Calculator Jump to: navigation,

353

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 4, Waste Management Facility report, Radioactive mixed waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, handling method and containment vessel, waste number, waste designation and amount of waste.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

354

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

355

A REVIEW OF GLOBAL OCEAN TEMPERATURE OBSERVATIONS: IMPLICATIONS FOR OCEAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by taking an inventory of changes in energy storage. The main storage is in the ocean, the latest values, Energy Sustainable Economic, Earth's energy imbalance, and thermosteric sea level rise. Up-to-date estimates are provided

356

composition of putative oceans on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Results: Oceanic water composition · Oceanic water is a NaCl-CaCl2 solution · Large Cl mass · Cl in a "soda ocean" Temperature, o C 100 200 300 400 500 Concentration,mole/kgH2O 0.01 0.1 1 Cl- CaCl2 CaCl+ Na calcite · Quartz · Na-K feldspars · Anhydrite · Pyrite · Hematite/magnetite · Evaporites: NaCl+CaCl2 350o

Treiman, Allan H.

357

Waste Acceptance Testing of Secondary Waste Forms: Cast Stone, Ceramicrete and DuraLith  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To support the selection of a waste form for the liquid secondary wastes from WTP, Washington River Protection Solutions has initiated secondary-waste-form testing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In anticipation of a down-selection process for a waste form for the Solidification Treatment Unit to be added to the ETF, PNNL is conducting tests on four candidate waste forms to evaluate their ability to meet potential waste acceptance criteria for immobilized secondary wastes that would be placed in the IDF. All three waste forms demonstrated compressive strengths above the minimum 3.45 MPa (500 psi) set as a target for cement-based waste forms. Further, none of the waste forms showed any significant degradation in compressive strength after undergoing thermal cycling (30 cycles in a 10 day period) between -40 C and 60 C or water immersion for 90 days. The three leach test methods are intended to measure the diffusion rates of contaminants from the waste forms. Results are reported in terms of diffusion coefficients and a leachability index (LI) calculated based on the diffusion coefficients. A smaller diffusion coefficient and a larger LI are desired. The NRC, in its Waste Form Technical Position (NRC 1991), provides recommendations and guidance regarding methods to demonstrate waste stability for land disposal of radioactive waste. Included is a recommendation to conduct leach tests using the ANS 16.1 method. The resulting leachability index (LI) should be greater than 6.0. For Hanford secondary wastes, the LI > 6.0 criterion applies to sodium leached from the waste form. For technetium and iodine, higher targets of LI > 9 for Tc and LI > 11 for iodine have been set based on early waste-disposal risk and performance assessment analyses. The results of these three leach tests conducted for a total time between 11days (ASTM C1308) to 90 days (ANS 16.1) showed: (1) Technetium diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that all the waste forms had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium; (2) Rhenium diffusivity: Cast Stone 2M specimens, when tested using EPA 1315 protocol, had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium based on rhenium as a surrogate for technetium. All other waste forms tested by ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 test methods had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 9 for Tc based on rhenium release. These studies indicated that use of Re(VII) as a surrogate for 99Tc(VII) in low temperature secondary waste forms containing reductants will provide overestimated diffusivity values for 99Tc. Therefore, it is not appropriate to use Re as a surrogate 99Tc in future low temperature waste form studies. (3) Iodine diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that the three waste forms had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 11 for iodine. Therefore, it may be necessary to use a more effective sequestering material than silver zeolite used in two of the waste forms (Ceramicrete and DuraLith); (4) Sodium diffusivity: All the waste form specimens tested by the three leach methods (ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315) exceeded the target LI value of 6; (5) All three leach methods (ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308 and EPA 1315) provided similar 99Tc diffusivity values for both short-time transient diffusivity effects as well as long-term ({approx}90 days) steady diffusivity from each of the three tested waste forms (Cast Stone 2M, Ceramicrete and DuraLith). Therefore, any one of the three methods can be used to determine the contaminant diffusivities from a selected waste form.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Lindberg, Michael J.; Parker, Kent E.

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

358

7-122 A solar pond power plant operates by absorbing heat from the hot region near the bottom, and rejecting waste heat to the cold region near the top. The maximum thermal efficiency that the power plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

calculated above. 7-123 A Carnot heat engine cycle is executed in a closed system with a fixed mass of steam can have is to be determined. Analysis The highest thermal efficiency a heat engine operating between transfer. Therefore, the maximum efficiency of the actual heat engine will be lower than the value

Bahrami, Majid

359

Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source special nuclear and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this document. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge. This document has been revised to meet the interim status waste analysis plan requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173 303-300(5). When the final status permit is issued, permit conditions will be incorporated and this document will be revised accordingly.

ELLEFSON, M.D.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

360

Ocean Studies Board annual report 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Activities of the Ocean Studies Board fall into three broad categories: promoting the health of ocean sciences in the United States, encouraging the protection and wise use of the ocean and its resources, and applying ocean science to improve national security.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Ocean Studies Board annual report 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Activities of the Ocean Studies Board fall into three broad categories: promoting the health of ocean sciences in the United States, encouraging the protection and wise use of the ocean and its resources, and applying ocean science to improve national security.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Heat Content Changes in the Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat Content Changes in the Pacific Ocean The Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Cli- mate (ATOC assimilating ocean observations and changes expected from surface heat fluxes as measured by the daily National are a result of advection of heat by ocean currents. We calculate that the most likely cause of the discrepancy

Frandsen, Jannette B.

363

OCEAN-ATMOSPHERE INTERACTION AND TROPICAL CLIMATE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiation is the ultimate source of energy for motions in the atmosphere and ocean. Most absorption of solar radiation takes place on the Earth surface, the majority of which is occupied by oceans. Thus oceanic modulate surface radiative flux. Thus, the ocean and atmosphere are a coupled system and their interaction

Xie, Shang-Ping

364

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 165 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 165 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS CARIBBEAN OCEAN HISTORY AND THE CRETACEOUS Scientist, Leg 165 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Discovery Drive College of any portion requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University

365

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 104 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 104 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS NORWEGIAN SEA Olav Eldholm Co-Chief Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, Texas 77843-3469 Pni±ip o Rabinowitz Director Ocean Drilling Program Robert B Kidd Manager of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Louis E

366

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 110 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 110 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS LESSER ANTILLES FOREARC J. Casey Moore Staff Science Representative, Leg 110 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843-3469 Philip D. Direct* Ocean Drilling Program Robert B. Kidd Manager of Science Operations Ocean

367

INSTRUCTIONS INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM (IODP)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM (IODP) MANUSCRIPT AND PHOTOGRAPH COPYRIGHT, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, 1000 Discovery Drive, College Station, Texas 77845, USA A signed copyright of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program or any other publications of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program. Author

368

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 109 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 109 PRELIMINARY REPORT BARE ROCK DRILLING IN THE MID-ATLANTIC RIDGE RIFT 109 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, TX 77843-3469 Philip D. Rabinowitz Director Ocean Drilling Program Robert B. Kidd Manager of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Louis E

369

n CAPABILITY STATEMENT Centre for Ocean Engineering,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

n CAPABILITY STATEMENT Centre for Ocean Engineering, Science and Technology Overview The Centre for Ocean Engineering, Science and Technology (COEST) is dedicated to the ocean, the most fascinating and the most challenging environment for human endeavour. COEST brings together the disciplines of ocean

Liley, David

370

4, 709732, 2007 Ice-shelf ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OSD 4, 709732, 2007 Ice-shelf ocean interactions at Fimbul Ice Shelf M. R. Price Title Page published in Ocean Science Discussions are under open-access review for the journal Ocean Science Ice-shelf ocean interactions at Fimbul Ice Shelf, Antarctica from oxygen isotope ratio measurements M. R. Price 1

Boyer, Edmond

371

Characterization of the BVEST waste tanks located at ORNL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the fall of 1996 there was a major effort to sample and analyze the Active Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) tanks at ORNL which include the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) and the Bethel Valley Evaporator Service Tanks (BVEST). The characterization data summarized in this report was needed to address waste processing options, address concerns dealing with the performance assessment (PA) data for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), evaluate the waste characteristics with respect to the waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for WIPP and Nevada Test Site (NTS), address criticality concerns, and meet DOT requirements for transporting the waste. This report discusses the analytical characterization data for the supernatant and sludge in the BVEST waste tanks W-21, W-22, and W-23. The isotopic data presented in this report supports the position that fissile isotopes of uranium and plutonium were denatured as required by the administrative controls stated in the ORNL LLLW waste acceptance criteria (WAC). In general, the BVEST sludge was found to be hazardous based on RCRA characteristics and the transuranic alpha activity was well above the 100 nCi/g limit for TRU waste. The characteristics of the BVEST sludge relative to the WIPP WAC limits for fissile gram equivalent, plutonium equivalent activity, and thermal power from decay heat were estimated from the data in this report and found to be far below the upper boundary for any of the remote-handled transuranic waste (RH-TRU) requirements for disposal of the waste in WIPP.

Keller, J.M.; Giaquinto, J.M.; Meeks, A.M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Timothy D. Stark, F.ASCE1 landfills may contain aluminum from residential and commercial solid waste, industrial waste, and aluminum pro- duction wastes. Some aluminum-bearing waste materials, particularly aluminum production wastes

373

Radioactive mixed waste disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various types of waste have been generated during the 50-year history of the Hanford Site. Regulatory changes in the last 20 years have provided the emphasis for better management of these wastes. Interpretations of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA), and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) have led to the definition of radioactive mixed wastes (RMW). The radioactive and hazardous properties of these wastes have resulted in the initiation of special projects for the management of these wastes. Other solid wastes at the Hanford Site include low-level wastes, transuranic (TRU), and nonradioactive hazardous wastes. This paper describes a system for the treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of solid radioactive waste.

Jasen, W.G.; Erpenbeck, E.G.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Understanding radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

Murray, R.L.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Exploring the Deep... Exploring the Ocean Environment Unit 1The Ocean Basins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEO/OC 103 Exploring the Deep... Lab 2 #12;Exploring the Ocean Environment Unit 1­The Ocean Basins Ocean origins 19 How did the oceans form? Scientists believe that the oceans developed early ). This early atmosphere reflected much of the solar radiation striking Earth, allowing the surface to cool

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

376

Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal waters in the upper ocean, the vertical distribution of solar radiation (ESR) in the shortwave domain plays (2005), Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal

Lee, Zhongping

377

Mercury in the Anthropocene Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The toxic metal mercury is present only at trace levels in the ocean, but it accumulates in fish at concentrations high enough to pose a threat to human and environmental health. Human activity has dramatically altered the ...

Lamborg, Carl

378

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

379

Survey of computer codes applicable to waste facility performance evaluations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study is an effort to review existing information that is useful to develop an integrated model for predicting the performance of a radioactive waste facility. A summary description of 162 computer codes is given. The identified computer programs address the performance of waste packages, waste transport and equilibrium geochemistry, hydrological processes in unsaturated and saturated zones, and general waste facility performance assessment. Some programs also deal with thermal analysis, structural analysis, and special purposes. A number of these computer programs are being used by the US Department of Energy, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and their contractors to analyze various aspects of waste package performance. Fifty-five of these codes were identified as being potentially useful on the analysis of low-level radioactive waste facilities located above the water table. The code summaries include authors, identification data, model types, and pertinent references. 14 refs., 5 tabs.

Alsharif, M.; Pung, D.L.; Rivera, A.L.; Dole, L.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of polymer waste comprising nylon 6 and a polyolefin or mixtures of polyolefins to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents; selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent. 83 figs.

Evans, R.J.; Chum, H.L.

1994-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of polymer waste comprising nylon 6 and a polyolefin or mixtures of polyolefins to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents; selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent.

Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO); Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Ocean Barrier Layers Effect on Tropical Cyclone Intensification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improving a tropical cyclone's forecast and mitigating its destructive potential requires knowledge of various environmental factors that influence the cyclone's path and intensity. Herein, using a combination of observations and model simulations, we systematically demonstrate that tropical cyclone intensification is significantly affected by salinity-induced barrier layers, which are 'quasi-permanent' features in the upper tropical oceans. When tropical cyclones pass over regions with barrier layers, the increased stratification and stability within the layer reduce storm-induced vertical mixing and sea surface temperature cooling. This causes an increase in enthalpy flux from the ocean to the atmosphere and, consequently, an intensification of tropical cyclones. On average, the tropical cyclone intensification rate is nearly 50% higher over regions with barrier layers, compared to regions without. Our finding, which underscores the importance of observing not only the upper-ocean thermal structure but also the salinity structure in deep tropical barrier layer regions, may be a key to more skillful predictions of tropical cyclone intensities through improved ocean state estimates and simulations of barrier layer processes. As the hydrological cycle responds to global warming, any associated changes in the barrier layer distribution must be considered in projecting future tropical cyclone activity.

Balaguru, Karthik; Chang, P.; Saravanan, R.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xu, Zhao; Li, M.; Hsieh, J.

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

383

Deployment, release and recovery of ocean riser pipes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ocean thermal energy conversion facility includes a long pipe assembly which is supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. Cold water flows to the facility from deep in the ocean. The pipe assembly comprises an elongate pipe construction and a weight connected to the lower end of the construction by a line of selected length. A floatation collar is connected to the construction at its upper end to cause the construction to have positive buoyancy and a center of buoyancy closer to the upper end of the construction than its center of mass. The weight renders the entire pipe assembly negatively buoyant. In the event that support of the pipe assembly should be lost, as by release of the assembly from the facility hull in an emergency, the assembly sinks to the ocean floor where it is moored by the weight. The pipe construction floats submerged above the ocean floor in a substantially vertical attitude which facilitates recovery of the assembly.

Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA); Wetmore, Sherman B. (Westminster, CA); McNary, James F. (Santa Ana, CA)

1980-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

384

Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act (HWMA) describes a comprehensive, Statewide program to manage hazardous wastes through regulating hazardous waste generation, transportation, storage,...

385

Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Revision 6 Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan Waste6 WM QA Plan Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan LBNL/4 Management Quality Assurance

Waste Management Group

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Hazardous Waste Act (New Mexico)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"Hazardous waste" means any solid waste or combination of solid wastes that because of their quantity, concentration or physical, chemical or infectious characteristics may: cause or significantly...

387

Open ocean DMS air/sea fluxes over the eastern South Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

over the North Pacific Ocean, J. Geophys. Res. - Atmos. ,air/sea fluxes over S. Pacific Ocean References Asher, W.in the equa- torial Pacific Ocean ( 1982 to 1996): Evidence

Marandino, C. A; De Bruyn, W. J; Miller, S. D; Saltzman, E. S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant simulated RH TRU waste experiments: Data and interpretation pilot  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The simulated, i.e., nonradioactive remote-handled transuranic waste (RH TRU) experiments being conducted underground in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) were emplaced in mid-1986 and have been in heated test operation since 9/23/86. These experiments involve the in situ, waste package performance testing of eight full-size, reference RH TRU containers emplaced in horizontal, unlined test holes in the rock salt ribs (walls) of WIPP Room T. All of the test containers have internal electrical heaters; four of the test emplacements were filled with bentonite and silica sand backfill materials. We designed test conditions to be ``near-reference`` with respect to anticipated thermal outputs of RH TRU canisters and their geometrical spacing or layout in WIPP repository rooms, with RH TRU waste reference conditions current as of the start date of this test program. We also conducted some thermal overtest evaluations. This paper provides a: detailed test overview; comprehensive data update for the first 5 years of test operations; summary of experiment observations; initial data interpretations; and, several status; experimental objectives -- how these tests support WIPP TRU waste acceptance, performance assessment studies, underground operations, and the overall WIPP mission; and, in situ performance evaluations of RH TRU waste package materials plus design details and options. We provide instrument data and results for in situ waste container and borehole temperatures, pressures exerted on test containers through the backfill materials, and vertical and horizontal borehole-closure measurements and rates. The effects of heat on borehole closure, fracturing, and near-field materials (metals, backfills, rock salt, and intruding brine) interactions were closely monitored and are summarized, as are assorted test observations. Predictive 3-dimensional thermal and structural modeling studies of borehole and room closures and temperature fields were also performed.

Molecke, M.A.; Argueello, G.J.; Beraun, R.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities July 24, 2014 9:00AM to 3:30PM EDT U.S....

390

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. - Allentown, PA A microbial reverse electrodialysis...

391

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demonstration LLNL Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory MSW Municipal Solid Waste OSHA Occupational Safety and Health Administration PPE Personal Protective Equipment POTW Publicly Owned Treatment Works RCRA Resource

392

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. The purpose of the Manual is to catalog those procedural requirements and existing practices that ensure that all DOE elements and contractors continue to manage DOE's radioactive waste in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety, and the environment. Does not cancel other directives.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

393

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean. _______________________________ Steven R. Bohlen President, Joint Oceanographic Institutions Division Executive Director, Ocean Drilling

394

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean. Bohlen President, Joint Oceanographic Institutions Division Executive Director, Ocean Drilling Programs

395

Warm Bias and Parameterization of Boundary Upwelling in Ocean Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been demonstrated that Eastern Boundary Currents (EBC) are a baroclinic intensification of the interior circulation of the ocean due to the emergence of mesoscale eddies in response to the sharp buoyancy gradients driven by the wind-stress and the thermal surface forcing. The eddies accomplish the heat and salt transport necessary to insure that the subsurface flow is adiabatic, compensating for the heat and salt transport effected by the mean currents. The EBC thus generated occurs on a cross-shore scale of order 20-100 km, and thus this scale needs to be resolved in climate models in order to capture the meridional transport by the EBC. Our result indicate that changes in the near shore currents on the oceanic eastern boundaries are linked not just to local forcing, such as coastal changes in the winds, but depend on the basin-wide circulation as well.

Cessi, Paola; Wolfe, Christopher

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

396

Ocean Fertilization and Other Climate Change Mitigation Strategies: An Overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to evaluate ocean fertilization in the larger context of other proposed strategies for reducing the threat of the global warming, a wide range of different climate change mitigation approaches are compared in terms of their long-term potential, stage of development, relative costs and potential risks, as well as public acceptance. This broad comparative analysis is carried out for the following climate change mitigation strategies: supply-side and end-use efficiency improvements, terrestrial and geological carbon sequestration, CO2 ocean disposal and iron fertilization, nuclear power, and renewable energy generation from biomass, passive solar, solar thermal, photovoltaics, hydroelectric and wind. In addition, because of the inherent problems of conducting an objective comparative cost-benefit analysis, two non-technological solutions to global warming are also discussed: curbing population growth and transitioning to a steady-state economy.

Huesemann, Michael H.

2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

397

Continental insulation, mantle cooling, and the surface area of oceans and continents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Continental insulation, mantle cooling, and the surface area of oceans and continents A. Lenardica May 2005 Abstract It is generally assumed that continents, acting as thermal insulation above. The theory predicts that parameter regimes exist for which increased continental insulation has no effect

Manga, Michael

398

Comparative assessment of TRU waste forms and processes. Volume I. Waste form and process evaluations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study provides an assesses seven waste forms and eight processes for immobilizing transuranic (TRU) wastes. The waste forms considered are cast cement, cold-pressed cement, FUETAP (formed under elevated temperature and pressure) cement, borosilicate glass, aluminosilicate glass, basalt glass-ceramic, and cold-pressed and sintered silicate ceramic. The waste-immobilization processes considered are in-can glass melting, joule-heated glass melting, glass marble forming, cement casting, cement cold-pressing, FUETAP cement processing, ceramic cold-pressing and sintering, basalt glass-ceramic processing. Properties considered included gas generation, chemical durability, mechanical strength, thermal stability, and radiation stability. The ceramic products demonstrated the best properties, except for plutonium release during leaching. The glass and ceramic products had similar properties. The cement products generally had poorer properties than the other forms, except for plutonium release during leaching. Calculations of the Pu release indicated that the waste forms met the proposed NRC release rate limit of 1 part in 10/sup 5/ per year in most test conditions. The cast-cement process had the lowest processing cost, followed closely by the cold-pressed and FUETAP cement processes. Joule-heated glass melting had the lower cost of the glass processes. In-can melting in a high-quality canister had the highest cost, and cold-pressed and sintered ceramic the second highest. Labor and canister costs for in-can melting were identified. The major contributor to costs of disposing of TRU wastes in a defense waste repository is waste processing costs. Repository costs could become the dominant cost for disposing of TRU wastes in a commercial repository. It is recommended that cast and FUETAP cement and borosilicate glass waste-form systems be considered. 13 figures, 16 tables.

Ross, W.A.; Lokken, R.O.; May, R.P.; Roberts, F.P.; Timmerman, C.L.; Treat, R.L.; Westsik, J.H. Jr.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Eco-efficient waste glass recycling: Integrated waste management and green product development through LCA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new eco-efficient recycling route for post-consumer waste glass was implemented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrated waste management and industrial production are crucial to green products. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most of the waste glass rejects are sent back to the glass industry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recovered co-products give more environmental gains than does avoided landfill. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy intensive recycling must be limited to waste that cannot be closed-loop recycled. - Abstract: As part of the EU Life + NOVEDI project, a new eco-efficient recycling route has been implemented to maximise resources and energy recovery from post-consumer waste glass, through integrated waste management and industrial production. Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been used to identify engineering solutions to sustainability during the development of green building products. The new process and the related LCA are framed within a meaningful case of industrial symbiosis, where multiple waste streams are utilised in a multi-output industrial process. The input is a mix of rejected waste glass from conventional container glass recycling and waste special glass such as monitor glass, bulbs and glass fibres. The green building product is a recycled foam glass (RFG) to be used in high efficiency thermally insulating and lightweight concrete. The environmental gains have been contrasted against induced impacts and improvements have been proposed. Recovered co-products, such as glass fragments/powders, plastics and metals, correspond to environmental gains that are higher than those related to landfill avoidance, whereas the latter is cancelled due to increased transportation distances. In accordance to an eco-efficiency principle, it has been highlighted that recourse to highly energy intensive recycling should be limited to waste that cannot be closed-loop recycled.

Blengini, Gian Andrea, E-mail: blengini@polito.it [DISPEA - Department of Production Systems and Business Economics, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); CNR-IGAG, Institute of Environmental Geology and Geo-Engineering, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Busto, Mirko, E-mail: mirko.busto@polito.it [DISPEA - Department of Production Systems and Business Economics, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Fantoni, Moris, E-mail: moris.fantoni@polito.it [DITAG - Department of Land, Environment and Geo-Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Fino, Debora, E-mail: debora.fino@polito.it [DISMIC - Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

400

Solid Waste Management Written Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solid Waste Management Program Written Program Cornell University 8/28/2012 #12;Solid Waste.................................................................... 4 4.2.1 Compost Solid Waste Treatment Facility.................................................................... 4 4.2.2 Pathological Solid Waste Treatment Facility

Pawlowski, Wojtek

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is collected by the RSO. 2. Dry radioactive waste must be segregated by isotope. 3. Liquid radioactive waste must be separated by isotope. 4. Liquid frequently and change them if contaminated. 5. Use radioactive waste container to collect the waste. 6. Check

Jia, Songtao

402

www.d-waste.com info@d-waste.com  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the International Solid Waste Association, GIZ/SWEEP-Net, the Waste to Energy Research Council (WTERT) and the Solidwww.d-waste.com info@d-waste.com Acharnon 141 10446 ATHENS GREECE T: +30 2155302449 F: +30 2155302447 For Release November 13, 2013 Waste Atlas shows how the world handles its refuse D-Waste

403

CERAMIC WASTE FORM DATA PACKAGE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this data package is to provide information about simulated crystalline waste forms that can be used to select an appropriate composition for a Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) proof of principle demonstration. Melt processing, viscosity, electrical conductivity, and thermal analysis information was collected to assess the ability of two potential candidate ceramic compositions to be processed in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) CCIM and to guide processing parameters for the CCIM operation. Given uncertainties in the CCIM capabilities to reach certain temperatures throughout the system, one waste form designated 'Fe-MP' was designed towards enabling processing and another, designated 'CAF-5%TM-MP' was designed towards optimized microstructure. Melt processing studies confirmed both compositions could be poured from a crucible at 1600{degrees}C although the CAF-5%TM-MP composition froze before pouring was complete due to rapid crystallization (upon cooling). X-ray diffraction measurements confirmed the crystalline nature and phase assemblages of the compositions. The kinetics of melting and crystallization appeared to vary significantly between the compositions. Impedance spectroscopy results indicated the electrical conductivity is acceptable with respect to processing in the CCIM. The success of processing either ceramic composition will depend on the thermal profiles throughout the CCIM. In particular, the working temperature of the pour spout relative to the bulk melter which can approach 1700{degrees}C. The Fe-MP composition is recommended to demonstrate proof of principle for crystalline simulated waste forms considering the current configuration of INL's CCIM. If proposed modifications to the CCIM can maintain a nominal temperature of 1600{degrees}C throughout the melter, drain, and pour spout, then the CAF-5%TM-MP composition should be considered for a proof of principle demonstration.

Amoroso, J.; Marra, J.

2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

404

Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Hazardous Waste Program is carried out by the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality which administers its' program under the Hazardous Waste management Act (Arkansas Code Annotated 8-7...

405

Hazardous Waste Management (Delaware)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The act authorizes the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environment Control (DNREC) to regulate hazardous waste and create a program to manage sources of hazardous waste. The act...

406

Hazardous Waste Management (Oklahoma)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article states regulations for the disposal of hazardous waste. It also provides information about permit requirements for the transport, treatment and storage of such waste. It also mentions...

407

Pet Waste Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

About 1 million pounds of dog waste is deposited daily in North Texas alone. That's why proper disposal of pet waste can make a big difference in the environment. 5 photos, 2 pages...

Mechell, Justin; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

408

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"Proceed- ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Waste Management and WasteWaste Management and Waste--toto--EnergyEnergy Status in SingaporeStatus in Singapore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste Management and WasteWaste Management and Waste--toto--EnergyEnergy Status in Singapore #12;Singapore's Waste Management · In 2003, 6877 tonnes/day (2.51 M tonnes/year) of MSW collected plants · 8% (non-incinerable waste) and incineration ash goes to the offshore Semakau Landfill · To reach

Columbia University

412

Solid low-level radioactive waste radiation stability studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

properties and condition; on the other, on the specific features of thermal and radiation influences on it (Spitsyn et al. 1983). For the average composition of the fission products going to wastes repositories, the mean energy of irradiation may vary from... to the container determines, in part, the life of the container. Cormsion studies of containers by solidified wastes has indicated no problem areas in limited measurements to date; however very long-term effects have not been evaluated. The useful life...

Williams, Arnold Andre?

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Waste disposal package  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This is a claim for a waste disposal package including an inner or primary canister for containing hazardous and/or radioactive wastes. The primary canister is encapsulated by an outer or secondary barrier formed of a porous ceramic material to control ingress of water to the canister and the release rate of wastes upon breach on the canister. 4 figs.

Smith, M.J.

1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

414

Rethinking the Waste Hierarchy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

principles of EU waste policies. The environmental damage caused by waste depends on which type of manage, Environmental Assessment Institute For further information please contact: Environmental Assessment Institute.imv.dk #12;Environmental Assessment Institute Rethinking the Waste Hierarchy March 2005 Recommendations

415

Mechanistic models of oceanic nitrogen fixation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oceanic nitrogen fixation and biogeochemical interactions between the nitrogen, phosphorus and iron cycles have important implications for the control of primary production and carbon storage in the ocean. The biological ...

Monteiro, Fanny

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 207 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3E3 Canada -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Bauldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations the international Ocean Drilling Program, which is managed by Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc., under contract Foundation (United States) Natural Environment Research Council (United Kingdom) Ocean Research Institute

417

"What Controls the Structure and Stability of the Ocean Meridional Overturning Circulation: Implications for Abrupt Climate Change?"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The central goal of this research project is to understand the properties of the ocean meridional overturning circulation (MOC) a topic critical for understanding climate variability and stability on a variety of timescales (from decadal to centennial and longer). Specifically, we have explored various factors that control the MOC stability and decadal variability in the Atlantic and the ocean thermal structure in general, including the possibility abrupt climate change. We have also continued efforts on improving the performance of coupled ocean-atmosphere GCMs.

Fedorov, Alexey [Yale University] [Yale University

2013-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

418

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

F. J. Molz. Subsurface Waste Heat Storage, Experimentalfor land disposal of waste heat and waste water. Inst. forfor land disposal of waste heat and waste water. Inst. for

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Identifying Mixed Chemical and Radioactive Waste Mixed waste is: any waste material containing both radioactive materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identifying Mixed Chemical and Radioactive Waste Mixed waste is: any waste material containing both as noted on the list, you do not have a mixed waste and it may be managed as a normal radioactive waste radioactive waste after initially dating the container, the hold for decay time is extended, but you cannot

Straight, Aaron

420

Oceanic nutrient and oxygen transports and bounds on export production during the World Ocean Circulation Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of intense climate interest. A large fraction of the carbon fixed in the oceanic surface waters is recycledOceanic nutrient and oxygen transports and bounds on export production during the World Ocean are estimated from selected hydrographic sections from the World Ocean Circulation Experiment spanning the world

Wunsch, Carl

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C. UMMENHOFER*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C is restricted to the Indian or Pacific Ocean only, support the interpretation of forcing mechanisms for large Indian Ocean atmospheric forcing versus remote influences from Pacific wind forcing: low events develop

Ummenhofer, Caroline C.

422

Ocean Sci., 5, 313327, 2009 www.ocean-sci.net/5/313/2009/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The role of the penetration length scale of short- wave radiation into the surface ocean and its impact of the shortwave radiation hitting the ocean sur- face is absorbed and scattered at depths considerably shal- lowerOcean Sci., 5, 313­327, 2009 www.ocean-sci.net/5/313/2009/ © Author(s) 2009. This work

Gnanadesikan, Anand

423

AANNUALNNUAL RREPORTEPORT Integrated Ocean Drilling ProgramIntegrated Ocean Drilling Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AANNUALNNUAL RREPORTEPORT Integrated Ocean Drilling ProgramIntegrated Ocean Drilling Program U ANNUAL REPORT #12;#12;Integrated Ocean Drilling Program United States Implementing Organization JOI T his Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP)-U.S. Implementing Organization (USIO) Fiscal Year 2006

424

Constraining Oceanic dust deposition using surface 1 ocean dissolved Al 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Constraining Oceanic dust deposition using surface 1 ocean dissolved Al 2 Qin Han, J. Keith Moore, Charles Zender, Chris Measures, David Hydes 3 Abstract 4 We use measurements of ocean surface dissolved Al and Deposition 6 (DEAD) model, to constrain dust deposition to the oceans. Our Al database contains 7 all

Zender, Charles

425

Oceanic processes associated with anomalous events in the Indian Ocean with relevance to 19971998  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oceanic processes associated with anomalous events in the Indian Ocean with relevance to 1997 Abstract. An anomalous climatic event occurred in the Indian Ocean (IO) region during 1997­1998, which 1997, warm SSTAs appeared in the western IO, and they peaked in February 1998. An ocean general

Wang, Yuqing

426

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Oceans and Human Health Initiative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. We receive many benefits from the oceans from seafood, recreation and transportation industriesNational Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Oceans and Human Health Initiative (OHHI) is taking a new look at how the health of our ocean impacts our own health and well- being, and in turn how

427

Oceans and ClimateOceans and Climate PeterPeter RhinesRhines 11  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

say, the ocean is a great thermometer/thermometer/halometerhalometer Levitus, Antonov, Boyer+ Stephens

428

Career Opportunity in Ocean Energy POSITION TITLE: Director of Renewable Ocean Energy Research Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Career Opportunity in Ocean Energy POSITION TITLE: Director of Renewable Ocean Energy Research: The Coastal Studies Institute (CSI) is seeking a dynamic individual to lead its Renewable Ocean Energy Program for a multi-institutional and multi-disciplinary renewable ocean energy research program. The position

429

Ocean Sci., 3, 337344, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/337/2007/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1/3 of the total tidal energy dissipation, in the ocean basins through "internal" waves breaking, eOcean Sci., 3, 337­344, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/337/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Ocean Science Unpredictability of internal M2 H. van Haren Netherlands

Boyer, Edmond

430

Ocean Sci., 3, 461482, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/461/2007/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Sci., 3, 461­482, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/461/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Ocean Science Effects of mesoscale eddies on global ocean Environment Laboratories, International Atomic Energy Agency, Monaco *now at: Institute of Biogeochemistry

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

431

Call title: "The ocean of tomorrow" Call identifier: FP7-OCEAN-2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

challenges in ocean management Theme 5 ­ Energy Area ENERGY.10.1 Call "The ocean of tomorrow" ­ Joining1 Call title: "The ocean of tomorrow" · Call identifier: FP7-OCEAN-2010 · Date of publication: 30, and Biotechnology (KBBE) - EUR 6 million from Theme 5 ­ Energy - EUR 10.5 million from Theme 6 ­ Environment

Milano-Bicocca, Università

432

The effect of ocean mixed layer depth on climate in slab ocean aquaplanet experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a severely reduced (&50 %) meridi- onal energy transport relative to the deep ocean runs. As a resultThe effect of ocean mixed layer depth on climate in slab ocean aquaplanet experiments Aaron Donohoe online: 28 June 2013 ? Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013 Abstract The effect of ocean mixed layer

Battisti, David

433

Secondary waste form testing : ceramicrete phosphate bonded ceramics.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cleanup activities of the Hanford tank wastes require stabilization and solidification of the secondary waste streams generated from the processing of the tank wastes. The treatment of these tank wastes to produce glass waste forms will generate secondary wastes, including routine solid wastes and liquid process effluents. Liquid wastes may include process condensates and scrubber/off-gas treatment liquids from the thermal waste treatment. The current baseline for solidification of the secondary wastes is a cement-based waste form. However, alternative secondary waste forms are being considered. In this regard, Ceramicrete technology, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, is being explored as an option to solidify and stabilize the secondary wastes. The Ceramicrete process has been demonstrated on four secondary waste formulations: baseline, cluster 1, cluster 2, and mixed waste streams. Based on the recipes provided by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the four waste simulants were prepared in-house. Waste forms were fabricated with three filler materials: Class C fly ash, CaSiO{sub 3}, and Class C fly ash + slag. Optimum waste loadings were as high as 20 wt.% for the fly ash and CaSiO{sub 3}, and 15 wt.% for fly ash + slag filler. Waste forms for physical characterizations were fabricated with no additives, hazardous contaminants, and radionuclide surrogates. Physical property characterizations (density, compressive strength, and 90-day water immersion test) showed that the waste forms were stable and durable. Compressive strengths were >2,500 psi, and the strengths remained high after the 90-day water immersion test. Fly ash and CaSiO{sub 3} filler waste forms appeared to be superior to the waste forms with fly ash + slag as a filler. Waste form weight loss was {approx}5-14 wt.% over the 90-day immersion test. The majority of the weight loss occurred during the initial phase of the immersion test, indicative of washing off of residual unreacted binder components from the waste form surface. Waste forms for ANS 16.1 leach testing contained appropriate amounts of rhenium and iodine as radionuclide surrogates, along with the additives silver-loaded zeolite and tin chloride. The leachability index for Re was found to range from 7.9 to 9.0 for all the samples evaluated. Iodine was below detection limit (5 ppb) for all the leachate samples. Further, leaching of sodium was low, as indicated by the leachability index ranging from 7.6-10.4, indicative of chemical binding of the various chemical species. Target leachability indices for Re, I, and Na were 9, 11, and 6, respectively. Degradation was observed in some of the samples post 90-day ANS 16.1 tests. Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) results showed that all the hazardous contaminants were contained in the waste, and the hazardous metal concentrations were below the Universal Treatment Standard limits. Preliminary scale-up (2-gal waste forms) was conducted to demonstrate the scalability of the Ceramicrete process. Use of minimal amounts of boric acid as a set retarder was used to control the working time for the slurry. Flexibility in treating waste streams with wide ranging compositional make-ups and ease of process scale-up are attractive attributes of Ceramicrete technology.

Singh, D.; Ganga, R.; Gaviria, J.; Yusufoglu, Y. (Nuclear Engineering Division); ( ES)

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

434

Municipal waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to apparatus for processing municipal waste, and more particularly to vibrating mesh screen conveyor systems for removing grit, glass, and other noncombustible materials from dry municipal waste. Municipal waste must be properly processed and disposed of so that it does not create health risks to the community. Generally, municipal waste, which may be collected in garbage trucks, dumpsters, or the like, is deposited in processing areas such as landfills. Land and environmental controls imposed on landfill operators by governmental bodies have increased in recent years, however, making landfill disposal of solid waste materials more expensive. 6 figs.

Mayberry, J.L.

1988-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

435

Radioactive Waste Management Basis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

Perkins, B K

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

436

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07. Admin Chg 2, dated 6-8-11, cancels DOE M 435.1-1 Chg 1.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

437

Mixed Waste Salt Encapsulation Using Polysiloxane - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A proof-of-concept experimental study was performed to investigate the use of Orbit Technologies polysiloxane grouting material for encapsulation of U.S. Department of Energy mixed waste salts leading to a final waste form for disposal. Evaporator pond salt residues and other salt-like material contaminated with both radioactive isotopes and hazardous components are ubiquitous in the DOE complex and may exceed 250,000,000 kg of material. Current treatment involves mixing low waste percentages (less than 10% by mass salt) with cement or costly thermal treatment followed by cementation to the ash residue. The proposed technology involves simple mixing of the granular salt material (with relatively high waste loadings-greater than 50%) in a polysiloxane-based system that polymerizes to form a silicon-based polymer material. This study involved a mixing study to determine optimum waste loadings and compressive strengths of the resultant monoliths. Following the mixing study, durability testing was performed on promising waste forms. Leaching studies including the accelerated leach test and the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure were also performed on a high nitrate salt waste form. In addition to this testing, the waste form was examined by scanning electron microscope. Preliminary cost estimates for applying this technology to the DOE complex mixed waste salt problem is also given.

Miller, C.M.; Loomis, G.G.; Prewett, S.W.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, January-March, 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reports and summaries are provided for the following programs: high-level waste process development; alternative waste forms; nuclear waste materials characterization center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton solidification; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; NWVP off-gas analysis; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; verification instrument development; mobility of organic complexes of radionuclide in soils; low-level waste generation reduction handbook; waste management system studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology program; high-level waste form preparation; development of backfill materials; development of structural engineered barriers; disposal charge analysis; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; spent fuel and pool component integrity program; analysis of postulated criticality events in a storage array of spent LWR fuel; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium mill tailings; liner evaluation for uranium mill tailings; multilayer barriers for sealing of uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; and revegetation of inactive uranium tailings sites.

Chikalla, T.D.; Powell, J.A. (comp.)

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Characterization of the MVST waste tanks located at ORNL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the fall of 1996 there was a major effort to sample and analyze the Active Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) tanks at ORNL which include the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) and the Bethel Valley Evaporator Service Tanks (BVEST). The characterization data summarized in this report was needed to address waste processing options, address concerns of the performance assessment (PA) data for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), evaluate the characteristics with respect to the waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for WIPP and Nevada Test Site (NTS), address criticality concerns, and meet DOT requirements for transporting the waste. This report only discusses the analytical characterization data for the MVST waste tanks. The isotopic data presented in this report support the position that fissile isotopes of uranium and plutonium were ``denatured`` as required by administrative controls. In general, MVST sludge was found to be both hazardous by RCRA characteristics and the transuranic alpha activity was well about the limit for TRU waste. The characteristics of the MVST sludge relative to the WIPP WAC limits for fissile gram equivalent, plutonium equivalent activity, and thermal power from decay heat, were estimated from the data in this report and found to be far below the upper boundary for any of the remote-handled transuranic waste requirements for disposal of the waste in WIPP.

Keller, J.M.; Giaquinto, J.M.; Meeks, A.M.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 205 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 205 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS FLUID FLOW AND SUBDUCTION FLUXES ACROSS __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 202 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 202 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS SOUTHEAST PACIFIC PALEOCEANOGRAPHIC TRANSECTS __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College

442

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 195 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 195 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS MARIANA CONVERGENT MARGIN/ WEST PHILIPPINE SEA Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX

443

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 185 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 185 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS IZU-MARIANA MARGIN Dr. Terry Plank Co France Dr. Carlota Escutia Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park, 1000

444

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS SHAKEDOWN AND SEA TRIALS CRUISE Philip D. Rabinowitz Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843 William J. Merrell Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station

445

SHIPBOARD SCIENTISTS1 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SHIPBOARD SCIENTISTS1 HANDBOOK OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY TECHNICAL NOTE 3 portion requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University be obtained from the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A & M University Research Park, 1000 Discovery

446

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 REPORT NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO Philip D Rabinowitz Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843 William J. Merrell Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843

447

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 200 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 200 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING AT THE H2O LONG-TERM SEAFLOOR Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA

448

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 159 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 159 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS THE COTE D'IVOIRE - GHANA TRANSFORM MARGIN, Leg 159 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Discovery Drive College Station requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park

449

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 140 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 140 PRELIMINARY REPORT HOLE 504B Dr. Henry Dick Dr. Jörg Erzinger Co Giessen Federal Republic of Germany Dr. Laura Stokking Staff Scientist, Leg 140 Ocean Drilling Program Copies of this publication may be obtained from the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A

450

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 199 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 199 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS PALEOGENE EQUATORIAL TRANSECT Dr. Mitchell __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive

451

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 196 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 196 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS LOGGING WHILE DRILLING AND ADVANCED CORKS Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA

452

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 105 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 105 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS LABRADOR SEA - BAFFIN BAY Dr. Michael A. Bradford Clement Staff Science Representative, Leg 105 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, TX 77843-3469" Philip Director Ocean Drilling Program Robert B. Kidd Manager of Science

453

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 108 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 108 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS NORTHWEST AFRICA Dr. William Ruddiman Co Federal Republic of Germany Dr. Jack G. Baldauf Staff Scientist, Leg 108 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, Texas 77843-3469 Philip W Rabin Direct Ocean Drilling Program

454

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 118 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 118 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS FRACTURE ZONE DRILLING ON THE SOUTHWEST INDIAN Oceanographic Institution Woods Hole, MA 02543 Andrew C. Adamson Staff Scientist, Leg 118 Ocean Drilling Program the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park, 1000

455

Ocean Optics Environmental Optics, Nanoscience Division  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

suspended solids swept up from the floor of the Gulf of Mexico The right picture shows a phytoplankton bloom and changes observed. This can be used to monitor pollution in our oceans and methods taken when levels become such as ocean pollution, currents and warming, and to see how the oceans are affecting the health of our planet

Strathclyde, University of

456

www.hboi.fau.edu Ocean Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

www.hboi.fau.edu Ocean Energy Collaboration: A Charge for Engineers BULLETIN Summer 2012 Beginning the State of Florida provided $5 million to establish the Center for Ocean Energy Technology at FAU. In 2010 to ocean energy research; the others are in Hawaii and the Pacific Northwest. Bill Baxley is the SNMREC

Fernandez, Eduardo

457

Behaviour and thermal experience of adult sockeye salmon migrating through stratified  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

entirely by endogenous energy reserves as individuals cease feeding before leaving the ocean en routeBehaviour and thermal experience of adult sockeye salmon migrating through stratified lakes near water temperatures by utilising thermal refugia in cool-water tributaries (Berman & Quinn 1991; Goniea

Cooke, Steven J.

458

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

electrolytic cell, designed to integrate waste heat recovery (i.e a microbial heat recovery cell or MHRC), can operate as a fuel cell and convert effluent streams into...

459

New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the issues of conducting debris treatment in the New Waste Calcine Facility (NWCF) decontamination area and the methods currently being used to decontaminate material at the NWCF.

K. E. Archibald

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Reconciling the new demands for food protection with environmental needs in the management of livestock wastes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

treatment. Direct application of heat available from biogas coupled with heat recovery may make thermal of livestock wastes Colin H Burton Cemagref, Groupement de Rennes, 17, avenue de Cucillé, 35044 Rennes, France it as a waste, is under threat from new concerns on public health and especially food quality. Restrictions

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Polyethylene encapsulatin of nitrate salt wastes: Waste form stability, process scale-up, and economics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A polyethylene encapsulation system for treatment of low-level radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes has been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Polyethylene has several advantages compared with conventional solidification/stabilization materials such as hydraulic cements. Waste can be encapsulated with greater efficiency and with better waste form performance than is possible with hydraulic cement. The properties of polyethylene relevant to its long-term durability in storage and disposal environments are reviewed. Response to specific potential failure mechanisms including biodegradation, radiation, chemical attack, flammability, environmental stress cracking, and photodegradation are examined. These data are supported by results from extensive waste form performance testing including compressive yield strength, water immersion, thermal cycling, leachability of radioactive and hazardous species, irradiation, biodegradation, and flammability. The bench-scale process has been successfully tested for application with a number of specific problem'' waste streams. Quality assurance and performance testing of the resulting waste form confirmed scale-up feasibility. Use of this system at Rocky Flats Plant can result in over 70% fewer drums processed and shipped for disposal, compared with optimal cement formulations. Based on the current Rocky Flats production of nitrate salt per year, polyethylene encapsulation can yield an estimated annual savings between $1.5 million and $2.7 million, compared with conventional hydraulic cement systems. 72 refs., 23 figs., 16 tabs.

Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Transuranic (TRU) Waste | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Defined by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act as "waste containing more than 100 nanocuries of alpha-emitting...

463

Solid Waste Management Plan. Revision 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The waste types discussed in this Solid Waste Management Plan are Municipal Solid Waste, Hazardous Waste, Low-Level Mixed Waste, Low-Level Radioactive Waste, and Transuranic Waste. The plan describes for each type of solid waste, the existing waste management facilities, the issues, and the assumptions used to develop the current management plan.

NONE

1995-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

464

Ferrocyanide tank waste stability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ferrocyanide wastes were generated at the Hanford Site during the mid to late 1950s as a result of efforts to create more tank space for the storage of high-level nuclear waste. The ferrocyanide process was developed to remove [sup 137]CS from existing waste and newly generated waste that resulted from the recovery of valuable uranium in Hanford Site waste tanks. During the course of research associated with the ferrocyanide process, it was recognized that ferrocyanide materials, when mixed with sodium nitrate and/or sodium nitrite, were capable of violent exothermic reaction. This chemical reactivity became an issue in the 1980s, when safety issues associated with the storage of ferrocyanide wastes in Hanford Site tanks became prominent. These safety issues heightened in the late 1980s and led to the current scrutiny of the safety issues associated with these wastes, as well as current research and waste management programs. Testing to provide information on the nature of possible tank reactions is ongoing. This document supplements the information presented in Summary of Single-Shell Tank Waste Stability, WHC-EP-0347, March 1991 (Borsheim and Kirch 1991), which evaluated several issues. This supplement only considers information particular to ferrocyanide wastes.

Fowler, K.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste Read more overleaf Introduction Energy from waste provides us with an opportunity for a waste solution and a local source of energy rolled,itcan onlyaddressaportionofthewastestream andisnotsufficientonitsown. Energy obtained from the combustion of residual waste (Energy from

466

Hanford Tank Waste Information Enclosure 1 Hanford Tank Waste Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hanford Tank Waste Information Enclosure 1 1 Hanford Tank Waste Information 1.0 Summary This information demonstrates the wastes in the twelve Hanford Site tanks meet the definition of transuranic (TRU. The wastes in these twelve (12) tanks are not high-level waste (HLW), and contain more than 100 nanocuries

467

Stabilization of compactible waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of series of experiments performed to determine the feasibility of stabilizing compacted or compactible waste with polymers. The need for this work arose from problems encountered at disposal sites attributed to the instability of this waste in disposal. These studies are part of an experimental program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) investigating methods for the improved solidification/stabilization of DOE low-level wastes. The approach taken in this study was to perform a series of survey type experiments using various polymerization systems to find the most economical and practical method for further in-depth studies. Compactible dry bulk waste was stabilized with two different monomer systems: styrene-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and polyester-styrene, in laboratory-scale experiments. Stabilization was accomplished by wetting or soaking compactible waste (before or after compaction) with monomers, which were subsequently polymerized. Three stabilization methods are described. One involves the in-situ treatment of compacted waste with monomers in which a vacuum technique is used to introduce the binder into the waste. The second method involves the alternate placement and compaction of waste and binder into a disposal container. In the third method, the waste is treated before compaction by wetting the waste with the binder using a spraying technique. A series of samples stabilized at various binder-to-waste ratios were evaluated through water immersion and compression testing. Full-scale studies were conducted by stabilizing two 55-gallon drums of real compacted waste. The results of this preliminary study indicate that the integrity of compacted waste forms can be readily improved to ensure their long-term durability in disposal environments. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) We are applying our unique capabilities in actinide and repository  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the continued and growing use of nuclear energy as a sustainable option. Workers at Los Alamos' Radioassay. A salt bed in the area of Carlsbad, New Mexico, which was left from the evaporation of an ancient ocean to 42 waste drums. #12;Los Alamos National Laboratory is operated for the Department of Energy

469

LiH thermal energy storage device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal energy storage device for use in a pulsed power supply to store waste heat produced in a high-power burst operation utilizes lithium hydride as the phase change thermal energy storage material. The device includes an outer container encapsulating the lithium hydride and an inner container supporting a hydrogen sorbing sponge material such as activated carbon. The inner container is in communication with the interior of the outer container to receive hydrogen dissociated from the lithium hydride at elevated temperatures. 5 figures.

Olszewski, M.; Morris, D.G.

1994-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

470

Underground waste barrier structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is an underground waste barrier structure that consists of waste material, a first container formed of activated carbonaceous material enclosing the waste material, a second container formed of zeolite enclosing the first container, and clay covering the second container. The underground waste barrier structure is constructed by forming a recessed area within the earth, lining the recessed area with a layer of clay, lining the clay with a layer of zeolite, lining the zeolite with a layer of activated carbonaceous material, placing the waste material within the lined recessed area, forming a ceiling over the waste material of a layer of activated carbonaceous material, a layer of zeolite, and a layer of clay, the layers in the ceiling cojoining with the respective layers forming the walls of the structure, and finally, covering the ceiling with earth.

Saha, Anuj J. (Hamburg, NY); Grant, David C. (Gibsonia, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Guidelines for mixed waste minimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, there is no commercial mixed waste disposal available in the United States. Storage and treatment for commercial mixed waste is limited. Host States and compacts region officials are encouraging their mixed waste generators to minimize their mixed wastes because of management limitations. This document provides a guide to mixed waste minimization.

Owens, C.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Operational Waste Volume Projection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of June. 2000.

STRODE, J.N.

2000-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

473

Operational waste volume projection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of June 1996.

Koreski, G.M.

1996-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

474

Small boiler uses waste coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Burning coal waste in small boilers at low emissions poses considerable problem. While larger boiler suppliers have successfully installed designs in the 40 to 80 MW range for some years, the author has been developing small automated fluid bed boiler plants for 25 years that can be applied in the range of 10,000 to 140,000 lbs/hr of steam. Development has centered on the use of an internally circulating fluid bed (CFB) boiler, which will burn waste fuels of most types. The boiler is based on the traditional D-shaped watertable boiler, with a new type of combustion chamber that enables a three-to-one turndown to be achieved. The boilers have all the advantages of low emissions of the large fluid boilers while offering a much lower height incorporated into the package boiler concept. Recent tests with a waste coal that had a high nitrogen content of 1.45% demonstrated a NOx emission below the federal limit of 0.6 lbs/mm Btu. Thus a NOx reduction on the order of 85% can be demonstrate by combustion modification alone. Further reductions can be made by using a selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) system and sulfur absorption of up to 90% retention is possible. The article describes the operation of a 30,000 lbs/hr boiler at the Fayette Thermal LLC plant. Spinheat has installed three ICFB boilers at a nursing home and a prison, which has been tested on poor-grade anthracite and bituminous coal. 2 figs.

Virr, M.J. [Spinheat Ltd. (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

475

Method for solidification of radioactive and other hazardous waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Solidification of liquid radioactive waste, and other hazardous wastes, is accomplished by the method of the invention by incorporating the waste into a porous glass crystalline molded block. The porous block is first loaded with the liquid waste and then dehydrated and exposed to thermal treatment at 50-1,000.degree. C. The porous glass crystalline molded block consists of glass crystalline hollow microspheres separated from fly ash (cenospheres), resulting from incineration of fossil plant coals. In a preferred embodiment, the porous glass crystalline blocks are formed from perforated cenospheres of grain size -400+50, wherein the selected cenospheres are consolidated into the porous molded block with a binder, such as liquid silicate glass. The porous blocks are then subjected to repeated cycles of saturating with liquid waste, and drying, and after the last cycle the blocks are subjected to calcination to transform the dried salts to more stable oxides. Radioactive liquid waste can be further stabilized in the porous blocks by coating the internal surface of the block with metal oxides prior to adding the liquid waste, and by coating the outside of the block with a low-melting glass or a ceramic after the waste is loaded into the block.

Anshits, Alexander G. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Vereshchagina, Tatiana A. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Voskresenskaya, Elena N. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Kostin, Eduard M. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Pavlov, Vyacheslav F. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Revenko, Yurii A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Tretyakov, Alexander A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Sharonova, Olga M. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Aloy, Albert S. (Saint-Petersburg, RU); Sapozhnikova, Natalia V. (Saint-Petersburg, RU); Knecht, Dieter A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Macheret, Yevgeny (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Department of Environmental...

477

Waste Heat Recovery  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

DRAFT - PRE-DECISIONAL - DRAFT 1 Waste Heat Recovery 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the TechnologySystem ......

478

Norcal Waste Systems, Inc.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fact sheet describes the LNG long-haul heavy-duty trucks at Norcal Waste Systems Inc.'s Sanitary Fill Company.

Not Available

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Solid Waste Management (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Solid waste facilities operating in Connecticut must abide by these regulations, which describe requirements and procedures for issuing construction and operating permits; environmental...

480

Solid Waste Policies (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute establishes the support of the state for alternative waste management practices that reduce the reliance upon land disposal and incorporate resource recovery. Cities and counties are...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Solid Waste Management (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Indiana Department of...

482

Avoidable waste management costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the activity based costing method used to acquire variable (volume dependent or avoidable) waste management cost data for routine operations at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Waste volumes from environmental restoration, facility stabilization activities, and legacy waste were specifically excluded from this effort. A core team consisting of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, and Oak Ridge Reservation developed and piloted the methodology, which can be used to determine avoidable waste management costs. The method developed to gather information was based on activity based costing, which is a common industrial engineering technique. Sites submitted separate flow diagrams that showed the progression of work from activity to activity for each waste type or treatability group. Each activity on a flow diagram was described in a narrative, which detailed the scope of the activity. Labor and material costs based on a unit quantity of waste being processed were then summed to generate a total cost for that flow diagram. Cross-complex values were calculated by determining a weighted average for each waste type or treatability group based on the volume generated. This study will provide DOE and contractors with a better understanding of waste management processes and their associated costs. Other potential benefits include providing cost data for sites to perform consistent cost/benefit analysis of waste minimization and pollution prevention (WMIN/PP) options identified during pollution prevention opportunity assessments and providing a means for prioritizing and allocating limited resources for WMIN/PP.

Hsu, K.; Burns, M.; Priebe, S.; Robinson, P.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Solid Waste Permits (Louisiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality administers the rules and regulations governing the storage, collection, processing, recovery, and reuse of solid waste protect the air,...

484

Solid Waste Management (Michigan)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act encourages the Department of Environmental Quality and Health Department representatives to develop and encourage methods for disposing solid waste that are environmentally sound, that...

485

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300.degree. C. to 800.degree. C. to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100.degree. C. to 1400.degree. C. at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300 C to 800 C to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100 C to 1400 C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, G.G.

1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

487

Waste minimization assessment procedure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Perry Nuclear Power Plant began developing a waste minimization plan early in 1991. In March of 1991 the plan was documented following a similar format to that described in the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual. Initial implementation involved obtaining management's commitment to support a waste minimization effort. The primary assessment goal was to identify all hazardous waste streams and to evaluate those streams for minimization opportunities. As implementation of the plan proceeded, non-hazardous waste streams routinely generated in large volumes were also evaluated for minimization opportunities. The next step included collection of process and facility data which would be useful in helping the facility accomplish its assessment goals. This paper describes the resources that were used and which were most valuable in identifying both the hazardous and non-hazardous waste streams that existed on site. For each material identified as a waste stream, additional information regarding the materials use, manufacturer, EPA hazardous waste number and DOT hazard class was also gathered. Once waste streams were evaluated for potential source reduction, recycling, re-use, re-sale, or burning for heat recovery, with disposal as the last viable alternative.

Kellythorne, L.L. (Centerior Energy, Cleveland, OH (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Beryllium Impregnation of Uranium Fuel: Thermal Modeling of Cylindrical Objects for Efficiency Evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With active research projects related to nuclear waste immobilization and high conductivity nuclear fuels, a thermal model has been developed to simulate the temperature profile within a heat generating cylinder in order to imitate the behavior...

Lynn, Nicholas

2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

489

Thermal conductivity of thermal-battery insulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal conductivities of a variety of insulating materials used in thermal batteries were measured in atmospheres of argon and helium using several techniques. (Helium was used to simulate the hydrogen atmosphere that results when a Li(Si)/FeS{sub 2} thermal battery ages.) The guarded-hot-plate method was used with the Min-K insulation because of its extremely low thermal conductivity. For comparison purposes, the thermal conductivity of the Min-K insulating board was also measured using the hot-probe method. The thermal-comparator method was used for the rigid Fiberfrax board and Fiberfrax paper. The thermal conductivity of the paper was measured under several levels of compression to simulate the conditions of the insulating wrap used on the stack in a thermal battery. The results of preliminary thermal-characterization tests with several silica aerogel materials are also presented.

Guidotti, R.A.; Moss, M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Subsurface Hybrid Power Options for Oil & Gas Production at Deep Ocean Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An investment in deep-sea (deep-ocean) hybrid power systems may enable certain off-shore oil and gas exploration and production. Advanced deep-ocean drilling and production operations, locally powered, may provide commercial access to oil and gas reserves otherwise inaccessible. Further, subsea generation of electrical power has the potential of featuring a low carbon output resulting in improved environmental conditions. Such technology therefore, enhances the energy security of the United States in a green and environmentally friendly manner. The objective of this study is to evaluate alternatives and recommend equipment to develop into hybrid energy conversion and storage systems for deep ocean operations. Such power systems will be located on the ocean floor and will be used to power offshore oil and gas exploration and production operations. Such power systems will be located on the oceans floor, and will be used to supply oil and gas exploration activities, as well as drilling operations required to harvest petroleum reserves. The following conceptual hybrid systems have been identified as candidates for powering sub-surface oil and gas production operations: (1) PWR = Pressurized-Water Nuclear Reactor + Lead-Acid Battery; (2) FC1 = Line for Surface O{sub 2} + Well Head Gas + Reformer + PEMFC + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (3) FC2 = Stored O2 + Well Head Gas + Reformer + Fuel Cell + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (4) SV1 = Submersible Vehicle + Stored O{sub 2} + Fuel Cell + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (5) SV2 = Submersible Vehicle + Stored O{sub 2} + Engine or Turbine + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (6) SV3 = Submersible Vehicle + Charge at Docking Station + ZEBRA & Li-Ion Batteries; (7) PWR TEG = PWR + Thermoelectric Generator + Lead-Acid Battery; (8) WELL TEG = Thermoelectric Generator + Well Head Waste Heat + Lead-Acid Battery; (9) GRID = Ocean Floor Electrical Grid + Lead-Acid Battery; and (10) DOC = Deep Ocean Current + Lead-Acid Battery.

Farmer, J C; Haut, R; Jahn, G; Goldman, J; Colvin, J; Karpinski, A; Dobley, A; Halfinger, J; Nagley, S; Wolf, K; Shapiro, A; Doucette, P; Hansen, P; Oke, A; Compton, D; Cobb, M; Kopps, R; Chitwood, J; Spence, W; Remacle, P; Noel, C; Vicic, J; Dee, R

2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

491

Secondary Waste Cast Stone Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Cast Stone a cementitious waste form, has been selected for solidification of this secondary waste stream after treatment in the ETF. The secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. This secondary waste Cast Stone waste form qualification testing plan outlines the testing of the waste form and immobilization process to demonstrate that the Cast Stone waste form can comply with the disposal requirements. Specifications for the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form have not been established. For this testing plan, Cast Stone specifications are derived from specifications for the immobilized LAW glass in the WTP contract, the waste acceptance criteria for the IDF, and the waste acceptance criteria in the IDF Permit issued by the State of Washington. This testing plan outlines the testing needed to demonstrate that the waste form can comply with these waste form specifications and acceptance criteria. The testing program must also demonstrate that the immobilization process can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. This testing plan also outlines the testing needed to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support performance assessment analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form in the IDF

Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

492

Impact of the Southern ocean winds on sea-ice - ocean interaction and its associated global ocean circulation in a warming world  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation discusses a linkage between the Southern Ocean (SO) winds and the global ocean circulation in the framework of a coarse-resolution global ocean general circulation model coupled to a sea-ice model. In addition to reexamination...

Cheon, Woo Geunn

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

493

Integrated thermal treatment system study -- Phase 2 results. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the second phase of a study on thermal treatment technologies. The study consists of a systematic assessment of nineteen thermal treatment alternatives for the contact-handled mixed low-level waste (MLLW) currently stored in the US Department of Energy complex. The treatment alternatives consist of widely varying technologies for safely destroying the hazardous organic components, reducing the volume, and preparing for final disposal of the MLLW. The alternatives considered in Phase 2 were innovative thermal treatments with nine types of primary processing units. Other variations in the study examined the effect of combustion gas, air pollution control system design, and stabilization technology for the treatment residues. The Phase 1 study examined ten initial thermal treatment alternatives. The Phase 2 systems were evaluated in essentially the same manner as the Phase 1 systems. The alternatives evaluated were: rotary kiln, slagging kiln, plasma furnace, plasma gasification, molten salt oxidation, molten metal waste destruction, steam gasification, Joule-heated vitrification, thermal desorption and mediated electrochemical oxidation, and thermal desorption and supercritical water oxidation. The quantities, and physical and chemical compositions, of the input waste used in the Phase 2 systems differ from those in the Phase 1 systems, which were based on a preliminary waste input database developed at the onset of the Integrated Thermal Treatment System study. The inventory database used in the Phase 2 study incorporates the latest US Department of Energy information. All systems, both primary treatment systems and subsystem inputs, have now been evaluated using the same waste input (2,927 lb/hr). 28 refs., 88 figs., 41 tabs.

Feizollahi, F.; Quapp, W.J.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

The proposed combustion standards and DOE thermal treatment systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the provisions of the Clean Air Act (CAA) concerning emission of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published the proposed Revised Standards for Hazardous Waste Combustors on April 19, 1996 (EPA, 1996). These standards would apply to the existing Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive and mixed waste incinerators, and may be applied to several developing alternatives to incineration. The DOE has reviewed the basis for these regulations and prepared extensive comments to present concerns about the bases and implications of the standards. DOE is now discussing compliance options with the EPA for regulation of radioactive and mixed waste thermal treatment systems.

McFee, J. [IT Corp. (United States); Hinman, M.B. [Carter and Hinman, P.A. (United States); Eaton, D.; NcNeel, K. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

6 Technology Readiness Assessment for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW Waste Vitrification Facility L. Holton D. Alexander C. Babel H. Sutter J. Young August...

496

Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This act provides for planning for the processing and disposal of municipal waste; requires counties to submit plans for municipal waste management systems within their boundaries; authorizes...

497

Hazardous Waste Management (North Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These rules identify and list hazardous waste and set standards for the generators and operators of such waste as well as owners or operators of waste facilities. They also stats standards for...

498

Virginia Waste Management Act (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Solid waste and hazardous waste are regulated under a number of programs at the Department of Environmental Quality. These programs are designed to encourage the reuse and recycling of solid waste...

499

Solid Waste Disposal Act (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality is responsible for the regulation and management of municipal solid waste and hazardous waste. A fee is applied to all solid waste disposed in the...

500

Solid Waste Act (New Mexico)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The main purpose of the Solid Waste Act is to authorize and direct the establishment of a comprehensive solid waste management program. The act states details about specific waste management...