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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in the Earth's oceans to generate electricity.

2

Ocean Thermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Ocean Thermal Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Ocean Thermal Incentives...

3

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draft Programmaticof ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. Depart~on Ocean TherUial Energy Conversion, June 18, 1979. Ocean

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Energy Basics: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Thermal Energy Conversion A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in the Earth's oceans to generate electricity. OTEC works best when...

5

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOE-EPA Working Group on Ocean TherUial Energy Conversion,Sands, M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)r:he comnercialization of ocean thermal energy conversion

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermal Energy Conversion Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion August 16, 2013 - 4:22pm Addthis A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in...

7

Energy Basics: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy...

8

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal Energy Conversion Conference. Ocean Systems Branch,Thermal Energy Conversion Conference. Ocean Systems Branch,thermal energy conversion, June 18, 1979. Ocean Systems

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

NREL-Ocean Energy Thermal Conversion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Energy Thermal Conversion Jump to: navigation, search Logo: NREL-Ocean Energy Thermal Conversion Name NREL-Ocean Energy Thermal Conversion AgencyCompany Organization...

10

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M.D. (editor). 1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Draft1980 :. i l OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTALDevelopment Plan. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

l OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENTOcean Thermal Energy Conversion Draft Programmatic Environ-Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE Assistant Secre-

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

List of Ocean Thermal Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Incentives Thermal Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 96 Ocean Thermal Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 96) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Business Energy Investment Tax Credit (ITC) (Federal) Corporate Tax Credit United States Agricultural Commercial Industrial Utility Anaerobic Digestion Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Fuel Cells Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Direct Use Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Hydroelectric energy Landfill Gas Microturbines Municipal Solid Waste Ocean Thermal Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Small Wind Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat Tidal Energy Wave Energy Wind energy Yes CCEF - Project 150 Initiative (Connecticut) State Grant Program Connecticut Commercial Solar Thermal Electric

13

The Thermal Structure of the Upper Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The salient feature of the oceanic thermal structure is a remarkably shallow thermocline, especially in the Tropics and subtropics. What factors determine its depth? Theories for the deep thermohaline circulation provide an answer that depends on ...

Giulio Boccaletti; Ronald C. Pacanowski; S. George; H. Philander; Alexey V. Fedorov

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Assessment of ocean thermal energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a promising renewable energy technology to generate electricity and has other applications such as production of freshwater, seawater air-conditioning, marine culture and chilled-soil ...

Muralidharan, Shylesh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the commercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionR. E. Hathaway. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion.of sewage effluent in an ocean current. Inst. of Tech. ,

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: An overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ocean thermal energy conversion, or OTEC is a technology that extracts power from the ocean's natural thermal gradient. This technology is being pursued by researchers from many nations; in the United States, OTEC research is funded by the US Department of Energy's Ocean Energy Technology program. The program's goal is to develop the technology so that industry can make a competent assessment of its potential -- either as an alternative or as a supplement to conventional energy sources. Federally funded research in components and systems will help OTEC to the threshold of commercialization. This publication provides an overview of the OTEC technology. 47 refs., 25 figs.

Not Available

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cycle ocean thermal difference power plant. M.S. Thesis,ocean thermal energy conversion power plants. M.S. Thesis.comments on the thermal effects of power plants on fish eggs

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the commercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionOpen cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. A preliminary1978. 'Open cycle thermal energy converS1on. A preliminary

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Potential Environmental Impacts and Fisheries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Potential Environmental Impacts and Fisheries Christina M Comfort Institute #12;Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) · Renewable energy ­ ocean thermal gradient · Large, M.Sc. Candidate University of Hawaii at Manoa Department of Oceanography Hawaii Natural Energy

Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

20

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermal Energy Conversion Basics Thermal Energy Conversion Basics Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:22pm Addthis A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in the Earth's oceans to generate electricity. OTEC works best when the temperature difference between the warmer, top layer of the ocean and the colder, deep ocean water is about 36°F (20°C). These conditions exist in tropical coastal areas, roughly between the Tropic of Capricorn and the Tropic of Cancer. To bring the cold water to the surface, ocean thermal energy conversion plants require an expensive, large-diameter intake pipe, which is submerged a mile or more into the ocean's depths. Some energy experts believe that if ocean thermal energy conversion can become cost-competitive with conventional power technologies, it could be

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermal Energy Conversion Basics Thermal Energy Conversion Basics Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:22pm Addthis A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in the Earth's oceans to generate electricity. OTEC works best when the temperature difference between the warmer, top layer of the ocean and the colder, deep ocean water is about 36°F (20°C). These conditions exist in tropical coastal areas, roughly between the Tropic of Capricorn and the Tropic of Cancer. To bring the cold water to the surface, ocean thermal energy conversion plants require an expensive, large-diameter intake pipe, which is submerged a mile or more into the ocean's depths. Some energy experts believe that if ocean thermal energy conversion can become cost-competitive with conventional power technologies, it could be

22

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SAN DIEGO Recycling of Wasted Energy : Thermal to ElectricalRecycling of Wasted Energy : Thermal to Electrical Energyenergy, geothermal energy, wasted heat from a nuclear

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system including a flash evaporator for vaporizing relatively warm ocean surface water and an axial flow, elastic fluid turbine having a vertical shaft and axis of rotation. The warm ocean water is transmitted to the evaporator through a first prestressed concrete skirt-conduit structure circumferentially situated about the axis of rotation. The unflashed warm ocean water exits the evaporator through a second prestressed concrete skirt-conduit structure located circumferentially about and radially within the first skirt-conduit structure. The radially inner surface of the second skirt conduit structure constitutes a cylinder which functions as the turbine's outer casing and obviates the need for a conventional outer housing. The turbine includes a radially enlarged disc element attached to the shaft for supporting at least one axial row of radially directed blades through which the steam is expanded. A prestressed concrete inner casing structure of the turbine has upstream and downstream portions respectively situated upstream and downstream from the disc element. The radially outer surfaces of the inner casing portions and radially outer periphery of the axially interposed disc cooperatively form a downwardly radially inwardly tapered surface. An annular steam flowpath of increasing flow area in the downward axial direction is radially bounded by the inner and outer prestressed concrete casing structures. The inner casing portions each include a transversely situated prestressed concrete circular wall for rotatably supporting the turbine shaft and associated structure. The turbine blades are substantially radially coextensive with the steam flowpath and receive steam from the evaporator through an annular array of prestressed concrete stationary vanes which extend between the inner and outer casings to provide structural support therefor and impart a desired flow direction to the steam.

Wittig, J. Michael (West Goshen, PA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

On Production and Dissipation of Thermal Variance in the Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integral relationship is derived expressing the total dissipation of thermal variance by oceanic microstructure in terms of the large-scale forcing at the ocean surface by air/sea heat exchange. The net heat gain by the ocean over warm water ...

Terrence M. Joyce

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

An Operational Global-Scale Ocean Thermal Analysis System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Optimum Thermal Interpolation System (OTIS) is an ocean thermal analysis product developed for real-time operational use at the U.S. Navy's Fleet Numerical Oceanography Center. It functions in an analysis-prediction-analysis data assimilation ...

R. Michael Clancy; Patricia A. Phoebus; Kenneth D. Pollak

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Discharge to Ocean  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Discharge to Ocean Discharge to Ocean Fact Sheet - Discharge to Ocean Past Practices In early offshore oil and gas development, drilling wastes were generally discharged from the platforms directly to the ocean. Until several decades ago, the oceans were perceived to be limitless dumping grounds. During the 1970s and 1980s, however, evidence mounted that some types of drilling waste discharges could have undesirable effects on local ecology, particularly in shallow water. When water-based muds (WBMs) were used, only limited environmental harm was likely to occur, but when operators employed oil-based muds (OBMs) on deeper sections of wells, the resulting cuttings piles created impaired zones beneath and adjacent to the platforms. At some North Sea locations, large piles of oil-based cuttings remain on the sea floor near the platforms. Piles of oil-based cuttings can affect the local ecosystem in three ways: by smothering organisms, by direct toxic effect of the drilling waste, and by anoxic conditions caused by microbial degradation of the organic components in the waste. Current regulatory controls minimize the impacts of permitted discharges of cuttings.

27

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Western Gulf of Mexico. Energy Research and Developmentfor central Gulf of Mexico. Energy Research and DevelopmentGulf of Mexico, - IV-34 in Proc. Fourth Ocean Thermal Energy

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Ocean Thermal Resources off the Hawaiian Islands luisvega@hawaii.edu Ocean Thermal Resources off the Hawaiian Islands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information to assist developers of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) systems in site selection functions required to determine electricity production with specific OTEC systems can be found in the open be satisfied with desalinated water produced with OTEC systems. This renewable ocean resource is vast enough

29

Thermally Driven Circulations in Small Oceanic Basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A linear, steady model of the circulation of a small (f plane) oceanic basin driven by heating or cooling at the surface is considered in order to examine the partition of upwelling (heating) or downwelling (cooling) between the basin's interior ...

Joseph Pedlosky

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Thermal Expansion in Ocean and Coupled General Circulation Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than half of the predicted rise in future sea level caused by the enhanced greenhouse effect is currently thought to be due to the thermal expansion of the oceans. Here methods for quantifying this thermal expansion component of sea level ...

D. R. Jackett; T. J. McDougall; M. H. England; A. C. Hirst

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

COMMERCIAL FISHERY DATA FROM A PROPOSED OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) SITE IN PUERTO RICO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites to identify thethermal energy conversion (OTEC) program; preoperationalOCEAN THERHAL _ENERGY _CONVERSION(OTEC) --:siTE IN PUERTO

Ryan, Constance J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Thermal denitration and mineralization of waste constituents  

SciTech Connect

In order to produce a quality grout from LLW using hydraulic cements, proper conditioning of the waste is essential for complete cement curing. Several technologies were investigated as options for conditions. Since the LLW is dilute, removal of all, or most, of the water will significantly reduce the final waste volume. Neutralization of the LLW is also desirable since acidic liquids to not allow cement to cure properly. The nitrate compounds are very soluble and easily leached from solid waste forms; therefore, denitration is desirable. Thermal and chemical denitration technologies have the advantages of water removal, neutralization, and denitration. The inclusion of additives during thermal treatment were investigated as a method of forming insoluable waste conditions.

Nenni, J.A.; Boardman, R.D.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT FOR THE NOVEMBER 1977 GOTEC-02 CRUISE TO THE GULF OF MEXICO MOBILE SITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9437 GOTEC-02 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARYto potential Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites inThree Proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites:

Commins, M.L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Thermal Stability of the World Ocean Thermoclines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of the strong variation with temperature of the thermal expansion coefficient of seawater, both horizontal and vertical mixing that perturb the gradients produce changes of volume, usually a decrease, that shift mass relative to the earth'...

N. P. Fofonoff

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Seawater pump study: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Program. Final report. [For ocean thermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The pumping power required to move cold seawater and warm seawater through an Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plant is a significant portion of the plant power output; therefore, seawater pump performance, sizing, and cost information are very influential inputs into any power plant system design optimizations. The analysis and evaluation of large seawater pumping systems selected specifically for the OTEC application are provided with a view toward judging the impact of pump selection on overall OTEC power plant performance. A self-contained bulb, direct drive, axial flow pump was found to have a distinct advantage in performance and arrangement flexibility. A design of a pump operating at a net total head rise of 3.5 meters and a flow capacity of 100 m/sup 3//s is presented including pump blade geometry (profiles), pump diffuser geometry, and pump/diffuser configuration and performance. Results are presented in terms of the geometric and power requirements of several related pump designs over a range of seawater capacity from 25 m/sup 3//s to 100 m/sup 3//s. Summary analysis and evaluations include pump design weights and cost estimates.

Little, T.E.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Program PreoperationalOcean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), U.S. Department ofOregon State University. Conversion Power Plants. Corvallis,

Sullivan, S.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

STEPA Temperature Profiler for Measuring the Oceanic Thermal Boundary Layer at the OceanAir Interface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fast measuring system has been designed and built to determine the oceanic thermal microstructure at the oceanair interface. The system consists of a profiler sonde, which amends through the uppermost few meters of the ocean with a time of ...

Theodor C. Mammen; Nikolaus von Bosse

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Environmental programs for ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The environmental research effort in support of the US Department of Energy's Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) program has the goal of providing documented information on the effect of proposed operations on the ocean and the effect of oceanic conditions on the plant. The associated environment program consists of archival studies in potential areas serial oceanographic cruises to sites or regions of interest, studies from various fixed platforms at sites, and compilation of such information for appropriate legal compliance and permit requirements and for use in progressive design of OTEC plants. Site/regions investigated are south of Mobile and west of Tampa, Gulf of Mexico; Punta Tuna, Puerto Rico; St. Croix, Virgin Islands; Kahe Point, Oahu and Keahole Point, Hawaii, Hawaiian Islands; and off the Brazilian south Equatorial Coast. Four classes of environmental concerns identified are: redistribution of oceanic properties (ocean water mixing, impingement/entrainment etc.); chemical pollution (biocides, working fluid leaks, etc.); structural effects (artificial reef, aggregation, nesting/migration, etc.); socio-legal-economic (worker safety, enviromaritime law, etc.).

Wilde, P.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Ocean thermal energy conversion plants : experimental and analytical study of mixing and recirculation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a method of generating power using the vertical temperature gradient of the tropical ocean as an energy source. Experimental and analytical studies have been carried out to determine ...

Jirka, Gerhard H.

40

Near-inertial and thermal to atmospheric forcing in the North Atlantic Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observational and modeling techniques are employed to investigate the thermal and inertial upper ocean response to wind and buoyancy forcing in the North Atlantic Ocean. First, the seasonal kinetic energy variability of ...

Silverthorne, Katherine E

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Program. Volume 1. Preoperatinal ocean test platform  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An environmental impact assessment for the field test of the first preoperational Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion, referred to as OTEC-1, is presented. The conceptual design of OTEC-1 is described, and the existing environments at the four OTEC-1 study sites (Punta Tuna, Keahole Point, offshore New Orleans, and offshore Tampa) are discussed. The environmental impacts considered include organism impingement, organism entrainment, ocean water mixing, metallic ion release, chlorine release, ammonia leakage, oil release, and platform attraction. The development of a risk assessment model for credible accidents at OTEC-1 is discussed. Also, the federal and state legal, safety, and health policies pertinent to OTEC-1 are presented. A glossary is included. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Carbon dioxide release from ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) cycles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of recent measurements of CO{sub 2} release from an open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) experiment. Based on these data, the rate of short-term CO{sub 2} release from future open-cycle OTEC plants is projected to be 15 to 25 times smaller than that from fossil-fueled electric power plants. OTEC system that incorporate subsurface mixed discharge are expected to result in no long-term release. OTEC plants can significantly reduce CO{sub 2} emissions when substituted for fossil-fueled power generation. 12 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Green, H.J. (Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA)); Guenther, P.R. (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Tropical Oceanic Response to Extratropical Thermal Forcing in a Coupled Climate Model: A Comparison between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The tropical oceanic response to the extratropical thermal forcing is quantitatively estimated in a coupled climate model. This work focuses on comparison of the responses between the tropical Atlantic and Pacific. Under the same extratropical ...

Haijun Yang; Lu Wang

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT FOR THE NOVEMBER 1977 GOTEC-02 CRUISE TO THE GULF OF MEXICO MOBILE SITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

02 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARY DATA REPORTOcean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites in the Gulf ofOcean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites: Puerto Rico,

Commins, M.L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICAL DATA REPORT FROM 0. S. S. RESEARCHER IN GULF OF MEXICO, JULY 12-23, 1977.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

01 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICAL DATA REPORTOcean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites: Puerto Rico,Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion plant were in- itiated in

Quinby-Hunt, M.S.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Low-Frequency Variability in the Midlatitude Baroclinic Atmosphere Induced by an Oceanic Thermal Front  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the flow induced by an eastwest-oriented oceanic thermal front in a highly idealized baroclinic model. Previous work showed that thermal fronts could produce energetic midlatitude jets in an equivalent-barotropic atmosphere ...

Yizhak Feliks; Michael Ghil; Eric Simonnet

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) A New Secure Renewable Energy Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) A New Secure Renewable Energy Source For Defense New Ventures #12;What is OTEC? OTEC B fiOTEC Benefits: Large Renewable Energy Source 3-5 Terawatts Water Temperature Delta 2 A New Clean Renewable 24/7 Energy Source #12;Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion

48

Thermal processing system concepts and considerations for RWMC buried waste  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a preliminary determination of ex situ thermal processing system concepts and related processing considerations for application to remediation of transuranic (TRU)-contaminated buried wastes (TRUW) at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Beginning with top-level thermal treatment concepts and requirements identified in a previous Preliminary Systems Design Study (SDS), a more detailed consideration of the waste materials thermal processing problem is provided. Anticipated waste stream elements and problem characteristics are identified and considered. Final waste form performance criteria, requirements, and options are examined within the context of providing a high-integrity, low-leachability glass/ceramic, final waste form material. Thermal processing conditions required and capability of key systems components (equipment) to provide these material process conditions are considered. Information from closely related companion study reports on melter technology development needs assessment and INEL Iron-Enriched Basalt (IEB) research are considered. Five potentially practicable thermal process system design configuration concepts are defined and compared. A scenario for thermal processing of a mixed waste and soils stream with essentially no complex presorting and using a series process of incineration and high temperature melting is recommended. Recommendations for applied research and development necessary to further detail and demonstrate the final waste form, required thermal processes, and melter process equipment are provided.

Eddy, T.L.; Kong, P.C.; Raivo, B.D.; Anderson, G.L.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Lockheed Testing the Waters for Ocean Thermal Energy System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The company is working to develop a system to produce electricity using temperature differences in the ocean.

50

Thermal impact of waste emplacement and surface cooling associated with geologic disposal of nuclear waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal effects associated with the emplacement of aged radioactive wastes in a geologic repository were studied, with emphasis on the following subjects: the waste characteristics, repository structure, and rock properties controlling the thermally induced effects; the current knowledge of the thermal, thermomechanical, and thermohydrologic impacts, determined mainly on the basis of previous studies that assume 10-year-old wastes; the thermal criteria used to determine the repository waste loading densities; and the technical advantages and disadvantages of surface cooling of the wastes prior to disposal as a means of mitigating the thermal impacts. The waste loading densities determined by repository designs for 10-year-old wastes are extended to older wastes using the near-field thermomechanical criteria based on room stability considerations. Also discussed are the effects of long surface cooling periods determined on the basis of far-field thermomechanical and thermohydrologic considerations. The extension of the surface cooling period from 10 years to longer periods can lower the near-field thermal impact but have only modest long-term effects for spent fuel. More significant long-term effects can be achieved by surface cooling of reprocessed high-level waste.

Wang, J.S.Y.; Mangold, D.C.; Spencer, R.K.; Tsang, C.F.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Control of waste gas from a thermal EOR operation  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes a waste-gas treatment system designed to control emissions from thermal EOR wells. This case study discusses the need, design, installation, and operation of the system.

Peavy, M.A.; Braun, J.E. (Oryx Energy Co. (US))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Draft environmental assessment: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, for the deployment and operation of a commercial 40-Megawatt (MW) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plant (hereafter called the Pilot Plant). A description of the proposed action is presented, and a generic environment typical of the candidate Pilot Plant siting regions is described. An assessment of the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed action is given, and the risk of credible accidents and mitigating measures to reduce these risks are considered. The Federal and State plans and policies the proposed action will encompass are described. Alternatives to the proposed action are presented. Appendix A presents the navigation and environmental information contained in the US Coast Pilot for each of the candidate sites; Appendix B provides a brief description of the methods and calculations used in the EA. It is concluded that environmental disturbances associated with Pilot Plant activities could potentially cause significant environmental impacts; however, the magnitude of these potential impacts cannot presently be assessed, due to insufficient engineering and environmental information. A site- and design-specific OTEC Pilot Plant Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is required to resolve the potentially significant environmental effects associated with Pilot Plant deployment and operation. (WHK)

Sullivan, S.M.; Sands, M.D.; Donat, J.R.; Jepsen, P.; Smookler, M.; Villa, J.F.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Programmatic Environmental Analysis--Appendices  

SciTech Connect

The programmatic environmental analysis is an initial assessment of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology considering development, demonstration and commercialization. It is concluded that the OTEC development program should continue because the development, demonstration, and commercialization on a single-plant deployment basis should not present significant environmental impacts. However, several areas within the OTEC program require further investigation in order to assess the potential for environmental impacts from OTEC operation, particularly in large-scale deployments and in defining alternatives to closed-cycle biofouling control: (1) Larger-scale deployments of OTEC clusters or parks require further investigations in order to assess optimal platform siting distances necessary to minimize adverse environmental impacts. (2) The deployment and operation of the preoperational platform (OTEC-1) and future demonstration platforms must be carefully monitored to refine environmental assessment predictions, and to provide design modifications which may mitigate or reduce environmental impacts for larger-scale operations. These platforms will provide a valuable opportunity to fully evaluate the intake and discharge configurations, biofouling control methods, and both short-term and long-term environmental effects associated with platform operations. (3) Successful development of OTEC technology to use the maximal resource capabilities and to minimize environmental effects will require a concerted environmental management program, encompassing many different disciplines and environmental specialties. This volume contains these appendices: Appendix A -- Deployment Scenario; Appendix B -- OTEC Regional Characterization; and Appendix C -- Impact and Related Calculations.

Authors, Various

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Thermal Treatment of Solid Wastes Using the Electric Arc Furnace  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A thermal waste treatment facility has been developed at the Albany Research Center (ARC) over the past seven years to process a wide range of heterogeneous mixed wastes, on a scale of 227 to 907 kg/h (500 to 2,000 lb/h). The current system includes a continuous feed system, a 3-phase AC, 0.8 MW graphite electrode arc furnace, and a dedicated air pollution control system (APCS) which includes a close-coupled thermal oxidizer, spray cooler, baghouse, and wet scrubber. The versatility of the complete system has been demonstrated during 5 continuous melting campaigns, ranging from 11 to 25 mt (12 to 28 st) of treated wastes per campaign, which were conducted on waste materials such as (a) municipal incinerator ash, (b) simulated low-level radioactive, high combustible-bearing mixed wastes, (c) simulated low-level radioactive liquid tank wastes, (d) heavy metal contaminated soils, and (e) organic-contaminated dredging spoils. In all cases, the glass or slag products readily passed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxicity Characteristic Leachability Program (TCLP) test. Additional studies are currently under way on electric utility wastes, steel and aluminum industry wastes, as well as zinc smelter residues. Thermal treatment of these solid waste streams is intended to produce a metallic product along with nonhazardous glass or slag products.

O'Connor, W.K.; Turner, P.C.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Gravitational Potential Energy Balance for the Thermal Circulation in a Model Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The gravitational potential energy balance of the thermal circulation in a simple rectangular model basin is diagnosed from numerical experiments based on a mass-conserving oceanic general circulation model. The vertical mixing coefficient is ...

Rui Xin Huang; Xingze Jin

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

The Relationship between Tibet-Tropical Ocean Thermal Contrast and Interannual Variability of Indian Monsoon Rainfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the northern summer the Tibetan Plateau is a heat source for the atmosphere, and the Equatorial Pacific Ocean Cold Tongue is a heat sink, both contributing to the thermal forcing of large-scale quasi-zonal atmospheric circulation.

Congbin Fu; Joseph O. Fletcher

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Intraseasonal Variability of the Upper-Ocean Thermal Structure Observed at 0 and 165E  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to perturbations in surface wind and energy fluxes associated with the atmospheric MaddenJulian oscillation (MJO), the thermal structure of the upper ocean (surface to 300 m) in the equatorial western Pacific exhibits prominent and ...

Chidong Zhang

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Low-Frequency Variability in the Midlatitude Atmosphere Induced by an Oceanic Thermal Front  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the flow induced in a highly idealized atmospheric model by an eastwest-oriented oceanic thermal front. The model has a linear marine boundary layer coupled to a quasigeostrophic, equivalent- barotropic free atmosphere. The ...

Yizhak Feliks; Michael Ghil; Eric Simonnet

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Technical resource document for assured thermal processing of wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a concise compendium of resource material covering assured thermal processing of wastes (ATPW), an area in which Sandia aims to develop a large program. The ATPW program at Sandia is examining a wide variety of waste streams and thermal processes. Waste streams under consideration include municipal, chemical, medical, and mixed wastes. Thermal processes under consideration range from various incineration technologies to non-incineration processes such as supercritical water oxidation or molten metal technologies. Each of the chapters describes the element covered, discusses issues associated with its further development and/or utilization, presents Sandia capabilities that address these issues, and indicates important connections to other ATPW elements. The division of the field into elements was driven by the team`s desire to emphasize areas where Sandia`s capabilities can lead to major advances and is therefore somewhat unconventional. The report will be valuable to Sandians involved in further ATPW program development.

Farrow, R.L.; Fisk, G.A.; Hartwig, C.M.; Hurt, R.H.; Ringland, J.T.; Swansiger, W.A.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Thermal and chemical remediation of mixed waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and system for treating organic waste materials without venting gaseous emissions to the atmosphere. A fluidized bed including lime particles is operated at a temperature of at least 500.degree. C. by blowing gas having 20%/70% oxygen upwardly through the bed particles at a rate sufficient to fluidize same. A toxic organic waste material is fed into the fluidized bed where the organic waste material reacts with the lime forming CaCO.sub.3. The off gases are filtered and cooled to condense water which is separated. A portion of the calcium carbonate formed during operation of the fluidized bed is replaced with lime particles. The off gases from the fluidized bed after drying are recirculated until the toxic organic waste material in the bed is destroyed.

Nelson, Paul A. (Wheaton, IL); Swift, William M. (Downers Grove, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Thermal Treatment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

range from 75 to 150ton (Bansal and Sugiarto 1999). Many factors can impact treatment costs, including oil and moisture content of the waste, particle size distribution of the...

62

Thermal and chemical remediation of mixed waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and system for treating organic waste materials without venting gaseous emissions to the atmosphere. A fluidized bed including lime particles is operated at a temperature of at least 500 C by blowing gas having 20%/70% oxygen upwardly through the bed particles at a rate sufficient to fluidize same. A toxic organic waste material is fed into the fluidized bed where the organic waste material reacts with the lime forming CaCO[sub 3]. The off gases are filtered and cooled to condense water which is separated. A portion of the calcium carbonate formed during operation of the fluidized bed is replaced with lime particles. The off gases from the fluidized bed after drying are recirculated until the toxic organic waste material in the bed is destroyed. 3 figs.

Nelson, P.A.; Swift, W.M.

1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

63

Wave Breaking and Ocean Surface Layer Thermal Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of breaking waves on ocean surface temperatures and surface boundary layer deepening is investigated. The modification of the MellorYamada turbulence closure model by Craig and Banner and others to include surface wave breaking ...

George Mellor; Alan Blumberg

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Thermal and chemical remediation of mixed wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for treating organic waste materials without venting gaseous emissions to the atmosphere which includes oxidizing the organic waste materials at an elevated temperature not less than about 500.degree. C. with a gas having an oxygen content in the range of from about 20% to about 70% to produce an oxidation product containing CO.sub.2 gas. The gas is then filtered to remove particulates, and then contacted with an aqueous absorbent solution of alkali metal carbonates or alkanolamines to absorb a portion of the CO.sub.2 gas from the particulate-free oxidation product. The CO.sub.2 absorbent is thereafter separated for further processing. A process and system are also disclosed in which the waste materials are contacted with a reactive medium such as lime and product treatment as described.

Nelson, Paul A. (Wheaton, IL); Swift, William M. (Downers Grove, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

ALTERNATIVE THERMAL DESTRUCTION PROCESSES FOR HAZARDOUS WASTES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

·Product Gas 400 2,000 11,300 Natural Gas 15,900 57,700 11,300 Most of these boilers are very small natural gas Distillate oil Natural gas Residual oil Distillate oil Natural gas Bituminous coal Bituminous coal Percent regulations. Candidate thermal processes include industrial processes such as boilers, process heaters, cement

Columbia University

66

Heat exchanger cleaning in support of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) - electronics subsystems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electronics systems supporting the development of biofouling countermeasures for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) are described. Discussed are the thermistor/thermopile amplifiers, heaters, flowmeters, temperature measurement, control systems for chlorination, flow driven brushes, and recirculating sponge rubber balls. The operation and troubleshooting of each electronic subsystem is documented.

Lott, D.F.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Annual Cycle of Subsurface Thermal Structure in the Tropical Atlantic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subsurface thermal structure in the tropical Atlantic Ocean (30N20S, East of 80W) is studied on the basis of an extensive data bank of subsurface soundings. Calendar monthly maps are presented showing mixed layer depth, base of ...

Stefan Hastenrath; Jacques Merle

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

An Attempt to Estimate the Thermal Resistance of the Upper Ocean to Climatic Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An attempt is made to estimate the thermal inertia of the upper ocean, relevant to climatic change. This is done by assuming that the annual variation in sea surface temperature (SST) can, to a first-order approximation, be described by a simple ...

H. M. Van Den Dool; J. D. Horel

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

VAC*TRAX - Thermal desorption for mixed wastes  

SciTech Connect

The patented VAC*TRAX process was designed in response to the need to remove organic constituents from mixed waste, waste that contains both a hazardous (RCRA or TSCA regulated) component and a radioactive component. Separation of the mixed waste into its hazardous and radioactive components allows for ultimate disposal of the material at existing, permitted facilities. The VAC*TRAX technology consists of a jacketed vacuum dryer followed by a condensing train. Solids are placed in the dryer and indirectly heated to temperatures as high as 260{degrees}C, while a strong vacuum (down to 50 mm Hg absolute pressure) is applied to the system and the dryer is purged with a nitrogen carrier gas. The organic contaminants in the solids are thermally desorbed, swept up in the carrier gas and into the condensing train where they are cooled and recovered. The dryer is fitted with a filtration system that keeps the radioactive constituents from migrating to the condensate. As such, the waste is separated into hazardous liquid and radioactive solid components, allowing for disposal of these streams at a permitted incinerator or a radioactive materials landfill, respectively. The VAC*TRAX system is designed to be highly mobile, while minimizing the operational costs with a simple, robust process. These factors allow for treatment of small waste streams at a reasonable cost. This paper describes the VAC*TRAX thermal desorption process, as well as results from the pilot testing program. Also, the design and application of the full-scale treatment system is presented. Materials tested to date include spiked soil and debris, power plant trash and sludge contaminated with solvents, PCB contaminated soil, solvent-contaminated uranium mill-tailings, and solvent and PCB-contaminated sludge and trash. Over 70 test runs have been performed using the pilot VAC*TRAX system, with more than 80% of the tests using mixed waste as the feed material.

McElwee, M.J.; Palmer, C.R.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A generally mushroom-shaped, open cycle OTEC system and distilled water producer which has a skirt-conduit structure extending from the enlarged portion of the mushroom to the ocean. The enlarged part of the mushroom houses a toroidal casing flash evaporator which produces steam which expands through a vertical rotor turbine, partially situated in the center of the blossom portion and partially situated in the mushroom's stem portion. Upon expansion through the turbine, the motive steam enters a shell and tube condenser annularly disposed about the rotor axis and axially situated beneath the turbine in the stem portion. Relatively warm ocean water is circulated up through the radially outer skirt-conduit structure entering the evaporator through a radially outer portion thereof, flashing a portion thereof into motive steam, and draining the unflashed portion from the evaporator through a radially inner skirt-conduit structure. Relatively cold cooling water enters the annular condenser through the radially inner edge and travels radially outwardly into a channel situated along the radially outer edge of the condenser. The channel is also included in the radially inner skirt-conduit structure. The cooling water is segregated from the potable, motive steam condensate which can be used for human consumption or other processes requiring high purity water. The expansion energy of the motive steam is partially converted into rotational mechanical energy of the turbine rotor when the steam is expanded through the shaft attached blades. Such mechanical energy drives a generator also included in the enlarged mushroom portion for producing electrical energy. Such power generation equipment arrangement provides a compact power system from which additional benefits may be obtained by fabricating the enclosing equipment, housings and component casings from low density materials, such as prestressed concrete, to permit those casings and housings to also function as a floating support vessel.

Wittig, J. Michael (West Goshen, PA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Deep water pipe, pump, and mooring study: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion program. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ocean engineering issues affecting the design, construction, deployment, and operation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plants are of key importance. This study addressed the problems associated with the conceptual design of the deep-water pipe, cold-water-pumping, and platform mooring arrangements. These subsystems fall into a natural grouping since the parameters affecting their design are closely related to each other and to the ocean environment. Analysis and evaluations are provided with a view toward judging the impact of the various subsystems on the overall plant concept and to provide an estimate of material and construction cost. Parametric data is provided that describes mooring line configurations, mooring line loads, cold water pipe configurations, and cold water pumping schemes. Selected parameters, issues, and evaluation criteria are used to judge the merits of candidate concepts over a range of OTEC plant size from 100 MWe to 1000 MWe net output power.

Little, T.E.; Marks, J.D.; Wellman, K.H.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Design and cost of near-term OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) plants for the production of desalinated water and electric power. [Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There currently is an increasing need for both potable water and power for many islands in the Pacific and Caribbean. The Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology fills these needs and is a viable option because of the unlimited supply of ocean thermal energy for the production of both desalinated water and electricity. The OTEC plant design must be flexible to meet the product-mix demands that can be very different from site to site. This paper describes different OTEC plants that can supply various mixes of desalinated water and vapor -- the extremes being either all water and no power or no water and all power. The economics for these plants are also presented. The same flow rates and pipe sizes for both the warm and cold seawater streams are used for different plant designs. The OTEC plant designs are characterized as near-term because no major technical issues need to be resolved or demonstrated. The plant concepts are based on DOE-sponsored experiments dealing with power systems, advanced heat exchanger designs, corrosion and fouling of heat exchange surfaces, and flash evaporation and moisture removal from the vapor using multiple spouts. In addition, the mature multistage flash evaporator technology is incorporated into the plant designs were appropriate. For the supply and discharge warm and cold uncertainties do exist because the required pipe sizes are larger than the maximum currently deployed -- 40-inch high-density polyethylene pipe at Keahole Point in Hawaii. 30 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

Rabas, T.; Panchal, C.; Genens, L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Energy implications of the thermal recovery of biodegradable municipal waste materials in the United Kingdom  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: > Energy balances were calculated for the thermal treatment of biodegradable wastes. > For wood and RDF, combustion in dedicated facilities was the best option. > For paper, garden and food wastes and mixed waste incineration was the best option. > For low moisture paper, gasification provided the optimum solution. - Abstract: Waste management policies and legislation in many developed countries call for a reduction in the quantity of biodegradable waste landfilled. Anaerobic digestion, combustion and gasification are options for managing biodegradable waste while generating renewable energy. However, very little research has been carried to establish the overall energy balance of the collection, preparation and energy recovery processes for different types of wastes. Without this information, it is impossible to determine the optimum method for managing a particular waste to recover renewable energy. In this study, energy balances were carried out for the thermal processing of food waste, garden waste, wood, waste paper and the non-recyclable fraction of municipal waste. For all of these wastes, combustion in dedicated facilities or incineration with the municipal waste stream was the most energy-advantageous option. However, we identified a lack of reliable information on the energy consumed in collecting individual wastes and preparing the wastes for thermal processing. There was also little reliable information on the performance and efficiency of anaerobic digestion and gasification facilities for waste.

Burnley, Stephen, E-mail: s.j.burnley@open.ac.uk [Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Phillips, Rhiannon, E-mail: rhiannon.jones@environment-agency.gov.uk [Strategy Unit, Welsh Assembly Government, Ty Cambria, 29 Newport Road, Cardiff CF24 0TP (United Kingdom); Coleman, Terry, E-mail: terry.coleman@erm.com [Environmental Resources Management Ltd, Eaton House, Wallbrook Court, North Hinksey Lane, Oxford OX2 0QS (United Kingdom); Rampling, Terence, E-mail: twa.rampling@hotmail.com [7 Thurlow Close, Old Town Stevenage, Herts SG1 4SD (United Kingdom)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Ocean thermal energy conversion power system development-I. Phase I. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Power System Development-I (PSD-I), Phase I, study was to develop conceptual and preliminary designs of closed-cycle ammonia power system modules for the 100-MW(e) OTEC Demonstration Plant, the 400-MW(e) Commercial Size Plant, and Heat Exchanger Test Articles representative of the full-size power system module design. Results are presented.

Not Available

1978-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

75

Ocean thermal plantships for production of ammonia as the hydrogen carrier.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conventional petroleum, natural gas, and coal are the primary sources of energy that have underpinned modern civilization. Their continued availability in the projected quantities required and the impacts of emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) on the environment are issues at the forefront of world concerns. New primary sources of energy are being sought that would significantly reduce the emissions of GHGs. One such primary source that can help supply energy, water, and fertilizer without GHG emissions is available in the heretofore unexploited thermal gradients of the tropical oceans. The world's oceans are the largest natural collector and reservoir of solar energy. The potential of ocean energy is limitless for producing base-load electric power or ammonia as the hydrogen carrier and fresh water from seawater. However, until now, ocean energy has been virtually untapped. The general perception is that ocean thermal energy is limited to tropical countries. Therefore, the full potential of at-sea production of (1) ammonia as a hydrogen carrier and (2) desalinated water has not been adequately evaluated. Using ocean thermal plantships for the at-sea co-production of ammonia as a hydrogen carrier and desalinated water offer potential energy, environmental, and economic benefits that support the development of the technology. The introduction of a new widespread solution to our projected energy supply requires lead times of a decade or more. Although continuation of the ocean thermal program from the 1970s would likely have put us in a mitigating position in the early 2000s, we still have a window of opportunity to dedicate some of our conventional energy sources to the development of this renewable energy by the time new sources would be critically needed. The primary objective of this project is to evaluate the technical and economic viability of ocean thermal plantships for the production of ammonia as the hydrogen carrier. This objective is achieved by completing project tasks that consist of updating the John Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) pilot plantship design and extrapolating it to commercial plantships, evaluating a new energy-efficient ammonia synthesis process, evaluating the co-production of desalinated water on plantships, and developing a conceptual design of a satellite plantships system for commercial-scale ammonia production. In addition, an industrial workshop was organized to present the results and develop future goals for commercialization of ocean thermal plantships by 2015. The following goals, arranged in chronological order, were examined at the workshop: (1) Global displacement of petroleum-fuel-based (diesel, fuel oil, naphtha) power generation for freeing up these fuels for transportation, chemical feedstock, and other high-valued uses; (2) At-sea production of desalinated water for regions of critical water shortages; (3) Displacement of carbon-based feed stocks and energy for production of ammonia fertilizers; (4) Development of hydrogen supply to allow economic processing of heavy crude oils and upgrading oil sands; (5) Development of ammonia-fueled distributed energy to displace natural-gas fueled power generation to free up natural gas for higher-value uses and the mitigation of issues associated with imported liquefied natural gas (LNG); and (6) Use of ammonia as a hydrogen carrier for transportation.

Panchal, C.B.; Pandolfini, P. P.; Kumm, W. H.; Energy Systems; Johns Hopkins Univ.; Arctic Energies, Ltd.

2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

76

PMB-Waste: An analysis of fluidized bed thermal treatment  

SciTech Connect

A fluidized bed treatment process was evaluated for solid waste from plastic media blasting of aircraft protective coating. The treatment objective is to decompose and oxidize all organic components, and concentrate all the hazardous metals in the ash. The reduced volume and mass are expected to reduce disposal cost. A pilot test treatment was done in an existing fluidized bed equipped with emissions monitors, and emissions within regulatory requirements were demonstrated. A economic analysis of the process is inconclusive due to lack of reliable cost data of disposal without thermal treatment.

Gat, U.; Kass, M.D.; Lloyd, D.B.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Near and far field models of external fluid mechanics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The world is facing the challenge of finding new renewable sources of energy - first, in response to fossil fuel reserve depletion, and second, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) can ...

Rodrguez Buo, Mariana

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Research on the external fluid mechanics of ocean thermal energy conversion plants : report covering experiments in a current  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report describes a set of experiments in a physical model study to explore plume transport and recirculation potential for a range of generic Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plant designs and ambient conditions. ...

Fry, David J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Baroclinic Adjustment in an AtmosphereOcean Thermally Coupled Model: The Role of the Boundary Layer Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Baroclinic eddy equilibration and the roles of different boundary layer processes in limiting the baroclinic adjustment are studied using an atmosphereocean thermally coupled model. Boundary layer processes not only affect the dynamical ...

Yang Zhang; Peter H. Stone

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Corrosion and biofouling on the non-heat-exchanger surfaces of an ocean thermal energy conversion power plant: a survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Of the many foreseeable problems confronting economical ocean thermal energy conversion operation, two major items are the deterioration of the structural and functional components, which prevents efficient operation, and the biofouling of the surfaces, which adds excess weight to the floating ocean platform. The techniques required for effective long-term control of deterioration and corrosion have been investigated actively for many years, and successful solutions for most situations have been developed. For the most part, these solutions can be directly transferred to the ocean thermal energy conversion plant. The majority of problems in these areas are expected to be associated with scale-up and will require some advanced development due to the immensity of the ocean thermal energy conversion platform. Current antifouling control systems are not effective for long-term fouling prevention. Commercially available antifouling coatings are limited to a 3-year service life in temperate waters, and even shorter in tropical waters. However, underwater cleaning techniques and some fouling-control systems presently being used by conventional power plants may find utility on an ocean thermal energy conversion plant. In addition, some recent major advances in long-term antifouling coatings sponsored by the Navy may be applicable to ocean thermal energy conversion. 132 references.

Castelli, V.J. (ed.)

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

In-situ biofouling of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) evaporator tubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Puerto Rico Center for Energy and Environmental Research equipped a LCU facility in 1100 m of water near Punta Tuna, Puerto Rico to measure in situ biofouling of simulated Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion evaporator tubes. The system consisted of two 5052 aluminum alloy and two titanium tubes, through which a continuous flow of ocean water was maintained. The tubes were cleaned three times and the fouling resistance was measured, showing only slight differences between the tubes with respect to heat transfer loss resulting from biofouling. In all units, the average fouling rate after cleaning was greater than before cleaning, and only after the first cleaning did the aluminum units show greater fouling rates than did the titanium. The titanium units showed a progressive increase in the fouling rates with each cleaning. The subsequent average fouling rates for all units after eight months were between 4 and 4.6 x 0.000010 sq m-k/W-day.

Sasscer, D.S. (Univ. of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez); Morgan, T. (Argonne National Lab., IL)

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Study on the Mode of Power Plant Circulating Water Waste Heat Regenerative Thermal System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power Plant Circulating Water (PPCW) waste heat recycling is an important way of increasing a power plants primary energy ratio. According to the PPCW waste heat regenerative thermal system, the authors propose two modes of heat pump heat regenerative ... Keywords: heat pump, power plant circulating water (PPCW), waste heat recycling, energy saving

Bi Qingsheng; Ma Yanliang; Yang Zhifu

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

EA-1189: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed 9: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste, Richland, Washington EA-1189: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to demonstrate the feasibility of commercial treatment of contact-handled low-level mixed waste to meet existing Federal and State regulatory standards for eventual land disposal at the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 29, 1998 EA-1189: Finding of No Significant Impact Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste September 29, 1998 EA-1189: Final Environmental Assessment Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste

84

Experience base for Radioactive Waste Thermal Processing Systems: A preliminary survey  

SciTech Connect

In the process of considering thermal technologies for potential treatment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory mixed transuranic contaminated wastes, a preliminary survey of the experience base available from Radioactive Waste Thermal Processing Systems is reported. A list of known commercial radioactive waste facilities in the United States and some international thermal treatment facilities are provided. Survey focus is upon the US Department of Energy thermal treatment facilities. A brief facility description and a preliminary summary of facility status, and problems experienced is provided for a selected subset of the DOE facilities.

Mayberry, J.; Geimer, R.; Gillins, R.; Steverson, E.M.; Dalton, D. (Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Anderson, G.L. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

GEOTEC (Geothermal-Enhanced Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) engineering concept study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project was to provide a conceptual design for a modular state-of-the-art geothermal-enhanced ocean thermal energy conversion (GEOTEC) plant for implementation at a Navy site on Adak Island, Alaska. This report includes the following appendices: (1) statement of work; (2) geothermal resource assessment; (3) assessment of environmental issues; (4) design optimization program formulations for GEOTEC; (5) calculation of geofluid temperature drop in brine collection system; (6) pressure losses and pumping requirements for seawater pipeline system; (7) geocost comparison of single and dual binary cycle systems; (8) description of seawater pipeline system; and (9) plant system installed cost estimates. (ACR)

Not Available

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermally-Chargeable Supercapacitor Fluctuating Low-GradeThermally-Chargeable Supercapacitor for Fluctuating Low-Thermally-Chargeable Supercapacitor for Fluctuating Low-

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the portion of thermal energy that can be converted toof high-performance thermal energy harvesting systems, butreferred to as the thermal energy from low- temperature heat

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Computational Efficient Upscaling Methodology for Predicting Thermal Conductivity of Nuclear Waste forms  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluated different upscaling methods to predict thermal conductivity in loaded nuclear waste form, a heterogeneous material system. The efficiency and accuracy of these methods were compared. Thermal conductivity in loaded nuclear waste form is an important property specific to scientific researchers, in waste form Integrated performance and safety code (IPSC). The effective thermal conductivity obtained from microstructure information and local thermal conductivity of different components is critical in predicting the life and performance of waste form during storage. How the heat generated during storage is directly related to thermal conductivity, which in turn determining the mechanical deformation behavior, corrosion resistance and aging performance. Several methods, including the Taylor model, Sachs model, self-consistent model, and statistical upscaling models were developed and implemented. Due to the absence of experimental data, prediction results from finite element method (FEM) were used as reference to determine the accuracy of different upscaling models. Micrographs from different loading of nuclear waste were used in the prediction of thermal conductivity. Prediction results demonstrated that in term of efficiency, boundary models (Taylor and Sachs model) are better than self consistent model, statistical upscaling method and FEM. Balancing the computation resource and accuracy, statistical upscaling is a computational efficient method in predicting effective thermal conductivity for nuclear waste form.

Li, Dongsheng; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2011-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

89

Effective thermal conductivity measurements relevant to deep borehole nuclear waste disposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this work was to measure the effective thermal conductivity of a number of materials (particle beds, and fluids) proposed for use in and around canisters for disposal of high level nuclear waste in deep ...

Shaikh, Samina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Selected legal and institutional issues related to Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), an attractive alternative to traditional energy sources, is still in the early stages of development. To facilitate OTEC commercialization, it is essential that a legal and institutional framework be designed now so as to resolve uncertainties related to OTEC development, primarily involving jurisdictional, regulatory, and environmental issues. The jurisdictional issues raised by OTEC use are dependent upon the site of an OTEC facility and its configuration; i.e., whether the plant is a semipermanent fixture located offshore or a migrating plant ship that provides a source of energy for industry at sea. These issues primarily involve the division of authority between the Federal Government and the individual coastal states. The regulatory issues raised are largely speculative: they involve the adaptation of existing mechanisms to OTEC operation. Finally, the environmental issues raised center around compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) as well as international agreements. 288 references.

Nanda, V. P.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Thermal and radiolytic gas generation from Tank 241-S-102 waste  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes progress in evaluating thermal and radiolytic rate parameters for flammable gas generation in Hanford single-shell tank wastes based on the results of laboratory tests using actual waste from Tank 241-S-102 (S-102). Work described in this report was conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Flammable Gas Safety Project, whose purpose is to develop information to support Fluor Daniel Hanford (FDH) and its Project Management Hanford Contract (PHMC) subcontractors in their efforts to ensure the safe interim storage of wastes at the Hanford Site. This work is related to gas generation studies being performed at Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT) under subcontract to PNNL, using simulated wastes, and to studies being performed at Numatec Hanford Corporation (formerly Westinghouse Hanford Company) using actual wastes. The results of gas generation from Tank S-102 waste under thermal and radiolytic conditions are described in this report. The accurate measurement of gas generation rates in actual waste from highly radioactive waste tanks is needed to assess the potential for producing and storing flammable gases within the waste tanks. This report addresses the gas generation capacity of the waste from Tank S-102, a waste tank listed as high priority by the Flammable Gas Safety Program due to its potential for flammable gas accumulation above the flammability limit.

King, C.M.; Pederson, L.R.; Bryan, S.A.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Thermal analysis of Yucca Mountain commercial high-level waste packages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal performance of commercial high-level waste packages was evaluated on a preliminary basis for the candidate Yucca Mountain repository site. The purpose of this study is to provide an estimate for waste package component temperatures as a function of isolation time in tuff. Several recommendations are made concerning the additional information and modeling needed to evaluate the thermal performance of the Yucca Mountain repository system.

Altenhofen, M.K. [Altenhofen (M.K.), Richland, WA (United States); Eslinger, P.W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion power system development. Phase I: preliminary design. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Westinghouse has completed the Preliminary Design Phase for the Power System Development of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Demonstration Plant project. This study included the development of a preliminary design for a Modular Application scaled power system (10MWe) and Heat Exchanger Test Articles, both based on the concept developed in the Conceptual Design Phase. The results of this study were used to improve the baseline design of the 50MWe module for the Commercial Size Power System, which was recommended for the demonstration plant by the conceptual design study. The 50MWe module was selected since it has the lowest cost, and since its size convincingly demonstrates that future economically viable commercial plants, having reliable operation with credible anticipated costs, are possible. Additional optimization studies on the size of the power system plus hull continue to identify 50MWe as the preferred minimum cost configuration. This study was limited to a closed cycle ammonia power system module, using a seawater temperature difference of 40/sup 0/F, and a surface platform/ship reference hull. This volume describes system operation, a complete test program to verify mechanical reliability and thermal performance, fabrication and installation operations, and a cost analysis. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

94

Development of plastic heat exchangers for ocean thermal energy conversion. Final report, August 1976--December 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Materials and processes have been selected and design information obtained for plastic ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) heat exchangers as the result of a program comprising five types of laboratory experiments. Tests to evaluate the chemical resistance of seven commercially available thermoplastics to sea water and several possible working fluids were conducted with emphasis placed on compatibility with ammonia. Environmental rupture tests involving exposure of stressed specimens to sea water or liquid ammonia indicated that the high density polyethylene (HDPE) is the best suited candidate and produced an extrapolated 100,000 hour failure stress of 1060 psi for HDPE. Long term durability tests of extruded HDPE plate-tube panel confirmed that plastic heat transfer surface is mechanically reliable in an OTEC environment. Thermal conductivity measurements of acetylene black filled HDPE indicated that conductivity may be increased by 50% with a 35% by weight filler loading. The permeability coefficient measured for liquid ammonia through HDPE was higher than previous estimates. Test showed that the rate can be significantly reduced by sulfonation of HDPE. A review of biofouling mechanisms revealed that the permeable nature of the plastic heat exchanger surface may be used to control primary biofouling form formation by allowing incorporation of non-toxic organic repellents into the plastic. A preliminary design and fabrication development program suggests that construction of an ammonia condenser test unit is feasible using currently available materials and manufacturing techniques.

Hart, G.K.; Lee, C.O.; Latour, S.R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion power system development. Phase I. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the conceptual and preliminary design of closed-cycle, ammonia, ocean thermal energy conversion power plants by Westinghouse Electric Corporation. Preliminary designs for evaporator and condenser test articles (0.13 MWe size) and a 10 MWe modular experiment power system are described. Conceptual designs for 50 MWe power systems, and 100 MWe power plants are also descirbed. Design and cost algorithms were developed, and an optimized power system design at the 50 MWe size was completed. This design was modeled very closely in the test articles and in the 10 MWe Modular Application. Major component and auxiliary system design, materials, biofouling, control response, availability, safety and cost aspects are developed with the greatest emphasis on the 10 MWe Modular Application Power System. It is concluded that all power plant subsystems are state-of-practice and require design verification only, rather than continued research. A complete test program, which verifies the mechanical reliability as well as thermal performance, is recommended and described.

Not Available

1978-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

96

Energy Basics: Ocean Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy...

97

Ocean | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description Related Links List of Ocean Thermal Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleOcean&oldid273467"...

98

Thermal Response of the 21-PWR Waste Package to a Fire Accident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the thermal response of the 21-PWR WP (pressurized water reactor waste package) to the regulatory fire event. The scope of this calculation is limited to the two-dimensional waste package temperature calculations to support the waste package design. The information provided by the sketches attached to this calculation (Attachment IV) is that of the potential design of the type of waste package considered in this calculation. The procedure AP-3.12Q.Calculations (Reference 1), and the Development Plan (Reference 24) are used to develop this calculation.

F.P. Faucher; H. Marr; M.J. Anderson

2000-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

99

Overview of non-thermal mixed waste treatment technologies: Treatment of mixed waste (ex situ); Technologies and short descriptions  

SciTech Connect

This compendium contains brief summaries of new and developing non- thermal treatment technologies that are candidates for treating hazardous or mixed (hazardous plus low-level radioactive) wastes. It is written to be all-encompassing, sometimes including concepts that presently constitute little more than informed ``ideas``. It bounds the universe of existing technologies being thought about or considered for application on the treatment of such wastes. This compendium is intended to be the very first step in a winnowing process to identify non-thermal treatment systems that can be fashioned into complete ``cradle-to-grave`` systems for study. The purpose of the subsequent systems paper studies is to investigate the cost and likely performance of such systems treating a representative sample of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) mixed low level wastes (MLLW). The studies are called Integrated Non-thermal Treatment Systems (INTS) Studies and are being conducted by the Office of Science and Technology (OST) of the Environmental Management (EM) of the US Department of Energy. Similar studies on Integrated Thermal Treatment Systems have recently been published. These are not designed nor intended to be a ``downselection`` of such technologies; rather, they are simply a systems evaluation of the likely costs and performance of various non- thermal technologies that have been arranged into systems to treat sludges, organics, metals, soils, and debris prevalent in MLLW.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Harvesting useful electric energy from ambient thermal gradients and/or temperature fluctuations is immensely important. For many years, a number of direct and indirect thermal-to-electrical energy (more)

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization- Final Technical Report on Award DE-EE0002664. October 28, 2012  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project focuses on assessing the Maximum Practicably Extractable Energy (MPEE) from the world's ocean thermal resources. MPEE is defined as being sustainable and technically feasible, given today's state-of-the-art ocean energy technology. Under this project the OTEEV team developed a comprehensive Geospatial Information System (GIS) dataset and software tool, and used the tool to provide a meaningful assessment of MPEE from the global and domestic U.S. ocean thermal resources. The OTEEV project leverages existing NREL renewable energy GIS technologies and integrates extractable energy estimated from quality-controlled data and projected optimal achievable energy conversion rates. Input data are synthesized from a broad range of existing in-situ measurements and ground-truthed numerical models with temporal and spatial resolutions sufficient to reflect the local resource. Energy production rates are calculated for regions based on conversion rates estimated for current technology, local energy density of the resource, and sustainable resource extraction. Plant spacing and maximum production rates are then estimated based on a default plant size and transmission mechanisms. The resulting data are organized, displayed, and accessed using a multi-layered GIS mapping tool, http://maps.nrel.gov/mhk_atlas with a user-friendly graphical user interface.

Ascari, Matthew B.; Hanson, Howard P.; Rauchenstein, Lynn; Van Zwieten, James; Bharathan, Desikan; Heimiller, Donna; Langle, Nicholas; Scott, George N.; Potemra, James; Nagurny, N. John; Jansen, Eugene

2012-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

102

Seasonal Prediction of Thermal Stress Accumulation for Coral Bleaching in the Tropical Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mass coral bleaching, associated with anomalously warm ocean temperatures over large regions, poses a serious threat to the future health of the world coral reef systems. Seasonal forecasts from coupled oceanatmosphere models can be a valuable ...

C. M. Spillman; O. Alves; D. A. Hudson

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

The importance of thermal loading conditions to waste package performance at Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect

Temperature and relative humidity are primary environmental factors affecting waste package corrosion rates for the potential repository in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Under ambient conditions, the repository environment is quite humid. If relative humidity is low enough (<70%), corrosion will be minimal. Under humid conditions, corrosion is reduced if the temperature is low (<60 C). Using the V-TOUGH code, the authors model thermo-hydrological flow to investigate the effect of repository heat on temperature and relative humidity in the repository for a wide range of thermal loads. These calculations indicate that repository heat may substantially reduce relative humidity on the waste package, over hundreds of years for low thermal loads and over tens of thousands of year for high thermal loads. Temperatures associated with a given relative humidity decrease with increasing thermal load. Thermal load distributions can be optimized to yield a more uniform reduction in relative humidity during the boiling period.

Buscheck, T.A.; Nitao, J.J.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanoporous Thermal-to-Electrical Energy Conversion System (hand, the indirect energy conversion systems tend to beIn a direct energy conversion system, heat can be converted

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the overall efficiency. The heat source can be solar thermalefficiency of the vehicles can be considerably enhanced [105]. Other examples of LGH include solar thermal

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Power system development: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC). Preliminary design report: appendices, Part 2 (Final)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is the development of a preliminary design for a full-sized, closed cycle, ammonia power system module for the 100 MWe OTEC demonstration plant. In turn, this demonstration plant is to demonstrate, by 1984, the operation and performance of an Ocean Thermal Power Plant having sufficiently advanced heat exchanger design to project economic viability for commercial utilization in the late 1980's and beyond. Included in this power system development are the preliminary designs for a proof-of-concept pilot plant and test article heat exchangers which are scaled in such a manner as to support a logically sequential, relatively low-cost development of the full-scale power system module. The conceptual designs are presented for the demonstration plant power module, the proof-of-concept pilot plant, and for a pair of test article heat exchangers. Costs associated with the design, development, fabrication, checkout, delivery, installation, and operation are included. The accompanying design and producibilty studies on the full-scale power system module project the performance/economics for the commercial plant. This section of the report contains appendices on the electrical system, instrumentation and control, ammonia pump evaluation study, ammonia and nitrogen support subsystems, piping and support design calculations, and plant availability. (WHK)

None

1978-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

107

Concurrent studies of enhanced heat transfer and materials for ocean thermal exchangers. Progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Aluminum alloys 1100, 3003, 5052, and 6063 were examined for their compatibility with the proposed working fluids for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), anhydrous ammonia, Freon 22 and propane, and mixtures of these with sea water. Such mixtures would occur if leaks develop in evaporator or condenser heat exchangers. These aluminum alloys are compatible with the anhydrous working fluids. In ammonia-sea water solutions only limited general corrosion is found in 0 to 30 percent ammonia, no corrosion in 30 to 90 percent ammonia, and ''self limiting'' pits in 90 to 100 percent ammonia so rapid deterioration of the exchangers would not occur. No corrosion was observed in sea water saturated with Freon 22 or propane. No differences in alloy performance were evident in any of these tests so selection can be made on the basis of compatibility with sea water. A review of the available literature indicates that 5052 shows the best performance in surface sea water followed by 1100, 3003 and then 6063 alloy. In deep sea water only 5052 and 1100 alloys appear suitable although more data is required. In both surface and deep sea waters, alcladding offers the best protection against tube perforation; few instances of penetration into the core alloy have been observed for the alclad alloys examined in this study.

Bonewitz, R.A.

1976-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

108

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power system development. Preliminary design report, Appendices, Part 1 (Final)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is the development of a preliminary design for a full-sized, closed cycle, ammonia power system module for the 100 MWe OTEC demonstration plant. In turn, this demonstration plant is to demonstrate, by 1984, the operation and performance of an Ocean Thermal Power Plant having sufficiently advanced heat exchanger design to project economic viability for commercial utilization in the late 1980's and beyond. Included in this power system development are the preliminary designs for a proof-of-concept pilot plant and test article heat exchangers which are scaled in such a manner as to support a logically sequential, relatively low-cost development of the full-scale power system module. The conceptual designs are presented for the demonstration plant power module, the proof-of-concept pilot plant, and for a pair of test article heat exchangers. Costs associated with the design, development, fabrication, checkout, delivery, installation, and operation are included. The accompanying design and producibilty studies on the full-scale power system module project the performance/economics for the commercial plant. This section of the report contains appendices on the developed computer models, water system dynamic studies, miscellaneous performance analysis, materials and processes, detailed equipment lists, turbine design studies, tube cleaner design, ammonia leak detection, and heat exchanger design supporting data. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

109

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion power system development. Phase I: preliminary design. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Westinghouse has completed the Preliminary Desigh Phase for the Power System Development of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Demonstration Plant project. This study included the development of a preliminary design for a Modular Application scaled power system (10MWe) and Heat Exchanger Test Articles, both based on the concept developed in the Conceptual Design Phase. The results of this study were used to improve the baseline design of the 50MWe module for the Commercial Size Power System, which was recommended for the demonstration plant by the conceptual design study. The 50MWe module was selected since it has the lowest cost, and since its size convincingly demonstrates that future economically viable commercial plants, having reliable operation with credible anticipated costs, are possible. Additional optimization studies on the size of the power system plus hull continue to identify 50MWe as the preferred minimum cost configuration. This study was limited to a closed cycle ammonia power system module, using a seawater temperature difference of 40/sup 0/F, and a surface platform/ship reference hull. This volume presents the preliminary design configuration and system optimization. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

110

Computer code input for thermal hydraulic analysis of Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility Title II design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The input files to the P/Thermal computer code are documented for the thermal hydraulic analysis of the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility Title II design analysis.

Cramer, E.R.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Bentonite alteration due to thermal-hydro-chemical processes during the early thermal period in a nuclear waste repository  

SciTech Connect

After closure of an underground nuclear waste repository, the decay of radionuclides will raise temperature in the repository, and the bentonite buffer will resaturate by water inflow from the surrounding host rock. The perturbations from these thermal and hydrological processes are expected to dissipate within hundreds to a few thousand years. Here, we investigate coupled thermal-hydro-chemical processes and their effects on the short-term performance of a potential nuclear waste repository located in a clay formation. Using a simplified geometric configuration and abstracted hydraulic parameters of the clayey formation, we examine geochemical processes, coupled with thermo-hydrologic phenomena, and potential changes in porosity near the waste container during the early thermal period. The developed models were used for evaluating the mineral alterations and potential changes in porosity of the buffer, which can affect the repository performance. The results indicate that mineral alteration and associated changes in porosity induced by early thermal and hydrological processes are relatively small and are expected to not significantly affect flow and transport properties. Chlorite precipitation was obtained in all simulation cases. A maximum of one percent volume fraction of chlorite could be formed, whose process may reduce swelling and sorption capacity of bentonite clay, affecting the performance of the repository. llitisation process was not obtained from the present simulations.

Xu, T.; Senger, R.; Finsterle, S.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Thermal Processing of Wastes - III (Eaf and Iron & Steel Plant Wastes)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... OF WASTE MATERIALS IN A FERROCHROME INDUSTRY: S. A. Platias, MIRTEC S. A., Research Division, Industrial Area, 38500 Volos, Greece. 2:50 pm.

113

Thermal conversion of municipal solid waste via hydrothermal carbonization: Comparison of carbonization products to products from current waste management techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a novel thermal conversion process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HTC converts wastes into value-added resources. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbonization integrates majority of carbon into solid-phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbonization results in a hydrochar with high energy density. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using hydrochar as an energy source may be beneficial. - Abstract: Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a novel thermal conversion process that may be a viable means for managing solid waste streams while minimizing greenhouse gas production and producing residual material with intrinsic value. HTC is a wet, relatively low temperature (180-350 Degree-Sign C) thermal conversion process that has been shown to convert biomass to a carbonaceous residue referred to as hydrochar. Results from batch experiments indicate HTC of representative waste materials is feasible, and results in the majority of carbon (45-75% of the initially present carbon) remaining within the hydrochar. Gas production during the batch experiments suggests that longer reaction periods may be desirable to maximize the production of energy-favorable products. If using the hydrochar for applications in which the carbon will remain stored, results suggest that the gaseous products from HTC result in fewer g CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions than the gases associated with landfilling, composting, and incineration. When considering the use of hydrochar as a solid fuel, more energy can be derived from the hydrochar than from the gases resulting from waste degradation during landfilling and anaerobic digestion, and from incineration of food waste. Carbon emissions resulting from the use of the hydrochar as a fuel source are smaller than those associated with incineration, suggesting HTC may serve as an environmentally beneficial alternative to incineration. The type and extent of environmental benefits derived from HTC will be dependent on hydrochar use/the purpose for HTC (e.g., energy generation or carbon storage).

Lu Xiaowei; Jordan, Beth [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of South Carolina, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Berge, Nicole D., E-mail: berge@cec.sc.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of South Carolina, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

How Much Predictive Skill Is Contained in the Thermal Structure of an Oceanic GCM?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The time history of upper-ocean temperatures in the tropical Pacific has been used as a predictor in a statistical prediction scheme to forecast SST anomalies in this region. The temperature variations were taken from the output of an oceanic ...

Mojib Latif; Nicholas E. Graham

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

THERMAL IMPACT OF WASTE EMPLACEMENT AND SURFACE COOLING ASSOCIATED WITH GEOLOGIC DISPOSAL OF NUCLEAR WASTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

l e of both uranium and plutonium. The overall objective i sthe remaining uranium or plutonium, or both, can be recycledSF) contains both uranium and plutonium as waste components.

Wang, J.S.Y.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Thermal testing of packages for transport of radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect

Shipping containers for radioactive materials must be shown capable of surviving tests specified by regulations such as Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (called 10CFR71 in this paper) within the United States. Equivalent regulations hold for other countries such as Safety Series 6 issued by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The containers must be shown to be capable of surviving, in order, drop tests, puncture tests, and thermal tests. Immersion testing in water is also required, but must be demonstrated for undamaged packages. The thermal test is intended to simulate a 30 minute exposure to a fully engulfing pool fire that could occur if a transport accident involved the spill of large quantities of hydrocarbon fuels. Various qualification methods ranging from pure analysis to actual pool fire tests have been used to prove regulatory compliance. The purpose of this paper is to consider the alternatives for thermal testing, point out the strengths and weaknesses of each approach, and to provide the designer with the information necessary to make informed decisions on the proper test program for the particular shipping container under consideration. While thermal analysis is an alternative to physical testing, actual testing is often emphasized by regulators, and this report concentrates on these testing alternatives.

Koski, J.A.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

117

Waste Heat Recovery System: Lightweight Thermal Energy Recovery (LIGHTER) System  

SciTech Connect

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: GM is using shape memory alloys that require as little as a 10C temperature difference to convert low-grade waste heat into mechanical energy. When a stretched wire made of shape memory alloy is heated, it shrinks back to its pre-stretched length. When the wire cools back down, it becomes more pliable and can revert to its original stretched shape. This expansion and contraction can be used directly as mechanical energy output or used to drive an electric generator. Shape memory alloy heat engines have been around for decades, but the few devices that engineers have built were too complex, required fluid baths, and had insufficient cycle life for practical use. GM is working to create a prototype that is practical for commercial applications and capable of operating with either air- or fluid-based heat sources. GMs shape memory alloy based heat engine is also designed for use in a variety of non-vehicle applications. For example, it can be used to harvest non-vehicle heat sources, such as domestic and industrial waste heat and natural geothermal heat, and in HVAC systems and generators.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Unvented thermal process for treatment of hazardous and mixed wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Unvented Thermal Process is being developed that does not release gases during the thermal treatment operation. The main unit in the process is a fluidized-bed processor containing a bed of calcined limestone (CaO), which reacts with gases given off during oxidation of organic materials. Gases that will react with CaO include CO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, HCI, HBr, and other acid gases. Water vapor formed during the oxidation process is carried off with the fluidizing gas and is removed in a condenser. Oxygen is added to the remaining gas (mainly nitrogen), which is recirculated to the oxidizer. The most flexible arrangement of equipment involves separating the processor into two units: An oxidizer, which may be any of a variety of types including standard incinerators, and a carbon dioxide sorber.

Nelson, P.A.; Swift, W.M.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

The Basic Effects of AtmosphereOcean Thermal Coupling on Midlatitude Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Starting from the assumption that the atmosphere is the primary source of variability internal to the midlatitude atmosphereocean system on intraseasonal to interannual timescales, the authors construct a simple stochastically forced, one-...

Joseph J. Barsugli; David S. Battisti

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Surrogate formulations for thermal treatment of low-level mixed waste. Part 1: Radiological surrogates  

SciTech Connect

The evaluation and comparison of proposed thermal treatment systems for mixed wastes can be expedited by tests in which the radioactive components of the wastes are replaced by surrogate materials chosen to mimic, as far as is possible, the chemical and physical properties of the radioactive materials of concern. In this work, sponsored by the Mixed Waste Integrated Project of the US Department of Energy, the authors have examined reported experience with such surrogates and suggest a simplified standard list of materials for use in tests of thermal treatment systems. The chief radioactive nuclides of concern in the treatment of mixed wastes are {sup 239}Pu, {sup 238}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 103}Ru, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 90}Sr. These nuclides are largely by-products of uranium enrichment, reactor fuel reprocessing, and weapons program activities. Cs, Ru, and Sr all have stable isotopes that can be used as perfect surrogates for the radioactive forms. Technetium exists only in radioactive form, as do plutonium and uranium. If one wishes to preclude radioactive contamination of the thermal treatment system under trial burn, surrogate elements must be chosen for these three. For technetium, the authors suggest the use of natural ruthenium, and for both plutonium and uranium, they recommend cerium. The seven radionuclides listed can therefore be simulated by a surrogate package containing stable isotopes of ruthenium, strontium, cesium, and cerium.

Stockdale, J.A.D.; Bostick, W.D.; Hoffmann, D.P. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lee, H.T. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Limits on the thermal energy release from radioactive wastes in a mined geologic repository  

SciTech Connect

The theraml energy release of nuclear wastes is a major factor in the design of geologic repositories. Thermal limits need to be placed on various aspets of the geologic waste disposal system to avoid or retard the degradation of repository performance because of increased temperatures. The thermal limits in current use today are summarized in this report. These limits are placed in a hierarchial structure of thermal criteria consistent with the failure mechanism they are trying to prevent. The thermal criteria hierarchy is used to evaluate the thermal performance of a sample repository design. The design consists of disassembled BWR spent fuel, aged 10 years, close packed in a carbon steel canister with 15 cm of crushed salt backfill. The medium is bedded salt. The most-restrictive temperature for this design is the spent-fuel centerline temperature limit of 300/sup 0/C. A sensitivity study on the effects of additional cooling prior to disposal on repository thermal limits and design is performed.

Scott, J.A.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

THERMAL IMPACT OF WASTE EMPLACEMENT AND SURFACE COOLING ASSOCIATED WITH GEOLOGIC DISPOSAL OF NUCLEAR WASTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emplacement in t u f f s . Sandia National Laboratories,e a r waste in s h a l e . Sandia N a t i o n a l L a b o rof a WIPP mine d r i f t . Sandia N a t i o n a l L a b o r

Wang, J.S.Y.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Thermal Energy Storage/Waste Heat Recovery Applications in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cement industry is the most energy-intensive industry in the United States in terms of energy cost as a percentage of the product according to a 1973 report by the Cost of Living Council. Martin Marietta Aerospace, Denver Division, and the Portland Cement Association have studied the potential benefits of using waste heat recovery methods and thermal energy storage systems in the cement manufacturing process. This work was performed under DOE Contract No. EC-77-C-01-50S4. The study has been completed and illustrates very attractive cost benefits realized from waste heat recovery/thermal storage systems. This paper will identify and quantify the sources of rejected energy in the cement manufacturing process, establish uses of this energy, exhibit various energy storage concepts, and present a methodology for selection of most promising energy storage systems. Two storage systems show the best promise - rock beds and draw salt storage. Thermal performance and detailed economic analyses have been performed on these systems and will be presented. Through use of thermal energy storage in conjunction with waste heat electric power generation units, an estimated 2.4 x 1013 BTU per year, or an equivalent of 4.0 x 10 barrels of oil per year, can be conserved. Attractive rates of return on investment of the proposed systems are an incentive for utilization and further development.

Beshore, D. G.; Jaeger, F. A.; Gartner, E. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Energy Basics: Ocean Energy Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy...

125

Isolation of Metals from Liquid Wastes: Reactive in Turbulent Thermal Reactors  

SciTech Connect

A Generic Technology for treatment of DOE Metal-Bearing Liquid Waste The DOE metal-bearing liquid waste inventory is large and diverse, both with respect to the metals (heavy metals, transuranics, radionuclides) themselves, and the nature of the other species (annions, organics, etc.) present. Separation and concentration of metals is of interest from the standpoint of reducing the volume of waste that will require special treatment or isolation, as well as, potentially, from the standpoint of returning some materials to commerce by recycling. The variety of metal-bearing liquid waste in the DOE complex is so great that it is unlikely that any one process (or class of processes) will be suitable for all material. However, processes capable of dealing with a wide variety of wastes will have major advantages in terms of process development, capital, and operating costs, as well as in environmental and safety permitting. Moreover, to the extent that a process operates well with a variety of metal-bearing liquid feedwastes, its performance is likely to be relatively robust with respect to the inevitable composition variations in each waste feed. One such class of processes involves high-temperature treatment of atomized liquid waste to promote reactive capture of volatile metallic species on collectible particulate substrates injected downstream of a flame zone. Compared to low-temperature processes that remove metals from the original liquid phase by extraction, precipitation, ion exchange, etc., some of the attractive features of high-temperature reactive scavenging are: The organic constituents of some metal-bearing liquid wastes (in particular, some low-level mixed wastes) must be treated thermally in order to meet the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), and the laws of various states. No species need be added to an already complex liquid system. This is especially important in light of the fact that DOE has already experienced problems with organic complexants added to precipitate radionuclides. For example, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has expressed, in a formal Recommendation to the Secretary of Energy, its concern about the evolution of benzene vapor in concentrations greater then the lower flammability limit from tanks to which sodium tetraphenylborate has been added to precipitate 137Cs in the ''In-Tank Precipitation'' (ITP) process at the Savannah River Site. Other species added to the waste in the ITP process are sodium titanate (to adsorb 90Sr and Pu), and oxalic acid. Avoiding addition of organics to radioactive waste has the additional advantage that is likely to significantly reduce the rate of radiolytic and radiolytically-induced hydrogen generation (c.f. Meisel et al., [1993]), in which it is shown that removal of organics reduces the rate of hydrogen generation in simulated waste from Hanford tank 241-SY-101 by over 70%. Organic species already present are destroyed with very high efficiency. This attribute is especially attractive with respect to high-level tank waste at the Hanford Site, in which large amounts of citrate, glyoxylate, EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid), and HEDTA [N-(2- hydroxyethyl)-ethylenediaminetriacetic acid] were added to precipitate radionuclides. These organic species are important in the thermal and radiolytic generation of methane, hydrogen, and nitrous oxide, flammable mixtures of which are episodically vented from 25 tanks on Hanford's Flammable Gas Watch List [Hopkins, 1994]. The same basic approach can be used to treat a broad range of liquid wastes, in each case concentrating the metals (regardless of liquid-phase oxidation state or association with chelators or absorbents) using a collectible sorbent, and destroying any organic species present. In common with the Army's approach (see section 2.2) to the thermal destruction of a 10 range of chemical warfare agents (GB, VX, and two blister agents), this may drastically simplify process and plant design and

Wendt, Jost O.L.

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

126

Upper Ocean Thermal Response to Strong Autumnal Forcing of the Northeast Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CASID free-drifting thermistor chain buoys that utilized Service ARGOS positioning and data collection were deployed in the northeast Pacific Ocean in the vicinity of OWS-P in late autumn in both 1980 and 1981 as part of the Storm Transfer and ...

W. G. Large; J. C. McWilliams; P. P. Niiler

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Uncertainty analysis routine for the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) biofouling measurement device and data reduction procedure. [HTCOEF code  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biofouling and corrosion of heat exchanger surfaces in Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) systems may be controlling factors in the potential success of the OTEC concept. Very little is known about the nature and behavior of marine fouling films at sites potentially suitable for OTEC power plants. To facilitate the acquisition of needed data, a biofouling measurement device developed by Professor J. G. Fetkovich and his associates at Carnegie-Mellon University (CMU) has been mass produced for use by several organizations in experiments at a variety of ocean sites. The CMU device is designed to detect small changes in thermal resistance associated with the formation of marine microfouling films. An account of the work performed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to develop a computerized uncertainty analysis for estimating experimental uncertainties of results obtained with the CMU biofouling measurement device and data reduction scheme is presented. The analysis program was written as a subroutine to the CMU data reduction code and provides an alternative to the CMU procedure for estimating experimental errors. The PNL code was used to analyze sample data sets taken at Keahole Point, Hawaii; St. Croix, the Virgin Islands; and at a site in the Gulf of Mexico. The uncertainties of the experimental results were found to vary considerably with the conditions under which the data were taken. For example, uncertainties of fouling factors (where fouling factor is defined as the thermal resistance of the biofouling layer) estimated from data taken on a submerged buoy at Keahole Point, Hawaii were found to be consistently within 0.00006 hr-ft/sup 2/-/sup 0/F/Btu, while corresponding values for data taken on a tugboat in the Gulf of Mexico ranged up to 0.0010 hr-ft/sup 2/-/sup 0/F/Btu. Reasons for these differences are discussed.

Bird, S.P.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Reduction of carbon content in waste-tire combustion ashes by bio-thermal treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Application of bio-catalyst (NOE-7F) in thermal treatment can adequately dispose dark-black fly ashes from co-combustion of both waste tires and coal. After thermal treatment of fly ashes by adding 10% NOE-7F, the carbon contents reduced by 37.6% and the weight losses increased by 405%, compared with the fly ashes without mixing with NOE-7F. The combustion behaviors of wasted tires combustion fly ashes with NOE-7F were also investigated by both thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The results verify that NOE-7F has positive effects on the combustion of residual carbon and toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) enhance the energy release and reduce the toxicity during the process of thermal treatment. Furthermore, using NOE-7F to dispose high-carbon content fly ashes did improve the compressive strength of fly ashes and concrete mixtures. Therefore, NOE-7F is a promising additive which could decrease treatment cost of high-carbon content fly ashes and reduce the amount of survival toxic PAHs.

Chen, C.C.; Lee, W.J.; Shih, S.I.; Mou, J.L. [National Cheng Kung University, Tainan (Taiwan). Dept. of Environmental Engineering

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Ocean Energy Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Oceans cover more than 70% of the Earth's surface. As the world's largest solar collectors, oceans contain thermal energy from the sun and produce mechanical energy from tides and waves. Even...

130

Ocean thermal energy conversion power system development-I. Phase I. Preliminary design report. Volume 1. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a conceptual and preliminary design study of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) closed loop ammonia power system modules performed by Lockheed Missiles and Space Company, Inc. (LMSC) are presented. This design study is the second of 3 tasks in Phase I of the Power System Development-I Project. The Task 2 objectives were to develop: 1) conceptual designs for a 40 to 50-MW(e) closed cycle ammonia commercial plant size power module whose heat exchangers are immersed in seawater and whose ancillary equipments are in a shirt sleeve environment; preliminary designs for a modular application power system sized at 10-MW(e) whose design, construction and material selection is analogous to the 50 MW(e) module, except that titanium tubes are to be used in the heat exchangers; and 3) preliminary designs for heat exchanger test articles (evaporator and condenser) representative of the 50-MW(e) heat exchangers using aluminum alloy, suitable for seawater service, for testing on OTEC-1. The reference ocean platform was specified by DOE as a surface vessel with the heat exchanger immersed in seawater to a design depth of 0 to 20 ft measured from the top of the heat exchanger. For the 50-MW(e) module, the OTEC 400-MW(e) Plant Ship, defined in the Platform Configuration and Integration study, was used as the reference platform. System design, performance, and cost are presented. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

131

The effect of biofouling in simulated Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) evaporator tubes at a potential site in Puerto Rico  

SciTech Connect

Since 29 January 1980, continuous flow of ocean surface water has been maintained through simulated Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) evaporator tubes in order to determine in situ, long-term effects of microbiofouling on heat exchanger efficiency. The experimental apparatus consists of two aluminum and two titanium modules mounted on a research platform moored at the potential OTEC site off Punta Tuna, Puerto Rico. The fouling resistance (R /SUB f/ ), a relative measure of heat transfer efficiency, is being monitored regularly, and the units have been cleaned four times. Postcleaning fouling rates (dR /SUB f/ /dt) for the aluminum units have not changed significantly but are considerably higher than the initial fouling rates. At first, post-cleaning fouling rates for the titanium units were less than for the aluminum units, but this value has been progressively increasing and now all units are fouling at approximately the same rate. Cleaning with manually operated M.A.N. brushes did not reduce R /SUB f/ to zero. On four occasions, flow velocity through the units has been increased. Results from these experiments suggest that initially the fouling layer is easily dislodged from the tube surface but that, with time, it becomes more firmly attached.

Sasscer, D.S.; Morgan, T.O.; Tosteson, T.R.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility thermal hydraulic analysis for Title II design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this work was to provide the thermal hydraulic analysis for the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) Title II design. Temperature distributions throughout the tank structure were calculated for subsequent use in the structural analysis and in the safety evaluation. Calculated temperatures of critical areas were compared to design allowables. Expected operating parameters were calculated for use in the ventilation system design and in the environmental impact documentation. The design requirements were obtained from the MWTF Functional Design Criteria (FDC). The most restrictive temperature limit given in the FDC is the 200 limit for the haunch and dome steel and concrete. The temperature limit for the rest of the primary and secondary tanks and concrete base mat and supporting pad is 250 F. Also, the waste should not be allowed to boil. The tank geometry was taken from ICF Kaiser Engineers Hanford drawing ES-W236A-Z1, Revision 1, included here in Appendix B. Heat removal rates by evaporation from the waste surface were obtained from experimental data. It is concluded that the MWTF tank cooling system will meet the design temperature limits for the design heat load of 700,000 Btu/h, even if cooling flow is lost to the annulus region, and temperatures change very slowly during transients due to the high heat capacity of the tank structure and the waste. Accordingly, transients will not be a significant operational problem from the viewpoint of meeting the specified temperature limits.

Cramer, E.R.

1994-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

133

Use of Thermal Energy Storage to Enhance the Recovery and Utilization of Industrial Waste Heat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recovery and reuse of industrial waste heat may be limited if an energy source cannot be fully utilized in an otherwise available out of phase or unequal capacity end-use process. This paper summarizes the results of a technical and economic evaluation involving process data from 12 industrial plants to determine if thermal energy storage (TES) systems can be used with commercially available energy management equipment to enhance the recovery and utilization of industrial waste heat. Results showing estimated installed costs, net energy savings, economic benefits, and utility impact are presented at both single plant and industry levels for 14 of 24 applications having after tax ROR's in excess of 20 percent. Maximum energy and cost savings for 9 of these 14 systems are shown to be conditional on the use of TES.

McChesney, H. R.; Bass, R. W.; Landerman, A. M.; Obee, T. N.; Sgamboti, C. T.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

A Two-Level Model of a Thermally Forced Ocean Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some simple solutions (mostly analytic) are presented for the large-scale baroclinic response to thermal forcing on a mid-latitude beta-plane. Surface heat flux is parameterized as (TATT)/tau;, with atmospheric temperature TA prescribed as a ...

M. K. Davey

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

On Haney-Type Surface Thermal Boundary Conditions for Ocean Circulation Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Haney-type surface thermal boundary conditions linearly connect net downward surface heat flux Q to airsea temperature difference (gradient-type condition) ?T1 or to climate/synoptic sea temperature difference (restoring-type condition) ?T2 by a ...

Peter C. Chu; Yuchun Chen; Shihua Lu

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

A Model of Sea Level Rise Caused by Ocean Thermal Expansion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Warming of the atmosphere as a result of an increased concentration of greenhouse gases is expected to lead to a significant rise is global sea level. We present estimates of the component of this sea level rise caused by thermal expansion of the ...

John A. Church; J. Stuart Godfrey; David R. Jackett; Trevor J. McDougall

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Phase 1: conceptual design. Ocean thermal energy conversion power system development. Volume 2 of 3. Technical details. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Westinghouse has completed the conceptual design of the Power System for the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Demonstration Plant project. This study included the development of a conceptual design for the following three items: first, a full-size power system module for the 100 MWe Demonstration Plant; second, a scaled proof of concept power system; and third, a heat exchanger test article. The study was limited to a closed cycle ammonia power system module, using a water temperature difference of 40/sup 0/F., and a surface platform/ship reference hull. Two power module of 50 MWe each are recommended for the demonstration plant. The 50 MWe module was selected since it has the lowest cost, and since it is of a size which convincingly demonstrates that future economically viable commercial plants, having reliable operation with credible anticipated costs, are possible. A modular, tube bundle approach to heat exchanger design makes large heat exchangers practical and economical. Other power module elements are considered to be within state-of-practice. Technological assessments of all subsystems indicate requirements for verification only, rather than continued research. A complete test program, which will verify the mechanical reliability as well as thermal performance, is recommended.

Not Available

1978-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

138

Comparison of Different Upscaling Methods for Predicting Thermal Conductivity of Complex Heterogeneous Materials System: Application on Nuclear Waste Forms  

SciTech Connect

To develop a strategy in thermal conductivity prediction of a complex heterogeneous materials system, loaded nuclear waste forms, the computational efficiency and accuracy of different upscaling methods have been evaluated. The effective thermal conductivity, obtained from microstructure information and local thermal conductivity of different components, is critical in predicting the life and performance of waste form during storage. Several methods, including the Taylor model, Sachs model, self-consistent model, and statistical upscaling method, were developed and implemented. Microstructure based finite element method (FEM) prediction results were used to as benchmark to determine the accuracy of the different upscaling methods. Micrographs from waste forms with varying waste loadings were used in the prediction of thermal conductivity in FEM and homogenization methods. Prediction results demonstrated that in term of efficiency, boundary models (e.g., Taylor model and Sachs model) are stronger than the self-consistent model, statistical upscaling method, and finite element method. However, when balancing computational efficiency and accuracy, statistical upscaling is a useful method in predicting effective thermal conductivity for nuclear waste forms.

Li, Dongsheng; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variations in eastern Indian Ocean upper-ocean thermal properties are assessed for the period 19702004, with a particular focus on asymmetric features related to opposite phases of Indian Ocean dipole events, using high-resolution ocean model ...

Caroline C. Ummenhofer; Franziska U. Schwarzkopf; Gary Meyers; Erik Behrens; Arne Biastoch; Claus W. Bning

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Assessment of thermal analysis software for the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management  

SciTech Connect

This assessment uses several recent assessments and the more general code compilations that have been completed to produce a list of 116 codes that can be used for thermal analysis. This list is then compared with criteria prepared especially for the Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (DOE/OCRWM). Based on these criteria, fifteen codes are narrowed to three primary codes and four secondary codes for use by the OCRWM thermal analyst. The analyst is cautioned that since no single code is sufficient for all applications, a code must be selected based upon the predominate heat transfer mode of the problem to be solved, but the codes suggested in this report have been used successfully for a range of OCRWM applications. The report concludes with a series of recommendations for additional work of which the major points include the following: The codes suggested by this report must be benchmarked with the existing US and international problems and validated when possible; An interactive code selection tool could be developed or, perhaps even more useful, a users group could be supported to ensure the proper selection of thermal codes and dissemination of information on the latest version; The status of the 116 codes identified by this report should be verified, and methods for maintaining the still active codes must be established; and special capabilities of each code in phase change, convection and radiation should be improved to better enable the thermal analyst to model OCRWM applications. 37 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

Williams, P.T.; Graham, R.F.; Lagerberg, G.N.; Chung, T.C.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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141

Assimilation of Subsurface Thermal Data into a Simple Ocean Model for the Initialization of an Intermediate Tropical Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Forecast Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An adjoint variational assimilation technique is used to assimilate observations of both the oceanic state and wind stress data into an intermediate coupled ENSO prediction model. This method of initialization is contrasted with the more usual ...

Richard Kleeman; Andrew M. Moore; Neville R. Smith

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Upper-Ocean Thermal Structure and the Western North Pacific Category 5 Typhoons. Part II: Dependence on Translation Speed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using new in situ ocean subsurface observations from the Argo floats, best-track typhoon data from the U.S. Joint Typhoon Warning Center, an ocean mixed layer model, and other supporting datasets, this work systematically explores the ...

I-I. Lin; Iam-Fei Pun; Chun-Chieh Wu

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Application of thermogravimetric analysis to study the thermal degradation of solid and liquid organic wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, the thermolysis of composite binary mixtures of refinery or coal-processing waste with waste biomass and D-grade (long-flame) coal was analyzed in order to increase the efficiency of the cothermolysis of chemically different organic wastes mainly because of the synergism of the thermolysis of mixture components and, correspondingly, the selectivity of formation of high-quality by-products (solid, gaseous, or liquid). A new approach to the analysis of thermogravimetric data was proposed and developed as applied to complex binary mixtures of carbon-containing materials. This approach was based on (1) the preliminary separation of the thermal degradation of individual carbon-containing mixture components into individual structural constituents and (2) the monitoring of the conversion of each particular structure fragment as a constituent of the mixtures in the course of the cothermolysis of the mixtures of starting components. Based on the approach developed, data on the main synergism effects in the course of cothermolysis in the binary test systems were obtained: the temperature regions of the appearance of these effects were distinguished, the main conclusions were made with respect to particular structure fragments in complex organic wastes responsible for the interaction of components in composite systems, and the directions (positive or negative) of changes in the yields of solid by-products and the degrees of effects (difference between the yields of cothermolysis by-products in each particular region of the appearance of synergistic effects in the systems) were determined. Additionally, the influence of alkali metal carbonate additives on synergistic effects in the interaction between binary system components under the process conditions of cothermolysis was analyzed.

E.S. Lygina; A.F. Dmitruk; S.B. Lyubchik; V.F. Tret'yakov [Tugan-Baranovsky State University of Economy and Trade, Donetsk (Ukraine)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Conceptual design of an open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion net power-producing experiment (OC-OTEC NPPE)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the conceptual design of an experiment to investigate heat and mass transfer and to assess the viability of open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC). The experiment will be developed in two stages, the Heat- and Mass-Transfer Experimental Apparatus (HMTEA) and the Net Power-Producing Experiment (NPPE). The goal for the HMTEA is to test heat exchangers. The goal for the NPPE is to experimentally verify OC-OTEC's feasibility by installing a turbine and testing the power-generating system. The design effort met the goals of both the HMTEA and the NPPE, and duplication of hardware was minimal. The choices made for the design resource water flow rates are consistent with the availability of cold and warm seawater as a result of the seawater systems upgrade carried out by the US Department of Energy (DOE), the state of Hawaii, and the Pacific International Center for High Technology Research. The choices regarding configuration of the system were made based on projected performance, degree of technical risk, schedule, and cost. The cost for the future phase of the design and the development of the HMTEA/NPPE is consistent with the projected future program funding levels. The HMTEA and NPPE were designed cooperatively by PICHTR, Argonne National Laboratory, and Solar Energy Research Institute under the guidance of DOE. The experiment will be located at the DOE's Seacoast Test Facility at the Natural Energy Laboratory of Hawaii, Kailua-Kona, Hawaii. 71 refs., 41 figs., 34 tabs.

Bharathan, D.; Green, H.J.; Link, H.F.; Parsons, B.K.; Parsons, J.M.; Zangrando, F.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Study of domestic social and economic impacts of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) commercial development. Volume II. Industry profiles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Econoimc profiles of the industries most affected by the construction, deployment, and operation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) powerplants are presented. Six industries which will contribute materials and/or components to the construction of OTEC plants have been identified and are profiled here. These industries are: steel industry, concrete industry, titanium metal industry, fabricated structural metals industry, fiber glass-reinforced plastics industry, and electrical transmission cable industry. The economic profiles for these industries detail the industry's history, its financial and economic characteristics, its technological and production traits, resource constraints that might impede its operation, and its relation to OTEC. Some of the historical data collected and described in the profile include output, value of shipments, number of firms, prices, employment, imports and exports, and supply-demand forecasts. For most of the profiled industries, data from 1958 through 1980 were examined. In addition, profiles are included on the sectors of the economy which will actualy construct, deploy, and supply the OTEC platforms.

None

1981-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

146

Ocean thermal energy conversion gas desorption studies. Volume 1. Design of experiments. [Open-cycle power systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seawater deaeration is a process affecting almost all proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) open-cycle power systems. If the noncondensable dissolved air is not removed from a power system, it will accumulate in thecondenser, reduce the effectiveness of condensation, and result in deterioration of system performance. A gas desorption study is being conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with the goal of mitigating these effects; this study is designed to investigate the vacuum deaeration process for low-temperature OTEC conditions where conventional steam stripping deaeration may not be applicable. The first in a series describing the ORNL studies, this report (1) considers the design of experiments and discusses theories of gas desorption, (2) reviews previous relevant studies, (3) describes the design of a gas desorption test loop, and (4) presents the test plan for achieving program objectives. Results of the first series of verification tests and the uncertainties encountered are also discussed. A packed column was employed in these verification tests and test data generally behaved as in previous similar studies. Results expressed as the height of transfer unit (HTU) can be correlated with the liquid flow rate by HTU = 4.93L/sup 0/ /sup 25/. End effects were appreciable for the vacuum deaeration system, and a correlation of them to applied vacuum pressure was derived.

Golshani, A.; Chen, F.C.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Marine pastures: a by-product of large (100 megawatt or larger) floating ocean-thermal power plants. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential biological productivity of an open-sea mariculture system utilizing the deep-sea water discharged from an ocean-thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plant was investigated. In a series of land-based studies, surface water was used to inoculate deep water and the primary production of the resultant blooms was investigated. Each cubic meter of deep water can produce approximately 2.34 g of phytoplankton protein, and that an OTEC plant discharging deep water at a rate of 4.5 x 10/sup 4/ m/sup 3/ min/sup -1/ could produce 5.3 x 10/sup 7/ kg of phytoplankton protein per 350-day year. A series of land-based shellfish studies indicated that, when fed at a constant rate of 1.83 x 10/sup -3/ g of protein per second per 70-140 g of whole wet weight, the clam, Tapes japonica, could convert the phytoplankton protein-nitrogen into shellfish meat protein-nitrogen with an efficiency of about 33 per cent. Total potential wet meat weight production from an OTEC plant pumping 4.5 x 10/sup 4/ m/sup 3/ min/sup -1/ is approximately 4.14 x 10/sup 8/ kg for a 350-day year. Various factors affecting the feasibility of open-sea mariculture are discussed. It is recommended that future work concentrate on a technical and economic analysis. (WDM)

Laurence, S.; Roels, O.A.

1976-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

148

Results of scoping tests for open-cycle OTEC (ocean thermal energy conversion) components operating with seawater  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents comprehensive documentation of the experimental research conducted on open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) components operating with seawater as a working fluid. The results of this research are presented in the context of previous analysis and fresh-water testing; they provide a basis for understanding and predicting with confidence the performance of all components of an OC-OTEC system except the turbine. Seawater tests have confirmed the results that were obtained in fresh-water tests and predicted by the analytical models of the components. A sound technical basis has been established for the design of larger systems in which net power will be produced for the first time from OC-OTEC technology. Design and operation of a complete OC-OTEC system that produces power will provide sufficient confidence to warrant complete transfer of OC-OTEC technology to the private sector. Each components performance is described in a separate chapter written by the principal investigator responsible for technical aspects of the specific tests. Chapters have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Zangrando, F; Bharathan, D; Green, H J; Link, H F; Parsons, B K; Parsons, J M; Pesaran, A A [Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA); Panchal, C B [Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Thermal and combined thermal and radiolytic reactions involving nitrous oxide, hydrogen, nitrogen, and ammonia in contact with tank 241-SY-101 simulated waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work described in this report was conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Flammable Gas Safety Project, the purpose of which is to develop information needed to support Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) in their efforts to ensure the safe interim storage of wastes at the Hanford Site. Described in this report are the results of tests to evaluate the rates of thermal and combined thermal and radiolytic reactions involving flammable gases in the presence of Tank 241-SY-101 simulated waste. Flammable gases generated by the radiolysis of water and by the thermal and radiolytic decomposition of organic waste constituents may themselves participate in further reactions. Examples include the decomposition of nitrous oxide to yield nitrogen and oxygen, the reaction of nitrous oxide and hydrogen to produce nitrogen and water, and the reaction of nitrogen and hydrogen to produce ammonia. The composition of the gases trapped in bubbles in the wastes might therefore change continuously as a function of the time that the gas bubbles are retained.

Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Evaluation of gasification and novel thermal processes for the treatment of municipal solid waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report identifies seven developers whose gasification technologies can be used to treat the organic constituents of municipal solid waste: Energy Products of Idaho; TPS Termiska Processor AB; Proler International Corporation; Thermoselect Inc.; Battelle; Pedco Incorporated; and ThermoChem, Incorporated. Their processes recover heat directly, produce a fuel product, or produce a feedstock for chemical processes. The technologies are on the brink of commercial availability. This report evaluates, for each technology, several kinds of issues. Technical considerations were material balance, energy balance, plant thermal efficiency, and effect of feedstock contaminants. Environmental considerations were the regulatory context, and such things as composition, mass rate, and treatability of pollutants. Business issues were related to likelihood of commercialization. Finally, cost and economic issues such as capital and operating costs, and the refuse-derived fuel preparation and energy conversion costs, were considered. The final section of the report reviews and summarizes the information gathered during the study.

Niessen, W.R.; Marks, C.H.; Sommerlad, R.E. [Camp Dresser and McKee, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)] [Camp Dresser and McKee, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Analysis of waste matrix material experiments mixed with highly enriched uranium on the thermal energy region  

SciTech Connect

The basic characteristics of waste materials such as silicon dioxide, aluminum and iron fueled with highly enriched uranium and moderated and reflected by polyethylene were investigated. These critical mass experiments were performed at the Los Alamos Criticality Experiments Facility (LACEF) on the Planet critical assembly. The primary intention of these experiments is to provide supplementary data that can be used to validate and improve criticality data for the Yucca Mountain and the Hanford Storage Waste Tanks Projects. The secondary intention of these experiments is to reduce the H/U ratio and increase the waste material/U ratio from previously published experiments. These experiments were designed to supply data for interlaced waste material/Fuel/Moderator systems on the thermal region. The experiments contained silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}), aluminum (Al) and iron (Fe) mixed with 93.23% enriched uranium and moderated and reflected by polyethylene. A base case experiment was also performed with polyethylene-only. This analysis systematically examines uncertainties associated with the critical experiments as they affect the calculated multiplication factor. The systematic analysis is separated into uncertainties due to mass measurements, uncertainties due to fabrication and uncertainties due to composition. Each type of uncertainty is analyzed individually and a total combined uncertainty is derived. The SiO{sub 2}-HEU experiment had a measured k{sub eff} of 0.993, the Al-HEU experiment had a measured k{sub eff} of 0.990, the Fe-HEU had a measured k{sub eff} of 1.000 and the polyethylene-HEU had a measured k{sub eff} of 1.0025. The calculated k{sub eff} values tend to agree well with the experimental values. The sensitivity analysis of these critical experiments yielded a total combined uncertainty on the measured k{sub eff} of {+-}0.0024 for SiO{sub 2}, of {+-}0.0028 for Al, of {+-}0.0026 for Fe, of {+-}0.0020 for polyethylene. (authors)

Loaiza, D.; Sanchez, R. [MS J562, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Potential use of wood and agriculture wastes as steam generator fuel for thermal enhanced oil recovery. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Enhanced oil recovery by steam injection methods produces over 200,000 barrels per day of crude oil in California. A sizeable portion of the produced crude, up to 40% for some projects, may be burned to generate steam for injection into the reservoir. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential to use wood and agriculture wastes to replace crude oil as steam generator fuel. The Bakersfield area of California's San Joaquin Valley is the focus for this paper. Production from thermal EOR methods centers around Bakersfield and agriculture and wood wastes are available from the San Joaquin Valley and the nearby Sierra Nevada mountains. This paper documents the production of waste materials by county, estimated energy value of each material, and estimated transportation cost for each material. Both agriculture and wood wastes were found to be available in sizeable quantities and could become attractive steam generation fuels. However, some qualifications need to be made on the use of these materials. Transportation costs will probably limit the range of shipping these materials to perhaps 50 to 100 miles. Availability is subject to competition from existing and developing uses of these materials, such as energy sources in their immediate production area. Existing steam generators probably cannot be retrofitted to burn these materials. Fluidized bed combustion, or low Btu gasification, may be a good technology for utilization. FBC or FBG could accept a variety of waste materials. This will be important because the amount of any single waste may not be large enough to support the energy requirements of a good size thermal f a good size thermal EOR operation.

Kosstrin, H.M.; McDonald, R.K.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Waste heat recovery system having thermal sleeve support for heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

A system for recovering waste heat from a stream of heated gas is disclosed. The system includes a convection heat transfer chamber, a boiler tank, and a plurality of heat pipes thermally interconnecting the convection heat transfer chamber with the boiler tank. Each of the heat pipes includes an evaporator section which is disposed in heat transfer relation with a stream of heated gas flowing through the convection heat transfer chamber, and a condenser section disposed in heat transfer relation with a volume of water contained within the boiler tank. The boiler tank is provided with a header plate having an array of heat pipe openings through which the heat pipes project. A heat pipe support sleeve is received in each heat pipe opening in sealed engagement with the header plate, with the heat pipes projecting through the support sleeves and thermally interconnecting the convection heat transfer chamber with the boiler tank. An intermediate portion of each heat pipe is received in sealed engagement with its associated support sleeve. In a preferred embodiment, heat transfer through the support sleeve is minimized in an arrangement in which each heat pipe opening is reduced by a stepped bore with the support sleeve connected in threaded, sealed engagement with the stepped bore. Futhermore, in this arrangement, the support sleeve has swaged end portions which project beyond the header plate and engage the heat pipe on opposite sides at points which are remote with respect to the support sleeve/header plate interface. One of the swages end portions is sealed against the heat pipe in a fluid-tight union within the boiler tank. The support sleeve is radially spaced with respect to the heat pipe, and is also radially spaced with respect to the heat pipe opening whereby heat transfer through the walls of the heat pipe to the support sleeve and to the header plate is minimized by concentric annular air gaps.

McCurley, J.

1984-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

154

Waste heat recovery system having thermal sleeve support for heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

A system for recovering waste heat from a stream of heated gas is disclosed. The system includes a convection heat transfer chamber, a boiler tank, and a plurality of heat pipes thermally interconnecting the convection heat transfer chamber with the boiler tank. Each of the heat pipes includes an evaporator section which is disposed in heat transfer relation with a stream of heated gas flowing through the convection heat transfer chamber, and a condenser section disposed in heat transfer relation with a volume of water contained within the boiler tank. The boiler tank is provided with a header plate having an array of heat pipe openings through which the heat pipes project. A heat pipe support sleeve is received in each heat pipe opening in sealed engagement with the header plate, with the heat pipes projecting through the support sleeves and thermally interconnecting the convection heat transfer chamber with the boiler tank. An intermediate portion of each heat pipe is received in sealed engagement with its associated support sleeve. In a preferred embodiment, heat transfer through the support sleeve is minimized in an arrangement in which each heat pipe opening is reduced by a stepped bore with the support sleeve connected in threaded, sealed engagement with the stepped bore. Furthermore, in this arrangement, the support sleeve has swaged end portions which project beyond the header plate and engage the heat pipe on opposite sides at points which are remote with respect to the support sleeve/header plate interface. One of the swaged end portions is sealed against the heat pipe in a fluid-tight union within the boiler tank. The support sleeve is radially spaced with respect to the heat pipe, and is also radially spaced with respect to the heat pipe opening whereby heat transfer through the walls of the heat pipe to the support sleeve and to the header plate is minimized by concentric annular air gaps.

McCurley, J.

1984-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

155

Waste heat recovery system having thermal sleeve support for heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

A system for recovering waste heat from a stream of heated gas is disclosed. The system includes a convection heat transfer chamber, a boiler tank, and a plurality of heat pipes thermally interconnecting the convection heat transfer chamber with the boiler tank. Each of the heat pipes includes an evaporator section which is disposed in heat transfer relation with a stream of heated gas flowing through the convection heat transfer chamber, and a condenser section disposed in heat transfer relation with a volume of water contained within the boiler tank. The boiler tank is provided with a header plate having an array of heat pipe openings through which the heat pipes project. A heat pipe support sleeve is received in each heat pipe opening in sealed engagement with the header plate, with the heat pipes projecting through the support sleeves and thermally interconnecting the convection heat transfer chamber with the boiler tank. An intermediate portion of each heat pipe is received in sealed engagement with its associated support sleeve. In a preferred embodiment, heat transfer through the support sleeve is minimized in an arrangement in which each heat pipe opening is reduced by a stepped bore with the support sleeve connected in threaded, sealed engagement with the stepped bore. Furthermore, in this arrangement, the support sleeve has swaged end portions which project beyond the header plate and engage the heat pipe on opposite sides at points which are remote with respect to the support sleeve/header plate interface. One of the swaged end portions is sealed against the heat pipe in a fluid-tight union within the boiler tank. The support sleeve is radially spaced with respect to the heat pipe and is also radially spaced with respect to the heat pipe opening whereby heat transfer through the walls of the heat pipe to the support sleeve and to the header plate is minimized by concentric annular air gaps.

McCurley, J.

1984-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

156

Waste heat recovery system having thermal sleeve support for heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

A system for recovering waste heat from a stream of heated gas is disclosed. The system includes a convection heat transfer chamber, a boiler tank, and a plurality of heat pipes thermally interconnecting the convection heat transfer chamber with the boiler tank. Each of the heat pipes includes an evaporator section which is disposed in heat transfer relation with a stream of heated gas flowing through the convection heat transfer chamber, and a condenser section disposed in heat transfer relation with a volume of water contained within the boiler tank. The boiler tank is provided with a header plate having an array of heat pipe openings through which the heat pipes project. A heat support sleeve is received in each heat pipe opening in sealed engagement with the header plate, with the heat pipes projecting through the support sleeves and thermally interconnecting the convection heat transfer chamber with the boiler tank. An intermediate portion of each heat pipe is received in sealed engagement with its associated support sleeve. In a preferred embodiment, heat transfer through the support sleeve is minimized in an arrangement in which each heat pipe opening is reduced by a stepped bore with the support sleeve connected in threaded, sealed engagement with the stepped bore. Furthermore, in this arrangement, the support sleeve has swaged end portions which project beyond the header plate and engage the heat pipe on opposite sides at points which are remote with respect to the support sleeve/header plate interface. One of the swaged end portions is sealed against the heat pipe in a fluid-tight union within the boiler tank. The support sleeve is radially spaced with respect to the heat pipe, and is also radially spaced with respect to the heat pipe opening whereby heat transfer through the walls of the heat pipe to the support sleeve and to the header plate is minimized by concentric annular air gaps.

McCurley, J.

1984-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

157

Combined thermal storage pond and dry cooling tower waste heat rejection system for solar-thermal steam-electric power plants. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal performance and economics of the combined thermal storage pond and dry cooling tower waste heat rejection system concept for solar-thermal steam-electric plants have been evaluated. Based on the computer simulation of the operation of southwest-sited solar-thermal plants, it has been determined that the combined pond-tower concept has significant cost and performance advantages over conventional dry cooling systems. Use of a thermal storage pond as a component of the dry cooling system allows a significant reduction in the required dry cooling heat exchange capacity and the associated parasitic power consumption. Importantly, it has been concluded that the combined pond-tower dry cooling system concept can be employed to economically maintain steam condensing temperatures at levels normally achieved with conventional evaporative cooling systems. An evaluation of alternative thermal storage pond design concepts has revealed that a stratified vertical-flow cut-and-fill reservoir with conventional membrane lining and covering would yield the best overall system performance at the least cost.

Guyer, E.C.; Bourne, J.G.; Brownell, D.L.; Rose, R.M.

1979-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

158

The Effect of Salinity on the Wind-Driven Circulation and the Thermal Structure of the Upper Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies of the effect of a freshening of the surface waters in high latitudes on the oceanic circulation have thus far focused almost entirely on the deep thermohaline circulation and its poleward heat transport. Here it is demonstrated, by means ...

A. V. Fedorov; R. C. Pacanowski; S. G. Philander; G. Boccaletti

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

On the Nature and Causes of Large-Scale Thermal Variability in the Central North Pacific Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-range Naval aircraft using AXBT's obtained meridional temperature sections from the central Pacific Ocean along 158 and 170W between 30 and 50N at approximately monthly intervals between November 1974 and April 1977 (29 months). Analyses ...

T. P. Barnett

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

A multi-criteria assessment of scenarios on thermal processing of infectious hospital wastes: A case study for Central Macedonia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Greece more than 14,000 tonnes of infectious hospital waste are produced yearly; a significant part of it is still mismanaged. Only one off-site licensed incineration facility for hospital wastes is in operation, with the remaining of the market covered by various hydroclave and autoclave units, whereas numerous problems are still generally encountered regarding waste segregation, collection, transportation and management, as well as often excessive entailed costs. Everyday practices still include dumping the majority of solid hospital waste into household disposal sites and landfills after sterilization, still largely without any preceding recycling and separation steps. Discussed in the present paper are the implemented and future treatment practices of infectious hospital wastes in Central Macedonia; produced quantities are reviewed, actual treatment costs are addressed critically, whereas the overall situation in Greece is discussed. Moreover, thermal treatment processes that could be applied for the treatment of infectious hospital wastes in the region are assessed via the multi-criteria decision method Analytic Hierarchy Process. Furthermore, a sensitivity analysis was performed and the analysis demonstrated that a centralized autoclave or hydroclave plant near Thessaloniki is the best performing option, depending however on the selection and weighing of criteria of the multi-criteria process. Moreover the study found that a common treatment option for the treatment of all infectious hospital wastes produced in the Region of Central Macedonia, could offer cost and environmental benefits. In general the multi-criteria decision method, as well as the conclusions and remarks of this study can be used as a basis for future planning and anticipation of the needs for investments in the area of medical waste management.

Karagiannidis, A. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Papageorgiou, A., E-mail: apapa@auth.g [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Perkoulidis, G. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Sanida, G. [3rd Health Region Administration (Macedonia), 16 Aristotelous Str, GR-54623 Thessaloniki (Greece); Samaras, P. [Technological Education Institution of West Macedonia, Department of Pollution Control Technologies, 50100 Kozani (Greece)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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161

Treatment of electronic waste to recover metal values using thermal plasma coupled with acid leaching - A response surface modeling approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sentences/phrases were modified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Necessary discussions for different figures were included. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer More discussion have been included on the flue gas analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Queries to both the reviewers have been given. - Abstract: The global crisis of the hazardous electronic waste (E-waste) is on the rise due to increasing usage and disposal of electronic devices. A process was developed to treat E-waste in an environmentally benign process. The process consisted of thermal plasma treatment followed by recovery of metal values through mineral acid leaching. In the thermal process, the E-waste was melted to recover the metal values as a metallic mixture. The metallic mixture was subjected to acid leaching in presence of depolarizer. The leached liquor mainly contained copper as the other elements like Al and Fe were mostly in alloy form as per the XRD and phase diagram studies. Response surface model was used to optimize the conditions for leaching. More than 90% leaching efficiency at room temperature was observed for Cu, Ni and Co with HCl as the solvent, whereas Fe and Al showed less than 40% efficiency.

Rath, Swagat S., E-mail: swagat.rath@gmail.com [Institute of Minerals and Materials Technology (CSIR), Bhubaneswar 751 013, Odisha (India); Nayak, Pradeep; Mukherjee, P.S.; Roy Chaudhury, G.; Mishra, B.K. [Institute of Minerals and Materials Technology (CSIR), Bhubaneswar 751 013, Odisha (India)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Preliminary one-dimensional thermal analysis of waste emplacement in tuffs  

SciTech Connect

One-dimensional calculations of near-field temperatures resulting from waste emplacement in a multiple-layered tuff stratigraphy are presented. Results indicate a marked sensitivity of peak temperatures to assignment of in-situ fluid pressure, geothermal-heat flux, waste type, and location of waste relative to a specific stratigraphic discontinuity. Under the criterion that allowable initial-power densities are limited by the occurrence of boiling at a distance of 10 m from emplaced waste, allowable power densities are calculated to range up to 150 kW/acre or more, depending upon geothermal heat flux and waste type.

Bulmer, B.M.; Lappin, A.R.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Ocean thermal energy conversion ecological data report from OSS Researcher in Gulf of Mexico, (GOTEC-01), July 12-23, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ecological measurements important for environmental assessment of the effect of an operating Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion plant were initiated in July 1977 at the proposed Gulf of Mexico site off the coasts of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida. The initial cruise of the OSS Researcher, in a joint effort with the Atlantic Oceanic and Meteorological Laboratories (AOML) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) took place from 12 to 23 July 1977. The measurements were taken at 15 oceanographic stations to a maximum depth of 1000 m. Water was analyzed for trace metals, nutrients and chlorophyll a and ATP. Physical data, salinity and dissolved oxygen measurements were supplied by NOAA-AOML. Two bioassays were carried out using indigenous phytoplankton to estimate the effect of deep water on the rates of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ uptake of photic zone algae. The Deep Scattering Layer (DSL) was monitored at the site by a continuously recording 12 kHz depth sounder at the Mobile site. This report presents data collected during the cruise.

Quinby-Hunt, M.S. (comp.)

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Short-Term Climatic Variability in the Thermal Structure of the Pacific Ocean during 197982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Short-term climatic variability in both sea surface temperature (SST) and vertically averaged temperature over the upper 400 m of ocean (Tav) is mapped over the Pacific from 20S to 50N each bimonth for four years from 1979 to 1982, leading up ...

Warren B. White; Gary A. Meyers; Jean Rene Donguy; Stephen E. Pazan

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Use of thermal analysis techniques (TG-DSC) for the characterization of diverse organic municipal waste streams to predict biological stability prior to land application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal analysis was used to assess stability and composition of organic matter in three diverse municipal waste streams. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results were compared with C mineralization during 90-day incubation, FTIR and {sup 13}C NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal analysis reflected the differences between the organic wastes before and after the incubation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The calculated energy density showed a strong correlation with cumulative respiration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conventional and thermal methods provide complimentary means of characterizing organic wastes. - Abstract: The use of organic municipal wastes as soil amendments is an increasing practice that can divert significant amounts of waste from landfill, and provides a potential source of nutrients and organic matter to ameliorate degraded soils. Due to the high heterogeneity of organic municipal waste streams, it is difficult to rapidly and cost-effectively establish their suitability as soil amendments using a single method. Thermal analysis has been proposed as an evolving technique to assess the stability and composition of the organic matter present in these wastes. In this study, three different organic municipal waste streams (i.e., a municipal waste compost (MC), a composted sewage sludge (CS) and a thermally dried sewage sludge (TS)) were characterized using conventional and thermal methods. The conventional methods used to test organic matter stability included laboratory incubation with measurement of respired C, and spectroscopic methods to characterize chemical composition. Carbon mineralization was measured during a 90-day incubation, and samples before and after incubation were analyzed by chemical (elemental analysis) and spectroscopic (infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance) methods. Results were compared with those obtained by thermogravimetry (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques. Total amounts of CO{sub 2} respired indicated that the organic matter in the TS was the least stable, while that in the CS was the most stable. This was confirmed by changes detected with the spectroscopic methods in the composition of the organic wastes due to C mineralization. Differences were especially pronounced for TS, which showed a remarkable loss of aliphatic and proteinaceous compounds during the incubation process. TG, and especially DSC analysis, clearly reflected these differences between the three organic wastes before and after the incubation. Furthermore, the calculated energy density, which represents the energy available per unit of organic matter, showed a strong correlation with cumulative respiration. Results obtained support the hypothesis of a potential link between the thermal and biological stability of the studied organic materials, and consequently the ability of thermal analysis to characterize the maturity of municipal organic wastes and composts.

Fernandez, Jose M., E-mail: joseman@sas.upenn.edu [Department of Earth and Environmental Science, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6316 (United States); Plaza, Cesar; Polo, Alfredo [Instituto de Ciencias Agrarias, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 115 dpdo., 28006 Madrid (Spain); Plante, Alain F. [Department of Earth and Environmental Science, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6316 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

166

MECHANICAL AND THERMAL DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOR RADIOACTIVE WASTE REPOSITORIES IN HARD ROCK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

KBS): "Handling of Spent Nuclear Fuel and Final Storage ofionwith the Swedish Nuclear Fuel Supply Company. REFERENCESReport of ctltdy Group on Nuclear Fuel Cycles and Waste

Cook, N.G.W.; Witherspoon, P.A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

EA-1135: Offsite Thermal Treatment of Low-level Mixed Waste, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to treat contact-handled low-level mixed waste, containing polychlorinated biphenyls and other organics, to meet existing regulatory...

168

Yard-waste compost evaluation for soil amendment utilization| Elemental, thermal, and infrared analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This research generates analytical criteria for the utilization of Northern California yard-waste composts, regardless of the samples feedstock, treatment facility, or final form. Several (more)

Flock, Rebecca J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Ocean Energy Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ocean Energy Technology Basics Ocean Energy Technology Basics Ocean Energy Technology Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:18pm Addthis Text Version Photo of low waves in the ocean. A dock is visible in the background. Oceans cover more than 70% of the Earth's surface. As the world's largest solar collectors, oceans contain thermal energy from the sun and produce mechanical energy from tides and waves. Even though the sun affects all ocean activity, the gravitational pull of the moon primarily drives tides, and wind powers ocean waves. Learn more about: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy Ocean Resources Addthis Related Articles Energy Department Releases New Energy 101 Video on Ocean Power A map generated by Georgia Tech's tidal energy resource database shows mean current speed of tidal streams. The East Coast, as shown above, has strong tides that could be tapped to produce energy. | Photo courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology

170

Ocean thermal energy conversion preliminary data report for the November 1977 GOTEC-02 cruise to the Gulf of Mexico Mobile Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the second in a series of preliminary data reports from cruises to potential Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites in the Gulf of Mexico. The data are from the GOTEC-02 cruise to a site at approximately 29/sup 0/N, 88/sup 0/W, the Mobile Site. Twelve oceanographic stations were visited. Due to bad weather, the results are scanty. The reader will note that much of the data is questionable. Current meter results are presented elsewhere (Molinari, Hazelworth and Ortman, 1979). Determinations of the biomass indicators - chlorophyll a, phaeophytins and adenosine triphosphate - and zooplankton, are presented. Results were generally those that might have been predicted from previous studies in the area.

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Molten Salt Oxidation: A Thermal Technology for Waste Treatment and Demilitarization  

SciTech Connect

MSO is a good alternative to incineration for the treatment of a variety of organic wastes including obsolete explosives, low-level mixed waste streams, PCB contaminated oils, spent resins and carbon. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has demonstrated the MSO process for the effective destruction of explosives, explosives-contaminated materials, and other wastes on a 1.5 kg/hr bench-scale unit and in an integrated MSO facility capable of treating 8 kg/hr of low-level radioactive mixed wastes. LLNL, under the direction and support of the Joint Demilitarization Technology (JDT) program, is currently building an integrated MSO plant for destroying explosives, explosives-contaminated sludge and explosives-contaminated activated charcoal. In a parallel effort, LLNL also provides technical support to DOE for the implementation of the MSO technology at industrial scale at Richland, Washington. Over 30 waste streams have been demonstrated with LLNL-built MSO systems. In this paper we will present our latest experimental data, our operational experience with MSO and also discuss its process capabilities.

Hsu, P C; Watkins, B; Pruneda, C; Kwak, S

2001-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

172

Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the modeling work by Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. to simulate the biochemical effects of of the nutrient-enhanced seawater plumes that are discharged by one or several 100 megawatt OTEC plants. The modeling is needed to properly design OTEC plants that can operate sustainably with acceptably low biological impact. In order to quantify the effect of discharge configuration and phytoplankton response, Makai Ocean Engineering implemented a biological and physical model for the waters surrounding O`ahu, Hawai`i, using the EPA-approved Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC). Each EFDC grid cell was approximately 1 square kilometer by 20 meters deep, and used a time step of three hours. The biological model was set up to simulate the biochemical response for three classes of organisms: Picoplankton (< 2 um) such as prochlorococccus, nanoplankton (2-20 um), and microplankton (> 20 um) e.g., diatoms. The dynamic biological phytoplankton model was calibrated using chemical and biological data collected for the Hawaii Ocean Time Series (HOTS) project. Peer review of the biological modeling was performed. The physical oceanography model uses boundary conditions from a surrounding Hawai'i Regional Ocean Model, (ROM) operated by the University of Hawai`i and the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration. The ROM provided tides, basin scale circulation, mesoscale variability, and atmospheric forcing into the edges of the EFDC computational domain. This model is the most accurate and sophisticated Hawai'ian Regional Ocean Model presently available, assimilating real-time oceanographic observations, as well as model calibration based upon temperature, current and salinity data collected during 2010 near the simulated OTEC site. The ROM program manager peer-reviewed Makai's implementation of the ROM output into our EFDC model. The supporting oceanographic data was collected for a Naval Facilities Engineering Command / Makai project. Results: The model was run for a 100 MW OTEC Plant consisting of four separate ducts, discharging a total combined flow rate of 420 m3/s of warm water and 320 m3/s of cold water in a mixed discharge at 70 meters deep. Each duct was assumed to have a discharge port diameter of 10.5m producing a downward discharge velocity of about 2.18 m/s. The natural system, as measured in the HOTS program, has an average concentration of 10-15 mgC/m3. To calibrate the biological model, we first ran the model with no OTEC plant and varied biological parameters until the simulated data was a good match to the HOTS observations. This modeling showed that phytoplankton concentration were patchy and highly dynamic. The patchiness was a good match with the data variability observed within the HOTS data sets. We then ran the model with simulated OTEC intake and discharge flows and associated nutrients. Directly under the OTEC plant, the near-field plume has an average terminal depth of 172 meters, with a volumetric dilution of 13:1. The average terminal plume temperature was 19.8oC. Nitrate concentrations are 1 to 2 umol/kg above ambient. The advecting plume then further dilutes to less than 1 umol/kg above ambient within a few kilometers downstream, while remaining at depth. Because this terminal near-field plume is well below the 1% light limited depths (~120m), no immediate biological utilization of the nutrients occurs. As the nitrate is advected and dispersed downstream, a fraction of the deep ocean nutrients (< 0.5 umol/kg perturbation) mix upward where they are utilized by the ambient phytoplankton population. This occurs approximately twenty-five kilometers downstream from the plant at 110 - 70 meters depth. For pico-phytoplankton, modeling results indicate that this nutrient perturbation causes a phytoplankton perturbation of approximately 1 mgC/m3 (~10% of average ambient concentrations) that covers an area 10x5 km in size at the 70 to 90m depth. Thus, the perturbations are well within the natural variability of the system, generally corresponding to a 10 to 15% increase above the a

PAT GRANDELLI, P.E.; GREG ROCHELEAU; JOHN HAMRICK, Ph.D.; MATT CHURCH, Ph.D.; BRIAN POWELL, Ph.D.

2012-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

173

Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the modeling work by Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. to simulate the biochemical effects of of the nutrient-enhanced seawater plumes that are discharged by one or several 100 megawatt OTEC plants. The modeling is needed to properly design OTEC plants that can operate sustainably with acceptably low biological impact. In order to quantify the effect of discharge configuration and phytoplankton response, Makai Ocean Engineering implemented a biological and physical model for the waters surrounding O`ahu, Hawai`i, using the EPA-approved Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC). Each EFDC grid cell was approximately 1 square kilometer by 20 meters deep, and used a time step of three hours. The biological model was set up to simulate the biochemical response for three classes of organisms: Picoplankton ( 20 um) e.g., diatoms. The dynamic biological phytoplankton model was calibrated using chemical and biological data collected for the Hawaii Ocean Time Series (HOTS) project. Peer review of the biological modeling was performed. The physical oceanography model uses boundary conditions from a surrounding Hawai'i Regional Ocean Model, (ROM) operated by the University of Hawai`i and the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration. The ROM provided tides, basin scale circulation, mesoscale variability, and atmospheric forcing into the edges of the EFDC computational domain. This model is the most accurate and sophisticated Hawai'ian Regional Ocean Model presently available, assimilating real-time oceanographic observations, as well as model calibration based upon temperature, current and salinity data collected during 2010 near the simulated OTEC site. The ROM program manager peer-reviewed Makai's implementation of the ROM output into our EFDC model. The supporting oceanographic data was collected for a Naval Facilities Engineering Command / Makai project. Results: The model was run for a 100 MW OTEC Plant consisting of four separate ducts, discharging a total combined flow rate of 420 m3/s of warm water and 320 m3/s of cold water in a mixed discharge at 70 meters deep. Each duct was assumed to have a discharge port diameter of 10.5m producing a downward discharge velocity of about 2.18 m/s. The natural system, as measured in the HOTS program, has an average concentration of 10-15 mgC/m3. To calibrate the biological model, we first ran the model with no OTEC plant and varied biological parameters until the simulated data was a good match to the HOTS observations. This modeling showed that phytoplankton concentration were patchy and highly dynamic. The patchiness was a good match with the data variability observed within the HOTS data sets. We then ran the model with simulated OTEC intake and discharge flows and associated nutrients. Directly under the OTEC plant, the near-field plume has an average terminal depth of 172 meters, with a volumetric dilution of 13:1. The average terminal plume temperature was 19.8oC. Nitrate concentrations are 1 to 2 umol/kg above ambient. The advecting plume then further dilutes to less than 1 umol/kg above ambient within a few kilometers downstream, while remaining at depth. Because this terminal near-field plume is well below the 1% light limited depths (~120m), no immediate biological utilization of the nutrients occurs. As the nitrate is advected and dispersed downstream, a fraction of the deep ocean nutrients (< 0.5 umol/kg perturbation) mix upward where they are utilized by the ambient phytoplankton population. This occurs approximately twenty-five kilometers downstream from the plant at 110 - 70 meters depth. For pico-phytoplankton, modeling results indicate that this nutrient perturbation causes a phytoplankton perturbation of approximately 1 mgC/m3 (~10% of average ambient concentrations) that covers an area 10x5 km in size at the 70 to 90m depth. Thus, the perturbations are well within the natural variability of the system, generally corresponding to a 10 to 15% increase above the a

PAT GRANDELLI, P.E.; GREG ROCHELEAU; JOHN HAMRICK, Ph.D.; MATT CHURCH, Ph.D.; BRIAN POWELL, Ph.D.

2012-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

174

Investigation of flammable gas and thermal safety issues for retrieval of waste from Tank 241-AN-105  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of this report is to identify and resolve some of the flammable gas and thermal safety issues potentially associated with the retrieval of waste from Tank 241-AN-105 (AN-105), which is the first double-shell tank scheduled for waste retrieval at Hanford. The planned retrieval scenario includes the following steps in AN-105: (1) degas the tank using two submerged mixing pumps, (2) turn off the mixer pump(s) and allow any suspended solids to settle, (3) decant the supernatant to the intermediate feed staging tank(s) (IFSTs) (AP-102 and/or AP-104) using water/caustic dilution at the transfer pump inlet, (4) add the remaining dilution water/caustic to the slurry remaining in AN-105, (5) mix the tank with the mixer pump(s) until the soluble solids dissolve, (6) turn off the mixer pump(s) and let the insoluble solids settle, and (7) decant the new supernatant to the IFST(s), leaving the insoluble solids behind. Three waste retrieval safety issues are addressed in this report. They are (1) the controlled degassing of AN-105 to ensure that the headspace remains <25% of the lower flammability limit (LFL), (2) an assessment of how dissolved gas (mainly ammonia) released during the transfer of the supernatant in AN-105 to the IFSTs and the water/caustic dilution of the remaining slurry in AN-105 will affect the flammability in these tanks; and (3) an assessment of the maximum waste temperatures that might occur in AN-105 during retrieval operations.

Caley, S.M.; Stewart, C.W.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Cuta, J.M.; Mahoney, L.A.; Panisko, F.E.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

INEL Operable Unit 7-13 Retrieval/Ex Situ Thermal Treatment configuration options: INEL Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Systems Analysis project  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) Systems Analysis project is to identify and evaluate cradle-to-grave systems for the remediation of Transuranic (TRU)Contaminated Waste Pits and Trenches within the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The BWID program will use the results of the BWID Systems Analysis in conjunction with identified Department of Energy (DOE) Complex buried waste needs to develop a long-term strategy for improving buried waste remediation capabilities throughout the DOE system. This report presents Buried Waste Retrieval/Ex Situ Thermal Treatment configuration option concepts in the form of block diagrams. These configuration options are: Retrieval/Melter Treatment; Retrieval/Metal Sort/Thermal Treatment; Retrieval/No Sort/Incineration/Melter Treatment; Retrieval/Interim Storage/Melter Treatment; Retrieval/Interim Storage/Metal Sort/Thermal Treatment; and Retrieval/Interim Storage/No Sort/Incineration/Melter Treatment. Each option is presented as a complete end-to-end system.

Richardson, J.G.; Rudin, M.J.; O' Brien, M.C.; Morrison, J.L.; Raivo, B.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Preliminary design for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Stationkeeping Subsystem (SKSS). Task IV. Development and testing recommendations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The preliminary designs of Stationkeeping Subsystems (SKSS) for the OTEC Modular Experiment Plant are being prepared for a barge and spar platform. The SKSS selected by NOAA for the barge is a multiple anchor leg mooring with active tensioning (MAL), while that for the spar is a tension anchor leg (TAL) moor. The development and testing program required to provide design data and to validate performance predictions is described. Basic assumptions are made with regard to site characteristics, behavior of the SKSS and platform in the sea state, and characteristics of SKSS components. The test program is intended to provide the data necessary to confirm assumptions or to support design revisions. The testing program for the multiple anchor leg system is considered first, followed by the tension anchor leg program. Development and testing are recommended in the areas of materials, components and procedures which are beyond modest extrapolation of current ocean engineering practice. (WHK)

None

1979-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

177

Organic tank safety project: Preliminary results of energetics and thermal behavior studies of model organic nitrate and/or nitrite mixtures and a simulated organic waste  

SciTech Connect

As a result of years of production and recovery of nuclear defense materials and subsequent waste management at the Hanford Site, organic-bearing radioactive high-level wastes (HLW) are currently stored in large (up to 3. ML) single-shell storage tanks (SSTs). Because these wastes contain both fuels (organics) and the oxidants nitrate and nitrite, rapid energetic reactions at certain conditions could occur. In support of Westinghouse Hanford Company`s (WHC) efforts to ensure continued safe storage of these organic- and oxidant-bearing wastes and to define the conditions necessary for reactions to occur, we measured the thermal sensitivities and thermochemical and thermokinetic properties of mixtures of selected organics and sodium nitrate and/or nitrite and a simulated Hanford organic-bearing waste using thermoanalytical technologies. These thermoanalytical technologies are used by chemical reactivity hazards evaluation organizations within the chemical industry to assess chemical reaction hazards.

Scheele, R.D.; Sell, R.L.; Sobolik, J.L.; Burger, L.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Environmental Assessment Offsite Thermal Treatment of Low-Level Mixed Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) needs to demonstrate the economics and feasibility of offsite commercial treatment of contact-handled low-level mixed waste (LLMW), containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBS) and other organics, to meet existing regulatory standards for eventual disposal.

N /A

1999-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

179

Isolation of Metals from Liquid Wastes: Reactive Scavenging in Turbulent Thermal Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Overall project demonstrated that toxic metals (cesium Cs and strontium Sr) in aqueous and organic wastes can be isolated from the environment through reaction with kaolinite based sorbent substrates in high temperature reactor environments. In addition, a state-of-the art laser diagnostic tool to measure droplet characteristic in practical 'dirty' laboratory environments was developed, and was featured on the cover of a recent edition of the scientific journal ''applied Spectroscopy''. Furthermore, great strides have been made in developing a theoretical model that has the potential to allow prediction of the position and life history of every particle of waste in a high temperature, turbulent flow field, a very challenging problem involving as it does, the fundamentals of two phase turbulence and of particle drag physics.

Jost O.L. Wendt; Alan R. Kerstein; Alexander Scheeline; Arne Pearlstein; William Linak

2003-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

180

Rankine cycle energy conversion system design considerations for low and intermediate temperature sensible heat sources. Geothermal, waste heat, and solar thermal conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Design considerations are described for energy conversion systems for low and intermediate temperature sensible heat sources such as found in geothermal, waste heat, and solar-thermal applications. It is concluded that the most cost effective designs for the applications studied did not require the most efficient thermodynamic cycle, but that the efficiency of the energy conversion hardware can be a key factor.

Abbin, J.P. Jr.

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power system development (PSD) II. Preliminary design report. Appendix II: supporting data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The trade studies, calculations, and reports which provide the rationale for design conclusions for the 10 MWe OTEC power system are presented in this volume. These appendices include: (1) system design and optimization model; (2) system off-design performance computer model; (3) seawater system dynamics; (4) system mechanical design studies; (5) electrical design studies; (6) structural design studies; (7) tube cleaner design report and proposed brush test program; (8) heat exchangers: mechanical design; (9) heat exchangers: thermal hydraulic computer model; (10) heat exchangers: manufacturing flow plan; (11) heat exchangers: installation and removal procedures; (12) heat exchangers: stainless steel conceptual design; (13) heat exchangers: cost studies; (14)heat exchangers: materials selection and corrosion; and (15) heat exchangers: quality assurance. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

182

Guideline for benchmarking thermal treatment systems for low-level mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

A process for benchmarking low-level mixed waste (LLMW) treatment technologies has been developed. When used in conjunction with the identification and preparation of surrogate waste mixtures, and with defined quality assurance and quality control procedures, the benchmarking process will effectively streamline the selection of treatment technologies being considered by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for LLMW cleanup and management. Following the quantitative template provided in the benchmarking process will greatly increase the technical information available for the decision-making process. The additional technical information will remove a large part of the uncertainty in the selection of treatment technologies. It is anticipated that the use of the benchmarking process will minimize technology development costs and overall treatment costs. In addition, the benchmarking process will enhance development of the most promising LLMW treatment processes and aid in transferring the technology to the private sector. To instill inherent quality, the benchmarking process is based on defined criteria and a structured evaluation format, which are independent of any specific conventional treatment or emerging process technology. Five categories of benchmarking criteria have been developed for the evaluation: operation/design; personnel health and safety; economics; product quality; and environmental quality. This benchmarking document gives specific guidance on what information should be included and how it should be presented. A standard format for reporting is included in Appendix A and B of this document. Special considerations for LLMW are presented and included in each of the benchmarking categories.

Hoffman, D.P.; Gibson, L.V. Jr.; Hermes, W.H. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bastian, R.E. [Focus Environmental, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Davis, W.T. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Isolation of Metals from Liquid Wastes: Reactive Scavenging in Turbulent Thermal Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sorption of cesium and strontium on kaolinite powders was investigated as a means to minimize the emissions of these metals during certain high temperature processes currently being developed to isolate and dispose of radiological and mixed wastes. In this work, non-radioactive aqueous cesium acetate or strontium acetate was atomized down the center of a natural gas flame supported on a variable-swirl burner in a refractory-lined laboratory-scale combustion facility. Kaolinite powder was injected at a post-flame location in the combustor. Cesium readily vaporizes in the high temperature regions of the combustor, but was reactively scavenged onto dispersed kaolinite. Global sorption mechanisms of cesium vapor on kaolinite were quantified, and are related to those available in the literature for sodium and lead. Both metal adsorption and substrate deactivation steps are important, and so there is an optimum temperature, between 1400 and 1500 K, at which maximum sorption occurs. The presence of chlorine inhibits cesium sorption. In contrast to cesium, and in the absence of chlorine, strontium was only partially vaporized and was, therefore, only partially scavengeable. The strontium data did not allow quantification of global kinetic mechanisms of interaction, although equilibrium arguments provided insight into the effects of chlorine on strontium sorption. These results have implications for the use of sorbents to control cesium and strontium emissions during high temperature waste processing including incineration and vitrification.

William Linak

2004-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

184

Thermal springs list for the United States; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Key to Geophysical Records Documentation No. 12  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The compilation has 1702 thermal spring locations in 23 of the 50 States, arranged alphabetically by State (Postal Service abbreviation) and degrees of latitude and longitude within the State. It shows spring name, surface temperature in degrees Fahrenheit and degrees Celsius; USGS Professional Paper 492 number, USGS Circular 790 number, NOAA number, north to south on each degree of latitude and longitude of the listed. USGS 1:250,000-scale (AMS) map; and the USGS topographic map coverage, 1:63360- or 1:62500-scale (15-minute) or 1:24000-scale (7.5-minute) quadrangle also included is an alphabetized list showing only the spring name and the State in which it is located. Unnamed springs are omitted. The list includes natural surface hydrothermal features: springs, pools, mud pots, mud volcanoes, geysers, fumaroles, and steam vents at temperature of 20{sup 0}C (68[sup 0}F) or greater. It does not include wells or mines, except at sites where they supplement or replace natural vents presently or recently active, or, in some places, where orifices are not distinguishable as natural or artificial. The listed springs are located on the USGS 1:250,000 (AMS) topographic maps. (MHR)

Berry, G.W.; Grim, P.J.; Ikelman, J.A. (comps.)

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Feasibility study for thermal treatment of solid tire wastes in Bangladesh by using pyrolysis technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study on the basis of lab data and available resources in Bangladesh, feasibility study has been carried out for pyrolysis process converting solid tire wastes into pyrolysis oils, solid char and gases. The process considered for detailed analysis was fixed-bed fire-tube heating pyrolysis reactor system. The comparative techno-economic assessment was carried out in US$ for three different sizes plants: medium commercial scale (144 tons/day), small commercial scale (36 tons/day), pilot scale (3.6 tons/day). The assessment showed that medium commercial scale plant was economically feasible, with the lowest unit production cost than small commercial and pilot scale plants for the production of crude pyrolysis oil that could be used as boiler fuel oil and for the production of upgraded liquid-products.

Islam, M.R., E-mail: mrislam1985@yahoo.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Rajshahi University of Engineering and Technology, Rajshahi 6204 (Bangladesh); Joardder, M.U.H.; Hasan, S.M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Rajshahi University of Engineering and Technology, Rajshahi 6204 (Bangladesh); Takai, K.; Haniu, H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University Corporation Kitami Institute of Technology, 165 Koen-cho, Kitami City, Hokkaido 090-8507 (Japan)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

Estimates of Cabbeling in the Global Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Owing to the larger thermal expansion coefficient at higher temperatures, more buoyancy is put into the ocean by heating than is removed by cooling at low temperatures. The authors show that, even with globally balanced thermal and haline surface ...

Julian J. Schanze; Raymond W. Schmitt

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Ocean Terracing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Artworks can improve humanity ability to apply macro-engineering principles which skirt or correct oceanographic problems impairing the economic usefulness of coastal land, the overhead airshed, and seawater temperature and salinity stability. A new form of Art, Ocean Art, is here proposed which centers on deliberate terracing of appropriate regions of our world ocean; a proposed example of macro-engineered useful Ocean Art is the technically possible 21-st Century terracing of the Mediterranean Sea. Ocean Art is applicable worldwide to places that might be practically improved by its judicious employment. Such Ocean Art may constitute an entirely unique category of solutions to coastal disaster prevention planning.

Richard Cathcart; Alexander Bolonkin

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

188

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power system development utilizing advanced, high-performance heat transfer techniques. Volume 1. Conceptual design report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is the development of a preliminary design for a full-sized, closed cycle, ammonia power system module for the 100 MWe OTEC Demonstration Plant. In turn, this Demonstration Plant is to demonstrate, by 1984, the operation and performance of an ocean thermal power plant having sufficiently advanced heat exchanger design to project economic viability for commercial utilization in the late 1980's and beyond. Included in this power system development are the preliminary designs for a proof-of-concept pilot plant and test article heat exchangers which are scaled in such a manner as to support a logically sequential, relatively low-cost development of the full-scale power system module. The conceptual designs are presented for the Demonstration Plant power module, the proof-of-concept pilot plant, and for a pair of test article heat exchangers. Costs associated with the design, development, fabrication, checkout, delivery, installation, and operation are included. The accompanying design and producibility studies on the full-scale power system module project the performance/economics for the commercial plant. This section of the report describes the full-size power system module, and summarizes the design parameters and associated costs for the Demonstration Plant module (prototype) and projects costs for commercial plants in production. The material presented is directed primarily toward the surface platform/ship basic reference hull designated for use during conceptual design; however, other containment vessels were considered during the design effort so that the optimum power system would not be unduly influenced or restricted. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

189

OceanEnergyMMS.p65  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minerals Management Service, U.S. Department of the Interior Ocean Energy PAGE 1 Minerals Management Service, U.S. Department of the Interior Ocean Energy PAGE 1 Teacher Guide .......................................................... 2 Related National Science Standards .......................... 3 Introduction to Ocean Energy .................................. 4 Petroleum & Natural Gas ......................................... 5 Natural Oil and Gas Seeps ........................................ 7 Methane Hydrates .................................................... 8 Solar Energy .............................................................. 9 Wind Energy ........................................................... 10 Wave Energy ........................................................... 11 OTEC: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion .............

190

Systems study of the feasibility of high-level nuclear waste fractionation for thermal stress control in a geologic repository: appendices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study assesses the benefits and costs of fractionating the cesium and strontium (Cs/Sr) components in commercial high-level waste (HLW) to a separate waste stream for the purpose of reducing geologic-repository thermal stresses in the region of the HLW. The major conclusion is that the Cs/Sr fractionation concept offers the prospect of a substantial total system cost advantage for HLW disposal if reduced HLW package temperatures in a basalt repository are desired. However there is no cost advantage if currently designated maximum design temperatures are acceptable. Aging the HLW for 50 to 100 years can accomplish similar results at equivalent or lower costs. Volume II contains appendices for: (1) thermal analysis supplement; (2) fractionation process experimental results supplement; (3) cost analysis supplement; and (4) radiological risk analysis supplement.

McKee, R.W.; Elder, H.K.; McCallum, R.F.; Silviera, D.J.; Swanson, J.L.; Wiles, L.E.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Flexible ocean upwelling pipe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, a cold water riser pipe is releasably supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. The pipe is substantially vertical and has its lower end far below the hull above the ocean floor. The pipe is defined essentially entirely of a material which has a modulus of elasticity substantially less than that of steel, e.g., high density polyethylene, so that the pipe is flexible and compliant to rather than resistant to applied bending moments. The position of the lower end of the pipe relative to the hull is stabilized by a weight suspended below the lower end of the pipe on a flexible line. The pipe, apart from the weight, is positively buoyant. If support of the upper end of the pipe is released, the pipe sinks to the ocean floor, but is not damaged as the length of the line between the pipe and the weight is sufficient to allow the buoyant pipe to come to a stop within the line length after the weight contacts the ocean floor, and thereafter to float submerged above the ocean floor while moored to the ocean floor by the weight. The upper end of the pipe, while supported by the hull, communicates to a sump in the hull in which the water level is maintained below the ambient water level. The sump volume is sufficient to keep the pipe full during heaving of the hull, thereby preventing collapse of the pipe.

Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Waste Heat Recovery and Recycling in Thermal Separation Processes: Distillation, Multi-Effect Evaporation (MEE) and Crystallization Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaporation and crystallization are key thermal separation processes for concentrating and purifying inorganic and organic products with energy consumption over 1,000 trillion Btu/yr. This project focused on a challenging task of recovering low-temperature latent heat that can have a paradigm shift in the way thermal process units will be designed and operated to achieve high-energy efficiency and significantly reduce the carbon footprint as well as water footprint. Moreover, this project has evaluated the technical merits of waste-heat powered thermal heat pumps for recovery of latent heat from distillation, multi-effect evaporation (MEE), and crystallization processes and recycling into the process. The Project Team has estimated the potential energy, economics and environmental benefits with the focus on reduction in CO2 emissions that can be realized by 2020, assuming successful development and commercialization of the technology being developed. Specifically, with aggressive industry-wide applications of heat recovery and recycling with absorption heat pumps, energy savings of about 26.7 trillion Btu/yr have been estimated for distillation process. The direct environmental benefits of this project are the reduced emissions of combustible products. The estimated major reduction in environmental pollutants in the distillation processes is in CO2 emission equivalent to 3.5 billion lbs/year. Energy consumption associated with water supply and treatments can vary between 1,900 kWh and 23,700 kWh per million-gallon water depending on sources of natural waters [US DOE, 2006]. Successful implementation of this technology would significantly reduce the demand for cooling-tower waters, and thereby the use and discharge of water treatment chemicals. The Project Team has also identified and characterized working fluid pairs for the moderate-temperature heat pump. For an MEE process, the two promising fluids are LiNO3+KNO3+NANO3 (53:28:19 ) and LiNO3+KNO3+NANO2(53:35:12). And for an H2O2 distillation process, the two promising fluids are Trifluoroethanol (TFE) + Triethylene Glycol Dimethyl ether (DMETEG) and Ammonia+ Water. Thermo-physical properties calculated by Aspen+ are reasonably accurate. Documentation of the installation of pilot-plants or full commercial units were not found in the literature for validating thermo-physical properties in an operating unit. Therefore, it is essential to install a pilot-scale unit to verify thermo-physical properties of working fluid pairs and validate the overall efficiency of the thermal heat pump at temperatures typical of distillation processes. For an HO2 process, the ammonia-water heat pump system is more compact and preferable than the TFE-DMETEG heat pump. The ammonia-water heat pump is therefore recommended for the H2O2 process. Based on the complex nature of the heat recovery system, we anticipated that capital costs could make investments financially unattractive where steam costs are low, especially where co-generation is involved. We believe that the enhanced heat transfer equipment has the potential to significantly improve the performance of TEE crystallizers, independent of the absorption heat-pump recovery system. Where steam costs are high, more detailed design/cost engineering will be required to verify the economic viability of the technology. Due to the long payback period estimated for the TEE open system, further studies on the TEE system are not warranted unless there are significant future improvements to heat pump technology. For the H2O2 distillation cycle heat pump waste heat recovery system, there were no significant process constraints and the estimated 5 years payback period is encouraging. We therefore recommend further developments of application of the thermal heat pump in the H2O2 distillation process with the focus on the technical and economic viability of heat exchangers equipped with the state-of-the-art enhancements. This will require additional funding for a prototype unit to validate enhanced thermal performances of heat transfer equipment, evaluat

Emmanuel A. Dada; Chandrakant B. Panchal; Luke K. Achenie; Aaron Reichl; Chris C. Thomas

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

193

Expected near-field thermal environments in a sequentially loaded spent-fuel or high-level waste repository in salt  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the effect of realistic waste emplacement schedules on repository thermal environments. Virtually all estimates to date have been based on instantaneous loading of wastes having uniform properties throughout the repository. However, more realistic scenarios involving sequential emplacement of wastes reflect the gradual filling of the repository over its lifetime. These cases provide temperatures that can be less extreme than with the simple approximation. At isolated locations in the repository, the temperatures approach the instantaneous-loading limit. However, for most of the repository, temperature rises in the near-field are 10 to 40 years behind the conservative estimates depending on the waste type and the location in the repository. Results are presented for both spent-fuel and high-level reprocessing waste repositories in salt, for a regional repository concept, and for a single national repository concept. The national repository is filled sooner and therefore more closely approximates the instantaneously loaded repository. However, temperatures in the near-field are still 20/sup 0/C or more below the values in the simple model for 40 years after startup of repository emplacement operations. The results suggest that current repository design concepts based on the instantaneous-loading predictions are very conservative. Therefore, experiments to monitor temperatures in a test and evaluation facility, for example, will need to take into account the reduced temperatures in order to provide data used in predicting repository performance.

Rickertsen, L.D.; Arbital, J.G.; Claiborne, H.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Thermoelectric Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A novel thermoelectric OTEC concept is proposed and compared with the ammonia closed-cycle designs. The thermoelectric OTEC is a much simpler system which uses no working fluid and therefore requires no pressure vessel, working fluid pumps, or turbogenerator. These components are replaced by power modules which are heat exchangers integrated with thermoelectric generators. The thermoelectric OTEC offers several potential advantages including: simpler and more easily mass-produced components; higher reliability system performance through the use of a high level of redundancy and long-lived, solid-state thermoelectric generators; greater safety for crew and environment by elimination of the pressurized working fluid; and the possibility of lower system costs. These comparisons are discussed and plans for future work are presented.

Jayadev, T.S.; Benson, D.K.; Bohn, M.S.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

An Improved System for Tropical Ocean Subsurface Temperature Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study demonstrates techniques that lead to improved use of ocean thermal information and more useful and informative products for monitoring variability in the tropical oceans. The method is based on statistical interpolation and is ...

Neville R. Smith

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Process for remediation of plastic waste - Energy Innovation ...  

A single step process for degrading plastic waste by converting the plastic waste into carbonaceous products via thermal decomposition of the plastic waste by placing ...

197

Applications of thermal energy storage to process heat and waste heat recovery in the primary aluminum industry. Final report, September 1977-September 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a study entitled, Applications of Thermal Energy Storage to Process Heat and Waste Heat Recovery in the Primary Aluminum Industry are presented. In this preliminary study, a system has been identified by which the large amounts of low-grade waste energy in the primary pollution control system gas stream can be utilized for comfort heating in nearby communities. Energy is stored in the form of hot water, contained in conventional, insulated steel tanks, enabling a more efficient utilization of the constant energy source by the cyclical energy demand. Less expensive energy storage means (heated ponds, aquifers), when they become fully characterized, will allow even more cost-competitive systems. Extensive design tradeoff studies have been performed. These tradeoff studies indicate that a heating demand equivalent to 12,000 single-family residences can be supplied by the energy from the Intalco plant. Using a 30-year payback criterion (consistent with utility planning practice), the average cost of energy supplied over the system useful life is predicted at one-third the average cost of fossil fuel. The study clearly shows that the utilization of waste energy from aluminum plants is both technically and economically attractive. The program included a detailed survey of all aluminum plants within the United States, allowing the site specific analyses to be extrapolated to a national basis. Should waste heat recovery systems be implemented by 1985, a national yearly savings of 6.5 million barrels of oil can be realized.

Katter, L.B.; Hoskins, R.L.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

MWIP: Surrogate formulations for thermal treatment of low-level mixed waste. Part 4, Wastewater treatment sludges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The category of sludges, filter cakes, and other waste processing residuals represent the largest volume of low-level mixed (hazardous and radioactive) wastes within the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Treatment of these wastes to minimize the mobility of contaminants, and to eliminate the presence of free water, is required under the Federal Facility Compliance Act agreements between DOE and the Environmental Protection Agency. In the text, we summarize the currently available data for several of the high priority mixed-waste sludge inventories within DOE. Los Alamos National Laboratory TA-50 Sludge and Rocky Flats Plant By-Pass Sludge are transuranic (TRU)-contaminated sludges that were isolated with the use of silica-based filter aids. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant West End Treatment Facility Sludge is predominantly calcium carbonate and biomass. The Oak Ridge K-25 Site Pond Waste is a large-volume waste stream, containing clay, silt, and other debris in addition to precipitated metal hydroxides. We formulate ``simulants`` for the waste streams described above, using cerium oxide as a surrogate for the uranium or plutonium present in the authentic material. Use of nonradiological surrogates greatly simplifies material handling requirements for initial treatability studies. The use of synthetic mixtures for initial treatability testing will facilitate compositional variation for use in conjunction with statistical design experiments; this approach may help to identify any ``operating window`` limitations. The initial treatability testing demonstrations utilizing these ``simulants`` will be based upon vitrification, although the materials are also amenable to testing grout-based and other stabilization procedures. After the feasibility of treatment and the initial evaluation of treatment performance has been demonstrated, performance must be verified using authentic samples of the candidate waste stream.

Bostick, W.D.; Hoffmann, D.P.; Stevenson, R.J.; Richmond, A.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bickford, D.F. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Ocean Datasets | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Datasets Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean Ocean, Coast, and Great Lakes Planning...

200

On Thermal Expansion over the Last Hundred Years  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimates of sea level rise during the period 18561991 due to thermal expansion are presented. The estimates are based on an ocean model that consists of three zonally averaged ocean basins representing the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. ...

J. R. de Wolde; R. Bintanja; J. Oerlemans

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Marine pastures: a by-product of large (100 megawatt or larger) floating ocean thermal power plants. Progress report, February 1, 1976--April 30, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Computer programs have been developed to define the temperature increase which would be needed to bring deep-ocean water into density equilibrium with surface water for locations where data are available. A series of continuous-flow studies on phytoplankton blooms resulting from mixtures of 80 percent deep and 20 percent surface water in 2000-liter concrete culturing vessels (''reactors'') has been completed. A quantitative determination of nutrient utilization and flow through a combined primary and secondary trophic level system has been completed. This study utilized the clam Tapes semidecussata, fed from phytoplankton grown in 80 percent deep and 20 percent surface water. An analysis of the fate of the deep water discharged from a floating OTEC plant indicates that horizontal containment of the resulting deep water: surface water mixture is necessary if conditions optimal for open-sea mariculture are to obtain. The design of a small open-ocean ''pool'' is in the final stages of completion. A combined mussel/oyster/clam system is in the final stages of design and will be placed in the ocean during April 1976. (WDM)

Roels, O.A.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Marine pastures: a by-product of large (100 megawatt or larger) floating ocean thermal power plants. Progress report, February 1, 1976--April 30, 1976  

SciTech Connect

Computer programs have been developed to define the temperature increase which would be needed to bring deep-ocean water into density equilibrium with surface water for locations where data are available. A series of continuous-flow studies on phytoplankton blooms resulting from mixtures of 80 percent deep and 20 percent surface water in 2000-liter concrete culturing vessels (''reactors'') has been completed. A quantitative determination of nutrient utilization and flow through a combined primary and secondary trophic level system has been completed. This study utilized the clam Tapes semidecussata, fed from phytoplankton grown in 80 percent deep and 20 percent surface water. An analysis of the fate of the deep water discharged from a floating OTEC plant indicates that horizontal containment of the resulting deep water: surface water mixture is necessary if conditions optimal for open-sea mariculture are to obtain. The design of a small open-ocean ''pool'' is in the final stages of completion. A combined mussel/oyster/clam system is in the final stages of design and will be placed in the ocean during April 1976. (WDM)

Roels, O.A.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Development and Analysis of the Systematically Merged Atlantic Regional Temperature and Salinity Climatology For Oceanic Heat Content Estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An oceanic climatology to calculate upper ocean thermal structure was developed for application year-round in the North Atlantic Ocean basin. The Systematically Merged Atlantic Regional Temperature and Salinity (SMARTS) Climatology is used in a ...

P. C. Meyers; L. K. Shay; J. K. Brewster

204

Independent peer review panel report on the integrated nonthermal treatment systems study and the comparison of integrated thermal and integrated nonthermal treatment systems for mixed low level waste  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) Office of Science and Technology (OST) has conducted studies of integrated thermal treatment systems and integrated nonthermal treatment systems (INTS) for treating contact handled, alpha and non-alpha mixed low level radioactive waste (MLLW). The MLLW in the DOE complex consists of a wide variety of organic and inorganic solids and liquids contaminated with radioactive substances. Treatment systems are needed to destroy organic material and stabilize residues prior to land disposal. In May 1996 the Deputy Assistant Secretary for OST appointed an Independent Peer Review Panel to: (1) review and comment on the INTS Study; (2) make recommendations on the most promising thermal and nonthermal treatment systems; (3) make recommendations on research and development necessary to prove the performance of nonthermal and thermal technologies; and (4) review and comment on the preliminary draft of the ITTS/INTS Comparison Report. This report presents the primary conclusions and recommendations based on the review of the INTS study and the comparison report. System selection, overviews, comparisons, cost estimations and sensitivity analyses, and recommended R and D engineering needs are then described and discussed.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT SENSITIVITY OF DOUBLE SHELL DYNAMIC RESPONSE TO THE WASTE ELASTIC PROPERTIES  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to determine the sensitivity of the dynamic response of the Hanford double-shell tanks (DSTs) to the assumptions regarding the constitutive properties of the contained waste. In all cases, the waste was modeled as a uniform linearly elastic material. The focus of the study was on the changes in the modal response of the tank and waste system as the extensional modulus (elastic modulus in tension and compression) and shear modulus of the waste were varied through six orders of magnitude. Time-history analyses were also performed for selected cases and peak horizontal reaction forces and axial stresses at the bottom of the primary tank were evaluated. Because the analysis focused on the differences in the responses between solid-filled and liquid-filled tanks, it is a comparative analysis rather than an analysis of record for a specific tank or set of tanks. The shear modulus was varied between 4 x 10{sup 3} Pa and 4.135 x 10{sup 9} Pa. The lowest value of shear modulus was sufficient to simulate the modal response of a liquid-containing tank, while the higher values are several orders of magnitude greater than the upper limit of expected properties for tank contents. The range of elastic properties used was sufficient to show liquid-like response at the lower values, followed by a transition range of semi-solid-like response to a clearly identifiable solid-like response. It was assumed that the mechanical properties of the tank contents were spatially uniform. Because sludge-like materials are expected only to exist in the lower part of the tanks, this assumption leads to an exaggeration of the effects of sludge-like materials in the tanks. The results of the study show that up to a waste shear modulus of at least 40,000 Pa, the modal properties of the tank and waste system are very nearly the same as for the equivalent liquid-containing tank. This suggests that the differences in critical tank responses between liquid-containing tanks and tanks containing sludge-like materials having a shear modulus not exceeding 40,000 Pa are unlikely to be greater than those due to the uncertainties involved in the definition of the design ground motion or in the properties of the tank-waste system. This is the fundamental conclusion of the study. The study also shows that increasing the waste extensional modulus and shear modulus does not lead to increased mass participation at the impulsive frequency of the liquid-containing system. Instead, increasing the waste stiffness eventually leads to fundamental changes in the modal properties including an increase in the fundamental system frequency.

MACKEY TC; ABATT FG; JOHNSON KI

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

206

Investigations of Near-Field Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Models for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Clay/Shale Rock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at the Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon and Volckaert, 2003) have all been under intensive scientific investigation (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relationships to flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of radioactive waste. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA.

Liu, H.H.; Li, L.; Zheng, L.; Houseworth, J.E.; Rutqvist, J.

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

207

Waste Heat Energy Harvesting Using Olsen Cycle on PZN-5.5PT Single Crystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermal energy that would otherwise be wasted. In 2009, anthe energy consumed in the United States was wasted in the

McKinley, Ian Meeker; Kandilian, Razmig; Pilon, Laurent

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Analyses of MTI Imagery of Power Plant Thermal Discharge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MTI images of thermal discharge from three power plants are analyzed in this paper with the aid of a 3-D hydrodynamic code. The power plants use different methods to dissipate waste heat in the environment: a cooling lake at Comanche Peak, ocean discharge at Pilgrim and cooling canals at Turkey Point. This paper shows that it is possible to reproduce the temperature distributions captured in MTI imagery with accurate code inputs, but the key parameters change from site to site. Wind direction and speed are the most important parameters at Pilgrim, whereas air temperatures and dewpoint temperatures are most important at Comanche Peak and Turkey Point. This paper also shows how the combination of high-resolution thermal imagery and hydrodynamic simulation lead to better understanding of the mechanisms by which waste heat is dissipated in the environment.

Garrett, A.J.

2001-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

209

Ocean Map | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Map Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean Map Gallery Planning for ocean, coastal, and Great...

210

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of phenolic resin containing waste streams to sequentially recover monomers and chemicals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a waste phenolic resin containing feedstreams in a manner such that pyrolysis of said resins and a given high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolyses of the resins in other monomeric components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said resin and a given high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other monomeric components; selecting, if desired, a catalyst and a support and treating said feedstreams with said catalyst to effect acid or basic catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said first temperature program range to utilize reactive gases such as oxygen and steam in the pyrolysis process to drive the production of specific products; differentially heating said feedstreams at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantity of said high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other monomeric components therein; separating said high value monomeric constituent; selecting a second higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said phenolic resins waste and differentially heating said feedstreams at said higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said different high value monomeric constituent; and separating said different high value monomeric constituent. 11 figs.

Chum, H.L.; Evans, R.J.

1992-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

211

The Ventilated Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adiabatic theories of ocean circulation and density structure have a long tradition, from the concept of the ventilated thermocline to the notion that deep ocean ventilation is controlled by westerly winds over the Southern Ocean. This study ...

Patrick Haertel; Alexey Fedorov

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

On Scatterometer Ocean Stress  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scatterometers estimate the relative atmosphereocean motion at spatially high resolution and provide accurate inertial-scale ocean wind forcing information, which is crucial for many ocean, atmosphere, and climate applications. An empirical ...

M. Portabella; A. Stoffelen

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Effects of the Indonesian Throughflow on the Pacific and Indian Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effects of the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) on the circulation and thermal structure of the Pacific and Indian Oceans are studied by comparing solutions of a near-global ocean general circulation model with open and closed Indonesian passages ...

Tong Lee; Ichiro Fukumori; Dimitris Menemenlis; Zhangfan Xing; Lee-Lueng Fu

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Variations in Ocean Surface Temperature due to Near-Surface Flow: Straining the Cool Skin Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aqueous thermal boundary layer near to the ocean surface, or skin layer, has thickness O(1 mm) and plays an important role in controlling the exchange of heat between the atmosphere and the ocean. Theoretical arguments and experimental ...

Andrew J. Wells; Claudia Cenedese; J. Thomas Farrar; Christopher J. Zappa

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Scales of Variability in the Equatorial Pacific Inferred form Tropical Atmosphere-Ocean Buoy Array  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The highly temporally resolved time series from the Tropical Atmosphere-Ocean moored buoy array are used to evaluate the scales of thermal variability in the upper equatorial Pacific. The TAO array consists of nearly 70 deep-ocean moorings ...

William S. Kessler; M. C. Spillane; Michael J. McPhaden; D. E. Harrison

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

V-TOUGH: An enhanced version of the TOUGH code for the thermal and hydrologic simulation of large-scale problems in nuclear waste isolation  

SciTech Connect

The TOUGH code developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is being extensively used to numerically simulate the thermal and hydrologic environment around nuclear waste packages in the unsaturated zone for the Yucca Mountain Project. At the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) we have rewritten approximately 80 percent of the TOUGH code to increase its speed and incorporate new options. The geometry of many problems requires large numbers of computational elements elements in order to realistically model detailed physical phenomena, and, as a result, large amounts of computer time are needed. In order to increase the speed of the code we have incorporated fast linear equation solvers, vectorization of substantial portions of code, improved automatic time stepping, and implementation of table look-up for the steam table properties. These enhancements have increased the speed of the code for typical problems by a factor of 20 on the Cray 2 computer. In addition to the increase in computational efficiency we have added several options: vapor pressure lowering; equivalent continuum treatments of fractures; energy and material volumetric, mass and flux accounting; and Stefan-Boltzmann radiative heat transfer. 5 refs.

Nitao, J.J.

1989-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

217

A literature review of coupled thermal-hydrologic-mechanical-chemical processes pertinent to the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect

A literature review has been conducted to determine the state of knowledge available in the modeling of coupled thermal (T), hydrologic (H), mechanical (M), and chemical (C) processes relevant to the design and/or performance of the proposed high-level waste (HLW) repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The review focuses on identifying coupling mechanisms between individual processes and assessing their importance (i.e., if the coupling is either important, potentially important, or negligible). The significance of considering THMC-coupled processes lies in whether or not the processes impact the design and/or performance objectives of the repository. A review, such as reported here, is useful in identifying which coupled effects will be important, hence which coupled effects will need to be investigated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in order to assess the assumptions, data, analyses, and conclusions in the design and performance assessment of a geologic reposit``. Although this work stems from regulatory interest in the design of the geologic repository, it should be emphasized that the repository design implicitly considers all of the repository performance objectives, including those associated with the time after permanent closure. The scope of this review is considered beyond previous assessments in that it attempts with the current state-of-knowledge) to determine which couplings are important, and identify which computer codes are currently available to model coupled processes.

Manteufel, R.D.; Ahola, M.P.; Turner, D.R.; Chowdhury, A.H. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

ocean | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ocean ocean Dataset Summary Description This shapefile represents the seasonal winter depth profile to reach water at a temperature of 20ºC. Source NREL Date Released October 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords depth profile hydrokinetic ocean ocean energy ocean thermal energy conversion OTEC seawater cooling thermal Data application/zip icon OTEC Seawater Cooling 20ºC Depth Profile - Winter Average (zip, 1.1 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period March 2009 - February 2011 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment This GIS data was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ("NREL"), which is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE"). The user is granted the right, without any fee or cost, to use, copy, modify, alter, enhance and distribute this data for any purpose whatsoever, provided that this entire notice appears in all copies of the data. Further, the user of this data agrees to credit NREL in any publications or software that incorporate or use the data. Access to and use of the GIS data shall further impose the following obligations on the User. The names DOE/NREL may not be used in any advertising or publicity to endorse or promote any product or commercial entity using or incorporating the GIS data unless specific written authorization is obtained from DOE/NREL. The User also understands that DOE/NREL shall not be obligated to provide updates, support, consulting, training or assistance of any kind whatsoever with regard to the use of the GIS data. THE GIS DATA IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL DOE/NREL BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO CLAIMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOSS OF DATA OR PROFITS, WHICH MAY RESULT FROM AN ACTION IN CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTIOUS CLAIM THAT ARISES OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE ACCESS OR USE OF THE GIS DATA. The User acknowledges that access to the GIS data is subject to U.S. Export laws and regulations and any use or transfer of the GIS data must be authorized under those regulations. The User shall not use, distribute, transfer, or transmit GIS data or any products incorporating the GIS data except in compliance with U.S. export regulations. If requested by DOE/NREL, the User agrees to sign written assurances and other export-related documentation as may be required to comply with U.S. export regulations.

219

Thermal and combined thermal and radiolytic reactions involving nitrous oxide, hydrogen, and nitrogen in the gas phase; comparison of gas generation rates in supernate and solid fractions of Tank 241-SY-101 simulated waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes progress made in evaluating me by which flammable gases are generated in Hanford double-shell tank wastes, based on the results of laboratory tests using simulated waste mixtures. Work described in this report. was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the Flammable Gas Safety Project, the purpose of which is to develop information needed to support Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) in their efforts to ensure the safe interim storage of wastes at the Hanford Site. This work is related to gas generation studies being performed at Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), under subcontract to PNL, using simulated wastes, and to studies being performed at VMC using actual wastes.

Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Mixed waste: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the peer-reviewed and edited versions of papers submitted for presentation a the Second International Mixed Waste Symposium. Following the tradition of the First International Mixed Waste Symposium, these proceedings were prepared in advance of the meeting for distribution to participants. The symposium was organized by the Mixed Waste Committee of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The topics discussed at the symposium include: stabilization technologies, alternative treatment technologies, regulatory issues, vitrification technologies, characterization of wastes, thermal technologies, laboratory and analytical issues, waste storage and disposal, organic treatment technologies, waste minimization, packaging and transportation, treatment of mercury contaminated wastes and bioprocessing, and environmental restoration. Individual abstracts are catalogued separately for the data base.

Moghissi, A.A.; Blauvelt, R.K.; Benda, G.A.; Rothermich, N.E. [eds.] [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Safety and Health

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

About Ocean Community | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About Ocean Community Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean About Ocean Community This...

222

Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:29am Addthis Photo of water flowing from several openings in a hydropower dam. Hydropower produces 10% of the nation's energy, including power from the Ice Harbor Dam in Burbank, Washington. This page provides a brief overview of hydropower and ocean energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply these technologies within the Federal sector. Overview Hydropower has been used for centuries to power machinery, but the application most commonly associated with hydropower is electricity production through dams. Ocean energy refers to various forms of renewable energy harnessed from the ocean. There are two primary types of ocean energy: mechanical and thermal.

223

Ocean Technical | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean Technical Community of Practice Through a variety of...

224

The Effect of the Ocean Eddy on Tropical Cyclone Intensity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rapid intensification of Hurricane Katrina followed by the devastation of the U.S. Gulf States highlights the critical role played by an upper-oceanic thermal structure (such as the ocean eddy or Loop Current) in affecting the development of ...

Chun-Chieh Wu; Chia-Ying Lee; I-I. Lin

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Mixing and Energetics of the Oceanic Thermohaline Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using an idealized tube model and scaling analysis, the physics supporting the oceanic thermohaline circulation is examined. Thermal circulation in the tube model can be classified into two categories. When the cooling source is at a level higher ...

Rui Xin Huang

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Data Assimilation Tests with an Oceanic Mixed-Layer Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A data assimilation technique using a one-dimensional, ocean mixed-layer model to advance the thermal structure observations to the analysis time is tested. The effects of insertions of erroneous temperature profiles in such a model are studied ...

Russell L. Elsberry; Larry L. Warrenfelt

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

A Laboratory Model of Vertical Ocean Circulation Driven by Mixing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model of deep ocean circulation driven by turbulent mixing is produced in a long, rectangular laboratory tank. The salinity difference is substituted for the thermal difference between tropical and polar regions. Freshwater gently flows in at ...

J. A. Whitehead; Wei Wang

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Makai Ocean Engineering Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Makai Ocean Engineering Inc Makai Ocean Engineering Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Makai Ocean Engineering Inc Address PO Box 1206 Place Kailua Zip 96734-1206 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Year founded 1973 Number of employees 28 Phone number 808.259.8871 Website http://www.makai.com Region United States LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: Deep Water Pipelines This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it.

229

Ocean shell noises  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean shell noises Name: Rick A Cazzato Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Why do you here noises when you put a ocean shell to your ear? Does this happen because of...

230

Mixing by ocean eddies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mesoscale eddies mix and transport tracers such as heat and potential vorticity laterally in the ocean. While this transport plays an important role in the climate system, especially in the Southern Ocean, we lack a, ...

Abernathey, Ryan (Ryan Patrick)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

1World Ocean Review < world ocean review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pucher, Robert Liska, Jürgen Stampfl . 211 Novel sealing materials for vascular grafts, Anna Szulc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 299 IT tool to create new product from waste, Clara Ceppa, Ewa Karwowska, Malgorzata Wojtkowska . . . . . 343 Biological Hydrogen production from waste sugar

Bosch, Thomas C. G.

232

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Program Management Plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Office of the Associate Laboratory Director for Energy and Environmental Technology has established the OTEC Program Management Office to be responsible for the ANL-assigned tasks of the OTEC Program under DOE's Chicago Operations and Regional Office (DOE/CORO). The ANL OTEC Program Management Plan is essentially a management-by-objective plan. The principal objective of the program is to provide lead technical support to CORO in its capacity as manager of the DOE power-system program. The Argonne OTEC Program is divided into three components: the first deals with development of heat exchangers and other components of OTEC power systems, the second with development of biofouling counter-measures and corrosion-resistant materials for these components in seawater service, and the third with environmental and climatic impacts of OTEC power-system operation. The essential points of the Management Plan are summarized, and the OTEC Program is described. The organization of the OTEC Program at ANL is described including the functions, responsibilities, and authorities of the organizational groupings. The system and policies necessary for the support and control functions within the organization are discussed. These functions cross organizational lines, in that they are common to all of the organization groups. Also included are requirements for internal and external reports.

Combs, R E

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

disturbances d~e to carbon dioxide releases and sea-surfacefom installations; however, the carbon dioxide~releases fromwith other man-ind~ced carbon dioxide releases to result in

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

planes, Large quantities of chlorine will be used to controlthe marine environment. Chlorine react ions in sea\\Chlorine also has been reported to

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion LUIS A. VEGA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demand due to emerging economies like China, India, and Brazil. Coal and natural gas resources 7296 O. It seems sensible toconsider OTEC as one of the renewable energy technologies of the future. Introduction

236

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Mostly about USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Structures (Plantships) · Bottom-Mounted Structures · Model Basin Tests/ At-Sea Tests · 210 kW OC-OTEC systems and with an investment payback period estimated at 3 to 4 years. #12;OTEC 12 Energy Carriers & Attachments #12;#12;#12;#12;Bottom-Mounted Structures · Fixed Towers · Guyed Towers · TLP not shown · Causeway

237

The Potential Impact of Ocean Thermal Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the entrainmcnt and impingement that would result with the pumping of large volumes of seawater through an OTEC on bottom-mounted towers or offshore in the form of moored floating plants or free- floating plantships on the order of 100 m. Bottom-mounted plants (on towers) will make use of the space along the vertical extent

238

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and power usages (baseload electricity and production of =approximately 60 GW of baseload electricty could be producedcommunities, and will produce baseload electrical power and

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Ocean | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Ocean Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean Welcome to our COMMUNITY This is the National Ocean Council's portal for data, information, and decision tools to support people engaged in regional marine planning for the future use of the ocean, our coasts, and the Great Lakes. Our goal is to enhance discovery of and access to data and information for planners, stakeholders, and the public. Please visit our Feedback page to tell us what would make the site most useful to you as we expand our content. Start Here! Previous Pause Next PacIOOS - Pacific Islands Voyager PacIOOS - Pacific Islands Voyager View More West Coast Governors Alliance - Regional Data Framework West Coast Governors Alliance - Regional Data Framework View More Mid-Atlantic Ocean Data Portal

240

Ocean energy contract list, fiscal year 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the federal Ocean Energy Technology (OET) Program is to develop techniques that harness ocean energy (waves, currents, and thermal and salinity gradients) in a cost-effective and environmentally acceptable manner. The OET Program seeks to develop ocean energy technology to a point at which the commercial sector can assess whether applications of the technology are viable energy conversion alternatives or supplements to systems. The federal OET Program is conducted by DOE and is assigned to the Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Renewable Energy. Past studies conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) have identified ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) as the largest potential contributor to US energy supplies from the ocean resource. As a result, of the OET Program concentrates on research to advance OTEC technology. The FY 1990 contract overview comprises a list of all subcontracts begun, ongoing, or completed during FY 1990 (October 1, 1989, through September 30, 1990). Under each managing laboratory, projects are listed alphabetically by project area and then by subcontractor name.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1979  

SciTech Connect

Progress and activities are reported on the following: high-level waste immobilization, alternative waste forms, nuclear waste materials characterization, TRU waste immobilization programs, TRU waste decontamination, krypton solidification, thermal outgassing, iodine-129 fixation, monitoring of unsaturated zone transport, well-logging instrumentation development, mobile organic complexes of fission products, waste management system and safety studies, assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems, waste/rock interactions technology, spent fuel and fuel pool integrity program, and engineered barriers. (DLC)

Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

A study for destination of solid wastes from vessels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Everyday humans around the globe perform a series of activities that, in addition to the final product concerned, results in a significant number of solid waste, commonly called "junk." These solid wastes not treated to an appropriate final destination ... Keywords: monitoring, oceanic pollution, scanning, solid waste management, tracking

Carla M. Maccagnan Fontana; Maria Ldia Dias; Eduardo Mario Dias; Srgio Luiz Pereira

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Mixed waste characterization reference document  

SciTech Connect

Waste characterization and monitoring are major activities in the management of waste from generation through storage and treatment to disposal. Adequate waste characterization is necessary to ensure safe storage, selection of appropriate and effective treatment, and adherence to disposal standards. For some wastes characterization objectives can be difficult and costly to achieve. The purpose of this document is to evaluate costs of characterizing one such waste type, mixed (hazardous and radioactive) waste. For the purpose of this document, waste characterization includes treatment system monitoring, where monitoring is a supplement or substitute for waste characterization. This document establishes a cost baseline for mixed waste characterization and treatment system monitoring requirements from which to evaluate alternatives. The cost baseline established as part of this work includes costs for a thermal treatment technology (i.e., a rotary kiln incinerator), a nonthermal treatment process (i.e., waste sorting, macronencapsulation, and catalytic wet oxidation), and no treatment (i.e., disposal of waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)). The analysis of improvement over the baseline includes assessment of promising areas for technology development in front-end waste characterization, process equipment, off gas controls, and monitoring. Based on this assessment, an ideal characterization and monitoring configuration is described that minimizes costs and optimizes resources required for waste characterization.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

oceans - Geodata icon | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

oceans - Geodata icon Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean...

245

Oceanic Heat Flux Calculation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors review the procedure for the direct calculation of oceanic heat flux from hydrographic measurements and set out the full recipe that is required.

Sheldon Bacon; Nick Fofonoff

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Energy Basics: Ocean Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Resources Although the potential for ocean energy technologies is believed to be very large, no comprehensive studies have been conducted to date to determine an accurate resource...

247

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Iron, manganese and lead at Hawaii Ocean Time-series stationof beryllium to the oceans, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. , 114,organic carbon fluxes in the ocean based on the quantitative

Han, Qin; Moore, J. Keith; Zender, Charles; Measures, Chris; Hydes, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Ocean Energy Program Overview, Fiscal years 1990--1991. Programs in utility technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The oceans are the world`s largest solar energy collector and storage system. Covering 71% of the earth`s surface, the oceans collect and store this energy as waves, currents, and thermal and salinity gradients. The purpose of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Ocean Energy Program is to develop techniques that harness ocean energy cost effectively and in ways that do not harm the environment. The program seeks to develop ocean energy technology to a point at which industry can accurately assess whether the applications of the technology are viable energy conversion alternatives, or supplements to current power-generating systems. In past studies, DOE identified ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), which uses the temperature difference between warm surface water and cold deep water, as the most promising of the ocean energy technologies. As a result, the Ocean Energy Program has concentrated research that advances OTEC technology. The program also monitored developments in wave energy, ocean current, and salinity gradient concepts. It is not actively developing these technologies now. The mission of the Ocean Energy Program is to develop techniques to harness the vast solar energy stored in the oceans` waves, currents, and thermal and salinity gradients.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Ocean Health and Human Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al. 2002. Indicators of ocean health and human health:Nature 423:280283. Oceans and Human Health Act. 2003. S.Editorial Guest Editorial Ocean Health and Human Health

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Ocean General Circulation Models  

SciTech Connect

1. Definition of Subject The purpose of this text is to provide an introduction to aspects of oceanic general circulation models (OGCMs), an important component of Climate System or Earth System Model (ESM). The role of the ocean in ESMs is described in Chapter XX (EDITOR: PLEASE FIND THE COUPLED CLIMATE or EARTH SYSTEM MODELING CHAPTERS). The emerging need for understanding the Earths climate system and especially projecting its future evolution has encouraged scientists to explore the dynamical, physical, and biogeochemical processes in the ocean. Understanding the role of these processes in the climate system is an interesting and challenging scientific subject. For example, a research question how much extra heat or CO2 generated by anthropogenic activities can be stored in the deep ocean is not only scientifically interesting but also important in projecting future climate of the earth. Thus, OGCMs have been developed and applied to investigate the various oceanic processes and their role in the climate system.

Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

251

Real-time upper-ocean temperature observations from aircraft during operational hurricane reconnaissance missions: AXBT Demonstration Project year one results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thousands of aircraft observations of upper-ocean thermal structure have been obtained during hurricane and typhoon research field experiments in recent decades. The results from these experiments suggest a strong correlation between upper-ocean ...

Elizabeth R. Sanabia; Bradford S. Barrett; Peter G. Black; Sue Chen; James A. Cummings

252

Process for remediation of plastic waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A single step process for degrading plastic waste by converting the plastic waste into carbonaceous products via thermal decomposition of the plastic waste by placing the plastic waste into a reactor, heating the plastic waste under an inert or air atmosphere until the temperature of 700.degree. C. is achieved, allowing the reactor to cool down, and recovering the resulting decomposition products therefrom. The decomposition products that this process yields are carbonaceous materials, and more specifically egg-shaped and spherical-shaped solid carbons. Additionally, in the presence of a transition metal compound, this thermal decomposition process produces multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

Pol, Vilas G. (Westmont, IL); Thiyagarajan, Pappannan (Germantown, MD)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

253

Process for remediation of plastic waste  

SciTech Connect

A single step process for degrading plastic waste by converting the plastic waste into carbonaceous products via thermal decomposition of the plastic waste by placing the plastic waste into a reactor, heating the plastic waste under an inert or air atmosphere until the temperature of about 700.degree. C. is achieved, allowing the reactor to cool down, and recovering the resulting decomposition products therefrom. The decomposition products that this process yields are carbonaceous materials, and more specifically carbon nanotubes having a partially filled core (encapsulated) adjacent to one end of the nanotube. Additionally, in the presence of a transition metal compound, this thermal decomposition process produces multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

Pol, Vilas G; Thiyagarajan, Pappannan

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

254

ZERO WASTE.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of the thesis was to develop a clear vision on better waste management system. The thesis introduced the sustainable waste management along with (more)

Upadhyaya, Luv

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Thermal energy storage application areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of thermal energy storage in the areas of building heating and cooling, recovery of industrial process and waste heat, solar power generation, and off-peak energy storage and load management in electric utilities is reviewed. (TFD)

Not Available

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Microbial metabolism in the deep ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon flux through the oceans twilight zone. Science 316:sinking particle flux in the oceans twilight zone. LimnolRespiration in the dark ocean. Geophys Res Lett 30:doi:

Hansman, Roberta Lynn

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Microbial Metabollism in the Deep Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon flux through the oceans twilight zone. Science 316:sinking particle flux in the oceans twilight zone. LimnolRespiration in the dark ocean. Geophys Res Lett 30:doi:

Hansman, Roberta L

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al Qin Han,1 J. Keith Moore,1; accepted 7 December 2007; published 12 April 2008. [1] We use measurements of ocean surface dissolved Al (DEAD) model to constrain dust deposition to the oceans. Our Al database contains all available

Moore, Keith

259

SOME OCEAN MODEL FUNDAMENTALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of these lectures is to present elements of the equations and algorithms used in numerical models of the large-scale ocean circulation. Such models generally integrate the oceans primitive equations, which are based on Newtons Laws applied to a continuum fluid under hydrostatic balance in a spherical geometry, along with linear irreversible thermodynamics and subgrid scale (SGS) parameterizations. During formulations of both the kinematics and dynamics, we highlight issues related to the use of a generalized vertical coordinate. The vertical coordinate is arguably the most critical element determining how a model is designed and applications to which a model is of use.

Stephen M. Griffies

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Ocean bottom seisometer  

SciTech Connect

An improved ocean bottom seismometer is described comprising: a spherical-shaped main housing having a seismic acquisition portion and a ballast portion below the acquisition portion. The ballast portion controls the ascent and descent of the ocean bottom seismometer; a conical skirt fixed to the main housing elevating the main housing above a horizontal plane coincident with a base of the skirt. The skirt is capable of confining fluid under the main housing when the base rests on an ocean bottom; spherical compartments mounted inside the skirt; and a lifting hook mounted on the outside of the main housing.

Neeley, W.P.

1987-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The Impact of Rapid Wind Variability upon AirSea Thermal Coupling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The basic effect of extratropical atmosphereocean thermal coupling is to enhance the variance of both anomalous sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and air temperatures (AIRT) due to a decreased energy flux between the atmosphere and ocean, called ...

Philip Sura; Matthew Newman

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Carbon in Atlantic Ocean  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Atlantic Ocean About CARINA NDP-091: CARINA Data Synthesis Project The CARINA Group CARINA Cruise Summary Table and Data CARINA Data Products CARINA Database V1.2 ODV Collection...

263

Nonlinear Midlatitude Ocean Adjustment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ocean adjustment on annual to interdecadal scales to variable forcing is considered for a more nonlinear general circulation than has previously been studied. The nature of the response is a strong function of forcing frequency and importantly ...

William K. Dewar

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Global Ocean Meridional Overturning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A decade-mean global ocean circulation is estimated using inverse techniques, incorporating airsea fluxes of heat and freshwater, recent hydrographic sections, and direct current measurements. This information is used to determine mass, heat, ...

Rick Lumpkin; Kevin Speer

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Tropical Ocean Circulation Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A primitive equation model of the equatorial Pacific Ocean was forced by realistic wind stress distributions over decades. Results were presented for a set of two experiments. In the first experiment the model was forced by an objectively ...

Mojib Latif

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Modeling the Pacific Ocean  

SciTech Connect

Two numerical models utilizing primitive equations (two momentum equations and a mass continuity equation) simulate the oceanography of the Pacific Ocean from 20{degrees}S to 50{degrees}N. The authors examine the abundant model data through visualization , by animating the appropriate model fields and viewing the time history of each model simulation as a color movie. The animations are used to aid understanding of ocean circulation.

Johnson, M.A.; O' Brien, J.J. (Mesoscale Air-Sea Interaction Group, Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

ocean energy | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ocean energy ocean energy Dataset Summary Description This shapefile represents the seasonal winter depth profile to reach water at a temperature of 20ºC. Source NREL Date Released October 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords depth profile hydrokinetic ocean ocean energy ocean thermal energy conversion OTEC seawater cooling thermal Data application/zip icon OTEC Seawater Cooling 20ºC Depth Profile - Winter Average (zip, 1.1 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period March 2009 - February 2011 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment This GIS data was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ("NREL"), which is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE"). The user is granted the right, without any fee or cost, to use, copy, modify, alter, enhance and distribute this data for any purpose whatsoever, provided that this entire notice appears in all copies of the data. Further, the user of this data agrees to credit NREL in any publications or software that incorporate or use the data. Access to and use of the GIS data shall further impose the following obligations on the User. The names DOE/NREL may not be used in any advertising or publicity to endorse or promote any product or commercial entity using or incorporating the GIS data unless specific written authorization is obtained from DOE/NREL. The User also understands that DOE/NREL shall not be obligated to provide updates, support, consulting, training or assistance of any kind whatsoever with regard to the use of the GIS data. THE GIS DATA IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL DOE/NREL BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO CLAIMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOSS OF DATA OR PROFITS, WHICH MAY RESULT FROM AN ACTION IN CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTIOUS CLAIM THAT ARISES OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE ACCESS OR USE OF THE GIS DATA. The User acknowledges that access to the GIS data is subject to U.S. Export laws and regulations and any use or transfer of the GIS data must be authorized under those regulations. The User shall not use, distribute, transfer, or transmit GIS data or any products incorporating the GIS data except in compliance with U.S. export regulations. If requested by DOE/NREL, the User agrees to sign written assurances and other export-related documentation as may be required to comply with U.S. export regulations.

268

EA-1189: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste, Richland, Washington EA-1189: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste, Richland, Washington...

269

Mercury removal from solid mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

The removal of mercury from mixed wastes is an essential step in eliminating the temporary storage of large inventories of mixed waste throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Currently thermal treatment has been identified as a baseline technology and is being developed as part of the DOE Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP). Since thermal treatment will not be applicable to all mercury containing mixed waste and the removal of mercury prior to thermal treatment may be desirable, laboratory studies have been initiated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop alternative remediation technologies capable of removing mercury from certain mixed waste. This paper describes laboratory investigations of the KI/I{sub 2} leaching processes to determine the applicability of this process to mercury containing solid mixed waste.

Gates, D.D.; Morrissey, M.; Chava, K.K.; Chao, K.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

270

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Summary Notes from 28 May 2008 Generic Technical Issue...

271

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of mixed polymer waste streams to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents, selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent.

Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO); Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of mixed polymer waste streams to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents; selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent.

Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO); Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of mixed polymer waste streams to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents; selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent.

Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO); Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of mixed polymer waste streams to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents, selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent. 87 figures.

Evans, R.J.; Chum, H.L.

1994-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

275

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of mixed polymer waste streams to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents; selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent. 83 figs.

Evans, R.J.; Chum, H.L.

1994-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

276

1138 JOURNAL OF CLIMATE VOLUME 24 Observational Evidence for Oceanic Controls on Hurricane Intensity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The influence of oceanic changes on tropical cyclone activity is investigated using observational estimates of sea surface temperature (SST), airsea fluxes, and ocean subsurface thermal structure during the period 1998 2007. SST conditions are examined before, during, and after the passage of tropical cyclones, through Lagrangian composites along cyclone tracks across all ocean basins, with particular focus on the North Atlantic. The influence of translation speed is explored by separating tropical cyclones according to the translation

Ian D. Lloyd; Gabriel A. Vecchi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

small-scale features in ocean winds. Science, 303, Chelton,of the regional coupled ocean-atmosphere model RCAO. Borealstress dependence on ocean surface velocity: implications

Seo, Hyodae

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

small-scale features in ocean winds. Science, 303, Chelton,of the regional coupled ocean-atmosphere model RCAO. Borealstress dependence on ocean surface velocity: implications

Seo, Hyodae

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Ocean - Community Practice Block | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Community Practice Block Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean...

280

Mesozooplankton trophic variability in a changing ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

trends in contemporary ocean productivity. Nature 444: 752-Gyre Oscillation links ocean climate and ecosystem change.biomass from satellite ocean colour. J. Mar. Syst. 78: 18-

Dcima, Moira

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Ocean Map National | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean Featured Maps The following maps are from data...

282

Ocean Feedback Form | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feedback Form Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean Comments or Suggestions Name * Email Topic...

283

Vertical Heat Transport by Ocean Circulation and the Role of Mechanical and Haline Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertical transport of heat by ocean circulation is investigated using a coupled climate model and novel thermodynamic methods. Using a streamfunction in temperaturedepth coordinates, cells are identified by whether they are thermally direct (flux ...

Jan D. Zika; Willem P. Sijp; Matthew H. England

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Diagnostic Model of the Three-Dimensional Circulation in the Upper Equatorial Pacific Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To investigate the processes that maintain the large-scale, annual-average thermal structure of the equatorial Pacific, the three-dimensional ocean circulation for a large area is determined from a diagnostic model applied to repeated, meridional ...

Harry L. Bryden; Esther C. Brady

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Decadal Variability in an Idealized Ocean Model and Its Sensitivity to Surface Boundary Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variability in a three-dimensional ocean model of idealized geometry is analyzed. The variability is induced in the model by adding a stochastic component to the surface buoyancy forcing. The influence of the surface thermal forcing on the model ...

A. Capotondi; W. R. Holland

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Vertical Heat Transport by the Ocean Circulation and the Role of Mechanical and Haline Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertical transport of heat by the ocean circulation is investigated using a coupled-climate model and novel thermodynamic methods. Using a streamfunction in temperature-depth coordinates, cells are identified by whether they are thermally direct (...

Jan D. Zika; Willem P. Sijp; Matthew H. England

287

Ocean Eddy Dynamics in a Coupled OceanAtmosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of mesoscale oceanic eddies is analyzed in a quasigeostrophic coupled oceanatmosphere model operating at a large Reynolds number. The model dynamics are characterized by decadal variability that involves nonlinear adjustment of the ...

P. Berloff; W. Dewar; S. Kravtsov; J. McWilliams

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Indian Ocean Intraseasonal Variability in an Ocean General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of atmospheric intraseasonal variability on the tropical Indian Ocean is examined with an ocean general circulation model (OGCM). The model is forced by observation-based wind stresses and surface heat fluxes from an atmospheric ...

A. Schiller; J. S. Godfrey

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Interactions of the Tropical Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have investigated the interactions of the tropical oceans on interannual timescales by conducting a series of uncoupled atmospheric and oceanic general circulation experiments and hybrid-coupled model simulations. The results ...

M. Latif; T. P. Barnett

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Climate and the Tropical Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An attempt is made to determine the role of the ocean in establishing the mean tropical climate and its sensitivity to radiative perturbations. A simple two-box energy balance model is developed that includes ocean heat transports as an ...

Amy Clement; Richard Seager

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Energy Basics: Ocean Energy Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Technologies Photo of low waves in the ocean. A dock is visible in the background. Oceans cover more than 70% of the Earth's surface. As the world's largest solar...

292

Hazardous Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 6   General refractory disposal options...D landfill (b) Characterized hazardous waste by TCLP

293

Near-Inertial Ocean Current Response to Hurricane Frederic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hurricane Frederic passed with 80 to 130 km of the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office current meter arrays in water depths ranging from 100 to 470 m near the DeSoto Canyon region, and within 150 km of an Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) ...

Lynn K. Shay; Russell L. Elsberry

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

On the Climatic Impact of Ocean Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrations of coupled climate models with mixed-layer and fixed-current ocean components are used to explore the climatic response to varying magnitudes of ocean circulation. Four mixed-layer ocean experiments without ocean heat transports are ...

Michael Winton

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Ocean energy conversion systems annual research report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Alternative power cycle concepts to the closed-cycle Rankine are evaluated and those that show potential for delivering power in a cost-effective and environmentally acceptable fashion are explored. Concepts are classified according to the ocean energy resource: thermal, waves, currents, and salinity gradient. Research projects have been funded and reported in each of these areas. The lift of seawater entrained in a vertical steam flow can provide potential energy for a conventional hydraulic turbine conversion system. Quantification of the process and assessment of potential costs must be completed to support concept evaluation. Exploratory development is being completed in thermoelectricity and 2-phase nozzles for other thermal concepts. Wave energy concepts are being evaluated by analysis and model testing with present emphasis on pneumatic turbines and wave focussing. Likewise, several conversion approaches to ocean current energy are being evaluated. The use of salinity resources requires further research in membranes or the development of membraneless processes. Using the thermal resource in a Claude cycle process as a power converter is promising, and a program of R and D and subsystem development has been initiated to provide confirmation of the preliminary conclusion.

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

An Ocean Dynamical Thermostat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of ocean dynamics in the regulation of tropical sea surface temperatures (SSTs) is investigated using the Zebiak-Cane coupled occan-atmosphere model. The model is forced with a uniform heating, or cooling, varying between 40 W m?2 into ...

Amy C. Clement; Richard Seager; Mark A. Cane; Stephen E. Zebiak

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Navigating oceans of data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some science domains have the advantage that the bulk of the data comes from a single source instrument, such as a telescope or particle collider. More commonly, big data implies a big variety of data sources. For example, the Center for Coastal Margin ... Keywords: environmental data, ocean observatories, spatial-temporal data management

David Maier; V. M. Megler; Antnio M. Baptista; Alex Jaramillo; Charles Seaton; Paul J. Turner

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 534) and identity of liquid waste Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 534

Russell, Lynn

299

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2/2009 Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 200 West Arbor Dr. San Diego, CA 92103 (619 (9:1) OR Biohazard symbol (if untreated) and identity of liquid waste Biohazard symbol Address

Firtel, Richard A.

300

Ecological analysis of spatial and temporal patterns of pelagic ecosystem components potentially interacting with an OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) plant near Punta Tuna, Puerto Rico: physical characteristics. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This hydrographic study characterizes the Punta Tuna area as a potential site for an OTEC power plant. Seven cruises were conducted at approximately two month intervals. Each cruise included at least 22 hydrocast stations, six done as serial stations in a small area to reveal temporal and small scale variability. The results of the analysis of these data so far indicate a bi-seasonality in the dynamics. Mesoscale eddies and meanders are a common feature of the circulation pattern on Puerto Rico's southern coast. The time series studies have shown their existence of a very energetic internal wave field with relatively large amplitude waves at the diurnal and semi-diurnal tidal frequencies. The results in terms of an OTEC power plant indicate the thermal resource to be at least a 20C thermal gradient in the upper 100 m year round.

Lopez, J.M.; Tilly, L.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

SELF SINTERING OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for disposal of radioactive liquid waste materials. The wastes are mixed with clays and fluxes to form a ceramic slip and disposed in a thermally insulated container in a layer. The temperature of the layer rises due to conversion of the energy of radioactivity to heat boillng off the liquid to fomn a dry mass. The dry mass is then covered with thermal insulation, and the mass is self-sintered into a leach-resistant ceramic cake by further conversion of the energy of radioactivity to heat.

McVay, T.N.; Johnson, J.R.; Struxness, E.G.; Morgan, K.Z.

1959-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

302

Why Sequence Subarctic Pacific Ocean?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequence Subarctic Pacific Ocean? Sequence Subarctic Pacific Ocean? The subarctic Pacific Ocean is one of the areas considered particularly vulnerable to acidification, which could affect the ocean's ability to act as a carbon sink. Global warming affects the food webs and biodiversity in marine ecosystems, especially in regions known as oxygen minimum zones where key components of the global carbon cycle take place. Oxygen minimum zones are found between 200 and 1,000 meters below sea level in the subarctic Pacific, the eastern South Pacific Ocean, the northern parts of the Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea, and off southwestern Africa. As global warming continues, researchers believe the oxygen levels in the oceans will decrease, a change that will extend the boundaries of the oxygen minimum

303

Hazardous Waste Program (Alabama)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This rule states criteria for identifying the characteristics of hazardous waste and for listing hazardous waste, lists of hazardous wastes, standards for the management of hazardous waste and...

304

Extracting Multiyear Surface Currents from Sequential Thermal Imagery Using the Maximum Cross-Correlation Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ocean surface circulation can be estimated by automated tracking of thermal infrared features in pairs of sequential satellite imagery. A 7-yr time series of velocity, extracted from thermal imagery of the East Australian Current using the ...

Melissa M. Bowen; William J. Emery; John L. Wilkin; Paul C. Tildesley; Ian J. Barton; Rebecca Knewtson

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Mass Wasting in the Western Galapagos Islands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oceanic island volcanoes such as those in the Hawaiian, Canary and Galapagos Islands are known to become unstable, causing failures of the subaerial and submarine slopes of the volcanic edifices. These mass wasting events appear to be the primary source of destruction and loss of volume of many oceanic islands, but our knowledge of mass wasting is still rudimentary in many seamount and island chains. To better understand mass wasting in the western Galapagos Islands, multi-beam bathymetry and backscatter sidescan sonar images were used to examine topography and acoustic backscatter signatures that are characteristic of mass wasting. Observations show that mass wasting plays an important role in the development of Galapagos volcanoes. While volcanic activity continues to conceal the submarine terrain, the data show that four forms of mass wasting are identified including debris flows, slumps sheets, chaotic slumps, and detached blocks. A total of 23 mass wasting features were found to exist in the western Galapagos Islands, including fourteen debris flows with one that incorporated a set of detached blocks, seven slump sheets, and one chaotic slump. Some of the indentified features have obvious origination zones while the sources of others are not clearly identifiable. Approximately 73 percent of the surveyed coastlines are affected by slumping on the steep upper slopes and ~64 percent are affected by debris flows on the lower slopes. Unlike the giant landslides documented by GLORIA imagery around the Hawaiian Islands, the western Galapagos Islands appear to be characterized by small slump sheets existing along the steep shallow submarine flanks of the island and by debris flows that are flanked by rift zones and extend off the platform. This study indicates that submarine mass wasting is widespread in the western Galapagos, suggesting that the production of small-scale downslope movement is part of the erosive nature of these oceanic volcanic islands.

Hall, Hillary

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

A sustained oscillation in a toy-model of the coupled atmosphere-ocean system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interaction between atmospheric mid-latitude flow and wind-driven ocean circulation is studied coupling two idealized low-order spectral models. The barotropic Charney-DeVore model with three components simulates a bimodal mid-latitude atmospheric circulation in a channel with two stable flow patterns induced by topography. The wind-driven ocean double gyre circulation in a square basin (of half the channel length) is modeled by an equivalent barotropic formulation of the Veronis model with 21 components, which captures Rossby-wave dynamics and nonlinear decadal variability. When coupled, the atmosphere forces the ocean by wind-stress while, simultaneously, the ocean affects the atmosphere by thermal forcing in terms of a vorticity source. Coupled atmosphere-ocean simulations show two stable flow patterns associated with the topographically induced atmospheric bimodality and a sustained oscillation due to interaction between atmospheric bimodality and oceanic Rossby dynamics. The oscillation is of inter-annua...

Bothe, Oliver

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Ocean Informatics Monograph. Ocean Informatics Initiative: an Ethnographic Study (2002-2006). Part 1: Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collaborative Care and Ocean Informatics. Proceedings of theOceanography: Probing the Oceans, 1936-1978. San Diego, CA:Collaboration: Towards an Ocean Informatics Environment.

Millerand, Florence; Baker, Karen S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Ocean Informatics Monograph. Ocean Informatics Initiative: an Ethnographic Study (2002-2006). Part 2: Appendices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scientific Digital Delivery Ocean Informatics: Shaun HaberResearch Publications about the Ocean Informatics initiativeF. and K.S. Baker (2011). Ocean Informatics Monograph (2002-

Millerand, Florence; Baker, Karen S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Thermal catalytic conversion of the used isobutyl isoprene rubber into valuable hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

continuous ?ow reactor for thermal degradation of polymers.Qian J. Studies of the thermal degradation of waste rubber.10.1007/s10973-009-0577-3 Thermal catalytic conversion of

Rasul Jan, M.; Jabeen, Farah; Shah, Jasmin; Mabood, Fazal

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Invert Effective Thermal Conductivity Calculation  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the temperature-dependent effective thermal conductivities of a repository-emplaced invert steel set and surrounding ballast material. The scope of this calculation analyzes a ballast-material thermal conductivity range of 0.10 to 0.70 W/m {center_dot} K, a transverse beam spacing range of 0.75 to 1.50 meters, and beam compositions of A 516 carbon steel and plain carbon steel. Results from this calculation are intended to support calculations that identify waste package and repository thermal characteristics for Site Recommendation (SR). This calculation was developed by Waste Package Department (WPD) under Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) procedure AP-3.12Q, Revision 1, ICN 0, Calculations.

M.J. Anderson; H.M. Wade; T.L. Mitchell

2000-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

311

Waste= Capital.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The evolution of manufacturing practices over the last century has led to the creation of excess waste during the production process, depleting resources and overwhelming (more)

Stidham, Steve P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

II Observations of the 2004 and 2006 Indian OceanOceans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .magnitudes determined from ocean-bottom pressure gauge data

Drushka, Kyla

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Waste disposal options report. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

Volume 2 contains the following topical sections: estimates of feed and waste volumes, compositions, and properties; evaluation of radionuclide inventory for Zr calcine; evaluation of radionuclide inventory for Al calcine; determination of k{sub eff} for high level waste canisters in various configurations; review of ceramic silicone foam for radioactive waste disposal; epoxides for low-level radioactive waste disposal; evaluation of several neutralization cases in processing calcine and sodium-bearing waste; background information for EFEs, dose rates, watts/canister, and PE-curies; waste disposal options assumptions; update of radiation field definition and thermal generation rates for calcine process packages of various geometries-HKP-26-97; and standard criteria of candidate repositories and environmental regulations for the treatment and disposal of ICPP radioactive mixed wastes.

Russell, N.E.; McDonald, T.G.; Banaee, J.; Barnes, C.M.; Fish, L.W.; Losinski, S.J.; Peterson, H.K.; Sterbentz, J.W.; Wenzel, D.R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Parametric Analyses of Heat Removal from High Level Waste Tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The general thermal hydraulics program GOTH-SNF was used to predict the thermal response of the waste in tanks 241-AY-102 and 241-AZ-102 when mixed by two 300 horsepower mixer pumps. This mixing was defined in terms of a specific waste retrieval scenario. Both dome and annulus ventilation system flow are necessary to maintain the waste within temperature control limits during the mixing operation and later during the sludge-settling portion of the scenario are defined.

TRUITT, J.B.

2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

315

Assessment of selected furnace technologies for RWMC waste  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a description and initial evaluation of five selected thermal treatment (furnace) technologies, in support of earlier thermal technologies scoping work for application to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) buried wastes. The cyclone furnace, molten salt processor, microwave melter, ausmelt (fuel fired lance) furnace, and molten metal processor technologies are evaluated. A system description and brief development history are provided. The state of development of each technology is assessed, relative to treatment of RWMC buried waste.

Batdorf, J.; Gillins, R. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Anderson, G.L. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Mixed waste characterization, treatment, and disposal focus area. Technology summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents details about the technology development programs of the Department of Energy. In this document, waste characterization, thermal treatment processes, non-thermal treatment processes, effluent monitors and controls, development of on-site innovative technologies, and DOE business opportunities are applied to environmental restoration. The focus areas for research are: contaminant plume containment and remediation; mixed waste characterization, treatment, and disposal; high-level waste tank remediation; landfill stabilization; and decontamination and decommissioning.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Texas facility treats, recycles refinery, petrochemical wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A US Gulf Coast environmental services company is treating refinery and petrochemical plant wastes to universal treatment standards (UTS). DuraTherm Inc.`s recycling center uses thermal desorption to treat a variety of refinery wastes and other hazardous materials. The plant is located in San Leon, Tex., near the major Houston/Texas City refining and petrochemical center. DuraTherm`s customers include major US refining companies, plus petrochemical, terminal, pipeline, transportation, and remediation companies. Examples of typical contaminant concentrations and treatment levels for refinery wastes are shown. The paper discusses thermal desorption, the process description and testing.

NONE

1996-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

318

Waste Generated from LMR-AMTEC Reactor Concept  

SciTech Connect

The candidate Liquid Metal Reactor-Alkali Metal Thermal -to- Electric Converter (LMR-AMTEC) is considered to be the first reactor that would use pure liquid potassium as a secondary coolant, in which potassium vapor aids in the conversion of thermal energy to electric energy. As with all energy production, the thermal generation of electricity produces wastes. These wastes must be managed in ways which safeguard human health and minimize their impact on the environment. Nuclear power is the only energy industry, which takes full responsibility for all its wastes. Based on the candidate design of the LMR-AMTEC components and the coolant types, different wastes will be generated from LMR. These wastes must be classified and characterized according to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulation, CFR. This paper defines the waste generation and waste characterization from LMR-AMTEC and reviews the applicable U.S. regulations that govern waste transportation, treatment, storage and final disposition. The wastes generated from LMR-AMTEC are characterized as: (1) mixed waste which is generated from liquid sodium contaminated by fission products and activated corrosion products; (2) hazardous waste which is generated from liquid potassium contaminated by corrosion products; (3) spent nuclear fuel; and (4) low-level radioactive waste which is generated from the packing materials (e.g. activated carbon in cold trap and purification units). The regulations and management of these wastes are summarized in this paper.

Hasan, Ahmed; Mohamed, Yasser, T.; Mohammaden, Tarek, F.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

319

NOS Point Forecast Guidance to Weather and Ocean Conditions ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Point Forecast Guidance to Weather and Ocean Conditions Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean...

320

ocean - faq right side block | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ocean - faq right side block Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean Frequently Asked Questions...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Ocean Renewable Power Company LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Renewable Power Company LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean Renewable Power Company LLC Place Portland, Maine Zip 4101 Sector Ocean, Renewable Energy Product Ocean...

322

MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT PHASE I: AUDIT OF CURRENT PRACTICE The Mushroom Waste Management Project (MWMP) was initiated by Environment Canada, the BC Ministry of solid and liquid wastes generated at mushroom producing facilities. Environmental guidelines

323

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE January 2010 Prepared for the Interagency DE-AC05-76RL01830 Waste Disposal Workshops: Anthrax-Contaminated Waste AM Lesperance JF Upton SL #12;#12;PNNL-SA-69994 Waste Disposal Workshops: Anthrax- Contaminated Waste AM Lesperance JF Upton SL

324

Convergence Rate and Stability of Ocean-Atmosphere Coupling Schemes with a Zero-Dimensional Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A zero-dimensional climate model is considered with three thermal reservoirs, i.e., the atmosphere, the surface mixed layer and the intermediate water of the ocean. Realistic values are adopted for the rates of heat transfer between those ...

Robert E. Dickinson

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Lih thermal energy storage device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage device for use in a pulsed power supply to store waste heat produced in a high-power burst operation utilizes lithium hydride as the phase change thermal energy storage material. The device includes an outer container encapsulating the lithium hydride and an inner container supporting a hydrogen sorbing sponge material such as activated carbon. The inner container is in communication with the interior of the outer container to receive hydrogen dissociated from the lithium hydride at elevated temperatures.

Olszewski, Mitchell (Knoxville, TN); Morris, David G. (Knoxville, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

THERMAL RECOVERY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

THERMAL RECOVERY Thermal recovery comprises the techniques of steamflooding, cyclic steam stimulation, and in situ combustion. In steamflooding, high-temperature steam is injected...

327

Arctic Ocean circulation patterns revealed by GRACE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of ocean bottom pressure (OBP) anomalies from the satellite mission GRACE, complemented by information from two ocean models, are used to investigate the variations and distribution of the Arctic Ocean mass from 2002 through 2011. The ...

Cecilia Peralta-Ferriz; James H. Morison; John M. Wallace; Jennifer A. Bonin; Jinlun Zhang

328

The bottom of the ocean food chain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The bottom of the ocean food chain 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:July 2013 All Issues submit The bottom of the ocean food chain Global ocean...

329

Strong wind forcing of the ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Geophysical Research-Oceans, 107 (C2). Vanderbilt, V .in the subtropical pacific ocean. Science, 316, 1017^1021.simulations of the upper ocean's response to hurricane felix

Zedler, Sarah E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Connecting Changing Ocean Circulation with Changing Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of changing ocean currents on climate change is evaluated by comparing an earth system models response to increased CO2 with and without an ocean circulation response. Inhibiting the ocean circulation response, by specifying a ...

Michael Winton; Stephen M. Griffies; Bonita L. Samuels; Jorge L. Sarmiento; Thomas L. Frlicher

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print Friday, 21 June 2013 10:08 The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the...

332

Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) Summary The COSIM project develops advanced ocean and ice models for evaluating the role of ocean and ice in high-latitude climate...

333

Ocean Tidal and Wave Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

First published in 2000, the annual Renewable Energy Technical Assessment Guide (TAG-RE) provides a consistent basis for evaluating the economic feasibility of renewable generation technologies. This excerpt from the 2005 TAG-RE addresses ocean tidal and wave energy conversion technologies, which offer promise for converting the significant energy potential available in ocean tidal currents and waves to electricity in the future.

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

334

Ocean Navitas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Navitas Navitas Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean Navitas Address Nursery House Place United Kingdom Zip DN21 5BQ Sector Ocean Product Ocean Navitas was incorporated in May 2006 by experienced engineers, businessmen and sailing enthusiasts David Hunt, James McCague and Simon Condry. Website http://www.oceannavitas.com Region United Kingdom References Ocean NavitasUNIQ75db538f85b32404-ref-000014E2-QINU LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Ocean Navitas NaREC This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: Aegir Dynamo This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it.

335

Ocean - FAQ | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FAQ FAQ Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean Frequently Asked Questions Following are some Frequently Asked Questions, we hope to add to this list as we hear from you. Questions What is Ocean.data.gov? How can I use this resource? What data can I expect to find here? Where do these data come from? Can data from State and academic sources be included in this portal? Who can suggest data and information to be included in Ocean.data.gov? Who decides what data are included? How do I get involved? How does this differ from other data efforts such as regional data portals? Where do I find information about data standards, metadata standards, and formats? Can we provide feedback about a particular dataset?

336

The Global Impact of Ocean Nourishment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the ocean to sequester atmospheric carbon dioxide and to increase the sustainable fish catch. The present annual level of photosynthetic activity of the upper ocean is...

337

Green Ocean Wave Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Wave Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Green Ocean Wave Energy Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:http:www.greenoceanwa Region United States LinkedIn...

338

Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is...

339

Waste Hoist  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

45-ton Rope-Guide Friction Hoist Completely enclosed (for contamination control), the waste hoist at WIPP is a modern friction hoist with rope guides. With a 45-ton capacity, it...

340

Oceanic shipping soundscapes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shipping and wind are key sources in the oceanic soundscape that affects marine mammal habitats. A new method of forming such soundscapes is presented. Frequency and range dependent transmission losses are precomputed from a grid of virtual sources using fast ray computations (BELLHOP) on a specified number of radial lines. Each radial line samples the bathymetry along its bearing out to a given maximum range. A shipping soundscape is then estimated by assigning a source spectral density level (dB re 1 ? Pa2/Hz) and a shipping density (number of ships per unit area per unit time) to the various grid nodes. Such density values are obtained directly from ships carrying an automatic identification system (AIS) that transmit information such as ship type

Christian de Moustier; Michael Porter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Atmospheric and Oceanic Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction It is widely recognized that internal tides have strong influence on the global thermohaline circulation, because it contribute significantly to deep ocean mixing, the essential process for the maintenance of the thermohaline circulation [Munk and Wunsch, 1998]. Internal tides generated by strong tide-topography interactions occasionally break causing intense turbulent mixing [Lien and Gregg, 2001]. Turbulent mixing may also be induced far from wave generation sites, because propagating internal tides can nonlinearly interact with the background internal waves and cascade part of their energy down to small scales where breaking can occur. The East China Sea and adjacent seas are one of the most important generation regions of internal tides, and hence the associated turbulent mixing. Indeed, using a two-dimensional analytical model, Baines [1982] predicted that the continental shelf slope in the East China Sea is the second largest generator of the M 2 internal tide amon

Niwa; Group Representative

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Advanced Electrochemical Waste Forms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes ... Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b.

343

The Coal-Waste Artificial Reef Program (C-WARP): A New Resource  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Coal-Waste Artificial Reef Program (C-WARP): A New Resource Potential for Fishing Reef ABSTRACT-Thefeasibility ofusing solid blocks of waste materialfrom coal:firedpower plantslor underwater (scrubber) sludge from coal-burning power stations. was constructed in the Atlantic Ocean offLong Island. N

344

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 158 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the Ocean Drilling Program Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany) Institut Français

345

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 160 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for Ocean Drilling Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany

346

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 160 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for Ocean Drilling Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany

347

Thermodynamic Analysis of Ocean Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calculating a streamfunction as function of depth and density is proposed as a new way of analyzing the thermodynamic character of the overturning circulation in the global ocean. The sign of an overturning cell in this streamfunction directly ...

J. Nycander; J. Nilsson; K. Ds; G. Brostrm

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Humidity Profiles over the Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The distribution of water vapor in the atmosphere affects climate change through radiative balance and surface evaporation. The variabilities of atmospheric humidity profile over oceans from daily to interannual time scales were examined using ...

W. Timothy Liu; Wenqing Tang; Pearn P. Niiler

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

The Oceanic Eddy Heat Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rectified eddy heat transport is calculated from a global high-resolution ocean general circulation model. The eddy heat transport is found to be strong in the western boundary currents, the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, and the equatorial ...

Steven R. Jayne; Jochem Marotzke

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Ocean Tidal Dissipation and its Role in Solar System Satellite Evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Magma ocean dissipation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .of the ocean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Tidally-driven flow in global satellite oceans

Chen, Erinna

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

MPAS-Ocean Development Update  

SciTech Connect

The Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) is a modeling framework developed jointly between NCAR and LANL, built to allow core developers to: rapidly develop new dynamical cores, and leverage improvements made to shared codes. MPAS-Ocean (MPAS-O) is a functioning ocean model capable of high resolution, or highly vairable resolution simulations. The first MPAS-O publication is expected by the end of the year.

Jacobsen, Douglas W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ringler, Todd D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Petersen, Mark R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jones, Philip W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Maltrud, Mathew E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

352

Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Analysis Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Analysis A disposal concept consists of three parts: waste inventory (7 waste types examined), geologic setting (e.g., clay/shale, salt, crystalline, other sedimentary), and the engineering concept of operations (range of generic operational concepts examined). Two major categories for waste package emplacement modes are identified: 1) "open" where extended ventilation can remove heat for many years following waste emplacement underground; and 2) "enclosed" modes for clay/shale and salt media where waste packages are emplaced in direct or close contact with natural or engineered materials which may have temperature limits that constrain thermal

353

Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Analysis Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Analysis A disposal concept consists of three parts: waste inventory (7 waste types examined), geologic setting (e.g., clay/shale, salt, crystalline, other sedimentary), and the engineering concept of operations (range of generic operational concepts examined). Two major categories for waste package emplacement modes are identified: 1) "open" where extended ventilation can remove heat for many years following waste emplacement underground; and 2) "enclosed" modes for clay/shale and salt media where waste packages are emplaced in direct or close contact with natural or engineered materials which may have temperature limits that constrain thermal

354

Understanding Cement Waste Forms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 29, 2009 ... Ongoing nuclear operations, decontamination and decommissioning, salt waste disposal, and closure of liquid waste tanks result in...

355

Waste Minimization Contents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About the 1996 International Symposium on Extraction and Processing for the Treatment and Minimization of Wastes: Waste Minimization Contents...

356

Possible global environmental impacts of solid waste practices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pollutants resulting from the management of solid waste have been shown to affect the air, land, oceans, and waterways. In addition, solid wastes have other, more indirect impacts such as reduction in feedstocks of natural resources, because useful materials are disposed of rather than recycled. The objective of this study is to evaluate solid waste management practices that have negative implications on the global environment and develop recommendations for reducing such impacts. Recommendations identifying needed changes are identified that will reduce global impacts of solid waste practices in the future. The scope of this study includes the range of non-hazardous solid wastes produced within our society, including municipal solid waste (MSW) and industrial solid waste (ISW), as well as industry-specific wastes from activities such as construction, demolition, and landclearing. Most solid waste management decisions continue to be made and implemented at very local levels, predominantly with a short-term focus to respond to relatively immediate pressures of landfill shortages, funding problems, political considerations, and the like. In this rush to address immediate local problems, little consideration is being given to potential impacts, either short- or long-term, at the national or global level resulting from solid waste management practices. More and more, the cumulative impacts from local decisions concerning solid waste management are beginning to manifest themselves in broader, longer-term impacts than are being addressed by the decision-makers or, at the very least, are presenting a greater and greater potential for such impacts.

Davis, M.M.; Holter, G.M.; DeForest, T.J.; Stapp, D.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Dibari, J.C. [Heritage College, Toppenish, WA (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

List of Municipal Solid Waste Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste Incentives Waste Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 172 Municipal Solid Waste Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 172) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Advanced Clean Energy Project Grants (Texas) State Grant Program Texas Commercial Industrial Utility Biomass Municipal Solid Waste No Advanced Energy Fund (Ohio) Public Benefits Fund Ohio Commercial Industrial Institutional Residential Utility Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Fuel Cells Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Electric Hydroelectric energy Landfill Gas Microturbines Municipal Solid Waste Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes Alternative Energy Law (AEL) (Iowa) Renewables Portfolio Standard Iowa Investor-Owned Utility Anaerobic Digestion

358

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industrial users. Costs and per kWh increased from to 2.7rf-30, 1978, the average cost per kWh was 6.09i for residential

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

District (Hawaii) Electrical Power Grid--Hawaii . . . . . .Electrical Power Grid--Puerto Rico . . . . Ammonia andocean water to produce electrical power by means of gas or

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Ocean thermal energy. Quarterly report, April-June 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly report includes summaries of the following tasks: (1) OTEC pilot plant conceptual design review; (2) OTEC methanol; (3) management decision requirements for OTEC construction; (4) hybrid geothermal - OTEC (GEOTEC) power plant performance estimates; and (5) supervision of testing of pneumatic wave energy conversion system.

Not Available

1982-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Ocean thermal energy. Quarterly report, January-March 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly report summarizes work of the following tasks as of March 31, 1982: OTEC pilot plant conceptual design review; OTEC methanol; review of electrolyzer development programs and requirements; financial and legal considerations in OTEC implementation; potential Navy sites for GEOTEC systems; hybrid geothermal-OTEC power plants: single-cycle performance estimates; and supervision of testing of pneumatic wave energy conversion system.

Not Available

1982-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

362

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cable contractors, tropical cyclones and geology. Dept. ofpressure center. Tropical cyclones are usually accompaniedor plankton. case of 'TROPICAL CYCLONE TUNICATES TURBIDITY

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

distur- bances due to carbon dioxide releases and sea-how- ever, the carbon dioxide releases from large- scalewith other man-induced carbon dioxide releases to result in

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Degradation Processes for Chlorine in Saline Waters .92-101. Fate and effects of chlorine Bogdanov, D.V. , V.A.control alternatives to chlorine for power plant cooling

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and commercialization and a DOE requirement for the SAR. TheDOE Operations (SAR), established the uniform requirement todocument requirements and updating schedule of the SAR (DOE,

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

proposed or existing oil or gas exploration areas, site-useOTEC Liability - Gas and oil exploration and exploitation onor natural gas; however, some oil exploration is beginning,

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Response of oceanic hydrate-bearing sediments to thermal stresses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shales to evaluate whether the predicted salinity distribution will be a cause for concern during similar production

Moridis, G.J.; Kowalsky, M.B.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion - Energy Explained, Your Guide To ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Landfill Gas and Biogas; Biomass & the Environment See also: Biofuels. Biofuels: Ethanol & Biodiesel. Ethanol; Use of Ethanol; Ethanol & the Environment; Biodiesel;

369

Response of oceanic hydrate-bearing sediments to thermal stresses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fluid consistency with evi- dence of bubbling gas) in the dissociating outer annulus (source: Deep Sea Drilling

Moridis, G.J.; Kowalsky, M.B.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Ocean thermal energy. Quarterly report, October-December 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly report summarizes work on the following tasks: OTEC methanol; approaches for financing OTEC proof-of-concept experimental vessels; investigation of OTEC-ammonia as an alternative fuel; review of electrolyzer development programs and requirements; hybrid geothermal-OTEC power plants: single-cycle performance; estimates; and hybrid geothermal-OTEC power plants: dual-cycle performance estimates.

Not Available

1981-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

371

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

System Tube-in-She11 Heat Exchanger . . . . . . . . .possible Plate-Type Heat Exchanger Estimated Relationship~res isolation of the heat and exchanger module, purging of

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power system development. Conceptual design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conceptual design of a power system for application to the OTEC 100-MWe Demonstration Plant is presented. System modeling, design, and performance are described in detail. Materials considerations, module assembly, and cost considerations are discussed. Appendices include: A) systems analysis, B) general arrangements, C) system equipment, D) ammonia system material considerations; E) ammonia cycle, F) auxiliary subsystems, G) DACS availability analysis, H) heat exchanger supporting data, I) rotating machinery, and J) platform influences. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

373

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

This programmatic environmental analysis is an initial assessment of OTEC technology considering development, demonstration and commercialization; it is concluded that the OTEC development program should continue because the development, demonstration, and commercialization on a single-plant deployment basis should not present significant environmental impacts. However, several areas within the OTEC program require further investigation in order to assess the potential for environmental impacts from OTEC operation, particularly in large-scale deployments and in defining alternatives to closed-cycle biofouling control: (1) Larger-scale deployments of OTEC clusters or parks require further investigations in order to assess optimal platform siting distances necessary to minimize adverse environmental impacts. (2) The deployment and operation of the preoperational platform (OTEC-1) and future demonstration platforms must be carefully monitored to refine environmental assessment predictions, and to provide design modifications which may mitigate or reduce environmental impacts for larger-scale operations. These platforms will provide a valuable opportunity to fully evaluate the intake and discharge configurations, biofouling control methods, and both short-term and long-term environmental effects associated with platform operations. (3) Successful development of OTEC technology to use the maximal resource capabilities and to minimize environmental effects will require a concerted environmental management program, encompassing many different disciplines and environmental specialties.

Sands, M. D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by means of gas or steam turbines. temperature The minimalby means of gas or steam turbines. The minimal operationalproblems. present steam turbine hardware by a factor of 11

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Response of oceanic hydrate-bearing sediments to thermal stresses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and cumulative mass of water produced from the gravel pack (gas volume and water mass produced from the gravel pack (VCof gas produced from the annular gravel pack QP, mass water

Moridis, G.J.; Kowalsky, M.B.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in size, and will produce baseload systems primarily land-and intended power use (baseload electricity or at-seathe ultimate use of providing baseload products, ammonia and

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and intended power use (baseload electri- city or at-seaship), and power usages (baseload electricity, ammonia andship con- ~lguratlons. For baseload power production, the

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fauna associated with offshore platforms 1n the northeasternrisks and safety of offshore drilling platforms. ation andPlatform Effects Attraction - Fish congregate around offshore

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrical Power Grid--Puerto Rico . . . . Ammonia andin the coastal waters of Puerto Rico. Unpublished. HarborAuthority, San Juan, Puerto Rico. Markel, A.L. VA. Personal

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. L. 1979. A review of water intake screening options forcapacity of cooling water intake structures for minimizingvessels. a. Warm and Cold Water Intakes Volumes - A single

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power station on northeastern Long Island Sound, USA. Marinepower cycle will entrain and impinge members of the marinesuch as a power plant. A species of marine plankton

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Oceanic Influences on the Seasonal Cycle in Evaporation over the Indian Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The annual mean and seasonal cycle in latent heating over the Indian Ocean are investigated using a simple, analytical ocean model and a 3D, numerical, ocean model coupled to a prescribed atmosphere, which permits interaction through sea surface ...

Roxana C. Wajsowicz; Paul S. Schopf

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

In a Perfect Ocean: The State of the Fisheries and Ecosystems in the North Atlantic Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review: In a Perfect Ocean: The State of the Fisheriesin the North Atlantic Ocean By Daniel Pauly and Jay MacleanJay Maclean. In a Perfect Ocean: The State of the Fisheries

Miller, Ryder W.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

The dynamic response of oceanic hydrate deposits to ocean temperature change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

during transit through the ocean water column Geophys. Res.hydrate in the world's oceans. Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 8,of methane hydrate in ocean sediment. Energy and Fuels, 19,

Reagan, Matthew T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Ocean Barrier Layers Effect on Tropical Cyclone Intensification  

SciTech Connect

Improving a tropical cyclone's forecast and mitigating its destructive potential requires knowledge of various environmental factors that influence the cyclone's path and intensity. Herein, using a combination of observations and model simulations, we systematically demonstrate that tropical cyclone intensification is significantly affected by salinity-induced barrier layers, which are 'quasi-permanent' features in the upper tropical oceans. When tropical cyclones pass over regions with barrier layers, the increased stratification and stability within the layer reduce storm-induced vertical mixing and sea surface temperature cooling. This causes an increase in enthalpy flux from the ocean to the atmosphere and, consequently, an intensification of tropical cyclones. On average, the tropical cyclone intensification rate is nearly 50% higher over regions with barrier layers, compared to regions without. Our finding, which underscores the importance of observing not only the upper-ocean thermal structure but also the salinity structure in deep tropical barrier layer regions, may be a key to more skillful predictions of tropical cyclone intensities through improved ocean state estimates and simulations of barrier layer processes. As the hydrological cycle responds to global warming, any associated changes in the barrier layer distribution must be considered in projecting future tropical cyclone activity.

Balaguru, Karthik; Chang, P.; Saravanan, R.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xu, Zhao; Li, M.; Hsieh, J.

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

386

Deployment, release and recovery of ocean riser pipes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ocean thermal energy conversion facility includes a long pipe assembly which is supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. Cold water flows to the facility from deep in the ocean. The pipe assembly comprises an elongate pipe construction and a weight connected to the lower end of the construction by a line of selected length. A floatation collar is connected to the construction at its upper end to cause the construction to have positive buoyancy and a center of buoyancy closer to the upper end of the construction than its center of mass. The weight renders the entire pipe assembly negatively buoyant. In the event that support of the pipe assembly should be lost, as by release of the assembly from the facility hull in an emergency, the assembly sinks to the ocean floor where it is moored by the weight. The pipe construction floats submerged above the ocean floor in a substantially vertical attitude which facilitates recovery of the assembly.

Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA); Wetmore, Sherman B. (Westminster, CA); McNary, James F. (Santa Ana, CA)

1980-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

387

Business Energy Investment Tax Credit (ITC) (Federal) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Direct Use, Geothermal Electric, Geothermal Heat Pumps, Hydroelectric, Landfill Gas, Microturbines, Municipal Solid Waste, Ocean Thermal, Photovoltaics, Small...

388

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Program. Volume 2. Preoperational ocean test platform  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The supporting data used to prepare an environmental assessment for the OTEC-1 test facility are presented. The candidate sites (Keahole Point, Hawaii; Punta Tuna, Puerto Rico; offshore New Orleans; and offshore Tampa) are characterized and an annotated bibliography is included for each site. Estimates of the water discharge plume and water suction plume geometry are given. A summary of the calculations used to evoluate the water intake and discharge impact field is presented. An annotated list of applicable health and safety regulations are presented, and a general annotated bibliography of OTEC literature is included. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Linear and nonlinear transient heat conduction in nuclear waste repositories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analytical solutions of thermal problems connected with the disposal of nuclear wastes are presented. Linear and nonlinear diffusion problems are analyzed considering time-dependent heat sources. Comparisons between the temperature distributions at a ...

C. A. Estrada-Gasca; M. H. Cobble

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource! energy forum Case Studies from Estonia, Switzerland, Germany BREFs and their BATs Next Generation of Waste Fired Power Plants: Getting the most out of your trash Bossart,· ABB Waste-to-Energy Plants Edmund Fleck,· ESWET Marcel van Berlo,· Afval Energie Bedrijf From

Columbia University

391

NOS Point Forecast Guidance to Weather and Ocean Conditions ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NOS Point Forecast Guidance to Weather and Ocean Conditions Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities ...

392

Mechanisms of the meridional heat transport in the Southern Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

atlas of the Southern Ocean, Natural Environment ResearchMHT. Keywords Southern Ocean . Meridional heat transport .1 Introduction The Southern Ocean (SO) circulation plays an

Volkov, Denis L.; Fu, Lee-Lueng; Lee, Tong

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Observation of Physical Fluxes Between an Estuary and the Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

between the coastal ocean and a semi-enclosed estuarinebetween the coastal ocean and a semi-enclosed estuarinebetween the coastal ocean and a semi-enclosed estuarine

Stacey, Mark; Powell, Thomas

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Depth profiling ambient noise in the deep ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acoustic Ambient Noise in the Ocean: Spectra and Sources,"and Osterhus, S. (1999). "Ocean Ambient Sound Instrumenta Subsurface Package," J. Atmos. Ocean. Tech. 16, 1118-1126.

Barclay, David Readshaw

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Ocean Acidification Impacts on Shellfish Workshop: Findings and Recommendations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TheworkshoptoinvestigateoceanacidificationimpactsonGrowersAssociation. OceanAcidificationImpactsonProceedings IntegratedOceanObservingSystems California

Dickson, Andrew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo-Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo-affect the dynam- ics and thermodynamics of the upper ocean.

Drushka, Kyla

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Plasma Arc Technology Dedicated to Solving Military Waste Problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A thermal plasma is an electrically conductive gas capable of generating temperatures up to 10,000C near its column. The energy generated by plasma arcs has recently been applied to hazardous waste disposal. Since 1989 the US Army Corps of Engineers Construction Engineering Research Laboratories have been active participants in research and development toward establishing plasma arc technology (PAT) as an efficient, economical and safe hazardous waste immobilization tool. In the U.S. the removal and disposal of asbestos contaminated material (ACM) generate significant amounts of hazardous waste. Recently, PAT has been used to convert ACM safely and efficiently into an innocuous ceramic substance no longer requiring Class I disposal. In addition to ACM waste disposal, PAT meets the waste disposal needs of pyrotechnic smoke assemblies, thermal batteries, proximity fuses, and contaminated soil. This paper will provide an overview of PAT and discuss Army and Department of Defense hazardous waste disposal needs.

Smith, E. D.; Zaghloul, H. H.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

ARM - Field Campaign - Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TDCIMS) Thermal Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TDCIMS) Related Campaigns Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAMAZON 2014) 2014.01.01, Martin, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon: Thermal Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TDCIMS) 2014.01.01 - 2014.10.31 Lead Scientist : Jim Smith Description As part of both GoAmazon2014 IOPs, the Thermal Desorption Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TDCIMS) will perform measurements of the molecular composition of 10-50 nm diameter particles. TDCIMS observations will be used to address two objectives the GoAmazon. For studying the interactions between anthropogenic and biogenic emissions, the TDCIMS will

399

Ocean - Tools | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tools Tools Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean Decision-Support Tools (DSTs): Science and information are fundamental to effective marine planning. Marine planning involves inclusive discussion and analyses of the status and potential uses of 3-dimensional areas of coastal, marine and Great Lakes ecosystems (including the water column) and their potential changes over time. Relevant spatial data and derived interpretive and analytical products (i.e. decision-support tools) help inform all phases of the marine planning process. To date, several decision-support tools have been develop to support marine planning efforts. Marine planners should carefully evaluate which tools best apply to their region or specific issue or project. Below is a list of

400

Recovering Industrial Waste Heat by the Means of Thermoelectricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

]. When waste heat, geothermal heat and solar is the heat source, the cost of thermal input canRecovering Industrial Waste Heat by the Means of Thermoelectricity Spring 2010 Department available thermoelectric modules and to build a thermoelectric power generator demonstration unit

Kjelstrup, Signe

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Location and identification of radioactive waste in Massachusetts Bay  

SciTech Connect

The accurate location and identification of hazardous waste materials dumped in the world`s oceans are becoming an increasing concern. For years, the oceans have been viewed as a convenient and economical place to dispose of all types of waste. In all but a few cases, major dump sites have been closed leaving behind years of accumulated debris. The extent of past environmental damage, the possibility of continued environmental damage, and the possibility of hazardous substances reaching the human food chain need to be carefully investigated. This paper reports an attempt to accurately locate and identify the radioactive component of the waste material. The Department of Energy`s Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL), in support of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), provided the precision navigation system and prototype underwater radiological monitoring equipment that were used during this project. The paper also describes the equipment used, presents the data obtained, and discusses future equipment development.

Colton, D.P.; Louft, H.L.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

402

Approximation of Ocean Heat Storage by OceanAtmosphere Energy Exchange: Implications for Seasonal Cycle Mixed Layer Ocean Formulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The approximation of ocean heat storage by the net surface energy flux and the implications for zonal mean SST simulation using mixed layer ocean formulation are examined. The analysis considers both constant and variable depth mixed layers. ...

Robert G. Gallimore; David D. Houghton

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Waste Hoist  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Primary Hoist: 45-ton Rope-Guide Friction Hoist Largest friction hoist in the world when it was built in 1985 Completely enclosed (for contamination control), the waste hoist at WIPP is a modern friction hoist with rope guides (uses a balanced counterweight and tail ropes). With a 45-ton capacity, it was the largest friction hoist in the world when it was built in 1986. Hoist deck footprint: 2.87m wide x 4.67m long Hoist deck height: 2.87m wide x 7.46m high Access height to the waste hoist deck is limited by a high-bay door at 4.14m high Nominal configuration is 2-cage (over/under), with bottom (equipment) cage interior height of 4.52m The photo, at left, shows the 4.14m high-bay doors at the top collar of the waste hoist shaft. The perpendicular cross section of the opening is 3.5m x 4.14m, but the bottom cage cross section is 2.87m x 4.5m (and 4.67m into the plane of the photo).

404

Warm Bias and Parameterization of Boundary Upwelling in Ocean Models  

SciTech Connect

It has been demonstrated that Eastern Boundary Currents (EBC) are a baroclinic intensification of the interior circulation of the ocean due to the emergence of mesoscale eddies in response to the sharp buoyancy gradients driven by the wind-stress and the thermal surface forcing. The eddies accomplish the heat and salt transport necessary to insure that the subsurface flow is adiabatic, compensating for the heat and salt transport effected by the mean currents. The EBC thus generated occurs on a cross-shore scale of order 20-100 km, and thus this scale needs to be resolved in climate models in order to capture the meridional transport by the EBC. Our result indicate that changes in the near shore currents on the oceanic eastern boundaries are linked not just to local forcing, such as coastal changes in the winds, but depend on the basin-wide circulation as well.

Cessi, Paola; Wolfe, Christopher

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

405

Ocean energy systems. Quarterly report, October-December 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research progress is reported on developing Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) systems that will provide synthetic fuels (e.g., methanol), energy-intensive products such as ammonia (for fertilizers and chemicals), and aluminum. The work also includes assessment and design concepts for hybrid plants, such as geothermal-OTEC (GEOTEC) plants. Another effort that began in the spring of 1982 is a technical advisory role to DOE with respect to their management of the conceptual design activity of the two industry teams that are designing offshore OTEC pilot plants that could deliver power to Oahu, Hawaii. In addition, a program is underway in which tests of a different kind of ocean-energy device, a turbine that is air-driven as a result of wave action in a chamber, are being planned. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 31 December 1982.

Not Available

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Ocean energy systems. Quarterly report, January-March 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on the development of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) systems that will provide synthetic fuels (e.g., methanol), energy-intensive products such as ammonia (for fertilizers and chemicals), and aluminum. The work also includes assessment and design concepts for hybrid plants, such as geothermal-OTEC (GEOTEC) plants. Another effort that began in the spring of 1982 is a technical advisory role to DOE with respect to their management of the conceptual and preliminary design activity of industry teams that are designing a shelf-mounted offshore OTEC pilot plant that could deliver power to Oahu, Hawaii. In addition, a program is underway to evaluate and test the Pneumatic Wave-Energy Conversion System (PWECS), an ocean-energy device consisting of a turbine that is air-driven as a result of wave action in a chamber. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 31 March 1983.

Not Available

1983-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

407

Absorption Cooling Optimizes Thermal Design for Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contrary to popular concept, in most cases, thermal energy is the real VALUE in cogeneration and not the electricity. The proper consideration of the thermal demands is equal to or more important than the electrical demands. High efficiency two-stage absorption chillers of the type used at Rice University Cogen Plant offer the most attractive utilization of recoverable thermal energy. With a coefficient of performance (COP) up to 1.25, the two-stage, parallel flow absorption chiller can offer over fifty (50) percent more useful thermal energy from the same waste heat source--gas turbine exhaust, I.C. engine exhaust and jacketwater, incinerator exhaust, or steam turbine extraction.

Hufford, P. E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Medical School Biomedical Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medical School Biomedical Waste Labware, gloves, pipets, pipet tips Stock cultures, bacterial with or without needles, razor blades, scalpel blades) Key: Pathological waste BL1 & BL2 waste (low risk ­ LR) BL2 waste (moderate risk - MR)/BL3 waste Blood Blood Autoclave Needle box Metal Cart Must either bleach

Cooley, Lynn

409

Waste Sorting Activity Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Sorting Activity Introduction: This waste sorting game was originally designed to be one have completed the waste sorting activity quickly, no team was able to complete the waste sorting task who were unfamiliar with Dalhousie's waste management system. Goals: The primary goal of the activity

Beaumont, Christopher

410

University of Waste Procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Maryland Hazardous And Regulated Waste Procedures Manual Revised July 2001 #12;Review II. HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT III. BIOLOGICAL, PATHOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL WASTE (BPMW) MANAGEMENT IV. LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE (LLRW) MANAGEMENT V. EMERGENCY PROCEDURES VI. WASTE MINIMIZATION VII

Rubloff, Gary W.

411

Ocean Color Web | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Color Web Ocean Color Web Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean » Data Ocean Color Web Dataset Summary Description A comprehensive image analysis package for the processing, display, analysis, and quality control of ocean color data. Tags {Ocean,"water color",spectrometer,"sea viewing",MODIS,"marine biology",NASA,GSFC,"Goddard Space Flight Center"} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet Ease of Access 0 No votes yet Dataset Additional Information Last Updated 15-Jan-2010 Publisher National Aeronautics and Space Administration Contact Name Contact Email Gene.C.Feldman@nasa.gov Unique Identifier NASA-1547

412

Dynamics of global ocean heat transport variability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A state-of-the-art, high-resolution ocean general circulation model is used to estimate the time-dependent global ocean heat transport and investigate its dynamics. The north-south heat transport is the prime manifestation ...

Jayne, Steven Robert

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Open Ocean Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Open Ocean Energy Ltd Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:http:www.open-ocean-e LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No...

414

Buoyancy Arrest and ShelfOcean Exchange  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When steady flow in a stratified ocean passes between the continental slope and open ocean, its ability to cross isobaths is potentially limited by buoyancy arrest. If the bottom Ekman transport vanishes and there are no interior stresses, then ...

K. H. Brink

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Dynamic and Thermodynamic Regulation of Ocean Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relative roles of clouds, surface evaporation, and ocean heat transport in limiting maximum sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the western Pacific warm pool are investigated by means of simple and intermediate coupled oceanatmosphere models. ...

Tim Li; Timothy F. Hogan; C-P. Chang

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

An Ocean Observing System for Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Designs and implementation are proceeding for a Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) and a Global Climate Observing System (GCOS). The initial design for the ocean component of the GCOS, which is also the climate module of the GOOS, was completed ...

Worth D. Nowlin Jr.; Neville Smith; George Needler; Peter K. Taylor; Robert Weller; Ray Schmitt; Liliane Merlivat; Alain Vzina; Arthur Alexiou; Michael McPhaden; Massaaki Wakatsuchi

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Assimilation of Altimeter Data into Ocean Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of assimilating satellite altimeter data into an ocean model is considered for the case in which the ocean currents are weak, so that they can be represented by a superposition of linear Rossby waves, and the altimeter measurements ...

D. J. Webb; A. Moore

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

A Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development is described of a Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (COADS)the result of a cooperative project to collect global weather observations taken near the ocean's surface since 1854, primarily from merchant ships, into a compact and ...

Scott D. Woodruff; Ralph J. Slutz; Roy L. Jenne; Peter M. Steurer

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Continental insulation, mantle cooling, and the surface area of oceans and continents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continental insulation, mantle cooling, and the surface area of oceans and continents A. Lenardica, Rice University, Houston, TX 77251-1892, United States b School of Mathematical Sciences, Building 28 May 2005 Abstract It is generally assumed that continents, acting as thermal insulation above

Manga, Michael

420

Transit-Time Distributions in a Global Ocean Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results from a simulation of the ocean transit-time distribution (TTD) for global and regional ocean surface boundary conditions are presented based on a 5000-yr integration using the Parallel Ocean Program ocean general circulation model. ...

Synte Peacock; Mathew Maltrud

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Disposal of Rocky Flats residues as waste  

SciTech Connect

Work is underway at the Rocky Flats Plant to evaluate alternatives for the removal of a large inventory of plutonium-contaminated residues from the plant. One alternative under consideration is to package the residues as transuranic wastes for ultimate shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Current waste acceptance criteria and transportation regulations require that approximately 1000 cubic yards of residues be repackaged to produce over 20,000 cubic yards of WIPP certified waste. The major regulatory drivers leading to this increase in waste volume are the fissile gram equivalent, surface radiation dose rate, and thermal power limits. In the interest of waste minimization, analyses have been conducted to determine, for each residue type, the controlling criterion leading to the volume increase, the impact of relaxing that criterion on subsequent waste volume, and the means by which rules changes may be implemented. The results of this study have identified the most appropriate changes to be proposed in regulatory requirements in order to minimize the costs of disposing of Rocky Flats residues as transuranic wastes.

Dustin, D.F.; Sendelweck, V.S. [EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Plant; Rivera, M.A. [Lamb Associates, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 106 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the following agencies: Australia/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for the Ocean Drilling Program Deutsche

423

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 201 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the following agencies: Australia/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for the Ocean Drilling Program Deutsche

424

The 1981 ocean tomography experiment: Preliminary results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary results from a 1981 test ocean acoustic tomography experiment are presented. The system deployed in the southern North Atlantic

The Ocean Tomography Group; R. C. Spindel

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Constraining Oceanic dust deposition using surface 1 ocean dissolved Al 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constraining Oceanic dust deposition using surface 1 ocean dissolved Al 2 Qin Han, J. Keith Moore, Charles Zender, Chris Measures, David Hydes 3 Abstract 4 We use measurements of ocean surface dissolved Al and Deposition 6 (DEAD) model, to constrain dust deposition to the oceans. Our Al database contains 7 all

Zender, Charles

426

The CCSM4 Ocean Component  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ocean component of the Community Climate System Model version 4 (CCSM4) is described, and its solutions from the twentieth-century (20C) simulations are documented in comparison with observations and those of CCSM3. The improvements to the ...

Gokhan Danabasoglu; Susan C. Bates; Bruce P. Briegleb; Steven R. Jayne; Markus Jochum; William G. Large; Synte Peacock; Steve G. Yeager

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Retrieval/ex situ thermal treatment scoring interaction report  

SciTech Connect

A retrieval/ex situ thermal treatment technology process for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory transuranic waste pits and trenches is present. A system performance score is calculated, and assumptions, requirements, and reference baseline technologies for all subelements are included.

Raivo, B.D.; Richardson, J.G.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Transport of Freshwater by the Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global distribution of freshwater transport in the ocean is presented, based on an integration point at Bering Strait, which connects the Pacific and Atlantic oceans via the Artic Ocean. Through Bering Strait, 0.8 106 m3 s?1 of relatively ...

Susan E. Wijffels; Raymond W. Schmitt; Harry L. Bryden; Anders Stigebrandt

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Ocean Circulation Kinetic Energy: Reservoirs, Sources,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The coupling of the generation of different energy forms in the dynamics (in either balanced or wave motions are almost nonexistent in the ocean. www.annualreviews.org · Ocean Circulation Kinetic Energy 255 Annu.Rev.Fluid processes? Are the seemingly different dynamical ranges coupled? 2. THE OCEANIC ENERGY BUDGET We begin

Ferrari, Raffaele

430

Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization (MAWS). Technology summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization(MAWS) concept, actual waste streams are utilized as additive resources for vitrification, which may contain the basic components (glass formers and fluxes) for making a suitable glass or glassy slag. If too much glass former is present, then the melt viscosity or temperature will be too high for processing; while if there is too much flux, then the durability may suffer. Therefore, there are optimum combinations of these two important classes of constituents depending on the criteria required. The challenge is to combine these resources in such a way that minimizes the use of non-waste additives yet yields a processable and durable final waste form for disposal. The benefit to this approach is that the volume of the final waste form is minimized (waste loading maximized) since little or no additives are used and vitrification itself results in volume reduction through evaporation of water, combustion of organics, and compaction of the solids into a non-porous glass. This implies a significant reduction in disposal costs due to volume reduction alone, and minimizes future risks/costs due to the long term durability and leach resistance of glass. This is accomplished by using integrated systems that are both cost-effective and produce an environmentally sound waste form for disposal. individual component technologies may include: vitrification; thermal destruction; soil washing; gas scrubbing/filtration; and, ion-exchange wastewater treatment. The particular combination of technologies will depend on the waste streams to be treated. At the heart of MAWS is vitrification technology, which incorporates all primary and secondary waste streams into a final, long-term, stabilized glass wasteform. The integrated technology approach, and view of waste streams as resources, is innovative yet practical to cost effectively treat a broad range of DOE mixed and low-level wastes.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Systematic evaluation of options to avoid generation of noncertifiable transuranic (TRU) waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

At present, >35% of the volume of newly generated transuranic (TRU) waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory is not certifiable for transport to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Noncertifiable waste would constitute 900--1,000 m{sup 3} of the 2,600 m{sup 3} of waste projected during the period of the Environmental Management (EM) Accelerated Cleanup: Focus on 2006 plan (DOE, 1997). Volume expansion of this waste to meet thermal limits would increase the shipped volume to {approximately}5,400 m{sup 3}. This paper presents the results of efforts to define which TRU waste streams are noncertifiable at Los Alamos, and to prioritize site-specific options to reduce the volume of certifiable waste over the period of the EM Accelerated Cleanup Plan. A team of Los Alamos TRU waste generators and waste managers reviewed historic generation rates and thermal loads and current practices to estimate the projected volume and thermal load of TRU waste streams for Fiscal Years 1999--2006. These data defined four major problem TRU waste streams. Estimates were also made of the volume expansion that would be required to meet the permissible wattages for all waste. The four waste streams defined were: (1) {sup 238}Pu-contaminated combustible waste from production of Radioactive Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) with {sup 238}Pu activity which exceeds allowable shipping limits by 10--100X. (2) {sup 241}Am-contaminated cement waste from plutonium recovery processes (nitric and hydrochloric acid recovery) are estimated to exceed thermal limits by {approximately}3X. (3) {sup 239}Pu-contaminated combustible waste, mainly organic waste materials contaminated with {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Am, is estimated to exceed thermal load requirements by a factor of {approximately}2X. (4) Oversized metal waste objects, (especially gloveboxes), cannot be shipped as is to WIPP because they will not fit in a standard waste box or drum.

Boak, J.M.; Kosiewicz, S.T.; Triay, I.; Gruetzmacher, K.; Montoya, A.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

A Method to Estimate Three-Dimensional Thermal Structure from Satellite Altimetry Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new empirical method to estimate mesoscale three-dimensional oceanic thermal structures from near-real-time satellite altimetry data is presented. The method uses a two-layer model with a novel set of empirical parameters for stratification. ...

Akiko Takano; Hidekatsu Yamazaki; Takeyoshi Nagai; Osamu Honda

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Removing Unwanted Fluctuations in the AVHRR Thermal Calibration Data Using Robust Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study deals with analysis of thermal calibration of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) aboard National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) spacecrafts. In particular, the effects caused by various types of ...

A. P. Trishchenko

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Slurry growth and gas retention in synthetic Hanford waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work seeks to establish chemical and physical processes responsible for the generation and retention of gases within waste from a particular high-level waste tank on the Hanford Site, Tank 101-SY, through the use of synthetic wastes on a laboratory scale. The goal of these activities is to support the development of mitigation/remediation strategies for Tank 101-SY. Laboratory studies of aged synthetic waste have shown that gas generation occurs thermally at a significant level at current tank temperatures. Gas compositions include the same gases produced in actual tank waste, primarily N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, and H{sub 2}. Gas stoichiometries have been shown to be greatly influenced by several organic and inorganic constituents within the synthetic waste. Retention of gases in the synthetic waste is in the form of bubble attachment to solid particles.

Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.; Scheele, R.D.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Technologies for environmental cleanup: Toxic and hazardous waste management  

SciTech Connect

This is the second in a series of EUROCOURSES conducted under the title, ``Technologies for Environmental Cleanup.`` To date, the series consist of the following courses: 1992, soils and groundwater; 1993, Toxic and Hazardous Waste Management. The 1993 course focuses on recent technological developments in the United States and Europe in the areas of waste management policies and regulations, characterization and monitoring of waste, waste minimization and recycling strategies, thermal treatment technologies, photolytic degradation processes, bioremediation processes, medical waste treatment, waste stabilization processes, catalytic organic destruction technologies, risk analyses, and data bases and information networks. It is intended that this course ill serve as a resource of state-of-the-art technologies and methodologies for the environmental protection manager involved in decisions concerning the management of toxic and hazardous waste.

Ragaini, R.C.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Slurry growth and gas retention in synthetic Hanford waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work seeks to establish chemical and physical processes responsible for the generation and retention of gases within waste from a particular high-level waste tank on the Hanford Site, Tank 101-SY, through the use of synthetic wastes on a laboratory scale. The goal of these activities is to support the development of mitigation/remediation strategies for Tank 101-SY. Laboratory studies of aged synthetic waste have shown that gas generation occurs thermally at a significant level at current tank temperatures. Gas compositions include the same gases produced in actual tank waste, primarily N[sub 2], N[sub 2]O, and H[sub 2]. Gas stoichiometries have been shown to be greatly influenced by several organic and inorganic constituents within the synthetic waste. Retention of gases in the synthetic waste is in the form of bubble attachment to solid particles.

Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.; Scheele, R.D.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Radioactive Waste Management (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section regulates the transportation and disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Minnesota, and establishes a Nuclear Waste Council to monitor the federal high-level radioactive waste...

438

Waste Management Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Management Facility ISO 14001 Registered A wide range of wastes are generated during the normal course of business at BNL. These waste streams are common to many businesses...

439

Turning wastes into high grade ecoproducts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nature of precursors has a strong influence on the structure and properties of the activated carbons (AC). At the same time, their adsorption capacity is determined by the condition of manufacturing during the thermal processes. This study was undertaken ... Keywords: adsorption, depollution, microporosity, renewable ecoproducts, wastes re-use

Georgeta Predeanu

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Waste Logic Decommissioning Waste Manager 2.0 Users Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Decommissioning Waste Manager, part of EPRI's Waste Logic series of computer programs, analyzes decommissioning waste cost and volume reduction strategies with the intent of quantifying the existing waste management program for any given waste generator.

2001-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Design Evolution Study Thermal Operating Methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study provides results supporting the conclusion that the repository can be operated over a varying range of thermal modes and therefore temperatures. In particular, this work focused on limiting the peak, postclosure waste package surface temperature to less than 85 degrees Celsius, a possible limit due to corrosion considerations. These operating modes were compared by varying the waste package in drift spacing (0.1-2.83 meters), drift pitch (drift spacing centerline to centerline of 40-120 meters), ventilation duration (75-300 years), and ventilation efficiency (50-80%). The resulting graphical representation shows where the constant temperature of the waste package (85 degrees Celsius) lies with respect to drift pitch and waste package spacing. The waste considered in this study is the strict youngest fuel first 5 years old fuel. Using only strict youngest fuel first 5 years old fuel in the waste stream results in an average heat load per waste package of 12.48kW/Pkg. With this high average heat load, it is not possible to achieve a maximum waste package surface temperature of 85 degrees Celsius or less. By aging 63% of the strict youngest fuel first 5 years old fuel for 27 years, it becomes possible to maintain the waste package surface temperature at 85 degrees Celsius or less. The 27 years of aging comes from the fact that the repository could be closed in as little as 50 years. It takes 23 years to emplace the waste and therefore the last fuel received for emplacement is 27 years prior to closures. The strict youngest fuel first 5 years old fuel waste stream with 63% aged for 27 years, results in an average power level of 8.4kW/Pkg. This lower heat load allows the controlled parameters of drift pitch, waste package spacing, aging, and ventilation duration to be varied to achieve the desired results. This study compares the hot strict youngest fuel first 5 years old fuel to the previous waste stream, which has an average of 26-year-old fuel. The 26-year-old fuel waste stream has an average power level of 7.2 kW/Pkg. This comparison illustrated how the parameters important to thermal performance differ for these two assumptions about the waste stream.

T.L. Mitchell

2002-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

442

Solid Waste (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The New Mexico Environment Department's Solid Waste Bureau manages solid waste in the state. The Bureau implements and enforces the rules established by the Environmental Improvement Board.

443

Industrial Waste Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9) Page 2 of 7 Industrial Waste Generation Work with Engineered Nanomaterials Power Consumption Historical Contamination (groundwater, soil) Hazardous Waste Generation Atmospheric...

444

Recycling Electronic Waste - Website  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 18, 2010 ... Joined: 2/13/2007. Below is a link to a website that has articles on recycling electronic waste. http://www.scientificamerican....ectronic-waste-...

445

International Trade with Waste.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In this thesis, trade with waste between developed countries and the third world will be presented to analyze whether waste?trading can create a possible (more)

Willn, Jenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Ocean Skeletal Structures Hypotheses and Interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we discuss hypotheses on formation of ocean skeletal structures. These structures entered the ocean together with atmospheric precipitation and were assembled from fragments of skeletal structures present in clouds. We base interpretation of this phenomenon on surface tension forces between fundamental tubular blocks of the investigated structures that may also occur beneath the ocean surface. A capillary model is presented to explain formation of a network of interacting tubes. Data about the nature of ocean skeletal structures can be instrumental in modeling many processes associated with physics of the ocean.

Rantsev-Kartinov, V A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Ocean Skeletal Structures Hypotheses and Interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we discuss hypotheses on formation of ocean skeletal structures. These structures entered the ocean together with atmospheric precipitation and were assembled from fragments of skeletal structures present in clouds. We base interpretation of this phenomenon on surface tension forces between fundamental tubular blocks of the investigated structures that may also occur beneath the ocean surface. A capillary model is presented to explain formation of a network of interacting tubes. Data about the nature of ocean skeletal structures can be instrumental in modeling many processes associated with physics of the ocean.

V. A. Rantsev-Kartinov; C. G. Parigger

2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

448

THERMAL PHASES OF EARTH-LIKE PLANETS: ESTIMATING THERMAL INERTIA FROM ECCENTRICITY, OBLIQUITY, AND DIURNAL FORCING  

SciTech Connect

In order to understand the climate on terrestrial planets orbiting nearby Sun-like stars, one would like to know their thermal inertia. We use a global climate model to simulate the thermal phase variations of Earth analogs and test whether these data could distinguish between planets with different heat storage and heat transport characteristics. In particular, we consider a temperate climate with polar ice caps (like the modern Earth) and a snowball state where the oceans are globally covered in ice. We first quantitatively study the periodic radiative forcing from, and climatic response to, rotation, obliquity, and eccentricity. Orbital eccentricity and seasonal changes in albedo cause variations in the global-mean absorbed flux. The responses of the two climates to these global seasons indicate that the temperate planet has 3 Multiplication-Sign the bulk heat capacity of the snowball planet due to the presence of liquid water oceans. The obliquity seasons in the temperate simulation are weaker than one would expect based on thermal inertia alone; this is due to cross-equatorial oceanic and atmospheric energy transport. Thermal inertia and cross-equatorial heat transport have qualitatively different effects on obliquity seasons, insofar as heat transport tends to reduce seasonal amplitude without inducing a phase lag. For an Earth-like planet, however, this effect is masked by the mixing of signals from low thermal inertia regions (sea ice and land) with that from high thermal inertia regions (oceans), which also produces a damped response with small phase lag. We then simulate thermal light curves as they would appear to a high-contrast imaging mission (TPF-I/Darwin). In order of importance to the present simulations, which use modern-Earth orbital parameters, the three drivers of thermal phase variations are (1) obliquity seasons, (2) diurnal cycle, and (3) global seasons. Obliquity seasons are the dominant source of phase variations for most viewing angles. A pole-on observer would measure peak-to-trough amplitudes of 13% and 47% for the temperate and snowball climates, respectively. Diurnal heating is important for equatorial observers ({approx}5% phase variations), because the obliquity effects cancel to first order from that vantage. Finally, we compare the prospects of optical versus thermal direct imaging missions for constraining the climate on exoplanets and conclude that while zero- and one-dimensional models are best served by thermal measurements, second-order models accounting for seasons and planetary thermal inertia would require both optical and thermal observations.

Cowan, Nicolas B. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2131 Tech Drive, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Voigt, Aiko [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Bundesstr. 53, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany); Abbot, Dorian S., E-mail: n-cowan@nortwestern.edu [Department of Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, 5734 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

449

Waste analysis plan for central waste complex  

SciTech Connect

This waste analysis plan (WAP) has been prepared for the Central Waste Complex which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. This WAP documents the methods used to characterize, and obtain and analyze representative samples of waste managed at this unit.

Weston, N.L.

1996-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

450

Melter development needs assessment for RWMC buried wastes  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a survey and initial assessment of the existing state-of-the-art melter technology necessary to thermally treat (stabilize) buried TRU waste, by producing a highly leach resistant glass/ceramic waste form suitable for final disposal. Buried mixed transuranic (TRU) waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) represents an environmental hazard requiring remediation. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) placed the INEL on the National Priorities List in 1989. Remediation of the buried TRU-contaminated waste via the CERCLA decision process is required to remove INEL from the National Priorities List. A Waste Technology Development (WTD) Preliminary Systems Design and Thermal Technologies Screening Study identified joule-heated and plasma-heated melters as the most probable thermal systems technologies capable of melting the INEL soil and waste to produce the desired final waste form (Iron-Enriched Basalt (IEB) glass/ceramic). The work reported herein then surveys the state of existing melter technology and assesses it within the context of processing INEL buried TRU wastes and contaminated soils. Necessary technology development work is recommended.

Donaldson, A.D.; Carpenedo, R.J.; Anderson, G.L.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Melter development needs assessment for RWMC buried wastes  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a survey and initial assessment of the existing state-of-the-art melter technology necessary to thermally treat (stabilize) buried TRU waste, by producing a highly leach resistant glass/ceramic waste form suitable for final disposal. Buried mixed transuranic (TRU) waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) represents an environmental hazard requiring remediation. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) placed the INEL on the National Priorities List in 1989. Remediation of the buried TRU-contaminated waste via the CERCLA decision process is required to remove INEL from the National Priorities List. A Waste Technology Development (WTD) Preliminary Systems Design and Thermal Technologies Screening Study identified joule-heated and plasma-heated melters as the most probable thermal systems technologies capable of melting the INEL soil and waste to produce the desired final waste form [Iron-Enriched Basalt (IEB) glass/ceramic]. The work reported herein then surveys the state of existing melter technology and assesses it within the context of processing INEL buried TRU wastes and contaminated soils. Necessary technology development work is recommended.

Donaldson, A.D.; Carpenedo, R.J.; Anderson, G.L.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Some aspects of low-level radioactive-waste disposal in the US  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the NRC supported Shallow Land Burial research program at Brookhaven National Laboraotry and its relationship to the proposed revised ruling on disposal of low level radioactive waste, 10 CFR Part 61. Section of the proposed regulation, which establish the new low level waste classification system and the performance objective placed on waste form, are described briefly. The report also summarizes the preliminary results obtained from the EPA program in which low level waste drums were retrieved from the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans.

Schweitzer, D.G.; Davis, R.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Modeling Thermal-Hydrologic Processes for a Heated Fractured Rock System: Impact of a Capillary-Pressure Maximum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

drift-scale thermal test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Lawrencemechanical analyses of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Testwaste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The modeling

Sun, Y.; Buscheck, T. A.; Lee, K. H.; Hao, Y.; James, S. C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Alpha low-level stored waste systems design study  

SciTech Connect

The Stored Waste System Design Study (SWSDS), commissioned by the Waste Technology Development Department at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), examines relative life-cycle costs associated with three system concepts for processing the alpha low-level waste (alpha-LLW) stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex`s Transuranic Storage Area at the INEL. The three system concepts are incineration/melting; thermal treatment/solidification; and sort, treat, and repackage. The SWSDS identifies system functional and operational requirements and assesses implementability; effectiveness; cost; and demonstration, testing, and evaluation (DT&E) requirements for each of the three concepts.

Feizollahi, F.; Teheranian, B. [Morrison Knudson Corp., San Francisco, CA (United States). Environmental Services Div.; Quapp, W.J. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Alpha low-level stored waste systems design study  

SciTech Connect

The Stored Waste System Design Study (SWSDS), commissioned by the Waste Technology Development Department at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), examines relative life-cycle costs associated with three system concepts for processing the alpha low-level waste (alpha-LLW) stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex's Transuranic Storage Area at the INEL. The three system concepts are incineration/melting; thermal treatment/solidification; and sort, treat, and repackage. The SWSDS identifies system functional and operational requirements and assesses implementability; effectiveness; cost; and demonstration, testing, and evaluation (DT E) requirements for each of the three concepts.

Feizollahi, F.; Teheranian, B. (Morrison Knudson Corp., San Francisco, CA (United States). Environmental Services Div.); Quapp, W.J. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Waste heat steams ahead with injection technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Owners of Commercial-Industrial-Institutional buildings whose thermal usage is too variable to implement cogeneration are looking to a gasturbine steam-injection technology, called the Cheng Cycle, to reduce their energy costs. The Cheng Cycle uses industrial components-a gas-turbine generating set, a waste-heat recovery steam generator and system controls-in a thermodynamically optimized mode. In the process, steam produced from waste heat can be used for space or process heating or to increase the electrical output of a gas turbine. The process was patented in 1974 by Dr. Dah Yu Cheng, of the University of Santa Clara, Santa Clara, Calif. When a plant's thermal needs fall because of production or temperature changes, unused steam is directed back to the turbine to increase electrical output. As thermal requirements rise, the process is reversed and needed steam is channeled to plant uses.

Shepherd, S.; Koloseus, C.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Assessment of incineration and melting treatment technologies for RWMC buried waste  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an identification, description, and ranking evaluation of the available thermal treatment technologies potentially capable of treating the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) buried mixed waste. The ranking evaluation focused separately upon incinerators for treatment of combustible wastes and melters for noncombustible wastes. The highest rank incinerators are rotary kilns and controlled air furnaces, while the highest rank melters are the hearth configuration plasma torch, graphite electrode arc, and joule-heated melters. 4 refs.

Geimer, R.; Hertzler, T.; Gillins, R. (Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Anderson, G.L. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

ARM - Field Campaign - Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Semi-Volatile Thermal desorption Aerosol Gas chromatograph (SVTAG) Semi-Volatile Thermal desorption Aerosol Gas chromatograph (SVTAG) Related Campaigns Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAMAZON 2014) 2014.01.01, Martin, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon: Semi-Volatile Thermal desorption Aerosol Gas chromatograph (SVTAG) 2014.02.01 - 2014.10.15 Lead Scientist : Allen Goldstein Description In areas where biogenic emissions are oxidized in the presence of anthropogenic pollutants such as SO2, NOx and black carbon, it has become increasingly apparent that secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is substantially enhanced. Research is urgently needed to elucidate fundamental processes of natural

459

Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS) was established by the Census of Marine Life program. It is an evolving strategic alliance of people and organizations sharing a vision to make marine biogeographic data, from all over the world, freely available over the World Wide Web. It is not a project or program, and is not limited to data from CoML-related projects. Any organization, consortium, project or individual may contribute. OBIS provides, on an open access basis through the World Wide Web, taxonomically and geographically resolved data on marine life and the ocean environment, interoperability with similar databases, and software tools for data exploration and analysis. The OBIS secretariat is hosted by Rutgers University, Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences. [Copied, then edited from http://www.iobis.org/about/

460

Final response to BDAT related comments document. D009, K044, K045, K047, D011, P119, P120, and P and U wastes. Volume 1-I  

SciTech Connect

The contents of this article include the following: characteristic wastes for mercury p and u wastes containing mercury (data submission only, thermal recovery standard-demonstrability, establishment of bdat standard level below the characteristic level, stabilization as bdat or sulfide precipitated d009 as bdat, alternative treatment for debris and other wastes, reconsideration of the retort cutoff level, treatment standard mixed waste, and indigenous waste); wastes from the manufacturing and processing of explosives (treatment standard); characteristic wastes for silver (treatment standards, precipiation, and concentration-based standards vs. recovery or stabilization); vanadium containing wastes (treatment technology, waste classification, treatment standards, and data submission); and p and u wastes containing thallium (data submission).

Rosengrant, L.; Craig, R.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste ocean thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 4, Waste Management Facility report, Radioactive mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, handling method and containment vessel, waste number, waste designation and amount of waste.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

462

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

463

Global warming projections: Sensitivity to deep ocean mixing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The climatological impact of increases in greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere, despite being a subject of intensive study in recent years, is still very uncertain [1, 2]. One major uncertainty affecting possible climate change that has not received enough attention is the uncertainty in heat uptake by the deep ocean. We analyze the influence of this process and its uncertainty on climate predictions by means of numerical simulations with a 2-dimensional (2D) climate model. In the case of high climate sensitivity, as a result of uncertainty in deep ocean heat uptake, there is more than a factor of two uncertainty in the predicted increase of surface temperature. The corresponding uncertainty in the sea level rise due to thermal expansion is much larger than the uncertainty in the predicted temperature change and is significant even in the case of low climate sensitivity. The uncertainty in the rate of heat uptake by the deep ocean has not been included in the projections of climate change made by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) [1,2]. However, our results show that this uncertainty plays a very important role in defining the ranges ofpossible warming and, especially, of sea level rise. To assess the uncertainty we have used a 2-dimensional (zonally averaged) climate model, the MIT 2D model [3,4,5]. This model allows us to

Andrei P. Sokolov; Peter H. Stone

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Waste Acceptance Testing of Secondary Waste Forms: Cast Stone, Ceramicrete and DuraLith  

SciTech Connect

To support the selection of a waste form for the liquid secondary wastes from WTP, Washington River Protection Solutions has initiated secondary-waste-form testing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In anticipation of a down-selection process for a waste form for the Solidification Treatment Unit to be added to the ETF, PNNL is conducting tests on four candidate waste forms to evaluate their ability to meet potential waste acceptance criteria for immobilized secondary wastes that would be placed in the IDF. All three waste forms demonstrated compressive strengths above the minimum 3.45 MPa (500 psi) set as a target for cement-based waste forms. Further, none of the waste forms showed any significant degradation in compressive strength after undergoing thermal cycling (30 cycles in a 10 day period) between -40 C and 60 C or water immersion for 90 days. The three leach test methods are intended to measure the diffusion rates of contaminants from the waste forms. Results are reported in terms of diffusion coefficients and a leachability index (LI) calculated based on the diffusion coefficients. A smaller diffusion coefficient and a larger LI are desired. The NRC, in its Waste Form Technical Position (NRC 1991), provides recommendations and guidance regarding methods to demonstrate waste stability for land disposal of radioactive waste. Included is a recommendation to conduct leach tests using the ANS 16.1 method. The resulting leachability index (LI) should be greater than 6.0. For Hanford secondary wastes, the LI > 6.0 criterion applies to sodium leached from the waste form. For technetium and iodine, higher targets of LI > 9 for Tc and LI > 11 for iodine have been set based on early waste-disposal risk and performance assessment analyses. The results of these three leach tests conducted for a total time between 11days (ASTM C1308) to 90 days (ANS 16.1) showed: (1) Technetium diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that all the waste forms had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium; (2) Rhenium diffusivity: Cast Stone 2M specimens, when tested using EPA 1315 protocol, had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium based on rhenium as a surrogate for technetium. All other waste forms tested by ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 test methods had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 9 for Tc based on rhenium release. These studies indicated that use of Re(VII) as a surrogate for 99Tc(VII) in low temperature secondary waste forms containing reductants will provide overestimated diffusivity values for 99Tc. Therefore, it is not appropriate to use Re as a surrogate 99Tc in future low temperature waste form studies. (3) Iodine diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that the three waste forms had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 11 for iodine. Therefore, it may be necessary to use a more effective sequestering material than silver zeolite used in two of the waste forms (Ceramicrete and DuraLith); (4) Sodium diffusivity: All the waste form specimens tested by the three leach methods (ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315) exceeded the target LI value of 6; (5) All three leach methods (ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308 and EPA 1315) provided similar 99Tc diffusivity values for both short-time transient diffusivity effects as well as long-term ({approx}90 days) steady diffusivity from each of the three tested waste forms (Cast Stone 2M, Ceramicrete and DuraLith). Therefore, any one of the three methods can be used to determine the contaminant diffusivities from a selected waste form.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Lindberg, Michael J.; Parker, Kent E.

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

465

Infectious waste feed system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An infectious waste feed system for comminuting infectious waste and feeding the comminuted waste to a combustor automatically without the need for human intervention. The system includes a receptacle for accepting waste materials. Preferably, the receptacle includes a first and second compartment and a means for sealing the first and second compartments from the atmosphere. A shredder is disposed to comminute waste materials accepted in the receptacle to a predetermined size. A trough is disposed to receive the comminuted waste materials from the shredder. A feeding means is disposed within the trough and is movable in a first and second direction for feeding the comminuted waste materials to a combustor.

Coulthard, E. James (York, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Understanding radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect

This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

Murray, R.L.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Nuclear waste solidification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High level liquid waste solidification is achieved on a continuous basis by atomizing the liquid waste and introducing the atomized liquid waste into a reaction chamber including a fluidized, heated inert bed to effect calcination of the atomized waste and removal of the calcined waste by overflow removal and by attrition and elutriation from the reaction chamber, and feeding additional inert bed particles to the fluidized bed to maintain the inert bed composition.

Bjorklund, William J. (Richland, WA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Marin Clean Energy - Feed-In Tariff (California) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Gas, Municipal Solid Waste, Ocean Thermal, Photovoltaics, Small Hydroelectric, Solar Thermal Electric, Tidal Energy, Wave Energy, Wind Active Incentive Yes Implementing...

469

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of polymer waste comprising nylon 6 and a polyolefin or mixtures of polyolefins to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents; selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent. 83 figs.

Evans, R.J.; Chum, H.L.

1994-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

470

Impact of the Southern ocean winds on sea-ice - ocean interaction and its associated global ocean circulation in a warming world  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation discusses a linkage between the Southern Ocean (SO) winds and the global ocean circulation in the framework of a coarse-resolution global ocean general circulation model coupled to a sea-ice model. In addition to reexamination of the conventional linkage that begins with northward Ekman transport and extends to the North Atlantic (NA) overturning, the author investigates a new linkage that begins with the Southern Hemisphere (SH) sea-ice ocean interaction perturbed by the anomalous SO winds and extends to the SH overturning, the response of the NA overturning, and the long-term baroclinic adjustment of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). How the above two linkages will interact with each other in a warming world is also investigated. An interactive momentum flux forcing, allowing for the strength of momentum flux between atmosphere and sea ice to vary in response to the simulated sea-ice conditions, enhances wind-driven ice divergence to increase the fraction of leads and polynyas, which increases dense water formation, and thus intensifies convection. Within three experimental frameworks, this increased dense water consistently increases the Antarctic Bottom Water formation, which directly intensifies the SH overturning and indirectly weakens the NA overturning. As a result of the hemispheric change in overturning circulations, the meridional density gradient across the ACC appears to increase, ultimately increasing the baroclinic part of the ACC via an enhanced thermal wind shear. Subsequently, impacts of the poleward shifted and intensified SH subpolar westerly winds (SWWs) on the global ocean circulation are investigated in phases. When the SWWs are only shifted poleward, the effect of the anomalous winds is transmitted to the northern NA, decreasing both the NA overturning and the North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) outflow. However, when the SWWs are shifted poleward and intensified, this effect is cut off by the intensified Deacon cell overturning, and is not transmitted to the northern NA, and instead increases the NADW outflow substantially. To sum up, with respect to the SO winds perturbed by the global warming, the SH overturning cell and the NADW outflow increase, leading to an increase in the volume transport of the ACC.

Cheon, Woo Geunn

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) Eligibility...

472

Business Plan : Residential Solid Waste Collection.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Residential solid waste means all the solid wastes produced in household level, which includes bio-waste, metal, mixed wastes, organic and inorganic waste. The inability of (more)

Mazengo, Dorice

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Low temperature hydrothermal destruction of organics in Hanford tank wastes  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is to evaluate and develop a low temperature hydrothermal process (HTP) for the destruction of organics that are present wastes temporarily stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site. Organic compounds contribute to tank waste safety issues, such as hydrogen generation. Some organic compounds act as complexants, promoting the solubility of radioactive constituents such as {sup 90}Sr and {sup 241}Am, which is undesirable for waste pretreatment processing. HTP is thermal-chemical autogenous processing method that is typically operated between 250{degrees}C and 375{degrees}C and approximately 200 atm. Testing with simulated tank waste, containing a variety of organics has been performed. The distribution of strontium, cesium and bulk metals between the supernatant and solid phases as a function of the total organic content of the waste simulant will be presented. Test results using simulant will be compared with similar tests conducted using actual radioactive waste.

Orth, R.J.; Elmore, M.R.; Zacher, A.H.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Schmidt, A.J.; Jones, E.O.; Hart, T.R.; Poshusta, J.C.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earth, Space Sciences » Earth, Space Sciences » Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) The COSIM project develops advanced ocean and ice models for evaluating the role of ocean and ice in high-latitude climate change and projecting the impacts of high-latitude change on regions throughout the globe. Get Expertise Phil Jones COSIM Email Matthew Hecht COSIM Email Elizabeth Hunke COSIM Email Mat Maltrud COSIM Email Bill Lipscomb COSIM Email Scott Elliott COSIM Email Todd Ringler COSIM Email We are also developing a set of next-generation ocean and ice models with variable resolution horizontal grids to focus resolution on regions of interest or regions where specific processes (like eddies) need to be resolved. Summary The COSIM project develops advanced ocean and ice models for evaluating the

475

Ocean - Regional Planning Efforts | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Planning Efforts Regional Planning Efforts Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean Regional Planning Efforts Marine planning is a science-based process that provides transparent information about ocean use and guarantees the public and stakeholders a voice early on in decisions affecting the uses of the marine environment. It is an inclusive, bottom-up approach that gives the Federal Government, States, and Tribes, with input from local communities, stakeholders, and the public, the ability to make informed decisions on how best to optimize the use of and protect the ocean, coasts, and Great Lakes. Under the National Ocean Policy, the United States is subdivided into nine regional planning areas. Within each region, Federal, State, and Tribal

476

Horizontal stirring in the global ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Horizontal mixing and the distribution of coherent structures in the global ocean are analyzed using Finite-Size Lyapunov Exponents (FSLE), computed for the surface velocity field derived from the Ocean general circulation model For the Earth Simulator (OFES). FSLEs measure horizontal stirring and dispersion; additionally, the transport barriers which organize the oceanic flow can roughly be identified with the ridges of the FSLE field. We have performed a detailed statistical study, particularizing for the behaviour of the two hemispheres and different ocean basins. The computed Probability Distributions Functions (PDFs) of FSLE are broad and asymmetric. Horizontal mixing is generally more active in the northern hemisphere than in the southern one. Nevertheless the Southern Ocean is the most active ocean, and the Pacific the less active one. A striking result is that the main currents can be classified in two 'activity classes': Western Boundary Currents, which have broad PDFs with large FSLE values, and Eas...

Hernndez-Carrasco, I; Hernndez-Garca, E; Turiel, A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Subsurface Hybrid Power Options for Oil & Gas Production at Deep Ocean Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investment in deep-sea (deep-ocean) hybrid power systems may enable certain off-shore oil and gas exploration and production. Advanced deep-ocean drilling and production operations, locally powered, may provide commercial access to oil and gas reserves otherwise inaccessible. Further, subsea generation of electrical power has the potential of featuring a low carbon output resulting in improved environmental conditions. Such technology therefore, enhances the energy security of the United States in a green and environmentally friendly manner. The objective of this study is to evaluate alternatives and recommend equipment to develop into hybrid energy conversion and storage systems for deep ocean operations. Such power systems will be located on the ocean floor and will be used to power offshore oil and gas exploration and production operations. Such power systems will be located on the oceans floor, and will be used to supply oil and gas exploration activities, as well as drilling operations required to harvest petroleum reserves. The following conceptual hybrid systems have been identified as candidates for powering sub-surface oil and gas production operation