Sample records for waste notes sum

  1. A Note on the Use of Sum in the Logic of Proofs Roman Kuznets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jäger, Gerhard

    A Note on the Use of Sum in the Logic of Proofs Roman Kuznets Institut f¨ur Informatik und angewandte Mathematik Universit¨at Bern Neubr¨uckstrasse 10, 3012 Bern, Switzerland kuznets

  2. Jan. 6 Introduction and course overview Waste generation and characterization EPA 2011 Waste Characterization Report (Exec. Sum., Ch. 1-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barlaz, Morton A.

    Policy & Global Solid Waste Management 24 Regulatory Policy & Global Solid Waste Management 27 Regulatory Policy & Global Solid Waste Management 29 Life-cycle analysis (LCA) Life-Cycle Assessment Principles Final exam at 8 AM 2014 Course Syllabus CE 477/CE 577 Solid Waste Engineering #12;

  3. Global MSW Generation in 2007 estimated at two billion tons Global Waste Management Market Assessment 2007, Key Note Publications Ltd ,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    analyses the global waste market, with particular reference to municipal solid waste (MSW). Key NoteGlobal MSW Generation in 2007 estimated at two billion tons Global Waste Management Market between growth in wealth and increase in waste -- the more affluent a society becomes, the more waste

  4. LLW (Low-Level Waste) Notes, Volume 13, Number 1, February 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LLW Notes is a newsletter distributed to Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum Participants and other state and compact officials. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties. This issue focuses on the following topics: DOI approves Ward Valley permit application; Project evidentiary hearings begin in Texas; and Summary judgment motions in California breach of contract action.

  5. Technical Note: Evaluation of Effective Microorganisms (EM) In Solid Waste Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekeran, V.; Balaji, C.; Bhagavathipushpa, T.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microorganisms (EM) In Solid Waste Management V. Sekeran C.is the treatment, disposal and/or recycling of solid wastes.Generally solid waste from a municipality consists of

  6. Treatment technologies for hazardous ashes generated from possible incineration of navy waste. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torres, T.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Navy recognizes that thermal treatment of Navy hazardous wastes (HW) should, under the terms of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, be avoided. Combustion waste disposal may nonetheless become unavoidable in certain cases, even after all possible process enhancements that avoid HW production are implemented. Even then, some toxic constituents that may be present in the waste will not be destroyed by incineration and will persist in the ash residue produced by incineration. Such incinerator ashes will have to be disposed of in HW landfills. The Navy is thus evaluating methods of treatment of such ash to remove or immobilize the toxic constituents that persist following incineration in order to render the waste treatment residue nonhazardous. Appropriate technology identified in this work can be applied to ash produced by HW combuster operated by the Navy, if any, or be required for ash produced by commercial generators handling Navy HWs.

  7. Technical Note: Updated durability/composition relationships for Hanford high-level waste glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piepel, G.F.; Hartley, S.A.; Redgate, P.E.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical note presents empirical models developed in FYI 995 to predict durability as functions of glass composition. Models are presented for normalized releases of B, Li, Na, and Si from the 7-day Product Consistency Test (PCT) applied to quenched and canister centerline cooled (CCC) glasses as well as from the 28-day Materials Characterization Center-1 (MCC-1) test applied to quenched glasses. Models are presented for Composition Variation Study (CVS) data from low temperature melter (LTM) studies (Hrma, Piepel, et al. 1994) and high temperature melter (HTM) studies (Vienna et al. 1995). The data used for modeling in this technical note are listed in Appendix A.

  8. Draft Title 40 CFR 191 compliance certification application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 9: Appendices RM, SCR, SER, SUM, WRAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rock Mechanics Program is important to the establishment of a radioactive waste repository in salt because rock mechanics deals with the prediction of creep closure and eventual encapsulation of the waste. The intent of this paper is to give the current status of the program. This program consists of three major modeling efforts: continuum creep, fracture, and the disturbed rock zone. These models, together with laboratory material parameters, plastic flow potentials, initial and boundary input data, and other peripheral information forms the predictive technology. The extent to which the predictive technology is validated against in situ test data adds certainty to the method. Application of the technology is through simulations of the test results, design, or performance using numerical codes. In summary, the predictive capabilities are technically sound and reasonable. The current status of the program is that which would be advanced for compliance.

  9. Low-Level Waste Forum notes and summary reports for 1994. Volume 9, Number 3, May-June 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue includes the following articles: Vermont ratifies Texas compact; Pennsylvania study on rates of decay for classes of low-level radioactive waste; South Carolina legislature adjourns without extending access to Barnwell for out-of-region generators; Southeast Compact Commission authorizes payments for facility development, also votes on petitions, access contracts; storage of low-level radioactive waste at Rancho Seco removed from consideration; plutonium estimates for Ward Valley, California; judgment issued in Ward Valley lawsuits; Central Midwest Commission questions court`s jurisdiction over surcharge rebates litigation; Supreme Court decides commerce clause case involving solid waste; parties voluntarily dismiss Envirocare case; appellate court affirms dismissal of suit against Central Commission; LLW Forum mixed waste working group meets; US EPA Office of Radiation and Indoor Air rulemakings; EPA issues draft radiation site cleanup regulation; EPA extends mixed waste enforcement moratorium; and NRC denies petition to amend low-level radioactive waste classification regulations.

  10. Windblow by lump sum online (England and Wales) November 2009 THE FORESTRY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AND CONDITIONS FOR STANDARD PURCHASE OF TREES IN AREAS DAMAGED BY WINDBLOW BY LUMP SUM You have offered, hazardous, toxic, radioactive or dangerous waste whether or not such emission, substance or waste

  11. Windblow by lump sum online (Scotland) November 2009 THE FORESTRY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AND CONDITIONS FOR STANDARD PURCHASE OF TREES IN AREAS DAMAGED BY WINDBLOW BY LUMP SUM You have offered, hazardous, toxic, radioactive or dangerous waste whether or not such emission, substance or waste

  12. Analytic Continuation of Harmonic Sums

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Albino

    2009-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method for calculating any (nested) harmonic sum to arbitrary accuracy for all complex values of the argument. The method utilizes the relation between harmonic sums and (derivatives of) Hurwitz zeta functions, which allows a harmonic sum to be calculated as an expansion valid for large values of its argument. A program for implementing this method is also provided.

  13. Summing tree graphs at threshold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, L.S. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1992-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The solution of the classical field equation generates the sum of all tree graphs. We show that the classical equation reduces to an easily solved ordinary differential equation for certain multiparticle threshold amplitudes and compute these amplitudes.

  14. Sum Frequency Generation for Surface Vibrational Spectroscopy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sum Frequency Generation for Surface Vibrational Spectroscopy Sum Frequency Generation for Surface Vibrational Spectroscopy This customized SFG-VS spectrometer incorporates unique...

  15. The Initial Environmental Assessments for the Nuclear Waste Repository under Section 112 of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montange, Charles H.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NWPA. See note 139 supra. NUCLEAR WASTE ASSESSMENTS cess orof the program. If the Nuclear Waste Policy Act is to work,potentially acceptable for nuclear waste repositories was

  16. Summary - Environmental Management Waste Management Facility...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    remedial actions at Oak Ridge. As noted in the recommendations, compaction assessment, waste settlement and impact on the cover should have a focused review to ensure long term...

  17. Spin Sum Rules and Polarizabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Drechsel

    2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn sum rule and related dispersive integrals connect real and virtual Compton scattering to inclusive photo- and electroproduction. Being based on universal principles as causality, unitarity, and gauge invariance, these relations provide a unique testing ground to study the internal degrees of freedom that hold a system together. The present contribution reviews the spin-dependent sum rules and cross sections of the nucleon. At small momentum transfer, the data sample information on the long range phenomena (Goldstone bosons and collective resonances), whereas the primary degrees of freedom (quarks and gluons) become visible at large momentum transfer (short distance). The rich body of new data covers a wide range of phenomena from coherent to incoherent processes, and from the generalized spin polarizabilities on the low-energy side to higher twist effects in deep inelastic scattering.

  18. Summing Planar Bosonic Open Strings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bardakci, Korkut

    2006-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In earlier work, planar graphs of massless {phi}{sup 3} theory were summed with the help of the light cone world sheet picture and the mean field approximation. In the present article, the same methods are applied to the problem of summing planar bosonic open strings. They find that in the ground state of the system, string boundaries form a condensate on the world sheet, and a new string emerges from this summation. Its slope is always greater than the initial slope, and it remains non-zero even when the initial slope is set equal to zero. If they assume the initial string tends to a field a theory in the zero slope limit, this result provides evidence for string formation in field theory.

  19. Blue Note

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Murray Gibson

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne's Murray Gibson is a physicist whose life's work includes finding patterns among atoms. The love of distinguishing patterns also drives Gibson as a musician and Blues enthusiast."Blue" notes are very harmonic notes that are missing from the equal temperament scale.The techniques of piano blues and jazz represent the melding of African and Western music into something totally new and exciting.

  20. Blue Note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray Gibson

    2007-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne's Murray Gibson is a physicist whose life's work includes finding patterns among atoms. The love of distinguishing patterns also drives Gibson as a musician and Blues enthusiast."Blue" notes are very harmonic notes that are missing from the equal temperament scale.The techniques of piano blues and jazz represent the melding of African and Western music into something totally new and exciting.

  1. QCD Sum Rules and Compton Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudio Coriano'; Anatoly Radyushkin; George Sterman

    1993-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We extend QCD sum rule analysis to moderate energy fixed angle Compton scattering. In this kinematic region there is a strong similarity to the sum rule treatment of electromagnetic form factors, although the four-point amplitude requires a modification of the Borel transform. To illustrate our method, we derive the sum rules for helicity amplitudes in pion Compton scattering and estimate their large-$t$ behavior in the local duality approximation.

  2. LLW notes. Vol. 11, No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    `LLW Notes` is distributed by Afton Associates, Inc. to Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum Participants and other state and compact officials identified by those Participants to receive `LLW Notes`. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

  3. SEMIDEFINITE PROGRAMMING AND SUMS OF HERMITIAN ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 1, 2009 ... Primary 11E25, 90C22; Secondary 08B20, 13J30. Key words and phrases. noncommutative polynomial, sum of squares, semidefinite program-.

  4. Radioactive Waste Radioactive Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    form · Separate liquid from solid · Radionuclide · Separate all but H3/C14 #12;#12;Radioactive Waste;Radioactive Waste H3/C14 solids Type B (non-incinerable) metal glass hazardous materials #12;#12;Radioactive#12;Radioactive Waste at UF Bldg 831 392-8400 #12;Radioactive Waste · Program is designed to

  5. Exact sum rules for inhomogeneous strings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amore, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.amore@gmail.com

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive explicit expressions for the sum rules of the eigenvalues of inhomogeneous strings with arbitrary density and with different boundary conditions. We show that the sum rule of order N may be obtained in terms of a diagrammatic expansion, with (N?1)!/2 independent diagrams. These sum rules are used to derive upper and lower bounds to the energy of the fundamental mode of an inhomogeneous string; we also show that it is possible to improve these approximations taking into account the asymptotic behavior of the spectrum and applying the Shanks transformation to the sequence of approximations obtained to the different orders. We discuss three applications of these results. -- Highlights: •We derive an explicit expression for the sum rules of an inhomogeneous string. •We obtain a diagrammatic representation for the sum rules of a given order. •We obtain precise bounds on the lowest eigenvalue of the string.

  6. LLW Notes, vol. 9, no. 1. February/March 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LLW Notes is published ten times each year and is distributed to Low- Level Radioactive Waste Forum Participants and other state and compact officials identified by those Participants to receive LLW Notes. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of representatives of states and compacts established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies.

  7. SU(3) Sum Rules for Charm Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuval Grossman; Dean J Robinson

    2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present flavor SU(3) sum rules for $D \\to PP$ and $D \\to PV$ decay amplitudes, that are valid to second order in symmetry breaking by the strange quark mass spurion. Decay rate sum rules are also computed to this order. Particular attention is given to sum rules arising from the isospin and U-spin subgroups, the former providing sensitive tests for alternative sources of SU(3) breaking. We apply the latter together with the postulated $\\Delta U = 0$ rule for the large penguin picture to predict the ratio and difference of the direct CP asymmetries for $D \\to KK^*$ and $D \\to \\pi \\rho$.

  8. OTS NOTE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN .METALS~ c3 Alexander941 OTS NOTE

  9. Vibrational sum frequency study on biological interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Soon Mi

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    , which is related to molecular orientation. Since the polarizabilities of molecules in bulk phase will be canceled out, a sum frequency signal can only be generated from interfaces where the inversion symmetry is broken. Because of its interfacial...

  10. A Bayesian analysis of QCD sum rules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gubler, Philipp; Oka, Makoto [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A new technique has recently been developed, in which the Maximum Entropy Method is used to analyze QCD sum rules. This approach has the virtue of being able to directly generate the spectral function of a given operator, without the need of making an assumption about its specific functional form. To investigate whether useful results can be extracted within this method, we have first studied the vector meson channel, where QCD sum rules are traditionally known to provide a valid description of the spectral function. Our results show a significant peak in the region of the experimentally observed {rho}-meson mass, which is in agreement with earlier QCD sum rules studies and suggests that the Maximum Entropy Method is a strong tool for analyzing QCD sum rules.

  11. RSSC RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL 08/2011 7-1 RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    . Properly labeled containers with lids, covers, or seals. B. Labels, tape, plastic bags, plastic jugs or suitable liquid containers, corrugated cardboard boxes. C. Note: Liquid Waste containers are provided radioactive waste containing different radionuclides. C. Minimize radioactive waste by preventing unnecessary

  12. TRAVEL ACCIDENT INSURANCE The maximum benefit (Principal Sum) is $100,000 of Accidental Death and Dismemberment (Age

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 53 - TRAVEL ACCIDENT INSURANCE CHUBB Benefits The maximum benefit (Principal Sum) is $100 of the accident, the policy will pay as follows: Payment Schedule Injury or Dismemberment Policy Pays Loss of Life to seven days Aggregate Limit of Insurance: $1,000,000 per Accident NOTE: The insurance coverage described

  13. On a concentration inequality for sums of independent isotropic vectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cranston, Michael Craig; Molchanov, Stanislav Alekseevich

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hoeffding. Probability inequalities for sums of boundedMarek Kanter. Probability inequalities for convex sets andOn a concentration inequality for sums of independent

  14. A NOTE ON STIRLING SERIES MARKUS KUBA AND HELMUT PRODINGER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Stephan

    A NOTE ON STIRLING SERIES MARKUS KUBA AND HELMUT PRODINGER Abstract. We study sums S = S(d, n, k The unsigned Stirling numbers of the first kind, also called Stirling cycle numbers, are defined the Kronecker delta function. Throughout this work we use Knuth's notation n k . It is well known that Stirling

  15. Physics 214 Winter 2013 The Poisson sum formula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Physics 214 Winter 2013 The Poisson sum formula The Poisson sum formula takes on a number will use this version of the Poisson sum formula in solving problem 14.13 of Jackson. To prove this formula sum formula is as follows. Given a function f(t) and its Fourier transform, F() - eit f(t)dt , (7

  16. Physics 214 Winter 2013 The Poisson sum formula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Physics 214 Winter 2013 The Poisson sum formula The Poisson sum formula takes on a number of di will use this version of the Poisson sum formula in solving problem 14.13 of Jackson. To prove this formula the desired result announced in eq. (1). Actually, the most common form for the Poisson sum formula

  17. QCD Sum Rules and Virtual Compton Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Radyushkin

    1996-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this talk I report on recent progress in a few areas closely related to the virtual Compton scattering studies. In particular, I discuss the quark-hadron duality estimate of the $\\gamma^* p \\to \\Delta^+$ transition, QCD sum rule calculation of the $\\gamma \\gamma^* \\to \\pi^0$ form factor, and application of perturbative QCD to deeply virtual Compton scattering at small $t$.

  18. BLEI'S INEQUALITY AND COORDINATEWISE MULTIPLE SUMMING OPERATORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinnamon, Gordon J.

    BLEI'S INEQUALITY AND COORDINATEWISE MULTIPLE SUMMING OPERATORS DUMITRU POPA AND GORD SINNAMON are proved. When specialized to single-function inequalities they include a pair of inequalities due to Blei and a recent extension of Blei's inequality. The first of these inequalities is applied to give explicit

  19. Sum rule description of color transparency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frankfurt, L. (National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)); Greenberg, W.R.; Miller, G.A. (Physics Department, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)); Strikman, M. (Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States))

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The assumption that a small pointlike configuration does not interact with nucleons leads to a new set of sum rules that are interpreted as models of the baryon-nucleon interaction. These models are rendered semirealistic by requiring consistency with data for cross section fluctuations in proton-proton diffractive collisions.

  20. LLW Notes, volume 9, No. 7. November and December 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LLW Notes is distributed to Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum Participants and other state and compact officials identified by those Participants to receive LLW Notes. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of state and compact representatives appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low- Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

  1. LLW Notes, Volume 9, Number 6. October 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LLW Notes is distributed to Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum Participants and other state and compact officials identified by those Participants to receive LLW Notes. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of state and compact representatives appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low- Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

  2. LLW Notes, vol.9, no. 5. August/September 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LLW Notes is distributed to Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum Participants and other state and compact officials identified by those Participants to receive LLW Notes. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of state and compact representatives appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low- Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

  3. On certain sum rules for the hydrogen atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francisco M. Fernández

    2011-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that some sum rules for the hydrogen atom derived recently are incorrect because the authors did not take into account the continuous part of the spectrum in the sum over intermediate states.

  4. Simplifying additivity problems using direct sum constructions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motohisa Fukuda; Michael M. Wolf

    2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the additivity problems for the classical capacity of quantum channels, the minimal output entropy and its convex closure. We show for each of them that additivity for arbitrary pairs of channels holds iff it holds for arbitrary equal pairs, which in turn can be taken to be unital. In a similar sense, weak additivity is shown to imply strong additivity for any convex entanglement monotone. The implications are obtained by considering direct sums of channels (or states) for which we show how to obtain several information theoretic quantities from their values on the summands. This provides a simple and general tool for lifting additivity results.

  5. VOL2NOTE.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Tables * Note 4. Domestic Crude Oil Production * Note 5. Export Data * Note 6. Quality Control and Data Revision * Note 7. Frames Maintenance * Note 8. Descriptive Monthly...

  6. Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 534) and identity of liquid waste Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 534

  7. Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    2/2009 Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 200 West Arbor Dr. San Diego, CA 92103 (619 (9:1) OR Biohazard symbol (if untreated) and identity of liquid waste Biohazard symbol Address

  8. Scattering and; Delay, Scale, and Sum Migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehman, S K

    2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    How do we see? What is the mechanism? Consider standing in an open field on a clear sunny day. In the field are a yellow dog and a blue ball. From a wave-based remote sensing point of view the sun is a source of radiation. It is a broadband electromagnetic source which, for the purposes of this introduction, only the visible spectrum is considered (approximately 390 to 750 nanometers or 400 to 769 TeraHertz). The source emits an incident field into the known background environment which, for this example, is free space. The incident field propagates until it strikes an object or target, either the yellow dog or the blue ball. The interaction of the incident field with an object results in a scattered field. The scattered field arises from a mis-match between the background refractive index, considered to be unity, and the scattering object refractive index ('yellow' for the case of the dog, and 'blue' for the ball). This is also known as an impedance mis-match. The scattering objects are referred to as secondary sources of radiation, that radiation being the scattered field which propagates until it is measured by the two receivers known as 'eyes'. The eyes focus the measured scattered field to form images which are processed by the 'wetware' of the brain for detection, identification, and localization. When time series representations of the measured scattered field are available, the image forming focusing process can be mathematically modeled by delayed, scaled, and summed migration. This concept of optical propagation, scattering, and focusing have one-to-one equivalents in the acoustic realm. This document is intended to present the basic concepts of scalar scattering and migration used in wide band wave-based remote sensing and imaging. The terms beamforming and (delayed, scaled, and summed) migration are used interchangeably but are to be distinguished from the narrow band (frequency domain) beamforming to determine the direction of arrival of a signal, and seismic migration in which wide band time series are shifted but not to form images per se. Section 3 presents a mostly graphically-based motivation and summary of delay, scale, and sum beamforming. The model for incident field propagation in free space is derived in Section 4 under specific assumptions. General object scattering is derived in Section 5 and simplified under the Born approximation in Section 6. The model of this section serves as the basis in the derivation of time-domain migration. The Foldy-Lax, full point scatterer scattering, method is derived in Section 7. With the previous forward models in hand, delay, scale, and sum beamforming is derived in Section 8. Finally, proof-of-principle experiments are present in Section 9.

  9. Mr. John E. Kieling, Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    if deemed necessary by WHE. Attachments are required to be completed as the applicable step is completed. 1.0 UNDERGROUND SITE-DERIVED WASTE CONTAINER PREPARATION NOTE Adequate...

  10. Sum rules for polarization-dependent x-ray absorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ankudinov, A.; Rehr, J.J. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A complete set of sum rules is obtained for polarization-dependent x-ray-absorption fine structure and x-ray circular magnetic dichroism (CMD), analogous to those for CMD derived by Thole [ital et] [ital al]. These sum rules relate x-ray-absorption coefficients to the ground-state expectation values of various operators. Problems with applying these sum rules are discussed.

  11. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, Waste Analysis Plan The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, Waste Analysis Plan This...

  12. Fishery Notes Alaska Plans New

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was severe," he said. Since high salinities Waste Heat Boosts Growth of Salmon Use of waste heat from

  13. Hazardous Waste Program (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This rule states criteria for identifying the characteristics of hazardous waste and for listing hazardous waste, lists of hazardous wastes, standards for the management of hazardous waste and...

  14. RCT#2-Instr for Prep of Rad Waste Disposal 7/00 Page 1 of 6 RADIATION CONTROL TECHNIQUE #2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    . Labels, tape, clear plastic bags, HDPE plastic jugs or suitable liquid containers, corrugated cardboard by Waste Management. II. PREREQUISITES: A. Properly labeled containers with lids, covers, caps or seals. B boxes, waste pickup request forms. C. Note: Waste Management provides HDPE Liquid Waste containers

  15. Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy Conversion, and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes...

  16. Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MHRC System Concept ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy Conversion, and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with...

  17. BRIEFING NOTES November 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mound, Jon

    and EU, have promoted biofuel advancement which has #12;Briefing Note. November 2010. SustainableBRIEFING NOTES November 2010 Sustainable biofuels in Africa: cultivation of Jatropha curcas in Mali Background Case study 1 - Mali Case study 2 - Malawi Policy recommendations Biofuel cultivation worldwide

  18. Gauss Optics and Gauss Sum on an Optical Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shigeki Matsutani

    2008-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In the previous article (Found Phys. Lett. {\\bf{16}} 325-341), we showed that a reciprocity of the Gauss sums is connected with the wave and particle complementary. In this article, we revise the previous investigation by considering a relation between the Gauss optics and the Gauss sum based upon the recent studies of the Weil representation for a finite group.

  19. Perturbative Check of the Action and Energy Lattice Sum Rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Feuerbacher

    2003-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Lattice sum rules are checked using lattice perturbation theory. The action sum rule gives a relation between the quark-antiquark potential, its logarithmic derivative with respect to distance and the expectation value of the action; the energy sum rule expresses the potential as the sum of the energy in the gluon fields and of an anomalous term. Two different independent calculations of the quark-antiquark potential are presented, and the transversality of the gluonic vacuum polarization on the lattice is proven. The crucial part of the action sum rule is an identity whose explicit check using perturbation theory provides methods and results which are useful for checking the energy sum rule. Additionally, the gauge invariance of the expectation value of the Wilson loop up to next-to-leading order is proven. The possibility of restricting the expectation value of the action to one fixed time slice is discussed. The energy sum rule is checked perturbatively up to next-to-leading order and shown to be satisfied with good numerical accuracy. The various contributions to the quark-antiquark potential are analyzed, and the restriction of the expectation value of the sum over all spatial plaquettes (the energy in the magnetic fields) to one fixed time slice is examined.

  20. Sum Rules and Cutoff Effects in Wilson Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey B. Meyer

    2006-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the transfer matrix formalism to derive non-perturbative sum rules in Wilson's lattice QCD with N_f flavours of quarks. The discretization errors on these identities are treated in detail. As an application, it is shown how the sum rules can be exploited to give improved estimates of the continuum spectrum and static potential.

  1. Analytic and algorithmic aspects of generalized harmonic sums and polylogarithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ablinger, Jakob; Schneider, Carsten [Research Institute for Symbolic Computation (RISC), Johannes Kepler University, Altenbergerstraße 69, A-4040, Linz (Austria)] [Research Institute for Symbolic Computation (RISC), Johannes Kepler University, Altenbergerstraße 69, A-4040, Linz (Austria); Blümlein, Johannes [Deutsches Elektronen–Synchrotron, DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany)] [Deutsches Elektronen–Synchrotron, DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent three-loop calculations of massive Feynman integrals within Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) and, e.g., in recent combinatorial problems the so-called generalized harmonic sums (in short S-sums) arise. They are characterized by rational (or real) numerator weights also different from ±1. In this article we explore the algorithmic and analytic properties of these sums systematically. We work out the Mellin and inverse Mellin transform which connects the sums under consideration with the associated Poincaré iterated integrals, also called generalized harmonic polylogarithms. In this regard, we obtain explicit analytic continuations by means of asymptotic expansions of the S-sums which started to occur frequently in current QCD calculations. In addition, we derive algebraic and structural relations, like differentiation with respect to the external summation index and different multi-argument relations, for the compactification of S-sum expressions. Finally, we calculate algebraic relations for infinite S-sums, or equivalently for generalized harmonic polylogarithms evaluated at special values. The corresponding algorithms and relations are encoded in the computer algebra package HarmonicSums.

  2. MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of solid and liquid wastes generated at mushroom producing facilities. Environmental guidelines#12;MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT PHASE I: AUDIT OF CURRENT PRACTICE The Mushroom Waste Management Project (MWMP) was initiated by Environment Canada, the BC Ministry

  3. The Energy Impact of Industrial Recycling and Waste Exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, W. C.

    , Environmental Protection Agency Hazardous Waste Management System: Identification and Listing of Hazardous Wastes" as published in the Federal Register, Volume 45, No. 98, for May 19, 1980, pages 33121-33127. Specifically note Section 261.6 Rnd check... in this category are lubricating or hydraulic oils; all are combustible, with heats of combustion in the range of 19,000 Btu/lb. Changes underway in Federal and State regulations governing the management of hazardous wastes under the Resource Conservation...

  4. QCD sum rules on the complex Borel plane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ken-Ji Araki; Keisuke Ohtani; Philipp Gubler; Makoto Oka

    2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Borel transformed QCD sum rules conventionally use a real valued parameter (the Borel mass) for specifying the exponential weight over which hadronic spectral functions are averaged. In this paper, it is shown that the Borel mass can be generalized to have complex values and that new classes of sum rules can be derived from the resulting averages over the spectral functions. The real and imaginary parts of these novel sum rules turn out to have damped oscillating kernels and potentially contain a larger amount of information on the hadronic spectrum than the real valued QCD sum rules. As a first practical test, we have formulated the complex Borel sum rules for the phi meson channel and have analyzed them using the maximum entropy method, by which we can extract the most probable spectral function from the sum rules without strong assumptions on its functional form. As a result, it is demonstrated that, compared to earlier studies, the complex valued sum rules allow us to extract the spectral function with a significantly improved resolution and thus to study more detailed structures of the hadronic spectrum than previously possible.

  5. The Equivalence of Linear Programs and Zero-Sum Games

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1951, Dantzig showed the equivalence of linear programming problems and ... This note concerns the equivalence between linear programming (LP) ...

  6. Power Corrections to QCD Sum Rules for Compton Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudio Coriano'

    1993-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We extend previous work on sum rules for the invariant amplitudes of pion Compton scattering by deriving a complete lowest order perturbative spectral function - and its leading non perturbative power corr ections - for a specific combination of the two helicities $(H_1 + H_2)$ of this process. Using some properties of a modified version of the Borel transform, we develop a method of calculation of the gluonic corrections which can be easily extended to other similar reactions, such as proton Compton scattering. A preliminary comparison of the new sum rule with the pion form factor sum rule is made.

  7. Shear spectral sum rule in a nonconformal gravity dual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springer, Todd; Gale, Charles; Jeon, Sangyong [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, H3A2T8 (Canada); Lee, Su Houng [Institute of Physics and Applied Physics, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A sum rule which relates a stress-energy tensor correlator to thermodynamic functions is examined within the context of a simple nonconformal gravity dual. Such a sum rule was previously derived using AdS/CFT for conformal N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory, but we show that it does not generalize to the nonconformal theory under consideration. We provide a generalized sum rule and numerically verify its validity. A useful by-product of the calculation is the computation of the spectral density in a strongly coupled nonconformal theory. Qualitative features of the spectral densities and implications for lattice measurements of transport coefficients are discussed.

  8. Sums of Squares Relaxations of Polynomial Semidefinite Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokyo Institute of Technology. 2-12-1 Oh-Okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552 Japan. Sums of ...... 5.2 Linearization leading to an SDP relaxation. Since the ...

  9. An Efficient Global Optimization Algorithm for Nonlinear Sum-of ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    to nonlinear sum-of-ratios problem arising in image processing, engineering and ... 2010 Mathematics subject Classification: 90C26, 90C32, 65K05 ... optimization of the average element shape quality in the finite element method, computer.

  10. Calculation of Massless Feynman Integrals using Harmonic Sums

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Bekavac

    2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the evaluation of the epsilon expansion of multi-loop massless Feynman integrals is introduced. This method is based on the Gegenbauer polynomial technique and the expansion of the Gamma function in terms of harmonic sums. Algorithms for the evaluation of nested and harmonic sums are used to reduce the expressions to get analytical or numerical results for the expansion coefficients. Methods to increase the precision of numerical results are discussed.

  11. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Adsorbed Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins at Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Solid-Water Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holinga, George J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapter 2 Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy2.1. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational SpectroscopyIntroduction Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational

  12. Interfacial Water Organization and Ion Distributions Investigated with Vibrational Sum Frequency Spectroscopy: Answering Fundamental Questions for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sum frequency generation (VSFG) and heterodyne-detected vibrational sum frequency generation (HD above their counterions. However, high valency anions exist below their counter cations, #12;iv causing

  13. Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This sixth Annual Report presents and analyzes DOE Complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention activities at 36 reporting sites from 1993 through 1997. In May 1996, the Secretary of Energy established a 50 percent Complex-Wide Waste Reduction Goal (relative to the 1993 baseline) for routine operations radioactive and hazardous waste generation, to be achieved by December 31, 1999. Excluding sanitary waste, routine operations waste generation increased three percent from 1996 to 1997, and decreased 61 percent overall from 1993 to 1997. DOE has achieved its Complex-Wide Waste Reduction Goals for routine operations based upon a comparison of 1997 waste generation to the 1993 baseline. However, it is important to note that increases in low-level radioactive and low-level mixed waste generation could reverse this achievement. From 1996 to 1997, low-level radioactive waste generation increased 10 percent, and low-level mixed waste generation increased slightly. It is critical that DOE sites continue to reduce routine operations waste generation for all waste types, to ensure that DOE`s Complex-Wide Waste Reduction Goals are achieved by December 31, 1999.

  14. Waste processing air cleaning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kriskovich, J.R.

    1998-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste processing and preparing waste to support waste processing relies heavily on ventilation. Ventilation is used at the Hanford Site on the waste storage tanks to provide confinement, cooling, and removal of flammable gases.

  15. HAZARDOUS WASTE [Written Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    HAZARDOUS WASTE MANUAL [Written Program] Cornell University [10/7/13 #12;Hazardous Waste Program................................................... 8 3.0 MINIMIZING HAZARDOUS WASTE GENERATION.........................................................10 4.0 HAZARDOUS WASTE GENERATOR REQUIREMENTS.....................................................10

  16. Editor's Note: Hurricane Sandy,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Jay

    Editor's Note: Hurricane Sandy, also known as Super Storm Sandy, Tropi- cal Storm Sandy, or just to protect the public, vital infrastructure, and the environment. Hurricane Sandy When Joseph Bruno, New York- nuity that the city demonstrated in the wake of Hurricane Sandy. So when he addressed a forum at New

  17. Computer Engineering Curriculum Notes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    1 Computer Engineering Curriculum Notes 2013-2014 Technical Electives Students fulfill 15 credits be assigned to either group A or group B as determined by Computer Engineering program committee. Every year the computer engineering program committee will review the list and may make change(s). Group A (at least 6

  18. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING Curriculum Notes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING Curriculum Notes 2013-2014 1. Electrical Engineering (EE) students must/programs/electrical_engineering) and minors are used to regulate technical electives. A student must complete four technical elective courses in Electrical Engineering or Computer Engineering. At a minimum

  19. Waste Disposal (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This article lays an outline of waste disposal regulations, permits and fees, hazardous waste management and underground storage tank requirements.

  20. Polarizability sum rule across real and virtual Compton scattering processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pascalutsa, Vladimir

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive a sum rule relating various electromagnetic properties of a spin-1/2 particle and consider its empirical implications for the proton. Given the measured values of the proton anomalous magnetic moment, electric and magnetic charge radii, the slope of the first moment of the spin structure function $g_1$, and the recently determined proton spin polarizability $\\gamma_{E1M2}$, the sum rule yields a constraint on the low-momentum behavior of a generalized polarizability appearing in virtual Compton scattering. With the help of the presently ongoing measurements of different electromagnetic observables at the MAMI, Jefferson Lab, and HI$\\gamma$S facilities, the sum rule will provide a model-independent test of the low-energy spin structure of the nucleon.

  1. Heavy hybrid mesons in the QCD sum rule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng-Zhi Huang; Shi-Lin Zhu

    2015-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the spectra of the hybrid mesons containing one heavy quark ($q\\bar{Q}g$) within the framework of QCD sum rules in the heavy quark limit. The derived sum rules are stable with the variation of the Borel parameter within their corresponding working ranges. The extracted binding energy for the heavy hybrid doublets $H^h(S^h)$ and $M^h(T^h)$ is almost degenerate. We also calculate the pionic couplings between these heavy hybrid and the conventional heavy meson doublets using the light-cone QCD sum rule method. The extracted coupling constants are rather small as a whole. With these couplings we make a rough estimate of the partial widths of these pionic decay channels.

  2. Testing solar lepton mixing sum rules in neutrino oscillation experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballett, Peter; Luhn, Christoph; Pascoli, Silvia; Schmidt, Michael A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small discrete family symmetries such as S4, A4 or A5 may lead to simple leading-order predictions for the neutrino mixing matrix such as the bimaximal, tribimaximal or golden ratio mixing patterns, which may be brought into agreement with experimental data with the help of corrections from the charged-lepton sector. Such scenarios generally lead to relations among the parameters of the physical leptonic mixing matrix known as solar lepton mixing sum rules. In this article, we present a simple derivation of such solar sum rules, valid for arbitrary neutrino and charged lepton mixing angles and phases, assuming only {\\theta}13^{\

  3. Finite Temperature Sum Rules in Lattice Gauge Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey B. Meyer

    2007-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive non-perturbative sum rules in SU($N$) lattice gauge theory at finite temperature. They relate the susceptibilities of the trace anomaly and energy-momentum tensor to temperature derivatives of the thermodynamic potentials. Two of them have been derived previously in the continuum and one is new. In all cases, at finite latttice spacing there are important corrections to the continuum sum rules that are only suppressed by the bare coupling $g_0^2$. We also show how the discretization errors affecting the thermodynamic potentials can be controlled by computing these susceptibilities.

  4. Transfer Lines to Connect Liquid Waste Facilities and Salt Waste...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Transfer Lines to Connect Liquid Waste Facilities and Salt Waste Processing Facility Transfer Lines to Connect Liquid Waste Facilities and Salt Waste Processing Facility October...

  5. Briefing notes on MPhils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Runde, Jochen

    2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    staff.’ (extract from BP internal report) The CMI MPhil initiative is also serving as an agent of change within Cambridge University. Successes on this front include: great strides in the development of the platform-sharing model (e.g. all CMI... BRIEFING NOTE Professional Practice MPhil Programmes developed under the aegis of CMI CMI has sponsored the development of a number of new MPhils at Cambridge, inspired by the successful ‘Professional Practice’ programmes at MIT. It is the multi...

  6. WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    to Climate protection in light of the· Waste Framework Directive. The "energy package", e.g. the RenewablesWASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource! energy forum Case Studies from Estonia, Switzerland, Germany Bossart,· ABB Waste-to-Energy Plants Edmund Fleck,· ESWET Marcel van Berlo,· Afval Energie Bedrijf From

  7. Simplex with Sum of Infeasibilities for SMT New York University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Clark W.

    Simplex with Sum of Infeasibilities for SMT Tim King New York University Clark Barrett Bruno reasoning within Satisfiability Modulo Theories (SMT) solvers is the Simplex for DPLL(T) algorithm given convergence on some problems. More traditional Simplex algorithms minimize a global criterion to determine

  8. allelic sums test: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    allelic sums test First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Allele age and a test for selection...

  9. A Wave Analysis of the Subset Sum Problem Mark Jelasity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jelasity, Márk

    A Wave Analysis of the Subset Sum Problem M´ark Jelasity Research Group of Artificial Intelligence the wave model, a novel approach on analyzing the behavior of GAs. Our aim is to give techniques that have and effective heuristics on certain problem classes. The wave analysis is the process of building wave models

  10. Computing Partial Eigenvalue Sum in Electronic Structure Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bai, Zhaojun

    and CPU time. In the application of electronic structure calculations in molecular dynamics, the newComputing Partial Eigenvalue Sum in Electronic Structure Calculations Z. Bai M. Faheyy G. Golubz M where computation of the total energy of an electronic structure requires the evaluation of partial

  11. Counter-ions at single charged wall: Sum rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ladislav Samaj

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    For inhomogeneous classical Coulomb fluids in thermal equilibrium, like the jellium or the two-component Coulomb gas, there exists a variety of exact sum rules which relate the particle one-body and two-body densities. The necessary condition for these sum rules is that the Coulomb fluid possesses good screening properties, i.e. the particle correlation functions or the averaged charge inhomogeneity, say close to a wall, exhibit a short-range (usually exponential) decay. In this work, we study equilibrium statistical mechanics of an electric double layer with counter-ions only, i.e. a globally neutral system of equally charged point-like particles in the vicinity of a plain hard wall carrying a fixed uniform surface charge density of opposite sign. At large distances from the wall, the one-body and two-body counter-ion densities go to zero slowly according to the inverse-power law. In spite of the absence of screening, all known sum rules are shown to hold for two exactly solvable cases of the present system: in the weak-coupling Poisson-Boltzmann limit (in any spatial dimension larger than one) and at a special free-fermion coupling constant in two dimensions. This fact indicates an extended validity of the sum rules and provides a consistency check for reasonable theoretical approaches.

  12. CONTRACTION AND SUM OF SQUARES ANALYSIS OF HCCI ENGINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaver, Gregory M.

    CONTRACTION AND SUM OF SQUARES ANALYSIS OF HCCI ENGINES Gregory M. Shaver , Aleksandar Koji´c , J ignition (HCCI), requires not only precise valve control but also a combustion control strategy, HCCI has no specific event that initiates combustion. Since exhaust gas is re-inducted from

  13. On Stirling numbers and Euler sums Victor Adamchik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adamchik, Victor

    On Stirling numbers and Euler sums Victor Adamchik Wolfram Research Inc., 100 Trade Center Dr of Stirling numbers of the first kind for non­integer values of their arguments. We discuss the analytic representations of Stirling numbers through harmonic numbers, the generalized hy­ pergeometric function

  14. On Stirling numbers and Euler sums Victor Adamchik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adamchik, Victor

    On Stirling numbers and Euler sums Victor Adamchik Wolfram Research Inc., 100 Trade Center Dr of Stirling numbers of the rst kind for non-integer values of their arguments. We discuss the analytic representations of Stirling numbers through harmonic numbers, the generalized hy- pergeometric function

  15. QCD sum rules and neutron-proton mass difference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, K.; Hwang, W.P. (Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan 10764 (Taiwan, Province of China)); Henley, E.M. (Department of Physics FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)); Kisslinger, L.S. (Department of Physics, Carnegie-Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States))

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the method of QCD sum rules to investigate the neutron-proton mass difference. We include diagrams consistently up to dimension 9, assuming different [ital up] and [ital down] current-quark masses ([ital m][sub [ital u

  16. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 1, Part 1, Generator dangerous waste report, dangerous waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, weight, and waste designation.

  17. Waste Description Pounds Reduced,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -labeled oligonucleotides Waste minimization 3,144 Radiological waste (396 ft3 ); Mixed waste (35 gallons); Hazardous Waste of radioactivity, thus avoiding radiological waste generation. This process won a 2008 DOE P2 Star Award environmentally friendly manor. BNL pays shipping fees to the recycling facility. Building demolition recycling

  18. Notes and Definitions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The EnergyCenterDioxideDocumentationThreeNewsfuelNotes and Definitions

  19. Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ELLEFSON, M.D.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

  20. Radioactive Waste Management (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section regulates the transportation and disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Minnesota, and establishes a Nuclear Waste Council to monitor the federal high-level radioactive waste...

  1. Glass Ceramic Waste Forms for Combined CS+LN+TM Fission Products Waste Streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Turo, Laura A.; Riley, Brian J.; Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna; Sickafus, Kurt E.

    2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, glass ceramics were explored as an alternative waste form for glass, the current baseline, to be used for immobilizing alkaline/alkaline earth + lanthanide (CS+LN) or CS+LN+transition metal (TM) fission-product waste streams generated by a uranium extraction (UREX+) aqueous separations type process. Results from past work on a glass waste form for the combined CS+LN waste streams showed that as waste loading increased, large fractions of crystalline phases precipitated upon slow cooling.[1] The crystalline phases had no noticeable impact on the waste form performance by the 7-day product consistency test (PCT). These results point towards the development of a glass ceramic waste form for treating CS+LN or CS+LN+TM combined waste streams. Three main benefits for exploring glass ceramics are: (1) Glass ceramics offer increased solubility of troublesome components in crystalline phases as compared to glass, leading to increased waste loading; (2) The crystalline network formed in the glass ceramic results in higher heat tolerance than glass; and (3) These glass ceramics are designed to be processed by the same melter technology as the current baseline glass waste form. It will only require adding controlled canister cooling for crystallization into a glass ceramic waste form. Highly annealed waste form (essentially crack free) with up to 50X lower surface area than a typical High-Level Waste (HLW) glass canister. Lower surface area translates directly into increased durability. This was the first full year of exploring glass ceramics for the Option 1 and 2 combined waste stream options. This work has shown that dramatic increases in waste loading are achievable by designing a glass ceramic waste form as an alternative to glass. Table S1 shows the upper limits for heat, waste loading (based on solubility), and the decay time needed before treatment can occur for glass and glass ceramic waste forms. The improvements are significant for both combined waste stream options in terms of waste loading and/or decay time required before treatment. For Option 1, glass ceramics show an increase in waste loading of 15 mass % and reduction in decay time of 24 years. Decay times of {approx}50 years or longer are close to the expected age of the fuel that will be reprocessed when the modified open or closed fuel cycle is expected to be put into action. Option 2 shows a 2x to 2.5x increase in waste loading with decay times of only 45 years. Note that for Option 2 glass, the required decay time before treatment is only 35 years because of the waste loading limits related to the solubility of MoO{sub 3} in glass. If glass was evaluated for similar waste loadings as those achieved in Option 2 glass ceramics, the decay time would be significantly longer than 45 years. These glass ceramics are not optimized, but already they show the potential to dramatically reduce the amount of waste generated while still utilizing the proven processing technology used for glass production.

  2. Ramanujan sums for signal processing of low frequency noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Planat; H. C. Rosu; S. Perrine

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An aperiodic (low frequency) spectrum may originate from the error term in the mean value of an arithmetical function such as M\\"obius function or Mangoldt function, which are coding sequences for prime numbers. In the discrete Fourier transform the analyzing wave is periodic and not well suited to represent the low frequency regime. In place we introduce a new signal processing tool based on the Ramanujan sums c_q(n), well adapted to the analysis of arithmetical sequences with many resonances p/q. The sums are quasi-periodic versus the time n of the resonance and aperiodic versus the order q of the resonance. New results arise from the use of this Ramanujan-Fourier transform (RFT) in the context of arithmetical and experimental signals

  3. WASTES: Wastes system transportation and economic simulation: Version 2, Programmer's reference manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buxbaum, M.E.; Shay, M.R.

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The WASTES Version II (WASTES II) Programmer's Reference Manual was written to document code development activities performed under the Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The manual will also serve as a valuable tool for programmers involved in maintenance of and updates to the WASTES II code. The intended audience for this manual are experienced FORTRAN programmers who have only a limited knowledge of nuclear reactor operation, the nuclear fuel cycle, or nuclear waste management practices. It is assumed that the readers of this manual have previously reviewed the WASTES II Users Guide published as PNL Report 5714. The WASTES II code is written in FORTRAN 77 as an extension to the SLAM commercial simulation package. The model is predominately a FORTRAN based model that makes extensive use of the SLAM file maintenance and time management routines. This manual documents the general manner in which the code is constructed and the interactions between SLAM and the WASTES subroutines. The functionality of each of the major WASTES subroutines is illustrated with ''block flow'' diagrams. The basic function of each of these subroutines, the algorithms used in them, and a discussion of items of particular note in the subroutine are reviewed in this manual. The items of note may include an assumption, a coding practice that particularly applies to a subroutine, or sections of the code that are particularly intricate or whose mastery may be difficult. The appendices to the manual provide extensive detail on the use of arrays, subroutines, included common blocks, parameters, variables, and files.

  4. Waste Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1DOE AwardsDNitrate Salt Bearing Waste

  5. QCD sum rules for the baryon octet in nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. L. Kryshen

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The baryon self-energies are expressed in terms of the QCD condensates of the lowest dimension in symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter within the QCD sum-rule approach. The self-energies are shown to satisfy the Gell-Mann--Okubo relations in the linear SU(3) breaking approximation. The results are in qualitative agreement with those obtained by the standard nuclear physics methods.

  6. Transverse quark distribution in mesons: QCD sum rule approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.H.; Hatsuda, T.; Miller, G.A. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washingtion, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States) Department of Physics, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of))

    1994-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    QCD sum rules are used to compute the first few moments of the mesonic quark momentum. Transverse, longitudinal, and mixed transverse-longitudinal components are examined. The transverse size of the pion is shown to be dictated by the gluon condensate, even though the mass and the longitudinal distribution are dominated by the quark condensate. The implications of our results for color transparency physics and finite temperature QCD are discussed.

  7. Notes on basic algebraic geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 16, 2008 ... Notes on basic algebraic geometry ...... Having discovered the basic equation ..... back to a rational function on X. Thus we get a nonzero ...

  8. Solid Waste (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The New Mexico Environment Department's Solid Waste Bureau manages solid waste in the state. The Bureau implements and enforces the rules established by the Environmental Improvement Board.

  9. Radioactive Waste Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1984-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish policies and guidelines by which the Department of Energy (DOE) manages tis radioactive waste, waste byproducts, and radioactively contaminated surplus facilities.

  10. Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation gives regulatory authority to the Department of Environmental Management to monitor commercial sites for hazardous wastes; fees on waste received at such sites; hearings and...

  11. Transuranic Waste Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The guide provides criteria for determining if a waste is to be managed in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter III, Transuranic Waste Requirements.

  12. Salt Waste Processing Initiatives

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1 Patricia Suggs Salt Processing Team Lead Assistant Manager for Waste Disposition Project Office of Environmental Management Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Initiatives...

  13. Waste Treatment Plant Overview

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the...

  14. NOTE / NOTE Sex ratio variation in gynodioecious species of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorken, Marcel

    NOTE / NOTE Sex ratio variation in gynodioecious species of Echium endemic to the Canary Islands Marcel E. Dorken Abstract: Species of Echium from the Canary Islands represent an adaptive radiation fertility of females and hermaphrodites were de- tected. Key words: Canary Islands, Echium, island radiation

  15. Notes2Providers.doc -1-Notes to Retail Providers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    providers that purchase electricity from a power pool that submits an Annual Report to the Energy CommissionNotes2Providers.doc -1- Notes to Retail Providers February 2003 Power Source Disclosure an energy mix or fuel mix different than the California Mix, (Net System Power)i . As a retail provider you

  16. Unreviewed Safety Question Determination - Processing Waste in...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Unreviewed Safety Question Determination - Processing Waste in the Waste Characterization Glovebox Unreviewed Safety Question Determination - Processing Waste in the Waste...

  17. Detection of free liquid in containers of solidified radioactive waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenhalgh, Wilbur O. (Richland, WA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of nondestructively detecting the presence of free liquid within a sealed enclosure containing solidified waste by measuring the levels of waste at two diametrically opposite locations while slowly tilting the enclosure toward one of said locations. When the measured level remains constant at the other location, the measured level at said one location is noted and any measured difference of levels indicates the presence of liquid on the surface of the solidified waste. The absence of liquid in the enclosure is verified when the measured levels at both locations are equal.

  18. Solid Waste and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter of the law that establishes the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency establishes the rules and regulations regarding solid waste.

  19. Radioactive and chemotoxic wastes: Only radioactive wastes?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eletti, G.F.; Tocci, M. [ENEA DISP, Rome (Italy)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive waste arising from Italian Nuclear Power Plants and Research Centers, classified as 1st and 2nd Category wastes, are managed only as radioactive wastes following the Technical Guide No. 26 issued by the Italian Regulatory Body: ENEA DISP on 1987. A very important Regulatory Regime revision for Italian Nuclear Activities started at the end of 1991. This paper considers the need to develop a new strategy dedicated to mixed waste in line with current international trends.

  20. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 4, Waste Management Facility report, Radioactive mixed waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, handling method and containment vessel, waste number, waste designation and amount of waste.

  1. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation.

  2. Texas Phosphorus Index TECHNICAL NOTES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    for West Texas, see Figure 1. NRCS and Extension Service specialists in Texas developed the P indicesTexas Phosphorus Index TECHNICAL NOTES U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE TEXAS Revised December, 2012 AGRONOMY TECHNICAL NOTE NUMBER ­ 15 PHOSPHORUS ASSESSMENT

  3. Waste Toolkit A-Z Can I recycle stationery?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melham, Tom

    Waste Toolkit A-Z Stationery Can I recycle stationery? Yes! You can recycle paper and paper based products such as used note pads, paper and cardboard files in the University Grundon recycling boxes. You can't recycle mixed materials that are made of non- recyclable plastic, such as plastic files

  4. Mixed waste focus area alternative technologies workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borduin, L.C.; Palmer, B.A.; Pendergrass, J.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Technology Analysis Group

    1995-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA)-sponsored Alternative Technology Workshop held in Salt Lake City, Utah, from January 24--27, 1995. The primary workshop goal was identifying potential applications for emerging technologies within the Options Analysis Team (OAT) ``wise`` configuration. Consistent with the scope of the OAT analysis, the review was limited to the Mixed Low-Level Waste (MLLW) fraction of DOE`s mixed waste inventory. The Los Alamos team prepared workshop materials (databases and compilations) to be used as bases for participant review and recommendations. These materials derived from the Mixed Waste Inventory Report (MWIR) data base (May 1994), the Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP) data base, and the OAT treatment facility configuration of December 7, 1994. In reviewing workshop results, the reader should note several caveats regarding data limitations. Link-up of the MWIR and DSTP data bases, while representing the most comprehensive array of mixed waste information available at the time of the workshop, requires additional data to completely characterize all waste streams. A number of changes in waste identification (new and redefined streams) occurred during the interval from compilation of the data base to compilation of the DSTP data base with the end result that precise identification of radiological and contaminant characteristics was not possible for these streams. To a degree, these shortcomings compromise the workshop results; however, the preponderance of waste data was linked adequately, and therefore, these analyses should provide useful insight into potential applications of alternative technologies to DOE MLLW treatment facilities.

  5. HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT REFERENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faraon, Andrei

    Principal Investigators 7 Laboratory Personnel 8 EH&S Personnel 8 HAZARDOUS WASTE ACCUMULATION AREAS 9 Satellite Accumulation Area 9 Waste Accumulation Facility 10 HAZARDOUS WASTE CONTAINER MANAGEMENT LabelingHAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT REFERENCE GUIDE Prepared by Environment, Health and Safety Office

  6. Hazardous Waste Management Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Pengcheng

    records. The initial training of Hazardous Waste Management and Waste Minimization is done in a classHazardous Waste Management Training Persons (including faculty, staff and students) working before handling hazardous waste. Departments are re- quired to keep records of training for as long

  7. Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ELLEFSON, M.D.

    2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source special nuclear and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this document. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge. This document has been revised to meet the interim status waste analysis plan requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173 303-300(5). When the final status permit is issued, permit conditions will be incorporated and this document will be revised accordingly.

  8. Understanding radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, R.L.

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

  9. Radioactive mixed waste disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jasen, W.G.; Erpenbeck, E.G.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various types of waste have been generated during the 50-year history of the Hanford Site. Regulatory changes in the last 20 years have provided the emphasis for better management of these wastes. Interpretations of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA), and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) have led to the definition of radioactive mixed wastes (RMW). The radioactive and hazardous properties of these wastes have resulted in the initiation of special projects for the management of these wastes. Other solid wastes at the Hanford Site include low-level wastes, transuranic (TRU), and nonradioactive hazardous wastes. This paper describes a system for the treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of solid radioactive waste.

  10. Generic implementations of parallel prefix sums and its applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Tao

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ); } else { // the task should do: // y[i] = x[i]; no need for d d = 0; } new_tasks.push_back( new task_type(taskid, subrange, d, bin_op)); // create a new task with this "taskid" 26 // that will work on this "subrange", // whose task-sepcific data is "d...]. They are one of the most important building blocks for parallel algorithms. The definition of the prefix sums problem is [4]: Given a binary associative operator ?, and an ordered set of n elements 3 [a0, a1, ..., an?1], return the ordered set [a0, (a0?a1...

  11. Sum rule for the double virtual Compton scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. A. Kuraev; S. Bakmaev; E. Tomasi-Gustafsson; V. V. Bytev

    2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The two photon exchange amplitude is investigated in frame of analytic properties of the virtual Compton scattering amplitude as a function of the invariant mass squared of the intermediate hadronic state. A sum rule is built, based on arguments from analyticity. It relates the differential cross section of elastic electron-proton scattering including form factors, and the cross section of inelastic scattering channel, with a contribution of nucleon anti-nucleon pair production arising from the Fermi statistics. The last term is calculated in frame of a simple model of nucleon-pion interaction.

  12. Justifying the Naive Partonic Sum Rule for Proton Spin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiangdong Ji; Jian-Hui Zhang; Yong Zhao

    2015-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a theoretical basis for understanding the spin structure of the proton in terms of the spin and orbital angular momenta of free quarks and gluons in Feynman's parton picture. We show that each term in the Jaffe-Manohar spin sum rule can be related to the matrix element of a gauge-invariant, but frame-dependent operator through a matching formula in large-momentum effective field theory. We present all the matching conditions for the spin content at one-loop order in perturbation theory, which provide a basis to calculate parton orbital angular momentum in lattice QCD at leading logarithmic accuracy.

  13. Justifying the naive partonic sum rule for proton spin

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ji, Xiangdong; Zhang, Jian-Hui; Zhao, Yong (ORCID:0000000226886415)

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a theoretical basis for understanding the spin structure of the proton in terms of the spin and orbital angular momenta of free quarks and gluons in Feynman’s parton picture. We show that each term in the Jaffe–Manohar spin sum rule can be related to the matrix element of a gauge-invariant, but frame-dependent operator through a matching formula in large-momentum effective field theory. We present all the matching conditions for the spin content at one-loop order in perturbation theory, which provide a basis to calculate parton orbital angular momentum in lattice QCD at leading logarithmic accuracy.

  14. Radioactive Waste Management Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07.

  15. Radium bearing waste disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tope, W.G.; Nixon, D.A.; Smith, M.L.; Stone, T.J.; Vogel, R.A. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Schofield, W.D. [Foster Wheeler Environmental Corp. (United States)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fernald radium bearing ore residue waste, stored within Silos 1 and 2 (K-65) and Silo 3, will be vitrified for disposal at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). A comprehensive, parametric evaluation of waste form, packaging, and transportation alternatives was completed to identify the most cost-effective approach. The impacts of waste loading, waste form, regulatory requirements, NTS waste acceptance criteria, as-low-as-reasonably-achievable principles, and material handling costs were factored into the recommended approach.

  16. Hazardous Waste Act (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Hazardous waste" means any solid waste or combination of solid wastes that because of their quantity, concentration or physical, chemical or infectious characteristics may:  cause or significantly...

  17. Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act (HWMA) describes a comprehensive, Statewide program to manage hazardous wastes through regulating hazardous waste generation, transportation, storage,...

  18. Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waste Management Group

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Revision 6 Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan Waste6 WM QA Plan Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan LBNL/4 Management Quality Assurance

  19. waste | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AlternativesSupplements to Coal - Feedstock Flexibility Waste Streams Gasification can be applied to a variety of waste streams, of which municipal solid waste (MSW) and...

  20. Sum-Frequency Generation from Chiral Media and Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Na

    2006-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Sum frequency generation (SFG), a second-order nonlinear optical process, is electric-dipole forbidden in systems with inversion symmetry. As a result, it has been used to study chiral media and interfaces, systems intrinsically lacking inversion symmetry. This thesis describes recent progresses in the applications of and new insights into SFG from chiral media and interfaces. SFG from solutions of chiral amino acids is investigated, and a theoretical model explaining the origin and the strength of the chiral signal in electronic-resonance SFG spectroscopy is discussed. An interference scheme that allows us to distinguish enantiomers by measuring both the magnitude and the phase of the chiral SFG response is described, as well as a chiral SFG microscope producing chirality-sensitive images with sub-micron resolution. Exploiting atomic and molecular parity nonconservation, the SFG process is also used to solve the Ozma problems. Sum frequency vibrational spectroscopy is used to obtain the adsorption behavior of leucine molecules at air-water interfaces. With poly(tetrafluoroethylene) as a model system, we extend the application of this surface-sensitive vibrational spectroscopy to fluorine-containing polymers.

  1. Direct Sum Theorem for Bounded Round Quantum Communication Complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dave Touchette

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove a direct sum theorem for bounded round entanglement-assisted quantum communication complexity. To do so, we use the fully quantum definition for information cost and complexity that we recently introduced, and use both the fact that information is a lower bound on the communication, and the fact that a direct sum property holds for quantum information complexity. We then give a protocol for compressing a single copy of a protocol down to its quantum information cost, up to terms depending on the number of rounds and the allowed increase in error. Two important tools to derive this protocol are a smooth conditional min-entropy bound for a one-shot quantum state redistribution protocol, and the quantum substate theorem of Jain, Radhakrishnan and Sen (FOCS'02) to transform this bound into a von Neumann conditional entropy bound. This result further establishes the newly introduced notions of quantum information cost and complexity as the correct quantum generalisations of the classical ones in the standard communication complexity setting. Finding such a quantum generalization of information complexity was one of the open problem recently raised by Braverman (STOC'12).

  2. Review Of Rheology Models For Hanford Waste Blending

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D. C.; Stone, M.

    2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The area of rheological property prediction was identified as a technology need in the Hanford Tank Waste - waste feed acceptance initiative area during a series of technical meetings among the national laboratories, Department of Energy-Office of River Protection, and Hanford site contractors. Meacham et al. delivered a technical report in June 2012, RPP-RPT-51652 ''One System Evaluation of Waste Transferred to the Waste Treatment Plant'' that included estimating of single shell tank waste Bingham plastic rheological model constants along with a discussion of the issues inherent in predicting the rheological properties of blended wastes. This report was selected as the basis for moving forward during the technical meetings. The report does not provide an equation for predicting rheological properties of blended waste slurries. The attached technical report gives an independent review of the provided Hanford rheological data, Hanford rheological models for single tank wastes, and Hanford rheology after blending provided in the Meacham report. The attached report also compares Hanford to SRS waste rheology and discusses some SRS rheological model equations for single tank wastes, as well as discussing SRS experience with the blending of waste sludges with aqueous material, other waste sludges, and frit slurries. Some observations of note: Savannah River Site (SRS) waste samples from slurried tanks typically have yield stress >1 Pa at 10 wt.% undissolved solids (UDS), while core samples largely have little or no yield stress at 10 wt.% UDS. This could be due to how the waste has been processed, stored, retrieved, and sampled or simply in the differences in the speciation of the wastes. The equations described in Meacham's report are not recommended for extrapolation to wt.% UDS beyond the available data for several reasons; weak technical basis, insufficient data, and large data scatter. When limited data are available, for example two to three points, the equations are not necessarily satisfactory (justified) for interpolations, due to the number of unknown variables equal the number of known data points, resulting in a coefficient of determination of one. SRS has had some success predicting the rheology of waste blends for similar waste types using rheological properties of the individual wastes and empirical blending viscosity equations. Both the Kendall-Monroe and Olney-Carlson equations were used. High accuracy was not obtained, but predictions were reasonable compared to measured flow curves. Blending SRS processed waste with frit slurry (much larger particles and the source of SRS glass formers) is a different sort of problem than that of two similar slurries of precipitated waste particles. A different approach to rheology prediction has had some success describing the incorporation of large frit particles into waste than the one used for blending two wastes. In this case, the Guth-Simha equation was used. If Hanford waste is found to have significant particles in the >100 ?m diameter range, then it might be necessary to handle those particles differently from broadly distributed waste particles that are primarily <30 ?m in diameter. The following are recommendations for the Hanford tank farms: Investigate the impact of large-scale mixing operations on yield stress for one or more Hanford tanks to see if Hanford waste rheological properties change to become more like SRS waste during both tank retrieval and tank qualification operations; Determine rheological properties of mobilized waste slurries by direct measurement rather than by prediction; Collect and characterize samples during the waste feed qualification process for each campaign; o From single source tanks that feed the qualification tanks; o Blends from the qualification tanks; Predictive rheological models must be used with caution, due to the lack of data to support such models and the utilization of the results that come from these models in making process decisions (e.g. the lack of actual operation experience). As experience is ga

  3. Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities July 24, 2014 9:00AM to 3:30PM EDT U.S....

  4. CUDACUDA based Rendering of 3Dbased Rendering of 3DCUDACUDA based Rendering of 3Dbased Rendering of 3DCUDACUDA--based Rendering of 3Dbased Rendering of 3D Minkowski SumsMinkowski Sums

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    CUDACUDA based Rendering of 3Dbased Rendering of 3DCUDACUDA based Rendering of 3Dbased Rendering of 3DCUDACUDA--based Rendering of 3Dbased Rendering of 3D Minkowski SumsMinkowski Sums CUDACUDA--based Rendering of 3Dbased Rendering of 3D Minkowski SumsMinkowski Sums CS267 Projectj Wei Li #12;Background

  5. Radioactive Waste Management Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. The purpose of the Manual is to catalog those procedural requirements and existing practices that ensure that all DOE elements and contractors continue to manage DOE's radioactive waste in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety, and the environment. Does not cancel other directives.

  6. Solid Waste Management Written Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Solid Waste Management Program Written Program Cornell University 8/28/2012 #12;Solid Waste.................................................................... 4 4.2.1 Compost Solid Waste Treatment Facility.................................................................... 4 4.2.2 Pathological Solid Waste Treatment Facility

  7. Waste Management and WasteWaste Management and Waste--toto--EnergyEnergy Status in SingaporeStatus in Singapore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    ;20031970 The Solid Waste Challenge Waste Explosion 1,200 t/d1,200 t/d 6,900 t/d6,900 t/d #12;Waste ManagementWaste Management and WasteWaste Management and Waste--toto--EnergyEnergy Status in Singapore #12;Singapore's Waste Management · In 2003, 6877 tonnes/day (2.51 M tonnes/year) of MSW collected

  8. Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Hazardous Waste Program is carried out by the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality which administers its' program under the Hazardous Waste management Act (Arkansas Code Annotated 8-7...

  9. Hazardous Waste Management (Delaware)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The act authorizes the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environment Control (DNREC) to regulate hazardous waste and create a program to manage sources of hazardous waste. The act...

  10. Hazardous Waste Management (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This article states regulations for the disposal of hazardous waste. It also provides information about permit requirements for the transport, treatment and storage of such waste. It also mentions...

  11. Audit Report on "Waste Processing and Recovery Act Acceleration Efforts for Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste at the Hanford Site"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management's (EM), Richland Operations Office (Richland), is responsible for disposing of the Hanford Site's (Hanford) transuranic (TRU) waste, including nearly 12,000 cubic meters of radioactive contact-handled TRU wastes. Prior to disposing of this waste at the Department's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), Richland must certify that it meets WIPP's waste acceptance criteria. To be certified, the waste must be characterized, screened for prohibited items, treated (if necessary) and placed into a satisfactory disposal container. In a February 2008 amendment to an existing Record of Decision (Decision), the Department announced its plan to ship up to 8,764 cubic meters of contact-handled TRU waste from Hanford and other waste generator sites to the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) at Idaho's National Laboratory (INL) for processing and certification prior to disposal at WIPP. The Department decided to maximize the use of the AMWTP's automated waste processing capabilities to compact and, thereby, reduce the volume of contact-handled TRU waste. Compaction reduces the number of shipments and permits WIPP to more efficiently use its limited TRU waste disposal capacity. The Decision noted that the use of AMWTP would avoid the time and expense of establishing a processing capability at other sites. In May 2009, EM allocated $229 million of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) funds to support Hanford's Solid Waste Program, including Hanford's contact-handled TRU waste. Besides providing jobs, these funds were intended to accelerate cleanup in the short term. We initiated this audit to determine whether the Department was effectively using Recovery Act funds to accelerate processing of Hanford's contact-handled TRU waste. Relying on the availability of Recovery Act funds, the Department changed course and approved an alternative plan that could increase costs by about $25 million by processing Hanford TRU-waste on-site rather than at AMWTP. Further, under the newly adopted alternative approach, the Department would fail to achieve the previously anticipated reductions in volume associated with the use of existing AMWTP waste compaction capabilities.

  12. Solid waste handling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parazin, R.J.

    1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents estimates of the solid radioactive waste quantities that will be generated in the Separations, Low-Level Waste Vitrification and High-Level Waste Vitrification facilities, collectively called the Tank Waste Remediation System Treatment Complex, over the life of these facilities. This study then considers previous estimates from other 200 Area generators and compares alternative methods of handling (segregation, packaging, assaying, shipping, etc.).

  13. Waste disposal package

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, M.J.

    1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a claim for a waste disposal package including an inner or primary canister for containing hazardous and/or radioactive wastes. The primary canister is encapsulated by an outer or secondary barrier formed of a porous ceramic material to control ingress of water to the canister and the release rate of wastes upon breach on the canister. 4 figs.

  14. Final Report Waste Incineration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    solid waste, the composition and com- bustion of it. A main focus is on the European emission from municipal solid waste incineration. In the latter area, concepts of treatment, such as physical with municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) and the problems that occur in connection to this. The emphasis

  15. Rethinking the Waste Hierarchy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    principles of EU waste policies. The environmental damage caused by waste depends on which type of manage, Environmental Assessment Institute For further information please contact: Environmental Assessment Institute.imv.dk #12;Environmental Assessment Institute Rethinking the Waste Hierarchy March 2005 Recommendations

  16. On the Equivalence of Linear Programming Problems and Zero-Sum ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilan Adler

    2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 18, 2010 ... Abstract: In 1951, Dantzig showed the equivalence of linear programming and two-person zero-sum games. However, in the description of his ...

  17. New Sum Rules from Low Energy Compton Scattering on Arbitrary Spin Target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hovhannes R. Grigoryan; Massimo Porrati

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive two sum rules by studying the low energy Compton scattering on a target of arbitrary (nonzero) spin j. In the first sum rule, we consider the possibility that the intermediate state in the scattering can have spin |j \\pm 1| and the same mass as the target. The second sum rule applies if the theory at hand possesses intermediate narrow resonances with masses different from the mass of the scatterer. These sum rules are generalizations of the Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn-Weinberg sum rule. Along with the requirement of tree level unitarity, they relate different low energy couplings in the theory. Using these sum rules, we show that in certain cases the gyromagnetic ratio can differ from the "natural" value g=2, even at tree level, without spoiling perturbative unitarity. These sum rules can be used as constraints applicable to all supergravity and higher-spin theories that contain particles charged under some U(1) gauge field. In particular, applied to four dimensional N=8 supergravity in a spontaneously broken phase, these sum rules suggest that for the theory to have a good ultraviolet behavior, additional massive states need to be present, such as those coming from the embedding of the N=8 supergravity in type II superstring theory. We also discuss the possible implications of the sum rules for QCD in the large-N_c limit.

  18. BNL ALARA Center: ALARA Notes, No. 9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, T.A.; Xie, J.W.; Beckman, M.C. [eds.] [and others

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue of the Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Alara Notes includes the agenda for the Third International Workshop on ALARA and specific instructions on the use of the on-line fax-on-demand service provided by BNL. Other topics included in this issue are: (1) A discussion of low-level discharges from Canadian nuclear plants, (2) Safety issues at French nuclear plants, (3) Acoustic emission as a means of leak detection, (4) Replacement of steam generators at Doel-3, Beaznau, and North Anna-1, (5) Remote handling equipment at Bruce, (6) EPRI`s low level waste program, (7) Radiation protection during concrete repairs at Savannah River, (8) Reactor vessel stud removal/repair at Comanche Peak-1, (9) Rework of reactor coolant pump motors, (10) Restoration of service water at North Anna-1 and -2, (11) Steam generator tubing problems at Mihama-1, (12) Full system decontamination at Indian Point-2, (13) Chemical decontamination at Browns Ferry-2, and (14) Inspection methodolody in France and Japan.

  19. Capturing Waste Gas: Saves Energy, Lower Costs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuilding RemovalCSS Letter -SeptemberWorkshop |Capturing Waste Gas:

  20. Radioactive Waste Management Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07. Admin Chg 2, dated 6-8-11, cancels DOE M 435.1-1 Chg 1.

  1. Radioactive Waste Management Basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, B K

    2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

  2. Municipal waste processing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayberry, J.L.

    1988-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to apparatus for processing municipal waste, and more particularly to vibrating mesh screen conveyor systems for removing grit, glass, and other noncombustible materials from dry municipal waste. Municipal waste must be properly processed and disposed of so that it does not create health risks to the community. Generally, municipal waste, which may be collected in garbage trucks, dumpsters, or the like, is deposited in processing areas such as landfills. Land and environmental controls imposed on landfill operators by governmental bodies have increased in recent years, however, making landfill disposal of solid waste materials more expensive. 6 figs.

  3. Mixed waste: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moghissi, A.A.; Blauvelt, R.K.; Benda, G.A.; Rothermich, N.E. [eds.] [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Safety and Health

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains the peer-reviewed and edited versions of papers submitted for presentation a the Second International Mixed Waste Symposium. Following the tradition of the First International Mixed Waste Symposium, these proceedings were prepared in advance of the meeting for distribution to participants. The symposium was organized by the Mixed Waste Committee of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The topics discussed at the symposium include: stabilization technologies, alternative treatment technologies, regulatory issues, vitrification technologies, characterization of wastes, thermal technologies, laboratory and analytical issues, waste storage and disposal, organic treatment technologies, waste minimization, packaging and transportation, treatment of mercury contaminated wastes and bioprocessing, and environmental restoration. Individual abstracts are catalogued separately for the data base.

  4. Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF)...

  5. Sustainable waste management in Africa through CDM projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Couth, R. [CRECHE, Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, School of Engineering, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4041 (South Africa); Trois, C., E-mail: troisc@ukzn.ac.za [CRECHE, Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, School of Engineering, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4041 (South Africa)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is a compendium on GHG reductions via improved waste strategies in Africa. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This note provides a strategic framework for Local Authorities in Africa. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Assists LAs to select Zero Waste scenarios and achieve sustained GHG reduction. - Abstract: Only few Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) projects (traditionally focussed on landfill gas combustion) have been registered in Africa if compared to similar developing countries. The waste hierarchy adopted by many African countries clearly shows that waste recycling and composting projects are generally the most sustainable. This paper undertakes a sustainability assessment for practical waste treatment and disposal scenarios for Africa and makes recommendations for consideration. The appraisal in this paper demonstrates that mechanical biological treatment of waste becomes more financially attractive if established through the CDM process. Waste will continue to be dumped in Africa with increasing greenhouse gas emissions produced, unless industrialised countries (Annex 1) fund carbon emission reduction schemes through a replacement to the Kyoto Protocol. Such a replacement should calculate all of the direct and indirect carbon emission savings and seek to promote public-private partnerships through a concerted support of the informal sector.

  6. Surface Studies of Aqueous Methanol Solutions by Vibrational Broad Bandwidth Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surface Studies of Aqueous Methanol Solutions by Vibrational Broad Bandwidth Sum Frequency methanol (CH3OH) and aqueous methanol solutions were investigated using broad bandwidth sum frequency of methanol molecules at the air-liquid interfaces of neat methanol and aqueous methanol solutions. However

  7. Sum rules for inhomogeneous Coulomb fluids, and ideal conductor boundary conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of particles interacting through Coulomb's law plus some short-range interaction (a hard core repulsion389 Sum rules for inhomogeneous Coulomb fluids, and ideal conductor boundary conditions B of an inhomogeneous Coulomb fluid is shown to obey a sum rule involving electrical multipole moments of arbitrary

  8. NOTES AND DISCUSSIONS Note on thermal heating efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Carlos

    ; but there is a dual theorem about the maximum efficiency with which heat at one temperature can be converted into heat part of the world's energy resources are actually used for heating rather than production of work if the engine is reversible. In the latter case the ``wasted energy'' Q1 Carnot Q2 T1 T2 2 is delivered as heat

  9. QCD sum rule determination of the charm-quark mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodenstein, S. [Centre for Theoretical and Mathematical Physics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa); Bordes, J.; Penarrocha, J. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universitat de Valencia, and Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Centro Mixto Universitat de Valencia-CSIC (Spain); Dominguez, C. A. [Centre for Theoretical and Mathematical Physics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa); Department of Physics, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch 7600 (South Africa); Schilcher, K. [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Staudingerweg 7, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    QCD sum rules involving mixed inverse moment integration kernels are used in order to determine the running charm-quark mass in the MS scheme. Both the high and the low energy expansion of the vector current correlator are involved in this determination. The optimal integration kernel turns out to be of the form p(s)=1-(s{sub 0}/s){sup 2}, where s{sub 0} is the onset of perturbative QCD. This kernel enhances the contribution of the well known narrow resonances, and reduces the impact of the data in the range s{approx_equal}20-25 GeV{sup 2}. This feature leads to a substantial reduction in the sensitivity of the results to changes in s{sub 0}, as well as to a much reduced impact of the experimental uncertainties in the higher resonance region. The value obtained for the charm-quark mass in the MS scheme at a scale of 3 GeV is m{sub c}(3 GeV)=987{+-}9 MeV, where the error includes all sources of uncertainties added in quadrature.

  10. Technical Note 499 December1990

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Note 499 · December1990 Interpretation as Abduction Jerry R. Hobbs, Mark Stickel;Interpretation as Abduction Jerry R. Hobbs, Mark Stickel, Douglas Appelt, and Paul Martin Artificial Intelligence Center SRI International Abstract Abduction is inference to the best explanation. In the TACITUS project

  11. A note on axial symmetries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher Beetle; Shawn Wilder

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This note describes a local scheme to characterize and normalize an axial Killing field on a general Riemannian geometry. No global assumptions are necessary, such as that the orbits of the Killing field all have period $2 \\pi$. Rather, any Killing field that vanishes at at least one point necessarily has the expected global properties.

  12. Solid Waste Management Plan. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The waste types discussed in this Solid Waste Management Plan are Municipal Solid Waste, Hazardous Waste, Low-Level Mixed Waste, Low-Level Radioactive Waste, and Transuranic Waste. The plan describes for each type of solid waste, the existing waste management facilities, the issues, and the assumptions used to develop the current management plan.

  13. EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation DOE's Radioactive Waste Management Priorities: Continue to manage waste...

  14. Transuranic (TRU) Waste | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Defined by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act as "waste containing more than 100 nanocuries of alpha-emitting...

  15. Cooperative Research Program in Coal-Waste Liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald Huffman

    2000-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a feasibility study for a demonstration plant for the liquefaction of waste plastic and tires and the coprocessing of these waste polymers with coal are presented. The study was conducted by a committee that included nine representatives from the CFFS, six from the U.S. Department of Energy - Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), and four from Burns and Roe, Inc. The study included: (1) An assessment of current recycling practices, particularly feedstock recycling in Germany; (2) A review of pertinent research, and a survey of feedstock availability for various types of waste polymers; and (3) A conceptual design for a demonstration plant was developed and an economic analysis for various feedstock mixes. The base case for feedstock scenarios was chosen to be 200 tons per day of waste plastic and 100 tons per day of waste tires. For this base case with oil priced at $20 per barrel, the return on investment (ROI) was found to range from 9% to 20%, using tipping fees for waste plastic and tires typical of those existing in the U.S. The most profitable feedstock appeared to waste plastic alone, with a plant processing 300 t/d of plastic yielding ROI's from 13 to 27 %, depending on the tipping fees for waste plastic. Feedstock recycling of tires was highly dependent on the price that could be obtained for recovered carbon. Addition of even relatively small amounts (20 t/d) of coal to waste plastic and/or coal feeds lowered the ROI's substantially. It should also be noted that increasing the size of the plant significantly improved all ROI's. For example, increasing plant size from 300 t/d to1200 t/d approximately doubles the estimated ROI's for a waste plastic feedstock.

  16. New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Waste Streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. E. Archibald

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the issues of conducting debris treatment in the New Waste Calcine Facility (NWCF) decontamination area and the methods currently being used to decontaminate material at the NWCF.

  17. Waste IncIneratIon and Waste PreventIon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and heat. In 2005/2006, German waste incineration plants provided some 6 terawatt hours (TWh-/Abfallgesetz) continues to hold: Waste prevention has priority over recovery and disposal. Nevertheless, the use of waste for en- ergy recovery is an indispensable element of sus- tainable waste management. Waste incineration

  18. Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste Read more overleaf Introduction Energy from waste provides us with an opportunity for a waste solution and a local source of energy rolled,itcan onlyaddressaportionofthewastestream andisnotsufficientonitsown. Energy obtained from the combustion of residual waste (Energy from

  19. www.d-waste.com info@d-waste.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    marketplace, about 47 grams of waste is produced-- with worldwide municipal solid waste generation totaling, the International Solid Waste Association, GIZ/SWEEP-Net, the Waste to Energy Research Council (WTERT) and the Solid management data available". According to David Newman, president of the International Solid Waste Association

  20. Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Timothy D. Stark, F.ASCE1 landfills may contain aluminum from residential and commercial solid waste, industrial waste, and aluminum American Society of Civil Engineers. CE Database subject headings: Solid wastes; Leaching; Aluminum

  1. Waste Disposal Guide HOW TO PROPERLY DISPOSE OF WASTE MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaefer, Marcus

    Waste Disposal Guide HOW TO PROPERLY DISPOSE OF WASTE MATERIALS GENERATED AT DEPAUL UNIVERSITY.4 Hazardous Waste Defined p.5 Chemical Waste Procedure for Generating Departments p.6 o A of Containers p.8 o E. Disposal of Empty Containers p.8 o F. Storage of Waste Chemicals p.8,9 o G

  2. Complex-energy approach to sum rules within nuclear density functional theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nobuo Hinohara; Markus Kortelainen; Witold Nazarewicz; Erik Olsen

    2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The linear response of the nucleus to an external field contains unique information about the effective interaction, correlations, and properties of its excited states. To characterize the response, it is useful to use its energy-weighted moments, or sum rules. By comparing computed sum rules with experimental values, the information content of the response can be utilized in the optimization process of the nuclear Hamiltonian or EDF. But the additional information comes at a price: compared to the ground state, computation of excited states is more demanding. To establish an efficient framework to compute sum rules of the response that is adaptable to the optimization of the nuclear EDF and large-scale surveys of collective strength, we have developed a new technique within the complex-energy FAM based on the QRPA. To compute sum rules, we carry out contour integration of the response function in the complex-energy plane. We benchmark our results against the conventional matrix formulation of the QRPA theory, the Thouless theorem for the energy-weighted sum rule, and the dielectric theorem for the inverse energy-weighted sum rule. We demonstrate that calculated sum-rule values agree with those obtained from the matrix formulation of the QRPA. We also discuss the applicability of both the Thouless theorem about the energy-weighted sum rule and the dielectric theorem for the inverse energy-weighted sum rule to nuclear density functional theory in cases when the EDF is not based on a Hamiltonian. The proposed sum-rule technique based on the complex-energy FAM is a tool of choice when optimizing effective interactions or energy functionals. The method is very efficient and well-adaptable to parallel computing. The FAM formulation is especially useful when standard theorems based on commutation relations involving the nuclear Hamiltonian and external field cannot be used.

  3. Guidelines for mixed waste minimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owens, C.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, there is no commercial mixed waste disposal available in the United States. Storage and treatment for commercial mixed waste is limited. Host States and compacts region officials are encouraging their mixed waste generators to minimize their mixed wastes because of management limitations. This document provides a guide to mixed waste minimization.

  4. Underground waste barrier structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saha, Anuj J. (Hamburg, NY); Grant, David C. (Gibsonia, PA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is an underground waste barrier structure that consists of waste material, a first container formed of activated carbonaceous material enclosing the waste material, a second container formed of zeolite enclosing the first container, and clay covering the second container. The underground waste barrier structure is constructed by forming a recessed area within the earth, lining the recessed area with a layer of clay, lining the clay with a layer of zeolite, lining the zeolite with a layer of activated carbonaceous material, placing the waste material within the lined recessed area, forming a ceiling over the waste material of a layer of activated carbonaceous material, a layer of zeolite, and a layer of clay, the layers in the ceiling cojoining with the respective layers forming the walls of the structure, and finally, covering the ceiling with earth.

  5. Summary report. Low-level radioactive waste management activities in the states and compacts. Volume 4, No. 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    `Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Activities in the States and Compacts` is a supplement to `LLW Notes` and is distributed periodically by Afton Associates, Inc. to state, compact and federal officials that receive `LLW Notes`. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low- Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

  6. Summary report, low-level radioactive waste management activities in the states and compacts. Vol. 4. No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    `Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Activities in the States and Compacts` is a supplement to `LLW Notes` and is distributed periodically by Afton Associates, Inc. to state, compact and federal officials that receive `LLW Notes`. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low- Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

  7. NOTE: OPTIMAL NON-HOMOGENEOUS COMPOSITES FOR ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Tavakoli

    2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    NOTE: OPTIMAL NON-HOMOGENEOUS COMPOSITES FOR. DYNAMIC LOADING REVISITED. R. TAVAKOLI. 1. Problem formulation. Consider ? ? Rd (

  8. THOMSON SCIENTIFIC EndNote Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    texto. · Armazenar até 10.000 referências em sua base de dados pessoal (EndNote Web Library), pro resultados das pesquisas diretamente em sua base de dados pessoal do EndNote Web clicando no botão "Save to EndNote Web". As referências sal- vas em sua base de dados pessoal do EndNote Web serão exibidas com

  9. Operational Waste Volume Projection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STRODE, J.N.

    1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2018 are projected based on assumption as of July 1999. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement.

  10. Operational Waste Volume Projection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STRODE, J.N.

    2000-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of June. 2000.

  11. Operational waste volume projection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koreski, G.M.

    1996-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of June 1996.

  12. OFFSHORE WIND FARMS Guidance note for Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OFFSHORE WIND FARMS Guidance note for Environmental Impact Assessment In respect of FEPA and CPA requirements Version 2 - June 2004 #12;Offshore Wind Farms: Guidance Note for Environmental Impact Assessment 2004 #12;Offshore Wind Farms: Guidance Note for Environmental Impact Assessment in Respect of FEPA

  13. DANE TECHNICAL NOTE INFN -LNF, Accelerator Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN)

    K K DANE TECHNICAL NOTE INFN - LNF, Accelerator Division Frascati, March 10, 1997 Note: BM-1 BUNCH current. This measurement allows to calculate energy losses due to parasitic beam-vacuum chamber losses. In this Note we present results of the measurements and their analysis, comparing the results

  14. Vitrification of waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300.degree. C. to 800.degree. C. to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100.degree. C. to 1400.degree. C. at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

  15. Vitrification of waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wicks, G.G.

    1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300 C to 800 C to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100 C to 1400 C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

  16. Solid Waste Management (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solid waste facilities operating in Connecticut must abide by these regulations, which describe requirements and procedures for issuing construction and operating permits; environmental...

  17. Solid Waste Policies (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute establishes the support of the state for alternative waste management practices that reduce the reliance upon land disposal and incorporate resource recovery. Cities and counties are...

  18. Solid Waste Permits (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality administers the rules and regulations governing the storage, collection, processing, recovery, and reuse of solid waste protect the air,...

  19. Norcal Waste Systems, Inc.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet describes the LNG long-haul heavy-duty trucks at Norcal Waste Systems Inc.'s Sanitary Fill Company.

  20. Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Department of Environmental...

  1. Solid Waste Management (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Indiana Department of...

  2. Solid Waste Management (Michigan)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act encourages the Department of Environmental Quality and Health Department representatives to develop and encourage methods for disposing solid waste that are environmentally sound, that...

  3. Waste Heat Recovery

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DRAFT - PRE-DECISIONAL - DRAFT 1 Waste Heat Recovery 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the TechnologySystem ......

  4. Secondary Waste Cast Stone Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Cast Stone – a cementitious waste form, has been selected for solidification of this secondary waste stream after treatment in the ETF. The secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. This secondary waste Cast Stone waste form qualification testing plan outlines the testing of the waste form and immobilization process to demonstrate that the Cast Stone waste form can comply with the disposal requirements. Specifications for the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form have not been established. For this testing plan, Cast Stone specifications are derived from specifications for the immobilized LAW glass in the WTP contract, the waste acceptance criteria for the IDF, and the waste acceptance criteria in the IDF Permit issued by the State of Washington. This testing plan outlines the testing needed to demonstrate that the waste form can comply with these waste form specifications and acceptance criteria. The testing program must also demonstrate that the immobilization process can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. This testing plan also outlines the testing needed to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support performance assessment analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form in the IDF

  5. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    licensed to safely and permanently dispose of transuranic radioactive waste, or TRU waste, left over from the production of nuclear weapons. After more than 20 years of...

  6. Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act provides for planning for the processing and disposal of municipal waste; requires counties to submit plans for municipal waste management systems within their boundaries; authorizes...

  7. Solid Waste Act (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The main purpose of the Solid Waste Act is to authorize and direct the establishment of a comprehensive solid waste management program. The act states details about specific waste management...

  8. Virginia Waste Management Act (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solid waste and hazardous waste are regulated under a number of programs at the Department of Environmental Quality. These programs are designed to encourage the reuse and recycling of solid waste...

  9. Hazardous Waste Management (North Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These rules identify and list hazardous waste and set standards for the generators and operators of such waste as well as owners or operators of waste facilities. They also stats standards for...

  10. Solid Waste Disposal Act (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality is responsible for the regulation and management of municipal solid waste and hazardous waste. A fee is applied to all solid waste disposed in the...

  11. Georgia Waste Control Law (Georgia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Waste Control Law makes it unlawful to dump waste in any lakes, streams or surfaces waters of the State or on any private property without consent of the property owner. Waste is very broadly...

  12. Extending the response of the sum coincidence spectrometer to multiple gamma radiation cascades

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helton, Victor Dean

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tubes, and cathode followers, respectively. D. D. Sum represents the differ- ential discriminator of the sum energies. Rl and R2 are resistors and RVI is a potentiometer Consider first a gamma-radiation cascade in which two gamma rays are coincident.... Setting the differential discriminator on the sum of the two gamma-ray energies allows the analyzer to be gated only when the full energy of both gamma rays is absorbed in the detectors. The analyzer may be gated by the absorption of the full energies...

  13. Solid Waste Paul Woodson, East Central University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of groundwater contamination, air pollution, and odor. Solid wastes may be displeasing to the public either, industrial and medical wastes, food wastes, mineral waste, and nonhazardous wastes. In addition/reservoirs, special wastes, such as medical wastes, low level radioactive wastes, construction/demolition debris

  14. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2003 Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

    2005-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide information needed by the DOE to assess WIPP's environmental performance and to convey that performance to stakeholders and members of the public. This report has been prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A and DOE guidance. This report documents WIPP's environmental monitoring programs and their results for 2003. The WIPP Project is authorized by the DOE National Security and Military Applications of Nuclear Energy Authorization Act of 1980 (Pub. L. 96-164). After more than 20 years of scientific study and public input, WIPP received its first shipment of waste on March 26, 1999. Located in southeastern New Mexico, WIPP is the nation's first underground repository permitted to safely and permanently dispose of TRU radioactive and mixed waste (as defined in the WIPP LWA) generated through the research and production of nuclear weapons and other activities related to the national defense of the United States. TRU waste is defined in the WIPP LWA as radioactive waste containing more than 100 nanocuries (3,700 becquerels [Bq]) of alpha-emitting transuranic isotopes per gram of waste, with half-lives greater than 20 years. Exceptions are noted as high-level waste, waste that has been determined not to require the degree of isolation required by the disposal regulations, and waste the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has approved for disposal. Most TRU waste is contaminated industrial trash, such as rags and old tools, and sludges from solidified liquids; glass; metal; and other materials from dismantled buildings. A TRU waste is eligible for disposal at WIPP if it has been generated in whole or in partby one or more of the activities listed in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (42 United States Code [U.S.C.] §10101, et seq.), including naval reactors development, weapons activities, verification and control technology, defense nuclear materials production, defense nuclear waste and materials by-products management, defense nuclear materials security and safeguards and security investigations, and defense research and development. The waste must also meet the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria. When TRU waste arrives at WIPP, it is transported into the Waste Handling Building. The waste containers are removed from the shipping containers, placed on the waste hoist, and lowered to the repository level of 655 m (2,150 ft; approximately 0.5 mi) below the surface. Next, the containers of waste are removed from the hoist and placed in excavated storage rooms in the Salado Formation, a thick sequence of evaporite beds deposited approximately 250 million years ago (Figure 1.1). After each panel has been filled with waste, specially designed closures are emplaced. When all of WIPP's panels have been filled, at the conclusion of WIPP operations, seals will be placed in the shafts. Salt under pressure is relatively plastic, and mine openings will be allowed to creep closed for final disposal, encapsulating and isolating the waste.

  15. Hazardous Waste Management (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The New Mexico Environment Department's Hazardous Waste Bureau is responsible for the management of hazardous waste in the state. The Bureau enforces the rules established by the Environmental...

  16. Solid Waste Management (South Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute contains provisions for solid waste management systems, groundwater monitoring, liability for pollution, permitting, inspections, and provisions for waste reduction and recycling...

  17. RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL IN GRANITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL IN GRANITE Paul A. WitherspoonRADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL IN GRANITE Paul A. Wither spoona repository site in granite are to evaluate the suitability

  18. Solid Waste Management Act (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act establishes rules for the permitting, posting of security, construction, operation, closure, maintenance and remediation of solid waste disposal sites; disposal of solid waste in ways that...

  19. Animal Waste Technology Fund (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A bill passed in 2012 transferred responsibility for animal waste management technology projects to the Maryland Department of Agriculture. The Department will maintain the Animal Waste Technology...

  20. Solid Waste Rules (New Hampshire)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The solid waste statute applies to construction and demolition debris, appliances, recyclables, and the facilities that collect, process, and dispose of solid waste. DES oversees the management of...

  1. Nebraska Hazardous Waste Regulations (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Environmental Quality, contain provisions pertaining to hazardous waste management, waste standards, permitting requirements, and land disposal...

  2. Solid Waste Management (North Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Solid Waste Program regulates safe management of solid waste through guidance, technical assistance, regulations, permitting, environmental monitoring, compliance evaluation and enforcement....

  3. Waste classification sampling plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landsman, S.D.

    1998-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this sampling is to explain the method used to collect and analyze data necessary to verify and/or determine the radionuclide content of the B-Cell decontamination and decommissioning waste stream so that the correct waste classification for the waste stream can be made, and to collect samples for studies of decontamination methods that could be used to remove fixed contamination present on the waste. The scope of this plan is to establish the technical basis for collecting samples and compiling quantitative data on the radioactive constituents present in waste generated during deactivation activities in B-Cell. Sampling and radioisotopic analysis will be performed on the fixed layers of contamination present on structural material and internal surfaces of process piping and tanks. In addition, dose rate measurements on existing waste material will be performed to determine the fraction of dose rate attributable to both removable and fixed contamination. Samples will also be collected to support studies of decontamination methods that are effective in removing the fixed contamination present on the waste. Sampling performed under this plan will meet criteria established in BNF-2596, Data Quality Objectives for the B-Cell Waste Stream Classification Sampling, J. M. Barnett, May 1998.

  4. Nuclear waste solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walker, Darrel D. (1684 Partridge Dr., Aiken, SC 29801); Ebra, Martha A. (129 Hasty Rd., Aiken, SC 29801)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High efficiency removal of technetium values from a nuclear waste stream is achieved by addition to the waste stream of a precipitant contributing tetraphenylphosphonium cation, such that a substantial portion of the technetium values are precipitated as an insoluble pertechnetate salt.

  5. Radioactive waste disposal package

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lampe, Robert F. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

  6. Heterogeneous waste processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vanderberg, Laura A. (Los Alamos, NM); Sauer, Nancy N. (Los Alamos, NM); Brainard, James R. (Los Alamos, NM); Foreman, Trudi M. (Los Alamos, NM); Hanners, John L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combination of treatment methods are provided for treatment of heterogeneous waste including: (1) treatment for any organic compounds present; (2) removal of metals from the waste; and, (3) bulk volume reduction, with at least two of the three treatment methods employed and all three treatment methods emplyed where suitable.

  7. Absolute frequency measurement of an SF6 two-photon line using a femtosecond optical comb and sum-frequency generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anne Amy-Klein; Andrei Goncharov; Mickael Guinet; Christophe Daussy; Olivier Lopez; Alexander Shelkovnikov; Christian Chardonnet

    2005-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a new simple technique to measure IR frequencies near 30 THz using a femtosecond (fs) laser optical comb and sum-frequency generation. The optical frequency is directly compared to the distance between two modes of the fs laser, and the resulting beat note is used to control this distance which depends only on the repetition rate fr of the fs laser. The absolute frequency of a CO2 laser stabilized onto an SF6 two-photon line has been measured for the first time. This line is an attractive alternative to the usual saturated absorption OsO4 resonances used for the stabilization of CO2 lasers. First results demonstrate a fractional Allan deviation of 3.10-14 at 1 s.

  8. Absolute frequency measurement of an SF6 two-photon line using a femtosecond optical comb and sum-frequency generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amy-Klein, A; Guinet, M; Daussy, C; López, O; Shelkovnikov, A; Chardonnet, C; Amy-Klein, Anne; Goncharov, Andrei; Guinet, Mickael; Daussy, Christophe; Lopez, Olivier; Shelkovnikov, Alexander; Chardonnet, Christian

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a new simple technique to measure IR frequencies near 30 THz using a femtosecond (fs) laser optical comb and sum-frequency generation. The optical frequency is directly compared to the distance between two modes of the fs laser, and the resulting beat note is used to control this distance which depends only on the repetition rate fr of the fs laser. The absolute frequency of a CO2 laser stabilized onto an SF6 two-photon line has been measured for the first time. This line is an attractive alternative to the usual saturated absorption OsO4 resonances used for the stabilization of CO2 lasers. First results demonstrate a fractional Allan deviation of 3.10-14 at 1 s.

  9. AVLIS production plant waste management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the executive summary, this document contains the following: (1) waste management facilities design objectives; (2) AVLIS production plant wastes; (3) waste management design criteria; (4) waste management plan description; and (5) waste management plan implementation. 17 figures, 18 tables.

  10. Leontief Economies Encode Nonzero Sum Two-Player Games Bruno Codenotti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saberi, Amin

    Leontief Economies Encode Nonzero Sum Two-Player Games Bruno Codenotti Amin Saberi Kasturi@tti-c.org. Department of Management Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford CA 94305. Email: saberi

  11. Gaussian approximations and multiplier bootstrap for maxima of sums of high-dimensional random vectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chetverikov, Denis

    We derive a Gaussian approximation result for the maximum of a sum of high-dimensional random vectors. Specifically, we establish conditions under which the distribution of the maximum is approximated by that of the maximum ...

  12. Maximizing Sum Rate and Minimizing MSE on Multiuser Downlink: Optimality, Fast Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiang, Mung

    -Input-Single-Output (MISO) channel, where the transmitter (at the base station) is equipped with an antenna array and each, e.g., increasing the total throughput (sum rates) or the total reliability in the system. Joint

  13. MINERALIZATION OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING (FBSR): COMPARISONS TO VITREOUS WASTE FORMS, AND PERTINENT DURABILITY TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C

    2008-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to generate a document for the Washington State Department of Ecology and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency that would cover the following topics: (1) A description of the mineral structures produced by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) of Hanford type Low Activity Waste (LAW including LAWR which is LAW melter recycle waste) waste, especially the cage structured minerals and how they are formed. (2) How the cage structured minerals contain some contaminants, while others become part of the mineral structure (Note that all contaminants become part of the mineral structure and this will be described in the subsequent sections of this report). (3) Possible contaminant release mechanisms from the mineral structures. (4) Appropriate analyses to evaluate these release mechanisms. (5) Why the appropriate analyses are comparable to the existing Hanford glass dataset. In order to discuss the mineral structures and how they bond contaminants a brief description of the structures of both mineral (ceramic) and vitreous waste forms will be given to show their similarities. By demonstrating the similarities of mineral and vitreous waste forms on atomic level, the contaminant release mechanisms of the crystalline (mineral) and amorphous (glass) waste forms can be compared. This will then logically lead to the discussion of why many of the analyses used to evaluate vitreous waste forms and glass-ceramics (also known as glass composite materials) are appropriate for determining the release mechanisms of LAW/LAWR mineral waste forms and how the durability data on LAW/LAWR mineral waste forms relate to the durability data for LAW/LAWR glasses. The text will discuss the LAW mineral waste form made by FBSR. The nanoscale mechanism by which the minerals form will be also be described in the text. The appropriate analyses to evaluate contaminant release mechanisms will be discussed, as will the FBSR test results to date and how they compare to testing performed on LAW glasses. Other details about vitreous waste form durability and impacts of REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) on durability are given in Appendix A. Details about the FBSR process, various pilot scale demonstrations, and applications are given in Appendix B. Details describing all the different leach tests that need to be used jointly to determine the leaching mechanisms of a waste form are given in Appendix C. Cautions regarding the way in which the waste form surface area is measured and in the choice of leachant buffers (if used) are given in Appendix D.

  14. Standing trees lump sum online (England and Wales) November 2009 THE FORESTRY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    " means any radioactive or other emissions and any natural or artificial substances (whether in solid, toxic, radioactive or dangerous waste whether or not such emission, substance or waste is referred, transportation, storage, treatment or disposal of Dangerou

  15. QCD Sum Rules for Magnetically Induced Mixing between ?c and J/?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cho, Sungtae [Yonsei Univ., Seoul, (Korea, Rep. of). Inst. of Physics and Applied Physics; Hattori, Koichi [Yonsei Univ., Seoul, (Korea, Rep. of). Inst. of Physics and Applied Physics; RIKEN, Nishina Ceneter, Wako, Saitama (Japan); RIKEN BNL Research Center, Upton, NY (United States); Lee, Su Houng [Yonsei Univ., Seoul, (Korea, Rep. of). Inst. of Physics and Applied Physics; Morita, Kenji [Frankfurt Inst. for Advanced Studies (Germany); Univ. of Wroclaw (Poland). Inst. of Theoretcial Physics; Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Yukawa Inst. for Theoretical Phystics; Ozaki, Sho [Yonsei Univ., Seoul, (Korea, Rep. of). Inst. of Physics and Applied Physics; IPNS, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the properties of charmonia in strong magnetic fields by using QCD sum rules. We show how to implement the mixing effects between ?c and J/? on the basis of field-theoretical approaches, and then show that the sum rules are saturated by the mixing effects with phenomenologically determined parameters. Consequently, we find that the mixing effects are the dominant contribution to the mass shifts of the static charmonia in strong magnetic fields.

  16. Forward Compton Scattering with weak neutral current: constraints from sum rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorchtein, Mikhail

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We generalize forward real Compton amplitude to the case of the interference of the electromagnetic and weak neutral current, formulate a low-energy theorem, relate the new amplitudes to the interference structure functions and obtain a new set of sum rules. We address a possible new sum rule that relates the product of the axial charge and magnetic moment of the nucleon to the 0th moment of the structure function $g_5(\

  17. Hanford Tank Waste Information Enclosure 1 Hanford Tank Waste Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) and the definition of HLW from the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended (NWPA). The WIPP Land Withdrawal Act by the disposal regulations; or #12;Hanford Tank Waste Information Enclosure 1 2 (C) waste that the Nuclear 10, Code of Federal Regulations. The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (42 U.S.C. 10101

  18. Lecture notes for criticality safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fullwood, R.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These lecture notes for criticality safety are prepared for the training of Department of Energy supervisory, project management, and administrative staff. Technical training and basic mathematics are assumed. The notes are designed for a two-day course, taught by two lecturers. Video tapes may be used at the options of the instructors. The notes provide all the materials that are necessary but outside reading will assist in the fullest understanding. The course begins with a nuclear physics overview. The reader is led from the macroscopic world into the microscopic world of atoms and the elementary particles that constitute atoms. The particles, their masses and sizes and properties associated with radioactive decay and fission are introduced along with Einstein's mass-energy equivalence. Radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, radiation penetration, shielding and health-effects are discussed to understand protection in case of a criticality accident. Fission, the fission products, particles and energy released are presented to appreciate the dangers of criticality. Nuclear cross sections are introduced to understand the effectiveness of slow neutrons to produce fission. Chain reactors are presented as an economy; effective use of the neutrons from fission leads to more fission resulting in a power reactor or a criticality excursion. The six-factor formula is presented for managing the neutron budget. This leads to concepts of material and geometric buckling which are used in simple calculations to assure safety from criticality. Experimental measurements and computer code calculations of criticality are discussed. To emphasize the reality, historical criticality accidents are presented in a table with major ones discussed to provide lessons-learned. Finally, standards, NRC guides and regulations, and DOE orders relating to criticality protection are presented.

  19. Decay constants of heavy-light vector mesons from QCD sum rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick Gelhausen; Alexander Khodjamirian; Alexei A. Pivovarov; Denis Rosenthal

    2015-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We revisit QCD sum rules for the decay constants of heavy-light mesons. In the sum rules for the vector mesons B^*_(s) and D^*_(s) we improve the accuracy of OPE, taking into account the O(alpha_s^2) terms in the perturbative part and calculating the O(alpha_s) corrections to the quark-condensate contribution. With this accuracy, we obtain the ratios of decay constants: f_B^*/f_B=1.02 +0.07 -0.03, f_D^*/f_D=1.20 +0.10 -0.07. The sum rule predictions for the decay constants of pseudoscalar mesons are updated with the results f_B=(207 +17 -9) MeV, f_B_s=(242 +17 -12) MeV, f_D=(201 +12 -13) MeV, f_D_s=(238 +13 -23) MeV. In order to assess the sensitivity of our calculation to the form of the sum rule, we consider alternative versions such as the power moments and Borel sum rules with different weights of the spectral density. We also investigated the heavy quark limit of the sum rules for vector and pseudoscalar mesons, estimating the violations of the heavy-quark spin and flavour symmetry.

  20. A multi-objective approach to solid waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galante, Giacomo, E-mail: galante@dtpm.unipa.i [Dipartimento di Tecnologia, Produzione Meccanica e Ingegneria Gestionale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze (Italy); Aiello, Giuseppe; Enea, Mario; Panascia, Enrico [Dipartimento di Tecnologia, Produzione Meccanica e Ingegneria Gestionale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze (Italy)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The issue addressed in this paper consists in the localization and dimensioning of transfer stations, which constitute a necessary intermediate level in the logistic chain of the solid waste stream, from municipalities to the incinerator. Contextually, the determination of the number and type of vehicles involved is carried out in an integrated optimization approach. The model considers both initial investment and operative costs related to transportation and transfer stations. Two conflicting objectives are evaluated, the minimization of total cost and the minimization of environmental impact, measured by pollution. The design of the integrated waste management system is hence approached in a multi-objective optimization framework. To determine the best means of compromise, goal programming, weighted sum and fuzzy multi-objective techniques have been employed. The proposed analysis highlights how different attitudes of the decision maker towards the logic and structure of the problem result in the employment of different methodologies and the obtaining of different results. The novel aspect of the paper lies in the proposal of an effective decision support system for operative waste management, rather than a further contribution to the transportation problem. The model was applied to the waste management of optimal territorial ambit (OTA) of Palermo (Italy).

  1. Hazardous Waste Pick-up DEPARTMENT of ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH and SAFETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emmons, Scott

    chemicals and concentrations Volume (L) or Weight (Kg) # of Containers Type of Container 1. Glass Plastic Metal Box 2. Glass Plastic Metal Box 3. Glass Plastic Metal Box 4. Glass Plastic Metal Box 5. Glass Plastic Metal Box 6. Glass Plastic Metal Box Please note that each item of waste must have an attached

  2. Waste to Energy Time Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SEMINAR Waste to Energy Time Activities 9:30-9:40 Brief introduction of participants 9:40-10:10 Presentation of Dr. Kalogirou, "Waste to Energy: An Integral Part of Worldwide Sustainable Waste Management" 10. Sofia Bethanis, "Production of synthetic aggregates for use in structural concrete from waste to energy

  3. Hazardous Waste Disposal Sites (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These sections contain information on fees and monitoring relevant to operators of hazardous waste disposal sites.

  4. Contained recovery of oily waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jr., Lyle A. (Laramie, WY); Sudduth, Bruce C. (Laramie, WY)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for recovering oily waste from oily waste accumulations underground comprising sweeping the oily waste accumulation with hot water to recover said oily waste, wherein said area treated is isolated from surrounding groundwater hydraulically. The hot water may be reinjected after the hot-water displacement or may be treated to conform to any discharge requirements.

  5. Methane generation from waste materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Samani, Zohrab A. (Las Cruces, NM); Hanson, Adrian T. (Las Cruces, NM); Macias-Corral, Maritza (Las Cruces, NM)

    2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An organic solid waste digester for producing methane from solid waste, the digester comprising a reactor vessel for holding solid waste, a sprinkler system for distributing water, bacteria, and nutrients over and through the solid waste, and a drainage system for capturing leachate that is then recirculated through the sprinkler system.

  6. Radioactive waste material disposal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide. 3 figs.

  7. Radioactive waste material disposal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles W. (155 Newport Dr., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Beahm, Edward C. (106 Cooper Cir., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Parker, George W. (321 Dominion Cir., Knoxville, TN 37922)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide.

  8. Specifying Waste Heat Boilers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganapathy, V.

    or hydrochloric acid vapor should be mentioned upfront so the HRSG designer can take proper precauations while designing the unit.Material selection is also impacted by the presence of corrosive gases.If partial pressure of hydrogen is high in the gas stream...SPECIFYING WASTE HEAT BOILERS V.Ganapathy.ABCO Industries Abilene,Texas ABSTRACT Waste heat boilers or Heat Recovery Steam 'Generators(HRSGs) as they are often called are used to recover energy from waste gas streams in chemical plants...

  9. Certification Plan, low-level waste Hazardous Waste Handling Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert, R.

    1992-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan also incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end-product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; an executive summary of the Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP) for the HWHF and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification. This plan provides guidance from the HWHF to waste generators, waste handlers, and the Waste Certification Specialist to enable them to conduct their activities and carry out their responsibilities in a manner that complies with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Waste generators have the primary responsibility for the proper characterization of LLW. The Waste Certification Specialist verifies and certifies that LBL LLW is characterized, handled, and shipped in accordance with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Certification is the governing process in which LBL personnel conduct their waste generating and waste handling activities in such a manner that the Waste Certification Specialist can verify that the requirements of WHC-WAC are met.

  10. Hanford Site Secondary Waste Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westsik, Joseph H.

    2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is making plans to dispose of 54 million gallons of radioactive tank wastes at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The high-level wastes and low-activity wastes will be vitrified and placed in permanent disposal sites. Processing of the tank wastes will generate secondary wastes, including routine solid wastes and liquid process effluents, and these need to be processed and disposed of also. The Department of Energy Office of Waste Processing sponsored a meeting to develop a roadmap to outline the steps necessary to design the secondary waste forms. Representatives from DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Washington State Department of Ecology, the Oregon Department of Energy, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, technical experts from the DOE national laboratories, academia, and private consultants convened in Richland, Washington, during the week of July 21-23, 2008, to participate in a workshop to identify the risks and uncertainties associated with the treatment and disposal of the secondary wastes and to develop a roadmap for addressing those risks and uncertainties. This report describes the results of the roadmap meeting in Richland. Processing of the tank wastes will generate secondary wastes, including routine solid wastes and liquid process effluents. The secondary waste roadmap workshop focused on the waste streams that contained the largest fractions of the 129I and 99Tc that the Integrated Disposal Facility risk assessment analyses were showing to have the largest contribution to the estimated IDF disposal impacts to groundwater. Thus, the roadmapping effort was to focus on the scrubber/off-gas treatment liquids with 99Tc to be sent to the Effluent Treatment Facility for treatment and solidification and the silver mordenite and carbon beds with the captured 129I to be packaged and sent to the IDF. At the highest level, the secondary waste roadmap includes elements addressing regulatory and performance requirements, waste composition, preliminary waste form screening, waste form development, process design and support, and validation. The regulatory and performance requirements activity will provide the secondary waste-form performance requirements. The waste-composition activity will provide workable ranges of secondary waste compositions and formulations for simulants and surrogates. Preliminary waste form screening will identify candidate waste forms for immobilizing the secondary wastes. The waste form development activity will mature the waste forms, leading to a selected waste form(s) with a defensible understanding of the long-term release rate and input into the critical decision process for a secondary waste treatment process/facility. The process and design support activity will provide a reliable process flowsheet and input to support a robust facility design. The validation effort will confirm that the selected waste form meets regulatory requirements. The final outcome of the implementation of the secondary waste roadmap is the compliant, effective, timely, and cost-effective disposal of the secondary wastes. The work necessary to address the programmatic, regulatory, and technical risks and uncertainties identified through the Secondary Waste Roadmap Workshop are assembled into several program needs elements. Programmatic/Regulatory needs include: • Select and deploy Hanford tank waste supplemental treatment technology • Provide treatment capability for secondary waste streams from tank waste treatment • Develop consensus on secondary waste form acceptance. Technology needs include: • Define secondary waste composition ranges and uncertainties • Identify and develop waste forms for secondary waste immobilization and disposal • Develop test methods to characterize secondary waste form performance. Details for each of these program elements are provided.

  11. Preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil field waste into salt caverns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J.; Elcock, D.; Raivel, M.; Caudle, D.; Ayers, R.C. Jr.; Grunewald, B.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Caverns can be readily formed in salt formations through solution mining. The caverns may be formed incidentally, as a result of salt recovery, or intentionally to create an underground chamber that can be used for storing hydrocarbon products or compressed air or disposing of wastes. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the feasibility, suitability, and legality of disposing of nonhazardous oil and gas exploration, development, and production wastes (hereafter referred to as oil field wastes, unless otherwise noted) in salt caverns. Chapter 2 provides background information on: types and locations of US subsurface salt deposits; basic solution mining techniques used to create caverns; and ways in which salt caverns are used. Later chapters provide discussion of: federal and state regulatory requirements concerning disposal of oil field waste, including which wastes are considered eligible for cavern disposal; waste streams that are considered to be oil field waste; and an evaluation of technical issues concerning the suitability of using salt caverns for disposing of oil field waste. Separate chapters present: types of oil field wastes suitable for cavern disposal; cavern design and location; disposal operations; and closure and remediation. This report does not suggest specific numerical limits for such factors or variables as distance to neighboring activities, depths for casings, pressure testing, or size and shape of cavern. The intent is to raise issues and general approaches that will contribute to the growing body of information on this subject.

  12. Hazardous Waste Management (Michigan)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A person shall not generate, dispose, store, treat, or transport hazardous waste in this state without complying with the requirements of this article. The department, in the conduct of its duties...

  13. Solid Waste Management (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act aims to establish and maintain a cooperative state and local program of planning and technical and financial assistance for comprehensive solid waste management. No person shall construct,...

  14. Waste and Recycling

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McCarthy, Kathy

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear engineer Dr. Kathy McCarthy talks about nuclear energy, the challenge of nuclear waste and the research aimed at solutions. For more information about nuclear energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  15. WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    labeled chemicals Waste Minimization/ Volume Reduction 0 Solid Radioactive Waste $2,168 $3,795 $2,168 VialWASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED, REUSED, RECYCLED OR CONSERVED IN 2003 WASTE TYPE DESCRIPTION DETAILS * Radioactive Waste Source Reduction 1,500 Radioactive Waste $6,000 $2,500 $6,000 Waste

  16. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report. Volume 1, Part 2, Generator dangerous waste report dangerous waste: Calendar Year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, weight, waste description, and waste designation.

  17. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report. Volume 1, Part 1, Generator dangerous waste report dangerous waste: Calendar Year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, weight, waste description, and waste designation.

  18. Citrus Waste Biomass Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karel Grohman; Scott Stevenson

    2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewable Spirits is developing an innovative pilot plant bio-refinery to establish the commercial viability of ehtanol production utilizing a processing waste from citrus juice production. A novel process based on enzymatic hydrolysis of citrus processing waste and fermentation of resulting sugars to ethanol by yeasts was successfully developed in collaboration with a CRADA partner, USDA/ARS Citrus and Subtropical Products Laboratory. The process was also successfully scaled up from laboratory scale to 10,000 gal fermentor level.

  19. Industrial Waste Heat Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, M. E.; Solomon, N. G.; Tabb, E. S.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INDUSTRIAL WASTE HEAT RECOVREY M. E. Ward and N. G. Solomon E. S. Tabb Solar Turbines International and Gas Research Institute San Diego, California Chicago, Illinois ABSTRACT i I One hundred fifty reports were reviewed along with interviews... tests, promising low temperature heat exchanger tube alloys and coated surfaces were identified. 1INTROUCTION of advanced technology heat recovery techniques 1_ Recovering waste heat from the flue gases of the pr~ary objective. Specific objectives...

  20. Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities Project Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnema, Bruce Edward

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This feasibility study report presents a draft design of the Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility (VWISF), which is one of three subprojects of the Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities (IWVF) project. The primary goal of the IWVF project is to design and construct a treatment process system that will vitrify the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) to a final waste form. The project will consist of three subprojects that include the Waste Collection Tanks Facility, the Waste Vitrification Facility (WVF), and the VWISF. The Waste Collection Tanks Facility will provide for waste collection, feed mixing, and surge storage for SBW and newly generated liquid waste from ongoing operations at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The WVF will contain the vitrification process that will mix the waste with glass-forming chemicals or frit and turn the waste into glass. The VWISF will provide a shielded storage facility for the glass until the waste can be disposed at either the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as mixed transuranic waste or at the future national geological repository as high-level waste glass, pending the outcome of a Waste Incidental to Reprocessing determination, which is currently in progress. A secondary goal is to provide a facility that can be easily modified later to accommodate storage of the vitrified high-level waste calcine. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of the VWISF, which would be constructed in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local laws. This project supports the Department of Energy’s Environmental Management missions of safely storing and treating radioactive wastes as well as meeting Federal Facility Compliance commitments made to the State of Idaho.

  1. EndNote X5 Basics What is EndNote?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    will need to choose between two installation types ­ Typical or Custom. If you choose Typical, you. This guide will show you the following basic steps for using EndNote: Opening or creating an EndNote Library Adding bibliographic references or citations to your library Using EndNote with Microsoft Word

  2. Hazardous waste sites and housing appreciation rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCluskey, Jill; Rausser, Gordon C.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WORKING PAPER NO. 906 HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES AND HOUSINGEconomics January 2000 Hazardous Waste Sites and Housingand RF. Anderson, Hazardous waste sites: the credibility

  3. Solid Waste Management Program (South Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    South Dakota's Solid Waste Management Program offers loans and grants for solid waste disposal, recycling, and waste tire projects. Funds are available for private or public projects, and...

  4. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Project Waste Form Qualification Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randklev, E.H.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy has created a waste acceptance process to help guide the overall program for the disposal of high-level nuclear waste in a federal repository. This Waste Form Qualification Program Plan describes the hierarchy of strategies used by the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Project to satisfy the waste form qualification obligations of that waste acceptance process. A description of the functional relationship of the participants contributing to completing this objective is provided. The major activities, products, providers, and associated scheduling for implementing the strategies also are presented.

  5. SECONDARY WASTE MANAGEMENT STRATEGY FOR EARLY LOW ACTIVITY WASTE TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CRAWFORD TW

    2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates parameters relevant to River Protection Project secondary waste streams generated during Early Low Activity Waste operations and recommends a strategy for secondary waste management that considers groundwater impact, cost, and programmatic risk. The recommended strategy for managing River Protection Project secondary waste is focused on improvements in the Effiuent Treatment Facility. Baseline plans to build a Solidification Treatment Unit adjacent to Effluent Treatment Facility should be enhanced to improve solid waste performance and mitigate corrosion of tanks and piping supporting the Effiuent Treatment Facility evaporator. This approach provides a life-cycle benefit to solid waste performance and reduction of groundwater contaminants.

  6. Mixed waste characterization reference document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste characterization and monitoring are major activities in the management of waste from generation through storage and treatment to disposal. Adequate waste characterization is necessary to ensure safe storage, selection of appropriate and effective treatment, and adherence to disposal standards. For some wastes characterization objectives can be difficult and costly to achieve. The purpose of this document is to evaluate costs of characterizing one such waste type, mixed (hazardous and radioactive) waste. For the purpose of this document, waste characterization includes treatment system monitoring, where monitoring is a supplement or substitute for waste characterization. This document establishes a cost baseline for mixed waste characterization and treatment system monitoring requirements from which to evaluate alternatives. The cost baseline established as part of this work includes costs for a thermal treatment technology (i.e., a rotary kiln incinerator), a nonthermal treatment process (i.e., waste sorting, macronencapsulation, and catalytic wet oxidation), and no treatment (i.e., disposal of waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)). The analysis of improvement over the baseline includes assessment of promising areas for technology development in front-end waste characterization, process equipment, off gas controls, and monitoring. Based on this assessment, an ideal characterization and monitoring configuration is described that minimizes costs and optimizes resources required for waste characterization.

  7. LLW Notes: Volume 10, Number 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

  8. LLW notes: Volume 10, Number 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, C. [ed.] [Afton Associates, Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

  9. LLW Notes: Volume 10, Number 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

  10. TESLA-LNF TECHNICAL NOTE Divisione Acceleratori

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TESLA-LNF TECHNICAL NOTE _____________ Divisione Acceleratori Frascati, November 20, 2003 Note: TESLA Report 2003-26 TESLA DAMPING RING: INJECTION/EXTRACTION SCHEMES WITH RF DEFLECTORS D. Alesini, S/extraction schemes in the Damping Ring of TESLA using RF deflectors. We illustrate different possible solutions using

  11. DANE TECHNICAL NOTE INFN -LNF, Accelerator Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN)

    (Chairman) F. Willeke, DESY 1. Follow up of previous Meeting The first report by the DANE Machine AdvisoryK K DANE TECHNICAL NOTE INFN - LNF, Accelerator Division Frascati, May 11, 2000 Note: G-55 Report by DANE Machine Advisory Panel on 2nd Meeting held on 4-5 May 2000 J. M. Jowett, CERN S. Myers, CERN

  12. DANE TECHNICAL NOTE INFN -LNF, Accelerator Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN)

    KKKK KKKK DANE TECHNICAL NOTE INFN - LNF, Accelerator Division Frascati, January 13, 1993 Note: IR to see how much heat has to be removed. The two main sources of heat are: 1) Resistive losses due. Technol. 5(6) 3446 (1987). #12;IR-1 pg. 6 APPENDIX IA Losses in the I.R. 1) Resistive losses in Be: dp dz

  13. BNL/SNS TECHNICAL NOTE R. Witkover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BNL/SNS TECHNICAL NOTE NO. 049 R. Witkover September 23, 1998 ALTERNATING GRADIENT SYNCHROTRON-In-Gap" Monitor for the Spallation Neutron Source #12;SNS Technical Note Considerations in Designing a "Beam of approximately 550 nsec. With a design intensity of 1014 per pulse, un-controlled losses must be kept to a level

  14. DANE TECHNICAL NOTE INFN -LNF, Accelerator Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN)

    KKKK KKKK DANE TECHNICAL NOTE INFN - LNF, Accelerator Division Frascati, October 26, 1994 Note: RF enough (i.e. if the parasitic losses are low with respect to the energy left by each passing bunch-zero longitudinal electric field on the cavity axis. Being azimuthally symmetric, it is possible to calculate them

  15. DANE TECHNICAL NOTE INFN -LNF, Accelerator Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN)

    K K DANE TECHNICAL NOTE INFN - LNF, Accelerator Division Frascati, July 16, 1996 Note: RF-19 losses and prevents to reach the operating voltage range. The RF cavity of the DANE -Factory Accumulator and electrical conductivities. Multipactoring (MP) is a phenomenon of resonant electron discharge which can occur

  16. DANE TECHNICAL NOTE INFN -LNF, Accelerator Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN)

    K K DANE TECHNICAL NOTE INFN - LNF, Accelerator Division Frascati, December 14, 1995 Note: CD-5, are also needed in order to minimise the losses. In order to use this device as a transverse kicker, two) excitation. #12;CD-5 pg. 3 The combined magnetic and electric field gives a net deflecting Lorentz force

  17. DANE TECHNICAL NOTE INFN -LNF, Accelerator Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN)

    KKKK KKKK DANE TECHNICAL NOTE INFN - LNF, Accelerator Division Frascati, Sept. 26, 1991 Note: RF-4 and vacuum simpler and less expensive. The cavity will be made of copper which has better electrical and thermal conductivity to reduce the RF losses and keep the cooling easier. #12;RF-4 pg. 2 Multipacting (MP

  18. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1996, 13 companies operated 22 primary aluminum reduction plants. Montana,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . 18.5% ad val. Unwrought (other than aluminum alloys) 7601.10.6000 Free 11.0% ad val. Waste and scrap18 ALUMINUM1 (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1996, 13 companies operated 22 primary aluminum reduction plants. Montana, Oregon

  19. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2004, 6 companies operated 14 primary aluminum reduction plants; 6 smelters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Unwrought (other than aluminum alloys) 7601.10.6000 Free. Waste and scrap 7602.00.0000 Free. Depletion20 ALUMINUM1 (Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2004, 6 companies operated 14 primary aluminum reduction plants; 6 smelters continued

  20. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1999, 12 companies operated 23 primary aluminum reduction plants. Montana,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .10.3000 2.6% ad val. Unwrought (other than aluminum alloys) 7601.10.6000 Free. Waste and scrap 760222 ALUMINUM1 (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1999, 12 companies operated 23 primary aluminum reduction plants. Montana, Oregon

  1. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2001, 12 companies operated 23 primary aluminum reduction plants. The 11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    coils) 7601.10.3000 2.6% ad val. Unwrought (other than aluminum alloys) 7601.10.6000 Free. Waste20 ALUMINUM1 (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2001, 12 companies operated 23 primary aluminum reduction plants. The 11 smelters east

  2. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2003, 7 companies operated 15 primary aluminum reduction plants; 6 smelters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Unwrought (other than aluminum alloys) 7601.10.6000 Free. Waste and scrap 7602.00.0000 Free. Depletion, prices in the aluminum scrap and secondary aluminum alloy markets fluctuated through September but closed20 ALUMINUM1 (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production

  3. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Limited shipments of tungsten concentrates were made from a California mine in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 43%; Germany, 11%; Canada,630 1,450 Events, Trends, and Issues: World tungsten supply was dominated by Chinese production

  4. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: A tungsten mine in California produced concentrates in 2012. Approximately eight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 45,200 3,630 1,610 Events, Trends, and Issues: World tungsten supply was dominated by Chinese production

  5. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: A mine in California restarted operations and made its first shipment of tungsten

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    182 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 43%; Canada, 16%; Germany, 9 by Chinese production and exports. China's Government restricted the amounts of tungsten that could

  6. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last recorded production of tungsten concentrates in the United States was in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    182 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last recorded production of tungsten concentrates in the United States was in 1994 of ores and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste

  7. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last recorded production of tungsten concentrates in the United States was in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last recorded production of tungsten concentrates in the United States was in 1994. In 2000, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 39%; Russia, 21

  8. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: A tungsten mine in California produced concentrates in 2013. Approximately eight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    174 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 45,100 2,300 2,240 Events, Trends, and Issues: World tungsten supply was dominated by Chinese production

  9. Cost effective waste management through composting in Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Couth, R. [CRECHE, Centre for Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, Civil Engineering Programme, School of Engineering, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4041 (South Africa); Trois, C., E-mail: troisc@ukzn.ac.za [CRECHE, Centre for Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, Civil Engineering Programme, School of Engineering, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4041 (South Africa)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The financial/social/institutional sustainability of waste management in Africa is analysed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This note is a compendium of a study on the potential for GHG control via improved zero waste in Africa. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study provides the framework for Local Authorities for realizing sustained GHG reductions. - Abstract: Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions per person from urban waste management activities are greater in sub-Saharan African countries than in other developing countries, and are increasing as the population becomes more urbanised. Waste from urban areas across Africa is essentially dumped on the ground and there is little control over the resulting gas emissions. The clean development mechanism (CDM), from the 1997 Kyoto Protocol has been the vehicle to initiate projects to control GHG emissions in Africa. However, very few of these projects have been implemented and properly registered. A much more efficient and cost effective way to control GHG emissions from waste is to stabilise the waste via composting and to use the composted material as a soil improver/organic fertiliser or as a component of growing media. Compost can be produced by open windrow or in-vessel composting plants. This paper shows that passively aerated open windrows constitute an appropriate low-cost option for African countries. However, to provide an usable compost material it is recommended that waste is processed through a materials recovery facility (MRF) before being composted. The paper demonstrates that material and biological treatment (MBT) are viable in Africa where they are funded, e.g. CDM. However, they are unlikely to be instigated unless there is a replacement to the Kyoto Protocol, which ceases for Registration in December 2012.

  10. Waste segregation procedures and benefits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fish, J.D.; Massey, C.D.; Ward, S.J.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Segregation is a critical first step in handling hazardous and radioactive materials to minimize the generation of regulated wastes. In addition, segregation can significantly reduce the complexity and the total cost of managing waste. Procedures at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque require that wastes be segregated, first, by waste type (acids, solvents, low level radioactive, mixed, classified, etc.). Higher level segregation requirements, currently under development, are aimed at enhancing the possibilities for recovery, recycle and reapplication; reducing waste volumes; reducing waste disposal costs, and facilitating packaging storage, shipping and disposal. 2 tabs.

  11. Chiral sum rules and vacuum condensates from tau-lepton decay data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. A. Dominguez; L. A. Hernandez; K. Schilcher; H. Spiesberger

    2015-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    QCD finite energy sum rules, together with the latest updated ALEPH data on hadronic decays of the tau-lepton are used in order to determine the vacuum condensates of dimension $d=2$ and $d=4$. These data are also used to check the validity of the Weinberg sum rules, and to determine the chiral condensates of dimension $d=6$ and $d=8$, as well as the chiral correlator at zero momentum, proportional to the counter term of the ${\\cal{O}}(p^4)$ Lagrangian of chiral perturbation theory, $\\bar{L}_{10}$. Suitable (pinched) integration kernels are introduced in the sum rules in order to suppress potential quark-hadron duality violations. We find no compelling indications of duality violations in the kinematic region above $s \\simeq 2.2$ GeV$^2$ after using pinched integration kernels.

  12. Achievable Secrecy Sum-Rate in a Fading MAC-WT with Power Control and without CSI of Eavesdropper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shah, Shahid M; Sharma, Vinod

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a two user fading Multiple Access Channel with a wire-tapper (MAC-WT) where the transmitter has the channel state information (CSI) to the intended receiver but not to the eavesdropper (eve). We provide an achievable secrecy sum-rate with optimal power control. We next provide a secrecy sum-rate with optimal power control and cooperative jamming (CJ). We then study an achievable secrecy sum rate by employing an ON/OFF power control scheme which is more easily computable. We also employ CJ over this power control scheme. Results show that CJ boosts the secrecy sum-rate significantly even if we do not know the CSI of the eve's channel. At high SNR, the secrecy sum-rate (with CJ) without CSI of the eve exceeds the secrecy sum-rate (without CJ) with full CSI of the eve.

  13. ZERO WASTE STANFORD WASTE REDUCTION, RECYCLING AND COMPOSTING GUIDELINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerdes, J. Christian

    ZERO WASTE STANFORD WASTE REDUCTION, RECYCLING AND COMPOSTING GUIDELINES PLASTICS, METALS & GLASS pleaseemptyandflatten COMPOSTABLES kitchenandyardwasteonly LANDFILL ONLY ifallelsefails All Plastic Containers Metal Material All Food Paper Plates & Napkins *including pizza & donut boxes Compostable & Biodegradable

  14. Energy implications of integrated solid waste management systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Little, R.E.; McClain, G.; Becker, M.; Ligon, P.; Shapiro, K.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study develops estimates of energy use and recovery from managing municipal solid waste (MSW) under various collection, processing, and disposal scenarios. We estimate use and recovery -- or energy balance -- resulting from MSW management activities such as waste collection, transport, processing, and disposal, as well as indirect use and recovery linked to secondary materials manufacturing using recycled materials. In our analysis, secondary materials manufacturing displaces virgin materials manufacturing for 13 representative products. Energy implications are expressed as coefficients that measure the net energy saving (or use) of displacing products made from virgin versus recycled materials. Using data developed for the 1992 New York City Master Plan as a starting point, we apply our method to an analysis of various collection systems and 30 types of facilities to illustrate bow energy balances shift as management systems are modified. In sum, all four scenarios show a positive energy balance indicating the energy and advantage of integrated systems versus reliance on one or few technology options. That is, energy produced or saved exceeds the energy used to operate the solid waste system. The largest energy use impacts are attributable to processing, including materials separation and composting. Collection and transportation energy are relatively minor contributors. The largest two contributors to net energy savings are waste combustion and energy saved by processing recycled versus virgin materials. An accompanying spatial analysis methodology allocates energy use and recovery to New York City, New York State outside the city, the U.S., and outside the U.S. Our analytical approach is embodied in a spreadsheet model that can be used by energy and solid waste analysts to estimate impacts of management scenarios at the state and substate level.

  15. Sum--of--squares results for polynomials related to the Bessis--Moussa--Villani conjecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Benoit; Torres-Ayala, Francisco

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the polynomial S_{m,k}(A,B), that is the sum of all words in noncommuting variables A and B having length m and exactly k letters equal to B, is not equal to a sum of commutators and Hermitian squares in the algebra R where X^2=A and Y^2=B, for all even values of m and k with 6 when m is even and not a multiple of 4, which implies that the trace of S_{m,4}(A,B) is nonnegative for all Hermitian matrices A and B, for these values of m.

  16. Elliptic Gauss Sums and Hecke L-values at s=1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asai, Tetsuya

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rationality of the elliptic Gauss sum coefficient is shown. The following is a specific case of our argument. Let f(u)=sl((1-i)\\varpi u), where sl() is the Gauss' lemniscatic sine and \\varpi=2.62205... is the real period of the elliptic curve y^2=x^3-x, so that f(u) is an elliptic function relative to the period lattice Z[i]. Let \\pi be a primary prime of Z[i] such that norm(\\pi)\\equiv 13\\mod 16. Let S be the quarter set mod \\pi consisting of quartic residues. Let us define G(\\pi):=\\sum_{\

  17. Charmonium spectra at finite temperature from QCD sum rules with the maximum entropy method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philipp Gubler; Kenji Morita; Makoto Oka

    2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Charmonia spectral functions at finite temperature are studied using QCD sum rules in combination with the maximum entropy method. This approach enables us to directly obtain the spectral function from the sum rules, without having to introduce any specific assumption about its functional form. As a result, it is found that while J/psi and eta_c manifest themselves as significant peaks in the spectral function below the deconfinement temperature T_c, they quickly dissolve into the continuum and almost completely disappear at temperatures between 1.0 T_c and 1.1 T_c.

  18. Waste generator services implementation plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mousseau, J.; Magleby, M.; Litus, M.

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recurring waste management noncompliance problems have spurred a fundamental site-wide process revision to characterize and disposition wastes at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The reengineered method, termed Waste Generator Services, will streamline the waste acceptance process and provide waste generators comprehensive waste management services through a single, accountable organization to manage and disposition wastes in a timely, cost-effective, and compliant manner. This report outlines the strategy for implementing Waste Generator Services across the INEEL. It documents the culmination of efforts worked by the LMITCO Environmental Management Compliance Reengineering project team since October 1997. These efforts have included defining problems associated with the INEEL waste management process; identifying commercial best management practices; completing a review of DOE Complex-wide waste management training requirements; and involving others through an Integrated Process Team approach to provide recommendations on process flow, funding/charging mechanisms, and WGS organization. The report defines the work that will be performed by Waste Generator Services, the organization and resources, the waste acceptance process flow, the funding approach, methods for measuring performance, and the implementation schedule and approach. Field deployment will occur first at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant in June 1998. Beginning in Fiscal Year 1999, Waste Generator Services will be deployed at the other major INEEL facilities in a phased approach, with implementation completed by March 1999.

  19. RECYCLING AND GENERAL WASTE MANAGEMENT OPERATIONAL PROCEDURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, Neal.A.

    RECYCLING AND GENERAL WASTE MANAGEMENT OPERATIONAL PROCEDURE Swansea University Estates Services.6.1/1 Recycling & General Waste Management Department: Estates & Facilities Management Site: Swansea University recycling and waste management facilities in Swansea university To ensure that Waste Management Objectives

  20. Page 1 of 2 UNIVERSAL WASTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    (laboratories should follow hazardous waste procedures) or thorough central battery recycling receptaclesPage 1 of 2 UNIVERSAL WASTE and OTHER ENVIRONMENTALLY DELETERIOUS PRODUCTS Batteries All Universal Waste Batteries generated in laboratories must be collected through the hazardous waste program

  1. FROM WASTE TO WORTH: THE ROLE OF WASTE DIVERSION IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    ;Canadian Energy-From-Waste Coalition (CEFWC) 1 There is considerable merit to the ideas outlined commitment to foster a green and sustainable economy. The Canadian Energy-From-Waste Coalition (CEFWC sign that the system is failing. #12;Canadian Energy-From-Waste Coalition (CEFWC) 2 Like you, the CEFWC

  2. L/O/G/OL/O/G/O Waste Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laksanacharoen, Sathaporn

    L/O/G/OL/O/G/O #12;· Waste Waste · Value () · · Flow #12;Genchi GenbutsuGenchi Genbutsu of waste) Zero Inventory #12;Just in Time in HealthcareJust in Time in Healthcare Takt time (pitch), one Electronic Call 3. #12;Poka-Yoke ?Poka-Yoke ? · Poka-Yoke yokeru = to avoid poka = inadvertent errors 1

  3. Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators Thermoelectrics have unique advantages for...

  4. Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Skutterudite TE modules were...

  5. Waste Management | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Cleanup Waste Management Waste Management July 15, 2014 Energy Expos Students work in groups to create hands-on exhibits about the energy sources that power the nation, ways to...

  6. High-Level Waste Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The guide provides the criteria for determining which DOE radioactive wastes are to be managed as high-level waste in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1.

  7. Low-Level Waste Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The guide provides criteria for determining which DOE radioactive wastes are to be managed as low-level waste in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter IV.

  8. Copenhagen Waste Management and Incineration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ownership of treatment facilities · Incineration plants · Land fill · Disposal of hazardous waste · Source waste prevention · Focus areas · Changes in behaviour among consumers and producers · City schemes almost fully developed · Collection of hazardous substances, paper, cardboard, gardening and bulky

  9. Waste Management Assistance Act (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section promotes the proper and safe storage, treatment, and disposal of solid, hazardous, and low-level radioactive wastes in Iowa, and calls on Iowans to assume responsibility for waste...

  10. Solid Waste Management Program (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Solid Waste Management Program in the Department of Natural Resources regulates the management of solid waste in the state of Missouri. A permit is required prior to the construction or...

  11. Delaware Solid Waste Authority (Delaware)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Delaware Solid Waste Authority (DSWA) runs three landfills, all of which recover methane and generate electricity with a total capacity of 24 MWs. The DSWA Solid Waste Plan includes goals,...

  12. Solid Waste Facilities Regulations (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter of the Massachusetts General Laws governs the operation of solid waste facilities. It seeks to encourage sustainable waste management practices and to mitigate adverse effects, such as...

  13. Hazardous Waste Management (North Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Health is the designated agency to administer and coordinate a hazardous waste management program to provide for the reduction of hazardous waste generation, reuse, recovery, and...

  14. Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act addresses the safe and proper management of hazardous wastes and used oil, the permitting of hazardous waste facilities, and the siting of facilities. The Department of Environmental...

  15. Hydrothermal Processing of Wet Wastes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 3A—Conversion Technologies III: Energy from Our Waste—Will we Be Rich in Fuel or Knee Deep in Trash by 2025? Hydrothermal Processing of Wet Wastes James R. Oyler, President, Genifuel Corporation

  16. Management of Solid Waste (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Solid Waste Management Division of the Department of Environmental Quality regulates solid waste disposal or any person who generates, collects, transports, processes, and/or disposes of solid...

  17. Chemotherapy waste may be a hazardous chemical waste or biomedical waste. Proper classification is necessary to be in compliance with the laws regulating each waste type.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Steven C.

    Chemotherapy waste may be a hazardous chemical waste or biomedical waste. Proper classification is necessary to be in compliance with the laws regulating each waste type. Hazardous Chemical Chemotherapy Waste: A number of chemotherapy drugs are regulated as a hazardous chemical waste. These include

  18. Hazardous Waste Management Overview The Five L's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    Hazardous Waste Management Overview The Five L's CoLLect CoLLect all hazardous chemical waste are unsure if your chemical waste is a Hazardous Waste, consult EH&S at hazmat@columbia.edu. DO NOT - Dispose of Hazardous Waste inappropriately or prior to determining its hazards. Hazardous Waste must never

  19. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides highlights from the 1995 summer meeting of the Low Level radioactive Waste Forum. Topics included: new developments in state and compacts; federal waste management; DOE plans for Greater-Than-Class C waste management; mixed wastes; commercial mixed waste management; international export of rad wastes for disposal; scintillation cocktails; license termination; pending legislation; federal radiation protection standards.

  20. Heat Recovery From Solid Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Underwood, O. W.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    areas of evaluation, including the cost of fuel, cost of solid waste disposal, plant energy requirements, available technology, etc....

  1. Workshop Notes from ""Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Workshop Notes from ""Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels: Lessons Learned for the Safe Deployment of Vehicles"" Workshop, December 10-11, 2009 Workshop Notes from...

  2. RETHINKING WASTE, RECYCLING, AND HOUSEKEEPING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howitt, Ivan

    RETHINKING WASTE, RECYCLING, AND HOUSEKEEPING EFFICIENCY.EFFICIENCY. A l GA leaner Green #12 t R li Management Recycling Staff The Office of Waste Reduction & Recycling started in The Office of Waste Reduction & Recycling started in 1990, we have 14 full time staff positions. ·We collect over 40

  3. HAZARDOUS WASTE LABEL DEPAUL UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaefer, Marcus

    - Hazardous Ignitable Reactive Toxic Oxidizer Other ( explain ) Generator Building Dept. HAZARDOUS WASTE LABEL: Generator Building Dept. Please fill out the hazardous waste label on line and download labels on to a plainHAZARDOUS WASTE LABEL DEPAUL UNIVERSITY ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY 5-4170 Corrosive Non

  4. Iso-vector form factors of the delta and nucleon in QCD sum rules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozpineci, A. [Physics Department, Middle East Technical University, 06800 (Turkey)

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Form factors are important non-perturbative properties of hadrons. They give information about the internal structure of the hadrons. In this work, iso-vector axial-vector and iso-vector tensor form factors of the nucleon and the iso-vector axial-vector {Delta}{yields}N transition form factor calculations in QCD Sum Rules are presented.

  5. Weighted Sum Rate Maximization of Correlated MISO Broadcast Channels under Linear Precoding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Weighted Sum Rate Maximization of Correlated MISO Broadcast Channels under Linear Precoding algorithm proposed by Christensen et al. in large correlated MISO broadcast channels. We propose a novel maximization. I. INTRODUCTION WE consider the multiple-input single-output (MISO) broadcast channel (BC

  6. Weighted Sum Rate Maximization in the Underlay Cognitive MISO Interference Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gesbert, David

    Weighted Sum Rate Maximization in the Underlay Cognitive MISO Interference Channel Laurent Gallo) maximization for a K-user Multiple-Input Single-Output (MISO) cognitive Interference Channel (IFC) with linear studied in a non-cognitive scenario for the MISO inter- ference channel (IFC) in [3], where a distributed

  7. Sum-frequency generation of 589 nm light with near-unit efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalibard, Jean

    . Dawson, A. D. Drobshoff, R. J. Beach, M. J. Messerly, S. A. Payne, A. Brown, D. M. Pennington, D. J­3974 (1995). 13. E. Streed, A. Chikkatur, T. Gustavson, M. Boyd, Y. Torii, D. Schneble, G. Campbell, D of sodium resonance radiation," Appl. Opt. 28, 2588­2591 (1989). 3. H. Moosm¨uller and J. D. Vance, "Sum

  8. Crystal Potential Formula for the Calculation of Crystal Lattice Sums1 Don Steiger and Calvin Ahlbrandt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glaser, Rainer

    Crystal Potential Formula for the Calculation of Crystal Lattice Sums1 Don Steiger and Calvin; In Final Form: April 7, 1998 A new formula is derived for the determination of the potential energy of the central unit cell of a finite crystal; this formula is called the crystal potential formula. The crystal

  9. Dirichlet L-series with real and complex characters and their application to solving double sums

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. J. Zucker; R. C. McPhedran

    2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A description of the properties of \\L with complex characters is given. By using these, together with the more familiar \\L with real characters, it is shown how certain two dimensional lattice sums, which previously could not be put into closed form, may now be expressed in this way.

  10. Fast Approximations for Sums of Distances, Clustering and the Fermat-Weber Problem 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bose, Prosenjit

    Fast Approximations for Sums of Distances, Clustering and the Fermat-Weber Problem 1 Prosenjit Bose Fermat-Weber problem in any #12;xed dimension. 1 Introduction Let S = fp 1 ; : : : ; p n g be a set roots that can be irrational numbers [1]. A famous problem related to the function w is the Fermat-Weber

  11. Fast Approximations for Sums of Distances, Clustering and the Fermat-Weber Problem 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morin, Pat

    Fast Approximations for Sums of Distances, Clustering and the Fermat-Weber Problem 1 Prosenjit Bose) time deterministic and O(n) time randomized #15;-approximation algorithm for the so called Fermat-Weber numbers [1]. A famous problem related to the function w is the Fermat-Weber problem [4] which asks

  12. Fast Approximations for Sums of Distances, Clustering and the Fermat-Weber Problem y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bose, Prosenjit

    Fast Approximations for Sums of Distances, Clustering and the Fermat-Weber Problem y Prosenjit Bose algorithm for the so called Fermat-Weber problem in any #12;xed dimension. 1 Introduction Let S = fp 1 be irrational numbers [1]. A famous problem related to the function w is the Fermat-Weber problem [4] which asks

  13. Impact of folivory on photosynthesis is greater than the sum of its holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    Impact of folivory on photosynthesis is greater than the sum of its holes A. R. Zangerl*, J. G), pp. 135­151.]. An impediment to understanding the effects of leaf damage on photosynthesis has been chlorophyll fluo- rescence and used it to map the effects of caterpillar feeding on whole-leaf photosynthesis

  14. Complex-energy approach to sum rules within nuclear density functional theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinohara, Nobuo; Nazarewicz, Witold; Olsen, Erik

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The linear response of the nucleus to an external field contains unique information about the effective interaction, correlations, and properties of its excited states. To characterize the response, it is useful to use its energy-weighted moments, or sum rules. By comparing computed sum rules with experimental values, the information content of the response can be utilized in the optimization process of the nuclear Hamiltonian or EDF. But the additional information comes at a price: compared to the ground state, computation of excited states is more demanding. To establish an efficient framework to compute sum rules of the response that is adaptable to the optimization of the nuclear EDF and large-scale surveys of collective strength, we have developed a new technique within the complex-energy FAM based on the QRPA. To compute sum rules, we carry out contour integration of the response function in the complex-energy plane. We benchmark our results against the conventional matrix formulation of the QRPA theory...

  15. ccsd-00016701,version2-3May2006 Generalised extreme value statistics and sum of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    random variables with a sum distributed according to one of the three (k-dependent) asymptotic distributions of extreme value statistics, namely the Gumbel, Fr´echet and Weibull distributions. These classes, as well as the limit distributions, are naturally extended to real values of k, thus providing a clear

  16. On The Analysis of Spatially-Coupled GLDPC Codes and The Weighted Min-Sum Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian, Yung-Yih

    2013-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    system that can approach the channel capacity using iterative HDD. The optimality of a codeword returned by the weighted min-sum (WMS) algorithm, an iterative decoding algorithm which is widely used in practice, is studied as well. The attenuated max...

  17. Surfactant/Water Interactions at the Air/Water Interface Probed by Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, Geraldine L.

    Surfactant/Water Interactions at the Air/Water Interface Probed by Vibrational Sum Frequency and orientation of water molecules at an air/water interface has been measured in the presence of cationic spectrum of both the surfactant and water molecules at the water surface. In the presence of the charged

  18. Sum--of--squares results for polynomials related to the Bessis--Moussa--Villani conjecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benoit Collins; Kenneth J. Dykema; Francisco Torres-Ayala

    2010-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the polynomial S_{m,k}(A,B), that is the sum of all words in noncommuting variables A and B having length m and exactly k letters equal to B, is not equal to a sum of commutators and Hermitian squares in the algebra R where X^2=A and Y^2=B, for all even values of m and k with 6 Bessis--Moussa--Villani conjecture, which asks whether the trace of S_{m,k}(A,B)) is nonnegative for all positive semidefinite matrices A and B. These results eliminate the possibility of using "descent + sum-of-squares" to prove the BMV conjecture. We also show that S_{m,4}(A,B) is equal to a sum of commutators and Hermitian squares in R when m is even and not a multiple of 4, which implies that the trace of S_{m,4}(A,B) is nonnegative for all Hermitian matrices A and B, for these values of m.

  19. Sum-of-Product Architectures Computing Just Right F. de Dinechin, Matei Istoan, Abdelbasset Massouri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    (SPC). This paper addresses the automatic construction of low-precision, but high accuracy SPC-processing transforms that can be expressed as a sum of products with constants (SPC). Specifically, a SPC is any Recherche (ANR) SPC architecture generator real coeff. (ai)0i

  20. The Power of Neutrino Mass Sum Rules for Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen F. King; Alexander Merle; Alexander J. Stuart

    2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino mass sum rules relate the three neutrino masses within generic classes of flavour models, leading to restrictions on the effective mass parameter measured in experiments on neutrinoless double beta decay as a function of the lightest neutrino mass. We perform a comprehensive study of the implications of such neutrino mass sum rules, which provide a link between model building, phenomenology, and experiments. After a careful explanation of how to derive predictions from sum rules, we discuss a large number of examples both numerically, using all three global fits available for the neutrino oscillation data, and analytically wherever possible. In some cases, our results disagree with some of those in the literature for reasons that we explain. Finally we discuss the experimental prospects for many current and near-future experiments, with a particular focus on the uncertainties induced by the unknown nuclear physics involved. We find that, in many cases, the power of the neutrino mass sum rules is so strong as to allow certain classes of models to be tested by the next generation of neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. Our study can serve as both a guideline and a theoretical motivation for future experimental studies.

  1. Contact of Oil with Solid Surfaces in Aqueous Media Probed Using Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhinojwala, Ali

    Contact of Oil with Solid Surfaces in Aqueous Media Probed Using Sum Frequency Generation is present between the oil and the sapphire substrate. Below the isoelectric point of the sapphire substrate and the attractive van der Waals interactions. INTRODUCTION An oil drop in contact with a solid surface in aqueous

  2. Using or Hiding Private Information? An Experimental Study of Zero-Sum Repeated Games with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Using or Hiding Private Information? An Experimental Study of Zero-Sum Repeated Games the value of private information in strictly competitive interactions in which there is a trade-off between, the empirical use of private information is almost complete when it should be, and decreases in longer

  3. ON THE ORDER OF STIRLING NUMBERS AND ALTERNATING BINOMIAL COEFFICIENT SUMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lengyel, Tamás

    ON THE ORDER OF STIRLING NUMBERS AND ALTERNATING BINOMIAL COEFFICIENT SUMS Ira M. Gessel \\Lambda=p is not an odd integer. Here S(n; k) denotes the Stirling number of the second kind; i.e., the number) denotes the Stirling number of the second kind, and n = a 2 q ; a is odd, and q is sufficiently large (for

  4. ON THE ORDER OF STIRLING NUMBERS AND ALTERNATING BINOMIAL COEFFICIENT SUMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lengyel, Tamás

    ON THE ORDER OF STIRLING NUMBERS AND ALTERNATING BINOMIAL COEFFICIENT SUMS Ira M. Gessel is sufficiently large and kip is not an odd integer. Here S(n, k) denotes the Stirling num- ber of the second kindStirling number of the second kind, and n = alq , a is odd, and q

  5. Off-shell [rho]-[omega] mixing in QCD sum rules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatsuda, T.; Henley, E.M.; Meissner, T.; Krein, G. (Physics Department, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States) Institute for Nuclear Theory, HN-12 University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States) Instituto de Fisica Teorica, Rua Pamplona, 145, 01405-900 Sao Paulo-SP (Brazil))

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The [ital q][sup 2] dependence of the [rho]-[omega] mixing amplitude is analyzed with the use of QCD sum rules and dispersion relations. Going off shell the mixing decreases, changes sign at [ital q][sup 2][congruent]0.4[ital m][sub [rho

  6. Focus Sheet | Hazardous Waste Checklist How to be ready for state hazardous waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcock, William

    storage cabinet. Avoid accumulating a lot of waste ­ keep areas clear. EPO ­ Hazardous Waste Checklist 07Focus Sheet | Hazardous Waste Checklist How to be ready for state hazardous waste inspectors. See a hazardous waste inspection. ons, rrosive. n hemicals? ical waste. Waste-like chemicals have als Are you

  7. Radioactive Waste Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this Order is to ensure that all Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive waste is managed in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety and the environment. Cancels DOE O 5820.2A. Chg 1 dated 8-28-01. Certified 1-9-07.

  8. Radioactive Waste Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this Order is to ensure that all Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive waste is managed in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety and the environment. Cancels DOE O 5820.2A

  9. Nuclear Waste Fund Activities Management Team | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOilNEWResponse to Time-Based Rates fromNuclear Security ConferenceWaste

  10. Notes on Slovene and Slavic Etymology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamp, Eric P.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The notes present critiques of F. Bezlaj's Etymological Dictionary of the Slovene Language and new proposals for the etymology of the words krma 'animal feed', Krma (toponym), kašelj 'cough', ogenj 'flame, fire', and oglje 'charcoal'....

  11. A. La Rosa Lecture Notes APPLIED OPTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. La Rosa Lecture Notes APPLIED OPTICS _______________________________________________________________________________ The variational principle and ray propagation The ray equation Propagation on a lenslike media: GRIN lenses Ref: A. Yariv and P. Yeh, "Photonics," Oxford University Press. Chapter 2. The ray equation obtained from

  12. A. La Rosa Lecture Notes APPLIED OPTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    _______________________________________________________________________________ Rays and Optical beams Ref: A. Yariv and P. Yeh, "Photonics," Oxford University Press. Chapter 2. IA. La Rosa Lecture Notes APPLIED OPTICS. Ray Matrices I.A Special cases Case: Propagation through a thin lens Case: Propagation through

  13. Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery: Practice Notes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novak, Petra Kralj

    1 Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery: Practice Notes Petra Kralj Novak Petra.Kralj.Novak@ijs.si and exam · 2013/1/15: Written exam, seminar proposal discussion · 2013/2/12: Data mining seminar

  14. Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery: Practice Notes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novak, Petra Kralj

    1 Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery: Practice Notes Petra Kralj Novak Petra.Kralj.Novak@ijs.si on Weka 3: Descriptive data mining ­ Discussion about seminars and exam · 2013/12/16: Written exam

  15. Lecture Notes in Secret Sharing Carles Padro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lecture Notes in Secret Sharing Carles Padr´o Nanyang Technological University, Singapore Version 2.7 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 2 Secret Sharing.2 Secret Sharing Schemes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 2.3 Threshold Secret

  16. Hanford Tank Waste - Near Source Treatment of Low Activity Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsey, William Gene

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract only. Treatment and disposition of Hanford Site waste as currently planned consists of 100+ waste retrievals, waste delivery through up to 8+ miles of dedicated, in-ground piping, centralized mixing and blending operations- all leading to pre-treatment combination and separation processes followed by vitrification at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The sequential nature of Tank Farm and WTP operations requires nominally 15-20 years of continuous operations before all waste can be retrieved from many Single Shell Tanks (SSTs). Also, the infrastructure necessary to mobilize and deliver the waste requires significant investment beyond that required for the WTP. Treating waste as closely as possible to individual tanks or groups- as allowed by the waste characteristics- is being investigated to determine the potential to 1) defer, reduce, and/or eliminate infrastructure requirements, and 2) significantly mitigate project risk by reducing the potential and impact of single point failures. The inventory of Hanford waste slated for processing and disposition as LAW is currently managed as high-level waste (HLW), i.e., the separation of fission products and other radionuclides has not commenced. A significant inventory of this waste (over 20M gallons) is in the form of precipitated saltcake maintained in single shell tanks, many of which are identified as potential leaking tanks. Retrieval and transport (as a liquid) must be staged within the waste feed delivery capability established by site infrastructure and WTP. Near Source treatment, if employed, would provide for the separation and stabilization processing necessary for waste located in remote farms (wherein most of the leaking tanks reside) significantly earlier than currently projected. Near Source treatment is intended to address the currently accepted site risk and also provides means to mitigate future issues likely to be faced over the coming decades. This paper describes the potential near source treatment and waste disposition options as well as the impact these options could have on reducing infrastructure requirements, project cost and mission schedule.

  17. TRU waste characterization chamber gloveboxes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, D. S.

    1998-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) is participating in the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Transuranic Waste Program in support of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The Laboratory's support currently consists of intrusive characterization of a selected population of drums containing transuranic waste. This characterization is performed in a complex of alpha containment gloveboxes termed the Waste Characterization Gloveboxes. Made up of the Waste Characterization Chamber, Sample Preparation Glovebox, and the Equipment Repair Glovebox, they were designed as a small production characterization facility for support of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This paper presents salient features of these gloveboxes.

  18. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Biennial Environmental Compliance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washinton TRU Solutions LLC

    2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Biennial Environmental Compliance Report (BECR) documents environmental regulatory compliance at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility designed for the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste, for the reporting period of April 1, 2000, to March 31, 2002. As required by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA)(Public Law [Pub. L.] 102-579, as amended by Pub. L. 104-201), the BECR documents U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office's (CBFO) compliance with applicable environmental protection laws and regulations implemented by agencies of the federal government and the state of New Mexico. In the prior BECR, the CBFO and the management and operating contractor (MOC)committed to discuss resolution of a Letter of Violation that had been issued by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) in August 1999, which was during the previous BECR reporting period. This Letter of Violation alleged noncompliance with hazardous waste aisle spacing, labeling, a nd tank requirements. At the time of publication of the prior BECR, resolution of the Letter of Violation was pending. On July 7, 2000, the NMED issued a letter noting that the aisle spacing and labeling concerns had been adequately addressed and that they were rescinding the violation alleging that the Exhaust Shaft Catch Basin failed to comply with the requirements for a hazardous waste tank. During the current reporting period, WIPP received a Notice of Violation and a compliance order alleging the violation of the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Regulations and the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP).

  19. WASTE/BY-PRODUCT HYDROGEN DOE/DOD Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; 6 Waste/Byproduct HydrogenWaste/By product Hydrogen Waste H2 sources include: Waste biomass: biogas Waste/Byproduct Hydrogen Waste/By product Hydrogen Fuel FlexibilityFuel Flexibility Biogas: generated

  20. Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 360: Solid Waste Management Facilities (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations apply to all solid wastes with the exception of hazardous or radioactive waste. Proposed solid waste processing facilities are required to obtain permits prior to construction,...

  1. SumTime-Turbine: A Knowledge-Based System to Communicate Gas Turbine Time-Series Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiter, Ehud

    SumTime-Turbine: A Knowledge-Based System to Communicate Gas Turbine Time-Series Data Jin Yu of Aberdeen Aberdeen, AB24 3UE, UK {jyu, ereiter, jhunter, ssripada}@csd.abdn.ac.uk Abstract: SumTime-Turbine produces textual summaries of archived time- series data from gas turbines. These summaries should help

  2. Multi-Carrier Multiple Access is Sum-Rate Optimal for Block Transmissions over Circulant ISI Channels*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giannakis, Georgios

    Multi-Carrier Multiple Access is Sum-Rate Optimal for Block Transmissions over Circulant ISI to maximizing the sum-rate of circulant inter-symbol interference (ISI) channels, that are assumed available at the transmitter. Cir- culant ISI channels are ensured either with cyclic pre`xed block transmissions

  3. Waste minimization handbook, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boing, L.E.; Coffey, M.J.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical guide presents various methods used by industry to minimize low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated during decommissioning and decontamination (D and D) activities. Such activities generate significant amounts of LLW during their operations. Waste minimization refers to any measure, procedure, or technique that reduces the amount of waste generated during a specific operation or project. Preventive waste minimization techniques implemented when a project is initiated can significantly reduce waste. Techniques implemented during decontamination activities reduce the cost of decommissioning. The application of waste minimization techniques is not limited to D and D activities; it is also useful during any phase of a facility`s life cycle. This compendium will be supplemented with a second volume of abstracts of hundreds of papers related to minimizing low-level nuclear waste. This second volume is expected to be released in late 1996.

  4. Hazardous Waste Contacts Please note some types of hazardous waste already have a specific disposal route in place

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    staff from Estates. Steven Swift - ext. 4834 Refrigerators: These should be disposed of through the WEEE equipment These should be disposed of through the WEEE cages. Andy Brown ­ ext. 6556 or Chris Gration ­ ext

  5. Summary Notes from 28 May 2008 Generic Technical Issue Discussion on Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE's NuclearSpurringSteamDepartment4SuitlandOctober 12, 2011

  6. Treatment of halogen-containing waste and other waste materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for treating a halogen-containing waste material. The process provides a bath of molten glass containing a sacrificial metal oxide capable of reacting with a halogen in the waste material. The sacrificial metal oxide is present in the molten glass in at least a stoichiometric amount with respect to the halogen in the waste material. The waste material is introduced into the bath of molten glass to cause a reaction between the halogen in the waste material and the sacrificial metal oxide to yield a metal halide. The metal halide is a gas at the temperature of the molten glass. The gaseous metal halide is separated from the molten glass and contacted with an aqueous scrubber solution of an alkali metal hydroxide to yield a metal hydroxide or metal oxide-containing precipitate and a soluble alkali metal halide. The precipitate is then separated from the aqueous scrubber solution. The molten glass containing the treated waste material is removed from the bath as a waste glass. The process of the invention can be used to treat all types of waste material including radioactive wastes. The process is particularly suited for separating halogens from halogen-containing wastes. 3 figs.

  7. Treatment of halogen-containing waste and other waste materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Beahm, Edward C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Parker, George W. (Concord, TN)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for treating a halogen-containing waste material. The process provides a bath of molten glass containing a sacrificial metal oxide capable of reacting with a halogen in the waste material. The sacrificial metal oxide is present in the molten glass in at least a stoichiometric amount with respect to the halogen in the waste material. The waste material is introduced into the bath of molten glass to cause a reaction between the halogen in the waste material and the sacrificial metal oxide to yield a metal halide. The metal halide is a gas at the temperature of the molten glass. The gaseous metal halide is separated from the molten glass and contacted with an aqueous scrubber solution of an alkali metal hydroxide to yield a metal hydroxide or metal oxide-containing precipitate and a soluble alkali metal halide. The precipitate is then separated from the aqueous scrubber solution. The molten glass containing the treated waste material is removed from the bath as a waste glass. The process of the invention can be used to treat all types of waste material including radioactive wastes. The process is particularly suited for separating halogens from halogen-containing wastes.

  8. Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: SinceDevelopment | Department ofPartnerships ToolkitWaste Heat Waste Heat - - to to - -Organic

  9. Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cells Webinar | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: SinceDevelopment | Department ofPartnerships ToolkitWaste Heat Waste Heat - - to

  10. Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cells Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: SinceDevelopment | Department ofPartnerships ToolkitWaste Heat Waste Heat - - toWorkshop

  11. ENERGIES RENOVABLES NOTES FINALS 2006 COGNOMS, NOM ASSISTNCIA TREBALL NOTA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batiste, Oriol

    ENERGIES RENOVABLES NOTES FINALS 2006 COGNOMS, NOM ASSISTÃ?NCIA TREBALL NOTA ALCOVERRO VIDAL, MARCEL

  12. Nuclear waste management. Semiannual progress report, October 1983-March 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McElroy, J.L.; Powell, J.A.

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress in the following studies on radioactive waste management is reported: defense waste technology; Nuclear Waste Materials Characterization Center; waste isolation; and supporting studies. 58 figures, 22 tables.

  13. Medical and Biohazardous Waste Generator's Guide (Revision 2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waste Management Group

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste Supplies 8. Solid Medical Waste Disposal ProceduresMedical/Biohazardous Waste Pickup Containers Solid Medical/Security Notice 8. Solid Medical Waste Disposal Procedures

  14. Waste Management in Dsseldorf Combination of separate collection,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Waste Management in Düsseldorf Combination of separate collection, recycling and waste-to-energy Biowaste Garden waste Light packaging Paper Glass Wood from bulky waste Bulky waste Rest / mixed waste Bio- Garden- Paper Glass Light Metals Wood Bulky Rest waste waste Card- Pack. waste board Saved CO2

  15. Hydraulic waste energy recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lederer, C.C.; Thomas, A.H.; McGuire, J.L. (Detroit Buildings and Safety Engineering Dept., MI (USA))

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water distribution systems are typically a municipality's largest consumer of energy and greatest expense. The water distribution network has varying pressure requirements due to the age of the pipeline and topographical differences. Certain circumstances require installation of pressure reducing devices in the pipeline to lower the water pressure in the system. The consequence of this action is that the hydraulic energy supplied by the high lift or booster pumps is wasted in the process of reducing the pressure. A possible solution to capture the waste hydraulic energy is to install an in-line electricity generating turbine. Energy recovery using in-line turbine systems is an emerging technology. Due to the lack of technical and other relevant information on in-line turbine system installations, questions of constructability and legal issues over the power service contract have yet to be answered. This study seeks to resolve these questions and document the findings so that other communities may utilize this information. 10 figs.

  16. Tritium waste package

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rossmassler, R.; Ciebiera, L.; Tulipano, F.J.; Vinson, S.; Walters, R.T.

    1995-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A containment and waste package system for processing and shipping tritium oxide waste received from a process gas includes an outer drum and an inner drum containing a disposable molecular sieve bed (DMSB) seated within the outer drum. The DMSB includes an inlet diffuser assembly, an outlet diffuser assembly, and a hydrogen catalytic recombiner. The DMSB absorbs tritium oxide from the process gas and converts it to a solid form so that the tritium is contained during shipment to a disposal site. The DMSB is filled with type 4A molecular sieve pellets capable of adsorbing up to 1000 curies of tritium. The recombiner contains a sufficient amount of catalyst to cause any hydrogen and oxygen present in the process gas to recombine to form water vapor, which is then adsorbed onto the DMSB. 1 fig.

  17. Tritium waste package

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rossmassler, Rich (Cranbury, NJ); Ciebiera, Lloyd (Titusville, NJ); Tulipano, Francis J. (Teaneck, NJ); Vinson, Sylvester (Ewing, NJ); Walters, R. Thomas (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A containment and waste package system for processing and shipping tritium xide waste received from a process gas includes an outer drum and an inner drum containing a disposable molecular sieve bed (DMSB) seated within outer drum. The DMSB includes an inlet diffuser assembly, an outlet diffuser assembly, and a hydrogen catalytic recombiner. The DMSB absorbs tritium oxide from the process gas and converts it to a solid form so that the tritium is contained during shipment to a disposal site. The DMSB is filled with type 4A molecular sieve pellets capable of adsorbing up to 1000 curies of tritium. The recombiner contains a sufficient amount of catalyst to cause any hydrogen add oxygen present in the process gas to recombine to form water vapor, which is then adsorbed onto the DMSB.

  18. Method for processing aqueous wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pickett, J.B.; Martin, H.L.; Langton, C.A.; Harley, W.W.

    1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is presented for treating waste water such as that from an industrial processing facility comprising the separation of the waste water into a dilute waste stream and a concentrated waste stream. The concentrated waste stream is treated chemically to enhance precipitation and then allowed to separate into a sludge and a supernate. The supernate is skimmed or filtered from the sludge and blended with the dilute waste stream to form a second dilute waste stream. The sludge remaining is mixed with cementitious material, rinsed to dissolve soluble components, then pressed to remove excess water and dissolved solids before being allowed to cure. The dilute waste stream is also chemically treated to decompose carbonate complexes and metal ions and then mixed with cationic polymer to cause the precipitated solids to flocculate. Filtration of the flocculant removes sufficient solids to allow the waste water to be discharged to the surface of a stream. The filtered material is added to the sludge of the concentrated waste stream. The method is also applicable to the treatment and removal of soluble uranium from aqueous streams, such that the treated stream may be used as a potable water supply. 4 figures.

  19. Method for processing aqueous wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pickett, John B. (3922 Wood Valley Dr., Aiken, SC 29803); Martin, Hollis L. (Rt. 1, Box 188KB, McCormick, SC 29835); Langton, Christine A. (455 Sumter St. SE., Aiken, SC 29801); Harley, Willie W. (110 Fairchild St., Batesburg, SC 29006)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for treating waste water such as that from an industrial processing facility comprising the separation of the waste water into a dilute waste stream and a concentrated waste stream. The concentrated waste stream is treated chemically to enhance precipitation and then allowed to separate into a sludge and a supernate. The supernate is skimmed or filtered from the sludge and blended with the dilute waste stream to form a second dilute waste stream. The sludge remaining is mixed with cementitious material, rinsed to dissolve soluble components, then pressed to remove excess water and dissolved solids before being allowed to cure. The dilute waste stream is also chemically treated to decompose carbonate complexes and metal ions and then mixed with cationic polymer to cause the precipitated solids to flocculate. Filtration of the flocculant removes sufficient solids to allow the waste water to be discharged to the surface of a stream. The filtered material is added to the sludge of the concentrated waste stream. The method is also applicable to the treatment and removal of soluble uranium from aqueous streams, such that the treated stream may be used as a potable water supply.

  20. Note and Record A note on polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe traps for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pretoria, University of

    Note and Record A note on polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe traps for sampling vegetation of traditional traps, and many are furtive (Myers et al., 2007; Pittman et al., 2008). PVC pipe traps, which and Hyperolius (see Channing, 2001; du Preez & Carruthers, 2009), may be attracted to artificial refugia of PVC

  1. GENOMIC RESOURCES NOTE Genomic Resources Notes accepted 1 February 201331 March

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieseberg, Loren

    GENOMIC RESOURCES NOTE Genomic Resources Notes accepted 1 February 2013­31 March 2013 GENOMIC RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT CONSORTIUM,1 MATTHEW G. KING,2 SE´ BASTIEN RENAUT,3 LOREN H. RIESEBERG2,4 and HEATHER C. ROWE3 1 Molecular Ecology Resources Editorial Office, 6270 University Blvd, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4

  2. 2004 Notes2Providers.doc -1-Notes to Retail Providers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with the meter data reported to the system operator (Retail providers that purchase electricity from a power pool2004 Notes2Providers.doc -1- Notes to Retail Providers February 2005 Power Source Disclosure than the California Mix, (Net System Power)i . As a retail provider you are probably aware that all

  3. Scientific note A scientific note on the partial nucleotide sequence of a US strain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Scientific note A scientific note on the partial nucleotide sequence of a US strain of Kashmir bee bee virus / nucleotide sequence / RT-PCR Kashmir bee virus (KBV) was first isolated from a diseased sequence of the amplified product. The BLASTN search of the Nucleotide Sequence Database at the National

  4. Radioactive waste processing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Robert E. (Lombard, IL); Ziegler, Anton A. (Darien, IL); Serino, David F. (Maplewood, MN); Basnar, Paul J. (Western Springs, IL)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for use in processing radioactive waste materials for shipment and storage in solid form in a container is disclosed. The container includes a top, and an opening in the top which is smaller than the outer circumference of the container. The apparatus includes an enclosure into which the container is placed, solution feed apparatus for adding a solution containing radioactive waste materials into the container through the container opening, and at least one rotatable blade for blending the solution with a fixing agent such as cement or the like as the solution is added into the container. The blade is constructed so that it can pass through the opening in the top of the container. The rotational axis of the blade is displaced from the center of the blade so that after the blade passes through the opening, the blade and container can be adjusted so that one edge of the blade is adjacent the cylindrical wall of the container, to insure thorough mixing. When the blade is inside the container, a substantially sealed chamber is formed to contain vapors created by the chemical action of the waste solution and fixant, and vapors emanating through the opening in the container.

  5. Generalized parton distribution functions and the nucleon spin sum rules in the chiral quark soliton model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wakamatsu, M.; Tsujimoto, H. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The theoretical predictions are given for the forward limit of the unpolarized spin-flip isovector generalized parton distribution function (E{sup u}-E{sup d})(x,{xi},t) within the framework of the chiral quark soliton model, with full inclusion of the polarization of Dirac sea quarks. We observe that [(H{sup u}-H{sup d})+(E{sup u}-E{sup d})](x,0,0) has a sharp peak around x=0, which we interpret as a signal of the importance of the pionic qq excitation with large spatial extension in the transverse direction. Another interesting indication given by the predicted distribution in combination with Ji's angular momentum sum rule is that the d quark carries more angular momentum than the u quark in the proton, which may have some relation with the physics of the violation of the Gottfried sum rule.

  6. Sum-Rate Optimal Power Policies for Energy Harvesting Transmitters in an Interference Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tutuncuoglu, Kaya

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper considers a two-user Gaussian interference channel with energy harvesting transmitters. Different than conventional battery powered wireless nodes, energy harvesting transmitters have to adapt transmission to availability of energy at a particular instant. In this setting, the optimal power allocation problem to maximize sum throughput within a given deadline is formulated. The convergence of the proposed iterative coordinate descent method for the problem is proved and the short-term throughput maximizing offline power allocation policy is found. Examples for interference regions with known sum capacities are given with directional water-filling interpretations when possible. Next, stochastic data arrivals are addressed. Finally online and/or distributed near-optimal policies are proposed. Performance of the proposed algorithms are demonstrated through simulations.

  7. Waste products in highway construction. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, C.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report presents waste materials and products for highway construction. The general legislation, local liability, and research projects related to waste materials are outlined. The waste materials and products presented include waste paving materials, industrial ash materials, taconite tailing materials, waste tire rubber materials and products, building rubble materials, incinerator ash products and materials, waste glass materials, waste shingle materials and products, waste plastics products, and slag materials. For each waste category, the legislation and restrictions, material properties, construction and application, field performance, and recycling at the end of service life if available are discussed.

  8. Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) Policy Category Other Policy Policy Type Environmental Regulations Affected Technologies BiomassBiogas, Coal with CCS,...

  9. Sulfate Adsorption at the Buried Fluorite-Solution Interface Revealed by Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sulfate Adsorption at the Buried Fluorite-Solution Interface Revealed by Vibrational Sum Frequency the adsorption of sulfate at the buried fluorite (CaF2)/Na2SO4 solution surface at pH 7 and 298 K in the presence surface with an average surface free energy of adsorption of -31 ± 3 kJ/mol for pH 7 solutions at 298 K

  10. Dynamic properties of one-component strongly coupled plasmas: The sum-rule approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arkhipov, Yu. V.; Askaruly, A.; Davletov, A. E. [Department of Optics and Plasma Physics, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole Bi 96, Almaty 050012 (Kazakhstan); Ballester, D. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Tkachenko, I. M. [Instituto de Matematica Pura y Aplicada, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Zwicknagel, G. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik II, Erlangen-Nuernberg Universitaet, Staudtstr. 7, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamic characteristics of strongly coupled one-component plasmas are studied within the moment approach. Our results on the dynamic structure factor and the dynamic local-field correction satisfy the sum rules and other exact relations automatically. A quantitative agreement is obtained with numerous simulation data on the plasma dynamic properties, including the dispersion and decay of collective modes. Our approach allows us to correct and complement the results previously found with other treatments.

  11. Single particle sum rules in the nuclear deep-inelastic region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rozynek, J.; Wilk, G. [Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Hoza 69, PL-00-689 Warsaw (Poland)

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have modeled the parton distribution in nuclei using a suitably modified nuclear Fermi motion. The modifications concern the nucleon rest energy which changes the Bjoerken x in a nuclear medium. We also introduce final state interactions between the scattered nucleon and the rest of the nucleus. The energy-momentum sum rule is saturated. Good agreement with experimental data of the EMC effect for x>0.15 and nuclear lepton pair production data has been obtained.

  12. Four-quark condensates in open-charm chiral QCD sum rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Hilger; Thomas Buchheim; Burkhard Kampfer; Stefan Leupold

    2012-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, in Hilger et al. (2011) [1] QCD sum rules for chiral partners in the open-charm meson sector have been presented at nonzero baryon net density or temperature up to and including mass dimension 5. Referring to this, details concerning the cancelation of infrared divergences are presented and important technical and conceptional ingredients for an incorporation of four-quark condensates beyond factorization and of other mass dimension 6 condensates are collected.

  13. Pharmaceutical waste may be a hazardous chemical waste, controlled substance or biomedical waste. Proper classification is necessary to be in compliance with the laws regulating each waste type.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Steven C.

    Pharmaceutical waste may be a hazardous chemical waste, controlled substance or biomedical waste. Hazardous Chemical Pharmaceutical Waste: A number of common pharmaceuticals are regulated as hazardous or more of the EPA characteristics of a hazardous chemical waste are also regulated as a hazardous

  14. WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minimization/ Volume Reduction 0 Solid Radioactive Waste $2,168 $0 $2,168 Vial Crusher for glass vialsWASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED, REUSED, RECYCLED OR CONSERVED IN 2004 WASTE TYPE DESCRIPTION DETAILS * Automotive Waste Substitution 510 Hazardous Waste $1,020 $1,000 $1,000 Aqueous Solvent

  15. Waste Toolkit A-Z Light bulbs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melham, Tom

    Waste Toolkit A-Z Light bulbs Can I recycle light bulbs? It depends what type of bulbs you have of in the normal University waste bins (landfill waste). Energy saving bulbs and fluorescent tubes are classified light bulbs? Standard filament bulbs Put in the waste bin (landfill waste) as these are not classified

  16. Interface control document between the Tank Waste Remediation System and the Solid Waste Disposal Division

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, D.R.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document discusses the interface between the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) and the Solid Waste Division (SWD).

  17. Vitrification of high sulfate wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, R.A.; Whittington, K.F.; Peters, R.D.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) through the Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) is investigating the application of vitrification technology to mixed wastes within the DOE system This work involves identifying waste streams, laboratory testing to identify glass formulations and characterize the vitrified product, and demonstration testing with the actual waste in a pilot-scale system. Part of this program is investigating process limits for various waste components, specifically those components that typically create problems for the application of vitrification, such as sulfate, chloride, and phosphate. This work describes results from vitrification testing for a high-sulfate waste, the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basin waste at Hanford. A low melting phosphate glass formulation has been developed for a waste stream high in sodium and sulfate. At melt temperatures in the range of 1,000 C to 1,200 C, sulfate in the waste is decomposed to gaseous oxides and driven off during melting, while the remainder of the oxides stay in the melt. Decomposition of the sulfates eliminates the processing problems typically encountered in vitrification of sulfate-containing wastes, resulting in separation of the sulfate from the remainder of the waste and allowing the sulfate to be collected in the off-gas system and treated as a secondary waste stream. Both the vitreous product and intentionally devitrified samples are durable when compared to reference glasses by TCLP and DI water leach tests. Simple, short tests to evaluate the compatibility of the glasses with potential melter materials found minimal corrosion with most materials.

  18. Waste Toolkit A-Z Food waste (recycling on-site)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melham, Tom

    into compost in 14 days, when mixed with wood chippings (from your grounds/gardens). The waste is heated usingWaste Toolkit A-Z Food waste (recycling on-site) How can I recycle food waste on-site? Recycling food waste on-site is a new concept as the University typically has its waste collected and taken away

  19. Treatment of mercury containing waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalb, Paul D. (Wading River, NY); Melamed, Dan (Gaithersburg, MD); Patel, Bhavesh R (Elmhurst, NY); Fuhrmann, Mark (Babylon, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is provided for the treatment of mercury containing waste in a single reaction vessel which includes a) stabilizing the waste with sulfur polymer cement under an inert atmosphere to form a resulting mixture and b) encapsulating the resulting mixture by heating the mixture to form a molten product and casting the molten product as a monolithic final waste form. Additional sulfur polymer cement can be added in the encapsulation step if needed, and a stabilizing additive can be added in the process to improve the leaching properties of the waste form.

  20. Progress Update: TRU Waste Shipping

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A progress update at the Savannah River Site. A continued effort on shipping TRU waste to WIPP in Carlsbad, New Mexico.

  1. Process for preparing liquid wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oden, Laurance L. (Albany, OR); Turner, Paul C. (Albany, OR); O'Connor, William K. (Lebanon, OR); Hansen, Jeffrey S. (Corvallis, OR)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for preparing radioactive and other hazardous liquid wastes for treatment by the method of vitrification or melting is provided for.

  2. Solid Waste Management Act (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act provides for the planning and regulation of solid waste storage, collection, transportation, processing, treatment, and disposal. It requires that municipalities submit plans for municipal...

  3. Performance Assessment for Transuranic Waste

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High- Level, and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes, can be met. The 40 CFR 191 analyses...

  4. Hazardous Waste Facilities Siting (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations describe the siting and permitting process for hazardous waste facilities and reference rules for construction, operation, closure, and post-closure of these facilities.

  5. Hazardous Waste Transporter Permits (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transportation of hazardous wastes into or through the State of Connecticut requires a permit. Some exceptions apply. The regulations provide information about obtaining permits and other permit...

  6. Reporting Fraud, Waste, and Abuse

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This Notice reminds all DOE employees of their duty to report allegations of fraud, waste, and abuse to the Office of Inspector General. No cancellation.

  7. Nuclear waste incineration technology status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziegler, D.L.; Lehmkuhl, G.D.; Meile, L.J.

    1981-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The incinerators developed and/or used for radioactive waste combustion are discussed and suggestions are made for uses of incineration in radioactive waste management programs and for incinerators best suited for specific applications. Information on the amounts and types of radioactive wastes are included to indicate the scope of combustible wastes being generated and in existence. An analysis of recently developed radwaste incinerators is given to help those interested in choosing incinerators for specific applications. Operating information on US and foreign incinerators is also included to provide additional background information. Development needs are identified for extending incinerator applications and for establishing commercial acceptance.

  8. Industrial Waste Heat Recovery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, M. E.; Solomon, N. G.; Tabb, E. S.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    instrumented tubes, are ;i 0 W Q. presented in Figures 5, 6, and 7. Figure 5 shows 2 w .. -100 the response of the tube to header weld joint which .. ~ TIC 89- TIC 93 w ?200 Q results from the thermal isolation design. Note the SHEll INLET TEMPERATURE... low thermal gradient across the weld joints, thermo DECREASES TO AMBIENT ?300 couples 65 and 81 and thermocouples 82 and 90. How -400 0 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 TIME (MINUTES) ever, the tube which was directly welded to the hot header had a much higher...

  9. Xyce parallel electronic simulator release notes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiter, Eric Richard; Hoekstra, Robert John; Mei, Ting; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard Louis; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Coffey, Todd Stirling; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick; Santarelli, Keith R.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator has been written to support, in a rigorous manner, the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratories electrical designers. Specific requirements include, among others, the ability to solve extremely large circuit problems by supporting large-scale parallel computing platforms, improved numerical performance and object-oriented code design and implementation. The Xyce release notes describe: Hardware and software requirements New features and enhancements Any defects fixed since the last release Current known defects and defect workarounds For up-to-date information not available at the time these notes were produced, please visit the Xyce web page at http://www.cs.sandia.gov/xyce.

  10. Columbia University Hazardous Waste Room Inspection Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    Storage Area Hazardous Waste Room Inspection Report Location: Bldg. Room: Date: Inspected ByColumbia University Hazardous Waste Room Inspection Report Flammable Storage Area Lack Pack always closed while holding hazardous wastes? Comment: 12. Are containers labeled? Date

  11. Biotechnology for environmental control and waste treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donaldson, T.L.; Harris, M.T.; Lee, D.D.; Walker, J.F.; Strandberg, G.W.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A slide show is reproduced here to review the technology of anaerobic digestion as a process for cleaning waste waters from municipal and industry wastes. Radioactive wastes are addressed also. (PSB)

  12. Hazardous Waste Management Standards and Regulations (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act states the standards and regulations for the management of hazardous waste. No person shall construct, modify or operate a hazardous waste facility or otherwise dispose of hazardous waste...

  13. Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Program (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Hazardous Waste Facilities Siting Board is responsible for overseeing the siting of hazardous waste facilities in Maryland, and will treat hazardous waste facilities separately from low-level...

  14. Eugene Solid Waste Management Market Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    Eugene Solid Waste Management Market Analysis Prepared By: Mitchell Johnson Alex Sonnichsen #12;Eugene Solid Waste Management Market Analysis May 2012 Page 1 Summary This study examines the economic impact of the solid waste management system

  15. Printed on recycled paper. 2013 Cornell Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    management by focusing University resources and capabilities on this pressing economic, environmental of waste generation and composition, waste reduction, risk management, environmental equity and publicPrinted on recycled paper. 2013 Cornell Waste Management Institute CWMI is a program

  16. Radioactive waste processing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, R.E.; Ziegler, A.A.; Serino, D.F.; Basnar, P.J.

    1985-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for use in processing radioactive waste materials for shipment and storage in solid form in a container is disclosed. The container includes a top, and an opening in the top which is smaller than the outer circumference of the container. The apparatus includes an enclosure into which the container is placed, solution feed apparatus for adding a solution containing radioactive waste materials into the container through the container opening, and at least one rotatable blade for blending the solution with a fixing agent such as cement or the like as the solution is added into the container. The blade is constructed so that it can pass through the opening in the top of the container. The rotational axis of the blade is displaced from the center of the blade so that after the blade passes through the opening, the blade and container can be adjusted so that one edge of the blade is adjacent the cylindrical wall of the container, to insure thorough mixing. When the blade is inside the container, a substantially sealed chamber is formed to contain vapors created by the chemical action of the waste solution and fixant, and vapors emanating through the opening in the container. The chamber may be formed by placing a removable extension over the top of the container. The extension communicates with the apparatus so that such vapors are contained within the container, extension and solution feed apparatus. A portion of the chamber includes coolant which condenses the vapors. The resulting condensate is returned to the container by the force of gravity.

  17. Coolside waste management research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Objective was to produce sufficient information on physical and chemical nature of Coolside waste (Coolside No.1, 3 at Edgewater power plant) to design and construct stable, environmentally safe landfills. Progress during this period was centered on analytical method development, elemental and mineralogical analysis of samples, and field facilities preparation to receive lysimeter fill. Sample preparation techniques for thick target PIXE/PIGE were investigated; good agreement between measured and actual values for standard fly ash were obtained for all elements except Fe, Ba, K (PIXE).

  18. Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.NewofGeothermal848 UnlimitedIntegrated DisposalWaste Treatment and

  19. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulenceUtilizeRural PublicRates >-Plans andWaste Isolation

  20. The Integrated Waste Tracking System - A Flexible Waste Management Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Robert Stephen

    2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has fully embraced a flexible, computer-based tool to help increase waste management efficiency and integrate multiple operational functions from waste generation through waste disposition while reducing cost. The Integrated Waste Tracking System (IWTS)provides comprehensive information management for containerized waste during generation,storage, treatment, transport, and disposal. The IWTS provides all information necessary for facilities to properly manage and demonstrate regulatory compliance. As a platformindependent, client-server and Web-based inventory and compliance system, the IWTS has proven to be a successful tracking, characterization, compliance, and reporting tool that meets the needs of both operations and management while providing a high level of management flexibility.

  1. LLW Notes, Volume 12, Number 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, C.; Brown, H. [eds.; Colsant, J.; Lovinger, T.; Scheele, L.; Shaker, M.A.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contents include articles entitled: California DHS sues US Interior Department to compel land transfer; LLW Forum holds winter meeting; LLW Forum waste information working group meets; LLW Forum regulatory issues discussion group meets; Envirocare investigation transferred to feds; Host state TCC meets in Laughlin, Nevada; BLM to require new permit for California site testing; Federal agencies and committees; Pena sworn in as Energy Secretary, Grumbly departs DOE; U.S. Supreme Court tackles property rights issues; GAO to study DOI`s actions; Congress scrutinizes FY `98 budget requests; and Senate committee passes high-level waste bill: Clinton threatens to veto.

  2. COMPUTER SECURITY revision list Subject Notes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chothia, Tom

    COMPUTER SECURITY revision list Subject Notes AES DES 3-DES CBC Diffie-Hellman Elgaml RSA KeyCrypt Electronic Signatures PGP Access Control Matrix Access Control Lists #12;COMPUTER SECURITY revision list for Linux Confused Deputy Problem MD5 SHA1 SHA2 / SHA256 / SHA512 SHA3 Collision attacks MAC Password

  3. DANE TECHNICAL NOTE INFN -LNF, Accelerator Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN)

    of the utilities (electrical power substation and cooling system) in the linac tunnel and klystron gallery before. Hutton (CEBAF), Chairman W. Scandale (CERN) A. Wrülich (ST) Overall Project Progress and Status The Committee noted the progress made since the last Review and is pleased to see that the major Project

  4. Technical Note Puncture protection of PVC geomembranes______________________________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Note Puncture protection of PVC geomembranes a design procedure for estimating the puncture protection of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) geomembranes. The puncture resistance of 0.5 mm, 0.75 mm, and 1.0 mm thick PVC geomembranes was measured using the truncated

  5. Ocean Engineering 33 (2006) 22092223 Technical Note

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohseni, Kamran

    Ocean Engineering 33 (2006) 2209­2223 Technical Note Pulsatile vortex generators for low-speed maneuvering of small underwater vehicles Kamran Mohseni� Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences, science writer). #12;1. Introduction Oceans hold the key to the origin and continuity of life on the Earth

  6. Section Notes 3 The Simplex Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yiling

    Section Notes 3 The Simplex Algorithm Applied Math 121 Week of September 22, 2014 Goals for the week · understand how to get from an LP to a simplex tableau. · be familiar with reduced costs, optimal solutions, different types of variables and their roles. · understand the steps of simplex phases I and II

  7. Section Notes 3 The Simplex Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yiling

    Section Notes 3 The Simplex Algorithm Applied Math 121 Week of February 14, 2011 Goals for the week · understand how to get from an LP to a simplex tableau. · be familiar with reduced costs, optimal solutions, different types of variables and their roles. · understand the steps of simplex phases I and II. · be able

  8. Section Notes 3 The Simplex Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yiling

    Section Notes 3 The Simplex Algorithm Applied Math 121 Week of February 17, 2014 Goals for the week · understand how to get from an LP to a simplex tableau. · be familiar with reduced costs, optimal solutions, different types of variables and their roles. · understand the steps of simplex phases I and II. · be able

  9. Briefing Note 2010 19 15 September 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    incremental costs for energy efficiency (EE) retrofits than do newer buildings. Throughout New York, 43Briefing Note 2010 ­ 19 15 September 2010 Energy Efficiency Retrofits Case Study - Empire State Building Produced in partnership with ISIS | A Research Centre | Sauder School of Business | UBC Author

  10. Technical Note Graphene: Substrate preparation and introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Note Graphene: Substrate preparation and introduction Radosav S. Pantelic a , Ji Won Suk September 2010 Accepted 4 October 2010 Available online xxxx Keywords: Graphene Graphene oxide Cryo the transfer of continuous, single-layer, pristine graphene to standard Quan- tifoil TEM grids. We compare

  11. Engineering Notes Ice Shape Characterization Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tino, Peter

    Engineering Notes Ice Shape Characterization Using Self-Organizing Maps Stephen T. McClain Baylor. Introduction DURING the validation and verification of ice accretion codes, predicted ice shapes must be compared with experimental measurements of wind-tunnel or atmospheric ice shapes. Current methods for ice

  12. Briefing Note 2010 25 16 December 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    of the CDM carbon market distortion issue are 19 chemical gas manufacturers, located mainly in China manufacturers in order to determine if the carbon crediting system has been manipulated.xi To date, China has1 Briefing Note 2010 ­ 25 16 December 2010 Carbon Market Distortions and Diminishing Environmental

  13. Briefing Note 2010 -9 21 June 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    for a carbon tariff in an attempt to curb unfair competition from countries like China, which have weakerBriefing Note 2010 - 9 21 June 2010 Border Carbon Adjustments: The Canadian Context Produced Border carbon adjustments (BCAs), also known as carbon tariffs, are being proposed in the EU and US

  14. AGN Taxonomy and Unification Historical notes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aretxaga, Itziar

    Lecture 1 AGN Taxonomy and Unification · Historical notes · Multifrequency detection of nuclear activity · Classification of AGN - taxonomy · Unification · Evidence for obscuring tori in AGN Itziar Aretxaga (INAOE) @El Escorial, Dec 2007 #12;AGN taxonomy "Active" is used to refer to energetic processes

  15. CS229 Lecture notes Generative Learning algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kosecka, Jana

    analysis (GDA). In this model, we'll assume that p(x|y) is distributed according to a multivariate normal discriminant analysis The first generative learning algorithm that we'll look at is Gaussian discrim- inant. In these notes, we'll talk about a different type of learning algorithm. Consider a classification problem

  16. 203-HJT-0611 UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    WELDS SHALL BE WITH ASME SECTION IX. NO CODE STAMP REQUIRED. 1. WELDING SHALL BE PERFORMED IN ACCORDANCE DIMENSIONS AND TOLERANCES PER ASME Y14.5M 3. MACHINED FINISH 125 MICRO- INCHES RMS 4. CONCENTRICITY .010 TIR.850 2.4 .9 2.850 .900 .975 1.20 NOTES 1. WELDING SHALL BE PERFORMED IN ACCORDANCE WITH ASME SECTION IX

  17. UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED 203-HJT-0611

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    WITH ASME SECTION IX. NO CODE STAMP REQUIRED. 2. NO RADIOGRAPHY REQUIRED. ALL WELDS SHALL BE DYE PENETRANT.349 NOTES 1. WELDING SHALL BE PERFORMED IN ACCORDANCE WITH ASME SECTION IX. NO CODE STAMP REQUIRED. 2 AND TOLERANCES PER ASME Y14.5M 3. MACHINED FINISH 125 MICRO- INCHES RMS 4. CONCENTRICITY .010 TIR 5. MACHINED

  18. UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED 203-HJT-0620A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    .928 2.298 NOTES 1. WELDING AND INSPECTION SHALL BE PERFORMED IN ACCORDANCE WITH ASME SECTION IX. NO CODE ASME Y14.5M 3. MACHINED FINISH 125 MICRO- INCHES RMS 4. CONCENTRICITY .010 TIR 5. MACHINED ANGLES 1 INSPECTION REQUIRED. 2. NUMBER OF PIPE BUTT WELDS SHOULD BE MINIMIZED. NO CODE STAMP REQUIRED. IN ACCORDANCE

  19. DANE TECHNICAL NOTE INFN -LNF, Accelerator Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN)

    THE RADIOFREQUENCY SYSTEM FOR DANE: FIRST REMARKS R. Boni, A. Gallo INTRODUCTION This note presents some considerations on the Radiofrequency System (RFS) for DANE. It is worthed to mention that the RFS has to supply to the beams the energy lost by synchrotron radiation and parasitic losses. We propose two different solutions

  20. Research Note Fast 2-flip move evaluations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao, Jin-Kao

    problems Fred Glover1 and Jin-Kao Hao2 1 OptTek Systems, Inc. 1919 Seventh Street Boulder, CO 80302, USA glover@opttek.com 2 Laboratoire d'Etude et de Recherche en Informatique (LERIA) Université d'Angers 2. Corresponding author: Fred Glover Biographical notes: Fred Glover holds the title of Distinguished Professor

  1. CenterPulse ContentsDirector's Notes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    to our year-in-review newsletter, CenterPulse. Please forward it to your colleagues to help us improveCenterPulse ContentsDirector's Notes 2012 Year in Review Happy New Year, everyone! The year 2012 that recommended full continuation of funding for years 52-56 of NIH support. While the final funding level

  2. GEOLOGICAL NOTE Desert Pavement: An Environmental Canary?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    GEOLOGICAL NOTE Desert Pavement: An Environmental Canary? P K. Haft Division of Earth and Ocean 27708 Ie-mail: /wff@geo.duke_eciul ABSTRACT Ongoing ctisruption of ancient, varnished desert pavement that the pavement disturbances reported here ~ue rarc on the millcnnhll time scale of desert varnish format ion

  3. Agent Notes Day 4 ~ Health Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ Agent Notes Day 4 ~ Health Training In preparation for the Health Day, you could order the National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health. To order these free booklets, go to www in the afternoon, and edit your agenda to reflect your choices. Several HealthHints newsletters are referenced

  4. Briefing Note 2011 29 4 February 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    Briefing Note 2011 ­ 29 4 February 2011 Fracking in BC: Integrating climate change issues Produced - otherwise known as fracking. However the current controversy regarding fracking, including in the US options to reduce associated emissions, water, and health impacts. Fracking involves shooting a high

  5. Informal Assessment Work Group Meeting Notes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Laughlin, Jay

    Informal Assessment Work Group Meeting Notes November 15, 2006 Present: Rula Awwad-Rafferty, Doug Baker, Dick Battaglia, Ben Beard, Suzi Billington, Alton Campbell, Jeanne Christiansen, Gail Eckwright is completed for all programs by May 2007? (Can we do the level of work needed in this time period?) Doug

  6. Application Note (A9) Revision: A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnsen, Sönke

    measurements of light falling onto a flat surface. Such studies vary from solar UV exposure limitsApplication Note (A9) Revision: A AUGUST 1995 OPTRONIC LABORATORIES, INC. 4632 36TH STREET Orlando on the wavelength of light so the bluer wavelengths are scattered more strongly than redder. This leads

  7. NOTE: The IRB does not stamp the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loudon, Catherine

    obtaining Short Form consent: Download and review the current IRB approval letter from the Doc DepotNOTE: The IRB does not stamp the HIPAA Research Authorization Form, the Bill of Rights or the Short Short Form Consent ­ The Basics Date of Last Revision: 08-27-2013 Audience: Researchers Utilizing

  8. Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery: Practice Notes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novak, Petra Kralj

    1 Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery: Practice Notes dr. Petra Kralj Novak Petra.Kralj.Novak@ijs.si and exam · 2013/12/16: Written exam, seminar proposal discussion · 2014/1/8: Data mining seminar gain becomes the root 7. Divide the set S into subsets Si according to the values of A 8. Repeat steps

  9. Computer Note A Prototype Object Database for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neigel, Joseph E.

    Computer Note A Prototype Object Database for Mitochondrial DNA Variation J. E. NEIGEL AND P preserved. We hope to prevent further loss by establishing a community database for population genetic surveys. We explored the feasibility of a population genetics database by developing a prototype

  10. Linear Algebra Notes David A. SANTOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Linear Algebra Notes David A. SANTOS dsantos@ccp.edu January 2, 2010 REVISION #12;ii Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 2 Matrices and Matrix Operations 18 2.1 The Algebra of Matrices . . . . . . . . . . . 18 2.3 Diagonalisability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 7.4 Theorem of Cayley and Hamilton . . . . . 147 8 Linear Algebra

  11. Panel Session Notes Session II: Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    to make cars more efficient, to make solar panels store more energy to be dispersed throughout the nightPanel Session Notes Session II: Energy Moderator: Dr. Jennifer Curtis Panelists: Dr. Gary Peter price for operating cost and the cost of manufacturing go down, there are many more sectors in the US

  12. A. La Rosa Lecture Notes APPLIED OPTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    variation of the electric field of the incident radiation Since the corresponding Poynting vector is given ox , which will depend on the electric field amplitude of the incident radiation. So, we need to find electrical charge emits radiation; the latter is camouflaged in the parameter . Note 2: Equation (11

  13. Practice Note Planning for brownfield land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Practice Note Planning for brownfield land regeneration to woodland and wider green infrastructure 1FCPN022 Gail Atkinson and Kieron Doick March 2014 The regeneration of brownfield land to green of brownfield regeneration to woodland in order to inform project planning, raise awareness of lessons learnt

  14. NASA TECHNICAL NOTE APOLLO EXPERIENCE REPORT -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    .' 1 * . NASA TECHNICAL NOTE APOLLO EXPERIENCE REPORT - SPACECRAFT STRUCTURAL WINDOWS by Oruis E(s)) ' Apollo Spacecraft * Chemically Tempered ' Fracture Mechanics 'h e a l e d Glass * Coatings ' Thermally is presented for the Apollo command and lunar modules. This report presents window design philosophy, design

  15. Fishery Notes EI Nino and Its Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fishery Notes EI Nino and Its Impact on Ecuadorean Fisheries Ecuadorean scientists report that an unusually powerful EI Nino in the eastern Pacific is adversely affecting Ecuador's pelagic fisheries. EI. The impact can be partic- ularly severe on larval and juvenile fish and, as a result, the effects of EI Nino

  16. Poor Theory Notes Toward a Manifesto

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loudon, Catherine

    Poor Theory Notes Toward a Manifesto Poor theory is less a theory than a way of proceeding. Poor theory proposes to find ways of making the most of limited resources. Poor theory uses the tools at hand. Poor theory suggests the need to `work around' intransigent problems, when clear solutions

  17. DANE TECHNICAL NOTE INFN -LNF, Accelerator Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN)

    K K DANE TECHNICAL NOTE INFN - LNF, Accelerator Division Frascati, 28 November, 2002 IR-12 together with the total losses around the rings. Results seem encouraging, as calculated loss rates at IR2 in details and compared to calculated losses for the KLOE and the DEAR cases. 1 Introduction Background rates

  18. BNL/SNS TECHNICAL NOTE R. Witkover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BNL/SNS TECHNICAL NOTE NO. 126 R. Witkover TechSource, Inc. Santa Fe, NM September 2, 2003 COLLIDER BLM Signal Calibration Constants R. Witkover TechSource, Inc. Santa Fe, NM Background The Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) system is designed to measure beam losses in the SNS using Ion Chambers supplied by BNL

  19. Infrared renormalons and the relations between the Gross-Llewellyn Smith and the Bjorken polarized and unpolarized sum rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. L. Kataev

    2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    It is demonstrated that the infrared renormalon calculus indicates that the QCD theoretical expressions for the Gross-Llewelln Smith sum rules and for the Bjorken polarized and unpolarized ones contain an identical negative twist-4 1/Q^2 correction. This observation is supported by the consideration of the results of calculations of the corresponding twist-4 matrix elements. Together with the indication of the similarity of perturbative QCD corrections to these three sum rules, this observation leads to simple new theoretical relations between the Gross-Llewellyn Smith and Bjorken polarized and unpolarized sum rules in the energy region $Q^2\\geq 1 GeV^2$. The validity of this relation is checked using concrete experimental data for the Gross-Llewellyn Smith and Bjorken polarized sum rules

  20. Absolute frequency measurement of an SF6 two-photon line using a femtosecond optical comb and sum-frequency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Absolute frequency measurement of an SF6 two-photon line using a femtosecond optical comb and sum laser. The absolute frequency of a CO2 laser stabilized onto an SF6 two-photon line has been measured

  1. Os efeitos da sonegação fiscal na estrutura tributária ótima: experiência brasileira de aplicação das regras de 'lump-sum taxation'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    La Guardia, Renata

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    da sonegação fiscal. No Brasil, os tributos ‘lump-sum’ sãobusca averiguar se, ao Brasil, aplicam-se as conclusões desonegação fiscal. Claro que o Brasil não passou recentemente

  2. Methods, systems and apparatus for approximation of peak summed fundamental and third harmonic voltages in a multi-phase machine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ransom, Ray M. (Big Bear City, CA); Gallegos-Lopez, Gabriel (Torrance, CA); Kinoshita, Michael H. (Redondo Beach, CA)

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods, system and apparatus are provided for quickly approximating a peak summed magnitude (A) of a phase voltage (Vph) waveform in a multi-phase system that implements third harmonic injection.

  3. Solid Waste Management Act (West Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In addition to establishing a comprehensive program of controlling all phases of solid waste management and assigning responsibilities for solid waste management to the Secretary of Department of...

  4. Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project - October 2010 October 2010 Review of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant...

  5. Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Operations, EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations, EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 The documents...

  6. Independent Oversight Assessment, Salt Waste Processing Facility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Salt Waste Processing Facility Project - January 2013 January 2013 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project The U.S. Department...

  7. Enforcement Letter, Westinghouse Waste Isolation Division - October...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Westinghouse Waste Isolation Division related to Quality Assurance and Occupational Radiation Protection Noncompliances at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant On October 3, 2000,...

  8. Waste Package Materials Performance Peer Review | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Waste Package Materials Performance Peer Review Waste Package Materials Performance Peer Review A consensus peer review of the current technical basis and the planned experimental...

  9. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Observation of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Facility Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Systems Hazards Analysis Activities...

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: radiation waste cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    waste cleanup ECIS and UOP (a Honewell Company): CSTs Clean Radioactive Waste in Fukushima and Worldwide On February 14, 2013, in Energy, Materials Science, Nuclear Energy,...

  11. Integrated Solid Waste Management Act (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act affirms the state's support for alternative waste management practices, including waste reduction and resource recovery. Each county and municipality is required to file an integrated...

  12. DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This regulation regulates the generation, storage, transportation, treatment, and disposal of hazardous waste, and wherever feasible, reduces or eliminates waste at the source. It is the policy of...

  13. Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record, Waste Treatment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    system (LMH), the melter equipment support handling system (LSH), the radioactive solid waste handling system (RWH), and the radioactive liquid waste disposal system (RLD)....

  14. Chapter 47 Solid Waste Facilities (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter establishes the permitting standards for solid waste sites or facilities, the standards applicable to all solid waste sites or facilities, and the standards for certification of...

  15. Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Presentation from the U.S....

  16. Vehicle Fuel Economy Improvement through Thermoelectric Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Economy Improvement through Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Vehicle Fuel Economy Improvement through Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions...

  17. Thermoelectric Generator Development for Automotive Waste Heat...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Thermoelectric Generator Development for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and...

  18. 1993 Solid Waste Reference Forecast Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valero, O.J.; Blackburn, C.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Kaae, P.S.; Armacost, L.L.; Garrett, S.M.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, which updates WHC-EP-0567, 1992 Solid Waste Reference Forecast Summary, (WHC 1992) forecasts the volumes of solid wastes to be generated or received at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site during the 30-year period from FY 1993 through FY 2022. The data used in this document were collected from Westinghouse Hanford Company forecasts as well as from surveys of waste generators at other US Department of Energy sites who are now shipping or plan to ship solid wastes to the Hanford Site for disposal. These wastes include low-level and low-level mixed waste, transuranic and transuranic mixed waste, and nonradioactive hazardous waste.

  19. Solid Waste Management Policy and Programs (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These statutes encourage the State and local governments to develop waste management strategies to achieve the maximum possible reduction in waste generation, eliminate or reduce adverse...

  20. Independent Oversight Assessment, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - January 2012 Independent Oversight Assessment, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - January 2012 January 2012 Assessment of the...

  1. Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides a brief overview of municipal solid waste energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply waste to energy within the Federal sector.

  2. Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) Reports and Records of Decision Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS)...

  3. Advanced Membrane Systems: Recovering Wasteful and Hazardous...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Membrane Systems: Recovering Wasteful and Hazardous Fuel Vapors at the Gasoline Tank Advanced Membrane Systems: Recovering Wasteful and Hazardous Fuel Vapors at the...

  4. Missouri Hazardous Waste Management Law (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Hazardous Waste Program, administered by the Hazardous Waste Management Commission in the Department of Natural Resources, regulates the processing, transportation, and disposal of hazardous...

  5. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2003,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    180 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2003, approximately and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 49

  6. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last recorded U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2001,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    180 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last recorded U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2001, approximately, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 41%; Russia, 21

  7. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2002,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    182 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2002, approximately, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 48%; Russia, 16

  8. Waste incineration and the community -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    , metals, plastics, paper and hazardous materials from the organic portion of household waste, together the volumes collected have often exceeded the recycling capacity. Composting the organic portion has also beenWaste incineration and the community - The Amsterdam experience The successful community relations

  9. THE ECONOMIST The waste industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of ten feet. Humanity has always produced waste in vast quantities; but more people, more consumption as with toxic chemicals, governments need to persuade people that they should be responsible for the muck into electricity or fuel or fertiliser. Environmentalists dream of a world in which almost nothing is wasted. #12

  10. Generating Steam by Waste Incineration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, D. R.; Darrow, L. A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Combustible waste is a significant source of steam at the new John Deere Tractor Works assembly plant in Waterloo, Iowa. The incinerators, each rated to consume two tons of solid waste per hour, are expected to provide up to 100 percent of the full...

  11. Reporting Fraud, Waste, and Abuse

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To notify all Department of Energy (DOE) employees, including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) employees, of their duty to report allegations of fraud, waste, and abuse to the appropriate authorities, including the DOE Office of Inspector General (OIG). Cancels: DOE N 221.12, Reporting Fraud, Waste, and Abuse, dated 10-19-06

  12. Waste Management Coordinating Lead Authors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    -to-energy ..............................................601 10.4.4 Biological treatment including composting, anaerobic digestion, and MBT (Mechanical Biological Treatment) ........................................601 10.4.5 Waste reduction, re-use and recycling ..............602 10.4.6 Wastewater and sludge treatment.....................602 10.4.7 Waste

  13. Characterization of geothermal solid wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, W.F.; Stephens, F.B.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The compositions of 5 major types of geothermal wastes have been determined, and samples have been subjected to EPA recommended extraction tests to determine if they contain toxic metals that would classify the wastes as hazardous. Of the samples tested, the extracts of geothermal brines clearly contain levels of As, Ba and Pb exceeding the maximum allowed concentrations that characterize wastes as toxic. Only one other waste type, geothermal scale, exhibited EP toxicity. Pb was found in the extract of geothermal scale at a level of 7 mg/l, only 2 mg/l over the maximum limit. All of the other types of geothermal waste samples showed levels of toxic metals in the extracts well below the regulated limits.

  14. Radioactive waste material melter apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Newman, Darrell F. (Richland, WA); Ross, Wayne A. (Richland, WA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for preparing metallic radioactive waste material for storage is disclosed. The radioactive waste material is placed in a radiation shielded enclosure. The waste material is then melted with a plasma torch and cast into a plurality of successive horizontal layers in a mold to form a radioactive ingot in the shape of a spent nuclear fuel rod storage canister. The apparatus comprises a radiation shielded enclosure having an opening adapted for receiving a conventional transfer cask within which radioactive waste material is transferred to the apparatus. A plasma torch is mounted within the enclosure. A mold is also received within the enclosure for receiving the melted waste material and cooling it to form an ingot. The enclosure is preferably constructed in at least two parts to enable easy transport of the apparatus from one nuclear site to another.

  15. Radioactive waste material melter apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Newman, D.F.; Ross, W.A.

    1990-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for preparing metallic radioactive waste material for storage is disclosed. The radioactive waste material is placed in a radiation shielded enclosure. The waste material is then melted with a plasma torch and cast into a plurality of successive horizontal layers in a mold to form a radioactive ingot in the shape of a spent nuclear fuel rod storage canister. The apparatus comprises a radiation shielded enclosure having an opening adapted for receiving a conventional transfer cask within which radioactive waste material is transferred to the apparatus. A plasma torch is mounted within the enclosure. A mold is also received within the enclosure for receiving the melted waste material and cooling it to form an ingot. The enclosure is preferably constructed in at least two parts to enable easy transport of the apparatus from one nuclear site to another. 8 figs.

  16. Method of recycling hazardous waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The production of primary metal from ores has long been a necessary, but environmentally devastating process. Over the past 20 years, in an effort to lessen environmental impacts, the metal processing industry has developed methods for recovering metal values from certain hazardous wastes. However, these processes leave residual molten slag that requires disposal in hazardous waste landfills. A new process recovers valuable metals, metal alloys, and metal oxides from hazardous wastes, such as electric arc furnace (EAF) dust from steel mills, mill scale, spent aluminum pot liners, and wastewater treatment sludge from electroplating. At the same time, the process does not create residual waste for disposal. This new method uses all wastes from metal production processes. These hazardous materials are converted to three valuable products - mineral wool, zinc oxide, and high-grade iron.

  17. UK report on waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, J. [London Waste Regulation Authority (United Kingdom)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arising jointly from the National and European Union requirements for more intensive attention to be paid to the environment, the United Kingdom (UK) has taken many strides forward in protecting the environment from pollution and preventing harm to human health arising from the handling, transport and disposal of wastes. Major adjustments are taking place in Europe following the opening up of the Eastern European countries. The consequences of the illegal movement of wastes and its mistreatment and disposal are now recognised within the European Union. The UK as a member State is well aware of the consequences which arise from the lack of proper waste management. This paper discusses waste management and legislation pertaining to waste management in the United Kingdom.

  18. Tyndall Briefing Note No. 26 Tyndall Briefing Note No. 26 June 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    FOR A GLOBAL EMISSIONS TRADING SCHEME (GETS) FOR INTERNATIONAL BUNKERS (AVIATION AND SHIPPING) A Briefing Note the proposal for a global emissions trading scheme (GETS) included in the Open Letter to the IPCC from

  19. Proof of the the Riemann hypothesis from the strong density hypothesis via a power sum method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuanyou Cheng; S. Albeverio

    2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Riemann hypothesis is equivalent to the $\\varpi$-form of the prime number theorem as $\\varpi(x) =O(x\\sp{1/2} \\log\\sp{2} x)$, where $\\varpi(x) =\\sum\\sb{n\\le x}\\ \\bigl(\\Lambda(n) -1\\big)$ with the sum running through the set of all natural integers. Let ${\\mathsf Z}(s) = -\\tfrac{\\zeta\\sp{\\prime}(s)}{\\zeta(s)} -\\zeta(s)$. We use the classical integral formula for the Heaviside function in the form of ${\\mathsf H}(x) =\\int\\sb{m -i\\infty} \\sp{m +i\\infty} \\tfrac{x\\sp{s}}{s} \\dd s$ where $m >0$, and ${\\mathsf H}(x)$ is 0 when $\\tfrac{1}{2} 1$. However, we diverge from the literature by applying Cauchy's residue theorem to the function ${\\mathsf Z}(s) \\cdot \\tfrac{x\\sp{s}} {s}$, rather than $-\\tfrac{\\zeta\\sp{\\prime}(s)} {\\zeta(s)} \\cdot \\tfrac{x\\sp{s}}{s}$, so that we may utilize the formula for $\\tfrac{1}{2}1$ of ${\\mathsf Z}(s)$, we use induction to reduce the size of the exponent $\\theta$ in $\\varpi(x) =O(x\\sp{\\theta} \\log\\sp{2} x)$, while we also use induction on $x$ when $\\theta$ is fixed. We prove that the Riemann hypothesis is valid under the assumptions of the explicit strong density hypothesis and the Lindel\\"of hypothesis recently proven, via a result of the implication on the zero free regions from the remainder terms of the prime number theorem by the power sum method of Tur\\'an.

  20. Process waste assessment for solid low-level radioactive waste and solid TRU waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haney, L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Gamble, G.S. [Law Environmental, Inc., Kennesaw, GA (United States)

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Process Waste Assessments (PWAs) are a necessary and important part of a comprehensive waste management plan. PWAs are required by Federal RCRA regulations, certain state regulations and Department of Energy Orders. This paper describes the assessment process and provides examples used by Law Environmental, Inc., in performing numerous PWAs at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC.