National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for waste ocean thermal

  1. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in the Earth's oceans to generate electricity.

  2. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Report about the Ocean Thermal...

  3. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ascari, Matthew

    2012-10-28

    The Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project focuses on assessing the Maximum Practicably Extractable Energy (MPEE) from the world’s ocean thermal resources. MPEE is defined as being sustainable and technically feasible, given today’s state-of-the-art ocean energy technology. Under this project the OTEEV team developed a comprehensive Geospatial Information System (GIS) dataset and software tool, and used the tool to provide a meaningful assessment of MPEE from the global and domestic U.S. ocean thermal resources.

  4. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    310, the Ocean the Ocean Energy Thermal Energy Conversionfor the commercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionOpen cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. A preliminary

  5. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01

    M.D. (editor). 1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Draft1980 :. i l OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTALDevelopment Plan. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE

  6. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC)field of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.II of the Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference.

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)of the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot

  8. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Potential Environmental Impacts and Fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Potential Environmental Impacts and Fisheries Christina M Comfort Institute #12;Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) · Renewable energy ­ ocean thermal gradient · Large will unavoidably affect pelagic fish... ­ Noise and water pollution ­ FAD effects ­ Entrainment and Impingement

  9. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:22pm Addthis A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat...

  10. Probative Investigation of the Thermal Stability of Wastes Involved...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the Thermal Stability of Wastes Involved in February 2014 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Drum Breach Event Probative Investigation of the Thermal Stability of Wastes...

  11. Assessment of ocean thermal energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muralidharan, Shylesh

    2012-01-01

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a promising renewable energy technology to generate electricity and has other applications such as production of freshwater, seawater air-conditioning, marine culture and chilled-soil ...

  12. A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    nental Assessment, Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)Impact Assessment Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC),Intake Screens for Ocean Thermal Energy M.S. Thesis. Oregon

  13. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01

    Recycling of Wasted Energy : Thermal to Electrical EnergyRecycling of Wasted Energy : Thermal to Electrical Energyelectric energy generation and thermal energy conduction

  14. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion LUIS A. VEGA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    demand due to emerging economies like China, India, and Brazil. Coal and natural gas resources 7296 OOcean Thermal Energy Conversion LUIS A. VEGA Hawaii Natural Energy Institute, School of Ocean the OTEC plant. The difference between gross power and in-plant power consumption needed to run all sweater

  15. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01

    ocean thermal energy, distributed solar thermal energy,heat source can be solar thermal energy, biological thermaland concentrated solar thermal energy farms. They demand

  16. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01

    and nuclear power plants, solar thermal energy, geothermalpower plants, distributed solar thermal energy, geo/ocean-power plants and concentrated solar thermal energy farms.

  17. The effects of ocean-dumped wastes on marine phytoplankto 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwab, Claude Raymond

    1980-01-01

    even such hazardous and persistent wastes as chemical warfare agents and radioactive wastes. The status of ocean dumping at this time is summarized in an excellent report by Smith and Brown (1971). Much of this same information, with some updates... phytoplankton so that this information can be used to evaluate the practice of ocean dumping in general and, more specifically, for the selected wastes studied, These studies will use radioactive carbon assimilation and adenosine triphosphate measurements so...

  18. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wittig, J. Michael (West Goshen, PA)

    1980-01-01

    An improved open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system including a flash evaporator for vaporizing relatively warm ocean surface water and an axial flow, elastic fluid turbine having a vertical shaft and axis of rotation. The warm ocean water is transmitted to the evaporator through a first prestressed concrete skirt-conduit structure circumferentially situated about the axis of rotation. The unflashed warm ocean water exits the evaporator through a second prestressed concrete skirt-conduit structure located circumferentially about and radially within the first skirt-conduit structure. The radially inner surface of the second skirt conduit structure constitutes a cylinder which functions as the turbine's outer casing and obviates the need for a conventional outer housing. The turbine includes a radially enlarged disc element attached to the shaft for supporting at least one axial row of radially directed blades through which the steam is expanded. A prestressed concrete inner casing structure of the turbine has upstream and downstream portions respectively situated upstream and downstream from the disc element. The radially outer surfaces of the inner casing portions and radially outer periphery of the axially interposed disc cooperatively form a downwardly radially inwardly tapered surface. An annular steam flowpath of increasing flow area in the downward axial direction is radially bounded by the inner and outer prestressed concrete casing structures. The inner casing portions each include a transversely situated prestressed concrete circular wall for rotatably supporting the turbine shaft and associated structure. The turbine blades are substantially radially coextensive with the steam flowpath and receive steam from the evaporator through an annular array of prestressed concrete stationary vanes which extend between the inner and outer casings to provide structural support therefor and impart a desired flow direction to the steam.

  19. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sands, M.Dale

    1980-08-01

    Significant achievements in Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology have increased the probability of producing OTEC-derived power in this decade with subsequent large-scale commercialization to follow by the turn of the century. Under U.S. Department of Energy funding, Interstate Electronics has prepared an OTEC Programmatic Environmental Assessment (EA) that considers tne development, demonstration, and commercialization of OTEC power systems. The EA considers several tecnnological designs (open cycle and closed cycle), plant configurations (land-based, moored, and plantship), and power usages (baseload electricity and production of ammonia and aluminum). Potencial environmental impacts, health and safety issues, and a status update of international, federal, and state plans and policies, as they may influence OTEC deployments, are included.

  20. Thermal denitration and mineralization of waste constituents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nenni, J.A.; Boardman, R.D.

    1997-08-01

    In order to produce a quality grout from LLW using hydraulic cements, proper conditioning of the waste is essential for complete cement curing. Several technologies were investigated as options for conditions. Since the LLW is dilute, removal of all, or most, of the water will significantly reduce the final waste volume. Neutralization of the LLW is also desirable since acidic liquids to not allow cement to cure properly. The nitrate compounds are very soluble and easily leached from solid waste forms; therefore, denitration is desirable. Thermal and chemical denitration technologies have the advantages of water removal, neutralization, and denitration. The inclusion of additives during thermal treatment were investigated as a method of forming insoluable waste conditions.

  1. Thermal Analysis of Waste Glass Batches: Effect of Batch Makeup...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Book: Thermal Analysis of Waste Glass Batches: Effect of Batch Makeup on Gas-Evolving Reactions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Thermal Analysis of Waste Glass Batches:...

  2. Mass wasting on the submarine Lomonosov Ridge, central Arctic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristoffersen, Yngve

    ) made from nuclear submarine Hawkbill (SCICEX). Bathymetry is derived from multi-beam measurements madeMass wasting on the submarine Lomonosov Ridge, central Arctic Ocean Yngve Kristoffersen a,, Bernard particulate matter in the water column accumulate as a uniform drape on submarine plateaus and ridges

  3. THERMAL IMPACT OF WASTE EMPLACEMENT AND SURFACE COOLING ASSOCIATED WITH GEOLOGIC DISPOSAL OF NUCLEAR WASTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.S.Y.

    2010-01-01

    producing nuclear wastes i s thermal expansion. Results ofof eventual expansion to accommodate a l l Canadian nuclear

  4. August 2011 Environmental Assessment of Ocean Thermal Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    August 2011 1 Environmental Assessment of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion in Hawaii Available data and a protocol for baseline monitoring Christina M. Comfort and Luis Vega, Ph.D. Hawaii National Marine Renewable Energy Center Hawaii Natural Energy Institute University of Hawaii at Manoa Honolulu, HI ccomfort

  5. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Mostly about USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to all US Island Territories. #12;OTEC 11 Other Applications: AC Cold deep water as the chiller fluid ? #12;Thermal Resource Temperature Difference between Surface Water and 1,000 m Water (want > 20 °C: Truisms · OTEC plants could supply all the electricity and potable water consumed in the State, {but

  6. THERMAL IMPACT OF WASTE EMPLACEMENT AND SURFACE COOLING ASSOCIATED WITH GEOLOGIC DISPOSAL OF NUCLEAR WASTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.S.Y.

    2010-01-01

    waste repository design AERE-R--9343 Atomic Energy Researchof the thermal s t r e s s field. AERE R-8999, Atomic Energy

  7. Development of US Navy Shipboard Systems for solid and liquid waste thermal treatment. Report for July 1995-April 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gullet, B.K.

    1996-07-01

    The paper describes the U.S. Navy`s shipboard environmental challenges and a few of its research programs for meeting its needs for solid and liquid waste treatment. This objective is particularly important in environmentally sensitive areas, such as the Mediterranean Sea, where fleet deployment time is significant. Prohibitions on ocean dumping and anticipated requirements on effluent discharge quality have led the Navy to continue the research, development, and demonstration of shipboard systems to treat their unpreventable wastes. For solid, non-hazardous wastes, post-minimization efforts are geared toward long-term development of systems to thermally pyrolyze and oxidize the wastes into significantly reduced volume and weight.

  8. Thermal impact of waste emplacement and surface cooling associated with geologic disposal of nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, J.S.Y.; Mangold, D.C.; Spencer, R.K.; Tsang, C.F.

    1982-08-01

    The thermal effects associated with the emplacement of aged radioactive wastes in a geologic repository were studied, with emphasis on the following subjects: the waste characteristics, repository structure, and rock properties controlling the thermally induced effects; the current knowledge of the thermal, thermomechanical, and thermohydrologic impacts, determined mainly on the basis of previous studies that assume 10-year-old wastes; the thermal criteria used to determine the repository waste loading densities; and the technical advantages and disadvantages of surface cooling of the wastes prior to disposal as a means of mitigating the thermal impacts. The waste loading densities determined by repository designs for 10-year-old wastes are extended to older wastes using the near-field thermomechanical criteria based on room stability considerations. Also discussed are the effects of long surface cooling periods determined on the basis of far-field thermomechanical and thermohydrologic considerations. The extension of the surface cooling period from 10 years to longer periods can lower the near-field thermal impact but have only modest long-term effects for spent fuel. More significant long-term effects can be achieved by surface cooling of reprocessed high-level waste.

  9. THERMAL ANALYSIS OF WASTE GLASS MELTER FEEDS Pavel Hrma,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    THERMAL ANALYSIS OF WASTE GLASS MELTER FEEDS Pavel Hrma, 1,2 David A. Pierce, 2 Richard Pokorn 3 1 Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and...

  10. THERMAL ANALYSIS OF WASTE GLASS MELTER FEED Pavel Hrma,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    THERMAL ANALYSIS OF WASTE GLASS MELTER FEED Pavel Hrma, (a,b) David A. Pierce, (b) Richard Pokorn (b,c) (a) Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science...

  11. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sands, M.Dale

    1980-08-01

    Significant acccrmplishments in Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology have increased the probability of producing OTEC-derived power within this decade with subsequent large scale commercialization following by the turn of the century. Under U.S. Department of Energy funding, the Oceanic Engineering Operations of Interstate Electronics Corporation has prepared several OTEC Environmental Assessments over the past years, in particular, the OTEC Programmatic Environmental Assessment. The Programmatic EA considers several technological designs (open- and closed-cycle), plant configuratlons (land-based, moored, and plant-ship), and power usages (baseload electricity, ammonia and aluminum production). Potential environmental impacts, health and safetv issues and a status update of the institutional issues as they influence OTEC deployments, are included.

  12. Near-inertial and thermal to atmospheric forcing in the North Atlantic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silverthorne, Katherine E

    2010-01-01

    Observational and modeling techniques are employed to investigate the thermal and inertial upper ocean response to wind and buoyancy forcing in the North Atlantic Ocean. First, the seasonal kinetic energy variability of ...

  13. Ocean thermal energy conversion plants : experimental and analytical study of mixing and recirculation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jirka, Gerhard H.

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a method of generating power using the vertical temperature gradient of the tropical ocean as an energy source. Experimental and analytical studies have been carried out to determine ...

  14. Technical resource document for assured thermal processing of wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrow, R.L.; Fisk, G.A.; Hartwig, C.M.; Hurt, R.H.; Ringland, J.T.; Swansiger, W.A.

    1994-06-01

    This document is a concise compendium of resource material covering assured thermal processing of wastes (ATPW), an area in which Sandia aims to develop a large program. The ATPW program at Sandia is examining a wide variety of waste streams and thermal processes. Waste streams under consideration include municipal, chemical, medical, and mixed wastes. Thermal processes under consideration range from various incineration technologies to non-incineration processes such as supercritical water oxidation or molten metal technologies. Each of the chapters describes the element covered, discusses issues associated with its further development and/or utilization, presents Sandia capabilities that address these issues, and indicates important connections to other ATPW elements. The division of the field into elements was driven by the team`s desire to emphasize areas where Sandia`s capabilities can lead to major advances and is therefore somewhat unconventional. The report will be valuable to Sandians involved in further ATPW program development.

  15. Thermal and chemical remediation of mixed waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Paul A. (Wheaton, IL); Swift, William M. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1994-01-01

    A process and system for treating organic waste materials without venting gaseous emissions to the atmosphere. A fluidized bed including lime particles is operated at a temperature of at least 500.degree. C. by blowing gas having 20%/70% oxygen upwardly through the bed particles at a rate sufficient to fluidize same. A toxic organic waste material is fed into the fluidized bed where the organic waste material reacts with the lime forming CaCO.sub.3. The off gases are filtered and cooled to condense water which is separated. A portion of the calcium carbonate formed during operation of the fluidized bed is replaced with lime particles. The off gases from the fluidized bed after drying are recirculated until the toxic organic waste material in the bed is destroyed.

  16. Thermal and chemical remediation of mixed waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, P.A.; Swift, W.M.

    1994-08-09

    A process and system for treating organic waste materials without venting gaseous emissions to the atmosphere. A fluidized bed including lime particles is operated at a temperature of at least 500 C by blowing gas having 20%/70% oxygen upwardly through the bed particles at a rate sufficient to fluidize same. A toxic organic waste material is fed into the fluidized bed where the organic waste material reacts with the lime forming CaCO[sub 3]. The off gases are filtered and cooled to condense water which is separated. A portion of the calcium carbonate formed during operation of the fluidized bed is replaced with lime particles. The off gases from the fluidized bed after drying are recirculated until the toxic organic waste material in the bed is destroyed. 3 figs.

  17. Thermal and chemical remediation of mixed wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Paul A. (Wheaton, IL); Swift, William M. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1997-01-01

    A process for treating organic waste materials without venting gaseous emissions to the atmosphere which includes oxidizing the organic waste materials at an elevated temperature not less than about 500.degree. C. with a gas having an oxygen content in the range of from about 20% to about 70% to produce an oxidation product containing CO.sub.2 gas. The gas is then filtered to remove particulates, and then contacted with an aqueous absorbent solution of alkali metal carbonates or alkanolamines to absorb a portion of the CO.sub.2 gas from the particulate-free oxidation product. The CO.sub.2 absorbent is thereafter separated for further processing. A process and system are also disclosed in which the waste materials are contacted with a reactive medium such as lime and product treatment as described.

  18. Thermal and chemical remediation of mixed wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, P.A.; Swift, W.M.

    1997-12-16

    A process is described for treating organic waste materials without venting gaseous emissions to the atmosphere which includes oxidizing the organic waste materials at an elevated temperature not less than about 500 C with a gas having an oxygen content in the range of from about 20% to about 70% to produce an oxidation product containing CO{sub 2} gas. The gas is then filtered to remove particulates, and then contacted with an aqueous absorbent solution of alkali metal carbonates or alkanolamines to absorb a portion of the CO{sub 2} gas from the particulate-free oxidation product. The CO{sub 2} absorbent is thereafter separated for further processing. A process and system are also disclosed in which the waste materials are contacted with a reactive medium such as lime and product treatment as described. 8 figs.

  19. Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters

  20. Lockheed Testing the Waters for Ocean Thermal Energy System

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The company is working to develop a system to produce electricity using temperature differences in the ocean.

  1. THERMAL ANALYSIS OF GEOLOGIC HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE PACKAGES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hensel, S.; Lee, S.

    2010-04-20

    The engineering design of disposal of the high level waste (HLW) packages in a geologic repository requires a thermal analysis to provide the temperature history of the packages. Calculated temperatures are used to demonstrate compliance with criteria for waste acceptance into the geologic disposal gallery system and as input to assess the transient thermal characteristics of the vitrified HLW Package. The objective of the work was to evaluate the thermal performance of the supercontainer containing the vitrified HLW in a non-backfilled and unventilated underground disposal gallery. In order to achieve the objective, transient computational models for a geologic vitrified HLW package were developed by using a computational fluid dynamics method, and calculations for the HLW disposal gallery of the current Belgian geological repository reference design were performed. An initial two-dimensional model was used to conduct some parametric sensitivity studies to better understand the geologic system's thermal response. The effect of heat decay, number of co-disposed supercontainers, domain size, humidity, thermal conductivity and thermal emissivity were studied. Later, a more accurate three-dimensional model was developed by considering the conduction-convection cooling mechanism coupled with radiation, and the effect of the number of supercontainers (3, 4 and 8) was studied in more detail, as well as a bounding case with zero heat flux at both ends. The modeling methodology and results of the sensitivity studies will be presented.

  2. Draft environmental assessment: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, S.M.; Sands, M.D.; Donat, J.R.; Jepsen, P.; Smookler, M.; Villa, J.F.

    1981-02-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, for the deployment and operation of a commercial 40-Megawatt (MW) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plant (hereafter called the Pilot Plant). A description of the proposed action is presented, and a generic environment typical of the candidate Pilot Plant siting regions is described. An assessment of the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed action is given, and the risk of credible accidents and mitigating measures to reduce these risks are considered. The Federal and State plans and policies the proposed action will encompass are described. Alternatives to the proposed action are presented. Appendix A presents the navigation and environmental information contained in the US Coast Pilot for each of the candidate sites; Appendix B provides a brief description of the methods and calculations used in the EA. It is concluded that environmental disturbances associated with Pilot Plant activities could potentially cause significant environmental impacts; however, the magnitude of these potential impacts cannot presently be assessed, due to insufficient engineering and environmental information. A site- and design-specific OTEC Pilot Plant Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is required to resolve the potentially significant environmental effects associated with Pilot Plant deployment and operation. (WHK)

  3. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Programmatic Environmental Analysis--Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Authors, Various

    1980-01-01

    The programmatic environmental analysis is an initial assessment of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology considering development, demonstration and commercialization. It is concluded that the OTEC development program should continue because the development, demonstration, and commercialization on a single-plant deployment basis should not present significant environmental impacts. However, several areas within the OTEC program require further investigation in order to assess the potential for environmental impacts from OTEC operation, particularly in large-scale deployments and in defining alternatives to closed-cycle biofouling control: (1) Larger-scale deployments of OTEC clusters or parks require further investigations in order to assess optimal platform siting distances necessary to minimize adverse environmental impacts. (2) The deployment and operation of the preoperational platform (OTEC-1) and future demonstration platforms must be carefully monitored to refine environmental assessment predictions, and to provide design modifications which may mitigate or reduce environmental impacts for larger-scale operations. These platforms will provide a valuable opportunity to fully evaluate the intake and discharge configurations, biofouling control methods, and both short-term and long-term environmental effects associated with platform operations. (3) Successful development of OTEC technology to use the maximal resource capabilities and to minimize environmental effects will require a concerted environmental management program, encompassing many different disciplines and environmental specialties. This volume contains these appendices: Appendix A -- Deployment Scenario; Appendix B -- OTEC Regional Characterization; and Appendix C -- Impact and Related Calculations.

  4. Characterization of the solid low level mixed waste inventory for the solid waste thermal treatment activity - III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Place, B.G., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-09-24

    The existing thermally treatable, radioactive mixed waste inventory is characterized to support implementation of the commercial, 1214 thermal treatment contract. The existing thermally treatable waste inventory has been identified using a decision matrix developed by Josephson et al. (1996). Similar to earlier waste characterization reports (Place 1993 and 1994), hazardous materials, radionuclides, physical properties, and waste container data are statistically analyzed. In addition, the waste inventory data is analyzed to correlate waste constituent data that are important to the implementation of the commercial thermal treatment contract for obtaining permits and for process design. The specific waste parameters, which were analyzed, include the following: ``dose equivalent`` curie content, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) content, identification of containers with PA-related mobile radionuclides (14C, 12 79Se, 99Tc, and U isotopes), tritium content, debris and non-debris content, container free liquid content, fissile isotope content, identification of dangerous waste codes, asbestos containers, high mercury containers, beryllium dust containers, lead containers, overall waste quantities, analysis of container types, and an estimate of the waste compositional split based on the thermal treatment contractor`s proposed process. A qualitative description of the thermally treatable mixed waste inventory is also provided.

  5. Low level mixed waste thermal treatment technical basis report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Place, B.G.

    1994-12-01

    Detailed characterization of the existing and projected Hanford Site Radioactive Mixed Waste (RMW) inventory was initiated in 1993 (Place 1993). This report presents an analysis of the existing and projected RMW inventory. The subject characterization effort continues to be in support of the following engineering activities related to thermal treatment of Hanford Site RMW: (1) Contracting for commercial thermal treatment; (2) Installation and operation of an onsite thermal treatment facility (Project W-242); (3) Treatment at another Department of Energy (DOE) site. The collation of this characterization information (data) has emphasized the establishment of a common data base for the entire existing RMW inventory so that the specification of feed streams destined for different treatment facilities can be coordinated.

  6. THERMAL TREATMENT REVIEW . WTE I THERMAL TREATMENT Since the beginning of this century, global waste-to-energy capacity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    of new waste-to gasification process at an industrial scale The Waste-To-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT), headquartered at Columbia University in New York City, keeps a close watch on the thermal waste-to-energy capacity has increased steadily at the rate of about four million tonnes of MSW per year

  7. Energy implications of the thermal recovery of biodegradable municipal waste materials in the United Kingdom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnley, Stephen; Phillips, Rhiannon; Coleman, Terry; Rampling, Terence

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: > Energy balances were calculated for the thermal treatment of biodegradable wastes. > For wood and RDF, combustion in dedicated facilities was the best option. > For paper, garden and food wastes and mixed waste incineration was the best option. > For low moisture paper, gasification provided the optimum solution. - Abstract: Waste management policies and legislation in many developed countries call for a reduction in the quantity of biodegradable waste landfilled. Anaerobic digestion, combustion and gasification are options for managing biodegradable waste while generating renewable energy. However, very little research has been carried to establish the overall energy balance of the collection, preparation and energy recovery processes for different types of wastes. Without this information, it is impossible to determine the optimum method for managing a particular waste to recover renewable energy. In this study, energy balances were carried out for the thermal processing of food waste, garden waste, wood, waste paper and the non-recyclable fraction of municipal waste. For all of these wastes, combustion in dedicated facilities or incineration with the municipal waste stream was the most energy-advantageous option. However, we identified a lack of reliable information on the energy consumed in collecting individual wastes and preparing the wastes for thermal processing. There was also little reliable information on the performance and efficiency of anaerobic digestion and gasification facilities for waste.

  8. Standard guide for characterization of radioactive and/or hazardous wastes for thermal treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This guide identifies methods to determine the physical and chemical characteristics of radioactive and/or hazardous wastes before a waste is processed at high temperatures, for example, vitrification into a homogeneous glass ,glass-ceramic, or ceramic waste form. This includes waste forms produced by ex-situ vitrification (ESV), in-situ vitrification (ISV), slagging, plasma-arc, hot-isostatic pressing (HIP) and/or cold-pressing and sintering technologies. Note that this guide does not specifically address high temperature waste treatment by incineration but several of the analyses described in this guide may be useful diagnostic methods to determine incinerator off-gas composition and concentrations. The characterization of the waste(s) recommended in this guide can be used to (1) choose and develop the appropriate thermal treatment methodology, (2) determine if waste pretreatment is needed prior to thermal treatment, (3) aid in development of thermal treatment process control, (4) develop surrogate wa...

  9. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01

    heat source can be solar thermal energy, biological thermaland concentrated solar thermal energy farms. They demandsources include solar thermal energy, geo-thermal energy,

  10. Study of thermal conductivity in organic solid wastes before composting J. HUET, C. Druilhe, G. Debenest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Study of thermal conductivity in organic solid wastes before composting J. HUET, C. Druilhe, G. Debenest ORBIT2012 1 STUDY OF THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY IN ORGANIC SOLID WASTES BEFORE COMPOSTING J. Huet and disposal. Composting can be defined as the process whereby aerobic micro-organisms convert organic

  11. NREL-Ocean Energy Thermal Conversion | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI Ventures Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name:NREL's RenewableOpenOcean

  12. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) A New Secure Renewable Energy Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) A New Secure Renewable Energy Source For Defense load renewable energy system to achieve energy security for DoD facilities and bases Schofield Barracks and Commercial Applications 1 Dr. Ted Johnson Director of Alternative Energy Programs Development Lockheed Martin

  13. Lyapunov Exponents of a Simple Stochastic Model of the Thermally and Wind-Driven Ocean Circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monahan, Adam Hugh

    Lyapunov Exponents of a Simple Stochastic Model of the Thermally and Wind-Driven Ocean Circulation, then the leading Lyapunov exponent of the circulation can become positive for sufficiently strong fluctuations of the leading Lyapunov exponent can have a substantial effect on the predictability of the system. 1 #12

  14. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wittig, J. Michael (West Goshen, PA)

    1980-01-01

    A generally mushroom-shaped, open cycle OTEC system and distilled water producer which has a skirt-conduit structure extending from the enlarged portion of the mushroom to the ocean. The enlarged part of the mushroom houses a toroidal casing flash evaporator which produces steam which expands through a vertical rotor turbine, partially situated in the center of the blossom portion and partially situated in the mushroom's stem portion. Upon expansion through the turbine, the motive steam enters a shell and tube condenser annularly disposed about the rotor axis and axially situated beneath the turbine in the stem portion. Relatively warm ocean water is circulated up through the radially outer skirt-conduit structure entering the evaporator through a radially outer portion thereof, flashing a portion thereof into motive steam, and draining the unflashed portion from the evaporator through a radially inner skirt-conduit structure. Relatively cold cooling water enters the annular condenser through the radially inner edge and travels radially outwardly into a channel situated along the radially outer edge of the condenser. The channel is also included in the radially inner skirt-conduit structure. The cooling water is segregated from the potable, motive steam condensate which can be used for human consumption or other processes requiring high purity water. The expansion energy of the motive steam is partially converted into rotational mechanical energy of the turbine rotor when the steam is expanded through the shaft attached blades. Such mechanical energy drives a generator also included in the enlarged mushroom portion for producing electrical energy. Such power generation equipment arrangement provides a compact power system from which additional benefits may be obtained by fabricating the enclosing equipment, housings and component casings from low density materials, such as prestressed concrete, to permit those casings and housings to also function as a floating support vessel.

  15. List of Ocean Thermal Incentives | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History ViewInformationWindsCompressed airGeothermalList ofList ofThermal

  16. Computational Efficient Upscaling Methodology for Predicting Thermal Conductivity of Nuclear Waste forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Dongsheng; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-09-28

    This study evaluated different upscaling methods to predict thermal conductivity in loaded nuclear waste form, a heterogeneous material system. The efficiency and accuracy of these methods were compared. Thermal conductivity in loaded nuclear waste form is an important property specific to scientific researchers, in waste form Integrated performance and safety code (IPSC). The effective thermal conductivity obtained from microstructure information and local thermal conductivity of different components is critical in predicting the life and performance of waste form during storage. How the heat generated during storage is directly related to thermal conductivity, which in turn determining the mechanical deformation behavior, corrosion resistance and aging performance. Several methods, including the Taylor model, Sachs model, self-consistent model, and statistical upscaling models were developed and implemented. Due to the absence of experimental data, prediction results from finite element method (FEM) were used as reference to determine the accuracy of different upscaling models. Micrographs from different loading of nuclear waste were used in the prediction of thermal conductivity. Prediction results demonstrated that in term of efficiency, boundary models (Taylor and Sachs model) are better than self consistent model, statistical upscaling method and FEM. Balancing the computation resource and accuracy, statistical upscaling is a computational efficient method in predicting effective thermal conductivity for nuclear waste form.

  17. Effective thermal conductivity measurements relevant to deep borehole nuclear waste disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaikh, Samina

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this work was to measure the effective thermal conductivity of a number of materials (particle beds, and fluids) proposed for use in and around canisters for disposal of high level nuclear waste in deep ...

  18. Ocean thermal plantships for production of ammonia as the hydrogen carrier.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panchal, C.B.; Pandolfini, P. P.; Kumm, W. H.; Energy Systems; Johns Hopkins Univ.; Arctic Energies, Ltd.

    2009-12-02

    Conventional petroleum, natural gas, and coal are the primary sources of energy that have underpinned modern civilization. Their continued availability in the projected quantities required and the impacts of emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) on the environment are issues at the forefront of world concerns. New primary sources of energy are being sought that would significantly reduce the emissions of GHGs. One such primary source that can help supply energy, water, and fertilizer without GHG emissions is available in the heretofore unexploited thermal gradients of the tropical oceans. The world's oceans are the largest natural collector and reservoir of solar energy. The potential of ocean energy is limitless for producing base-load electric power or ammonia as the hydrogen carrier and fresh water from seawater. However, until now, ocean energy has been virtually untapped. The general perception is that ocean thermal energy is limited to tropical countries. Therefore, the full potential of at-sea production of (1) ammonia as a hydrogen carrier and (2) desalinated water has not been adequately evaluated. Using ocean thermal plantships for the at-sea co-production of ammonia as a hydrogen carrier and desalinated water offer potential energy, environmental, and economic benefits that support the development of the technology. The introduction of a new widespread solution to our projected energy supply requires lead times of a decade or more. Although continuation of the ocean thermal program from the 1970s would likely have put us in a mitigating position in the early 2000s, we still have a window of opportunity to dedicate some of our conventional energy sources to the development of this renewable energy by the time new sources would be critically needed. The primary objective of this project is to evaluate the technical and economic viability of ocean thermal plantships for the production of ammonia as the hydrogen carrier. This objective is achieved by completing project tasks that consist of updating the John Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) pilot plantship design and extrapolating it to commercial plantships, evaluating a new energy-efficient ammonia synthesis process, evaluating the co-production of desalinated water on plantships, and developing a conceptual design of a satellite plantships system for commercial-scale ammonia production. In addition, an industrial workshop was organized to present the results and develop future goals for commercialization of ocean thermal plantships by 2015. The following goals, arranged in chronological order, were examined at the workshop: (1) Global displacement of petroleum-fuel-based (diesel, fuel oil, naphtha) power generation for freeing up these fuels for transportation, chemical feedstock, and other high-valued uses; (2) At-sea production of desalinated water for regions of critical water shortages; (3) Displacement of carbon-based feed stocks and energy for production of ammonia fertilizers; (4) Development of hydrogen supply to allow economic processing of heavy crude oils and upgrading oil sands; (5) Development of ammonia-fueled distributed energy to displace natural-gas fueled power generation to free up natural gas for higher-value uses and the mitigation of issues associated with imported liquefied natural gas (LNG); and (6) Use of ammonia as a hydrogen carrier for transportation.

  19. THERMAL IMPACT OF WASTE EMPLACEMENT AND SURFACE COOLING ASSOCIATED WITH GEOLOGIC DISPOSAL OF NUCLEAR WASTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.S.Y.

    2010-01-01

    Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management". This papern t i f i c Basis for Nuclear Waste Management, Vol. 1, F.J.c Basis for Nuclear Waste Management, v. 1, G.J. McCarthy (

  20. THERMAL IMPACT OF WASTE EMPLACEMENT AND SURFACE COOLING ASSOCIATED WITH GEOLOGIC DISPOSAL OF NUCLEAR WASTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.S.Y.

    2010-01-01

    thermohydroiogic behavior of nuclear waste r e p o s i t o rground repository for nuclear wastes in hard r o d ' .RELATED PROBLEMS IN A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY T h i s b i b

  1. Research on the external fluid mechanics of ocean thermal energy conversion plants : report covering experiments in a current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fry, David J. (David James)

    1981-01-01

    This report describes a set of experiments in a physical model study to explore plume transport and recirculation potential for a range of generic Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plant designs and ambient conditions. ...

  2. Near and far field models of external fluid mechanics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodríguez Buño, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    The world is facing the challenge of finding new renewable sources of energy - first, in response to fossil fuel reserve depletion, and second, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) can ...

  3. Thermal and radiolytic gas generation from Tank 241-S-102 waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, C.M.; Pederson, L.R.; Bryan, S.A.

    1997-07-01

    This report summarizes progress in evaluating thermal and radiolytic rate parameters for flammable gas generation in Hanford single-shell tank wastes based on the results of laboratory tests using actual waste from Tank 241-S-102 (S-102). Work described in this report was conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Flammable Gas Safety Project, whose purpose is to develop information to support Fluor Daniel Hanford (FDH) and its Project Management Hanford Contract (PHMC) subcontractors in their efforts to ensure the safe interim storage of wastes at the Hanford Site. This work is related to gas generation studies being performed at Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT) under subcontract to PNNL, using simulated wastes, and to studies being performed at Numatec Hanford Corporation (formerly Westinghouse Hanford Company) using actual wastes. The results of gas generation from Tank S-102 waste under thermal and radiolytic conditions are described in this report. The accurate measurement of gas generation rates in actual waste from highly radioactive waste tanks is needed to assess the potential for producing and storing flammable gases within the waste tanks. This report addresses the gas generation capacity of the waste from Tank S-102, a waste tank listed as high priority by the Flammable Gas Safety Program due to its potential for flammable gas accumulation above the flammability limit.

  4. Thermal Predictions of the Cooling of Waste Glass Canisters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donna Post Guillen

    2014-11-01

    Radioactive liquid waste from five decades of weapons production is slated for vitrification at the Hanford site. The waste will be mixed with glass forming additives and heated to a high temperature, then poured into canisters within a pour cave where the glass will cool and solidify into a stable waste form for disposal. Computer simulations were performed to predict the heat rejected from the canisters and the temperatures within the glass during cooling. Four different waste glass compositions with different thermophysical properties were evaluated. Canister centerline temperatures and the total amount of heat transfer from the canisters to the surrounding air are reported.

  5. Thermal Response of the 21-PWR Waste Package to a Fire Accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F.P. Faucher; H. Marr; M.J. Anderson

    2000-10-03

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the thermal response of the 21-PWR WP (pressurized water reactor waste package) to the regulatory fire event. The scope of this calculation is limited to the two-dimensional waste package temperature calculations to support the waste package design. The information provided by the sketches attached to this calculation (Attachment IV) is that of the potential design of the type of waste package considered in this calculation. The procedure AP-3.12Q.Calculations (Reference 1), and the Development Plan (Reference 24) are used to develop this calculation.

  6. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01

    the consumed thermal energy, and this process can be greatlythermal energy to electric energy must be based on processesprocess of an indirect energy conversion system consists of multiple steps to convert thermal

  7. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Life Cycle Cost Assessment, Final Technical Report, 30 May 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martel, Laura; Smith, Paul; Rizea, Steven; Van Ryzin, Joe; Morgan, Charles; Noland, Gary; Pavlosky, Rick; Thomas, Michael

    2012-06-30

    The Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Life Cycle Cost Assessment (OLCCA) is a study performed by members of the Lockheed Martin (LM) OTEC Team under funding from the Department of Energy (DOE), Award No. DE-EE0002663, dated 01/01/2010. OLCCA objectives are to estimate procurement, operations and maintenance, and overhaul costs for two types of OTEC plants: -Plants moored to the sea floor where the electricity produced by the OTEC plant is directly connected to the grid ashore via a marine power cable (Grid Connected OTEC plants) -Open-ocean grazing OTEC plant-ships producing an energy carrier that is transported to designated ports (Energy Carrier OTEC plants) Costs are developed using the concept of levelized cost of energy established by DOE for use in comparing electricity costs from various generating systems. One area of system costs that had not been developed in detail prior to this analysis was the operations and sustainment (O&S) cost for both types of OTEC plants. Procurement costs, generally referred to as capital expense and O&S costs (operations and maintenance (O&M) costs plus overhaul and replacement costs), are assessed over the 30 year operational life of the plants and an annual annuity calculated to achieve a levelized cost (constant across entire plant life). Dividing this levelized cost by the average annual energy production results in a levelized cost of electricity, or LCOE, for the OTEC plants. Technical and production efficiency enhancements that could result in a lower value of the OTEC LCOE were also explored. The thermal OTEC resource for Oahu, Hawai�¢����i and projected build out plan were developed. The estimate of the OTEC resource and LCOE values for the planned OTEC systems enable this information to be displayed as energy supplied versus levelized cost of the supplied energy; this curve is referred to as an Energy Supply Curve. The Oahu Energy Supply Curve represents initial OTEC deployment starting in 2018 and demonstrates the predicted economies of scale as technology and efficiency improvements are realized and larger more economical plants deployed. Utilizing global high resolution OTEC resource assessment from the Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project (an independent DOE project), Global Energy Supply Curves were generated for Grid Connected and Energy Carrier OTEC plants deployed in 2045 when the predicted technology and efficiencies improvements are fully realized. The Global Energy Supply Curves present the LCOE versus capacity in ascending order with the richest, lowest cost resource locations being harvested first. These curves demonstrate the vast ocean thermal resource and potential OTEC capacity that can be harvested with little change in LCOE.

  8. THERMAL IMPACT OF WASTE EMPLACEMENT AND SURFACE COOLING ASSOCIATED WITH GEOLOGIC DISPOSAL OF NUCLEAR WASTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.S.Y.

    2010-01-01

    6°C to prevent thermal pollution in the region overlying thethe e f f e c t s of thermal pollution in near- surface s o

  9. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01

    electrode surfaces, and electric energy is stored as surfacetemperature end and electric energy is generated, thermalbeing the generated electric energy and the consumed thermal

  10. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01

    making direct thermal energy storage methods, e.g. thosethermal shorting, that limits the energy conversion efficiency of direct thermoelectric energy conversion methods.

  11. On the thermal impact on the excavation damaged zone around deep radioactive waste disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delage, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Clays and claystones are considered in some countries (including Belgium, France and Switzerland) as a potential host rock for high activity long lived radioactive waste disposal at great depth. One of the aspects to deal with in performance assessment is related to the effects on the host rock of the temperature elevation due to the placement of exothermic wastes. The potential effects of the thermal impact on the excavated damaged zone in the close field are another important issue that was the goal of the TIMODAZ European research project. In this paper, some principles of waste disposal in clayey host rocks at great depth are first presented and a series of experimental investigations carried out on specific equipment specially developed to face the problem are presented. Both drained and undrained tests have been developed to investigate the drained thermal volume changes of clays and claystone and the thermal pressurization occurring around the galleries. This importance of proper initial saturation (un...

  12. Calculation of the Naval Long and Short Waste Package Three-Dimensional Thermal Interface Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. Marr

    2006-10-25

    The purpose of this calculation is to evaluate the thermal performance of the Naval Long and Naval Short spent nuclear fuel (SNF) waste packages (WP) in the repository emplacement drift. The scope of this calculation is limited to the determination of the temperature profiles upon the surfaces of the Naval Long and Short SNF waste package for up to 10,000 years of emplacement. The temperatures on the top of the outside surface of the naval canister are the thermal interfaces for the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program (NNPP). The results of this calculation are intended to support Licensing Application design activities.

  13. Thermal reactivity of mixtures of VDDT lubricant and simulated Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheele, R.D.; Panisko, F.E.; Sell, R.L.

    1996-09-01

    To predict whether the Polywater G lubricant residue remaining in the velocity, density, and temperature tree (VDTT) and the waste in Tank 241-SY-101 (101SY) will be chemically compatible with wastes in 101SY when two VDTTs are removed from 101SY, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory measured the thermal reaction sensitivity of the lubricant residue. This residue is a simulated 101SY waste containing the organic surrogate trisodium hydroxyethyl-ethylenediaminetriacetate (Na{sub 3}HEDTA) and two simulated potential waste and lubricant residue mixtures containing 10 and 90 percent lubricant residue. These studies using accelerating rate calorimetry found that the residue did not react at a rate exceeding 0.1 J/min/g mixture up to 190 degrees C with simulated 101SY waste containing Na{sub 3}HEDTA as the organic surrogate. Also, the dried lubricant residue did not decompose exothermically at a rate exceeding 0.1 J/min/g. Using guidelines used by the chemical industry, these results indicate that the lubricant residue should not react as a significant rate with the waste in 101SY when added to the waste at 60 degrees C or when the mixture cools to the waste`s temperature of 48 degrees C.

  14. Thermal valorization of post-consumer film waste in a bubbling bed gasifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martínez-Lera, S., E-mail: susanamartinezlera@gmail.com; Torrico, J.; Pallarés, J.; Gil, A.

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: • Film waste from packaging is a common waste, a fraction of which is not recyclable. • Gasification can make use of the high energy value of the non-recyclable fraction. • This waste and two reference polymers were gasified in a bubbling bed reactor. • This experimental research proves technical feasibility of the process. • It also analyzes impact of composition and ER on the performance of the plant. - Abstract: The use of plastic bags and film packaging is very frequent in manifold sectors and film waste is usually present in different sources of municipal and industrial wastes. A significant part of it is not suitable for mechanical recycling but could be safely transformed into a valuable gas by means of thermal valorization. In this research, the gasification of film wastes has been experimentally investigated through experiments in a fluidized bed reactor of two reference polymers, polyethylene and polypropylene, and actual post-consumer film waste. After a complete experimental characterization of the three materials, several gasification experiments have been performed to analyze the influence of the fuel and of equivalence ratio on gas production and composition, on tar generation and on efficiency. The experiments prove that film waste and analogue polymer derived wastes can be successfully gasified in a fluidized bed reactor, yielding a gas with a higher heating value in a range from 3.6 to 5.6 MJ/m{sup 3} and cold gas efficiencies up to 60%.

  15. RF Thermal Plasma Synthesis of Ferrite Nanopowders from Metallurgical Wastes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gubicza, Jenõ

    that of ferrites synthesized by the conventional ceramic route. Introduction Radiofrequency (RF) thermal plasmas by X-ray diffraction (XRD) using a Philips Xpert diffractometer and CuK radiation (=0.15418 nm

  16. CFD Modeling of Thermal Effects of Nuclear Waste Vitrification Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, Chris; Soltani, Mehdi; Barringer, Chris; Knight, Kelly

    2006-07-01

    The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) at Hanford, WA will vitrify nuclear waste stored at the DOE Hanford facility. The vitrification process will take place in two large concrete buildings where the glass is poured into stainless steel canisters or containers and allowed to cool. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) was used extensively to calculate the effects of the heat released by molten glass as it is poured and cooled, on the HVAC system and the building structure. CFD studies of the glass cooling in these facilities were used to predict canister temperatures, HVAC air temperatures, concrete temperatures and insulation requirements, and design temperatures for canister handling equipment and instrumentation at various stages of the process. These predictions provided critical input in the design of the HVAC system, specification of insulation, the design of canister handling equipment, and the selection of instrumentation. (authors)

  17. Radiation and Thermal Ageing of Nuclear Waste Glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, William J [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The radioactive decay of fission products and actinides incorporated into nuclear waste glass leads to self-heating and self-radiation effects that may affect the stability, structure and performance of the glass in a closed system. Short-lived fission products cause significant self-heating for the first 600 years. Alpha decay of the actinides leads to self-radiation damage that can be significant after a few hundred years, and over the long time periods of geologic disposal, the accumulation of helium and radiation damage from alpha decay may lead to swelling, microstructural evolution and changes in mechanical properties. Four decades of research on the behavior of nuclear waste glass are reviewed.

  18. Thermal Response of the 44-BWR Waste Package to a Hypothetical Fire Accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.R. Smotrel; H. Marr; M.J. Anderson

    2001-04-05

    The purpose of this calculation is to determine the thermal response of the 44-boiling water reactor (BWR) waste package (WP) to the hypothetical regulatory fire accident. The objective is to calculate the temperature response of the waste package materials to the hypothetical short-term fire defined in 10 CFR 7 1, Section 73(c)(4), Reference 1. The scope of the calculation includes evaluation of the accident with the waste package above ground, at the Yucca Mountain surface facility. The scope of this calculation is limited to the two-dimensional waste package temperature calculations to support the waste package design. The information provided by the sketches attached to this calculation is that for the potential design of the type of WP considered in this calculation. In addition to the nominal design configuration thermal load case, the effects of varying the BWR thermal load are determined. The associated activity is the development of engineering evaluations to support the Licensing Application (LA) design activities.

  19. Thermal Energy Storage/Waste Heat Recovery Applications in the Cement Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beshore, D. G.; Jaeger, F. A.; Gartner, E. M.

    1979-01-01

    , and the Portland Cement Association have studied the potential benefits of using waste heat recovery methods and thermal energy storage systems in the cement manufacturing process. This work was performed under DOE Contract No. EC-77-C-01-50S4. The study has been...

  20. THERMAL IMPACT OF WASTE EMPLACEMENT AND SURFACE COOLING ASSOCIATED WITH GEOLOGIC DISPOSAL OF NUCLEAR WASTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.S.Y.

    2010-01-01

    study recommends reprocessing spent fuel as a primary a l to r y . The reprocessing treatment of spent fuel does not ss for wastes from reprocessing and for spent fuel in several

  1. Waste Heat Recovery System: Lightweight Thermal Energy Recovery (LIGHTER) System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-01-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: GM is using shape memory alloys that require as little as a 10°C temperature difference to convert low-grade waste heat into mechanical energy. When a stretched wire made of shape memory alloy is heated, it shrinks back to its pre-stretched length. When the wire cools back down, it becomes more pliable and can revert to its original stretched shape. This expansion and contraction can be used directly as mechanical energy output or used to drive an electric generator. Shape memory alloy heat engines have been around for decades, but the few devices that engineers have built were too complex, required fluid baths, and had insufficient cycle life for practical use. GM is working to create a prototype that is practical for commercial applications and capable of operating with either air- or fluid-based heat sources. GM’s shape memory alloy based heat engine is also designed for use in a variety of non-vehicle applications. For example, it can be used to harvest non-vehicle heat sources, such as domestic and industrial waste heat and natural geothermal heat, and in HVAC systems and generators.

  2. Limits on the thermal energy release from radioactive wastes in a mined geologic repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, J.A.

    1983-03-01

    The theraml energy release of nuclear wastes is a major factor in the design of geologic repositories. Thermal limits need to be placed on various aspets of the geologic waste disposal system to avoid or retard the degradation of repository performance because of increased temperatures. The thermal limits in current use today are summarized in this report. These limits are placed in a hierarchial structure of thermal criteria consistent with the failure mechanism they are trying to prevent. The thermal criteria hierarchy is used to evaluate the thermal performance of a sample repository design. The design consists of disassembled BWR spent fuel, aged 10 years, close packed in a carbon steel canister with 15 cm of crushed salt backfill. The medium is bedded salt. The most-restrictive temperature for this design is the spent-fuel centerline temperature limit of 300/sup 0/C. A sensitivity study on the effects of additional cooling prior to disposal on repository thermal limits and design is performed.

  3. THERMAL IMPACT OF WASTE EMPLACEMENT AND SURFACE COOLING ASSOCIATED WITH GEOLOGIC DISPOSAL OF NUCLEAR WASTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.S.Y.

    2010-01-01

    disposal of high-level reprocessing waste i n a s a l t domebe recycled by fuel reprocessing if desired. Three cycles3434) As a r e s u l t of reprocessing, i t i s assumed t h

  4. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization- Final Technical Report on Award DE-EE0002664. October 28, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ascari, Matthew B.; Hanson, Howard P.; Rauchenstein, Lynn; Van Zwieten, James; Bharathan, Desikan; Heimiller, Donna; Langle, Nicholas; Scott, George N.; Potemra, James; Nagurny, N. John; Jansen, Eugene

    2012-10-28

    The Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project focuses on assessing the Maximum Practicably Extractable Energy (MPEE) from the world's ocean thermal resources. MPEE is defined as being sustainable and technically feasible, given today's state-of-the-art ocean energy technology. Under this project the OTEEV team developed a comprehensive Geospatial Information System (GIS) dataset and software tool, and used the tool to provide a meaningful assessment of MPEE from the global and domestic U.S. ocean thermal resources. The OTEEV project leverages existing NREL renewable energy GIS technologies and integrates extractable energy estimated from quality-controlled data and projected optimal achievable energy conversion rates. Input data are synthesized from a broad range of existing in-situ measurements and ground-truthed numerical models with temporal and spatial resolutions sufficient to reflect the local resource. Energy production rates are calculated for regions based on conversion rates estimated for current technology, local energy density of the resource, and sustainable resource extraction. Plant spacing and maximum production rates are then estimated based on a default plant size and transmission mechanisms. The resulting data are organized, displayed, and accessed using a multi-layered GIS mapping tool, http://maps.nrel.gov/mhk_atlas with a user-friendly graphical user interface.

  5. An in-line thermal-neutron coincidence counter for WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) certification measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krick, M.S.; Osborne, L.; Polk, P.J.; Atencio, J.D.; Bjork, C.

    1989-10-01

    A custom-designed, in-line, thermal-neutron coincidence counter has been constructed for the certification of plutonium waste intended for storage at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The mechanical and electrical components of the system and its performance characteristics are described. 6 refs., 16 figs.

  6. Reduction of carbon content in waste-tire combustion ashes by bio-thermal treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, C.C.; Lee, W.J.; Shih, S.I.; Mou, J.L.

    2009-07-01

    Application of bio-catalyst (NOE-7F) in thermal treatment can adequately dispose dark-black fly ashes from co-combustion of both waste tires and coal. After thermal treatment of fly ashes by adding 10% NOE-7F, the carbon contents reduced by 37.6% and the weight losses increased by 405%, compared with the fly ashes without mixing with NOE-7F. The combustion behaviors of wasted tires combustion fly ashes with NOE-7F were also investigated by both thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The results verify that NOE-7F has positive effects on the combustion of residual carbon and toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) enhance the energy release and reduce the toxicity during the process of thermal treatment. Furthermore, using NOE-7F to dispose high-carbon content fly ashes did improve the compressive strength of fly ashes and concrete mixtures. Therefore, NOE-7F is a promising additive which could decrease treatment cost of high-carbon content fly ashes and reduce the amount of survival toxic PAHs.

  7. Thermal and hydrometallurgical recovery methods of heavy metals from municipal solid waste fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kubo?ová, L.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • MSW fly ash was thermally and hydrometallurgically treated to remove heavy metals. • More than 90% of easy volatile heavy metals (Cd and Pb) were removed thermally. • More than 90% of Cd, Cr, Cu an Zn were removed by alkaline – acid leaching. • The best results were obtained for the solution of 3 M NaOH and 2 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. - Abstract: Heavy metals in fly ash from municipal solid waste incinerators are present in high concentrations. Therefore fly ash must be treated as a hazardous material. On the other hand, it may be a potential source of heavy metals. Zinc, lead, cadmium, and copper can be relatively easily removed during the thermal treatment of fly ash, e.g. in the form of chlorides. In return, wet extraction methods could provide promising results for these elements including chromium and nickel. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare thermal and hydrometallurgical treatment of municipal solid waste fly ash. Thermal treatment of fly ash was performed in a rotary reactor at temperatures between 950 and 1050 °C and in a muffle oven at temperatures from 500 to 1200 °C. The removal more than 90% was reached by easy volatile heavy metals such as cadmium and lead and also by copper, however at higher temperature in the muffle oven. The alkaline (sodium hydroxide) and acid (sulphuric acid) leaching of the fly ash was carried out while the influence of temperature, time, concentration, and liquid/solid ratio were investigated. The combination of alkaline-acidic leaching enhanced the removal of, namely, zinc, chromium and nickel.

  8. Assessment of thermal analysis software for the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, P.T.; Graham, R.F.; Lagerberg, G.N.; Chung, T.C.

    1989-07-01

    This assessment uses several recent assessments and the more general code compilations that have been completed to produce a list of 116 codes that can be used for thermal analysis. This list is then compared with criteria prepared especially for the Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (DOE/OCRWM). Based on these criteria, fifteen codes are narrowed to three primary codes and four secondary codes for use by the OCRWM thermal analyst. The analyst is cautioned that since no single code is sufficient for all applications, a code must be selected based upon the predominate heat transfer mode of the problem to be solved, but the codes suggested in this report have been used successfully for a range of OCRWM applications. The report concludes with a series of recommendations for additional work of which the major points include the following: The codes suggested by this report must be benchmarked with the existing US and international problems and validated when possible; An interactive code selection tool could be developed or, perhaps even more useful, a users group could be supported to ensure the proper selection of thermal codes and dissemination of information on the latest version; The status of the 116 codes identified by this report should be verified, and methods for maintaining the still active codes must be established; and special capabilities of each code in phase change, convection and radiation should be improved to better enable the thermal analyst to model OCRWM applications. 37 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

  9. Thermal properties measurements on rocksalt samples from the site of the proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweet, J. N.; McCreight, J. E.

    1980-05-13

    Thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, and specific heat measurements have been made on a number of specimens. The specific heat measurements were made by differential scanning calorimetry and the results showed that the specific heats of both clean rocksalt samples and of dirty samples with less than or equal to 7% insoluble impurities were essentially identical to the published specific heat for pure NaCl. In the thermal expansion measurements, two distinct groups of samples were identified. The first group had average expansion coefficients in the temperature range 300 to 700/sup 0/K close to that reported for pure NaCl. All the samples in this group were composed predominantly of halite, with only small amounts of other minerals or materials present. A second group of samples had expansion coefficients only approx. 0.3 to 0.5 that of NaCl. The samples in this group were composed largely of polyhalite, anhydrite, or siltstone. The measurements first reported by Acton on the thermal conductivity of samples taken from a borehole at the site of the proposed nuclear waste isolation pilot plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM, have been extended to include additional samples and higher temperature measurements. This is not believed to be the result of the onset of radiative thermal transport because the deviations are negative as well as positive. Infrared transmission measurements on rocksalt samples from the proposed WIPP site show no transmission in the 3 to 10 ..mu..m wavelength range for samples > 5 cm thick. Use of the estimated infrared absorption coefficient leads to the conclusion that there is little radiative heat transport for T < 800/sup 0/K. All samples were dense with little or no porosity evident. On the basis of these experiments, it is concluded that the thermal conductivity of materials found at the site can be predicted to an accuracy +- 30% from knowledge of the composition and grain size of these materials.

  10. Application of thermogravimetric analysis to study the thermal degradation of solid and liquid organic wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.S. Lygina; A.F. Dmitruk; S.B. Lyubchik; V.F. Tret'yakov

    2009-07-01

    In this work, the thermolysis of composite binary mixtures of refinery or coal-processing waste with waste biomass and D-grade (long-flame) coal was analyzed in order to increase the efficiency of the cothermolysis of chemically different organic wastes mainly because of the synergism of the thermolysis of mixture components and, correspondingly, the selectivity of formation of high-quality by-products (solid, gaseous, or liquid). A new approach to the analysis of thermogravimetric data was proposed and developed as applied to complex binary mixtures of carbon-containing materials. This approach was based on (1) the preliminary separation of the thermal degradation of individual carbon-containing mixture components into individual structural constituents and (2) the monitoring of the conversion of each particular structure fragment as a constituent of the mixtures in the course of the cothermolysis of the mixtures of starting components. Based on the approach developed, data on the main synergism effects in the course of cothermolysis in the binary test systems were obtained: the temperature regions of the appearance of these effects were distinguished, the main conclusions were made with respect to particular structure fragments in complex organic wastes responsible for the interaction of components in composite systems, and the directions (positive or negative) of changes in the yields of solid by-products and the degrees of effects (difference between the yields of cothermolysis by-products in each particular region of the appearance of synergistic effects in the systems) were determined. Additionally, the influence of alkali metal carbonate additives on synergistic effects in the interaction between binary system components under the process conditions of cothermolysis was analyzed.

  11. Thermal and combined thermal and radiolytic reactions involving nitrous oxide, hydrogen, nitrogen, and ammonia in contact with tank 241-SY-101 simulated waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.

    1996-02-01

    Work described in this report was conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Flammable Gas Safety Project, the purpose of which is to develop information needed to support Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) in their efforts to ensure the safe interim storage of wastes at the Hanford Site. Described in this report are the results of tests to evaluate the rates of thermal and combined thermal and radiolytic reactions involving flammable gases in the presence of Tank 241-SY-101 simulated waste. Flammable gases generated by the radiolysis of water and by the thermal and radiolytic decomposition of organic waste constituents may themselves participate in further reactions. Examples include the decomposition of nitrous oxide to yield nitrogen and oxygen, the reaction of nitrous oxide and hydrogen to produce nitrogen and water, and the reaction of nitrogen and hydrogen to produce ammonia. The composition of the gases trapped in bubbles in the wastes might therefore change continuously as a function of the time that the gas bubbles are retained.

  12. Evaluation of gasification and novel thermal processes for the treatment of municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niessen, W.R.; Marks, C.H.; Sommerlad, R.E.

    1996-08-01

    This report identifies seven developers whose gasification technologies can be used to treat the organic constituents of municipal solid waste: Energy Products of Idaho; TPS Termiska Processor AB; Proler International Corporation; Thermoselect Inc.; Battelle; Pedco Incorporated; and ThermoChem, Incorporated. Their processes recover heat directly, produce a fuel product, or produce a feedstock for chemical processes. The technologies are on the brink of commercial availability. This report evaluates, for each technology, several kinds of issues. Technical considerations were material balance, energy balance, plant thermal efficiency, and effect of feedstock contaminants. Environmental considerations were the regulatory context, and such things as composition, mass rate, and treatability of pollutants. Business issues were related to likelihood of commercialization. Finally, cost and economic issues such as capital and operating costs, and the refuse-derived fuel preparation and energy conversion costs, were considered. The final section of the report reviews and summarizes the information gathered during the study.

  13. Assessment and evaluation of a safety factor with respect to ocean disposal of waste materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zapatka, Thomas Francis

    1976-01-01

    . the probability of a spill if there is an accident; and P is the probability of environ- mental damage if there is a spill. The risk associated with ocean dumping is a function of only one probability: Risk = I * 1 * P 3 where P is the probability... in the marine environment. The variables that the author defines to be of most importance are: stage of development; concentration of toxicant; time of exposure; specific or non-specific reactions, lifetime of the compound; reactions with other chemicals...

  14. Vaporization of actinide oxides in thermal treatment processes for mixed waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Krikorian, O.H.; Adamson, M.G.

    1994-10-04

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the volatilities of U, Pu, and Am in thermal treatment processes for mixed wastes. The thermodynamics of vaporization U and Pu oxides in the presence of oxygen and water vapor and of U oxide in the presence of oxygen and chlorine were studied. Experimental studies of U oxide volatilities by previous authors have also been reviewed. For species where data are unavailable estimation methods were used to obtain free energies of formation of the gaseous species, The data are applied to thermal treatment processes in general and then more specifically to conditions representative of the Rocky Flats Plant Fluidized Bed Unit. (RFP FBU), molten salt oxidizer, and an incinerator. U volatilities are greatest ranging from 2.67 x 10{sup -7} gU/h in the RFP FBU to 4. 00 gU/h for typical incinerator conditions. Pu volatilities are almost 5 orders of magnitude less than U and Am volatilities are about 3 orders of magnitude less than Pu.

  15. Quantity, quality, and availability of waste heat from United States thermal power generation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gingerich, Daniel B [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Mauter, Meagan S [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2015-06-10

    Secondary application of unconverted heat produced during electric power generation has the potential to improve the life-cycle fuel efficiency of the electric power industry and the sectors it serves. This work quantifies the residual heat (also known as waste heat) generated by U.S. thermal power plants and assesses the intermittency and transport issues that must be considered when planning to utilize this heat. Combining Energy Information Administration plant-level data with literature-reported process efficiency data, we develop estimates of the unconverted heat flux from individual U.S. thermal power plants in 2012. Together these power plants discharged an estimated 18.9 billion GJth of residual heat in 2012, 4% of which was discharged at temperatures greater than 90 °C. We also characterize the temperature, spatial distribution, and temporal availability of this residual heat at the plant level and model the implications for the technical and economic feasibility of its end use. Increased implementation of flue gas desulfurization technologies at coal-fired facilities and the higher quality heat generated in the exhaust of natural gas fuel cycles are expected to increase the availability of residual heat generated by 10.6% in 2040.

  16. Quantity, quality, and availability of waste heat from United States thermal power generation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gingerich, Daniel B; Mauter, Meagan S

    2015-06-10

    Secondary application of unconverted heat produced during electric power generation has the potential to improve the life-cycle fuel efficiency of the electric power industry and the sectors it serves. This work quantifies the residual heat (also known as waste heat) generated by U.S. thermal power plants and assesses the intermittency and transport issues that must be considered when planning to utilize this heat. Combining Energy Information Administration plant-level data with literature-reported process efficiency data, we develop estimates of the unconverted heat flux from individual U.S. thermal power plants in 2012. Together these power plants discharged an estimated 18.9 billion GJthmore »of residual heat in 2012, 4% of which was discharged at temperatures greater than 90 °C. We also characterize the temperature, spatial distribution, and temporal availability of this residual heat at the plant level and model the implications for the technical and economic feasibility of its end use. Increased implementation of flue gas desulfurization technologies at coal-fired facilities and the higher quality heat generated in the exhaust of natural gas fuel cycles are expected to increase the availability of residual heat generated by 10.6% in 2040.« less

  17. MECHANICAL AND THERMAL DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOR RADIOACTIVE WASTE REPOSITORIES IN HARD ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, N.G.W.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    2008-01-01

    for Review of Nuclear Waste Management", DOE/ER-COO4/D, UC-Group on Nuclear Fuel Cycles and Waste Management", Reviews

  18. PART I. THERMAL BREAKDOWN CHARACTERISTICS OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE COMPONENTS IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    ENVIRONMENTS AND PART II. MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT IN CHINA Alexander P. Whitworth Advisor: Prof. Marco of Municipal Solid Waste Components in Varying Oxygen Environments and Municipal Solid Waste Management Management (MSW) in China In 2004, China surpassed the USA as the world's leading producer of solid waste

  19. Economics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC): Luis A. Vega Ph.D., National Marine Renewable Energy Center at the University of Hawai'i

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .D., National Marine Renewable Energy Center at the University of Hawai'i Copyright 2010, Offshore TechnologyOTC 21016 Economics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC): An Update Luis A. Vega Ph for the production of electricity, desalinated water and energy intensive products. It is postulated that the US

  20. Ocean thermal energy conversion power system development. Final design report: PSD-I, Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-06-30

    The PSD-I program provides a heat exchanger sytem consisting of an evaporator, condenser and various ancillaries with ammonia used as a working fluid in a closed simulated Rankine cycle. It is to be installed on the Chepachet Research Vessel for test and evaluation of a number of OTEC concepts in a true ocean environment. It is one of several test articles to be tested. Primary design concerns include control of biofouling, corrosion and erosion of aluminum tubes, selection of materials, and the development of a basis for scale-up to large heat exchangers so as to ultimately demonstrate economic feasibility on a commercial scale. The PSD-I test article is devised to verify thermodynamic, environmental, and mechanical performance of basic design concepts. The detailed design, development, fabrication, checklist, delivery, installation support, and operation support for the Test Article Heat Exchangers are described. (WHK)

  1. Determination of heat conductivity and thermal diffusivity of waste glass melter feed: Extension to high temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, Jarrett A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pokorny, Richard [Inst. of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic); Schweiger, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hrma, Pavel R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    The heat conductivity ({lambda}) and the thermal diffusivity (a) of reacting glass batch, or melter feed, control the heat flux into and within the cold cap, a layer of reacting material floating on the pool of molten glass in an all-electric continuous waste glass melter. After previously estimating {lambda} of melter feed at temperatures up to 680 deg C, we focus in this work on the {lambda}(T) function at T > 680 deg C, at which the feed material becomes foamy. We used a customized experimental setup consisting of a large cylindrical crucible with an assembly of thermocouples, which monitored the evolution of the temperature field while the crucible with feed was heated at a constant rate from room temperature up to 1100°C. Approximating measured temperature profiles by polynomial functions, we used the heat transfer equation to estimate the {lambda}(T) approximation function, which we subsequently optimized using the finite-volume method combined with least-squares analysis. The heat conductivity increased as the temperature increased until the feed began to expand into foam, at which point the conductivity dropped. It began to increase again as the foam turned into a bubble-free glass melt. We discuss the implications of this behavior for the mathematical modeling of the cold cap.

  2. MECHANICAL AND THERMAL DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOR RADIOACTIVE WASTE REPOSITORIES IN HARD ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, N.G.W.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    2008-01-01

    of Vitrified High Level Reprocessing Waste", Five Volumes.produce high-level waste by reprocessing used fuel, but the1.7 kW at 20 years after reprocessing for different tempera-

  3. Salt Disposal Investigations to Study Thermally Hot Radioactive Waste In A Deep Geologic Repository in Bedded Rock Salt - 12488

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Roger A. [DOE, Carlsbad Field Office, Carlsbad NM (United States); Buschman, Nancy [DOE, Office of Environmental Management, Washington DC (United States)

    2012-07-01

    A research program is proposed to investigate the behavior of salt when subjected to thermal loads like those that would be present in a high-level waste repository. This research would build upon results of decades of previous salt repository program efforts in the US and Germany and the successful licensing and operation of a repository in salt for disposal of defense transuranic waste. The proposal includes a combination of laboratory-scale investigations, numerical simulations conducted to develop validated models that could be used for future repository design and safety case development, and a thermal field test in an underground salt formation with a configuration that replicates a small portion of a conceptual repository design. Laboratory tests are proposed to measure salt and brine properties across and beyond the range of possible repository conditions. Coupled numerical models will seek to describe phenomenology (thermal, mechanical, and hydrological) observed in the laboratory tests. Finally, the field test will investigate many phenomena that have been variously cited as potential issues for disposal of thermally hot waste in salt, including buoyancy effects and migration of pre-existing trapped brine up the thermal gradient (including vapor phase migration). These studies are proposed to be coordinated and managed by the Carlsbad Field Office of DOE, which is also responsible for the operation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) within the Office of Environmental Management. The field test portion of the proposed research would be conducted in experimental areas of the WIPP underground, far from disposal operations. It is believed that such tests may be accomplished using the existing infrastructure of the WIPP repository at a lower cost than if such research were conducted at a commercial salt mine at another location. The phased field test is proposed to be performed over almost a decade, including instrumentation development, several years of measurements during heating and then subsequent cooling periods, and the eventual forensic mining back of the test bed to determine the multi-year behavior of the simulated waste/rock environment. Funding possibilities are described, and prospects for near term start-up are discussed. Mining of the access drifts required to create the test area in the WIPP underground began in November 2011. Because this mining uses existing WIPP infrastructure and labor, it is estimated to take about two years to complete the access drifts. WIPP disposal operations and facility maintenance activities will take priority over the SDI field test area mining. Funding of the SDI proposal was still being considered by DOE's Offices of Environmental Management and Nuclear Energy at the time this paper was written, so no specific estimates of the progress in 2012 have been included. (authors)

  4. Composition of Municipal Solid Waste-Need for Thermal Treatment in the present Indian context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    , Biomethanation, pelletization with or without energy recovery and other thermal processes for adoption

  5. THERMAL EVALUATION OF THE USE OF BWR MOX SNF IN THE WASTE PACKAGE DESIGN (SCPB: N/A)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. Wang

    1997-01-23

    This analysis is prepared by the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Waste Package Development Department (WPDD) as specified in the Waste Package Implementation Plan (pp. 4-8,4-11,4-24, 5-1, and 5-13; Ref. 5.10) and Waste Package Plan (pp. 3-15,3-17, and 3-24; Ref. 5.9). The design data request addressed herein is: (1) Characterize the conceptual 40 BWR and 24 BWR Multi-Purpose Canister (MPC) Waste Package (WP) design to show that the design is feasible for use in the MGDS environment when loaded with BWR MOX SNF. (2) Characterize the conceptual 44 BWR and 24 BWR Uncanistered Fuel (UCF) Waste Package (WP) design to show that the design is feasible for use in the MGDS environment when loaded with BWR MOX SNF. The purpose of this analysis is to respond to a concern that the long-term disposal thermal issues for the WP Design, if used with SNF designed for a MOX fuel cycle, do not preclude WP compatibility with the MGDS. The objective of this analysis is to provide thermal parameter information for the conceptual WP design with disposal container which is loaded with BWR MOX SNF under nominal MGDS repository conditions. The results are intended to show that the design has a reasonable chance to meet the MGDS design requirements for normal MGDS operation, and to provide the required guidance to determining the major design issues for future design efforts, and to show that the BWR MOX SNF loaded WP performance is similar to an WP loaded with commercial BWR SNF.

  6. Experiments on oxygen desorption from surface warm seawater under open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesaran, A.A.

    1989-12-01

    This paper reports the results of scoping deaeration experiments conducted with warm surface seawater under open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC). Concentrations of dissolved oxygen in seawater at three locations (in the supply water, water leaving a predeaerator, and discharge water from an evaporator) were measured and used to estimate oxygen desorption levels. The results suggest that 7% to 60% of dissolved oxygen in the supply water was desorbed from seawater in the predeaerator for pressures ranging from 9 to 35 kPa. Bubble injection in the upcomer increased the oxygen desorption rate by 20% to 60%. The dependence of oxygen desorption with flow rate could not be determined. The data also indicated that at typical OC-OTEC evaporator pressures when flashing occurred, 75% to 95% of dissolved oxygen was desorbed overall from the warm seawater. The uncertainty in results is larger than one would desire. These uncertainties are attributed to the uncertainties and difficulties in the dissolved oxygen measurements. Methods to improve the measurements for future gas desorption studies for warm surface and cold deep seawater under OC-OTEC conditions are recommended. 14 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Results of scoping tests for open-cycle OTEC (ocean thermal energy conversion) components operating with seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zangrando, F; Bharathan, D; Green, H J; Link, H F; Parsons, B K; Parsons, J M; Pesaran, A A [Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA); Panchal, C B [Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)

    1990-09-01

    This report presents comprehensive documentation of the experimental research conducted on open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) components operating with seawater as a working fluid. The results of this research are presented in the context of previous analysis and fresh-water testing; they provide a basis for understanding and predicting with confidence the performance of all components of an OC-OTEC system except the turbine. Seawater tests have confirmed the results that were obtained in fresh-water tests and predicted by the analytical models of the components. A sound technical basis has been established for the design of larger systems in which net power will be produced for the first time from OC-OTEC technology. Design and operation of a complete OC-OTEC system that produces power will provide sufficient confidence to warrant complete transfer of OC-OTEC technology to the private sector. Each components performance is described in a separate chapter written by the principal investigator responsible for technical aspects of the specific tests. Chapters have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  8. Conceptual design of an open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion net power-producing experiment (OC-OTEC NPPE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharathan, D.; Green, H.J.; Link, H.F.; Parsons, B.K.; Parsons, J.M.; Zangrando, F.

    1990-07-01

    This report describes the conceptual design of an experiment to investigate heat and mass transfer and to assess the viability of open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC). The experiment will be developed in two stages, the Heat- and Mass-Transfer Experimental Apparatus (HMTEA) and the Net Power-Producing Experiment (NPPE). The goal for the HMTEA is to test heat exchangers. The goal for the NPPE is to experimentally verify OC-OTEC's feasibility by installing a turbine and testing the power-generating system. The design effort met the goals of both the HMTEA and the NPPE, and duplication of hardware was minimal. The choices made for the design resource water flow rates are consistent with the availability of cold and warm seawater as a result of the seawater systems upgrade carried out by the US Department of Energy (DOE), the state of Hawaii, and the Pacific International Center for High Technology Research. The choices regarding configuration of the system were made based on projected performance, degree of technical risk, schedule, and cost. The cost for the future phase of the design and the development of the HMTEA/NPPE is consistent with the projected future program funding levels. The HMTEA and NPPE were designed cooperatively by PICHTR, Argonne National Laboratory, and Solar Energy Research Institute under the guidance of DOE. The experiment will be located at the DOE's Seacoast Test Facility at the Natural Energy Laboratory of Hawaii, Kailua-Kona, Hawaii. 71 refs., 41 figs., 34 tabs.

  9. Surface studies on aluminized and thermally oxidized superalloy 690 substrates interacted with simulated nuclear waste and sodium borosilicate melt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yusufali, C. Sengupta, P.; Dutta, R. S.; Dey, G. K.; Kshirsagar, R. J.; Mishra, R. K.; Kaushik, C. P.

    2014-04-24

    Aluminized and thermally oxidized Ni-Cr-Fe based superalloy 690 substrates with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer on top have been exposed in nitrate based environment (simulated high level nuclear liquid waste) at 373 K for 216 hours and sodium borosilicate melt at 1248 K for 192 hours. The surfaces of exposed samples have been characterized by using Electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA). Elemental X-ray mapping on coated specimen that exposed in simulated nuclear waste solution revealed that the surface is enriched with Ni, Cr and Al. X-ray mapping on surface of the specimen that interacted with sodium borosilicate melt indicated that the surface is composed of Al, Fe, Ni and Cr.

  10. Construction of the thermal/structural interactions in situ tests at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munson, D.E.; Matalucci, R.V. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hoag, D.L.; Blankenship D.A. [RE/SPEC Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others] [RE/SPEC Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); and others

    1997-02-01

    The Department of Energy has constructed the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to develop the technology for the disposal of radioactive waste from defense programs. Sandia National Laboratories has the responsibility for experimental activities at the WIPP and has emplaced several large-scale Thermal/Structural Interactions (TSI) in situ tests to validate techniques used to predict repository performance. The construction of the tests relied heavily on earlier excavations at the WIPP site to provide a basis for selecting excavation, surveying, and instrumentation methods, and achievable construction tolerances. The tests were constructed within close tolerances to provide consistent room dimensions and accurate placement of gages. This accuracy has contributed to the high quality of data generated which in turn has facilitated the comparison of test results to numerical predictions. The purpose of this report is to detail the construction activities of the TSI tests.

  11. Assessing the perception and reality of arguments against thermal waste treatment plants in terms of property prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, K.J.O.; Longhurst, P.J.; Wagland, S.T., E-mail: s.t.wagland@cranfield.ac.uk

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Previous research studies have shown that EfW facilities negatively impact the local house prices. • In this study property prices surrounding 3 operational EfW plants were analysed. • No significant negative effect on property prices due to an incinerator was found. - Abstract: The thermal processing of waste materials, although considered to be an essential part of waste management, is often sharply contested in the UK. Arguments such as health, depletion of resources, cost, noise, odours, traffic movement and house prices are often cited as reasons against the development of such facilities. This study aims to review the arguments and identify any effect on property prices due to the public perception of the plant. A selection of existing energy from waste (EfW) facilities in the UK, operational for at least 7 years, was selected and property sales data, within 5 km of the sites, was acquired and analysed in detail. The locations of the properties were calculated in relation to the plant using GIS software (ArcGIS) and the distances split into 5 zones ranging from 0 to 5 km from the site. The local property sale prices, normalised against the local house price index, were compared in two time periods, before and after the facility became operational, across each of the 5 zones. In all cases analysed no significant negative effect was observed on property prices at any distance within 5 km from a modern operational incinerator. This indicated that the perceived negative effect of the thermal processing of waste on local property values is negligible.

  12. Thermal evolution of an early magma ocean in interaction with the atmosphere: conditions for the condensation of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandeis, Geneviève

    for the condensation of a water ocean T. Lebrun1 , H. Massol1 , E. Chassefière1 , A. Davaille2 , E. Marcq3 , P. Sarda1-planet distance. Our results suggest that a steam atmosphere delays the end of the magma ocean phase by typically 1 Myr. Water vapor condenses to an ocean after 0.1 Myr, 1.5 Myr and 10 Myr for, respectively, Mars

  13. Ocean Power (4 Activities) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    our existing non-renewable resources. Ocean power is divided into three categories: wave energy, tidal energy, and ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) Systems. It is...

  14. EA-1189: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to demonstrate the feasibility of commercial treatment of contact-handled low-level mixed waste to meet existing Federal and State...

  15. Instrumentation of the thermal/structural interactions in situ tests at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munson, D.E.; Hoag, D.L.; Blankenship, D.A.; DeYonge, W.F.; Schiermeister, D.M.

    1997-04-01

    The Department of Energy has constructed the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to develop the technology for the disposal of radioactive waste from defense programs. Sandia National Laboratories had the responsibility for the experimental activities at the WIPP and fielded several large-scale Thermal/Structural Interactions (TSI) in situ tests to validate techniques used to predict repository performance. The instrumentation of these tests involved the placement of over 4,200 gages including room closure gages, borehole extensometers, stress gages, borehole inclinometers, fixed reference gages, borehole strain gages, thermocouples, thermal flux meters, heater power gages, environmental gages, and ventilation gages. Most of the gages were remotely read instruments that were monitored by an automated data acquisition system, but manually read instruments were also used to provide early deformation information and to provide a redundancy of measurement for the remote gages. Instruments were selected that could operate in the harsh environment of the test rooms and that could accommodate the ranges of test room responses predicted by pretest calculations. Instruments were tested in the field prior to installation at the WIPP site and were modified to improve their performance. Other modifications were made to gages as the TSI tests progressed using knowledge gained from test maintenance. Quality assurance procedures were developed for all aspects of instrumentation including calibration, installation, and maintenance. The instrumentation performed exceptionally well and has produced a large quantity of quality information.

  16. Environmental Assessment Offsite Thermal Treatment of Low-Level Mixed Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1999-05-06

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) needs to demonstrate the economics and feasibility of offsite commercial treatment of contact-handled low-level mixed waste (LLMW), containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBS) and other organics, to meet existing regulatory standards for eventual disposal.

  17. Isolation of Metals from Liquid Wastes: Reactive Scavenging in Turbulent Thermal Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jost O.L. Wendt; Alan R. Kerstein; Alexander Scheeline; Arne Pearlstein; William Linak

    2003-08-06

    The Overall project demonstrated that toxic metals (cesium Cs and strontium Sr) in aqueous and organic wastes can be isolated from the environment through reaction with kaolinite based sorbent substrates in high temperature reactor environments. In addition, a state-of-the art laser diagnostic tool to measure droplet characteristic in practical 'dirty' laboratory environments was developed, and was featured on the cover of a recent edition of the scientific journal ''applied Spectroscopy''. Furthermore, great strides have been made in developing a theoretical model that has the potential to allow prediction of the position and life history of every particle of waste in a high temperature, turbulent flow field, a very challenging problem involving as it does, the fundamentals of two phase turbulence and of particle drag physics.

  18. Results from an International Simulation Study on Coupled Thermal, Hydrological, and Mechanical (THM) Processes near Geological Nuclear Waste Repositories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, J.

    2008-01-01

    safety of a hypothetical nuclear waste repository – BMT1 ofAssociated with Nuclear Waste Repositories, Academic Press,safety of a hypothetical nuclear waste repository – BMT1 of

  19. Sulfur polymer cement as a low-level waste glass matrix encapsulant. Part 1: Thermal processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sliva, P.; Peng, Y.B.; Bunnell, L.R.; Peeler, D.K.; Feng, X.; Martin, P.; Turner, P.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Sulfur polymer cement (SPC) is a candidate material to encapsulate low-level waste (LLW) glass. Molten SPC will be poured into a LLW glass cullet-filled canister, surrounding the glass to act as an additional barrier to groundwater intrusion. This paper covers the first part of a study performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory concerned with the fundamental aspects of embedding LLW glass in SPC. Part one is a study of the SPC itself. Variations in SPC properties are discussed, especially in relation to long-term stability and controlling crystallization in a cooling canister.

  20. Isolation of Metals from Liquid Wastes: Reactive Scavenging in Turbulent Thermal Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Linak

    2004-12-16

    Sorption of cesium and strontium on kaolinite powders was investigated as a means to minimize the emissions of these metals during certain high temperature processes currently being developed to isolate and dispose of radiological and mixed wastes. In this work, non-radioactive aqueous cesium acetate or strontium acetate was atomized down the center of a natural gas flame supported on a variable-swirl burner in a refractory-lined laboratory-scale combustion facility. Kaolinite powder was injected at a post-flame location in the combustor. Cesium readily vaporizes in the high temperature regions of the combustor, but was reactively scavenged onto dispersed kaolinite. Global sorption mechanisms of cesium vapor on kaolinite were quantified, and are related to those available in the literature for sodium and lead. Both metal adsorption and substrate deactivation steps are important, and so there is an optimum temperature, between 1400 and 1500 K, at which maximum sorption occurs. The presence of chlorine inhibits cesium sorption. In contrast to cesium, and in the absence of chlorine, strontium was only partially vaporized and was, therefore, only partially scavengeable. The strontium data did not allow quantification of global kinetic mechanisms of interaction, although equilibrium arguments provided insight into the effects of chlorine on strontium sorption. These results have implications for the use of sorbents to control cesium and strontium emissions during high temperature waste processing including incineration and vitrification.

  1. Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of polycarbonate and plastic waste to recover monomers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, R.J.; Chum, H.L.

    1994-06-14

    A process is described using fast pyrolysis to convert a plastic waste feed stream containing polycarbonate and ABS to high value monomeric constituents prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituents prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting an acid or base catalysts and an oxide or carbonate support for treating the feed stream to affect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of the high value monomeric constituents of polycarbonate and ABS in the first temperature program range; differentially heating the feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituents prior to pyrolysis or other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents from the polycarbonate to cause pyrolysis to a different high value monomeric constituent of the plastic waste and differentially heating the feed stream at the second higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of different high value monomeric constituents; and separating the different high value monomeric constituents. 68 figs.

  2. Controlled catalystic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of polycarbonate and plastic waste to recover monomers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO); Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO)

    1994-01-01

    A process of using fast pyrolysis to convert a plastic waste feed stream containing polycarbonate and ABS to high value monomeric constituents prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituents prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting an acid or base catalysts and an oxide or carbonate support for treating the feed stream to affect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of the high value monomeric constituents of polycarbonate and ABS in the first temperature program range; differentially heating the feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituents prior to pyrolysis or other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents from the polycarbonate to cause pyrolysis to a different high value monomeric constituent of the plastic waste and differentially heating the feed stream at the second higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of different high value monomeric constituents; and separating the different high value monomeric constituents.

  3. Feasibility study for thermal treatment of solid tire wastes in Bangladesh by using pyrolysis technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Islam, M.R.; Joardder, M.U.H.; Hasan, S.M.; Takai, K.; Haniu, H.

    2011-09-15

    In this study on the basis of lab data and available resources in Bangladesh, feasibility study has been carried out for pyrolysis process converting solid tire wastes into pyrolysis oils, solid char and gases. The process considered for detailed analysis was fixed-bed fire-tube heating pyrolysis reactor system. The comparative techno-economic assessment was carried out in US$ for three different sizes plants: medium commercial scale (144 tons/day), small commercial scale (36 tons/day), pilot scale (3.6 tons/day). The assessment showed that medium commercial scale plant was economically feasible, with the lowest unit production cost than small commercial and pilot scale plants for the production of crude pyrolysis oil that could be used as boiler fuel oil and for the production of upgraded liquid-products.

  4. Ocean thermal energy conversion preliminary data report for the November 1977 GOTEC-02 cruise to the Gulf of Mexico Mobile Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Commins, M. L; Duncan, C. P.; Estrella, D. J.; Frisch, J. D.; Horne, A. J.; Jones, K.; Johnson, P. W.; Oldson, J. C.; Quinby-Hunt, M. S.; Ryan, C. J.; Sandusky, J. C.; Tatro, M.; Wilde, P.

    1980-03-01

    This is the second in a series of preliminary data reports from cruises to potential Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites in the Gulf of Mexico. The data are from the GOTEC-02 cruise to a site at approximately 29/sup 0/N, 88/sup 0/W, the Mobile Site. Twelve oceanographic stations were visited. Due to bad weather, the results are scanty. The reader will note that much of the data is questionable. Current meter results are presented elsewhere (Molinari, Hazelworth and Ortman, 1979). Determinations of the biomass indicators - chlorophyll a, phaeophytins and adenosine triphosphate - and zooplankton, are presented. Results were generally those that might have been predicted from previous studies in the area.

  5. Determination of temperature-dependent heat conductivity and thermal diffusivity of waste glass melter feed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pokorny, Richard; Rice, Jarrett A.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-06-01

    The cold cap is a layer of reacting glass batch floating on the surface of melt in an all-electric continuous glass melter. The heat needed for the conversion of the melter feed to molten glass must be transferred to and through the cold cap. Since the heat flux into the cold cap determines the rate of melting, the heat conductivity is a key property of the reacting feed. We designed an experimental setup consisting of a large cylindrical crucible with an assembly of thermocouples that monitors the evolution of the temperature field while the crucible is heated at a constant rate. Then we used two methods to calculate the heat conductivity and thermal diffusivity of the reacting feed: the approximation of the temperature field by polynomial functions and the finite-volume method coupled with least-squares analysis. Up to 680°C, the heat conductivity of the reacting melter feed was represented by a linear function of temperature.

  6. Systems study of the feasibility of high-level nuclear-waste fractionation for thermal stress control in a geologic repository: main report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKee, R.W.; Elder, H.K.; McCallum, R.F.; Silviera, D.J.; Swanson, J.L.; Wiles, L.E.

    1983-06-01

    This study assesses the benefits and costs of fractionating the cesium and strontium (Cs/Sr) components in commercial high-level waste (HLW) to a separate waste stream for the purpose of reducing geologic-repository thermal stresses in the region of the HLW. System costs are developed for a broad range of conditions comparing the Cs/Sr fractionation concept with disposal of 10-year-old vitrified HLW and vitrified HLW aged to achieve (through decay) the same heat output as the fractionated high-level waste (FHLW). All comparisons are based on a 50,000 metric ton equivalent (MTE) system. The FHLW and the Cs/Sr waste are both disposed of as vitrified waste but emplaced in separate areas of a basalt repository. The FHLW is emplaced in high-integrity packages at relatively high waste loading but low heat loading, while the Cs/Sr waste is emplaced in minimum-integrity packages at relatively high heat loading in a separate region of the repository. System cost comparisons are based on minimum cost combinations of canister diameter, waste concentration, and canister spacing in a basalt repository. The effects on both long- and near-term safety considerations are also addressed. The major conclusion is that the Cs/Sr fractionation concept offers the prospect of a substantial total system cost advantage for HLW disposal if reduced HLW package temperatures in a basalt repository are desired. However, there is no cost advantage if currently designated maximum design temperatures are acceptable. Aging the HLW for 50 to 100 years can accomplish similar results at equivalent or lower costs. 37 figures, 58 tables.

  7. Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PAT GRANDELLI, P.E.; GREG ROCHELEAU; JOHN HAMRICK, Ph.D.; MATT CHURCH, Ph.D.; BRIAN POWELL, Ph.D.

    2012-09-29

    This paper describes the modeling work by Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. to simulate the biochemical effects of of the nutrient-enhanced seawater plumes that are discharged by one or several 100 megawatt OTEC plants. The modeling is needed to properly design OTEC plants that can operate sustainably with acceptably low biological impact. In order to quantify the effect of discharge configuration and phytoplankton response, Makai Ocean Engineering implemented a biological and physical model for the waters surrounding O`ahu, Hawai`i, using the EPA-approved Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC). Each EFDC grid cell was approximately 1 square kilometer by 20 meters deep, and used a time step of three hours. The biological model was set up to simulate the biochemical response for three classes of organisms: Picoplankton (< 2 um) such as prochlorococccus, nanoplankton (2-20 um), and microplankton (> 20 um) e.g., diatoms. The dynamic biological phytoplankton model was calibrated using chemical and biological data collected for the Hawaii Ocean Time Series (HOTS) project. Peer review of the biological modeling was performed. The physical oceanography model uses boundary conditions from a surrounding Hawai'i Regional Ocean Model, (ROM) operated by the University of Hawai`i and the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration. The ROM provided tides, basin scale circulation, mesoscale variability, and atmospheric forcing into the edges of the EFDC computational domain. This model is the most accurate and sophisticated Hawai'ian Regional Ocean Model presently available, assimilating real-time oceanographic observations, as well as model calibration based upon temperature, current and salinity data collected during 2010 near the simulated OTEC site. The ROM program manager peer-reviewed Makai's implementation of the ROM output into our EFDC model. The supporting oceanographic data was collected for a Naval Facilities Engineering Command / Makai project. Results: The model was run for a 100 MW OTEC Plant consisting of four separate ducts, discharging a total combined flow rate of 420 m3/s of warm water and 320 m3/s of cold water in a mixed discharge at 70 meters deep. Each duct was assumed to have a discharge port diameter of 10.5m producing a downward discharge velocity of about 2.18 m/s. The natural system, as measured in the HOTS program, has an average concentration of 10-15 mgC/m3. To calibrate the biological model, we first ran the model with no OTEC plant and varied biological parameters until the simulated data was a good match to the HOTS observations. This modeling showed that phytoplankton concentration were patchy and highly dynamic. The patchiness was a good match with the data variability observed within the HOTS data sets. We then ran the model with simulated OTEC intake and discharge flows and associated nutrients. Directly under the OTEC plant, the near-field plume has an average terminal depth of 172 meters, with a volumetric dilution of 13:1. The average terminal plume temperature was 19.8oC. Nitrate concentrations are 1 to 2 umol/kg above ambient. The advecting plume then further dilutes to less than 1 umol/kg above ambient within a few kilometers downstream, while remaining at depth. Because this terminal near-field plume is well below the 1% light limited depths (~120m), no immediate biological utilization of the nutrients occurs. As the nitrate is advected and dispersed downstream, a fraction of the deep ocean nutrients (< 0.5 umol/kg perturbation) mix upward where they are utilized by the ambient phytoplankton population. This occurs approximately twenty-five kilometers downstream from the plant at 110 - 70 meters depth. For pico-phytoplankton, modeling results indicate that this nutrient perturbation causes a phytoplankton perturbation of approximately 1 mgC/m3 (~10% of average ambient concentrations) that covers an area 10x5 km in size at the 70 to 90m depth. Thus, the perturbations are well within the natural variability of the system, generally corresponding to a 10 to 15% increase above the a

  8. Waste Heat Recovery and Recycling in Thermal Separation Processes: Distillation, Multi-Effect Evaporation (MEE) and Crystallization Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emmanuel A. Dada; Chandrakant B. Panchal; Luke K. Achenie; Aaron Reichl; Chris C. Thomas

    2012-12-03

    Evaporation and crystallization are key thermal separation processes for concentrating and purifying inorganic and organic products with energy consumption over 1,000 trillion Btu/yr. This project focused on a challenging task of recovering low-temperature latent heat that can have a paradigm shift in the way thermal process units will be designed and operated to achieve high-energy efficiency and significantly reduce the carbon footprint as well as water footprint. Moreover, this project has evaluated the technical merits of waste-heat powered thermal heat pumps for recovery of latent heat from distillation, multi-effect evaporation (MEE), and crystallization processes and recycling into the process. The Project Team has estimated the potential energy, economics and environmental benefits with the focus on reduction in CO2 emissions that can be realized by 2020, assuming successful development and commercialization of the technology being developed. Specifically, with aggressive industry-wide applications of heat recovery and recycling with absorption heat pumps, energy savings of about 26.7 trillion Btu/yr have been estimated for distillation process. The direct environmental benefits of this project are the reduced emissions of combustible products. The estimated major reduction in environmental pollutants in the distillation processes is in CO2 emission equivalent to 3.5 billion lbs/year. Energy consumption associated with water supply and treatments can vary between 1,900 kWh and 23,700 kWh per million-gallon water depending on sources of natural waters [US DOE, 2006]. Successful implementation of this technology would significantly reduce the demand for cooling-tower waters, and thereby the use and discharge of water treatment chemicals. The Project Team has also identified and characterized working fluid pairs for the moderate-temperature heat pump. For an MEE process, the two promising fluids are LiNO3+KNO3+NANO3 (53:28:19 ) and LiNO3+KNO3+NANO2(53:35:12). And for an H2O2 distillation process, the two promising fluids are Trifluoroethanol (TFE) + Triethylene Glycol Dimethyl ether (DMETEG) and Ammonia+ Water. Thermo-physical properties calculated by Aspen+ are reasonably accurate. Documentation of the installation of pilot-plants or full commercial units were not found in the literature for validating thermo-physical properties in an operating unit. Therefore, it is essential to install a pilot-scale unit to verify thermo-physical properties of working fluid pairs and validate the overall efficiency of the thermal heat pump at temperatures typical of distillation processes. For an HO2 process, the ammonia-water heat pump system is more compact and preferable than the TFE-DMETEG heat pump. The ammonia-water heat pump is therefore recommended for the H2O2 process. Based on the complex nature of the heat recovery system, we anticipated that capital costs could make investments financially unattractive where steam costs are low, especially where co-generation is involved. We believe that the enhanced heat transfer equipment has the potential to significantly improve the performance of TEE crystallizers, independent of the absorption heat-pump recovery system. Where steam costs are high, more detailed design/cost engineering will be required to verify the economic viability of the technology. Due to the long payback period estimated for the TEE open system, further studies on the TEE system are not warranted unless there are significant future improvements to heat pump technology. For the H2O2 distillation cycle heat pump waste heat recovery system, there were no significant process constraints and the estimated 5 years payback period is encouraging. We therefore recommend further developments of application of the thermal heat pump in the H2O2 distillation process with the focus on the technical and economic viability of heat exchangers equipped with the state-of-the-art enhancements. This will require additional funding for a prototype unit to validate enhanced thermal performances of heat transfer equipment, evaluat

  9. Expected near-field thermal environments in a sequentially loaded spent-fuel or high-level waste repository in salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rickertsen, L.D.; Arbital, J.G.; Claiborne, H.C.

    1982-01-01

    This report describes the effect of realistic waste emplacement schedules on repository thermal environments. Virtually all estimates to date have been based on instantaneous loading of wastes having uniform properties throughout the repository. However, more realistic scenarios involving sequential emplacement of wastes reflect the gradual filling of the repository over its lifetime. These cases provide temperatures that can be less extreme than with the simple approximation. At isolated locations in the repository, the temperatures approach the instantaneous-loading limit. However, for most of the repository, temperature rises in the near-field are 10 to 40 years behind the conservative estimates depending on the waste type and the location in the repository. Results are presented for both spent-fuel and high-level reprocessing waste repositories in salt, for a regional repository concept, and for a single national repository concept. The national repository is filled sooner and therefore more closely approximates the instantaneously loaded repository. However, temperatures in the near-field are still 20/sup 0/C or more below the values in the simple model for 40 years after startup of repository emplacement operations. The results suggest that current repository design concepts based on the instantaneous-loading predictions are very conservative. Therefore, experiments to monitor temperatures in a test and evaluation facility, for example, will need to take into account the reduced temperatures in order to provide data used in predicting repository performance.

  10. 7-122 A solar pond power plant operates by absorbing heat from the hot region near the bottom, and rejecting waste heat to the cold region near the top. The maximum thermal efficiency that the power plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    7-49 7-122 A solar pond power plant operates by absorbing heat from the hot region near the bottom, and rejecting waste heat to the cold region near the top. The maximum thermal efficiency that the power plant can have is to be determined. Analysis The highest thermal efficiency a heat engine operating between

  11. Thermal springs list for the United States; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Key to Geophysical Records Documentation No. 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, G.W.; Grim, P.J.; Ikelman, J.A.

    1980-06-01

    The compilation has 1702 thermal spring locations in 23 of the 50 States, arranged alphabetically by State (Postal Service abbreviation) and degrees of latitude and longitude within the State. It shows spring name, surface temperature in degrees Fahrenheit and degrees Celsius; USGS Professional Paper 492 number, USGS Circular 790 number, NOAA number, north to south on each degree of latitude and longitude of the listed. USGS 1:250,000-scale (AMS) map; and the USGS topographic map coverage, 1:63360- or 1:62500-scale (15-minute) or 1:24000-scale (7.5-minute) quadrangle also included is an alphabetized list showing only the spring name and the State in which it is located. Unnamed springs are omitted. The list includes natural surface hydrothermal features: springs, pools, mud pots, mud volcanoes, geysers, fumaroles, and steam vents at temperature of 20{sup 0}C (68[sup 0}F) or greater. It does not include wells or mines, except at sites where they supplement or replace natural vents presently or recently active, or, in some places, where orifices are not distinguishable as natural or artificial. The listed springs are located on the USGS 1:250,000 (AMS) topographic maps. (MHR)

  12. MWIP: Surrogate formulations for thermal treatment of low-level mixed waste. Part 4, Wastewater treatment sludges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bostick, W.D.; Hoffmann, D.P.; Stevenson, R.J.; Richmond, A.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bickford, D.F. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The category of sludges, filter cakes, and other waste processing residuals represent the largest volume of low-level mixed (hazardous and radioactive) wastes within the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Treatment of these wastes to minimize the mobility of contaminants, and to eliminate the presence of free water, is required under the Federal Facility Compliance Act agreements between DOE and the Environmental Protection Agency. In the text, we summarize the currently available data for several of the high priority mixed-waste sludge inventories within DOE. Los Alamos National Laboratory TA-50 Sludge and Rocky Flats Plant By-Pass Sludge are transuranic (TRU)-contaminated sludges that were isolated with the use of silica-based filter aids. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant West End Treatment Facility Sludge is predominantly calcium carbonate and biomass. The Oak Ridge K-25 Site Pond Waste is a large-volume waste stream, containing clay, silt, and other debris in addition to precipitated metal hydroxides. We formulate ``simulants`` for the waste streams described above, using cerium oxide as a surrogate for the uranium or plutonium present in the authentic material. Use of nonradiological surrogates greatly simplifies material handling requirements for initial treatability studies. The use of synthetic mixtures for initial treatability testing will facilitate compositional variation for use in conjunction with statistical design experiments; this approach may help to identify any ``operating window`` limitations. The initial treatability testing demonstrations utilizing these ``simulants`` will be based upon vitrification, although the materials are also amenable to testing grout-based and other stabilization procedures. After the feasibility of treatment and the initial evaluation of treatment performance has been demonstrated, performance must be verified using authentic samples of the candidate waste stream.

  13. Thermally induced mechanical and permeability changes around a nuclear waste repository -- a far-field study based on equivalent properties determined by a discrete approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Min, Ki-Bok; Rutqvist, Jonny; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Jing, Lanru

    2004-01-01

    changes around a nuclear waste repository – a far-fieldmass containing a hypothetical nuclear waste repository. Thethe safe isolation of nuclear wastes from the biosphere,

  14. The Radiological and Thermal Characteristics of Fission Waste from a Deep-Burn Fusion-Fission Hybrid (LIFE) and Implications for Repository Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, H F; Blink, J; Farmer, J; Latkowski, J; Kramer, K

    2009-09-08

    We are studying the use of a Laser Inertial-confinement Fusion Engine (LIFE) to drive a hybrid fusion-fission system that can generate electrical power and/or burn nuclear waste. The system uses the neutrons from laser driven ICF to produce tritium and to drive nuclear reactions in a subcritical fission blanket. The fusion neutron source obviates the need for a self-sustaining chain reaction in the fission blanket. Either fissile or fertile could be used as fission fuel, thus eliminating the need for isotopic enrichment. The 'driven' system potentially allows very high levels of burnup to be reached, extracting a large fraction of the available energy in the fission fuel without the need for reprocessing. In this note, we discuss the radionuclide inventory of a depleted uranium (DU) fuel burned to greater than 95% FIMA (Fissions per Initial heavy Metal Atom), the implications for thermal management of the resulting waste, and the implications of this waste for meeting the dose standards for releases from a geological repository for high-level waste. The fission waste discussed here would be that produced by a LIFE hybrid with a 500-MW fusion source. The fusion neutrons are multiplied and moderated by a sequence of concentric shells of materials before encountering the fission fuel, and fission in this region is largely due to thermal neutrons. The fission blanket consists of 40 metric tons (MT) of DU, assumed to be in the form of TRISO-like UOC fuel particles embedded in 2-cm-diameter graphite pebbles. (It is recognized that TRISO-based fuel may not reach the high burnup of the fertile fuel considered here, and other fuel options are being investigated. We postulate the existence of a fuel that can reach >95% FIMA so that the waste disposal implications of high burnup can be assessed.) The engine and plant design considered here would receive one load of fission fuel and produce {approx}2 GWt of power (fusion + fission) over its 50- to 70-year lifetime. Neutron and photon transport calculations were performed using MCNP5. Burnup calculations were performed using a modified version of Monteburns 2.0. The nuclear data used were from ENDF/B-VII. Additional details of the burn calculations can be found in. For comparison to spent fuel from light water reactors (LWRs), we use the projected initial inventory of PWR and BWR fuels (current average age of 23 years since discharge) used for the Yucca Mountain Project Final Environmental Impact Statement. The decay of this initial inventory to 1 million years was calculated using ORIGEN2. The hybrid system considered here would have generated {approx}44 GWe-yr of energy at 99% FIMA. The energy generated per MT is therefore about 1100 MWe-yr/MT. In contrast, using average burnups of 41.2 GWt-day/MT and 33.6 GWt-day/MT for the PWR and BWR fuel slated for disposal at Yucca Mtn., and assuming a thermal electric conversion efficiency of {approx}33%, the total energy generated by the 68,000 MT 'Yucca Mtn. inventory' is {approx}2500 GWe-yr, or {approx}37 MWe-yr/MT, which is {approx}30 times less energy per MT than the waste from the hybrid. Clearly, relative to the current once-through fuel cycle, the use of a deep-burn hybrid to generate electricity would significantly reduce the need for repository capacity.

  15. Ocean Systems Lecture 16 & 17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richerson, Peter J.

    to thrive in oceans and lakes they need sunlight and nutrients. But thermal stratification tends to separateOcean Systems Lecture 16 & 17 #12;Hydroclimate, heat budgets and stratification For plants the nature of stratification. Light, less dense, water floats on top of colder, less dense water. Plankton

  16. Ocean Thermal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to:Information 3rd|Northfork ElectricName01988) | OpenThePower

  17. Ultrasonic Characterization of Wastes | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrasonic Characterization of Wastes It's commonplace for seeing babies in utero, fish underwater and submarines in the ocean, but now sonar technology will be giving DOE an image...

  18. Technical and philosophical aspects of ocean disposal 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zapatka, Marchi Charisse

    1976-01-01

    and demolition debris Solid wastes 26 26 30 30 31 32 lii 1 i tary wastes. Radioactive wastes Disposal Methods. 32 32 34 Harges Containerized methods. Submarine outfalls CHASE. Indirect discharge . 40 44 Transport Mechanisms of iiaste... disposal of wastes is not a new idea, although it is only in recent years that this issue has received considerable attention. Man is concerned about the condition of the ocean because i+ is a valuable source of many resources from the marine environment...

  19. A Magnetomechanical Thermal Energy Harvester With A Reversible Liquid Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Hong

    2012-01-01

    for Waste Heat Energy Harvesting and Thermal Conductanceand Mechanical Model of a Thermal Energy Harvesting Device”,to remove the excess thermal energy and prevent burning of

  20. Investigations of Near-Field Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Models for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Clay/Shale Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, H.H.; Li, L.; Zheng, L.; Houseworth, J.E.; Rutqvist, J.

    2011-06-20

    Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at the Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon and Volckaert, 2003) have all been under intensive scientific investigation (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relationships to flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of radioactive waste. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA.

  1. Thermal performance of a buried nuclear waste storage container storing a hybrid mix of PWR and BWR spent fuel rods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, G.L.

    1988-09-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will design, model, and test nuclear waste packages for use at the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. One such package would store lightly packed spent fuel rods from both pressurized and boiling water reactors. The storage container provides the primary containment of the nuclear waste and the spent fuel rod cladding provides secondary containment. A series of transient conduction and radiation heat transfer analyses was run to determine for the first 1000 yr of storage if the temperature of the tuff at the borehole wall ever falls below 97{degree}C and whether the cladding of the stored spent fuel ever exceeds 350{degree}C. Limiting the borehole to temperatures of 97{degree}C or greater helps minimize corrosion by assuring that no condensed water collects on the container. The 350{degree}C cladding limit minimizes the possibility of creep-related failure in the spent fuel rod cladding. For a series of packages stored in a 8 x 30 m borehole grid where each package contains 10-yr-old spent fuel rods generating 4.74 kW or more, the borehole wall stays above 97{degree}C for the full 1000-yr analysis period.

  2. Thermal, chemical, and mass-transport processes induced in abyssal sediments by the emplacement of nuclear waste: experimental and modeling results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McVey, D.F.; Erickson, K.L.; Seyfried, W.

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses heat and mass transport studies of marine red clay sediments being considered as a nuclear waste isolation medium. Numerical models indicate that for a maximum allowable sediment/canister interface temperature of 200 to 250/sup 0/C, the sediment can absorb about 1.5 kW initial power from waste in a 3 m long by 0.3 m dia canister buried 30 m in the sediment. Fluid displacement due to convection is found to be less than 1 m. Laboratory studies of the geochemical effects induced by heating sediment/seawater mixtures indicate that the canister and waste form must be designed to resist a hot, acid (pH 3 to 4) oxidizing environment. Since the thermally altered sediment volume of about 5.5 m/sup 3/ is small relative to the sediment volume overlying the canister, the acid and oxidizing conditions are not anticipated to effect the properties of the far field. Using sorption coefficient correlations, the migration of four nuclides /sup 239/Pu, /sup 137/Cs, /sup 129/I, and /sup 99/Tc were computer for a canister buried 30 m deep in a 60 m thick red clay sediment layer. It was found that the /sup 239/Pu and /sup 137/Cs are essentially completely contained in the sediments, while /sup 129/I and /sup 99/Tc broke through the 30 m of sediment in about 5000 years. The resultant peak injection rates of 4.6 x 10/sup -5/ ..mu..Ci/year-m/sup 2/ for /sup 129/I and 1.6 x 10/sup -2/ ..mu..Ci/year-m/sup 2/ for /sup 99/Tc were less than the natural radioactive flux of /sup 226/Ra (3.5 to 8.8 x 10/sup -4/ ..mu..Ci/year-m/sup 2/) and /sup 222/Rn (0.26 to 0.88 ..mu..Ci/year-m/sup 2/).

  3. Zero Waste, Renewable Energy & Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Zero Waste, Renewable Energy & Environmental Stewardship - Connecting loose ends: Thermal Recycling Party, Berlin · Research Institute Karlsruhe, Germany · Oekoinstitut, Freiburg, Germany · BASF, Germany business, namely "zero waste" and "clean production." #12;Arguments given against WTE: People who think we

  4. Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of phenolic resin containing waste streams to sequentially recover monomers and chemicals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO); Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO)

    1992-01-01

    A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a waste phenolic resin containing feedstreams in a manner such that pyrolysis of said resins and a given high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolyses of the resins in other monomeric components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said resin and a given high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other monomeric components; selecting, if desired, a catalyst and a support and treating said feedstreams with said catalyst to effect acid or basic catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said first temperature program range to utilize reactive gases such as oxygen and steam in the pyrolysis process to drive the production of specific products; differentially heating said feedstreams at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantity of said high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other monomeric components therein; separating said high value monomeric constituent; selecting a second higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said phenolic resins waste and differentially heating said feedstreams at said higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said different high value monomeric constituent; and separating said different high value monomeric constituent.

  5. Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of phenolic resin containing waste streams to sequentially recover monomers and chemicals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chum, H.L.; Evans, R.J.

    1992-08-04

    A process is described for using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a waste phenolic resin containing feedstreams in a manner such that pyrolysis of said resins and a given high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolyses of the resins in other monomeric components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said resin and a given high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other monomeric components; selecting, if desired, a catalyst and a support and treating said feedstreams with said catalyst to effect acid or basic catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said first temperature program range to utilize reactive gases such as oxygen and steam in the pyrolysis process to drive the production of specific products; differentially heating said feedstreams at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantity of said high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other monomeric components therein; separating said high value monomeric constituent; selecting a second higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said phenolic resins waste and differentially heating said feedstreams at said higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said different high value monomeric constituent; and separating said different high value monomeric constituent. 11 figs.

  6. Flexible ocean upwelling pipe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA)

    1980-01-01

    In an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, a cold water riser pipe is releasably supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. The pipe is substantially vertical and has its lower end far below the hull above the ocean floor. The pipe is defined essentially entirely of a material which has a modulus of elasticity substantially less than that of steel, e.g., high density polyethylene, so that the pipe is flexible and compliant to rather than resistant to applied bending moments. The position of the lower end of the pipe relative to the hull is stabilized by a weight suspended below the lower end of the pipe on a flexible line. The pipe, apart from the weight, is positively buoyant. If support of the upper end of the pipe is released, the pipe sinks to the ocean floor, but is not damaged as the length of the line between the pipe and the weight is sufficient to allow the buoyant pipe to come to a stop within the line length after the weight contacts the ocean floor, and thereafter to float submerged above the ocean floor while moored to the ocean floor by the weight. The upper end of the pipe, while supported by the hull, communicates to a sump in the hull in which the water level is maintained below the ambient water level. The sump volume is sufficient to keep the pipe full during heaving of the hull, thereby preventing collapse of the pipe.

  7. Thermally induced mechanical and permeability changes around a nuclear waste repository -- a far-field study based on equivalent properties determined by a discrete approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Min, Ki-Bok; Rutqvist, Jonny; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Jing, Lanru

    2004-01-01

    International Atomic Energy Agency, Scientific and Technical Basis for the Geological Disposal of Radioactive Wastes,

  8. Modeling the three-dimensional upper ocean heat budget and subduction rate during the Subduction Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the evolution of the upper ocean thermal structure and provide a useful tool for the analysis of air

  9. Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Tony

    2012-01-01

    doing so would reduce thermal pollution and overall planthave been wasted. Thermal pollution and the production of

  10. V-TOUGH: An enhanced version of the TOUGH code for the thermal and hydrologic simulation of large-scale problems in nuclear waste isolation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nitao, J.J.

    1989-11-06

    The TOUGH code developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is being extensively used to numerically simulate the thermal and hydrologic environment around nuclear waste packages in the unsaturated zone for the Yucca Mountain Project. At the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) we have rewritten approximately 80 percent of the TOUGH code to increase its speed and incorporate new options. The geometry of many problems requires large numbers of computational elements elements in order to realistically model detailed physical phenomena, and, as a result, large amounts of computer time are needed. In order to increase the speed of the code we have incorporated fast linear equation solvers, vectorization of substantial portions of code, improved automatic time stepping, and implementation of table look-up for the steam table properties. These enhancements have increased the speed of the code for typical problems by a factor of 20 on the Cray 2 computer. In addition to the increase in computational efficiency we have added several options: vapor pressure lowering; equivalent continuum treatments of fractures; energy and material volumetric, mass and flux accounting; and Stefan-Boltzmann radiative heat transfer. 5 refs.

  11. Thermal and combined thermal and radiolytic reactions involving nitrous oxide, hydrogen, and nitrogen in the gas phase; comparison of gas generation rates in supernate and solid fractions of Tank 241-SY-101 simulated waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.

    1995-03-01

    This report summarizes progress made in evaluating me by which flammable gases are generated in Hanford double-shell tank wastes, based on the results of laboratory tests using simulated waste mixtures. Work described in this report. was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the Flammable Gas Safety Project, the purpose of which is to develop information needed to support Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) in their efforts to ensure the safe interim storage of wastes at the Hanford Site. This work is related to gas generation studies being performed at Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), under subcontract to PNL, using simulated wastes, and to studies being performed at VMC using actual wastes.

  12. DESCRIPTION OF SELECTED WASTE MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;DESCRIPTION OF SELECTED WASTE MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS, OPTIONS AND STRATEGIES Prepared for BC of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food Fisheries and Oceans Fraser River Action Plan November, 1996 Prepared by P. E Nutrients in Wastes 22 4.2.5 Waste Treatment 23 5.0 STRATEGY DEVELOPMENT 24 5.1 LAND USE MANAGEMENT 24 5

  13. Comprehensive Ocean Drilling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comprehensive Ocean Drilling Bibliography containing citations related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, and International Ocean Discovery Program Last updated: May 2014 #12;Comprehensive Bibliography Comprehensive Ocean Drilling Bibliography

  14. Mixed waste: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moghissi, A.A.; Blauvelt, R.K.; Benda, G.A.; Rothermich, N.E.

    1993-12-31

    This volume contains the peer-reviewed and edited versions of papers submitted for presentation a the Second International Mixed Waste Symposium. Following the tradition of the First International Mixed Waste Symposium, these proceedings were prepared in advance of the meeting for distribution to participants. The symposium was organized by the Mixed Waste Committee of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The topics discussed at the symposium include: stabilization technologies, alternative treatment technologies, regulatory issues, vitrification technologies, characterization of wastes, thermal technologies, laboratory and analytical issues, waste storage and disposal, organic treatment technologies, waste minimization, packaging and transportation, treatment of mercury contaminated wastes and bioprocessing, and environmental restoration. Individual abstracts are catalogued separately for the data base.

  15. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 198 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (successors to the Planning Committee) and the Pollution Prevention and Safety Panel. Technical Editor: Karen thermal maximum, the mid-Maastrichtian deep-water event, and the early Aptian Oceanic Anoxic Event

  16. ROCK PROPERTIES AND THEIR EFFECT ON THERMALLY-INDUCED DISPLACEMENTS AND STRESSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, T.

    2010-01-01

    Disposal of High Level Radioactive Waste: Initial Assessment of the Thermal Stress Field," AERE Report

  17. Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic Tomography, Satellite Altimetry, and Modeling The ATOC to thermal expansion. Interpreting climate change signals from fluctuations in sea level is therefore in the advective heat flux. Changes in oceanic heat storage are a major expected element of future climate shifts

  18. Utilization of Common Automotive Three-Way NO{sub x} Reduction Catalyst for Managing Off- Gas from Thermal Treatment of High-Nitrate Waste - 13094

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, Adam L.; Ki Song, P.E.

    2013-07-01

    Studsvik's Thermal Organic Reduction (THOR) steam reforming process has been tested and proven to effectively treat radioactive and hazardous wastes streams with high nitrate contents to produce dry, stable mineral products, while providing high conversion (>98%) of nitrates and nitrites directly to nitrogen gas. However, increased NO{sub x} reduction may be desired for some waste streams under certain regulatory frameworks. In order to enhance the NO{sub x} reduction performance of the THOR process, a common Three-Way catalytic NO{sub x} reduction unit was installed in the process gas piping of a recently completed Engineering Scale Technology Demonstration (ESTD). The catalytic DeNO{sub x} unit was located downstream of the main THOR process vessel, and it was designed to catalyze the reduction of residual NO{sub x} to nitrogen gas via the oxidation of the hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and volatile organic compounds that are inherent to the THOR process gas. There was no need for auxiliary injection of a reducing gas, such as ammonia. The unit consisted of four monolith type catalyst sections positioned in series with a gas mixing section located between each catalyst section. The process gas was monitored for NO{sub x} concentration upstream and downstream of the catalytic DeNO{sub x} unit. Conversion efficiencies ranged from 91% to 97% across the catalytic unit, depending on the composition of the inlet gas. Higher concentrations of hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the THOR process gas increased the NO{sub x} reduction capability of the catalytic DeNO{sub x} unit. The NO{sub x} destruction performance of THOR process in combination with the Three-Way catalytic unit resulted in overall system NO{sub x} reduction efficiencies of greater than 99.9% with an average NO{sub x} reduction efficiency of 99.94% for the entire demonstration program. This allowed the NO{sub x} concentration in the ESTD exhaust gas to be maintained at less than 40 parts per million (ppm), dry basis with an average concentration of approximately 17 ppm, dry basis. There were no signs of catalyst deactivation throughout the 6 day demonstration program, even under the high steam (>50%) content and chemically reducing conditions inherent to the THOR process. Utilization of the common Three-Way automotive catalyst may prove to be a cost effective method for improving NO{sub x} emissions from thermal treatment processes that utilize similar processing conditions. This paper will discuss the details of the implementation and performance of the Three-Way catalytic DeNO{sub x} unit at the THOR ESTD, as well as a discussion of future work to determine the long-term durability of the catalyst in the THOR process. (authors)

  19. Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Tony

    2012-01-01

    concentrated solar thermal energy and low grade waste heatreclamation and solar thermal energy," Energy [accepted]. [and M Dennis, "Solar thermal energy systems in Australia,"

  20. Generic disposal concepts and thermal load management for larger...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Generic disposal concepts and thermal load management for larger waste packages. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Generic disposal concepts and thermal load management...

  1. COOLING OF THE OCEANIC LITHOSPHERE AND OCEAN FLOOR (Copyright, 2001, David T. Sandwell)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandwell, David T.

    1 COOLING OF THE OCEANIC LITHOSPHERE AND OCEAN FLOOR TOPOGRAPHY (Copyright, 2001, David T. Sandwell) Introduction This lecture is the development of the lithospheric cooling problem. For researchers in the areas important thermal boundary layer which is at the core-mantle boundary. As the lithosphere cools it becomes

  2. Mass Wasting in the Western Galapagos Islands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Hillary

    2012-10-19

    Oceanic island volcanoes such as those in the Hawaiian, Canary and Galapagos Islands are known to become unstable, causing failures of the subaerial and submarine slopes of the volcanic edifices. These mass wasting events appear to be the primary...

  3. Federal Waste Management www.lebensministerium.at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    of water use 25 2.3.6. Separately collected industrial recyclables 27 2.3.7. Other non-hazardous waste 27 2 volumes and waste treatment in Austria 12 2.2. Hazardous waste and waste oils 15 2.2.1. Waste volume 15 2.4. Recycling and treatment plants 27 2.4.1. Chemico-physical recycling and treatment plants 28 2.4.2. Thermal

  4. Mixed waste characterization reference document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    Waste characterization and monitoring are major activities in the management of waste from generation through storage and treatment to disposal. Adequate waste characterization is necessary to ensure safe storage, selection of appropriate and effective treatment, and adherence to disposal standards. For some wastes characterization objectives can be difficult and costly to achieve. The purpose of this document is to evaluate costs of characterizing one such waste type, mixed (hazardous and radioactive) waste. For the purpose of this document, waste characterization includes treatment system monitoring, where monitoring is a supplement or substitute for waste characterization. This document establishes a cost baseline for mixed waste characterization and treatment system monitoring requirements from which to evaluate alternatives. The cost baseline established as part of this work includes costs for a thermal treatment technology (i.e., a rotary kiln incinerator), a nonthermal treatment process (i.e., waste sorting, macronencapsulation, and catalytic wet oxidation), and no treatment (i.e., disposal of waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)). The analysis of improvement over the baseline includes assessment of promising areas for technology development in front-end waste characterization, process equipment, off gas controls, and monitoring. Based on this assessment, an ideal characterization and monitoring configuration is described that minimizes costs and optimizes resources required for waste characterization.

  5. Coastal ocean margins program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    The marine research program supported by the Office of Energy Research, Ecological Research Division, is focused to provide scientific information on major environmental issues facing development and expansion of most energy technologies and energy policy. These issues include waste disposal, siting/operations, and possible long term effects on global systems. The research is concentrated along the United States coastal margins where marine waters provide abundant food and resources while assimilating discharges from atmospheric, terrestrial, and aquatic sources. The program focuses on the formation and transport of particles within the waters of the continental shelf and the fate of these particles, whether on the shelf, on the slope, or in the open ocean. The program is conducted with multidisciplinary teams of researchers who investigate water mass movements, biological productivity, and naturally forming particles, as well as contaminant transport, to develop a clear understanding of the exchanges of contaminants and other materials that take place between continental shelf and open ocean waters. Seventy-five percent of the projects are funded to university grantees and twenty-five percent to National Laboratories.

  6. Modeling of thermally driven hydrological processes in partially saturated fractured rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Yvonne

    2010-01-01

    Waste isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) research and developmentIsolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Thermal/Structural InteractionWaste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project in New Mexico,

  7. Process for remediation of plastic waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pol, Vilas G; Thiyagarajan, Pappannan

    2013-11-12

    A single step process for degrading plastic waste by converting the plastic waste into carbonaceous products via thermal decomposition of the plastic waste by placing the plastic waste into a reactor, heating the plastic waste under an inert or air atmosphere until the temperature of about 700.degree. C. is achieved, allowing the reactor to cool down, and recovering the resulting decomposition products therefrom. The decomposition products that this process yields are carbonaceous materials, and more specifically carbon nanotubes having a partially filled core (encapsulated) adjacent to one end of the nanotube. Additionally, in the presence of a transition metal compound, this thermal decomposition process produces multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

  8. Process for remediation of plastic waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pol, Vilas G. (Westmont, IL); Thiyagarajan, Pappannan (Germantown, MD)

    2012-04-10

    A single step process for degrading plastic waste by converting the plastic waste into carbonaceous products via thermal decomposition of the plastic waste by placing the plastic waste into a reactor, heating the plastic waste under an inert or air atmosphere until the temperature of 700.degree. C. is achieved, allowing the reactor to cool down, and recovering the resulting decomposition products therefrom. The decomposition products that this process yields are carbonaceous materials, and more specifically egg-shaped and spherical-shaped solid carbons. Additionally, in the presence of a transition metal compound, this thermal decomposition process produces multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

  9. Thermally activated technologies: Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2003-05-01

    The purpose of this Technology Roadmap is to outline a set of actions for government and industry to develop thermally activated technologies for converting America’s wasted heat resources into a reservoir of pollution-free energy for electric power, heating, cooling, refrigeration, and humidity control. Fuel flexibility is important. The actions also cover thermally activated technologies that use fossil fuels, biomass, and ultimately hydrogen, along with waste heat.

  10. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01

    boch open- and closed-power cycles in land-based, moored andopen- and closed-power cycle), plant configurations (land-demonstration. The closed-power cycle may be used for land-

  11. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 0, NO. 0, PAGES 0-0, M 0, 2001 On the Pacific Ocean regime shift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 0, NO. 0, PAGES 0-0, M 0, 2001 On the Pacific Ocean regime shift variability of Pacific Ocean upper ocean heat content is examined for the 1948-1998 period using gridded-wide phenomenon affecting the thermal structure from 60 S to 70 N. EOF analysis of the Pacific Ocean heat content

  12. Short Communication Three ocean state indices implemented in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), the tropical cyclone heat potential, showing the thermal energy available in the ocean to enhance or decrease-case scenario, they also allow users to anticipate the effects of environmental hazards and pollution crises

  13. Radioactivity in the ocean: laws and biological effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunsaker, C.T.

    1985-01-01

    This paper summarizes the literature on US laws and international agreements, experimental and monitoring data, and ongoing studies to provide background information for environmental assessment and regulatory compliance activities for ocean dumping of low-level radioactive waste. The Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act is the major US legislation governing ocean disposal of radioactive waste. The major international agreement on ocean dumping is the Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and other Matter. The United States ended its ocean dumping of radioactive wastes in 1970, but other countries have continued ocean dumping under international supervision in the northeast Atlantic. Monitoring of former US disposal sites has neither revealed significant effects on marine biota nor indicated a hazard to human health. Also, no effects on marine organisms have been found that could be attributed to routine discharges into the Irish Sea from the Windscale reprocessing plant. We must improve our ability to predict the oceanic carrying capacity and the fate and effects of ionizing radiation in the marine environment.

  14. Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of mixed polymer waste streams to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO); Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO)

    1993-01-01

    A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents; selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent.

  15. Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of mixed polymer waste streams to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, R.J.; Chum, H.L.

    1994-04-05

    A process is described for using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents, selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent. 87 figures.

  16. Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of mixed polymer waste streams to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO); Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO)

    1994-01-01

    A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents, selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent.

  17. Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of mixed polymer waste streams to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO); Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO)

    1994-01-01

    A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents; selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent.

  18. Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of mixed polymer waste streams to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, R.J.; Chum, H.L.

    1994-10-25

    A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents; selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent. 83 figs.

  19. Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, July-September 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chikalla, T.D.

    1980-11-01

    Research is reported on: high-level waste immobilization, alternative waste forms, TRU waste immobilization and decontamination, krypton solidification, thermal outgassing, /sup 129/I fixation, unsaturated zone transport, well-logging instrumentation, waste management system and safety studies, effectiveness of geologic isolation systems, waste/rock interactions, engineered barriers, backfill material, spent fuel storage (criticality), barrier sealing and liners for U mill tailings, and revegetation of inactive U tailings sites. (DLC)

  20. GFD-2 OC-513 Spring 2013 P.B. Rhines MWF 10.30-11.20 Ocean Teaching Building 205

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    => potential vorticity thermal wind · rotation and stratification: the layered, stiffened ocean fluid · Ekman: wind-stress and buoyancy flux · stratification and the `quiet' interior water column · mapping

  1. Controlled catalystic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    catalystic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of polycarbonate and plastic waste to recover monomers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Controlled catalystic...

  2. Development of MEMS based pyroelectric thermal energy harvesters...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Laboratory (ORNL) is developing a new type of high efficiency thermal waste heat energy converter that can be used to actively cool electronic devices, concentrated...

  3. Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Tony

    2012-01-01

    waste heat reclamation and solar thermal energy," Energy [K Lovegrove and M Dennis, "Solar thermal energy systems inK Lovegrove and M Dennis, "Solar thermal energy systems in

  4. Ocean and Resources Engineering is the application of ocean science and engineering to the challenging conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    engineering, mixing and transport, water quality, ocean thermal energy conversion, hydrogen. GENO PAWLAK to waves and current, sediment transport, high pressure and temperature variations, and renewable energy methods, water wave mechanics, sediment transport. R. CENGIZ ERTEKIN Professor, PhD 1984, UC Berkeley

  5. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, Waste Analysis Plan The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, Waste Analysis Plan This...

  6. The renewable energy contribution from waste across Europe.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biomass Energy Plants incineration,gasification Collected & sorted waste wood BEP Steam -> Electr. & Heat from waste is a much cheaper source of RE than from most other RE sources (solar, wind, biomass (LFG) For dedicated Biomass Energy Plants (BEP) (waste wood) For WtE thermally treating MSW

  7. Absorption Cooling Optimizes Thermal Design for Cogeneration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hufford, P. E.

    1986-01-01

    (50) percent more useful thermal energy from the same waste heat source--gas turbine exhaust, I.C. engine exhaust and jacketwater, incinerator exhaust, or steam turbine extraction....

  8. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    we can mention: solar power plants, thermal power plants(Sources o Solar Heat o Winter Cold o Power Plant Cogeneratedpower plants and producers of industrial waste heat as well as large central focus solar

  9. Parametric Analyses of Heat Removal from High Level Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TRUITT, J.B.

    2000-06-05

    The general thermal hydraulics program GOTH-SNF was used to predict the thermal response of the waste in tanks 241-AY-102 and 241-AZ-102 when mixed by two 300 horsepower mixer pumps. This mixing was defined in terms of a specific waste retrieval scenario. Both dome and annulus ventilation system flow are necessary to maintain the waste within temperature control limits during the mixing operation and later during the sludge-settling portion of the scenario are defined.

  10. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM 2011 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM 2011 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT covering citations related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from Geo Drilling Program Publication Services September 2011 #12;OVERVIEW OF THE OCEAN DRILLING CITATION DATABASE

  11. CoastWatch/OceanWatch Proving Ground: VIIRS Ocean Color

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;VIIRS Operational Ocean Color User: NWS/EMC · Phytoplankton alter the penetration of solar radiationCoastWatch/OceanWatch Proving Ground: VIIRS Ocean Color User Engagement, Quality Assessment Science Seminar #12;Outline Overview of VIIRS Ocean Color Proving Ground (Hughes) VIIRS Ocean Color

  12. Our Ocean Backyard Santa Cruz Sentinel columns by Gary Griggs, Director, Institute of Marine Sciences, UC Santa Cruz.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    the ocean--wave power, tidal or current power, offshore wind power, and ocean thermal energy conversion Sciences, UC Santa Cruz. #15 November 8, 2008 Energy and the oceans­part 2 The San Onofre Power plant is one of only two commercial nuclear power plants in California. Important questions about energy

  13. Ocean Energy Technology Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2009-08-05

    Introduction to and overview of ocean renewable energy resources and technologies prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy management Program.

  14. MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT PHASE I: AUDIT OF CURRENT PRACTICE The Mushroom Waste Management Project (MWMP) was initiated by Environment Canada, the BC Ministry of solid and liquid wastes generated at mushroom producing facilities. Environmental guidelines

  15. Lih thermal energy storage device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olszewski, Mitchell (Knoxville, TN); Morris, David G. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A thermal energy storage device for use in a pulsed power supply to store waste heat produced in a high-power burst operation utilizes lithium hydride as the phase change thermal energy storage material. The device includes an outer container encapsulating the lithium hydride and an inner container supporting a hydrogen sorbing sponge material such as activated carbon. The inner container is in communication with the interior of the outer container to receive hydrogen dissociated from the lithium hydride at elevated temperatures.

  16. Ocean General Circulation Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun

    2012-09-30

    1. Definition of Subject The purpose of this text is to provide an introduction to aspects of oceanic general circulation models (OGCMs), an important component of Climate System or Earth System Model (ESM). The role of the ocean in ESMs is described in Chapter XX (EDITOR: PLEASE FIND THE COUPLED CLIMATE or EARTH SYSTEM MODELING CHAPTERS). The emerging need for understanding the Earth’s climate system and especially projecting its future evolution has encouraged scientists to explore the dynamical, physical, and biogeochemical processes in the ocean. Understanding the role of these processes in the climate system is an interesting and challenging scientific subject. For example, a research question how much extra heat or CO2 generated by anthropogenic activities can be stored in the deep ocean is not only scientifically interesting but also important in projecting future climate of the earth. Thus, OGCMs have been developed and applied to investigate the various oceanic processes and their role in the climate system.

  17. Response of photosynthesis to ocean acidification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackey, KRM; Morris, JJ; Morris, JJ; Morel, FMM; Kranz, SA

    2015-01-01

    sub- tropical North Pacific Ocean. Aquatic Microbial Ecologytropical Atlantic and Pacific Oceans and contributes sub-

  18. Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluwihare, Lihini

    Mixed Waste Before generating mixed waste (i.e, mixture of biohazardous and chemical or radioactive waste), call Environment, Health & Safety: (858) 534-2753. * Disinfectants other than bleach mustBiohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Human

  19. Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

    1980-09-01

    The status of the following programs is reported: high-level waste immobilization; alternative waste forms; Nuclear Waste Materials Characterization Center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton solidification; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; mobility of organic complexes of fission products in soils; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology; systems study on engineered barriers; criteria for defining waste isolation; spent fuel and fuel pool component integrity program; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; and development of backfill material.

  20. Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, October through December 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chikalla, T.D.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

    1981-03-01

    Progress reports and summaries are presented under the following headings: high-level waste process development; alternative waste forms; nuclear waste materials characterization center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton solidification; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; mobility of organic complexes of radionuclides in soils; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology; high level waste form preparation; development of backfill material; development of structural engineered barriers; ONWI disposal charge analysis; spent fuel and fuel component integrity program; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; analysis of postulated criticality events in a storage array of spent LWR fuel; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium tailings; liner evaluation for uranium mill tailings; multilayer barriers for sealing of uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; revegetation of inactive uranium tailing sites; verification instrument development.

  1. SHORT-TERM THERMAL RESISTANCE OF ZOEAE OF 10 SPECIES OF CRABS FROM PUGET SOUND, WASHINGTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the im,pact of entrainment and the discharge of altered waste water on the associated life; temperature through heat exchangers of steam electric stations and in mixing with thermal plumes of the waste water

  2. Mapping the Potential of U.S. Ocean Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    undertaken to date to accurately define the magnitude and location of U.S. and global wave, tidal, ocean thermal, and continental U.S. river hydrokinetic resources. With more...

  3. The Effects Of High Pressure-High Temperature On Some Physical Properties Of Ocean Sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morin, Roger

    1983-01-01

    A series of laboratory experiments was conducted with four ocean sediments, two biogenic oozes and two clays. Permeability and thermal conductivity were directly measured as a function of porosity and the testing program ...

  4. A magmatic trigger for the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dubin, Andrea Rose

    2015-01-01

    Fifty-six million years ago Earth experienced rapid global warming (~6°C) that was caused by the release of large amounts of carbon into the ocean-atmosphere system. This Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) is often ...

  5. WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource! energy forum Case Studies from Estonia, Switzerland, Germany Bossart,· ABB Waste-to-Energy Plants Edmund Fleck,· ESWET Marcel van Berlo,· Afval Energie Bedrijf From Waste to Energy To Energy from Waste #12;9.00-9.30: Registration 9.30-9.40: Chairman Ella Stengler opens

  6. Ocean Energy Resource Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Although the potential for ocean energy technologies is believed to be very large, no comprehensive studies have been conducted to date to determine an accurate resource assessment for the United States.

  7. ENCYCLOPEDIA OCEAN SCIENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENCYCLOPEDIA OF OCEAN SCIENCES Editor-in-Chief JOHN H. STEELE Editors STEVE A. THORPE KARL K in Marine Biology 26: 115-168. Rosland Rand Giske .I (1997) A dynamic model for tbe life history

  8. Leaching Characteristics of Hanford Ferrocyanide Wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.

    2009-12-21

    A series of leach tests were performed on actual Hanford Site tank wastes in support of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The samples were targeted composite slurries of high-level tank waste materials representing major complex, radioactive, tank waste mixtures at the Hanford Site. Using a filtration/leaching apparatus, sample solids were concentrated, caustic leached, and washed under conditions representative of those planned for the Pretreatment Facility in the WTP. Caustic leaching was performed to assess the mobilization of aluminum (as gibbsite, Al[OH]3, and boehmite AlO[OH]), phosphates [PO43-], chromium [Cr3+] and, to a lesser extent, oxalates [C2O42-]). Ferrocyanide waste released the solid phase 137Cs during caustic leaching; this was antithetical to the other Hanford waste types studied. Previous testing on ferrocyanide tank waste focused on the aging of the ferrocyanide salt complex and its thermal compatibilities with nitrites and nitrates. Few studies, however, examined cesium mobilization in the waste. Careful consideration should be given to the pretreatment of ferrocyanide wastes in light of this new observed behavior, given the fact that previous testing on simulants indicates a vastly different cesium mobility in this waste form. The discourse of this work will address the overall ferrocyanide leaching characteristics as well as the behavior of the 137Cs during leaching.

  9. Accelerated carbonation treatment of industrial wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunning, Peter J., E-mail: gunning_peter@hotmail.co [Centre for Contaminated Land Remediation, University of Greenwich, Chatham Maritime (United Kingdom); Hills, Colin D.; Carey, Paula J. [Centre for Contaminated Land Remediation, University of Greenwich, Chatham Maritime (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    The disposal of industrial waste presents major logistical, financial and environmental issues. Technologies that can reduce the hazardous properties of wastes are urgently required. In the present work, a number of industrial wastes arising from the cement, metallurgical, paper, waste disposal and energy industries were treated with accelerated carbonation. In this process carbonation was effected by exposing the waste to pure carbon dioxide gas. The paper and cement wastes chemically combined with up to 25% by weight of gas. The reactivity of the wastes to carbon dioxide was controlled by their constituent minerals, and not by their elemental composition, as previously postulated. Similarly, microstructural alteration upon carbonation was primarily influenced by mineralogy. Many of the thermal wastes tested were classified as hazardous, based upon regulated metal content and pH. Treatment by accelerated carbonation reduced the leaching of certain metals, aiding the disposal of many as stable non-reactive wastes. Significant volumes of carbon dioxide were sequestrated into the accelerated carbonated treated wastes.

  10. Thermal engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karnes, T.E.; Trupin, R.J.

    1984-01-03

    A thermal engine utilizing a strip of nitinol material or other thermally responsive shape memory effect material to drive a reciprocating output shaft, said strip of material forming a common wall between two different alternating temperature sources which thermally cycle the material.

  11. HAZARDOUS WASTE [Written Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    HAZARDOUS WASTE MANUAL [Written Program] Cornell University [10/7/13 #12;Hazardous Waste Program................................................... 8 3.0 MINIMIZING HAZARDOUS WASTE GENERATION.........................................................10 4.0 HAZARDOUS WASTE GENERATOR REQUIREMENTS.....................................................10

  12. Transport across 48N in the Atlantic Ocean RICK LUMPKIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Tallahassee, Florida K. PETER KOLTERMANN Bundesamt für Seeschiffahrt und Hydrographie, Hamburg, Germany for thermal wind calculations or the specific flux dataset chosen. In addition, flux-based calculations do. Introduction The partition of energy and freshwater flux between the ocean and the atmosphere and among various

  13. Waste Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricN A 035(92/02) nergFeet)DepartmentWasteWaste

  14. Electronic waste disassembly with industrial waste heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    and for e?ective use of industrial exhaust heat is describedto scale up the process to industrial production levels.Waste Disassembly with Industrial Waste Heat Mengjun

  15. Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluwihare, Lihini

    of biohazardous and chemical or radioactive waste), call Environment, Health & Safety: (858) 534Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Human Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 200 West Arbor Dr. San Diego, CA 92103 (858

  16. Ocean energy conversion systems annual research report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    Alternative power cycle concepts to the closed-cycle Rankine are evaluated and those that show potential for delivering power in a cost-effective and environmentally acceptable fashion are explored. Concepts are classified according to the ocean energy resource: thermal, waves, currents, and salinity gradient. Research projects have been funded and reported in each of these areas. The lift of seawater entrained in a vertical steam flow can provide potential energy for a conventional hydraulic turbine conversion system. Quantification of the process and assessment of potential costs must be completed to support concept evaluation. Exploratory development is being completed in thermoelectricity and 2-phase nozzles for other thermal concepts. Wave energy concepts are being evaluated by analysis and model testing with present emphasis on pneumatic turbines and wave focussing. Likewise, several conversion approaches to ocean current energy are being evaluated. The use of salinity resources requires further research in membranes or the development of membraneless processes. Using the thermal resource in a Claude cycle process as a power converter is promising, and a program of R and D and subsystem development has been initiated to provide confirmation of the preliminary conclusion.

  17. BRUCE HOWE Chair and Professor , PhD 1986, UC San Diego. Ocean observatories, ocean acoustic tomography, sensor webs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . NIHOUS Associate Professor, PhD 1983, UC Berkeley. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), marine renewable energy, hydrodynamics. EVA-MARIE NOSAL Assistant Professor, PhD 2007 Hawaii. Passive acoustic. JOHN C. WILTSHIRE Associate Specialist, PhD 1983, Hawaii. Marine mineral deposits, marine mining

  18. Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01

    mesoscale oceanic features are current coarse resolutionmesoscale r current variability associated with oceanic ringthe TIW- currents. These mesoscale oceanic and atmospheric

  19. Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01

    mesoscale oceanic features are current coarse resolutionmesoscale r current variability associated with oceanic ringthe TIW- currents. These mesoscale oceanic and atmospheric

  20. AOML is an environmental laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research on Virginia Key in Miami, Florida ATLANTIC OCEANOGRAPHIC AND METEOROLOGICAL LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the thermal struc- ture of the upper ocean. SOOP is a global network of commer- cial vessels that aid NOAA are to investigate the variability of the ocean's upper thermal structure at high latitudes (AX01 and AX02 transects storage and the global transport of heat and fresh water, which are crucial for improving climate

  1. WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    large amounts of waste that must be managed as part of both immediate recovery and long-term recovery management plans that can address contaminated waste through the entire life cycle of the waste. Through Demonstration LLNL Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory MSW Municipal Solid Waste OSHA Occupational Safety

  2. Possible global environmental impacts of solid waste practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M.M.; Holter, G.M.; DeForest, T.J.; Stapp, D.C.; Dibari, J.C.

    1994-09-01

    Pollutants resulting from the management of solid waste have been shown to affect the air, land, oceans, and waterways. In addition, solid wastes have other, more indirect impacts such as reduction in feedstocks of natural resources, because useful materials are disposed of rather than recycled. The objective of this study is to evaluate solid waste management practices that have negative implications on the global environment and develop recommendations for reducing such impacts. Recommendations identifying needed changes are identified that will reduce global impacts of solid waste practices in the future. The scope of this study includes the range of non-hazardous solid wastes produced within our society, including municipal solid waste (MSW) and industrial solid waste (ISW), as well as industry-specific wastes from activities such as construction, demolition, and landclearing. Most solid waste management decisions continue to be made and implemented at very local levels, predominantly with a short-term focus to respond to relatively immediate pressures of landfill shortages, funding problems, political considerations, and the like. In this rush to address immediate local problems, little consideration is being given to potential impacts, either short- or long-term, at the national or global level resulting from solid waste management practices. More and more, the cumulative impacts from local decisions concerning solid waste management are beginning to manifest themselves in broader, longer-term impacts than are being addressed by the decision-makers or, at the very least, are presenting a greater and greater potential for such impacts.

  3. Massachusetts Ocean Management Plan (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Massachusetts Ocean Act of 2008 required the state’s Secretary of Energy and Environmental Affairs to develop a comprehensive ocean management plan for the state by the end of 2009. That plan...

  4. Steroid estrogens in ocean sediments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braga, O.; Smythe, G.A.; Schäfer, Andrea; Feitz, A.J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper gives results from a study measuring the abundance of steroid hormones in ocean sediments in the proximity of a deep ocean sewage outfall. The outfall is discharge point for an enhanced primary sewage treatment ...

  5. A Global Pattern of Thermal Adaptation in Marine Phytoplankton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Global Pattern of Thermal Adaptation in Marine Phytoplankton Mridul K. Thomas,1,2 * Colin T temperatures this century will cause poleward shifts in species' thermal niches and a sharp decline in tropical in ocean stratification, which in turn leads to a decrease in nutrient supply to sur- face waters. However

  6. Ocean Engineering Development Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    the same conditions). 3) To demonstrate a working knowledge of fluid mechanics, naval architecture: Design/Fluid Mechanics Major: Ocean Engineering, Junior Focus: Naval Architecture and High Speed Small vessel under a variety of foil configurations, sea conditions, propulsion states and loads. 2) To perform

  7. Ocean Circulation Lynne D Talley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    to the topography, with low pressure in the center. Ocean currents transport heat from the tropics to the poles have gone to sea. As knowledge about ocean currents and capabilities to observe it below the surfaceOcean Circulation Lynne D Talley Volume 1, The Earth system: physical and chemical dimensions

  8. 6, 51375162, 2006 Oceanic ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 6, 5137­5162, 2006 Oceanic ozone deposition velocity C. W. Fairall et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Water-side turbulence enhancement of ozone deposition to the ocean C. W. Fairall1 , D. Helmig2 , L. Fairall (chris.fairall@noaa.gov) 5137 #12;ACPD 6, 5137­5162, 2006 Oceanic ozone deposition velocity C. W

  9. Strategic Plan National Ocean Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strategic Plan of the National Ocean Service 2005-2010 U.S. Department of Commerce National Oceanic Strategic Plan for 2005 to 2010. This Plan heralds a new era for the ocean and coasts as NOS responds these challenges. The NOS Strategic Plan is synchronous with the NOAA Strategic Plan -- one NOAA, one workforce

  10. December 2001 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    December 2001 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 203 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING AT THE EQUATORIAL -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Bauldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University. Acton Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

  11. February 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    February 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 204 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING GAS HYDRATES ON HYDRATE -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Richter Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

  12. November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 208 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS EARLY CENOZOIC EXTREME CLIMATES -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

  13. Engineering by Design Ocean Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Engineering by Design Ocean Engineering Bachelor of Science Degree Virginia Tech For more engineering is a diverse field. At Virginia Tech, the major focus areas are ocean energy systems and ocean in the aerospace and related industries and in the shipbuilding, naval engineering, and ship design fields. Some

  14. Ninth Annual Ocean Renewable Energy Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The future of clean, renewable ocean wave energy will be discussed in depth at the 2014 Ocean Renewable Energy Conference.

  15. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 1, Part 1, Generator dangerous waste report, dangerous waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, weight, and waste designation.

  16. Disposal of Rocky Flats residues as waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dustin, D.F.; Sendelweck, V.S. . Rocky Flats Plant); Rivera, M.A. )

    1993-01-01

    Work is underway at the Rocky Flats Plant to evaluate alternatives for the removal of a large inventory of plutonium-contaminated residues from the plant. One alternative under consideration is to package the residues as transuranic wastes for ultimate shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Current waste acceptance criteria and transportation regulations require that approximately 1000 cubic yards of residues be repackaged to produce over 20,000 cubic yards of WIPP certified waste. The major regulatory drivers leading to this increase in waste volume are the fissile gram equivalent, surface radiation dose rate, and thermal power limits. In the interest of waste minimization, analyses have been conducted to determine, for each residue type, the controlling criterion leading to the volume increase, the impact of relaxing that criterion on subsequent waste volume, and the means by which rules changes may be implemented. The results of this study have identified the most appropriate changes to be proposed in regulatory requirements in order to minimize the costs of disposing of Rocky Flats residues as transuranic wastes.

  17. Disposal of Rocky Flats residues as waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dustin, D.F.; Sendelweck, V.S.; Rivera, M.A.

    1993-03-01

    Work is underway at the Rocky Flats Plant to evaluate alternatives for the removal of a large inventory of plutonium-contaminated residues from the plant. One alternative under consideration is to package the residues as transuranic wastes for ultimate shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Current waste acceptance criteria and transportation regulations require that approximately 1000 cubic yards of residues be repackaged to produce over 20,000 cubic yards of WIPP certified waste. The major regulatory drivers leading to this increase in waste volume are the fissile gram equivalent, surface radiation dose rate, and thermal power limits. In the interest of waste minimization, analyses have been conducted to determine, for each residue type, the controlling criterion leading to the volume increase, the impact of relaxing that criterion on subsequent waste volume, and the means by which rules changes may be implemented. The results of this study have identified the most appropriate changes to be proposed in regulatory requirements in order to minimize the costs of disposing of Rocky Flats residues as transuranic wastes.

  18. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    Solar Thermal Collectors .is solar energy. Solar thermal collector arrays can be usedon integrating solar thermal collectors with desalination

  19. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    and thermal energy storage in solar thermal applications,"aided or powered by solar thermal energy. A section is alsoexhaustive review of solar thermal energy systems has been

  20. Advanced Thermal Control

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    thermal models power density cost lifetime Advanced Thermal Interface Materials Advanced Heat Transfer Technologies Air Cooling Thermal System Performance and Integration Thermal...

  1. Waste remediation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Halas, Nancy J.; Nordlander, Peter; Neumann, Oara

    2015-12-29

    A system including a steam generation system and a chamber. The steam generation system includes a complex and the steam generation system is configured to receive water, concentrate electromagnetic (EM) radiation received from an EM radiation source, apply the EM radiation to the complex, where the complex absorbs the EM radiation to generate heat, and transform, using the heat generated by the complex, the water to steam. The chamber is configured to receive the steam and an object, wherein the object is of medical waste, medical equipment, fabric, and fecal matter.

  2. Waste form development for use with ORNL waste treatment facility sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abotsi, G.M.K.; Bostick, W.D.

    1996-05-01

    A sludge that simulates Water Softening Sludge number 5 (WSS number 5 filtercake) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was prepared and evaluated for its thermal behavior, volume reduction, stabilization, surface area and compressive strength properties. Compaction of the surrogate waste and the calcium oxide (produced by calcination) in the presence of paraffin resulted in cylindrical molds with various degrees of stability. This work has demonstrated that surrogate WSS number 5 at ORNL can be successfully stabilized by blending it with about 35 percent paraffin and compacting the mixture at 8000 psi. This compressive strength of the waste form is sufficient for temporary storage of the waste while long-term storage waste forms are developed. Considering the remarkable similarity between the surrogate and the actual filtercake, the findings of this project should be useful for treating the sludge generated by the waste treatment facility at ORNL.

  3. Radioactive Waste Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1984-02-06

    To establish policies and guidelines by which the Department of Energy (DOE) manages tis radioactive waste, waste byproducts, and radioactively contaminated surplus facilities.

  4. Waste Treatment Plant Overview

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the...

  5. Salt Waste Processing Initiatives

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Patricia Suggs Salt Processing Team Lead Assistant Manager for Waste Disposition Project Office of Environmental Management Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Initiatives 2...

  6. Hanford Tank Waste Retrieval,

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tank Waste Retrieval, Treatment, and Disposition Framework September 24, 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 Hanford Tank Waste Retrieval, Treatment, and...

  7. Transuranic Waste Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09

    The guide provides criteria for determining if a waste is to be managed in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter III, Transuranic Waste Requirements.

  8. Waste-to-Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    into renewable energy, thereby enabling a national network of distributed power and biofuel production sites. Image courtesy of Iona Capital Waste-to-Energy Cycle Waste...

  9. Melter development needs assessment for RWMC buried wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donaldson, A.D.; Carpenedo, R.J.; Anderson, G.L.

    1992-02-01

    This report presents a survey and initial assessment of the existing state-of-the-art melter technology necessary to thermally treat (stabilize) buried TRU waste, by producing a highly leach resistant glass/ceramic waste form suitable for final disposal. Buried mixed transuranic (TRU) waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) represents an environmental hazard requiring remediation. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) placed the INEL on the National Priorities List in 1989. Remediation of the buried TRU-contaminated waste via the CERCLA decision process is required to remove INEL from the National Priorities List. A Waste Technology Development (WTD) Preliminary Systems Design and Thermal Technologies Screening Study identified joule-heated and plasma-heated melters as the most probable thermal systems technologies capable of melting the INEL soil and waste to produce the desired final waste form (Iron-Enriched Basalt (IEB) glass/ceramic). The work reported herein then surveys the state of existing melter technology and assesses it within the context of processing INEL buried TRU wastes and contaminated soils. Necessary technology development work is recommended.

  10. Melter development needs assessment for RWMC buried wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donaldson, A.D.; Carpenedo, R.J.; Anderson, G.L.

    1992-02-01

    This report presents a survey and initial assessment of the existing state-of-the-art melter technology necessary to thermally treat (stabilize) buried TRU waste, by producing a highly leach resistant glass/ceramic waste form suitable for final disposal. Buried mixed transuranic (TRU) waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) represents an environmental hazard requiring remediation. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) placed the INEL on the National Priorities List in 1989. Remediation of the buried TRU-contaminated waste via the CERCLA decision process is required to remove INEL from the National Priorities List. A Waste Technology Development (WTD) Preliminary Systems Design and Thermal Technologies Screening Study identified joule-heated and plasma-heated melters as the most probable thermal systems technologies capable of melting the INEL soil and waste to produce the desired final waste form [Iron-Enriched Basalt (IEB) glass/ceramic]. The work reported herein then surveys the state of existing melter technology and assesses it within the context of processing INEL buried TRU wastes and contaminated soils. Necessary technology development work is recommended.

  11. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Landfill Gas, Tidal, Wave, Ocean Thermal, Anaerobic Digestion Interconnection Standards for Small Generators...

  12. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Landfill Gas, Tidal, Wave, Ocean Thermal, Yes; specific technologies not identified, Hydroelectric...

  13. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Landfill Gas, Tidal, Wave, Ocean Thermal, Yes; specific technologies not identified, Hydroelectric (Small),...

  14. Location and identification of radioactive waste in Massachusetts Bay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colton, D.P.; Louft, H.L.

    1993-12-31

    The accurate location and identification of hazardous waste materials dumped in the world`s oceans are becoming an increasing concern. For years, the oceans have been viewed as a convenient and economical place to dispose of all types of waste. In all but a few cases, major dump sites have been closed leaving behind years of accumulated debris. The extent of past environmental damage, the possibility of continued environmental damage, and the possibility of hazardous substances reaching the human food chain need to be carefully investigated. This paper reports an attempt to accurately locate and identify the radioactive component of the waste material. The Department of Energy`s Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL), in support of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), provided the precision navigation system and prototype underwater radiological monitoring equipment that were used during this project. The paper also describes the equipment used, presents the data obtained, and discusses future equipment development.

  15. Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drushka, Kyla

    2011-01-01

    Pacific Oceans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean associated with thethe western equatorial Pacific Ocean. J. Geophys. Res. , 96,

  16. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 4, Waste Management Facility report, Radioactive mixed waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, handling method and containment vessel, waste number, waste designation and amount of waste.

  17. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation.

  18. Waste Acceptance Testing of Secondary Waste Forms: Cast Stone, Ceramicrete and DuraLith

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Lindberg, Michael J.; Parker, Kent E.

    2011-08-12

    To support the selection of a waste form for the liquid secondary wastes from WTP, Washington River Protection Solutions has initiated secondary-waste-form testing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In anticipation of a down-selection process for a waste form for the Solidification Treatment Unit to be added to the ETF, PNNL is conducting tests on four candidate waste forms to evaluate their ability to meet potential waste acceptance criteria for immobilized secondary wastes that would be placed in the IDF. All three waste forms demonstrated compressive strengths above the minimum 3.45 MPa (500 psi) set as a target for cement-based waste forms. Further, none of the waste forms showed any significant degradation in compressive strength after undergoing thermal cycling (30 cycles in a 10 day period) between -40 C and 60 C or water immersion for 90 days. The three leach test methods are intended to measure the diffusion rates of contaminants from the waste forms. Results are reported in terms of diffusion coefficients and a leachability index (LI) calculated based on the diffusion coefficients. A smaller diffusion coefficient and a larger LI are desired. The NRC, in its Waste Form Technical Position (NRC 1991), provides recommendations and guidance regarding methods to demonstrate waste stability for land disposal of radioactive waste. Included is a recommendation to conduct leach tests using the ANS 16.1 method. The resulting leachability index (LI) should be greater than 6.0. For Hanford secondary wastes, the LI > 6.0 criterion applies to sodium leached from the waste form. For technetium and iodine, higher targets of LI > 9 for Tc and LI > 11 for iodine have been set based on early waste-disposal risk and performance assessment analyses. The results of these three leach tests conducted for a total time between 11days (ASTM C1308) to 90 days (ANS 16.1) showed: (1) Technetium diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that all the waste forms had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium; (2) Rhenium diffusivity: Cast Stone 2M specimens, when tested using EPA 1315 protocol, had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium based on rhenium as a surrogate for technetium. All other waste forms tested by ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 test methods had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 9 for Tc based on rhenium release. These studies indicated that use of Re(VII) as a surrogate for 99Tc(VII) in low temperature secondary waste forms containing reductants will provide overestimated diffusivity values for 99Tc. Therefore, it is not appropriate to use Re as a surrogate 99Tc in future low temperature waste form studies. (3) Iodine diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that the three waste forms had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 11 for iodine. Therefore, it may be necessary to use a more effective sequestering material than silver zeolite used in two of the waste forms (Ceramicrete and DuraLith); (4) Sodium diffusivity: All the waste form specimens tested by the three leach methods (ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315) exceeded the target LI value of 6; (5) All three leach methods (ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308 and EPA 1315) provided similar 99Tc diffusivity values for both short-time transient diffusivity effects as well as long-term ({approx}90 days) steady diffusivity from each of the three tested waste forms (Cast Stone 2M, Ceramicrete and DuraLith). Therefore, any one of the three methods can be used to determine the contaminant diffusivities from a selected waste form.

  19. HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT REFERENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfree, Erik

    HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT REFERENCE GUIDE Prepared by Environment, Health and Safety Office@caltech.edu http://safety.caltech.edu #12;Hazardous Waste Management Reference Guide Page 2 of 36 TABLE OF CONTENTS Satellite Accumulation Area 9 Waste Accumulation Facility 10 HAZARDOUS WASTE CONTAINER MANAGEMENT Labeling

  20. ARM - Oceanic Properties

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska OutreachCalendar NSA Related Links AntarcticaNews fromOceanic

  1. Ocean | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg, Oregon:OGE Energy Resources, IncIncOccidental,OceanLtd

  2. Waste Package Lifting Calculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. Marr

    2000-05-11

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the structural response of the waste package during the horizontal and vertical lifting operations in order to support the waste package lifting feature design. The scope of this calculation includes the evaluation of the 21 PWR UCF (pressurized water reactor uncanistered fuel) waste package, naval waste package, 5 DHLW/DOE SNF (defense high-level waste/Department of Energy spent nuclear fuel)--short waste package, and 44 BWR (boiling water reactor) UCF waste package. Procedure AP-3.12Q, Revision 0, ICN 0, calculations, is used to develop and document this calculation.

  3. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01

    include the choice of power cycle (open or closed), plat-both closed- and open-power cycles and 1~volve. land-based,

  4. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    of open and hybrid OTEC power cycles. Pages VII 45 - VII 67.6 ALTERNATIVES 6 • 1 POWER CYCLE 6.2 PLATFORM CONFIGURATION.features of a closed power cycle include: Release of trace

  5. Ocean thermal energy. Quarterly report, April-June 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-30

    This quarterly report includes summaries of the following tasks: (1) OTEC pilot plant conceptual design review; (2) OTEC methanol; (3) management decision requirements for OTEC construction; (4) hybrid geothermal - OTEC (GEOTEC) power plant performance estimates; and (5) supervision of testing of pneumatic wave energy conversion system.

  6. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    3). The counties of Hawaii, Maui and Kauai, comprise 9%, 7%,POPULATION = 33,800) KAUAI HAWAII COUNTY -------. ; (Hawaii and Maui will increase to 10% to 12%, and 8% to 9%, respectively, and Kauai

  7. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    possible Plate-Type Heat Exchanger Estimated Relationshipseawater plate-type heat exchanger design is illustrated in6. One possible Plate Type Heat Exchanger Source: Berndt and

  8. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sands, M. D.

    1980-01-01

    This programmatic environmental analysis is an initial assessment of OTEC technology considering development, demonstration and commercialization; it is concluded that the OTEC development program should continue because the development, demonstration, and commercialization on a single-plant deployment basis should not present significant environmental impacts. However, several areas within the OTEC program require further investigation in order to assess the potential for environmental impacts from OTEC operation, particularly in large-scale deployments and in defining alternatives to closed-cycle biofouling control: (1) Larger-scale deployments of OTEC clusters or parks require further investigations in order to assess optimal platform siting distances necessary to minimize adverse environmental impacts. (2) The deployment and operation of the preoperational platform (OTEC-1) and future demonstration platforms must be carefully monitored to refine environmental assessment predictions, and to provide design modifications which may mitigate or reduce environmental impacts for larger-scale operations. These platforms will provide a valuable opportunity to fully evaluate the intake and discharge configurations, biofouling control methods, and both short-term and long-term environmental effects associated with platform operations. (3) Successful development of OTEC technology to use the maximal resource capabilities and to minimize environmental effects will require a concerted environmental management program, encompassing many different disciplines and environmental specialties.

  9. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    KILOMETERS () = FOSSIL GENERATING PLANT NUMBER WITHIN PLANTKaupo o () = FOSSIL GENERATING PLANT NUMBER WITHIN PLANTSea o = o FOSSIL GENERATING PLANT HYDROELECTRIC GENERATING

  10. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    Working Fluid Process Product Process Requirement FuelNo fuel in a conventional sense 1S used. working fluid is

  11. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    fauna associated with offshore platforms in Mexico. Fish.aspects of siting OTEC plants offshore the United States onthe high seas, and offshore other countries. In G. L.

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    fauna associated with offshore platforms in the northeasternaspects of siting OTEC plants offshore the United States onthe high seas, and offshore other countries. In G. L.

  13. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    Mexico. Energy Research and Development Administration, Division of SolarMexico. Energy Research and Development Administration, Division of Solar

  14. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    Sperm whale E Dugong E Caribbean manatee Hawaiian monk sealCaribbean monk seal E E Northwest Hawaiian Islands (NWHI) E

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    Caribbean Monachus schauinslandi Hawaiian monk seal EHawaiian Islands Monachus troeicalis Caribbean monk seal E

  16. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    manatee E Off Florida, Caribbean Hawaiian monk seal ENorthwest Hawaiian Islands (NWHI) Caribbean monk seal E

  17. Response of oceanic hydrate-bearing sediments to thermal stresses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, G.J.; Kowalsky, M.B.

    2006-01-01

    higher pressures. The geothermal gradient in this case (asoC/m. With this geothermal gradient, the base of the hydratedeposit and different geothermal gradient. As can be seen in

  18. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) | Seawater Cooling - Depth...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Author National Renewable Energy Laboratory Maintainer Nicholas Langle bureaucode 019:20 Catalog DOE harvestobjectid 3ba3acfd-d54a-4a3d-a971-1cf4ac97fcb0 harvestsourceid...

  19. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    skipjack tuna, Katsuwonnus pelamis, in an offshore area oflittle tuna), Katsuwonus pelamis (skipj ack), spp. ,

  20. Ocean thermal energy. Quarterly report, January-March 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-03-30

    This quarterly report summarizes work of the following tasks as of March 31, 1982: OTEC pilot plant conceptual design review; OTEC methanol; review of electrolyzer development programs and requirements; financial and legal considerations in OTEC implementation; potential Navy sites for GEOTEC systems; hybrid geothermal-OTEC power plants: single-cycle performance estimates; and supervision of testing of pneumatic wave energy conversion system.

  1. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    treatment As above eFederal Aviation Administration Heliport licensing Point source discharge See Safety/Health Section 5 Federal Water Pollution

  2. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the BillDepartmentSitesUMTRCA3 ANNUALPrograms inDevelopmentFernald Preserve

  3. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyApril 2014Department ofWindOPENOccurrence Reporting and

  4. Understanding radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

  5. Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of polymer waste comprising nylon 6 and a polyolefin or mixtures of polyolefins to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO); Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO)

    1994-01-01

    A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents; selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent.

  6. Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of polymer waste comprising nylon 6 and a polyolefin or mixtures of polyolefins to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, R.J.; Chum, H.L.

    1994-10-25

    A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents; selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent. 83 figs.

  7. Characterization of Hanford tank wastes containing ferrocyanides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tingey, J.M.; Matheson, J.D.; McKinley, S.G.; Jones, T.E.; Pool, K.H.

    1993-02-01

    Currently, 17 storage tanks on the Hanford site that are believed to contain > 1,000 gram moles (465 lbs) of ferrocyanide compounds have been identified. Seven other tanks are classified as ferrocyanide containing waste tanks, but contain less than 1,000 gram moles of ferrocyanide compounds. These seven tanks are still included as Hanford Watch List Tanks. These tanks have been declared an unreviewed safety question (USQ) because of potential thermal reactivity hazards associated with the ferrocyanide compounds and nitrate and nitrite. Hanford tanks with waste containing > 1,000 gram moles of ferrocyanide have been sampled. Extensive chemical, radiothermical, and physical characterization have been performed on these waste samples. The reactivity of these wastes were also studied using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetric analysis. Actual tank waste samples were retrieved from tank 241-C-112 using a specially designed and equipped core-sampling truck. Only a small portion of the data obtained from this characterization effort will be reported in this paper. This report will deal primarily with the cyanide and carbon analyses, thermal analyses, and limited physical property measurements.

  8. Oceans and Ecosystems Research Changing levels of Oceanic Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the atmospheric, the remainder is taken up by land plants and oceans. · We study the uptake by the oceans both EPA qualified the increasing CO2 levels as a pollutant along with the other greenhouse gases Ch4, N2O & wind Algorithm development pCO2= f(SST, color) Co-located satellite data Regional satellite SST & color

  9. OCEAN PREDICTION WITH THE HYBRID COORDINATE OCEAN MODEL (HYCOM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . of South Florida, Fugro-GEOS, ROFFS, Orbimage, Shell, ExxonMobil #12;414 ERIC P. CHASSIGNET ET AL-resolving, real-time global and basin-scale ocean prediction system in the context of the Global Ocean Data Assimilation Experiment (GODAE). Keywords: HYCOM, GODAE, LAS, data assimilation, metrics. 1. Introduction

  10. Radioactive Waste Management Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09

    This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07.

  11. Incinerator thermal release valve risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, J.B.

    1998-12-31

    Human health risk assessments were conducted on emissions from several types of incinerators--a hazardous waste combustor, a medical waste/tire combustor, and a refuse derived fuel combustor in three different states. As part of these studies, the short-term emissions from thermal release valves operating during upset conditions were additionally evaluated. The latter assessments addressed two specific risk-related questions: (1) what are the incremental long-term risks/hazards associated with these short-term emissions; (2) what are the acute health hazards associated with these emissions? For each study, emission estimates for both the incinerator stack and the thermal release valve were obtained from the facility. Stack testing was utilized to obtain stack gas concentrations of emissions at one facility; engineering estimates were used to ascertain emissions from the thermal release valve. The two facilities were proposed incinerators, so literature-derived emissions were used throughout.

  12. Modeling Ocean Ecosystems: The PARADIGM Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothstein, Lewis M.

    The role of the oceans in Earth systems ecology, and the effects of climate variability on the ocean and its ecosystems, can be understood only by observing, describing, and ultimately predicting the state of the ocean as ...

  13. Oceans and Human Health (and climate change)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine

    Oceans and Human Health (and climate change) Tracy K. Collier Science Dimensions and Ocean Health in a Changing Climate, USC March 12, 2013 1 #12 use Climate change Closes the loop in understanding connections between ocean health and human health

  14. Pelagic Polychaetes of the Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dales, K Phillips

    1957-01-01

    Polyc'kaetes of the Pacific Ocean CLAPARtDE,E. 1868. LesPolyc'haetes of the Pacific Ocean KINBERG, J. G. H. 1866.Polyc'kaetes of the Pacific Ocean TREADWELL, A. L. 1906.

  15. Marine Ecosystems Ocean Environment Research Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    been studying how CO2 emissions affect the ocean system for more than three decades and conQnue to monitor ocean acidificaQon in all the world's oceans from

  16. HOW TO COOK OCEAN PERCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , is an excellent food fish with firm fle h. When cooked, the meat is white and flaky, with a delicate flavor. Ocean to the consumer until 1935. At that time, the indlu;try began experimenting with filleting and freezing ocean pel

  17. November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 209 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING MANTLE PERIDOTITE ALONG Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA -------------------------------- Dr. D. Jay Miller Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University

  18. January 2003 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    January 2003 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 210 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING THE NEWFOUNDLAND HALF OF THE NEWFOUNDLAND­IBERIA TRANSECT: THE FIRST CONJUGATE MARGIN DRILLING IN A NON-VOLCANIC RIFT Brian E. Tucholke Co Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

  19. High-tech waste treatment plant to open in Ho Chi Min City (20-07-2005)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    High-tech waste treatment plant to open in Ho Chi Min City (20-07-2005) by Pham Hoang Nam HCM City will recycle waste products into either high quality, low-sulphur synthetic coal or synthetic "scrubbed gas". Pyrolysis, a thermal process that uses high temperatures to break down any waste containing carbon, uses

  20. Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waste Management Group

    2006-01-01

    LBNL/PUB-5352, Revision 6 Waste Management QualityAssurance Plan Waste Management Group Environment, HealthRev. 6 WM QA Plan Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan

  1. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant simulated RH TRU waste experiments: Data and interpretation pilot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molecke, M.A.; Argueello, G.J.; Beraun, R.

    1993-04-01

    The simulated, i.e., nonradioactive remote-handled transuranic waste (RH TRU) experiments being conducted underground in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) were emplaced in mid-1986 and have been in heated test operation since 9/23/86. These experiments involve the in situ, waste package performance testing of eight full-size, reference RH TRU containers emplaced in horizontal, unlined test holes in the rock salt ribs (walls) of WIPP Room T. All of the test containers have internal electrical heaters; four of the test emplacements were filled with bentonite and silica sand backfill materials. We designed test conditions to be ``near-reference`` with respect to anticipated thermal outputs of RH TRU canisters and their geometrical spacing or layout in WIPP repository rooms, with RH TRU waste reference conditions current as of the start date of this test program. We also conducted some thermal overtest evaluations. This paper provides a: detailed test overview; comprehensive data update for the first 5 years of test operations; summary of experiment observations; initial data interpretations; and, several status; experimental objectives -- how these tests support WIPP TRU waste acceptance, performance assessment studies, underground operations, and the overall WIPP mission; and, in situ performance evaluations of RH TRU waste package materials plus design details and options. We provide instrument data and results for in situ waste container and borehole temperatures, pressures exerted on test containers through the backfill materials, and vertical and horizontal borehole-closure measurements and rates. The effects of heat on borehole closure, fracturing, and near-field materials (metals, backfills, rock salt, and intruding brine) interactions were closely monitored and are summarized, as are assorted test observations. Predictive 3-dimensional thermal and structural modeling studies of borehole and room closures and temperature fields were also performed.

  2. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01

    varying solar energy inputs and thermal or power demands. Itusing aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"

  3. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    of solar collectors and thermal energy storage in solaraided or powered by solar thermal energy. A section is alsobesides MVC require thermal energy as their primary energy

  4. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    15] O. A. Hamed, "THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF MULTISTAGE FLASHdesa4.aspx. [18] Encon, "Thermal Evaporators," June 2013. [http://www.evaporator.com/thermal-evaporator. [19] Y. Tian

  5. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01

    of such an aquifer thermal storage system were studied andusing aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"

  6. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    This requires no thermal storage tanks, but can have athe need for large thermal storage equipment, the evaporatorinclude analysis of thermal storage. A way of keeping the

  7. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01

    aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

  8. Ocean Surface Topography Mission/ Jason 2 Launch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean Surface Topography Mission/ Jason 2 Launch PreSS KiT/JUNe 2008 #12;#12;Media Contacts Steve .............................................................................................................................. 7 Why Study Ocean Surface Topography

  9. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is...

  10. California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy Resources IN SUPPORT OF THE 2005 INTEGRATED....................................................................................................................... 9 Ocean Wave Energy............................................................................................................. 20 Wave Energy Conversion Technology

  11. Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities July 24, 2014 9:00AM to 3:30PM EDT U.S....

  12. Electronic waste disassembly with industrial waste heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    equipment for automatic dismantling of electronic componentsthe technology acceptance for dismantling of waste printedR. Research on with dismantling of PCB mounted electronic

  13. Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    oxygen demand (COD) and availability of low-grade waste heat sources. The pulp and paper industry and other industries are also potential MHRC users. Project Description This...

  14. Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    - Allentown, PA A microbial reverse electrodialysis technology will be combined with waste heat recovery to convert effluents into electricity and chemical products, including...

  15. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 1, Part 2, Generator dangerous waste report, dangerous waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This report contains information on hazardous materials at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, weight, and waste designation.

  16. Radioactive Waste Management Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09

    This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. The purpose of the Manual is to catalog those procedural requirements and existing practices that ensure that all DOE elements and contractors continue to manage DOE's radioactive waste in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety, and the environment. Does not cancel other directives.

  17. Waste Package Design Methodology Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.A. Brownson

    2001-09-28

    The objective of this report is to describe the analytical methods and processes used by the Waste Package Design Section to establish the integrity of the various waste package designs, the emplacement pallet, and the drip shield. The scope of this report shall be the methodology used in criticality, risk-informed, shielding, source term, structural, and thermal analyses. The basic features and appropriateness of the methods are illustrated, and the processes are defined whereby input values and assumptions flow through the application of those methods to obtain designs that ensure defense-in-depth as well as satisfy requirements on system performance. Such requirements include those imposed by federal regulation, from both the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and those imposed by the Yucca Mountain Project to meet repository performance goals. The report is to be used, in part, to describe the waste package design methods and techniques to be used for producing input to the License Application Report.

  18. Eco-efficient waste glass recycling: Integrated waste management and green product development through LCA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blengini, Gian Andrea, E-mail: blengini@polito.it [DISPEA - Department of Production Systems and Business Economics, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); CNR-IGAG, Institute of Environmental Geology and Geo-Engineering, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Busto, Mirko, E-mail: mirko.busto@polito.it [DISPEA - Department of Production Systems and Business Economics, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Fantoni, Moris, E-mail: moris.fantoni@polito.it [DITAG - Department of Land, Environment and Geo-Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Fino, Debora, E-mail: debora.fino@polito.it [DISMIC - Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new eco-efficient recycling route for post-consumer waste glass was implemented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrated waste management and industrial production are crucial to green products. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most of the waste glass rejects are sent back to the glass industry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recovered co-products give more environmental gains than does avoided landfill. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy intensive recycling must be limited to waste that cannot be closed-loop recycled. - Abstract: As part of the EU Life + NOVEDI project, a new eco-efficient recycling route has been implemented to maximise resources and energy recovery from post-consumer waste glass, through integrated waste management and industrial production. Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been used to identify engineering solutions to sustainability during the development of green building products. The new process and the related LCA are framed within a meaningful case of industrial symbiosis, where multiple waste streams are utilised in a multi-output industrial process. The input is a mix of rejected waste glass from conventional container glass recycling and waste special glass such as monitor glass, bulbs and glass fibres. The green building product is a recycled foam glass (RFG) to be used in high efficiency thermally insulating and lightweight concrete. The environmental gains have been contrasted against induced impacts and improvements have been proposed. Recovered co-products, such as glass fragments/powders, plastics and metals, correspond to environmental gains that are higher than those related to landfill avoidance, whereas the latter is cancelled due to increased transportation distances. In accordance to an eco-efficiency principle, it has been highlighted that recourse to highly energy intensive recycling should be limited to waste that cannot be closed-loop recycled.

  19. CERAMIC WASTE FORM DATA PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amoroso, J.; Marra, J.

    2014-06-13

    The purpose of this data package is to provide information about simulated crystalline waste forms that can be used to select an appropriate composition for a Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) proof of principle demonstration. Melt processing, viscosity, electrical conductivity, and thermal analysis information was collected to assess the ability of two potential candidate ceramic compositions to be processed in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) CCIM and to guide processing parameters for the CCIM operation. Given uncertainties in the CCIM capabilities to reach certain temperatures throughout the system, one waste form designated 'Fe-MP' was designed towards enabling processing and another, designated 'CAF-5%TM-MP' was designed towards optimized microstructure. Melt processing studies confirmed both compositions could be poured from a crucible at 1600{degrees}C although the CAF-5%TM-MP composition froze before pouring was complete due to rapid crystallization (upon cooling). X-ray diffraction measurements confirmed the crystalline nature and phase assemblages of the compositions. The kinetics of melting and crystallization appeared to vary significantly between the compositions. Impedance spectroscopy results indicated the electrical conductivity is acceptable with respect to processing in the CCIM. The success of processing either ceramic composition will depend on the thermal profiles throughout the CCIM. In particular, the working temperature of the pour spout relative to the bulk melter which can approach 1700{degrees}C. The Fe-MP composition is recommended to demonstrate proof of principle for crystalline simulated waste forms considering the current configuration of INL's CCIM. If proposed modifications to the CCIM can maintain a nominal temperature of 1600{degrees}C throughout the melter, drain, and pour spout, then the CAF-5%TM-MP composition should be considered for a proof of principle demonstration.

  20. Copenhagen Waste Management and Incineration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Copenhagen Waste Management and Incineration Florence, April 24 2009 Julie B. Svendsen 24 20092 Presentation · General introduction to Copenhagen Waste Management System · National incentives · Waste Management plan 2012 · Incineration plants #12;Florence, April 24 20093 Copenhagen Waste

  1. "Towards Optics-Based Measurements in Ocean Observatories"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    /JPSS ­ UAV ­ Ocean optics, Biological ­ Laser penetration New opportunity · Insitu Sensors ­ (Gliders"Towards Optics-Based Measurements in Ocean Observatories" "Ocean Observatories Contributions to Ocean Models and Data Assimilation For Ecosystems" Ocean Optics 2012 Glasgow Scotland Robert Arnone

  2. The Ocean Sampling Day Consortium

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; Schnetzer, Julia; Kostadinov, Ivaylo; Lehmann, Katja; Fernandez-Guerra, Antonio; Jeanthon, Christian; Rahav, Eyal; Ullrich, Matthias; et al

    2015-06-19

    In this study, Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and theirmore »embedded functional traits.« less

  3. Waste Management and WasteWaste Management and Waste--toto--EnergyEnergy Status in SingaporeStatus in Singapore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    ;20031970 The Solid Waste Challenge Waste Explosion 1,200 t/d1,200 t/d 6,900 t/d6,900 t/d #12;Waste ManagementWaste Management and WasteWaste Management and Waste--toto--EnergyEnergy Status in Singapore #12;Singapore's Waste Management · In 2003, 6877 tonnes/day (2.51 M tonnes/year) of MSW collected

  4. Hazardous Waste Management (Delaware)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The act authorizes the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environment Control (DNREC) to regulate hazardous waste and create a program to manage sources of hazardous waste. The act...

  5. Hanford Tank Waste Residuals

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Hanford Tank Waste Residuals DOE HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 Chris Kemp, DOE ORP Bill Hewitt, YAHSGS LLC Hanford Tanks & Tank Waste * Single-Shell Tanks (SSTs) - 27...

  6. Nuclear Waste Partnership, LLC

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Nuclear Waste Partnership, LLC Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Report from the Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review March 17-27, 2015 U.S. Department of...

  7. Pet Waste Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechell, Justin; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-08-28

    About 1 million pounds of dog waste is deposited daily in North Texas alone. That's why proper disposal of pet waste can make a big difference in the environment. 5 photos, 2 pages...

  8. Thermal Transport in Nanoporous Materials for Energy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Jin

    2012-01-01

    Thermal Conductivity Measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . .Thermal ConductivityThermal Conductivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Thermal

  9. Solid waste handling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parazin, R.J.

    1995-05-31

    This study presents estimates of the solid radioactive waste quantities that will be generated in the Separations, Low-Level Waste Vitrification and High-Level Waste Vitrification facilities, collectively called the Tank Waste Remediation System Treatment Complex, over the life of these facilities. This study then considers previous estimates from other 200 Area generators and compares alternative methods of handling (segregation, packaging, assaying, shipping, etc.).

  10. Waste disposal package

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, M.J.

    1985-06-19

    This is a claim for a waste disposal package including an inner or primary canister for containing hazardous and/or radioactive wastes. The primary canister is encapsulated by an outer or secondary barrier formed of a porous ceramic material to control ingress of water to the canister and the release rate of wastes upon breach on the canister. 4 figs.

  11. Second Generation Waste Package Design Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armijo, J.S.; Misra, M.; Kar, Piyush

    2007-06-28

    The following describes the objectives of Project Activity 023 “Second Generation Waste Package Design Study” under DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC28-04RW12232. The objectives of this activity are: to review the current YMP baseline environment and establish corrosion testenvironments representative of the range of dry to intermittently wet conditions expected in the drifts as a function of time; to demonstrate the oxidation and corrosion resistance of A588 weathering steel and reference Alloy 22 samples in the representative dry to intermittently dry conditions; and to evaluate backfill and design features to improve the thermal performance analyses of the proposed second-generation waste packages using existing models developed at the University of Nevada, Reno(UNR). The work plan for this project activity consists of three major tasks: Task 1. Definition of expected worst-case environments (humidity, liquid composition and temperature) at waste package outer surfaces as a function of time, and comparison with environments defined in the YMP baseline; Task 2. Oxidation and corrosion tests of proposed second-generation outer container material; and Task 3. Second Generation waste package thermal analyses. Full funding was not provided for this project activity.

  12. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Thermal Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Geothermal Heat Pumps, Municipal Solid Waste, Landfill Gas, Tidal, Wave, Ocean Thermal, Wind (Small),...

  13. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Savings Category: Geothermal Electric, Solar Thermal Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Municipal Solid Waste, Landfill Gas, Tidal, Wave, Ocean Thermal, Wind...

  14. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Savings Category: Geothermal Electric, Solar Thermal Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Municipal Solid Waste, Landfill Gas, Tidal, Wave, Ocean Thermal,...

  15. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Solar Thermal Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Municipal Solid Waste, Fuel Cells using Non-Renewable Fuels, Landfill Gas, Tidal, Wave, Ocean Thermal,...

  16. The Link Foundation Ocean Engineering and Instrumentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    and ocean instrumentation. Application Available online at www.linkoe.org or write to/email: Forms and DrThe Link Foundation Ocean Engineering and Instrumentation Ph.D. Fellowship Program Objectives: To foster ocean engineering and ocean instrumentation research; to enhance both the theoretical

  17. Response of photosynthesis to ocean acidification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackey, KRM; Morris, JJ; Morris, JJ; Morel, FMM; Kranz, SA

    2015-01-01

    primary productiv- ity, especially in the oligotrophic regions of the ocean. In addition to the energy

  18. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 165 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 165 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS CARIBBEAN OCEAN HISTORY AND THE CRETACEOUS Scientist, Leg 165 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Discovery Drive College of any portion requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University

  19. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 110 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 110 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS LESSER ANTILLES FOREARC J. Casey Moore Staff Science Representative, Leg 110 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843-3469 Philip D. Direct* Ocean Drilling Program Robert B. Kidd Manager of Science Operations Ocean

  20. INSTRUCTIONS INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM (IODP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM (IODP) MANUSCRIPT AND PHOTOGRAPH COPYRIGHT, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, 1000 Discovery Drive, College Station, Texas 77845, USA A signed copyright of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program or any other publications of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program. Author

  1. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 109 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 109 PRELIMINARY REPORT BARE ROCK DRILLING IN THE MID-ATLANTIC RIDGE RIFT 109 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, TX 77843-3469 Philip D. Rabinowitz Director Ocean Drilling Program Robert B. Kidd Manager of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Louis E

  2. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 104 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 104 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS NORWEGIAN SEA Olav Eldholm Co-Chief Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, Texas 77843-3469 Pni±ip o Rabinowitz Director Ocean Drilling Program Robert B Kidd Manager of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Louis E

  3. WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2013 Product Documentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2013 Product Documentation Ocean Climate Laboratory NODC / NESDIS / NOAA Silver: World Ocean Atlas 2013 Product Documentation. T. Boyer, Ed.; A. Mishonov, Technical Ed.; 14 pp such as mixed layer depth. Upon publishing Climatological Atlas of the World Ocean in 1982, he distributed

  4. Heat Content Changes in the Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Heat Content Changes in the Pacific Ocean The Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Cli- mate (ATOC assimilating ocean observations and changes expected from surface heat fluxes as measured by the daily National are a result of advection of heat by ocean currents. We calculate that the most likely cause of the discrepancy

  5. Newsletter of Coastal Ocean Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science Workshop Executive Summary Draft OCEAN.US Airlie House Workshop Update Evolution of the Cross and the following working groups: 1.Trace elements in ecological and biogeochemical processes 2.Physical forcing

  6. Mercury in the Anthropocene Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamborg, Carl

    The toxic metal mercury is present only at trace levels in the ocean, but it accumulates in fish at concentrations high enough to pose a threat to human and environmental health. Human activity has dramatically altered the ...

  7. Ocean Renewable Energy Conference X

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 10th annual Ocean Renewable Energy Conference provides attendees a forum to share new ideas and concepts, opportunity to learn from leading-edge practitioners and policy-makers, information...

  8. Thermal desorption treatability test conducted with VAC*TRAX Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-01

    In 1992, Congress passed the Federal Facilities Compliance Act, requiring the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to treat and dispose of its mixed waste in accordance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) treatment standards. In response to the need for mixed-waste treatment capacity, where off-site commercial treatment facilities do not exist or cannot be used, the DOE Albuquerque Operations Office (DOE-AL) organized a Treatment Selection Team to match mixed waste with treatment options and develop a strategy for treatment of mixed waste. DOE-AL manages nine sites with mixed-waste inventories. The Treatment Selection Team determined a need to develop mobile treatment units (MTUs) to treat waste at the sites where the wastes are generated. Treatment processes used for mixed wastes must remove the hazardous component (i.e., meet RCRA treatment standards) and contain the radioactive component in a form that will protect the worker, public, and environment. On the basis of the recommendations of the Treatment Selection Team, DOE-AL assigned projects to the sites to bring mixed-waste treatment capacity on-line. The three technologies assigned to the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office (DOE-GJPO) include thermal desorption (TD), evaporative oxidation, and waste water evaporation.

  9. MPAS-Ocean Development Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobsen, Douglas W.; Ringler, Todd D.; Petersen, Mark R.; Jones, Philip W.; Maltrud, Mathew E.

    2012-06-13

    The Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) is a modeling framework developed jointly between NCAR and LANL, built to allow core developers to: rapidly develop new dynamical cores, and leverage improvements made to shared codes. MPAS-Ocean (MPAS-O) is a functioning ocean model capable of high resolution, or highly vairable resolution simulations. The first MPAS-O publication is expected by the end of the year.

  10. Dept. of Ocean and Resources Engineering School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Only Indian and Pacific Ocean GlobalEEZ100km from shorelineAtlantic OceanIndo-Pacific #12;OTEC MODELINGDept. of Ocean and Resources Engineering School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology of deep layers, Increase in THC strength 1) Global 2) EEZ 3)100km from Shoreline 4) Only Atlantic Ocean 5

  11. Ocean Sci., 5, 313327, 2009 www.ocean-sci.net/5/313/2009/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gnanadesikan, Anand

    . The role of the penetration length scale of short- wave radiation into the surface ocean and its impactOcean Sci., 5, 313­327, 2009 www.ocean-sci.net/5/313/2009/ © Author(s) 2009. This work is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. Ocean Science Regional impacts of ocean color

  12. Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Zhongping

    Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal waters (2005), Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal; Siegel et al., 1995] have demonstrated that the penetration of EVIS in the upper layer of the ocean plays

  13. Secondary waste form testing : ceramicrete phosphate bonded ceramics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, D.; Ganga, R.; Gaviria, J.; Yusufoglu, Y.

    2011-06-21

    The cleanup activities of the Hanford tank wastes require stabilization and solidification of the secondary waste streams generated from the processing of the tank wastes. The treatment of these tank wastes to produce glass waste forms will generate secondary wastes, including routine solid wastes and liquid process effluents. Liquid wastes may include process condensates and scrubber/off-gas treatment liquids from the thermal waste treatment. The current baseline for solidification of the secondary wastes is a cement-based waste form. However, alternative secondary waste forms are being considered. In this regard, Ceramicrete technology, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, is being explored as an option to solidify and stabilize the secondary wastes. The Ceramicrete process has been demonstrated on four secondary waste formulations: baseline, cluster 1, cluster 2, and mixed waste streams. Based on the recipes provided by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the four waste simulants were prepared in-house. Waste forms were fabricated with three filler materials: Class C fly ash, CaSiO{sub 3}, and Class C fly ash + slag. Optimum waste loadings were as high as 20 wt.% for the fly ash and CaSiO{sub 3}, and 15 wt.% for fly ash + slag filler. Waste forms for physical characterizations were fabricated with no additives, hazardous contaminants, and radionuclide surrogates. Physical property characterizations (density, compressive strength, and 90-day water immersion test) showed that the waste forms were stable and durable. Compressive strengths were >2,500 psi, and the strengths remained high after the 90-day water immersion test. Fly ash and CaSiO{sub 3} filler waste forms appeared to be superior to the waste forms with fly ash + slag as a filler. Waste form weight loss was {approx}5-14 wt.% over the 90-day immersion test. The majority of the weight loss occurred during the initial phase of the immersion test, indicative of washing off of residual unreacted binder components from the waste form surface. Waste forms for ANS 16.1 leach testing contained appropriate amounts of rhenium and iodine as radionuclide surrogates, along with the additives silver-loaded zeolite and tin chloride. The leachability index for Re was found to range from 7.9 to 9.0 for all the samples evaluated. Iodine was below detection limit (5 ppb) for all the leachate samples. Further, leaching of sodium was low, as indicated by the leachability index ranging from 7.6-10.4, indicative of chemical binding of the various chemical species. Target leachability indices for Re, I, and Na were 9, 11, and 6, respectively. Degradation was observed in some of the samples post 90-day ANS 16.1 tests. Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) results showed that all the hazardous contaminants were contained in the waste, and the hazardous metal concentrations were below the Universal Treatment Standard limits. Preliminary scale-up (2-gal waste forms) was conducted to demonstrate the scalability of the Ceramicrete process. Use of minimal amounts of boric acid as a set retarder was used to control the working time for the slurry. Flexibility in treating waste streams with wide ranging compositional make-ups and ease of process scale-up are attractive attributes of Ceramicrete technology.

  14. An Evaluation of Shadow Shielding for Lunar System Waste Heat Rejection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worn, Cheyn

    2012-07-16

    Shadow shielding is a novel and practical concept for waste heat rejection from lunar surface spacecraft systems. A shadow shield is a light shield that shades the radiator from parasitic thermal radiation emanating from the sun or lunar surface...

  15. High-Performance Thermoelectric Devices Based on Abundant Silicide Materials for Vehicle Waste Heat Recovery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Development of high-performance thermoelectric devices for vehicle waste heat recovery will include fundamental research to use abundant promising low-cost thermoelectric materials, thermal management and interfaces design, and metrology

  16. The Effect of Simulated Barium Carbonate Waste Stream on the Hydration of Composite Cement Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheffield, University of

    of spent uranium oxide fuel and passed through a caustic scrubber producing a sodium carbonate waste form. In the Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP) at BNFL, Sellafield, CO2 is released during the dissolution

  17. Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, January-March, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chikalla, T.D.; Powell, J.A. (comp.)

    1981-06-01

    Reports and summaries are provided for the following programs: high-level waste process development; alternative waste forms; nuclear waste materials characterization center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton solidification; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; NWVP off-gas analysis; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; verification instrument development; mobility of organic complexes of radionuclide in soils; low-level waste generation reduction handbook; waste management system studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology program; high-level waste form preparation; development of backfill materials; development of structural engineered barriers; disposal charge analysis; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; spent fuel and pool component integrity program; analysis of postulated criticality events in a storage array of spent LWR fuel; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium mill tailings; liner evaluation for uranium mill tailings; multilayer barriers for sealing of uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; and revegetation of inactive uranium tailings sites.

  18. Radioactive Waste Management Basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, B K

    2009-06-03

    The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

  19. Municipal waste processing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayberry, J.L.

    1988-04-13

    This invention relates to apparatus for processing municipal waste, and more particularly to vibrating mesh screen conveyor systems for removing grit, glass, and other noncombustible materials from dry municipal waste. Municipal waste must be properly processed and disposed of so that it does not create health risks to the community. Generally, municipal waste, which may be collected in garbage trucks, dumpsters, or the like, is deposited in processing areas such as landfills. Land and environmental controls imposed on landfill operators by governmental bodies have increased in recent years, however, making landfill disposal of solid waste materials more expensive. 6 figs.

  20. Radioactive Waste Management Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09

    This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07. Admin Chg 2, dated 6-8-11, supersedes DOE M 435.1-1 Chg 1.

  1. Ocean Barrier Layers’ Effect on Tropical Cyclone Intensification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balaguru, Karthik; Chang, P.; Saravanan, R.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xu, Zhao; Li, M.; Hsieh, J.

    2012-09-04

    Improving a tropical cyclone's forecast and mitigating its destructive potential requires knowledge of various environmental factors that influence the cyclone's path and intensity. Herein, using a combination of observations and model simulations, we systematically demonstrate that tropical cyclone intensification is significantly affected by salinity-induced barrier layers, which are 'quasi-permanent' features in the upper tropical oceans. When tropical cyclones pass over regions with barrier layers, the increased stratification and stability within the layer reduce storm-induced vertical mixing and sea surface temperature cooling. This causes an increase in enthalpy flux from the ocean to the atmosphere and, consequently, an intensification of tropical cyclones. On average, the tropical cyclone intensification rate is nearly 50% higher over regions with barrier layers, compared to regions without. Our finding, which underscores the importance of observing not only the upper-ocean thermal structure but also the salinity structure in deep tropical barrier layer regions, may be a key to more skillful predictions of tropical cyclone intensities through improved ocean state estimates and simulations of barrier layer processes. As the hydrological cycle responds to global warming, any associated changes in the barrier layer distribution must be considered in projecting future tropical cyclone activity.

  2. Deployment, release and recovery of ocean riser pipes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA); Wetmore, Sherman B. (Westminster, CA); McNary, James F. (Santa Ana, CA)

    1980-11-18

    An ocean thermal energy conversion facility includes a long pipe assembly which is supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. Cold water flows to the facility from deep in the ocean. The pipe assembly comprises an elongate pipe construction and a weight connected to the lower end of the construction by a line of selected length. A floatation collar is connected to the construction at its upper end to cause the construction to have positive buoyancy and a center of buoyancy closer to the upper end of the construction than its center of mass. The weight renders the entire pipe assembly negatively buoyant. In the event that support of the pipe assembly should be lost, as by release of the assembly from the facility hull in an emergency, the assembly sinks to the ocean floor where it is moored by the weight. The pipe construction floats submerged above the ocean floor in a substantially vertical attitude which facilitates recovery of the assembly.

  3. Gas generation from Tank 241-SY-103 waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, S.A.; King, C.M.; Pederson, L.R.; Forbes, S.V.; Sell, R.L.

    1996-04-01

    This report summarizes progress made in evaluating mechanisms by which flammable gases are generated in Hanford double-shell tank wastes, based on the results of laboratory tests using actual waste from Tank 241-SY-103. The objective of this work is to establish the identity and stoichiometry of degradation products formed in actual tank wastes by thermal and radiolytic processes as a function of temperature. The focus of the gas generation tests on Tank 241-SY-103 samples is first the effect of temperature on gas generation (volume and composition). Secondly, gas generation from irradiation of Tank 241-SY-103 samples at the corresponding temperatures as the thermal-only treatments will be measured in the presence of an external radiation source (using a {sup 137}Cs capsule). The organic content will be measured on a representative sample prior to gas generation experiments and again at the termination of heating and irradiation. The gas generation will be related to the extent of organic species consumption during heating. Described in this report are experimental methods used for producing and measuring gases generated at various temperatures from highly radioactive actual tank waste, and results of gas generation from Tank 241-SY-103 waste taken from its convective layer. The accurate measurement of gas generation rates from actual waste from highly radioactive waste tanks is needed to assess the potential for producing and storing flammable gases within the waste tanks. This report addresses the gas generation capacity of the waste from the convective layer of Tank 241-SY-103, a waste tank listed on the Flammable Gas Watch List due to its potential for flammable gas accumulation above the flammability limit.

  4. Warm ocean anomaly, air sea fluxes, and the rapid intensification of tropical cyclone Nargis (2008)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    Profile Program) data base are searched to depict the detail UOTS structure. Sea surface height anom- aly are available. The cyclone track and intensity data is from the Unisys Weather (http://weather to Monthly Weather Review, 2008], in this work we investigate the role of upper ocean thermal structure (UOTS

  5. Ocean Heat Transport , Overturning Circulations, and some fine-resolution ASOF dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , seasonal storage of heat in the mixed layer balances air/sea heat flux, so only a mixed layer ocean of Europe? (i.e., is air-sea heat flux dominated by seasonal storage in the mixed layer?) We have argued, it is thermally driven'. Why? -salt diffusion is essential to overturning circulation, -diffusion is molecular

  6. Final Technical Report Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -EE0003638 Prepared For THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE): MARINE AND HYDROKINETIC INITIATIVE Prepared By MAKAI of the global OTEC resource dwarfs that of other other marine renewable energy technologies, and OTEC powerFinal Technical Report Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy

  7. LiH thermal energy storage device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olszewski, M.; Morris, D.G.

    1994-06-28

    A thermal energy storage device for use in a pulsed power supply to store waste heat produced in a high-power burst operation utilizes lithium hydride as the phase change thermal energy storage material. The device includes an outer container encapsulating the lithium hydride and an inner container supporting a hydrogen sorbing sponge material such as activated carbon. The inner container is in communication with the interior of the outer container to receive hydrogen dissociated from the lithium hydride at elevated temperatures. 5 figures.

  8. Open ocean DMS air/sea fluxes over the eastern South Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marandino, C. A; De Bruyn, W. J; Miller, S. D; Saltzman, E. S

    2009-01-01

    over the North Pacific Ocean, J. Geophys. Res. - Atmos. ,air/sea fluxes over S. Pacific Ocean References Asher, W.in the equa- torial Pacific Ocean ( 1982 to 1996): Evidence

  9. Enceladus's measured physical libration requires a global subsurface ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, P C; Tiscareno, M S; Burns, J A; Joseph, J; Loredo, T J; Helfenstein, P; Porco, C

    2015-01-01

    Several planetary satellites apparently have subsurface seas that are of great interest for, among other reasons, their possible habitability. The geologically diverse Saturnian satellite Enceladus vigorously vents liquid water and vapor from fractures within a south polar depression and thus must have a liquid reservoir or active melting. However, the extent and location of any subsurface liquid region is not directly observable. We use measurements of control points across the surface of Enceladus accumulated over seven years of spacecraft observations to determine the satellite's precise rotation state, finding a forced physical libration of 0.120 $\\pm$ 0.014{\\deg} (2{\\sigma}). This value is too large to be consistent with Enceladus's core being rigidly connected to its surface, and thus implies the presence of a global ocean rather than a localized polar sea. The maintenance of a global ocean within Enceladus is problematic according to many thermal models and so may constrain satellite properties or requ...

  10. Warm Bias and Parameterization of Boundary Upwelling in Ocean Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cessi, Paola; Wolfe, Christopher

    2012-11-06

    It has been demonstrated that Eastern Boundary Currents (EBC) are a baroclinic intensification of the interior circulation of the ocean due to the emergence of mesoscale eddies in response to the sharp buoyancy gradients driven by the wind-stress and the thermal surface forcing. The eddies accomplish the heat and salt transport necessary to insure that the subsurface flow is adiabatic, compensating for the heat and salt transport effected by the mean currents. The EBC thus generated occurs on a cross-shore scale of order 20-100 km, and thus this scale needs to be resolved in climate models in order to capture the meridional transport by the EBC. Our result indicate that changes in the near shore currents on the oceanic eastern boundaries are linked not just to local forcing, such as coastal changes in the winds, but depend on the basin-wide circulation as well.

  11. Ocean Fertilization and Other Climate Change Mitigation Strategies: An Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huesemann, Michael H.

    2008-07-29

    In order to evaluate ocean fertilization in the larger context of other proposed strategies for reducing the threat of the global warming, a wide range of different climate change mitigation approaches are compared in terms of their long-term potential, stage of development, relative costs and potential risks, as well as public acceptance. This broad comparative analysis is carried out for the following climate change mitigation strategies: supply-side and end-use efficiency improvements, terrestrial and geological carbon sequestration, CO2 ocean disposal and iron fertilization, nuclear power, and renewable energy generation from biomass, passive solar, solar thermal, photovoltaics, hydroelectric and wind. In addition, because of the inherent problems of conducting an objective comparative cost-benefit analysis, two non-technological solutions to global warming are also discussed: curbing population growth and transitioning to a steady-state economy.

  12. Polyethylene encapsulatin of nitrate salt wastes: Waste form stability, process scale-up, and economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1991-07-01

    A polyethylene encapsulation system for treatment of low-level radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes has been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Polyethylene has several advantages compared with conventional solidification/stabilization materials such as hydraulic cements. Waste can be encapsulated with greater efficiency and with better waste form performance than is possible with hydraulic cement. The properties of polyethylene relevant to its long-term durability in storage and disposal environments are reviewed. Response to specific potential failure mechanisms including biodegradation, radiation, chemical attack, flammability, environmental stress cracking, and photodegradation are examined. These data are supported by results from extensive waste form performance testing including compressive yield strength, water immersion, thermal cycling, leachability of radioactive and hazardous species, irradiation, biodegradation, and flammability. The bench-scale process has been successfully tested for application with a number of specific problem'' waste streams. Quality assurance and performance testing of the resulting waste form confirmed scale-up feasibility. Use of this system at Rocky Flats Plant can result in over 70% fewer drums processed and shipped for disposal, compared with optimal cement formulations. Based on the current Rocky Flats production of nitrate salt per year, polyethylene encapsulation can yield an estimated annual savings between $1.5 million and $2.7 million, compared with conventional hydraulic cement systems. 72 refs., 23 figs., 16 tabs.

  13. Transuranic (TRU) Waste | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Defined by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act as "waste containing more than 100 nanocuries of alpha-emitting...

  14. Solid Waste Management Plan. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-26

    The waste types discussed in this Solid Waste Management Plan are Municipal Solid Waste, Hazardous Waste, Low-Level Mixed Waste, Low-Level Radioactive Waste, and Transuranic Waste. The plan describes for each type of solid waste, the existing waste management facilities, the issues, and the assumptions used to develop the current management plan.

  15. Ferrocyanide tank waste stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, K.D.

    1993-01-01

    Ferrocyanide wastes were generated at the Hanford Site during the mid to late 1950s as a result of efforts to create more tank space for the storage of high-level nuclear waste. The ferrocyanide process was developed to remove [sup 137]CS from existing waste and newly generated waste that resulted from the recovery of valuable uranium in Hanford Site waste tanks. During the course of research associated with the ferrocyanide process, it was recognized that ferrocyanide materials, when mixed with sodium nitrate and/or sodium nitrite, were capable of violent exothermic reaction. This chemical reactivity became an issue in the 1980s, when safety issues associated with the storage of ferrocyanide wastes in Hanford Site tanks became prominent. These safety issues heightened in the late 1980s and led to the current scrutiny of the safety issues associated with these wastes, as well as current research and waste management programs. Testing to provide information on the nature of possible tank reactions is ongoing. This document supplements the information presented in Summary of Single-Shell Tank Waste Stability, WHC-EP-0347, March 1991 (Borsheim and Kirch 1991), which evaluated several issues. This supplement only considers information particular to ferrocyanide wastes.

  16. www.d-waste.com info@d-waste.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    management data available". According to David Newman, president of the International Solid Waste Association collection services, according to the first global survey of waste management. The Waste Atlas 2013 Report marketplace, about 47 grams of waste is produced-- with worldwide municipal solid waste generation totaling

  17. Waste Disposal Guide HOW TO PROPERLY DISPOSE OF WASTE MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaefer, Marcus

    of Containers p.8 o E. Disposal of Empty Containers p.8 o F. Storage of Waste Chemicals p.8,9 o G. Chemical Compatibility p.9 Radioactive Waste Disposal p.10 Bio Hazard Waste chemical and radioactive waste, and Biohazardous waste. This document contains university procedures

  18. 8-Waste treatment and disposal A. Responsibility for waste management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    8- Waste treatment and disposal A. Responsibility for waste management 1. Each worker is responsible for correctly bagging and labeling his/her own waste. 2. A BSL3 technician will be responsible for transporting and autoclaving the waste. Waste will be autoclaved once or twice per day, depending on use

  19. Beryllium Impregnation of Uranium Fuel: Thermal Modeling of Cylindrical Objects for Efficiency Evaluation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynn, Nicholas

    2011-08-04

    With active research projects related to nuclear waste immobilization and high conductivity nuclear fuels, a thermal model has been developed to simulate the temperature profile within a heat generating cylinder in order to imitate the behavior...

  20. Effective thermal conductivity method for predicting spent nuclear fuel cladding temperatures in a dry fill gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahney, Robert

    1997-12-19

    This paper summarizes the development of a reliable methodology for the prediction of peak spent nuclear fuel cladding temperature within the waste disposal package. The effective thermal conductivity method replaces other older methodologies.

  1. Effect of potential waste constituents on the reactivity of Hanford ferrocyanide wastes: Diluent, catalyst, and initiator studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheele, R.D.; Johnston, J.W.; Tingey, J.M.; Burger, L.L.; Sell, R.L.

    1993-04-01

    During the 1980s, scientists at the Hanford Site began considering disposal options for wastes in underground storage tanks. As a result of safety concerns, it was determined that special consideration should be given to ferrocyanide-bearing wastes to ensure their continued safe storage. In addition, Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) chartered Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to determine the conditions necessary for vigorous reactions to occur in the Hanford Site ferrocyanide wastes. As part of those studies, PNL has evaluated the effects of selected potential waste constituents to determine how they might affect the reactivity of the wastes. The authors` investigations of the diluent, catalytic, or initiating effects of potential waste constituents included studies (1) to determine the effect of the oxidant-to-ferrocyanide ratio, (2) to establish the effect of sodium aluminate concentration, (3) to identify materials that could affect the explosivity of a mixture of sodium nickel ferricyanide (a potential aging product of ferrocyanide) and sodium nitrate and nitrite, (4) and to determine the effect of nickel sulfide concentration. They also conducted a thermal sensitivity study and analyzed the results to determine the relative behaviors of sodium nickel ferrocyanide and ferricyanide. A statistical evaluation of the time-to-explosion (TTX) test results from the catalyst and initiator screening study found that the ferricyanide reacted at a faster rate than did the ferrocyanide analog. The thermal analyses indicated that the ferricyanide form is more thermally sensitive, exhibiting exothermic behavior at a lower temperature than the ferrocyanide form. The increased thermal sensitivity of the ferricyanide, which is a potential oxidation product of ferrocyanide, relative to the ferrocyanide analog, does not support the hypothesis that aging independent of the reaction pathway will necessarily reduce the reaction hazard of ferrocyanide wastes.

  2. High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production This...

  3. Thermal Phases of Directly Imaged Exoplanets: the Effects of Eccentricity, Obliquity, and Diurnal Forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowan, Nicolas B; Abbot, Dorian S

    2012-01-01

    [Abridged] In order to understand the climate on terrestrial planets orbiting nearby Sun-like stars, one would like to know their thermal inertia. We use a global climate model to simulate the thermal phase variations of Earth-analogs and test whether these data could distinguish between planets with different heat storage and heat transport characteristics. In particular, we consider a temperate climate with polar ice caps (like modern Earth), and a snowball state where the oceans are globally covered in ice. We first quantitatively study the periodic radiative forcing from, and climatic response to, rotation, obliquity, and eccentricity. The eccentricity responses of the two climates indicate that the temperate planet has 3x the bulk heat capacity of the snowball planet due to the presence of liquid water oceans. The temperate obliquity seasons are weaker than one would expect based on thermal inertia alone; this is due to cross-equatorial oceanic and atmospheric energy transport. Thermal inertia and cross-...

  4. Underground waste barrier structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saha, Anuj J. (Hamburg, NY); Grant, David C. (Gibsonia, PA)

    1988-01-01

    Disclosed is an underground waste barrier structure that consists of waste material, a first container formed of activated carbonaceous material enclosing the waste material, a second container formed of zeolite enclosing the first container, and clay covering the second container. The underground waste barrier structure is constructed by forming a recessed area within the earth, lining the recessed area with a layer of clay, lining the clay with a layer of zeolite, lining the zeolite with a layer of activated carbonaceous material, placing the waste material within the lined recessed area, forming a ceiling over the waste material of a layer of activated carbonaceous material, a layer of zeolite, and a layer of clay, the layers in the ceiling cojoining with the respective layers forming the walls of the structure, and finally, covering the ceiling with earth.

  5. CARD No. 24 Waste Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CARD No. 24 Waste Characterization 24.A.1 BACKGROUND DOE must provide waste inventory information Report (TWBIR), Revisions 2 and 3, which provides waste characterization information specific to DOE solidified waste forms was included. Waste described in TWBIR Revision 3 was primarily characterized through

  6. Effects of thermal fluctuations on thermal inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takashi Hiramatsu; Yuhei Miyamoto; Jun'ichi Yokoyama

    2014-12-25

    The mechanism of thermal inflation, a relatively short period of accelerated expansion after primordial inflation, is a desirable ingredient for a certain class of particle physics models if they are not to be in contention with the cosmology of the early Universe. Though thermal inflation is most simply described in terms of a thermal effective potential, a thermal environment also gives rise to thermal fluctuations that must be taken into account. We numerically study the effects of these thermal fluctuations using lattice simulations. We conclude that though they do not ruin the thermal inflation scenario, the phase transition at the end of thermal inflation proceeds through phase mixing and is therefore not accompanied by the formations of bubbles nor appreciable amplitude of gravitational waves.

  7. Operational Waste Volume Projection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STRODE, J.N.

    2000-08-28

    Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of June. 2000.

  8. Operational Waste Volume Projection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STRODE, J.N.

    1999-08-24

    Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2018 are projected based on assumption as of July 1999. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement.

  9. Method for solidification of radioactive and other hazardous waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anshits, Alexander G. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Vereshchagina, Tatiana A. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Voskresenskaya, Elena N. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Kostin, Eduard M. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Pavlov, Vyacheslav F. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Revenko, Yurii A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Tretyakov, Alexander A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Sharonova, Olga M. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Aloy, Albert S. (Saint-Petersburg, RU); Sapozhnikova, Natalia V. (Saint-Petersburg, RU); Knecht, Dieter A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Macheret, Yevgeny (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01

    Solidification of liquid radioactive waste, and other hazardous wastes, is accomplished by the method of the invention by incorporating the waste into a porous glass crystalline molded block. The porous block is first loaded with the liquid waste and then dehydrated and exposed to thermal treatment at 50-1,000.degree. C. The porous glass crystalline molded block consists of glass crystalline hollow microspheres separated from fly ash (cenospheres), resulting from incineration of fossil plant coals. In a preferred embodiment, the porous glass crystalline blocks are formed from perforated cenospheres of grain size -400+50, wherein the selected cenospheres are consolidated into the porous molded block with a binder, such as liquid silicate glass. The porous blocks are then subjected to repeated cycles of saturating with liquid waste, and drying, and after the last cycle the blocks are subjected to calcination to transform the dried salts to more stable oxides. Radioactive liquid waste can be further stabilized in the porous blocks by coating the internal surface of the block with metal oxides prior to adding the liquid waste, and by coating the outside of the block with a low-melting glass or a ceramic after the waste is loaded into the block.

  10. Small boiler uses waste coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Virr, M.J.

    2009-07-15

    Burning coal waste in small boilers at low emissions poses considerable problem. While larger boiler suppliers have successfully installed designs in the 40 to 80 MW range for some years, the author has been developing small automated fluid bed boiler plants for 25 years that can be applied in the range of 10,000 to 140,000 lbs/hr of steam. Development has centered on the use of an internally circulating fluid bed (CFB) boiler, which will burn waste fuels of most types. The boiler is based on the traditional D-shaped watertable boiler, with a new type of combustion chamber that enables a three-to-one turndown to be achieved. The boilers have all the advantages of low emissions of the large fluid boilers while offering a much lower height incorporated into the package boiler concept. Recent tests with a waste coal that had a high nitrogen content of 1.45% demonstrated a NOx emission below the federal limit of 0.6 lbs/mm Btu. Thus a NOx reduction on the order of 85% can be demonstrate by combustion modification alone. Further reductions can be made by using a selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) system and sulfur absorption of up to 90% retention is possible. The article describes the operation of a 30,000 lbs/hr boiler at the Fayette Thermal LLC plant. Spinheat has installed three ICFB boilers at a nursing home and a prison, which has been tested on poor-grade anthracite and bituminous coal. 2 figs.

  11. Thermal-Aware System-Level Modeling and Management for Multi-Processor Systems-on-Chip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Micheli, Giovanni

    -level MPC-based thermal modeling and management approaches on an industrial 8-core MPSoC design and show in voltage and frequency scaling waste additional power [6]. Thus, system-level thermal managementThermal-Aware System-Level Modeling and Management for Multi-Processor Systems-on-Chip Francesco

  12. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    storage in solar thermal applications," Applied Energy, pp.of Non-Tracking Solar Thermal Technology," 2011. [26] R.C. Y. Zhao, "A review of solar collectors and thermal energy

  13. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    Evaporator Powered By Solar Thermal Energy 10:00 AM 10:00 AMaided or powered by solar thermal energy. A section is alsoexhaustive review of solar thermal energy systems has been

  14. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    and thermal energy storage in solar thermal applications,"Solar infrastructure should include analysis of thermal storage.storage equipment, the evaporator can be integrated into the current solar

  15. Waste Heat Recovery

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DRAFT - PRE-DECISIONAL - DRAFT 1 Waste Heat Recovery 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the TechnologySystem ......

  16. Norcal Waste Systems, Inc.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-12-01

    Fact sheet describes the LNG long-haul heavy-duty trucks at Norcal Waste Systems Inc.'s Sanitary Fill Company.

  17. Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Department of Environmental...

  18. Solid Waste Management (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Indiana Department of...

  19. HLW Glass Waste Loadings

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    HLW Glass Waste Loadings Ian L. Pegg Vitreous State Laboratory The Catholic University of America Washington, DC Overview Overview Vitrification - general background Joule...

  20. Waste Confidence Discussion

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Long-Term Waste Confidence Update Christine Pineda Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission National Transportation Stakeholders Forum...

  1. Vitrification of waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

    1999-01-01

    A method for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300.degree. C. to 800.degree. C. to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100.degree. C. to 1400.degree. C. at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

  2. Vitrification of waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wicks, G.G.

    1999-04-06

    A method is described for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300 C to 800 C to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100 C to 1400 C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

  3. WASTE PACKAGE TRANSPORTER DESIGN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.C. Weddle; R. Novotny; J. Cron

    1998-09-23

    The purpose of this Design Analysis is to develop preliminary design of the waste package transporter used for waste package (WP) transport and related functions in the subsurface repository. This analysis refines the conceptual design that was started in Phase I of the Viability Assessment. This analysis supports the development of a reliable emplacement concept and a retrieval concept for license application design. The scope of this analysis includes the following activities: (1) Assess features of the transporter design and evaluate alternative design solutions for mechanical components. (2) Develop mechanical equipment details for the transporter. (3) Prepare a preliminary structural evaluation for the transporter. (4) Identify and recommend the equipment design for waste package transport and related functions. (5) Investigate transport equipment interface tolerances. This analysis supports the development of the waste package transporter for the transport, emplacement, and retrieval of packaged radioactive waste forms in the subsurface repository. Once the waste containers are closed and accepted, the packaged radioactive waste forms are termed waste packages (WP). This terminology was finalized as this analysis neared completion; therefore, the term disposal container is used in several references (i.e., the System Description Document (SDD)) (Ref. 5.6). In this analysis and the applicable reference documents, the term ''disposal container'' is synonymous with ''waste package''.

  4. Secondary Waste Cast Stone Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2012-09-26

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Cast Stone – a cementitious waste form, has been selected for solidification of this secondary waste stream after treatment in the ETF. The secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. This secondary waste Cast Stone waste form qualification testing plan outlines the testing of the waste form and immobilization process to demonstrate that the Cast Stone waste form can comply with the disposal requirements. Specifications for the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form have not been established. For this testing plan, Cast Stone specifications are derived from specifications for the immobilized LAW glass in the WTP contract, the waste acceptance criteria for the IDF, and the waste acceptance criteria in the IDF Permit issued by the State of Washington. This testing plan outlines the testing needed to demonstrate that the waste form can comply with these waste form specifications and acceptance criteria. The testing program must also demonstrate that the immobilization process can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. This testing plan also outlines the testing needed to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support performance assessment analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form in the IDF

  5. "What Controls the Structure and Stability of the Ocean Meridional Overturning Circulation: Implications for Abrupt Climate Change?"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedorov, Alexey

    2013-11-23

    The central goal of this research project is to understand the properties of the ocean meridional overturning circulation (MOC) – a topic critical for understanding climate variability and stability on a variety of timescales (from decadal to centennial and longer). Specifically, we have explored various factors that control the MOC stability and decadal variability in the Atlantic and the ocean thermal structure in general, including the possibility abrupt climate change. We have also continued efforts on improving the performance of coupled ocean-atmosphere GCMs.

  6. Thermal Control & System Integration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The thermal control and system integration activity focuses on issues such as the integration of motor and power control technologies and the development of advanced thermal control technologies....

  7. DNA Engine Thermal Cycler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raizada, Manish N.

    ® Peltier Thermal Cycler PTC-0200 DNA Engine Cycler Operations Manual Version 4.0 #12;ii Tech Support: 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .vi The DNA Engine® Peltier Thermal Cycler Introduction

  8. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    and C. Y. Zhao, "A review of solar collectors and thermalenergy storage in solar thermal applications," Appliedon photovoltaic/thermal hybrid solar technology," Applied

  9. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01

    thermal energy becomes apparent with the development of solarsolar energy systems, aquifer energy storage provides a buffer between time-varying solar energy inputs and thermal

  10. Vitrification development plan for US Department of Energy mixed wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, R.; Lucerna, J.; Plodinec, M.J.

    1993-10-01

    This document is a general plan for conducting vitrification development for application to mixed wastes owned by the US Department of Energy. The emphasis is a description and discussion of the data needs to proceed through various stages of development. These stages are (1) screening at a waste site to determine which streams should be vitrified, (2) waste characterization and analysis, (3) waste form development and treatability studies, (4) process engineering development, (5) flowsheet and technical specifications for treatment processes, and (6) integrated pilot-scale demonstration. Appendices provide sample test plans for various stages of the vitrification development process. This plan is directed at thermal treatments which produce waste glass. However, the study is still applicable to the broader realm of thermal treatment since it deals with issues such as off-gas characterization and waste characterization that are not necessarily specific to vitrification. The purpose is to provide those exploring or considering vitrification with information concerning the kinds of data that are needed, the way the data are obtained, and the way the data are used. This will provide guidance to those who need to prioritize data needs to fit schedules and budgets. Knowledge of data needs also permits managers and planners to estimate resource requirements for vitrification development.

  11. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Nitrate Salt Bearing Waste Container...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    LLC. The Order, at paragraph 22, requires the Permittees to submit a WIPP Nitrate Salt Bearing Waste Container Isolation Plan for identified nitrate salt bearing waste...

  12. Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act provides for planning for the processing and disposal of municipal waste; requires counties to submit plans for municipal waste management systems within their boundaries; authorizes...

  13. Report: EM Tank Waste Subcommittee Full Report for Waste Treatment...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    meeting, enclosed please find the Environmental Management Advisory Board EM Tank Waste Subcommittee Report for Waste Treatment Plant; Report Number EMAB EM-TWS WTP-001,...

  14. Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    6 Technology Readiness Assessment for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW Waste Vitrification Facility L. Holton D. Alexander C. Babel H. Sutter J. Young August...

  15. Waste Loading Enhancements for Hanford Low-Activity Waste Glasses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WASTE LOADING ENHANCEMENTS FOR HANFORD LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE GLASSES Albert A. Kruger, Glass Scientist DOE-WTP Project Office Engineering Division US Department of Energy Richland,...

  16. Virginia Waste Management Act (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solid waste and hazardous waste are regulated under a number of programs at the Department of Environmental Quality. These programs are designed to encourage the reuse and recycling of solid waste...

  17. HAZARDOUS WASTE LABEL DEPAUL UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaefer, Marcus

    HAZARDOUS WASTE LABEL DEPAUL UNIVERSITY ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY 5-4170 Corrosive Non- Hazardous Ignitable Reactive Toxic Oxidizer Other ( explain ) Generator Building Dept. HAZARDOUS WASTE LABEL DEPAUL UNIVERSITY ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY 5-4170 HAZARDOUS WASTE LABEL DEPAUL UNIVERSITY

  18. Land-ocean contrasts under climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrne, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Observations and climate models show a pronounced land-ocean contrast in the responses of surface temperature and the hydrological cycle to global warming: Land temperatures increase more than ocean temperatures, low-level ...

  19. PHYSICS OF OCEAN CIRCULATION Instructor: S. Riser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riser, Stephen C.

    Topography Tides Wind Geothermal heating Surface flows elsewhere #12;How deep is the ocean? The average ocean circulation #12;UNITS Horizontal distance: km (= 105 cm) Vertical distance: m Velocity: cm/sec Density: g/cm3

  20. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 164 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 164 PRELIMINARY REPORT GAS HYDRATE SAMPLING ON THE BLAKE RIDGE of Tokyo (Japan) National Science Foundation (United States) Natural Environment Research Council (United Kingdom) European Science Foundation Consortium for the Ocean Drilling Program (Belgium, Denmark, Finland

  1. Mechanistic models of oceanic nitrogen fixation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monteiro, Fanny

    2009-01-01

    Oceanic nitrogen fixation and biogeochemical interactions between the nitrogen, phosphorus and iron cycles have important implications for the control of primary production and carbon storage in the ocean. The biological ...

  2. Oceanography | Vol.24, No.3114 OCEAN WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Helen

    out ows via these pathways return freshwaters to the North Atlantic that were evaporated from tropical oceans, transported by the atmosphere, and delivered to the Arctic Ocean via precipi- tation, terrestrial

  3. Climate Research Ocean Climate Sta1ons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Research Ocean Climate Sta1ons PI: Meghan Cronin Co Lab Review 2 hClimate Sta-ons are moored buoys #12;Ocean Climate Sta1ons 2014 PMEL Lab Review 5 Contribu-ng to NOAA's Goals

  4. Price Philanthropies Ocean Science Education: Aquarium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hampton, Randy

    ! ! ! ! ! Price Philanthropies Ocean Science Education: Aquarium Express Outreach Who: Students by The Price Philanthropies Ocean Science Fund and participate in our Aquarium Express Outreach Programs! What education, Price Philanthropies, led by Robert and Allison Price, joined supporters of Birch Aquarium

  5. Factors affecting thermal infrared images at selected field sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisson, J.B.; Ferguson, J.S.

    1993-07-01

    A thermal infrared (TIR) survey was conducted to locate surface ordnance in and around the Naval Ordnance Disposal Area, and a thermal anomaly was found. This report documents studies conducted to identify the position of cause of the thermal anomaly. Also included are results of a long path Fourier transform infrared survey, soil sampling activities, soil gas surveys, and buried heater studies. The results of these studies indicated that the thermal anomaly was caused by a gravel pad, which had thermal properties different than those of the surrounding soil. Results from this investigation suggest that TIR is useful for locating surface objects having a high thermal inertia compared to the surrounding terrain, but TIR is of very limited use for characterizing buried waste or other similar buried objects at the INEL.

  6. Arnold Schwarzenegger CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE ENERGY ASSESSMENT Prepared For: California, State and Federal Agencies and their expectations in respect to potential wave power deployments Jim a huge amount of wave measurement data from various data sources Asfaw Beyene of the Department

  7. Deep Meridional Overturning Circulation in the Indian Ocean and Its Relation to Indian Ocean Dipole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deep Meridional Overturning Circulation in the Indian Ocean and Its Relation to Indian Ocean Dipole of the Ocean (GECCO) syn- thesis data to analyze and examine the relationship of the Indian Ocean deep within the zonal band of 108 on both sides of the equator. Therefore, there exists a surface to deep

  8. AANNUALNNUAL RREPORTEPORT Integrated Ocean Drilling ProgramIntegrated Ocean Drilling Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AANNUALNNUAL RREPORTEPORT Integrated Ocean Drilling ProgramIntegrated Ocean Drilling Program U ANNUAL REPORT #12;#12;Integrated Ocean Drilling Program United States Implementing Organization JOI T his Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP)-U.S. Implementing Organization (USIO) Fiscal Year 2006

  9. A Biochemical Ocean State Estimate in the Southern1 Ocean Gas Exchange Experiment2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haine, Thomas W. N.

    of the oceanic31 carbon pool. It influences light penetration with consequences for primary productivity1 A Biochemical Ocean State Estimate in the Southern1 Ocean Gas Exchange Experiment2 S. Dwivedi1 , T. W. N. Haine2 and C. E. Del Castillo3 3 1 Department of Atmospheric and Ocean Sciences, University

  10. Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C. UMMENHOFER*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ummenhofer, Caroline C.

    Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C is restricted to the Indian or Pacific Ocean only, support the interpretation of forcing mechanisms for large Indian Ocean atmospheric forcing versus remote influences from Pacific wind forcing: low events develop

  11. Waste Specification Records - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Specification Records About Us Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Program What's New Acceptance Criteria Acceptance Process Becoming a new Hanford Customer Annual Waste Forecast...

  12. Hazardous Waste Management (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The New Mexico Environment Department's Hazardous Waste Bureau is responsible for the management of hazardous waste in the state. The Bureau enforces the rules established by the Environmental...

  13. Solid Waste Management (North Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Solid Waste Program regulates safe management of solid waste through guidance, technical assistance, regulations, permitting, environmental monitoring, compliance evaluation and enforcement....

  14. Solid Waste Management (South Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute contains provisions for solid waste management systems, groundwater monitoring, liability for pollution, permitting, inspections, and provisions for waste reduction and recycling...

  15. Attachment C ? Waste Analysis Plan

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    PLAN 1 Los Alamos National Laboratory Hazardous Waste Permit December 2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF TABLES 2 WASTE ANALYSIS PLAN......

  16. Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waste Management Group

    2006-01-01

    Waste Management group organization chart. Revised to updatecurrent practices. New organization chart, roles, andManagement Group organization chart. EH&S Waste Management

  17. Radioactive waste disposal package

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lampe, Robert F. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1986-01-01

    A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

  18. Waste Description Pounds Reduced,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,320 $5,817 Installation of motion detector lighting in common areas of Buildings 490 and 463. "Bio Circle Cleaner" parts washer Substitution 640 Hazardous waste $10,000 $4,461 $10,000 Eliminates the need disposal system Recycling 528 Hazardous waste $12,000 $0 $12,000 Empty aerosol cans are recycled as scrap

  19. Hazardous Waste Management Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Pengcheng

    Hazardous Waste Management Training Persons (including faculty, staff and students) working with hazardous materials should receive annual training that addresses storage, use, and disposal of hazardous before handling hazardous waste. Departments are re- quired to keep records of training for as long

  20. Nuclear waste solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walker, Darrel D. (1684 Partridge Dr., Aiken, SC 29801); Ebra, Martha A. (129 Hasty Rd., Aiken, SC 29801)

    1987-01-01

    High efficiency removal of technetium values from a nuclear waste stream is achieved by addition to the waste stream of a precipitant contributing tetraphenylphosphonium cation, such that a substantial portion of the technetium values are precipitated as an insoluble pertechnetate salt.

  1. Radioactive waste storage issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunz, D.E.

    1994-08-15

    In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state`s boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected.

  2. Managing America's solid waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, J. A.

    1998-09-15

    This report presents an historical overview of the federal role in municipal solid waste management from 1965 to approximately 1995. Attention is focuses on the federal role in safeguarding public health, protecting the environment, and wisely using material and energy resources. It is hoped that this report will provide important background for future municipal solid waste research and development initiatives.

  3. Improving medical waste disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connor, L.

    1994-05-01

    This article describes the use of electron-beam irradiation, steam detoxification, and microwave disinfection systems rather than incineration to rid the waste stream of medical scraps. The topics of the article include biological waste stream sources and amounts, pyrolysis and oxidation, exhaust gas cleanup, superheated steam sterilization and detoxification.

  4. Ocean Surface Currents From Geostationary Satellite SST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Ocean Surface Currents From Geostationary Satellite SST -We are implementing and evaluating a feature tracking approach to estimate ocean surface currents. - This approach allows us to estimate://cioss.coas.oregonstate.edu/ Ocean surface currents (vectors) derived from SST (background) modeled fields along the west coast of U

  5. Introducing Research College of Oceanic & Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barth, Jack

    WECOMA Coll ege of Oceanic & Atmospheric Scie nces OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY in the O cean currents introduced by man (e.g., pollutants). Knowledge of upper-ocean currents is important for navigation and for search and rescue. The ocean currents off Oregon vary seasonally and can also vary from year to year

  6. Introducing Research College of Oceanic & Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    .coas.oregonstate.edu WECOMA WECOMA Coll ege of Oceanic & Atmospheric Scie nces OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY in the O cean currents, to the south in summer and generally to the north in winter, create ocean currents. The strong summertime and the topography of the ocean floor influence the east-west cross-shelf currents. Understanding and being able

  7. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 159 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 159 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS THE COTE D'IVOIRE - GHANA TRANSFORM MARGIN, Leg 159 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Discovery Drive College Station requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park

  8. SHIPBOARD SCIENTISTS1 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SHIPBOARD SCIENTISTS1 HANDBOOK OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY TECHNICAL NOTE 3 portion requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University be obtained from the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A & M University Research Park, 1000 Discovery

  9. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 105 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 105 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS LABRADOR SEA - BAFFIN BAY Dr. Michael A. Bradford Clement Staff Science Representative, Leg 105 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, TX 77843-3469" Philip Director Ocean Drilling Program Robert B. Kidd Manager of Science

  10. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 205 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 205 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS FLUID FLOW AND SUBDUCTION FLUXES ACROSS __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College

  11. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 REPORT NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO Philip D Rabinowitz Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843 William J. Merrell Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843

  12. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 185 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 185 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS IZU-MARIANA MARGIN Dr. Terry Plank Co France Dr. Carlota Escutia Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park, 1000

  13. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 202 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 202 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS SOUTHEAST PACIFIC PALEOCEANOGRAPHIC TRANSECTS __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College

  14. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 200 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 200 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING AT THE H2O LONG-TERM SEAFLOOR Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA

  15. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS SHAKEDOWN AND SEA TRIALS CRUISE Philip D. Rabinowitz Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843 William J. Merrell Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station

  16. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 199 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 199 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS PALEOGENE EQUATORIAL TRANSECT Dr. Mitchell __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive

  17. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 195 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 195 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS MARIANA CONVERGENT MARGIN/ WEST PHILIPPINE SEA Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX

  18. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 196 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 196 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS LOGGING WHILE DRILLING AND ADVANCED CORKS Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA

  19. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 140 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 140 PRELIMINARY REPORT HOLE 504B Dr. Henry Dick Dr. Jörg Erzinger Co Giessen Federal Republic of Germany Dr. Laura Stokking Staff Scientist, Leg 140 Ocean Drilling Program Copies of this publication may be obtained from the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A

  20. Ocean Engineering 33 (2006) 22092223 Technical Note

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohseni, Kamran

    2006-01-01

    . Three quarter of our planet's surface is covered by water where a richer biodiversity than life on land exists--more major taxonomic groupings of animals can be found in the oceans than on land. The oceans food, energy, and mineral resources, oceans also play a critical role in regulating Earth's weather

  1. Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere feedbacks in boundary current systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putrasahan, Dian Ariyani

    2012-01-01

    productive oceanic eastern boundary current, providing anCurrent System and the Kuroshio Extension uses OFES products for their oceanic

  2. Vitrification of NORM wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, C.

    1994-05-01

    Vitrification of wastes is a relatively new application of none of man`s oldest manufacturing processes. During the past 25 years it has been developed and accepted internationally for immobilizing the most highly radioactive wastes from spent nuclear fuel. By the year 2005, there will be nine operating high-level radioactive vitrification plants. Many of the technical ``lessons learned`` from this international program can be applied to much less hazardous materials such as naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). With the deployment of low capital and operating cost systems, vitrification should become a broadly applied process for treating a large variety of wastes. In many situations, the wastes can be transformed into marketable products. This paper will present a general description of waste vitrification, summarize some of its key advantages, provide some test data for a small sample of one NORM, and suggest how this process may be applied to NORM.

  3. Status and integration of studies of gas generation in Hanford wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pederson, L.R.; Bryan, S.A.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to review recent progress in determining the mechanism, kinetics, and stoichiometry of gas generation in Hanford waste tanks. Information has been gathered from the results of (1) laboratory studies with simulated wastes; (2) laboratory studies with actual waste core samples (Tanks SY-101 and SY-103); (3) studies of thermal and radiolytic reactions in the gas phase; (4) gas solubility evaluations; and (5) in-tank gas composition data. The results of laboratory studies using simulated wastes, which were aimed at determining chemical mechanisms responsible for gas generation, are summarized in Section 2. Emphasized are findings from work performed at the Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), which was conducted under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and completed in FY 1996. Thermally activated pathways for the decomposition of hydroxyethylethylene-diaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA, trisodium salt) in simulated wastes were established by this work, among other accomplishments.

  4. Seal welded cast iron nuclear waste container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Filippi, Arthur M. (Pittsburgh, PA); Sprecace, Richard P. (Murrysville, PA)

    1987-01-01

    This invention identifies methods and articles designed to circumvent metallurgical problems associated with hermetically closing an all cast iron nuclear waste package by welding. It involves welding nickel-carbon alloy inserts which are bonded to the mating plug and main body components of the package. The welding inserts might be bonded in place during casting of the package components. When the waste package closure weld is made, the most severe thermal effects of the process are restricted to the nickel-carbon insert material which is far better able to accommodate them than is cast iron. Use of nickel-carbon weld inserts should eliminate any need for pre-weld and post-weld heat treatments which are a problem to apply to nuclear waste packages. Although the waste package closure weld approach described results in a dissimilar metal combination, the relative surface area of nickel-to-iron, their electrochemical relationship, and the presence of graphite in both materials will act to prevent any galvanic corrosion problem.

  5. Multiple use of waste catalysts with and without regeneration for waste polymer cracking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salmiaton, A.; Garforth, A.A.

    2011-06-15

    Waste plastics contain a substantial number of valuable chemicals. The wastes from post-consumer as well as from industrial production can be recycled to valuable chemical feedstock, which can be used in refineries and/or petrochemical industries. This chemical recycling process is an ideal approach in recycling the waste for a better environment. Polymer cracking using a laboratory fluidised bed reactor concentrated on the used highly contaminated catalyst, E-Cat 2. Even though E-Cat 2 had low activity due to fewer acid sites, the products yielded were similar with amorphous ASA and were far better than thermal cracking. The high levels of heavy metals, namely nickel and vanadium, deposited during their lifetime as an FCC catalyst, did not greatly affect on the catalyst activity. It was also shown that E-Cat 2 could be used with and without regeneration. Although there was more deactivation when there was no regeneration step, the yield of gases (C{sub 2}-C{sub 7}) remained fairly constant. For the first time, these results indicate that 'waste' FCC catalyst (E-Cat) is a good candidate for future feedstock recycling of polymer waste. The major benefits of using E-Cat are a low market price, the ability to tolerate reuse and regeneration capacity.

  6. On The Thermal Consolidation Of Boom Clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delage, Pierre; Cui, Yu-Jun

    2012-01-01

    When a mass of saturated clay is heated, as in the case of host soils surrounding nuclear waste disposals at great depth, the thermal expansion of the constituents generates excess pore pressures. The mass of clay is submitted to gradients of pore pressure and temperature, to hydraulic and thermal flows, and to changes in its mechanical properties. In this work, some of these aspects were experimentally studied in the case of Boom clay, so as to help predicting the response of the soil, in relation with investigations made in the Belgian underground laboratory at Mol. Results of slow heating tests with careful volume change measurements showed that a reasonable prediction of the thermal expansion of the clay-water system was obtained by using the thermal properties of free water. In spite of the density of Boom clay, no significant effect of water adsorption was observed. The thermal consolidation of Boom clay was studied through fast heating tests. A simple analysis shows that the hydraulic and thermal trans...

  7. AVLIS production plant waste management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-11-15

    Following the executive summary, this document contains the following: (1) waste management facilities design objectives; (2) AVLIS production plant wastes; (3) waste management design criteria; (4) waste management plan description; and (5) waste management plan implementation. 17 figures, 18 tables.

  8. Thermal Regimes of Northeast Streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermal Loading (USGS) Stormwater and Streams ­ Optimizing Stormwater Management to Protect the Thermal

  9. Process modeling for the Integrated Thermal Treatment System (ITTS) study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liebelt, K.H.; Brown, B.W.; Quapp, W.J.

    1995-09-01

    This report describes the process modeling done in support of the integrated thermal treatment system (ITTS) study, Phases 1 and 2. ITTS consists of an integrated systems engineering approach for uniform comparison of widely varying thermal treatment technologies proposed for treatment of the contact-handled mixed low-level wastes (MLLW) currently stored in the U.S. Department of Energy complex. In the overall study, 19 systems were evaluated. Preconceptual designs were developed that included all of the various subsystems necessary for a complete installation, from waste receiving through to primary and secondary stabilization and disposal of the processed wastes. Each system included the necessary auxiliary treatment subsystems so that all of the waste categories in the complex were fully processed. The objective of the modeling task was to perform mass and energy balances of the major material components in each system. Modeling of trace materials, such as pollutants and radioactive isotopes, were beyond the present scope. The modeling of the main and secondary thermal treatment, air pollution control, and metal melting subsystems was done using the ASPEN PLUS process simulation code, Version 9.1-3. These results were combined with calculations for the remainder of the subsystems to achieve the final results, which included offgas volumes, and mass and volume waste reduction ratios.

  10. Waste Management & Research290 Waste Manage Res 2002: 20: 290301

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Waste Management & Research290 Waste Manage Res 2002: 20: 290­301 Printed in UK ­ all rights reserved Copyright © ISWA 2002 Waste Management & Research ISSN 0734­242X Introduction Chromated copper of sorting technologies for CCA treated wood waste Monika Blassino Helena Solo-Gabriele University of Miami

  11. Investigations on Repository Near-Field Thermal Modeling - Repository Science/Thermal Load Management & Design Concepts (M41UF033302)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutton, M; Blink, J A; Fratoni, M; Greenberg, H R; Ross, A D

    2011-07-15

    The various layers of material from the waste package (such as components of the engineered barrier system and the host rock surface) to a given distance within the rock wall at a given distance can be described as concentric circles with varying thermal properties (see Figure 5.1-1). The selected model approach examines the contributions of the waste package, axial waste package neighbors and lateral neighboring emplacement drifts (see Section 5.2.1 and Appendix H, Section 2). In clay and deep borehole media, the peak temperature is driven by the central waste package whereas, in granite and salt, the contribution to the temperature rise by adjacent (lateral) waste packages in drift or emplacement borehole lines is dominant at the time of the peak temperature. Mathematical models generated using Mathcad software provide insight into the effects of changing waste package spacing for six waste forms, namely UOX, MOX, co-extraction, new extraction, E-Chem ceramic and E-Chem metal in four different geologic media (granite, clay, salt and deep borehole). Each scenario includes thermal conductivity and diffusivity for each layer between the waste package and the host rock, dimensions of representative repository designs (such as waste package spacing, drift or emplacement borehole spacing, waste package dimensions and layer thickness), and decay heat curves generated from knowledge of the contents of a given waste form after 10, 50, 100 and 200 years of surface storage. Key results generated for each scenario include rock temperature at a given time calculated at a given radius from the central waste package (Section 5.2.1 and Appendix H, Section 3), the corresponding temperature at the interface of the waste package and EBS material, and at each EBS layer in between (Section 5.2.2 and Appendix H, Section 4). This information is vital to understand the implications of repository design (waste package capacity, surface storage time, waste package spacing, and emplacement drift or borehole spacing) by comparing the peak temperature to the thermal limits of the concentric layers surrounding the waste package; specifically 100 C for the bentonite buffer in granite and clay repositories, 100 C for rock wall in a clay repository and 200 C at the rock wall for a salt repository. These thermal limits are both preliminary and approximate, and serve as a means to evaluate design options rather than determining compliance for licensing situations. The thermal behavior of a salt repository is more difficult to model because it is not a concentric geometry and because the crushed salt backfill initially has a much higher thermal resistance than intact salt. Three models were investigated, namely a waste package in complete contact with crushed salt, secondly a waste package in contact with intact salt, and thirdly a waste package in contact with 75% intact and 25% crushed salt. The latter model best depicts emplacement of a waste package in the corner of an intact salt alcove and subsequently covered with crushed salt backfill to the angle of repose. The most conservative model (crushed salt) had temperatures much higher than the other models and although bounding, is too conservative to use. The most realistic model (75/25) had only a small temperature difference from the simplest (non-conservative, intact salt) model, and is the one chosen in this report (see Section 5.2.3). A trade-study investigating three key variables (surface storage time, waste package capacity and waste package spacing) is important to understand and design a repository. Waste package heat can be reduced by storing for longer periods prior to emplacement, or by reducing the number of assemblies or canisters within that waste package. Waste package spacing can be altered to optimize the thermal load without exceeding the thermal limits of the host rock or EBS components. By examining each of these variables, repository footprint (and therefore cost) can be optimized. For this report, the layout was fixed for each geologic medium based on prior published designs in

  12. Thermoelectric power generator for variable thermal power source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bell, Lon E; Crane, Douglas Todd

    2015-04-14

    Traditional power generation systems using thermoelectric power generators are designed to operate most efficiently for a single operating condition. The present invention provides a power generation system in which the characteristics of the thermoelectrics, the flow of the thermal power, and the operational characteristics of the power generator are monitored and controlled such that higher operation efficiencies and/or higher output powers can be maintained with variably thermal power input. Such a system is particularly beneficial in variable thermal power source systems, such as recovering power from the waste heat generated in the exhaust of combustion engines.

  13. Global warming and changes in ocean circulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffy, P.B.; Caldeira, K.C.

    1998-02-01

    This final report provides an overview of the goals and accomplishments of this project. Modeling and observational work has raised the possibility that global warming may cause changes in the circulation of the ocean. If such changes would occur they could have important climatic consequences. The first technical goal of this project was to investigate some of these possible changes in ocean circulation in a quantitative way, using a state-of -the-art numerical model of the ocean. Another goal was to develop our ocean model, a detailed three-dimensional numerical model of the ocean circulation and ocean carbon cycles. A major non-technical goal was to establish LLNL as a center of excellence in modelling the ocean circulation and carbon cycle.

  14. Generic repository design concepts and thermal analysis (FY11).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, Robert; Dupont, Mark; Blink, James A.; Fratoni, Massimiliano; Greenberg, Harris; Carter, Joe; Hardin, Ernest L.; Sutton, Mark A.

    2011-08-01

    Reference concepts for geologic disposal of used nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the U.S. are developed, including geologic settings and engineered barriers. Repository thermal analysis is demonstrated for a range of waste types from projected future, advanced nuclear fuel cycles. The results show significant differences among geologic media considered (clay/shale, crystalline rock, salt), and also that waste package size and waste loading must be limited to meet targeted maximum temperature values. In this study, the UFD R&D Campaign has developed a set of reference geologic disposal concepts for a range of waste types that could potentially be generated in advanced nuclear FCs. A disposal concept consists of three components: waste inventory, geologic setting, and concept of operations. Mature repository concepts have been developed in other countries for disposal of spent LWR fuel and HLW from reprocessing UNF, and these serve as starting points for developing this set. Additional design details and EBS concepts will be considered as the reference disposal concepts evolve. The waste inventory considered in this study includes: (1) direct disposal of SNF from the LWR fleet, including Gen III+ advanced LWRs being developed through the Nuclear Power 2010 Program, operating in a once-through cycle; (2) waste generated from reprocessing of LWR UOX UNF to recover U and Pu, and subsequent direct disposal of used Pu-MOX fuel (also used in LWRs) in a modified-open cycle; and (3) waste generated by continuous recycling of metal fuel from fast reactors operating in a TRU burner configuration, with additional TRU material input supplied from reprocessing of LWR UOX fuel. The geologic setting provides the natural barriers, and establishes the boundary conditions for performance of engineered barriers. The composition and physical properties of the host medium dictate design and construction approaches, and determine hydrologic and thermal responses of the disposal system. Clay/shale, salt, and crystalline rock media are selected as the basis for reference mined geologic disposal concepts in this study, consistent with advanced international repository programs, and previous investigations in the U.S. The U.S. pursued deep geologic disposal programs in crystalline rock, shale, salt, and volcanic rock in the years leading up to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, or NWPA (Rechard et al. 2011). The 1987 NWPA amendment act focused the U.S. program on unsaturated, volcanic rock at the Yucca Mountain site, culminating in the 2008 license application. Additional work on unsaturated, crystalline rock settings (e.g., volcanic tuff) is not required to support this generic study. Reference disposal concepts are selected for the media listed above and for deep borehole disposal, drawing from recent work in the U.S. and internationally. The main features of the repository concepts are discussed in Section 4.5 and summarized in Table ES-1. Temperature histories at the waste package surface and a specified distance into the host rock are calculated for combinations of waste types and reference disposal concepts, specifying waste package emplacement modes. Target maximum waste package surface temperatures are identified, enabling a sensitivity study to inform the tradeoff between the quantity of waste per disposal package, and decay storage duration, with respect to peak temperature at the waste package surface. For surface storage duration on the order of 100 years or less, waste package sizes for direct disposal of SNF are effectively limited to 4-PWR configurations (or equivalent size and output). Thermal results are summarized, along with recommendations for follow-on work including adding additional reference concepts, verification and uncertainty analysis for thermal calculations, developing descriptions of surface facilities and other system details, and cost estimation to support system-level evaluations.

  15. Overview of advanced technologies for stabilization of {sup 238}Pu-contaminated waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsey, K.B.; Foltyn, E.M.; Heslop, J.M.

    1998-02-01

    This paper presents an overview of potential technologies for stabilization of {sup 238}Pu-contaminated waste. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has processed {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel into heat sources for space and terrestrial uses for the past several decades. The 88-year half-life of {sup 238}Pu and thermal power of approximately 0.6 watts/gram make this isotope ideal for missions requiring many years of dependable service in inaccessible locations. However, the same characteristic which makes {sup 238}Pu attractive for heat source applications, the high Curie content (17 Ci/gram versus 0.06 Ci/gram for 239{sup Pu}), makes disposal of {sup 238}Pu-contaminated waste difficult. Specifically, the thermal load limit on drums destined for transport to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), 0.23 gram per drum for combustible waste, is impossible to meet for nearly all {sup 238}Pu-contaminated glovebox waste. Use of advanced waste treatment technologies including Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) and aqueous chemical separation will eliminate the combustible matrix from {sup 238}Pu-contaminated waste and recover kilogram quantities of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} from the waste stream. A conceptual design of these advanced waste treatment technologies will be presented.

  16. Radioactive waste material disposal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1995-10-24

    The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide. 3 figs.

  17. Radioactive waste material disposal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles W. (155 Newport Dr., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Beahm, Edward C. (106 Cooper Cir., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Parker, George W. (321 Dominion Cir., Knoxville, TN 37922)

    1995-01-01

    The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide.

  18. Specifying Waste Heat Boilers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganapathy, V.

    1992-01-01

    HEAT BOILERS V.Ganapathy.ABCO Industries Abilene,Texas ABSTRACT Waste heat boilers or Heat Recovery Steam 'Generators(HRSGs) as they are often called are used to recover energy from waste gas streams in chemical plants, refineries... stream_source_info ESL-IE-92-04-42.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 11937 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ESL-IE-92-04-42.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 SPECIFYING WASTE...

  19. Solidification of commercial and defense low-level radioactive waste in polyethylene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franz, E.M.; Heiser, L.H.; Colombo, P.

    1987-08-01

    A process was developed for the solidification of salt wastes, incinerator ash and ion-exchange resins in polyethylene. Of the salt wastes, sodium sulfate and boric acid are representative of the wastes produced at commercial nuclear facilities while sodium nitrate in a typical high-volume waste generated at defense-related facilities. Ease of processibility and high loading efficiencies were obtained through the use of low-density polyethylene with melt indices ranging from 2.0 to 55.0 g/minute. The process utilized a commercially available single-screw extruder to incorporate the wastes into the polyethylene at about 120/sup 0/C to produce a homogeneous mixture. Although present studies utilize dry wastes, wet wastes can also be processed using vented extruders of the type used commercially for the bitumen solidification process. Tests were performed on the waste forms to determine leachability and mechanical properties. To confirm the compatibility of polyethylene and nitrate salt waste at elevated temperatures, the self-ignition temperatures were measured and a differential scanning calorimeter was used to characterize the thermal behavior of oxidizing compounds contained in the simulated waste, as well as the real Savannah River Plant waste. No exothermic reactions were observed over the temperature range studied from 50/sup 0/C to 400/sup 0/C. 18 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs.

  20. INTERSTATE WASTE TECHNOLOGIES THERMOSELECT TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    1 INTERSTATE WASTE TECHNOLOGIES THERMOSELECT TECHNOLOGY AN OVERVIEW Presented to the DELAWARE SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT TECHNICAL WORKING GROUP January 10, 2006 #12;2 INTERSTATE WASTE MANAGEMENT ALLIANCE and maintenance (30 years) ­ Will guarantee performance and Operation and Maintenance ­ Serves solid waste

  1. Methane generation from waste materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Samani, Zohrab A. (Las Cruces, NM); Hanson, Adrian T. (Las Cruces, NM); Macias-Corral, Maritza (Las Cruces, NM)

    2010-03-23

    An organic solid waste digester for producing methane from solid waste, the digester comprising a reactor vessel for holding solid waste, a sprinkler system for distributing water, bacteria, and nutrients over and through the solid waste, and a drainage system for capturing leachate that is then recirculated through the sprinkler system.

  2. Generating power with waste wood

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkins, R.S.

    1995-02-01

    Among the biomass renewables, waste wood has great potential with environmental and economic benefits highlighting its resume. The topics of this article include alternate waste wood fuel streams; combustion benefits; waste wood comparisons; waste wood ash; pilot scale tests; full-scale test data; permitting difficulties; and future needs.

  3. Contained recovery of oily waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jr., Lyle A. (Laramie, WY); Sudduth, Bruce C. (Laramie, WY)

    1989-01-01

    A method is provided for recovering oily waste from oily waste accumulations underground comprising sweeping the oily waste accumulation with hot water to recover said oily waste, wherein said area treated is isolated from surrounding groundwater hydraulically. The hot water may be reinjected after the hot-water displacement or may be treated to conform to any discharge requirements.

  4. composition of putative oceans on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treiman, Allan H.

    · CO2, ~0.3-0.9 (volume fraction) · H2O, ~0.01-0.6 · N2, ~0.02-0.15 · High temperature corresponds CO2 and N2 are degassed · S and Cl are from Earth's data · 1 km thick ocean, variable basalt layer and phyllosilicates · S is in sulfate and sulfide minerals Why? · ~ neutral pH, no trapping of atmospheric CO2

  5. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01

    Microgrid: A Conceptual Solution”, 35th Annul IEEE Power Elecrronics Specialisrs Conference (2004) [60] R.J. Krane, Energy Storage

  6. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01

    p 540 [99] D. Tanner, Renewable Energy, Vol. 6 (3), pp. 367-K. Mahkamov, Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Vol.S. Wongwises, Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Vol.

  7. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01

    LIST OF FIGURES Fig.1.1. Schematic of the Organic Rankineis achieved by using Organic Rankine Cycle or Sterlingtechnologies such as Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) mahines,

  8. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01

    U. M. Khan, Surface Electrochemistry, Springer, New York [Journal of Applied Electrochemistry, Vol. 21, pp.1103- [15]M. Gamboa-Aldeco, Modern Electrochemistry 2A, 2 nd edition,

  9. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01

    a) Schematic of Sterling engine (b) P-V plot of the SterlingSterling engines. Organic Rankine Cycle or Sterling Engines. On the one hand,

  10. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01

    respectively; ? c is the Carnot cycle efficiency; and ? Z iswhere ? c = ?T/T h is the Carnot cycle limit and ? s is theT of LGH is small, the Carnot cycle limit becomes low and,

  11. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01

    pumps. The numerous moving parts also increase the installation, operational, and maintenance costs.maintenance, and operational costs associated with the expensive supporting components and moving parts, such as pumps,

  12. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01

    as Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) mahines, Sterling engines,Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) system or Sterling Engine (SE)an organic Rankine cycle (ORC) system generates electricity

  13. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01

    various types of Stirling engine have been developed, whichThermogalvanic cell Stirling Engine ORC Internal Combustionof Sterling engine [17] year inventor Robert Stirling John

  14. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01

    to electrical energy by turbine engines. Organic Rankineheat and rotating turbine engines. Figure 1.1 is a schematicthe gas stream rotates the turbine engine. The gas stream is

  15. Probative Investigation of the Thermal Stability of Wastes Involved in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills andOrderNATIONAL CHAIRSEnergyPresidentialGeneration |Generation

  16. Subsurface Hybrid Power Options for Oil & Gas Production at Deep Ocean Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, J C; Haut, R; Jahn, G; Goldman, J; Colvin, J; Karpinski, A; Dobley, A; Halfinger, J; Nagley, S; Wolf, K; Shapiro, A; Doucette, P; Hansen, P; Oke, A; Compton, D; Cobb, M; Kopps, R; Chitwood, J; Spence, W; Remacle, P; Noel, C; Vicic, J; Dee, R

    2010-02-19

    An investment in deep-sea (deep-ocean) hybrid power systems may enable certain off-shore oil and gas exploration and production. Advanced deep-ocean drilling and production operations, locally powered, may provide commercial access to oil and gas reserves otherwise inaccessible. Further, subsea generation of electrical power has the potential of featuring a low carbon output resulting in improved environmental conditions. Such technology therefore, enhances the energy security of the United States in a green and environmentally friendly manner. The objective of this study is to evaluate alternatives and recommend equipment to develop into hybrid energy conversion and storage systems for deep ocean operations. Such power systems will be located on the ocean floor and will be used to power offshore oil and gas exploration and production operations. Such power systems will be located on the oceans floor, and will be used to supply oil and gas exploration activities, as well as drilling operations required to harvest petroleum reserves. The following conceptual hybrid systems have been identified as candidates for powering sub-surface oil and gas production operations: (1) PWR = Pressurized-Water Nuclear Reactor + Lead-Acid Battery; (2) FC1 = Line for Surface O{sub 2} + Well Head Gas + Reformer + PEMFC + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (3) FC2 = Stored O2 + Well Head Gas + Reformer + Fuel Cell + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (4) SV1 = Submersible Vehicle + Stored O{sub 2} + Fuel Cell + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (5) SV2 = Submersible Vehicle + Stored O{sub 2} + Engine or Turbine + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (6) SV3 = Submersible Vehicle + Charge at Docking Station + ZEBRA & Li-Ion Batteries; (7) PWR TEG = PWR + Thermoelectric Generator + Lead-Acid Battery; (8) WELL TEG = Thermoelectric Generator + Well Head Waste Heat + Lead-Acid Battery; (9) GRID = Ocean Floor Electrical Grid + Lead-Acid Battery; and (10) DOC = Deep Ocean Current + Lead-Acid Battery.

  17. Solid Waste Management (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act aims to establish and maintain a cooperative state and local program of planning and technical and financial assistance for comprehensive solid waste management. No person shall construct,...

  18. Waste Steam Recovery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    An examination has been made of the recovery of waste steam by three techniques: direct heat exchange to process, mechanical compression, and thermocompression. Near atmospheric steam sources were considered, but the techniques developed are equally...

  19. Waste and Recycling

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McCarthy, Kathy

    2013-05-28

    Nuclear engineer Dr. Kathy McCarthy talks about nuclear energy, the challenge of nuclear waste and the research aimed at solutions. For more information about nuclear energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  20. HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-E’s HEATS program, short for “High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage,” seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.