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1

Assessment of New Calculation Method for Toxicological Sums-of-Fractions for Hanford Tank Wastes  

SciTech Connect

The toxicological source terms used for potential accident assessment in the Tank Farms DSA are based on toxicological sums-of-fractions (SOFs) that were calculated in fiscal years 2002 and 2003 based on the Best Basis Inventory (BBI) from May 2002, using the method described by Cowley et al. (2003). The present report describes a modified SOF-calculation method that is to be used in future toxicological updates and assessments and compares its results (for the 2002 BBI) to those of the old method. The new method generally calculated different (usually larger) SOFs than the old. The dominant reason was the more conservative way in which the new method represents concentration variability, in that it uses the waste layer with the maximum SOF to represent the tank SOF. The old method had used a tank-average waste composition and SOF. Differences between thermodynamically modeled and BBI solubilities were the next most common reason for differences between old (modeled) and new (BBI) SOFs, particularly in the liquid phase. The solubility-related changes in SOF were roughly equally distributed between increases and decreases. Changes in the effective toxicities of TOC and lead, which resulted from changes in the compounds in which these analytes were considered to be present, were the third most common reason. These toxicity changes increased SOFs and therefore were in a conservative direction.

Mahoney, Lenna A.

2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

2

Assessment of New Calculation Method for Toxicological Sums-of-Fractions for Hanford Tank Farm Wastes  

SciTech Connect

The toxicological source terms used for potential accident assessment in the Hanford Tank Farms DSA are based on toxicological sums-of-fractions (SOFs) that were calculated based on the Best Basis Inventory (BBI) from May 2002, using a method that depended on thermodynamic equilibrium calculations of the compositions of liquid and solid phases. The present report describes a simplified SOF-calculation method that is to be used in future toxicological updates and assessments and compares its results (for the 2002 BBI) to those of the old method.

Mahoney, Lenna A.

2006-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

3

Summary Notes from 28 May 2008 Generic Technical Issue Discussion on Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 Page 1 of 8 8 Page 1 of 8 Summary Notes from 28 May 2008 Generic Technical Issue Discussion on Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Attendees: Representatives from Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff (NRC) met at the DOE offices in Germantown, Maryland on 28 May 2008. Representatives from Department of Energy- Savannah River (DOE-SR), Department of Energy-Richland (DOE-RL), and Department of Energy-River Protection (DOE-ORP) participated in the meeting via a teleconference link. Discussion: NRC staff prepared and disseminated agenda topics (listed in the next section) summarizing issues and considerations relative to estimating waste inventory and waste tank characterization. A summary of the discussion regarding each agenda topic is

4

Notes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Notes 1 "Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Whmi)" is based on AC electricity consumed during charging events which began during the reporting period and distance driven...

5

NOTE: Autoclave Waste Treatment Testing Records are to be kept three (3) years SWFHCRF Form for review by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality at any time.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NOTE: Autoclave Waste Treatment Testing Records are to be kept three (3) years SWFHCRF Form: ______________ =================================================================================================== · Microbiological Waste: For a definition of microbiological waste, refer to The University's Procedures for Disposal of Hazardous Waste, available at www.utexas.edu/safety/ehs/disposal/hazwaste/toc.html · Weight

6

Notes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Notes Notes Track Reconstruction with Cosmic Ray Data at the Tracker Integration Facility (pdf format) CMS Tracker Alignment at the Integration Facility (pdf format) Silicon Strip Tracker Detector Performance with Cosmic Ray Data at the Tracker Integration Facility (pdf format) Tracker Operation and Performance at the Magnet Test and Cosmic Challenge (pdf format) CMS Silicon Tracker Module Assembly and Testing at FNAL (pdf format) Silicon Tracker Module Assembly at UCSB (pdf format) CT and test beam results of irradiated magnetic Czochralski silicon (MCz-Si) detectors Nuclear Inst. and Methods in Physics Research, A 604 (2009), pp 254-25 Silicon Beam Telescope for LHC Upgrade Tests Nuclear Inst. and Methods in Physics Research, A 593 (2008), pp. 523-529 SiTracker Home Page

7

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Summary Notes from 28 May 2008 Generic Technical Issue...

8

Crystal Reports - sum7.rpt  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Actual and Projected Amounts of Waste/Contaminated Media and SNF in Inventory (Sum-7) Actual and Projected Amounts of Waste/Contaminated Media and SNF in Inventory (Sum-7) W as te T yp e 1998(A )* 19 99( A )* 2000( A ) * 200 1( P)* 2002( P)* 2003(P) * 200 4( P)* 2005( P)* 2006(P) * 200 7( P) * 2 008( P)* 2009(P) * 201 0( P) * High Level Waste 336,304.81 332,544.329 353,500.777 365,687.747 361,180.677 351,892.427 352,997.657 350,209.767 345,701.497 345,343.917 349,033.047 343,816.957 332,096.627 High Level Waste - Vitrified** 712.00 960.000 1,201.000 1,471.000 1,651.000 1,906.000 2,146.000 2,296.000 2,411.000 2,611.000 2,815.000 3,038.000 3,107.000 Low Level Waste 217,654.05 193,684.839 158,909.581 151,308.711 145,553.373 125,878.135 117,113.320 111,909.250 68,856.440 46,646.790 31,562.880 27,937.300 24,285.060 Mixed Low Level Waste

9

LLW (Low-Level Waste) Notes, special edition, Volume 13, Number 3, April 1998  

SciTech Connect

This special edition of LLW Notes focuses upon the federal government`s attempts to implement environmental justice policies through a variety of mechanisms, including the federal licensing process; the formation of a federal advisory committee; the filing of an amicus curiae brief in a federal court case; and the administrative complaint process under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act. In the absence of clearly defined criteria for implementing the environmental justice concept, an examination of the individual mechanisms being used by the federal government can indicate the eventual scope of federal environmental justice initiatives. Also contained in this issue is a chart depicting the administrative complaints concerning environmental justice that have been filed with the US Environmental Protection Agency under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act. The chart lists information for only those complaints that have been filed with EPA, which is the lead federal agency for environmental justice. EPA has received the vast majority of environmental justice administrative complaints.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Crystal Reports - sum2.rpt  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Annual Amounts of Waste and SNF Generation (Sum-2) Annual Amounts of Waste and SNF Generation (Sum-2) Qu an tity (m 3 ) M at e r ial T yp e 1998(A )* 1999(A ) * 2000(A )* 2001( P) * 2 002( P)* 2003(P) * 20 04( P) * 2005(P) * 20 06( P) * 2007( P) * 2008(P) * 2009( P) * 2010 ( P)* T o t a l High Level Waste 14,278.000 14,470.570 14,166.475 15,966.690 16,545.580 18,025.830 17,221.517 12,755.407 13,926.837 18,688.607 19,547.650 13,015.617 27,991.067 216,599.85 Transuranic Waste 998.521 297.820 1,620.600 2,039.510 1,642.170 1,554.400 1,558.470 470.450 460.720 374.030 378.030 371.620 372.520 12,138.86 Mixed Low Level Waste 2,706.629 2,668.677 10,834.401 2,144.869 2,289.254 2,127.613 1,906.789 1,715.407 1,348.354 2,112.011 1,890.422 2,061.712 2,337.705 36,143.84 Low Level Waste 29,375.624 31,376.469 38,911.450 35,544.059 29,808.371 25,411.205 31,463.297 28,242.351 27,887.269 89,987.848 26,378.888 26,960.786 25,941.891 447,289.51

11

Extensional rewriting with sums  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inspired by recent work on normalisation by evaluation for sums, we propose a normalising and confluent extensional rewriting theory for the simply-typed ?-calculus extended with sum types. As a corollary of confluence we obtain decidability for ...

Sam Lindley

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Low-Level Waste Forum notes and summary reports for 1994. Volume 9, Number 3, May-June 1994  

SciTech Connect

This issue includes the following articles: Vermont ratifies Texas compact; Pennsylvania study on rates of decay for classes of low-level radioactive waste; South Carolina legislature adjourns without extending access to Barnwell for out-of-region generators; Southeast Compact Commission authorizes payments for facility development, also votes on petitions, access contracts; storage of low-level radioactive waste at Rancho Seco removed from consideration; plutonium estimates for Ward Valley, California; judgment issued in Ward Valley lawsuits; Central Midwest Commission questions court`s jurisdiction over surcharge rebates litigation; Supreme Court decides commerce clause case involving solid waste; parties voluntarily dismiss Envirocare case; appellate court affirms dismissal of suit against Central Commission; LLW Forum mixed waste working group meets; US EPA Office of Radiation and Indoor Air rulemakings; EPA issues draft radiation site cleanup regulation; EPA extends mixed waste enforcement moratorium; and NRC denies petition to amend low-level radioactive waste classification regulations.

NONE

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Crystal Reports - sum4.rpt  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste/Contaminated Media Waste/Contaminated Media and SNF Inventories By Program (Sum-4) Current Year: 2000 Pr o g r am HL W HL W -V i trifie d * T RU M L L W L L W O T HER ** S N F *** Qu a n t ity (m 3) Qu an tit y (NC ) Qu an tity (m 3) Qu a n tity (m 3 ) Qu an tit y (m 3) Qu an tity (m 3) Qu an tit y (M T HM ) Office of Defense Programs 0.00 0.00 628.20 391.82 1,843.59 0.00 2.44 Office of Environmental Management 353,500.78 1,201.00 110,447.25 45,869.38 156,965.74 3,946.00 2,442.12 Nuclear Energy 0.00 0.00 60.90 226.20 0.00 0.00 22.10 Non-DOE sources 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Office of Science 0.00 0.00 100.29 60.50 100.25 0.00 0.61 *Vitrified HLW quantites are reported in # of HLW Canisters. **Other includes "Unspecified" and 11(e)2 waste types.

14

Seagate Crystal Reports - sum5.  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Activities for the Current Year (Sum-5) Total In Situ M a n a g e d Quantity (m 3) W a s t e T y p e T r e a t m e n t Q u a n i t y ( m 3 ) Dis p o s a l Q u a n t i t y ( m 3 ) O t h e r P r o c e s s i n g Quantity (m 3) Current Year: 2000 0.00 6,179.16 0.00 13,302.16 High Level Waste 7,123.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 HLW - Vitrified* 0.00 25,224,051.67 109,482.56 620,184.69 25,997,927.64 Low Level Waste 44,208.72 1,769,462.20 26,793.32 12,478.78 1,813,177.23 Mixed Low Level Waste 4,442.93 290,997.70 89.16 734.39 296,005.30 Transuranic Waste 4,184.05 145,882.00 0.00 183,013.00 333,902.56 Other** 5,007.56 O n S i t e T r e a t m e n t ( M T H M ) S h i p t o O t h e r D O E S i t e s f o r M anagam e n t /Storage Ship for Final Dis p o s a l ( M T H M ) Total (M T HM ) 14.6110 14.5110 0.1000 0.0000 Spent Nuclear Fuel*** Data Set ID: EM Corporate - FY 2001 Update

15

Seagate Crystal Reports - Sum12  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Activity Quantities Activity Quantities for the Current Year by Site (Sum-12) WASTE TYPE: High Level Waste Current Year: 2000 Site S tarting Inventory (m3)* Addition Quantity (m3)* Treatment Quantity (m3)* Disposal Quantity (m3)* TBD Dispositions (m3) Other** (m3) Ending Inventory (m3) New P rocess Outputs Receipts On-Site Off-Site TBD-Site On-Site Off-Site TBD-Site Hanford 199,901.897 975.697 11,024.303 0.000 5,070.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 206,831.897 Idaho 9,357.432 254.778 75.000 0.000 398.160 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 9,393.880 Savannah 123,176.000 12,936.000 2,013.000 0.000 671.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 7,123.000 137,206.000 WestValley 109.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 40.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 69.000

16

Low-Level Waste Forum notes and summary reports for 1994. Volume 9, Number 4, July 1994  

SciTech Connect

This issue includes the following articles: Federal Facility Compliance Act Task Force forms mixed waste workgroup; Illinois Department of Nuclear Safety considers construction of centralized storage facility; Midwest Commission agrees on capacity limit, advisory committee; EPA responds to California site developer`s queries regarding application of air pollutant standards; county-level disqualification site screening of Pennsylvania complete; Texas Compact legislation introduced in US Senate; Generators ask court to rule in their favor on surcharge rebates lawsuit; Vermont authority and Battelle settle wetlands dispute; Eighth Circuit affirms decision in Nebraska community consent lawsuit; Nebraska court dismisses action filed by Boyd County local monitoring committee; NC authority, Chem-Nuclear, and Stowe exonerated; Senator Johnson introduces legislation to transfer Ward Valley site; Representative Dingell writes to Clinton regarding disposal of low-level radioactive waste; NAS committee on California site convenes; NRC to improve public petition process; NRC releases draft proposed rule on criteria for decontamination and closure of NRC-licensed facilities; and EPA names first environmental justice federal advisory council.

NONE

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Summary Notes from 28 May 2008 Generic Technical Issue Discussion...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary Notes from 28 May 2008 Generic Technical Issue Discussion on Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Attendees: Representatives from Department of...

18

Seagate Crystal Reports - sum1.  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste and SNF Generating Sites Waste and SNF Generating Sites In the Current Year (Sum-1) M IXED LOW LEVEL W A S T E ( m 3 ) HIGH LEVEL WASTE (m 3) NE EM SC SC EM TRA NSURANIC WASTE ( m 3 ) DP NE EM DP NE DP G e n e r a t i n g P r o g r a m Site SC Current Year: 2000 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.10 0.00 0.01 0.00 0.00 Ames Lab 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 2.38 0.00 7.22 0.00 0.00 Argonne East 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.42 0.00 0.00 0.00 2.50 0.00 Argonne West 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 16.50 0.00 0.00 Brookhaven 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.70 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Battelle WJ 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Fermi 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 St. Vrain 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 General Atomics 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 975.70 114.74

19

NMR implementations of Gauss sums  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I describe the use of NMR experiments which implement Gauss sums as a method for factoring numbers and discuss whether this approach can be computationally useful.

Jonathan A. Jones

2008-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

20

Crystal Reports - sum3.rpt  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

TRU MLLW L LW Other** Spent Nuc lear Fuel*** TRU MLLW L LW Other** Spent Nuc lear Fuel*** V o lu m e ( m 3) V o lu m e ( M T HM ) V o lu m e ( m 3 ) V o lu m e ( m 3) V o lu m e ( m 3 ) HLW -V itrif ied* Sit e V o lu m e ( m 3) V o lu m e ( NC ) HLW DOE Current Year Waste/Contaminated Media and SNF Inventories By Site (Sum-3) Current Year: 2000 Ames Lab 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.10 0.00 0.00 Argonne-E 0.00 0.00 98.56 84.07 76.21 0.00 0.00 Argonne-W 0.00 0.00 60.90 226.20 0.00 0.00 22.10 Ashtabula 0.00 0.00 0.00 433.00 2,916.00 0.00 0.00 Brookhaven 0.00 0.00 0.00 12.14 11,492.84 0.00 0.00 Columbus 0.00 0.00 0.00 3.77 0.00 0.00 0.00 EnergyTech 0.00 0.00 11.00 1.60 1,816.00 0.00 0.00 Fermi 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Fernald 0.00 0.00 0.00 1,477.40 38,896.20 0.00 0.00 St. Vrain 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 14.73

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste notes sum" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Application of spectral summing to indeterminate suspect low-level drums at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analytical technique developed by Pajarito Scientific Corporation (PSC), utilizing spectral summing of spectra from groups of drums of similar waste type, is being employed by the Waste Disposition Project - Low Level Waste Disposal (WDP-LLWD) Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This technique has been used to disposition low-level radioactive waste that has dropped out of the transuranic (TRU) category and has no place to go unless it can be proven to be LLW and not TRU. The TRU program at LANL run by Mobile Characterization Services (MCS) employs two High Efficiency Neutron Counters (HENC) with built-in gamma assay systems to assay radioactive waste for shipment and disposal as TRU waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) at Carlsbad, New Mexico. As well as being certified for WIPP assays, the HENC systems can also be used for low-level waste assays for disposal at LANL or off-site disposal facilities, such as the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Some of the waste processed through the HENC systems cannot be confinned TRU due to the absence of detected TRU alpha emitters above the TRU cutoff of 100 nCi/g. This waste becomes suspect low-level waste (SLLW). In many cases, the waste also can't be classified as LLW because the minimum detectable activity (MDA) of TRU radio nuclides is above the 100 nCi/g level. These wastes that do not have enough detectable TRU activity to be classified as TRU waste and have too high a MDA to be classified as LLW enter a radioactive waste characterization indetenninate status that prevents their dispositioning as either TRU waste or LLW. Spectral summing allows an experienced ganuna spectroscopy analyst to add the HENC gamma spectra of a number of similar waste items together to form a consolidated (summed) spectrum. This summed spectrum contains the assay results of the group of items rather than the individual item, and gamma peaks that were not discernable in the individual spectra can become quantifiable in the summed spectrum and the MDA for group sum is reduced. The group of waste items can then be properly classified as LLW based on the summed spectrum and valid assay values can be assigned for disposal. This technique has been successfully applied to a set of 52 debris drums - with individual MDA > 100 nCi/g - with a resulting group total TRU alpha activity concentration below 40nCi/g. Further application of the technique at LANL to other waste drums that are measured on a WIPP certified HENC system is planned and good candidate drum sets are being evaluated as indeterminate situations develop.

Gruetzmacher, Kathleen M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Veilleux, John M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lucero, Randy P [PAJARITO SCIENTIFIC CORAPTION; Seamans, Jr., James V [PAJARITO SCIENTIFIC CORPORATION; Clapham, Martin J [PAJARITO SCIENTIFIC CORPORATION

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

22

Application of spectral summing to indeterminate suspect low-level drums at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spectral summing technique developed by Pajarito Scientific Corporation (PSC) is a unique modeling technique that is being employed by the Waste Disposition Project - Low Level Waste Disposition (WDP-LLWD) Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This technique has been used to disposition low-level radioactive waste that has dropped out of the transuranic (TRU) category and has no disposal path unless it can be proven to be LLW and not TRU. The TRU program at LANL run by Mobile Characterization Services (MCS) employs High Efficiency Neutron Counters (HENC) with built-in gamma assay systems to assay radioactive waste for shipment and disposal as TRU waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) at Carlsbad, New Mexico. As well as being certified for WIPP assays, the HENC systems can also be used for low-level waste assays for disposal at LANL or off-site disposal facilities, such as the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Some of the waste processed through the HENC systems cannot be confirmed TRU due to the absence of detected TRU alpha emitters above the TRU cutoff of 100 nCi/g. This waste becomes suspect low-level waste (SLLW). In many cases, the waste also can't be classified as LLW because the minimum detectable activity (MDA) of TRU radionuclides is above the 100 nCi/g level. These wastes that do not have enough detectable TRU activity to be classified as TRU waste and have TRU MDAs > 100nCi/g enter a radioactive waste characterization indeterminate state that prevents their dispositioning as either TRU waste or LLW. Spectral summing allows an experienced gamma spectroscopy analyst to add the HENC gamma spectra of a number of similar waste items together to form a consolidated (summed) spectrum. This summed spectrum contains the assay results of the group of items rather than the individual item, and gamma peaks that were not discemable in the individual spectra become quantifiable in the summed spectrum and the MDA for the group sum is reduced. The group of waste items can then be properly classified as LLW waste on the summed spectrum and valid assay values can be assigned for disposal. This technique has been successfully applied to a set of 52 debris drums - with individual MDA > 100nCi/g - with a resulting group total TRU alpha activity concentration below 40nCi/g. Further application of the technique at LANL to other debris drums and sludge drums that were measured on a WIPP certified HENe is planned and good candidate drum sets are being evaluated.

Gruetzmacher, Kathleen M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Veilleux, John M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lucero, Randy P [PAJARITO SCIENTIFIC CORPORATION; Seamans, Jr, J. V. [PAJARITO SCIENTIFIC CORPATION; Clapham, M. J. [PAJARITO SCIENTIFIC CORPORATION

2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

23

Notes and Definitions  

Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (EIA)

Notes and Definitions Notes and Definitions This report tracks U.S. natural gas inventories held in underground storage facilities. The weekly stocks generally are the volumes of working gas as of the report date. Changes in reported stock levels reflect all events affecting working gas in storage, including injections, withdrawals, and reclassifications between base and working gas. Totals may not match sum of components because of independent rounding. The complete documentation of EIA's estimation methodology is available in the report, Methodology for EIA Weekly Underground Natural Gas Storage Estimates. Information about the method used to prepare weekly data to compute the 5-year averages, maxima, minima, and year-ago values for the weekly report can be found in Computing the 5-year Averages, Maxima, Minima, and Year-Ago

24

Greedy sums of distinct squares  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When a positive integer is expressed as a sum of squares, with each successive summand as large as possible, the summands decrease rapidly in size until the very end, where one may find two 4's, or several 1's. We find that the set of integers for which ... Keywords: Greedy algorithm, differential-difference equations

Hugh L. Montgomery; Ulrike M. A. Vorhauer

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Cosmic-ray sum rules  

SciTech Connect

We introduce new sum rules allowing to determine universal properties of the unknown component of the cosmic rays; we show how they can be used to predict the positron fraction at energies not yet explored by current experiments, and to constrain specific models.

Frandsen, Mads T. [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Masina, Isabella [Dip. di Fisica dell'Universita di Ferrara and INFN Sez. di Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, I-44100 Ferrara (Italy); CP3-Origins, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark); Sannino, Francesco [CP3-Origins, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

Explanatory Notes  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Explanatory Notes Explanatory Notes Survey Methodology Description of Survey Form The Form EIA-820, "Annual Refinery Report," is the primary source of data in the "Refinery Capacity Report" tables. The form collects data on the consumption of purchased steam, electricity, coal, and natural gas; refinery receipts of crude oil by method of transportation; operable capacity for atmospheric crude oil distillation units and downstream units; and production capacity for crude oil and petroleum products. Frame The respondent frame consists of all operating and idle petroleum refineries (including new refineries under construction), located in the 50 States, the District of

27

Two novel methods in QCD sum rules  

SciTech Connect

Two novel methods in extracting the spectral information of hadrons in the QCD sum rule technique. The first one is to combine two sum rules so that the pole dominance is achieved and the resonance information is effectively obtained. This method is applied to the pentaquark {Theta}{sup +} and its quantum numbers are predicted. The second method is to use the Bayesian inference theory to obtain the most probable form of the spectral function from the sum rule. We have checked the method to work in the case of the rho meson sum rule.

Gubler, Philipp; Oka, Makoto [Dept. of Physics, H-27, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

28

Report Notes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Notes Notes 1 "Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi)" is based on AC electricity consumed during charging events which began during the reporting period and distance driven during all trips in the reporting period. 2 "Overall DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi)" is based on net DC electricity discharged from or charged to the plug-in battery pack and distance driven during all trips in the reporting period. DC Wh/mi may not be comparable to AC Wh/mi if AC electricity charged prior to the reporting period was discharged during driving within the reporting period, or if AC electricity charged during the reporting period was not discharged during driving within the reporting period. 3 Trips when the plug-in battery pack charge was depleted to propel the vehicle throughout

29

Determinant Sums for Undirected Hamiltonicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a Monte Carlo algorithm for Hamiltonicity detection in an $n$-vertex undirected graph running in $O^*(1.657^{n})$ time. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first superpolynomial improvement on the worst case runtime for the problem since the $O^*(2^n)$ bound established for TSP almost fifty years ago (Bellman 1962, Held and Karp 1962). It answers in part the first open problem in Woeginger's 2003 survey on exact algorithms for NP-hard problems. For bipartite graphs, we improve the bound to $O^*(1.414^{n})$ time. Both the bipartite and the general algorithm can be implemented to use space polynomial in $n$. We combine several recently resurrected ideas to get the results. Our main technical contribution is a new reduction inspired by the algebraic sieving method for $k$-Path (Koutis ICALP 2008, Williams IPL 2009). We introduce the Labeled Cycle Cover Sum in which we are set to count weighted arc labeled cycle covers over a finite field of characteristic two. We reduce Hamiltonicity to Labeled ...

Bjrklund, Andreas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

On binary Kloosterman sums divisible by 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By counting the coset leaders for cosets of weight 3 of the Melas code we give a new proof for the characterization of Kloosterman sums divisible by 3 for Keywords: 11L05, 11T71, 94B15, Binary Kloosterman sum, Cap, Melas code, Nonlinear function

Kseniya Garaschuk; Petr Lison?k

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Seagate Crystal Reports - sum6.  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Shipping and Shipping and Receiving Activity (Sum-6) Current Year: 2000 Receiving Site: Hanford Shipping Site HLW HL W -V i trified TRU M L L W LLW OTHER* SNF** Quantity (m 3) Quantity (m 3) Quantity ( m 3) Quantity (m 3) Quantity (m 3) Quantity ( m 3) Quantity (M THM ) Ames Lab 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 5.460 0.000 0.0000 Argonne-E 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1,049.800 0.000 0.0000 Bettis 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 11.680 0.000 0.0000 Brookhaven 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 55.070 0.000 0.0000 Columbus 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 156.070 0.000 0.0000 EnergyTech 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 41.780 0.000 0.0000 Fermi 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 42.840 0.000 0.0000 GenAtomics 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 164.030 0.000 0.0000 Lawr-Berk 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 12.220 0.000 0.0000 NavRctrFac 0.000 0.000 0.000 16.000 0.000 0.000 0.0000

32

Chapter 5. Technical Notes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... OOF: Finite Element Analysis of Microstructures. Table of Contents, Chapter 5. Technical Notes, OOF home. ... Chapter 5. Technical Notes. ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

33

CLAB Transuranic Waste Spreadsheets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Building 772-F Far-Field Transuranic (TRU) Waste Counting System is used to measure the radionuclide content of waste packages produced at the Central Laboratory Facilities (CLAB). Data from the instrument are entered into one of two Excel spreadsheets. The waste stream associated with the waste package determines which spreadsheet is actually used. The spreadsheets calculate the necessary information required for completion of the Transuranic Waste Characterization Form (OSR 29-90) and the Radioactive Solid Waste Burial Ground Record (OSR 7-375 or OSR 7-375A). In addition, the spreadsheets calculate the associated Low Level Waste (LLW) stream information that potentially could be useful if the waste container is ever downgraded from TRU to LLW. The spreadsheets also have the capability to sum activities from source material added to a waste container after assay. A validation data set for each spreadsheet along with the appropriate results are also presented in this report for spreadsheet verification prior to each use.

Leyba, J.D.

2000-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

34

OTS NOTE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

@ 'Alexander Williams @ 'Alexander Williams FROM: Ed Mitchellqm SUBJECT: W.R. Grace Elimination Recommendation The purpose of this note is to provide you with certain information regarding the recommendation to eliminate W.R. Grace Company (the former Heavy Minerals Company), Chicago,Illinois, from consideration as a site under FUSRAP. Enclosed is a memo dated July 9, 1990: FUSRAP Considered Site Recommendation, for W.R. Grace Company. It recommends elimination in accordance with FUSRAP protocol. Also enclosed is some typed input material (dated July 9, 1990) about the site that you may want to use in the preparation of your Record of Elimination. If you concur, please provide a Record of Elimination to indicate DOE's decision to eliminate this site. In lieu of a separate memo, you may want

35

OTS NOTE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

* pp4 r G- .2- * pp4 r G- .2- OTS NOTE DATE: April 24, 1991 TO: Alexander Williams FROM: Dan Stou tF L SUBJECT: American Potash and Chemical Company Elimination Recommendation The attached memorandum and supporting documents are the basis for our recommendation to eliminate the former American Potash and Chemical Company site from further consideration under FUSRAP. The site is located in West Hanover, Massachusetts. Documents discovered to date indicating use or handling of radioactive material by American Potash consist of a National Lead Company of Ohio (NLO) internal memorandum which discusses tests American Potash performed for Union Carbide Nuclear Corporation (Oak Ridge), an Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) prime contractor. The site predecessor, National Fireworks Ordnance

36

OTS NOTE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

March 22, 1991 March 22, 1991 TO: A. Williams FROM: 0. Sto> Attached is a revised site summary for the Exxon Company in Linden, New Jersey. The summary incorporates new information from a file search and from a conversation with.an NRC inspector. The specific locations of AEC/MED operations have not been identified. .I." -:;1 5':' :?iv,::.;& & had been decontami "ated. The NRC inspector did note that the kC.Mackenzie E. Mitchell C. Young .c. FUSRAP NJ.18 Exxon Research and Engineering Company The Former Standard Oil Development Company Linden, New Jersey Site Function In the spring of 1942, Standard Oil Development Company (SODC) was contracted to be in charge of obtaining materials for work being do the Metallurgical Laboratories and subsequently the MED. SODC play

37

Nuclear magnetic moments and related sum rules  

SciTech Connect

We first review the history and our present understanding of nuclear magnetic moments and Gamow-Teller transitions, with emphasis on the roles of configuration mixing and meson exchange currents. Then we discuss the renormalization of the orbital g-factor in nuclei, and its relation to the E1 sum rule for photoabsorption and the M1 sum rule for the scissors mode of deformed nuclei.

Bentz, Wolfgang [Department of Physics, School of Science, Tokai University, Hiratsuka-shi, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Arima, Akito [Musashi University, 1-26-1 Toyotama-kami, Nerima-ku, Tokyo 176-8534 (Japan)

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

38

A Simple Geometric Proof That Comonotonic Risks Have the Convex-largest Sum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the recent actuarial literature, several proofs have been given for the fact that if a random vector (X 1 ,X 2 ,...,X n ) with given marginals has a comonotonic joint distribution, the sum X 1 +X 2 + X n is the largest possible in convex order. In this note we give a lucid proof of this fact, based on a geometric interpretation of the support of the comonotonic distribution.

R. Kaas; J. Dhaene; D. Vyncke; M.J. Goovaerts; M. Denuit; K. U. Leuven

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

A Bayesian approach to QCD sum rules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

QCD sum rules are analyzed with the help of the Maximum Entropy Method. We develop a new technique based on the Bayesion inference theory, which allows us to directly obtain the spectral function of a given correlator from the results of the operator product expansion given in the deep euclidean 4-momentum region. The most important advantage of this approach is that one does not have to make any a priori assumptions about the functional form of the spectral function, such as the "pole + continuum" ansatz that has been widely used in QCD sum rule studies, but only needs to specify the asymptotic values of the spectral function at high and low energies as an input. As a first test of the applicability of this method, we have analyzed the sum rules of the rho-meson, a case where the sum rules are known to work well. Our results show a clear peak structure in the region of the experimental mass of the rho-meson. We thus demonstrate that the Maximum Entropy Method is successfully applied and that it is an efficient tool in the analysis of QCD sum rules.

Philipp Gubler; Makoto Oka

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

40

Auditing Categorical SUM, MAX and MIN Queries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Auditing consists in logging answered queries and checking, each time that a new query is submitted, that no sensitive information is disclosed by combining responses to answered queries with the response to the current query. Such a method for controlling ... Keywords: Aggregate function, max-query, min-query, null values, sum-query

Francesco M. Malvestuto

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste notes sum" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Channel capacities via $p$-summing norms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we show how \\emph{the metric theory of tensor products} developed by Grothendieck perfectly fits in the study of channel capacities, a central topic in \\emph{Shannon's information theory}. Furthermore, in the last years Shannon's theory has been generalized to the quantum setting to let the \\emph{quantum information theory} step in. In this paper we consider the classical capacity of quantum channels with restricted assisted entanglement. In particular these capacities include the classical capacity and the unlimited entanglement-assisted classical capacity of a quantum channel. To deal with the quantum case we will use the noncommutative version of $p$-summing maps. More precisely, we prove that the (product state) classical capacity of a quantum channel with restricted assisted entanglement can be expressed as the derivative of a completely $p$-summing norm.

Marius Junge; Carlos palazuelos

2013-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

42

Sum-of-Gaussians representation of sunshape  

SciTech Connect

The angular distribution of sunlight reaching the earth varies considerably because of interaction with the atmosphere. Five typical sunshapes, chosen from the widest to the narrowest shape in the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory data, are approximated by a sum of six Gaussian distributions. In many applications sunshapes are convolved with error-cone distributions that represent a statistical description of uncertainties encountered in an optical concentrating system. Sunshape convolution with a series of circular-normal error cones indicates that the effective sunshape is well represented by analytic convolution between the error cone and the sum of Gaussians. This analytic convolution can replace the more costly (in time and computer storage) numerical methods for convolving the error cone and the experimental sunshape distribution. Results of both calculation methods are found to be consistent when the dispersion of the error cone is greater than 0.0012. A simple prescription indicates how each of the analytic representations may be transformed to approximate sunshapes appropriate for slightly different atmospheric conditions. The analytic form of the effective sunshape is given as a sum of six elliptic-normal distributions when the error cone is an elliptic-normal distribution.

Vittitoe, C.N.; Biggs, F.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

On certain sum rules for the hydrogen atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that some sum rules for the hydrogen atom derived recently are incorrect because the authors did not take into account the continuous part of the spectrum in the sum over intermediate states.

Francisco M. Fernndez

2011-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

44

Quickies : intelligent sticky notes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis introduces 'Quickies', an attempt to bring one of the most useful inventions of the 20th century into the digital age: the ubiquitous sticky notes. Sticky notes help us manage our to-do lists, tag our objects ...

Mistry, Pranav (Pranav K.)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

just staff note  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Staff private notes Staff private notes August 27, 2013 (0 Comments) The availability on Edison started as of 20:00 PDT 8232013. Post your comment You cannot post comments until...

46

NIST Technical Note XXXX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. NIST Technical Note 1621 Optical Radiation Measurements Based on Detector Standards George P. Eppeldauer, Editor Page 2. ...

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

47

NBS TECHNICAL NOTE 674  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. NBS TECHNICAL NOTE 674 Page 2. NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS The National Bureau of Standards ...

2002-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

48

ZERO WASTE.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of the thesis was to develop a clear vision on better waste management system. The thesis introduced the sustainable waste management along with (more)

Upadhyaya, Luv

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Nevada Waste Leaves Idaho Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Media Contacts: Media Contacts: Danielle Miller, 208-526-5709 Brad Bugger, 208-526-0833 For Immediate Release: Date: March 02, 2010 Nevada Waste Leaves Idaho Facility (Note: This is a reissue of a press release originally sent last week to ensure all intended recipients receive a copy after technical glitch may have kept it from reaching some of them) It may have looked like just another shipment of transuranic radioactive waste leaving Idaho, but the shipment heading south on U.S. Interstate 15 the afternoon of January 26 actually contained waste from another DOE site in Nevada. The shipment demonstrated the capacity of the U.S. Department of Energy�s Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project to be a hub where the Department�s transuranic radioactive waste can be safely and compliantly

50

Scattering and; Delay, Scale, and Sum Migration  

SciTech Connect

How do we see? What is the mechanism? Consider standing in an open field on a clear sunny day. In the field are a yellow dog and a blue ball. From a wave-based remote sensing point of view the sun is a source of radiation. It is a broadband electromagnetic source which, for the purposes of this introduction, only the visible spectrum is considered (approximately 390 to 750 nanometers or 400 to 769 TeraHertz). The source emits an incident field into the known background environment which, for this example, is free space. The incident field propagates until it strikes an object or target, either the yellow dog or the blue ball. The interaction of the incident field with an object results in a scattered field. The scattered field arises from a mis-match between the background refractive index, considered to be unity, and the scattering object refractive index ('yellow' for the case of the dog, and 'blue' for the ball). This is also known as an impedance mis-match. The scattering objects are referred to as secondary sources of radiation, that radiation being the scattered field which propagates until it is measured by the two receivers known as 'eyes'. The eyes focus the measured scattered field to form images which are processed by the 'wetware' of the brain for detection, identification, and localization. When time series representations of the measured scattered field are available, the image forming focusing process can be mathematically modeled by delayed, scaled, and summed migration. This concept of optical propagation, scattering, and focusing have one-to-one equivalents in the acoustic realm. This document is intended to present the basic concepts of scalar scattering and migration used in wide band wave-based remote sensing and imaging. The terms beamforming and (delayed, scaled, and summed) migration are used interchangeably but are to be distinguished from the narrow band (frequency domain) beamforming to determine the direction of arrival of a signal, and seismic migration in which wide band time series are shifted but not to form images per se. Section 3 presents a mostly graphically-based motivation and summary of delay, scale, and sum beamforming. The model for incident field propagation in free space is derived in Section 4 under specific assumptions. General object scattering is derived in Section 5 and simplified under the Born approximation in Section 6. The model of this section serves as the basis in the derivation of time-domain migration. The Foldy-Lax, full point scatterer scattering, method is derived in Section 7. With the previous forward models in hand, delay, scale, and sum beamforming is derived in Section 8. Finally, proof-of-principle experiments are present in Section 9.

Lehman, S K

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

51

TECHNICAL NOTE A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TECHNICAL NOTE A novel FRET approach for in situ investigation of cellulase-cellulose interaction Liqun Wang & Yiqing Wang & Arthur J. Ragauskas Received: 15 May 2010 Revised: 9...

52

Table C3. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

specifically for that particular end use. HVAC = Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning. Due to rounding, data may not sum to totals.

53

Manhattan Project: Potsdam Note  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

POTSDAM NOTE POTSDAM NOTE Potsdam, Germany (July 1945) Resources > Photo Gallery Note written by President Harry S. Truman, in which he brags that Stalin did not understand when Truman hinted at Potsdam of a powerful new American weapon. (Scroll down to see the note.) Due to the success of Soviet espionage, however, Truman was incorrect-in fact, Stalin knew about the atomic bomb project three years before Truman did. Truman wrote this note on the back of a photograph of the Potsdam Conference taken on July 19, 1945. In the photograph Stalin talks with Truman and Secretary of State James Byrnes (both have their backs to the camera). The photograph of Potsdam is courtesy the Office of the Chief Signal Officer, War Department, U.S. Army; this image, and the photograph of Truman's writing on the back of it, are courtesy the National Archives.

54

Meeting Notes and Presentations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Board Notes and Slides Board Notes and Slides Notes from EM Corporate QA Board Tele-Conference - February 22, 2010 1 of 2 General: Attendance of voting board members was documented. All members were present or had a representative present on the call. Previous 5 Focus Areas: Dave Tuttel presented the proposed closeout of the previous 5 focus areas for the EM Corporate Board. * Focus Area 1 (Requirements Flow Down) - Board voted to close the focus area (unanimous) * Focus Area 2 (Adequate NQA-1 Suppliers) - Board voted to close the focus area (unanimous) * Focus Area 3 (CGI and Services Dedication) - Board voted to close the focus area (unanimous) * Focus Area 4 (Graded Approach to QA) -Discussion noted that the area as a whole may need more work in the future focus areas even though the procurement piece is ready to close out. The discussion also noted

55

Subsequence sums of a zero-sumfree sequence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Let G be a finite abelian group, and let S be a sequence of elements in G. Let f(S) denote the number of elements in G which can be expressed as the sum over a nonempty subsequence of S. In this paper, we show that, if S contains no zero-sum subsequence ...

Pingzhi Yuan

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Hazardous Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 6   General refractory disposal options...D landfill (b) Characterized hazardous waste by TCLP

57

reader-sum cover.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 2002 February 2002 Environmental Impact Statement U.S. Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management DOE/EIS-0250 Final Readers Guide and Summary Main Index ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS To ensure a more reader-friendly document, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) limited the use of acronyms and abbreviations in this environmental impact statement. In addition, acronyms and abbreviations are defined the first time they are used in each chapter or appendix. The acronyms and abbreviations used in the text of this document are listed below. Acronyms and abbreviations used in tables and figures because of space limitations are listed in footnotes to the tables and figures. CFR Code of Federal Regulations DOE U.S. Department of Energy (also called the Department)

58

EWS NOTES N  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EWS NOTES EWS NOTES N f √ ν Fermilab Friends for Science Education Fermilab Friends for Science Education exists to support innovative science education programs. Fall, 2009 Lynda Ballingall, Mike McGee and Mary Jo Murphy at the Fermilab booth Can they accelerate the ball? Michael Cooke and David Schmitz with liquid helium A cryogenic cannon - how cool is that?! Fermilab was a year-long participant in Science Chicago's LabFest, a series of events throughout the

59

NUCLEAR WASTE CONSULTANTS, INC.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Attached please find the Subtask 1.2 Management, prepared by Water, Waste bibliographical information relevant on NNWSI, now comprising 356 titles. scheduled, semi-annual update report contract. Update Report: Data Inventory and and Land (WWL). The report presents the to the all documents in the WWL library Please note that this is the last for Subtask 1.2 under the current The WWL report has received a managerial review by M. Logsdon (NWC), and the report was prepared under WWL's QA procedures, consistent with the NWC QA-manual. 009-1.2-- NNWSI DATABASE- Aucust IS- 19M-2 Auou~~~~ ~ _ _ _ 5._,1_88

Technical Review Branch

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 534) and identity of liquid waste Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 534

Russell, Lynn

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste notes sum" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2/2009 Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 200 West Arbor Dr. San Diego, CA 92103 (619 (9:1) OR Biohazard symbol (if untreated) and identity of liquid waste Biohazard symbol Address

Firtel, Richard A.

62

Nuclear Waste Partnership LLC PO Box 2078 GSA-207  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

072012 1 of 3 A URS-led partnership with B&W and AREVA Note: Form must be filled out completely and signed prior to submittal to the following address: Nuclear Waste Partnership...

63

Hazardous Waste Program (Alabama)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This rule states criteria for identifying the characteristics of hazardous waste and for listing hazardous waste, lists of hazardous wastes, standards for the management of hazardous waste and...

64

muon Collider Notes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Muon Collider Notes Muon Collider Notes MC-001 D. Neuffer, "Colliding Muon Beams at 90 GeV" Fermilab Note FN-319, July 1979. MC-002 D. Neuffer, "Principles and Applications of Muon Cooling" Proc. of the 12th International Conf. on High-Energy Accelerators, p. 481, 1983. MC-003 V.V. Parkhomchuk and A.N. Skrinsky, "Ionization Cooling: Physics and Applications" Proc. of the 12th International Conf. on High-Energy Accelerators, p. 485, 1983. MC-004 E.A. Perevedentsev and A.N. Skrinsky, "On the Proton Klystron" Proc. of the 12th International Conf. on High-Energy Accelerators, p. 508, 1983. MC-005 D. Neuffer, "Principles and Applications of Muon Cooling" Particle Accelerators, Vol. 14, p. 75, 1983. MC-006 D. Neuffer, "Multi-TeV Muon Colliders" Proc. of the Advanced

65

and Nikolskii-type inequalities for exponential sums - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2. 1 term exponential sums with constant first term. Schmidt [898 ] proved that there is a constantA@ (n) depending only on n so that ?. &. ' ??BDCFE ,G -HE ?.

66

Quark mixing sum rules and the right unitarity triangle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In analogy with the recently proposed lepton mixing sum rules, we derive quark mixing sum rules for the case of hierarchical quark mass matrices with 1-3 texture zeros, in which the separate up and down type 1-3 mixing angles are approximately zero, and $V_{ub}$ is generated from $V_{cb}$ as a result of 1-2 up type quark mixing. Using the sum rules, we discuss the phenomenological viability of such textures, including up to four texture zeros, and show how the right-angled unitarity triangle, i.e., $\\alpha \\approx 90^\\circ$, can be accounted for by a remarkably simple scheme involving real mass matrices apart from a single element being purely imaginary. In the framework of grand unified theories we show how the quark and lepton mixing sum rules may combine to yield an accurate prediction for the reactor angle.

Antusch, Stefan; Malinsky, Michal; Spinrath, Martin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Quark mixing sum rules and the right unitarity triangle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In analogy with the recently proposed lepton mixing sum rules, we derive quark mixing sum rules for the case of hierarchical quark mass matrices with 1-3 texture zeros, in which the separate up and down type 1-3 mixing angles are approximately zero, and $V_{ub}$ is generated from $V_{cb}$ as a result of 1-2 up type quark mixing. Using the sum rules, we discuss the phenomenological viability of such textures, including up to four texture zeros, and show how the right-angled unitarity triangle, i.e., $\\alpha \\approx 90^\\circ$, can be accounted for by a remarkably simple scheme involving real mass matrices apart from a single element being purely imaginary. In the framework of grand unified theories we show how the quark and lepton mixing sum rules may combine to yield an accurate prediction for the reactor angle.

Stefan Antusch; Stephen F. King; Michal Malinsky; Martin Spinrath

2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

68

Charm and bottom hadronic form factors with QCD sum rules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a brief review of some calculations of form factors and coupling constants in vertices with charm and bottom mesons in the framework of QCD sum rules. We first discuss the motivation for this work, describing possible applications of these form factors to charm and bottom decays processes. We first make a summarize of the QCD sum rules method. We give special attention to the uncertainties of the method introducing by the intrinsic variation of the parameters. Finally we conclude.

Bracco, M. E. [Faculdade de Tecnologia, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rod. Presidente Dutra Km 298, Polo Industrial, 27537-000, Resende, RJ (Brazil); Rodrigues, B. O.; Cerqueira, A. Jr. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Sao Francisco Xavier 524, 20550-900, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

69

QCD sum rule for nucleon in nuclear matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the two-point function of nucleon current in nuclear matter and write a QCD sum rule to analyse the residue of the nucleon pole as a function of nuclear density. The nucleon self-energy needed for the sum rule is taken as input from calculations using phenomenological NN potential. Our result shows a decrease in the residue with increasing nuclear density, as is known to be the case with similar quantities.

S. Mallik; Sourav Sarkar

2009-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

70

Waste= Capital.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The evolution of manufacturing practices over the last century has led to the creation of excess waste during the production process, depleting resources and overwhelming (more)

Stidham, Steve P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Solid Waste Reduction, Recovery, and Recycling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reduction, Recovery, and Recycling Reduction, Recovery, and Recycling Solid Waste Reduction, Recovery, and Recycling < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Natural Resources This statute expresses the strong support of the State of Wisconsin for the reduction of the amount of solid waste generated, the reuse, recycling and composting of solid waste, and resource recovery from solid waste. The statute also notes that research, development and innovation in the design, management and operation of solid waste reduction, reuse, recycling,

72

Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 11/06/08 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11/06/08 11/06/08 Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 11/06/08 The following documents are associated with the Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting held on November 6th, 2008. Note: (Please contact Steven Ross at steven.ross@em.doe.gov for a HLW Glass Waste Loadings version with animations on slide 6). Slurry Retrieval, Pipeline Transport & Plugging and Mixing Workshop The Way Ahead - West Valley Demonstration Project High-Level Liquid Waste Tank Integrity Workshop - 2008 Savannah River Tank Waste Residuals Hanford Tank Waste Residuals HLW Glass Waste Loadings High-Level Waste Corporate Board Performance Assessment Subcommittee More Documents & Publications Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 11/18/10 System Planning for Low-Activity Waste at Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility

73

MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT PHASE I: AUDIT OF CURRENT PRACTICE The Mushroom Waste Management Project (MWMP) was initiated by Environment Canada, the BC Ministry of solid and liquid wastes generated at mushroom producing facilities. Environmental guidelines

74

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE January 2010 Prepared for the Interagency DE-AC05-76RL01830 Waste Disposal Workshops: Anthrax-Contaminated Waste AM Lesperance JF Upton SL #12;#12;PNNL-SA-69994 Waste Disposal Workshops: Anthrax- Contaminated Waste AM Lesperance JF Upton SL

75

Travel Notes - World Market Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Travel notes, air travel, rail travel. Travel Notes - World Market Update Biofuels and Bioproducts and Biodiesel Processing Elearning Olive oil Industry Events Industrial Oil Products Abstracts Program Travel Hotel Short Courses Exhibits Regi

76

Turbine Oil Lube Notes Compilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a special compilation of the EPRI Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center's (NMAC's) "Lube Notes" articles (extracted from "Lube Notes Compilation, 1989-2001 (Report Number 1006848)) that relate specifically to the topic of turbine oils.

2002-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

77

Large deviation sum-queue optimality of a radial sum-rate monotone opportunistic scheduler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A centralized wireless system is considered that is serving a fixed set of users with time varying channel capacities. An opportunistic scheduling rule in this context selects a user (or users) to serve based on the current channel state and user queues. Unless the user traffic is symmetric and/or the underlying capacity region a polymatroid, little is known concerning how performance optimal schedulers should tradeoff "maximizing current service rate" (being opportunistic) versus "balancing unequal queues" (enhancing user-diversity to enable future high service rate opportunities). By contrast with currently proposed opportunistic schedulers, e.g., MaxWeight, Exp Rule, a radial sum-rate monotonic (RSM) scheduler de-emphasizes queue-balancing in favor of greedily maximizing the system service rate as the queue-lengths are scaled up linearly. In this paper it is shown that an RSM opportunistic scheduler, p-Log Rule, is not only throughput-optimal, but also maximizes the asymptotic exponential decay rate of the...

Sadiq, Bilal

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Windows Installation Notes for EXPGUI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... These notes describe how GSAS & EXPGUI are installed using separate distribution files for GSAS, EXPGUI and Tcl/Tk. ...

79

note1.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low-Emittance Low-Emittance APS Lattice with Alternating Horizontal Beta Functions at Insertion Devices - formerly OAG-TN-2004-057 - Michael Borland-12/8/2004 - Accelerator Systems Division, Advanced Photon Source 1 Introduction Previously [1, 2] we looked at the possibility of reducing the horizontal beta function in a straight section in order to optimize the beam properties for certain uses. This is difficult to do as an insertion because of the many constraints on the APS lattice. In particular, the emittance inevitably increases, and it can only be done for one or two sectors. We noted in [1] that an ESRF-style lattice with alternating high- and low-β x sectors might provide reasonably good emittance for the APS, while providing two types of beta function. In this note, we present such a lattice that not only provides alternating β x , but also improved emittance. 2 Linear Optics For the

80

A Bayesian analysis of the nucleon QCD sum rules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

QCD sum rules of the nucleon channel are reanalyzed, using the maximum entropy method (MEM). This new approach, based on the Bayesian probability theory, does not restrict the spectral function to the usual "pole + continuum"-form, allowing a more flexible investigation of the nucleon spectral function. Making use of this flexibility, we are able to investigate the spectral functions of various interpolating fields, finding that the nucleon ground state mainly couples to an operator containing a scalar diquark. Moreover, we formulate the Gaussian sum rule for the nucleon channel and find that it is more suitable for the MEM analysis to extract the nucleon pole in the region of its experimental value, while the Borel sum rule does not contain enough information to clearly separate the nucleon pole from the continuum.

Keisuke Ohtani; Philipp Gubler; Makoto Oka

2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

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81

Waste Hoist  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

45-ton Rope-Guide Friction Hoist Completely enclosed (for contamination control), the waste hoist at WIPP is a modern friction hoist with rope guides. With a 45-ton capacity, it...

82

Manhattan Project: Sources and Notes  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SOURCES AND NOTES SOURCES AND NOTES Resources > Sources Below are the collected specific notes for the text and images used on the pages of this web site. For a discussion of the most important works on the Manhattan Project, see the "Suggested Readings." For a general discussion of the use of sources in this web site, see "A Note on Sources." To scan the sources and notes for various categories, choose from the list below. To view the sources and notes for a specific web page, see the footnote at the bottom of each page (exceptions include this page and the home page; the sources and notes for the home page are the first ones listed below). Home Events 1890s-1939: Atomic Discoveries 1939-1942: Early Government Support 1942: Difficult Choices

83

Advanced Electrochemical Waste Forms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes ... Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b.

84

Discriminative sum types locate the source of type errors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a type system for locating the source of type errors in an applied lambda calculus with ML-style polymorphism. The system is based on discriminative sum types---known from work on soft typing---with annotation subtyping and recursive types. ... Keywords: polymorphism, type errors, type inference

Matthias Neubauer; Peter Thiemann

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Tiling Proofs of Recent Sum Identities Involving Pell Numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a white square. That is, X = Ad and Y = Bw where A has length 2n - 1 and B has length 2n. Here (X, Y sum identities, which are highlighted at the conclusion of this paper. In order to provide of tilings of a board of length n using white squares, black squares, and gray dominoes. Thus, for example, p

Benjamin, Arthur T.

86

Counter-ions at single charged wall: Sum rules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For inhomogeneous classical Coulomb fluids in thermal equilibrium, like the jellium or the two-component Coulomb gas, there exists a variety of exact sum rules which relate the particle one-body and two-body densities. The necessary condition for these sum rules is that the Coulomb fluid possesses good screening properties, i.e. the particle correlation functions or the averaged charge inhomogeneity, say close to a wall, exhibit a short-range (usually exponential) decay. In this work, we study equilibrium statistical mechanics of an electric double layer with counter-ions only, i.e. a globally neutral system of equally charged point-like particles in the vicinity of a plain hard wall carrying a fixed uniform surface charge density of opposite sign. At large distances from the wall, the one-body and two-body counter-ion densities go to zero slowly according to the inverse-power law. In spite of the absence of screening, all known sum rules are shown to hold for two exactly solvable cases of the present system: in the weak-coupling Poisson-Boltzmann limit (in any spatial dimension larger than one) and at a special free-fermion coupling constant in two dimensions. This fact indicates an extended validity of the sum rules and provides a consistency check for reasonable theoretical approaches.

Ladislav Samaj

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Bounds for the sum of dependent risks having overlapping marginals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe several analytical and numerical procedures to obtain bounds on the distribution function of a sum of n dependent risks having fixed overlapping marginals. As an application, we produce bounds on quantile-based risk measures for portfolios ... Keywords: 60E05, 60E15, Copula functions, Dependent risks, Frchet bounds, Mass transportation theory, Overlapping marginals, Value-at-Risk

Paul Embrechts; Giovanni Puccetti

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

PriceTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

ASTM: The American Society for Testing and Materials. Aviation Gasoline (Finished): A complex mixture of relatively volatile hydrocarbons with or without small quantities of additives, blended to form a fuel suitable for use in aviation reciprocating engines. Fuel specifi- cations are provided in ASTM Specification D 910 and Military Specifica- tion MIL-G-5572. Note: Data on blending components are not counted in data on finished aviation gasoline. Aviation Gasoline Blending Components: Naphthas that will be used for blending or compounding into finished aviation gasoline (e.g., straight run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, and xylene). Excludes oxygenates (alcohols, ethers), butane, and pentanes plus. Oxygenates are reported as other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and oxygenates. Barrel (petroleum): A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Biomass Waste:

89

Linear Collider Collaboration Tech Notes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NLC Home Page NLC Technical SLAC The LCC Tech Note series was started in July 1998 to document the JLC/NLC collaborative design effort. The notes are numbered sequentially and may also be given a SLAC, FNAL, LBNL, LLNL and/or KEK publication number. The LCC notes will be distributed through the Web in electronic form as PDF files -- the authors are responsible for keeping the original documents. Other document series are the NLC Notes that were started for the SLAC ZDR, the KEK ATF Notes, and at some future time there should be a series of Technical (NLD) Notes to document work on detector studies for the next-generation linear collider. LCC-0001 "Memorandum of Understanding between KEK and SLAC," 2/98. LCC-0002 "Transparencies and Summaries from the 1st ISG meeting: January 1998," G. Loew, ed., 2/98.

90

The Equivalence of Linear Programs and Zero-Sum Games  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

he noted that there was one case in which the reduction does not work. This also led .... linear program does not exist. ...... In: Handbook of game theory with eco-.

91

Unit costs of waste management operations  

SciTech Connect

This report provides estimates of generic costs for the management, disposal, and surveillance of various waste types, from the time they are generated to the end of their institutional control. Costs include monitoring and surveillance costs required after waste disposal. Available data on costs for the treatment, storage, disposal, and transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive, low-level radioactive, transuranic radioactive, hazardous, mixed (low-level radioactive plus hazardous), and sanitary wastes are presented. The costs cover all major elements that contribute to the total system life-cycle (i.e., ``cradle to grave``) cost for each waste type. This total cost is the sum of fixed and variable cost components. Variable costs are affected by operating rates and throughput capacities and vary in direct proportion to changes in the level of activity. Fixed costs remain constant regardless of changes in the amount of waste, operating rates, or throughput capacities. Key factors that influence cost, such as the size and throughput capacity of facilities, are identified. In many cases, ranges of values for the key variables are presented. For some waste types, the planned or estimated costs for storage and disposal, projected to the year 2000, are presented as graphics.

Kisieleski, W.E.; Folga, S.M.; Gillette, J.L.; Buehring, W.A.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Coordinator's Notes: Thinking Gender 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forward to attending Thinking Gender on February 5, 2010, asUntil then Thinking Gender 2009 Conference Coordinator, TGCOORDINATORs NOTES Thinking Gender 2009 Usually, when I

Riojas, Mirasol

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Research Park Notes, Issue 20  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0, September 4, 2001 Welcome to Research Park Notes Look for tidbits of information on National Environmental Research Park activities, observations, and users every couple of...

94

Research Park Notes, Issue 14  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4, May 29, 2001 Welcome to Research Park Notes Look for tidbits of information on National Environmental Research Park activities, observations, and users every couple of weeks....

95

Research Park Notes, Issue 17  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7, July 24, 2001 Welcome to Research Park Notes Look for tidbits of information on National Environmental Research Park activities, observations, and users every couple of weeks....

96

Research Park Notes, Issue 16  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6, July 10, 2001 Welcome to Research Park Notes Look for tidbits of information on National Environmental Research Park activities, observations, and users every couple of weeks....

97

Research Park Notes, Issue 22  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2, October 2, 2001 Welcome to Research Park Notes Look for tidbits of information on National Environmental Research Park activities, observations, and users every couple of...

98

Research Park Notes, Issue 25  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5, November 13, 2001 Welcome to Research Park Notes Look for tidbits of information on National Environmental Research Park activities, observations, and users every couple of...

99

Research Park Notes, Issue 15  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5, June 12, 2001 Welcome to Research Park Notes Look for tidbits of information on National Environmental Research Park activities, observations, and users every couple of weeks....

100

Search notes by: Eyal Amir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Search notes by: Eyal Amir April 26, 1997 Abstract Search is ubiquitous in AI. Here we Unguided Search 3 2.1 Breadth First Search

Amir, Eyal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste notes sum" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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101

Waste Minimization Contents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About the 1996 International Symposium on Extraction and Processing for the Treatment and Minimization of Wastes: Waste Minimization Contents...

102

Understanding Cement Waste Forms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 29, 2009 ... Ongoing nuclear operations, decontamination and decommissioning, salt waste disposal, and closure of liquid waste tanks result in...

103

January 23, 2007: WIPP receives first shipment of waste | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 23, 2007: WIPP receives first shipment of waste January 23, 2007: WIPP receives first shipment of waste January 23, 2007: WIPP receives first shipment of waste January 23, 2007: WIPP receives first shipment of waste January 23, 2007 The Department's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico, receives (pdf) its first shipment of remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste. The waste, which consisted of three 30-gallon drums of radioactive debris waste and originated at DOE's Idaho National Laboratory, was transported inside a shielded RH-72B shipping cask, providing the same low radiation levels as the contact-handled (CH) TRU wastes that have been shipped to WIPP since 1999. "This first shipment of RH-TRU waste is particularly significant to DOE," notes DOE Assistant

104

Meeting Summary Notes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Transportation Stakeholders Forum (NTSF) National Transportation Stakeholders Forum (NTSF) May 26, 2010 Meeting Summary Notes Opening Remarks - Steve O'Connor, DOE Office of Packaging and Transportation Steve O'Connor, DOE/EM Office of Packaging and Transportation welcomed the group to this first National Transportation Stakeholders Forum (NTSF) and thanked the planning committee and the dedication of the Midwest Council of State Government for hosting the meeting. The NTSF will focus on transportation across the DOE complex. Mr. O'Connor announced that the meeting would be recorded and questions for the panel could either be written down and passed to the session moderator or asked via the central microphone. Planners for the meeting have worked to ensure a more engaging panel format and to minimize the use of formal presentations. Mr. O'Connor

105

FORCE RECONSTRUCTION USING THE SUM OF WEIGHTED ACCELERATIONS  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

i i FORCE RECONSTRUCTION USING THE SUM OF WEIGHTED ACCELERATIONS TECHNIQUE - _-FUkT PRt_EOURE Thomas G. Came, Randy L. Mayas and Vesta I. Bateman .... _ i_ _ :!_ Sandia NationalLaboratories _. .... Albuquerque, NewMexico87185, USA ' _ i_ _ / ABSTRACT important design consideration. This would include payloador satelliteloads duringrocket launches[3]. Force reconstruction is a procedure in which the externally applied force is inferred from measured An applicationthat will be discussed as part of this structuralresponse ratherthan directlymeasured. In paper is the impact into a rigid barrier of a weapon a recently developed technique, the response system with an energy-absorbing nose. The nose acceleration time-histories are multiplied by scalar had been designed to absorb the energy of impact weights and summed to produce the reconstructed and to mitigate the shock to the

106

A QCD Sum Rules Approach to Mixing of Hadrons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for the calculation of the hadronic mixing angles using QCD sum rules is proposed. This method is then applied to predict the mixing angle between the heavy cascade hyperons {Xi}{sub Q} and {Xi}{sub Q}{sup '} where Q = c or Q = b. It is obtained the {theta}{sub b} = 6.4 deg. {+-}1.8 deg. and {theta}{sub c} = 5.5 deg. {+-}1.8 deg.

Aliev, T. M. [Physics Department, Middle East Technical University, Ankara (Turkey); Permanent institute: Institute of Physics, Baku (Azerbaijan); Ozpineci, A. [Physics Department, Middle East Technical University, Ankara (Turkey); Zamiralov, V. S. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, M. V. Lomonosov MSU, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

107

Meson-baryon sigma terms in QCD Sum Rules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We evaluate the pion-nucleon and the pion-Delta sigma terms by employing the method of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) sum rules. The obtained value of the pion-nucleon sigma term is compatible with the larger values already anticipated by the recent calculations. It is also found that the pion-Delta sigma term is as large as the pion-nucleon sigma term.

G. Erkol; M. Oka

2007-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

108

Savannah River Tank Waste Residuals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah Savannah River Savannah River Tank Waste Residuals HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 1 November 6, 2008 Presentation By Sherri R. Ross Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office The Issue * How clean is clean? * Ultimate Challenge - Justify highly radioactive radionuclides have been removed to the maximum extent practical? 2 removed to the maximum extent practical? - Building compelling regulatory documentation that will withstand intense scrutiny §3116 Requirements 1. Does not require disposal in deep geological repository 2. Highly radioactive radionuclides removed to the maximum extent practical 3. Meet the performance objectives in 10 CFR Part 3 3. Meet the performance objectives in 10 CFR Part 61, Subpart C 4. Waste disposed pursuant to a State-approved closure plan or permit Note: If it is anticipated that Class C disposal limits will be exceeded, additional

109

Monitoring the Durability Performance of Concrete in Nuclear Waste Containment. Technical Progress Report No. 3  

SciTech Connect

OAK-B135 Monitoring the Durability Performance of Concrete in Nuclear Waste Containment. Technical Progress Report No. 3(NOTE: Part II A item 1 indicates ''PAPER'', but a report is attached electronically)

Ulm, Franz-Josef

2000-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

110

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource! energy forum Case Studies from Estonia, Switzerland, Germany BREFs and their BATs Next Generation of Waste Fired Power Plants: Getting the most out of your trash Bossart,· ABB Waste-to-Energy Plants Edmund Fleck,· ESWET Marcel van Berlo,· Afval Energie Bedrijf From

Columbia University

111

Sum Capacity of the Gaussian Interference Channel in the Low Interference Regime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New upper bounds on the sum capacity of the two-user Gaussian interference channel are derived. Using these bounds, it is shown that treating interference as noise achieves the sum capacity if the interference levels are below certain thresholds.

Annapureddy, V Sreekanth

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Characteristics of transuranic waste at Department of Energy sites  

SciTech Connect

This document reports data and information on TRU waste from all DOE generating and storage sites. The geographical location of the sites is shown graphically. There are four major sections in this document. The first three cover the TRU waste groups known as Newly Generated, Stored, and Buried Wastes. Subsections are included under Newly Generated and Stored on contact-handled and remote-handled waste. These classifications of waste are defined, and the current or expected totals of each are given. Figure 1.3 shows the total amount of Buried and Stored TRU waste. Preparation of this document began in 1981, and most of the data are as of December 31, 1980. In a few cases data were reported to December 31, 1981, and these have been noted. The projections in the Newly Generated section were made, for the most part, at the end of 1981.

Jensen, R.T.; Wilkinson, F.J. III

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators Agency/Company /Organization: International Solid Waste Association (ISWA), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) Sector: Energy, Land, Water Focus Area: Renewable Energy, - Waste to Energy Phase: Evaluate Options Topics: Adaptation, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type: Guide/manual, Training materials Website: www.trp-training.info/ Cost: Paid Language: English References: Training Resource Pack[1] "The new TRP+ provides a structured package of notes, technical summaries, visual aids and other training material concerning the (hazardous) waste

114

Waste Hoist  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Primary Hoist: 45-ton Rope-Guide Friction Hoist Largest friction hoist in the world when it was built in 1985 Completely enclosed (for contamination control), the waste hoist at WIPP is a modern friction hoist with rope guides (uses a balanced counterweight and tail ropes). With a 45-ton capacity, it was the largest friction hoist in the world when it was built in 1986. Hoist deck footprint: 2.87m wide x 4.67m long Hoist deck height: 2.87m wide x 7.46m high Access height to the waste hoist deck is limited by a high-bay door at 4.14m high Nominal configuration is 2-cage (over/under), with bottom (equipment) cage interior height of 4.52m The photo, at left, shows the 4.14m high-bay doors at the top collar of the waste hoist shaft. The perpendicular cross section of the opening is 3.5m x 4.14m, but the bottom cage cross section is 2.87m x 4.5m (and 4.67m into the plane of the photo).

115

Medical School Biomedical Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medical School Biomedical Waste Labware, gloves, pipets, pipet tips Stock cultures, bacterial with or without needles, razor blades, scalpel blades) Key: Pathological waste BL1 & BL2 waste (low risk ­ LR) BL2 waste (moderate risk - MR)/BL3 waste Blood Blood Autoclave Needle box Metal Cart Must either bleach

Cooley, Lynn

116

Waste Sorting Activity Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Sorting Activity Introduction: This waste sorting game was originally designed to be one have completed the waste sorting activity quickly, no team was able to complete the waste sorting task who were unfamiliar with Dalhousie's waste management system. Goals: The primary goal of the activity

Beaumont, Christopher

117

University of Waste Procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Maryland Hazardous And Regulated Waste Procedures Manual Revised July 2001 #12;Review II. HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT III. BIOLOGICAL, PATHOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL WASTE (BPMW) MANAGEMENT IV. LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE (LLRW) MANAGEMENT V. EMERGENCY PROCEDURES VI. WASTE MINIMIZATION VII

Rubloff, Gary W.

118

Pseudounitary freedom in the operator-sum representation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dynamical map is a map that takes one density operator to another. Such a map can be written in an operator-sum representation (OSR) by using a spectral decomposition. The method of construction applies to general maps, which need not be completely positive. The OSR is not unique; there is freedom to choose a different set of operators in the OSR, yet still obtain the same map. Here, we show that, whereas the freedom for completely positive maps is unitary, the freedom for maps that are not necessarily completely positive is pseudounitary.

Ou, Yong-Cheng [Department of Physics, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois 62901 (United States); Byrd, Mark S. [Department of Physics, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois 62901 (United States); Department of Computer Science, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois 62901 (United States)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

On Extending Pollard's Theorem for t-Representable Sums  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Let $t\\geq 1$, let $A$ and $B$ be finite, nonempty subsets of an abelian group $G$, and let $A\\pp{i} B$ denote all the elements $c$ with at least $i$ representations of the form $c=a+b$, with $a\\in A$ and $b\\in B$. For $|A|, |B|\\geq t$, we show that either \\be\\label{almost}\\Sum{i=1}{t}|A\\pp{i} B|\\geq t|A|+t|B|-2t^2+1,\\ee or else there exist $A'\\subseteq A$ and $B'\\subseteq B$ with \\ber \

Grynkiewicz, David J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Waste Management Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Management Facility ISO 14001 Registered A wide range of wastes are generated during the normal course of business at BNL. These waste streams are common to many businesses...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste notes sum" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Radioactive Waste Management (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section regulates the transportation and disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Minnesota, and establishes a Nuclear Waste Council to monitor the federal high-level radioactive waste...

122

Glass Ceramic Waste Forms for Combined CS+LN+TM Fission Products Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect

In this study, glass ceramics were explored as an alternative waste form for glass, the current baseline, to be used for immobilizing alkaline/alkaline earth + lanthanide (CS+LN) or CS+LN+transition metal (TM) fission-product waste streams generated by a uranium extraction (UREX+) aqueous separations type process. Results from past work on a glass waste form for the combined CS+LN waste streams showed that as waste loading increased, large fractions of crystalline phases precipitated upon slow cooling.[1] The crystalline phases had no noticeable impact on the waste form performance by the 7-day product consistency test (PCT). These results point towards the development of a glass ceramic waste form for treating CS+LN or CS+LN+TM combined waste streams. Three main benefits for exploring glass ceramics are: (1) Glass ceramics offer increased solubility of troublesome components in crystalline phases as compared to glass, leading to increased waste loading; (2) The crystalline network formed in the glass ceramic results in higher heat tolerance than glass; and (3) These glass ceramics are designed to be processed by the same melter technology as the current baseline glass waste form. It will only require adding controlled canister cooling for crystallization into a glass ceramic waste form. Highly annealed waste form (essentially crack free) with up to 50X lower surface area than a typical High-Level Waste (HLW) glass canister. Lower surface area translates directly into increased durability. This was the first full year of exploring glass ceramics for the Option 1 and 2 combined waste stream options. This work has shown that dramatic increases in waste loading are achievable by designing a glass ceramic waste form as an alternative to glass. Table S1 shows the upper limits for heat, waste loading (based on solubility), and the decay time needed before treatment can occur for glass and glass ceramic waste forms. The improvements are significant for both combined waste stream options in terms of waste loading and/or decay time required before treatment. For Option 1, glass ceramics show an increase in waste loading of 15 mass % and reduction in decay time of 24 years. Decay times of {approx}50 years or longer are close to the expected age of the fuel that will be reprocessed when the modified open or closed fuel cycle is expected to be put into action. Option 2 shows a 2x to 2.5x increase in waste loading with decay times of only 45 years. Note that for Option 2 glass, the required decay time before treatment is only 35 years because of the waste loading limits related to the solubility of MoO{sub 3} in glass. If glass was evaluated for similar waste loadings as those achieved in Option 2 glass ceramics, the decay time would be significantly longer than 45 years. These glass ceramics are not optimized, but already they show the potential to dramatically reduce the amount of waste generated while still utilizing the proven processing technology used for glass production.

Crum, Jarrod V.; Turo, Laura A.; Riley, Brian J.; Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna; Sickafus, Kurt E.

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

123

Waste Logic Decommissioning Waste Manager 2.0 Users Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Decommissioning Waste Manager, part of EPRI's Waste Logic series of computer programs, analyzes decommissioning waste cost and volume reduction strategies with the intent of quantifying the existing waste management program for any given waste generator.

2001-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

124

Solid Waste (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The New Mexico Environment Department's Solid Waste Bureau manages solid waste in the state. The Bureau implements and enforces the rules established by the Environmental Improvement Board.

125

Industrial Waste Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9) Page 2 of 7 Industrial Waste Generation Work with Engineered Nanomaterials Power Consumption Historical Contamination (groundwater, soil) Hazardous Waste Generation Atmospheric...

126

Recycling Electronic Waste - Website  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 18, 2010 ... Joined: 2/13/2007. Below is a link to a website that has articles on recycling electronic waste. http://www.scientificamerican....ectronic-waste-...

127

International Trade with Waste.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In this thesis, trade with waste between developed countries and the third world will be presented to analyze whether waste?trading can create a possible (more)

Willn, Jenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Program for certification of waste from contained firing facility: Establishment of waste as non-reactive and discussion of potential waste generation problems  

SciTech Connect

Debris from explosives testing in a shot tank that contains 4 weight percent or less of explosive is shown to be non-reactive under the specified testing protocol in the Code of Federal Regulations. This debris can then be regarded as a non-hazardous waste on the basis of reactivity, when collected and packaged in a specified manner. If it is contaminated with radioactive components (e.g. depleted uranium), it can therefore be disposed of as radioactive waste or mixed waste, as appropriate (note that debris may contain other materials that render it hazardous, such as beryllium). We also discuss potential waste generation issues in contained firing operations that are applicable to the planned new Contained Firing Facility (CFF). The goal of this program is to develop and document conditions under which shot debris from the planned Contained Firing Facility (CFF) can be handled, shipped, and accepted for waste disposal as non-reactive radioactive or mixed waste. This report fulfills the following requirements as established at the outset of the program: 1. Establish through testing the maximum level of explosive that can be in a waste and still have it certified as non-reactive. 2. Develop the procedure to confirm the acceptability of radioactive-contaminated debris as non-reactive waste at radioactive waste disposal sites. 3. Outline potential disposal protocols for different CFF scenarios (e.g. misfires with scattered explosive).

Green, L., Garza, R., Maienschein, J., Pruneda, C.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

129

Phase 1 immobilized low-activity waste operational source term  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an engineering analysis of the Phase 1 privatization feeds to establish an operational source term for storage and disposal of immobilized low-activity waste packages at the Hanford Site. The source term information is needed to establish a preliminary estimate of the numbers of remote-handled and contact-handled waste packages. A discussion of the uncertainties and their impact on the source term and waste package distribution is also presented. It should be noted that this study is concerned with operational impacts only. Source terms used for accident scenarios would differ due to alpha and beta radiation which were not significant in this study.

Burbank, D.A.

1998-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

130

Detection of free liquid in containers of solidified radioactive waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of nondestructively detecting the presence of free liquid within a sealed enclosure containing solidified waste by measuring the levels of waste at two diametrically opposite locations while slowly tilting the enclosure toward one of said locations. When the measured level remains constant at the other location, the measured level at said one location is noted and any measured difference of levels indicates the presence of liquid on the surface of the solidified waste. The absence of liquid in the enclosure is verified when the measured levels at both locations are equal.

Greenhalgh, Wilbur O. (Richland, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Waste analysis plan for central waste complex  

SciTech Connect

This waste analysis plan (WAP) has been prepared for the Central Waste Complex which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. This WAP documents the methods used to characterize, and obtain and analyze representative samples of waste managed at this unit.

Weston, N.L.

1996-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

132

Sum Rules for Nucleon GPDs and Border Function Formulation  

SciTech Connect

Recently developed new approach to model nucleon generalized parton distributions (GPDs) H and E is based on two types of their representation in terms of double distributions. Within this approach, we re-consider the derivation of GPD sum rules that allow to use border functions H(x,x) and E(x,x) instead of full GPDs H(x,\\xi) and E(x,\\xi) in the integrals producing Compton form factors of deeply virtual Compton scattering. Using factorized DD Ansatz to model GPDs, we discuss the relation between the border functions and underlying parton densities. We found that substantial contribution to H(x,x) border function comes from the extra term required by new DD representations and related to E(x,\\xi) GPD.

Radyushkin, Anatoly V. [JLAB, Old Dominion U., JINR

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 4, Waste Management Facility report, Radioactive mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, handling method and containment vessel, waste number, waste designation and amount of waste.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

134

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

135

Linear Collider Collaboration Tech Notes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Notes Notes LCC - 0038 29/04/00 CBP Tech Note - 234 Transverse Field Profile of the NLC Damping Rings Electromagnet Wiggler 29 April 2000 17 J. Corlett and S. Marks Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory M. C. Ross Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stanford, CA Abstract: The primary effort for damping ring wiggler studies has been to develop a credible radiation hard electromagnet wiggler conceptual design that meets NLC main electron and positron damping ring physics requirements [1]. Based upon an early assessment of requirements, a hybrid magnet similar to existing designs satisfies basic requirements. However, radiation damage is potentially a serious problem for the Nd-Fe-B permanent magnet material, and cost remains an issue for samarium cobalt magnets. Superconducting magnet designs have not been

136

Estimate of Hanford Waste Rheology and Settling Behavior  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protections Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will process and treat radioactive waste that is stored in tanks at the Hanford Site. Piping, pumps, and mixing vessels have been selected to transport, store, and mix the high-level waste slurries in the WTP. This report addresses the analyses performed by the Rheology Working Group (RWG) and Risk Assessment Working Group composed of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Bechtel National Inc. (BNI), CH2M HILL, DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) and Yasuo Onishi Consulting, LLC staff on data obtained from documented Hanford waste analyses to determine a best-estimate of the rheology of the Hanford tank wastes and their settling behavior. The actual testing activities were performed and reported separately in referenced documentation. Because of this, many of the required topics below do not apply and are so noted.

Poloski, Adam P.; Wells, Beric E.; Tingey, Joel M.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Hall, Mark N.; Thomson, Scott L.; Smith, Gary Lynn; Johnson, Michael E.; Meacham, Joseph E.; Knight, Mark A.; Thien, Michael G.; Davis, Jim J.; Onishi, Yasuo

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

137

BNL ALARA Center: ALARA Notes, No. 9  

SciTech Connect

This issue of the Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Alara Notes includes the agenda for the Third International Workshop on ALARA and specific instructions on the use of the on-line fax-on-demand service provided by BNL. Other topics included in this issue are: (1) A discussion of low-level discharges from Canadian nuclear plants, (2) Safety issues at French nuclear plants, (3) Acoustic emission as a means of leak detection, (4) Replacement of steam generators at Doel-3, Beaznau, and North Anna-1, (5) Remote handling equipment at Bruce, (6) EPRI`s low level waste program, (7) Radiation protection during concrete repairs at Savannah River, (8) Reactor vessel stud removal/repair at Comanche Peak-1, (9) Rework of reactor coolant pump motors, (10) Restoration of service water at North Anna-1 and -2, (11) Steam generator tubing problems at Mihama-1, (12) Full system decontamination at Indian Point-2, (13) Chemical decontamination at Browns Ferry-2, and (14) Inspection methodolody in France and Japan.

Khan, T.A.; Xie, J.W.; Beckman, M.C. [eds.] [and others

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Mixed waste focus area alternative technologies workshop  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA)-sponsored Alternative Technology Workshop held in Salt Lake City, Utah, from January 24--27, 1995. The primary workshop goal was identifying potential applications for emerging technologies within the Options Analysis Team (OAT) ``wise`` configuration. Consistent with the scope of the OAT analysis, the review was limited to the Mixed Low-Level Waste (MLLW) fraction of DOE`s mixed waste inventory. The Los Alamos team prepared workshop materials (databases and compilations) to be used as bases for participant review and recommendations. These materials derived from the Mixed Waste Inventory Report (MWIR) data base (May 1994), the Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP) data base, and the OAT treatment facility configuration of December 7, 1994. In reviewing workshop results, the reader should note several caveats regarding data limitations. Link-up of the MWIR and DSTP data bases, while representing the most comprehensive array of mixed waste information available at the time of the workshop, requires additional data to completely characterize all waste streams. A number of changes in waste identification (new and redefined streams) occurred during the interval from compilation of the data base to compilation of the DSTP data base with the end result that precise identification of radiological and contaminant characteristics was not possible for these streams. To a degree, these shortcomings compromise the workshop results; however, the preponderance of waste data was linked adequately, and therefore, these analyses should provide useful insight into potential applications of alternative technologies to DOE MLLW treatment facilities.

Borduin, L.C.; Palmer, B.A.; Pendergrass, J.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Technology Analysis Group

1995-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

139

Bounds and Approximations for Sums of Dependent Log-Elliptical Random Variables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dhaene, Denuit, Goovaerts, Kaas & Vyncke (2002a,b) have studied convex bounds for a sum of dependent random variables and applied these to sums of log-normal random variables. In particular, they have shown how these convex bounds can be used to derive closed-form approximations for several of the risk measures of such a sum. In this paper we investigate to which extent their general results on convex bounds can also be applied to sums of log-elliptical random variables which incorporate sums of log-normals as a special case. Firstly, we show that unlike the log-normal case, for general sums of log-ellipticals the convex lower bound does no longer result in closed form approximations for the different risk measures. Secondly, we demonstrate how instead the weaker stop-loss order can be used to derive such closed form approximations. We also present numerical examples to show the accuracy of the proposed approximations.

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Twisted Dedekind Type Sums Associated with Barnes' Type Multiple Frobenius-Euler l-Functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to construct new Dedekind type sums. We construct generating functions of Barnes' type multiple Frobenius-Euler numbers and polynomials. By applying Mellin transformation to these functions, we define Barnes' type multiple l-functions, which interpolate Frobenius-Euler numbers at negative integers. By using generalizations of the Frobenius-Euler functions, we define generalized Dedekind type sums and prove corresponding reciprocity law. We also give twisted versions of the Frobenius-Euler polynomials and new Dedekind type sums and corresponding reciprocity law. Furthermore, by using p-adic q-Volkenborn integral and twisted (h,q)-Bernoulli functions, we construct p-adic (h,q)-higher order Dedekind type sums. By using relation between Bernoulli and Frobenius-Euler functions, we also define analogues of Hardy-Berndt type sums. We give some new relations related to to these sums as well.

Mehmet Cenkci; Yilmaz Simsek; Mumun Can; Veli Kurt

2007-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste notes sum" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Infectious waste feed system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An infectious waste feed system for comminuting infectious waste and feeding the comminuted waste to a combustor automatically without the need for human intervention. The system includes a receptacle for accepting waste materials. Preferably, the receptacle includes a first and second compartment and a means for sealing the first and second compartments from the atmosphere. A shredder is disposed to comminute waste materials accepted in the receptacle to a predetermined size. A trough is disposed to receive the comminuted waste materials from the shredder. A feeding means is disposed within the trough and is movable in a first and second direction for feeding the comminuted waste materials to a combustor.

Coulthard, E. James (York, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Understanding radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect

This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

Murray, R.L.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Microsoft Word - ExSum-Sept05.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Flaming Gorge Dam Final Environmental Impact Statement Executive Summary U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Reclamation Upper Colorado Region Salt Lake City, Utah September 2005 Note to the Reader This Executive Summary provides an overview of the proposed action analyzed in the Operation of Flaming Gorge Dam Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). It is intended to provide a concise report of the proposed action, alternatives, and environmental consequences which are explained and analyzed in detail in the EIS. Because a number of those on the EIS mailing list asked only for a copy

144

Nuclear waste solidification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High level liquid waste solidification is achieved on a continuous basis by atomizing the liquid waste and introducing the atomized liquid waste into a reaction chamber including a fluidized, heated inert bed to effect calcination of the atomized waste and removal of the calcined waste by overflow removal and by attrition and elutriation from the reaction chamber, and feeding additional inert bed particles to the fluidized bed to maintain the inert bed composition.

Bjorklund, William J. (Richland, WA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) Eligibility...

146

Business Plan : Residential Solid Waste Collection.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Residential solid waste means all the solid wastes produced in household level, which includes bio-waste, metal, mixed wastes, organic and inorganic waste. The inability of (more)

Mazengo, Dorice

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

The Effect of Congress' Mandate to Create Greater Efficiencies in the Characterization of Transuranic Waste through the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effective December 1, 2003, the U.S. Congress directed the Department of Energy (DOE) to file a permit modification request with the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) to amend the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (hereinafter 'the Permit') at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This legislation, Section 311 of the 2004 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, was designed to increase efficiencies in Transuranic (TRU) waste characterization processes by focusing on only those activities necessary to characterize waste streams, while continuing to protect human health and the environment. Congressionally prescribed changes would impact DOE generator site waste characterization programs and waste disposal operations at WIPP. With this legislative impetus, in early 2004 the DOE and Washington TRU Solutions (WTS), co-permittee under the Permit, submitted a permit modification request to the NMED pursuant to Section 311. After a lengthy process, including extensive public and other stakeholder input, the NMED granted the Permittees' request in October 2006, as part of a modification authorizing disposal of Remote-Handled (RH) TRU waste at WIPP. In conclusion: Implementation of the Permit under the revised Section 311 provisions is still in its early stages. Data are limited, as noted above. In view of these limited data and fluctuations in waste feed due to varying factors, at the current time it is difficult to determine with accuracy the impacts of Section 311 on the costs of characterizing TRU waste. It is safe to say, however, that the there have been many positive impacts flowing from Section 311. The generator sites now have more flexibility in characterizing waste. Also, RH TRU waste is now being disposed at WIPP - which was not possible before the 2006 Permit modification. As previously noted, the RH modification was approved at the same time as the Section 311 modification. Had the Section 311 changes not been implemented, RH TRU waste may not have been successfully permitted for disposal at WIPP. Changes made pursuant to Section 311 helped to facilitate approval of the proposed RH TRU modifications. For example, the three scenarios for use in AK Sufficiency Determination Requests, described herein, are essential to securing approval of some RH TRU waste streams for eventual disposal at WIPP. Thus, even if characterization rates do not increase significantly, options for disposal of RH TRU waste, which may not have been possible without Section 311, are now available and the TRU waste disposal mission is being accomplished as mandated by Congress in the LWA. Also, with the Section 311 modification, the Permittees commenced room-based VOC monitoring in the WIPP repository, which is also a positive impact of Section 311. Permit changes pursuant to Section 311 were a good beginning, but much more is need to encourage more efficient methodologies in waste characterization activities for TRU mixed waste destined for WIPP. Although the Permittees now have more flexibility in characterizing waste for disposal at WIPP, the processes are still lengthy, cumbersome, and paper-intensive. As the generator sites continue to characterize waste under Section 311, more data will likely be compiled and evaluated to assess the longer term cost and technical impacts of Section 311. Also, further refinements in TRU waste characterization requirements through Permit modifications are likely in future years to eliminate, improve, and clarify remaining unnecessary and redundant Permit provisions. Continuous improvements to the TRU waste characterization program are bound to occur, resulting in even greater efficiencies in the characterization and ultimate disposal of TRU waste. (authors)

Johnson, G.J. [Washington TRU Solutions, LLC, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Carlsbad, New Mexico (United States); Kehrman, R.F. [Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Carlsbad, New Mexico (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Raya James Johnson Rad/Mixed Waste** Steve Bakhtiar Leadhazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste at the Hazardoustraining. Radioactive and mixed waste generators must take

Waste Management Group

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Hazardous Waste Act (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

"Hazardous waste" means any solid waste or combination of solid wastes that because of their quantity, concentration or physical, chemical or infectious characteristics may: cause or significantly...

150

Waste Minimization Plan Prepared by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Minimization Plan Prepared by: Environmental Health and Safety Department Revised February 2012 #12;Waste Minimization Plan Table of Contents Policy Statement........................................................... 3 Centralized Waste Management Program

151

Explanatory Notes Explanatory Notes The EIA-782 Surveys Background  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Explanatory Notes Explanatory Notes The EIA-782 Surveys Background The EIA-782 surveys were implemented in 1983 to fulfill the data requirements necessary to meet En- ergy Information Administration (EIA) legislative mandates and user community data needs. The re- quirements include petroleum product price, market distribution, demand (or sales), and product supply data, which are needed for a complete evaluation of petroleum market performance. The EIA-782 series includes the Form EIA-782A, "Refiners'/Gas Plant Operators' Monthly Petroleum Product Sales Re- port"; Form EIA-782B, "Resellers'/Retailers' Monthly Petroleum Product Sales Report"; and Form EIA- 782C, "Monthly Report of Prime Supplier Sales of Petroleum Products Sold for Local Consumption."

152

NATURE OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES  

SciTech Connect

The integrated processes of nuclear industry are considered to define the nature of wastes. Processes for recovery and preparation of U and Th fuels produce wastes containing concentrated radioactive materials which present problems of confinement and dispersal. Fundamentals of waste treatment are considered from the standpoint of processes in which radioactive materials become a factor such as naturally occurring feed materials, fission products, and elements produced by parasitic neutron capture. In addition, the origin of concentrated fission product wastes is examined, as well as characteristics of present wastes and the level of fission products in wastes. Also, comments are included on high-level wastes from processes other than solvent extraction, active gaseous wastes, and low- to intermediate-level liquid wastes. (J.R.D.)

Culler, F.L. Jr.

1959-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

153

QCD sum rule determination of the charm-quark mass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

QCD sum rules involving mixed inverse moment integration kernels are used in order to determine the running charm-quark mass in the MS scheme. Both the high and the low energy expansion of the vector current correlator are involved in this determination. The optimal integration kernel turns out to be of the form p(s)=1-(s{sub 0}/s){sup 2}, where s{sub 0} is the onset of perturbative QCD. This kernel enhances the contribution of the well known narrow resonances, and reduces the impact of the data in the range s{approx_equal}20-25 GeV{sup 2}. This feature leads to a substantial reduction in the sensitivity of the results to changes in s{sub 0}, as well as to a much reduced impact of the experimental uncertainties in the higher resonance region. The value obtained for the charm-quark mass in the MS scheme at a scale of 3 GeV is m{sub c}(3 GeV)=987{+-}9 MeV, where the error includes all sources of uncertainties added in quadrature.

Bodenstein, S. [Centre for Theoretical and Mathematical Physics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa); Bordes, J.; Penarrocha, J. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universitat de Valencia, and Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Centro Mixto Universitat de Valencia-CSIC (Spain); Dominguez, C. A. [Centre for Theoretical and Mathematical Physics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa); Department of Physics, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch 7600 (South Africa); Schilcher, K. [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Staudingerweg 7, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

REVIEW OF RHEOLOGY MODELS FOR HANFORD WASTE BLENDING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The area of rheological property prediction was identified as a technology need in the Hanford Tank Waste ? waste feed acceptance initiative area during a series of technical meetings among the national laboratories, Department of Energy-Office of River Protection, and Hanford site contractors. Meacham et al. delivered a technical report in June 2012, RPP-RPT-51652 ?One System Evaluation of Waste Transferred to the Waste Treatment Plant? that included estimating of single shell tank waste Bingham plastic rheological model constants along with a discussion of the issues inherent in predicting the rheological properties of blended wastes. This report was selected as the basis for moving forward during the technical meetings. The report does not provide an equation for predicting rheological properties of blended waste slurries. The attached technical report gives an independent review of the provided Hanford rheological data, Hanford rheological models for single tank wastes, and Hanford rheology after blending provided in the Meacham report. The attached report also compares Hanford to SRS waste rheology and discusses some SRS rheological model equations for single tank wastes, as well as discussing SRS experience with the blending of waste sludges with aqueous material, other waste sludges, and frit slurries. Some observations of note: Savannah River Site (SRS) waste samples from slurried tanks typically have yield stress >1 Pa at 10 wt.% undissolved solids (UDS), while core samples largely have little or no yield stress at 10 wt.% UDS. This could be due to how the waste has been processed, stored, retrieved, and sampled or simply in the differences in the speciation of the wastes.. The equations described in Meacham?s report are not recommended for extrapolation to wt.% UDS beyond the available data for several reasons; weak technical basis, insufficient data, and large data scatter. When limited data are available, for example two to three points, the equations are not necessarily satisfactory (justified) for interpolations, due to the number of unknown variables equal the number of known data points, resulting in a coefficient of determination of one. SRS has had some success predicting the rheology of waste blends for similar waste types using rheological properties of the individual wastes and empirical blending viscosity equations. Both the Kendall-Monroe and Olney-Carlson equations were used. High accuracy was not obtained, but predictions were reasonable compared to measured flow curves. Blending SRS processed waste with frit slurry (much larger particles and the source of SRS glass formers) is a different sort of problem than that of two similar slurries of precipitated waste particles. A different approach to rheology prediction has had some success describing the incorporation of large frit particles into waste than the one used for blending two wastes. In this case, the Guth-Simha equation was used. If Hanford waste is found to have significant particles in the >100 ?m diameter range, then it might be necessary to handle those particles differently from broadly distributed waste particles that are primarily <30 ?m in diameter. The following are recommendations for the Hanford tank farms: ? Investigate the impact of large-scale mixing operations on yield stress for one or more Hanford tanks to see if Hanford waste rheological properties change to become more like SRS waste during both tank retrieval and tank qualification operations. ? Determine rheological properties of mobilized waste slurries by direct measurement rather than by prediction ? Collect and characterize samples during the waste feed qualification process for each campaign. o From single source tanks that feed the qualification tanks o Blends from the qualification tanks ? Predictive rheological models must be used with caution, due to the lack of data to support such models and the utilization of the results that come from these models in making process decisions (e.g. the lack of actual operation expe

Koopman, D.; Stone, M.

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

155

REVIEW OF RHEOLOGY MODELS FOR HANFORD WASTE BLENDING  

SciTech Connect

The area of rheological property prediction was identified as a technology need in the Hanford Tank Waste ? waste feed acceptance initiative area during a series of technical meetings among the national laboratories, Department of Energy-Office of River Protection, and Hanford site contractors. Meacham et al. delivered a technical report in June 2012, RPP-RPT-51652 ?One System Evaluation of Waste Transferred to the Waste Treatment Plant? that included estimating of single shell tank waste Bingham plastic rheological model constants along with a discussion of the issues inherent in predicting the rheological properties of blended wastes. This report was selected as the basis for moving forward during the technical meetings. The report does not provide an equation for predicting rheological properties of blended waste slurries. The attached technical report gives an independent review of the provided Hanford rheological data, Hanford rheological models for single tank wastes, and Hanford rheology after blending provided in the Meacham report. The attached report also compares Hanford to SRS waste rheology and discusses some SRS rheological model equations for single tank wastes, as well as discussing SRS experience with the blending of waste sludges with aqueous material, other waste sludges, and frit slurries. Some observations of note: Savannah River Site (SRS) waste samples from slurried tanks typically have yield stress >1 Pa at 10 wt.% undissolved solids (UDS), while core samples largely have little or no yield stress at 10 wt.% UDS. This could be due to how the waste has been processed, stored, retrieved, and sampled or simply in the differences in the speciation of the wastes.. The equations described in Meacham?s report are not recommended for extrapolation to wt.% UDS beyond the available data for several reasons; weak technical basis, insufficient data, and large data scatter. When limited data are available, for example two to three points, the equations are not necessarily satisfactory (justified) for interpolations, due to the number of unknown variables equal the number of known data points, resulting in a coefficient of determination of one. SRS has had some success predicting the rheology of waste blends for similar waste types using rheological properties of the individual wastes and empirical blending viscosity equations. Both the Kendall-Monroe and Olney-Carlson equations were used. High accuracy was not obtained, but predictions were reasonable compared to measured flow curves. Blending SRS processed waste with frit slurry (much larger particles and the source of SRS glass formers) is a different sort of problem than that of two similar slurries of precipitated waste particles. A different approach to rheology prediction has had some success describing the incorporation of large frit particles into waste than the one used for blending two wastes. In this case, the Guth-Simha equation was used. If Hanford waste is found to have significant particles in the >100 μm diameter range, then it might be necessary to handle those particles differently from broadly distributed waste particles that are primarily <30 μm in diameter. The following are recommendations for the Hanford tank farms: ? Investigate the impact of large-scale mixing operations on yield stress for one or more Hanford tanks to see if Hanford waste rheological properties change to become more like SRS waste during both tank retrieval and tank qualification operations. ? Determine rheological properties of mobilized waste slurries by direct measurement rather than by prediction ? Collect and characterize samples during the waste feed qualification process for each campaign. o From single source tanks that feed the qualification tanks o Blends from the qualification tanks ? Predictive rheological models must be used with caution, due to the lack of data to support such models and the utilization of the results that come from these models in making process decisions (e.g. the lack of actual operation expe

Koopman, D.; Stone, M.

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

156

SUMMARY NOTES RESEARCH NEEDS SESSION*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Institute U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Programs U.S. Department of Energy, Argonne National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy, Solar Energy Research Institute U.S. Department of Energy, Community Technology Systems Branch U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Solid Wastes

Columbia University

157

Solving the subset-sum problem with a light-based device  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose an optical computational device which uses light rays for solving the subset-sum problem. The device has a graph-like representation and the light is traversing it by following the routes given by the connections between nodes. The nodes are ... Keywords: NP-complete, Optical solutions, Subset sum, Unconventional computing

Mihai Oltean; Oana Muntean

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

A PECULIARITY OF THE WILCOXON-MANN-WHITNEY RANK-SUM TEST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A PECULIARITY OF THE WILCOXON-MANN-WHITNEY RANK-SUM TEST Scotia Canada B3H 3C3 Keywords: intransitivity, rank-sum test, Behrens-Mann-Whitney test is a test of relative location whenever the two distributions are symmetric. By con- trast

159

Development of Cementitious Waste Forms for Nuclear Waste ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials Solutions for the Nuclear Renaissance. Presentation Title, Development of Cementitious Waste Forms for Nuclear Waste Immobilization.

160

EM QA Working Group September 2011 Notes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Meeting minutes and notes from the EM QA Working Group video conference meeting held in September 2011.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste notes sum" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Appendix A Explanatory Notes - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

October 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Natural Gas Monthly 89 Appendix A Explanatory Notes The Energy Information ...

162

Linear Collider Collaboration Tech Notes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Notes Notes LCC - 0018, 15/06/99 Rev B, June 2002 Correct Account of RF Deflections in Linac Acceleration June 15, 1999 G.V. Stupakov Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stanford, California Abstract: During acceleration in the linac structure, the beam not only increases its longitudinal momentum, but also experiences a transverse kick from the accelerating mode which is linear in accelerating gradient. This effect is neglected in such computer codes as LIAR and TRANSPORT. We derived the Hamiltonian equations that describe the effect of RF deflection into the acceleration process and included it into the computational engine of LIAR. By comparing orbits for the NLC main linac, we found that the difference between the two algorithms is about 10\%. The effect will be more pronounced at smaller

163

Linear Collider Collaboration Tech Notes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 May 2001 Lattice Description for NLC Damping Rings at 120 Hz Andrzej Wolski Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract: We present a lattice design for the NLC Main Damping Rings at 120 Hz repe tition rate. A total wiggler length of a little over 46 m is needed to achieve the damping time required for extracted, normalized, vertical emittance below 0.02 mm mrad. The dynamic aperture (using a linear model for the wiggler) is in excess of 15 times the injected beam size. The principal lattice parameters and characteristics are presented in this note; we also outline results of studies of alignment and field quality tolerances. CBP Tech Note-227 LCC-0061 Lattice Description for NLC Main Damping Rings at 120 Hz Andrzej Wolski Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

164

Company Level Imports Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Company Level Imports Explanatory Notes Company Level Imports Explanatory Notes Notice: Ongoing analysis of imports data to the Energy Information Administration reveals that some imports are not correctly reported on Form EIA-814 "Monthly Imports Report". Contact with the companies provides sufficient information for EIA to include these imports in the data even though they have not provided complete reports on Form EIA-814. Estimates are included in aggregate data, but the estimates are not included in the file of Company-Level Imports. Therefore, summation of volumes for PAD Districts 1-5 from the Company-Level Imports will not equal aggregate import totals. Explanation of Codes Used in Imports Database Files SURVEY_ID EIA-814 Survey Form Number for Collecting Petroleum Import Statistics

165

Linear Collider Collaboration Tech Notes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4, 10/03/00 4, 10/03/00 Luminosity for NLC Design Variations March 10, 1999 K.A. Thompson and T.O. Raubenheimer Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stanford, CA, USA Abstract: In this note we give Guineapig simulation results for the luminosity and luminosity spectrum of three baseline NLC designs at 0.5~TeV and 1.0~TeV and compare the simulation results with analytic approximations. We examine the effects of varying several design parameters away from the NLC-B-500 and NLC-B-1000 designs, in order to study possible trade-offs of parameters that could ease tolerances, increase luminosity, or help to optimize machine operation for specific physics processes. Luminosity for NLC Design Variations K.A. Thompson and T.O.Raubenheimer INTRODUCTION In this note we give Guineapig [l] simulation results for the luminosity and

166

How to deal with laboratory waste Radioactive waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How to deal with laboratory waste Radioactive waste: Any laboratory waste, whether chemical or biological, containing radioactive material, should be disposed as radioactive waste. Radioactive waste should be removed from the laboratory to the departmental waste area, soon after finishing the experiment

Maoz, Shahar

167

Transuranic (TRU) Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Defined by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act as "waste containing more than 100 nanocuries of alpha-emitting transuranic isotopes per gram of waste with half-lives greater than 20 years, except for (A)...

168

Pet Waste Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

About 1 million pounds of dog waste is deposited daily in North Texas alone. That's why proper disposal of pet waste can make a big difference in the environment. 5 photos, 2 pages

Mechell, Justin; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

169

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy (DOE) is closing the circle on the generation, management, and disposal of transuranic waste. But the WIPP story is not just about radioactive waste. It is...

170

Immobilization of Nuclear Wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 20, 2010 ... Glassy and Glass Composite Nuclear Wasteforms: Michael Ojovan1; Bill Lee2; ... wastes which should be solidified for safe storage and disposal. ... has been vitrifying the Department of Energy's High Level Waste (HLW) at...

171

Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is being designed to immobilize pretreated Hanford high-level waste and transuranic waste in borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters. Testing is being conducted in the HWVP Technology Development Project to ensure that adapted technologies are applicable to the candidate Hanford wastes and to generate information for waste form qualification. Empirical modeling is being conducted to define a glass composition range consistent with process and waste form qualification requirements. Laboratory studies are conducted to determine process stream properties, characterize the redox chemistry of the melter feed as a basis for controlling melt foaming and evaluate zeolite sorption materials for process waste treatment. Pilot-scale tests have been performed with simulated melter feed to access filtration for solids removal from process wastes, evaluate vitrification process performance and assess offgas equipment performance. Process equipment construction materials are being selected based on literature review, corrosion testing, and performance in pilot-scale testing. 3 figs., 6 tabs.

Larson, D.E.; Allen, C.R. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Kruger, O.L.; Weber, E.T. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Transuranic Waste Screener  

The TRU waste screener (TRU-WS) is a multifunctional system for the rapid screening of transuranic material for criticality safety or screening for TRU content in open trays or waste containers.

173

Waste canister for storage of nuclear wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A waste canister for storage of nuclear wastes in the form of a solidified glass includes fins supported from the center with the tips of the fins spaced away from the wall to conduct heat away from the center without producing unacceptable hot spots in the canister wall.

Duffy, James B. (Fullerton, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

The wild wild waste: e-waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

E-Waste is a popular, informal name for discarded electronic products such as computers, VCRs, cameras, which have reached the end of their "useful life". Discarded electronic products contain a stew of toxic metals and chemicals such as lead, mercury, ... Keywords: donate, e-waste, ecology, efficiency, environment, green computing, hazardous material, re-use, recycle, reduce, thin-client, upgrade, virtualization

Scott E. Hanselman; Mahmoud Pegah

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Mixed Waste Treatment Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of an ongoing integrated mixed waste program, EPRI has documented nuclear utility industry experience in the on-site treatment of mixed waste. This report reviews all available exclusions/exceptions to EPA permitting requirements for environmentally responsible on-site management of mixed waste. Included is a description of emerging mixed waste treatment technologies along with a detailed evaluation of off-site treatment/disposal facilities.

1996-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

176

Recycle Plastic Waste Recommended Action  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AR No. 5 Recycle Plastic Waste Recommended Action Separate scrap plastic bag waste from solid waste stream and recycle. This can be accomplished by either arranging for no-cost pick-up of loose waste or by selling baled waste material. Assessment Recommendation Summary Recommended Waste Cost Implementation

Tullos, Desiree

177

Waste Management and WasteWaste Management and Waste--toto--EnergyEnergy Status in SingaporeStatus in Singapore  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Management and WasteWaste Management and Waste--toto--EnergyEnergy Status in Singapore #12;Singapore's Waste Management · In 2003, 6877 tonnes/day (2.51 M tonnes/year) of MSW collected plants · 8% (non-incinerable waste) and incineration ash goes to the offshore Semakau Landfill · To reach

Columbia University

178

Waste disposal package  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This is a claim for a waste disposal package including an inner or primary canister for containing hazardous and/or radioactive wastes. The primary canister is encapsulated by an outer or secondary barrier formed of a porous ceramic material to control ingress of water to the canister and the release rate of wastes upon breach on the canister. 4 figs.

Smith, M.J.

1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

179

Reducing waste, Photoby stcvcchan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I ' I I t Reducing waste, Photoby stcvcchan AMs President Mike Lee (left to right), Point Grey M U recycling given high priority on campus By GAVIN WILSON UBC is taking stepsto reduce waste and encourageGellatly,Vice-President,Administration and Finance,to develop and recommend university policies on waste recycling. Another task force has submitted

Farrell, Anthony P.

180

Hazardous Waste Management Training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hazardous Waste Management Training Persons (including faculty, staff and students) working be thoroughly familiar with waste handling and emergency procedures ap- plicable to their job responsibilities before handling hazardous waste. Departments are re- quired to keep records of training for as long

Dai, Pengcheng

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste notes sum" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Waste acceptance criteria for closure generated waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The PORTS Facility has been operating since 1954. The PORTS Facility is used to enrich uranium for nuclear navy applications and commercial nuclear reactors. The PORTS process uses molecular diffusion techniques to separate the U-235 isotope from the U-238 isotope. The PORTS Facility consists of a complex cascade of compressors and converters through which gaseous uranium hexafluoride feed is processed. The feed contains approximately 0.7 percent U-235 by weight while products contain from 4 to 97 percent U-235 by weight, depending on the final application. In general, the majority of the closure wastes generated at PORTS consists of personal protective equipment (PPE), rags, soils, decontamination solutions, and construction related debris. These hazardous wastes will be predominately characterized on the basis of process knowledge. PORTS assumes its conservative waste characterizations that are based on process knowledge are correct unless and until further investigation and/or analysis proves the constituents are not present or are present at concentrations below characteristic regulatory thresholds. Waste Acceptance Criteria for wastes generated by the closure of active and inactive RCRA facilities at PORTS has been developed. The criteria presented in this document govern the activities that are performed during the closure and subsequent generation of waste and relocation from the closure locations to the storage unit. These criteria are intended to ensure the proper handling, classification, processing, and storage of wastes in order to prevent hazardous waste release that may pose a threat to human health or the environment. Any wastes currently stored at each of the facilities that are to be closed will be transferred to the X-326 or X-7725 Storage Units. The waste transfers will be accomplished in accordance with the Container Transfer Plan.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Waste Disposal Matrix Type of Chemical University-related Waste Personal Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Disposal Matrix Type of Chemical University-related Waste Personal Waste Batteries, used or unwanted including lithium, alkaline, lead ­ acid or lithium aluminum hydride Chemical Waste Check Disposal of Toxics website for disposal options or Take to Bookstore Biological Waste Biological Waste Residential

Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

183

Radioactive Waste Management Basis  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

Perkins, B K

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

184

Municipal waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to apparatus for processing municipal waste, and more particularly to vibrating mesh screen conveyor systems for removing grit, glass, and other noncombustible materials from dry municipal waste. Municipal waste must be properly processed and disposed of so that it does not create health risks to the community. Generally, municipal waste, which may be collected in garbage trucks, dumpsters, or the like, is deposited in processing areas such as landfills. Land and environmental controls imposed on landfill operators by governmental bodies have increased in recent years, however, making landfill disposal of solid waste materials more expensive. 6 figs.

Mayberry, J.L.

1988-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

185

Lecture notes for criticality safety  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These lecture notes for criticality safety are prepared for the training of Department of Energy supervisory, project management, and administrative staff. Technical training and basic mathematics are assumed. The notes are designed for a two-day course, taught by two lecturers. Video tapes may be used at the options of the instructors. The notes provide all the materials that are necessary but outside reading will assist in the fullest understanding. The course begins with a nuclear physics overview. The reader is led from the macroscopic world into the microscopic world of atoms and the elementary particles that constitute atoms. The particles, their masses and sizes and properties associated with radioactive decay and fission are introduced along with Einstein's mass-energy equivalence. Radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, radiation penetration, shielding and health-effects are discussed to understand protection in case of a criticality accident. Fission, the fission products, particles and energy released are presented to appreciate the dangers of criticality. Nuclear cross sections are introduced to understand the effectiveness of slow neutrons to produce fission. Chain reactors are presented as an economy; effective use of the neutrons from fission leads to more fission resulting in a power reactor or a criticality excursion. The six-factor formula is presented for managing the neutron budget. This leads to concepts of material and geometric buckling which are used in simple calculations to assure safety from criticality. Experimental measurements and computer code calculations of criticality are discussed. To emphasize the reality, historical criticality accidents are presented in a table with major ones discussed to provide lessons-learned. Finally, standards, NRC guides and regulations, and DOE orders relating to criticality protection are presented.

Fullwood, R.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Almost Exact Sum Rules for Nucleon Moments From An Infinite Dimensional Algebra  

SciTech Connect

Recently there has been a great surge of interest in almost-exact sum rules for the magnetic moments of nucleons. (By almost-exact we mean: exact to all orders in the strong couplings but only the lowest order in electromagnetic and weak couplings.) Besides providing a means for calculation of the magnetic moments on the same level as the calculation of GA/GV by Adler and Weisberger these sum rules, taken together with the Adler-Weisberger sum rule, constitute a useful tool for investigating the nature of the dynamical approximations that underlie higher symmetry schemes.

Beg, M.A. B.

1966-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

187

ASSEMBLAGES ON WASTE ROCK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Natural regeneration on waste rock was investigated at the old Wangaloa coal mine, south-east Otago. A 450-m long waste rock stack had been created 4050 years ago, and has had little anthropogenic intervention since. The stack is made up of a gradient of three main waste rock types, defined as silt-rich, mixed, and quartz-rich, which reflect different proportions of loess siltstone and quartz gravel conglomerate. Plant species assemblages were quantified in four 5-m 2 quadrats in each waste rock type. Invertebrates were heat extracted from substrate cores (7 cm diameter; depth 5 cm) collected from quadrats over an eight-week period in spring 2003. Ordination analysis showed statistically distinct plant and invertebrate assemblages had arisen on each waste rock type. Revegetation patterns were dominated by native, woody individuals on all waste rock types, particularly manuka (Leptospermum scoparium) and kanuka (Kunzea ericoides). Plant cover on silt-rich waste rock was four-fold that on quartz-rich waste rock. Total numbers of invertebrates were highest on quartz-rich waste rock, but richness greatest on silt-rich waste rock. Collembola dominated the fauna but their numbers were proportionally greatest in poorly vegetated areas. Further work is required to explain the absence of plants and invertebrates from local areas of waste rock. ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

C. G. Rufaut; S. Hammit; D. Craw; S. G. Clearwater

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Mixed waste: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the peer-reviewed and edited versions of papers submitted for presentation a the Second International Mixed Waste Symposium. Following the tradition of the First International Mixed Waste Symposium, these proceedings were prepared in advance of the meeting for distribution to participants. The symposium was organized by the Mixed Waste Committee of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The topics discussed at the symposium include: stabilization technologies, alternative treatment technologies, regulatory issues, vitrification technologies, characterization of wastes, thermal technologies, laboratory and analytical issues, waste storage and disposal, organic treatment technologies, waste minimization, packaging and transportation, treatment of mercury contaminated wastes and bioprocessing, and environmental restoration. Individual abstracts are catalogued separately for the data base.

Moghissi, A.A.; Blauvelt, R.K.; Benda, G.A.; Rothermich, N.E. [eds.] [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Safety and Health

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

189

Sustainable waste management in Africa through CDM projects  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is a compendium on GHG reductions via improved waste strategies in Africa. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This note provides a strategic framework for Local Authorities in Africa. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Assists LAs to select Zero Waste scenarios and achieve sustained GHG reduction. - Abstract: Only few Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) projects (traditionally focussed on landfill gas combustion) have been registered in Africa if compared to similar developing countries. The waste hierarchy adopted by many African countries clearly shows that waste recycling and composting projects are generally the most sustainable. This paper undertakes a sustainability assessment for practical waste treatment and disposal scenarios for Africa and makes recommendations for consideration. The appraisal in this paper demonstrates that mechanical biological treatment of waste becomes more financially attractive if established through the CDM process. Waste will continue to be dumped in Africa with increasing greenhouse gas emissions produced, unless industrialised countries (Annex 1) fund carbon emission reduction schemes through a replacement to the Kyoto Protocol. Such a replacement should calculate all of the direct and indirect carbon emission savings and seek to promote public-private partnerships through a concerted support of the informal sector.

Couth, R. [CRECHE, Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, School of Engineering, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4041 (South Africa); Trois, C., E-mail: troisc@ukzn.ac.za [CRECHE, Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, School of Engineering, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4041 (South Africa)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

Tank Waste and Waste Processing | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing The Defense Waste Processing Facility set a record by producing 267 canisters filled with glassified waste in a year. New bubbler technology and other enhancements will increase canister production in the future. The Defense Waste Processing Facility set a record by producing 267 canisters filled with glassified waste in a year. New bubbler technology and other enhancements will increase canister production in the future. A Savannah River Remediation employee uses a manipulator located inside a shielded enclosure at the Defense Waste Processing Facility where the melter is pouring molten glass inside a canister. A Savannah River Remediation employee uses a manipulator located inside a

191

New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the issues of conducting debris treatment in the New Waste Calcine Facility (NWCF) decontamination area and the methods currently being used to decontaminate material at the NWCF.

K. E. Archibald

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Microsoft Word - Final TEC Notes_April 2005.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (D0E) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (D0E) TRANSPORTATION EXTERNAL COORDINATION WORKING GROUP (TEC) MEETING April 4-5, 2005 Phoenix, Arizona Meeting Notes Part I - Opening Remarks (April 4) Welcome and Meeting Overview Introduction Judith Holm, DOE Office of National Transportation (ONT), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), called the meeting to order and welcomed the participants. She reviewed the agenda and called special attention to the plenary sessions being held in the afternoon. Ms. Holm also mentioned a few housekeeping items which included a reminder to fill out the evaluation form. Of particular interest on the evaluation form is feedback from the members on how they would like to conduct meetings in the future. She emphasized that DOE

193

Analytic Approximation of Discrete Field Samples with Weighted Sums and the Gridless Computation of Field Derivatives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective analysis by weighted sums of discrete observations is equivalent to the approximation of the distribution of an observed parameter by a function which is also analytic, provided that the weighting function is both analytic and positive ...

F. Caracena

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Zero-crossing rate for the sum of two sinusoids or a signal plus noise (Corresp.)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the sum of two sinusoids of incommensurable frequencies, the number of zero-crossings per secondZis calculated. By averaging this result over a Rayleigh distribution for the amplitude of one of the sinusoids, Rice's formula is obtained ...

N. Blachman

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Models for Relativistic Coulomb Sum Rules:Expansions in Moments of the Nuclear Momentum Density  

SciTech Connect

Relativistic Coulomb sum rules for quasielastic electron scattering from nuclei are developed using a class of relativistic models for the nuclear ground-state momentum distribution. Approximate sum rules at constant 3- or 4-momentum transfer are expressed as expansions in moments of the momentum distribution. New sum-rule functions are derived which, even for very large values of energy and momentum where relativistic effects become dominant, approach simple asymptotic values; in doing so they approximately retain the flavor of the nonrelativistic Coulomb sum rule which approaches Z. Specific ways of achieving an optimum separation of effects relating to the electromagnetic response of a single nucleon and of a many-body system of structureless particles are discussed, including a study of sensitivities to alternative parameterizations of GEn. Comparisons of results using different momentum distributions for the case of 16O are presented.

Donnelly, T. W.; Kronenberg, E. L.; van Orden, J. W.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Can Surface-Cover Tiles Be Summed to Give Neighborhood Fluxes in Cities?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper addresses the question of whether the modeling practice of summing separate land-cover tiles to give urban fluxes at the neighborhood scale has merit. A central-city site in Basel, Switzerland, was instrumented to measure turbulent ...

J. A. Salmond; M. Roth; T. R. Oke; A. Christen; J. A. Voogt

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Waste Confidence Discussion | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Confidence Discussion Waste Confidence Discussion Long-Term Waste Confidence Update. Waste Confidence Discussion More Documents & Publications Status Update: Extended Storage...

198

Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste Read more overleaf Introduction Energy from waste provides us with an opportunity for a waste solution and a local source of energy rolled,itcan onlyaddressaportionofthewastestream andisnotsufficientonitsown. Energy obtained from the combustion of residual waste (Energy from

199

WIPP Waste Information System Waste Container Data Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIPP Waste Information System Waste Container Data Report 06/06/2008 07:50 2.6 % LASB00411 % % Report Date Run by Report Site Id Container Number Waste Stream Data Status Code PEARCYM Version RP0360 Selection Criteria - Total Pages PRD02Instance 5 #12;Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Container Data Report

200

8-Waste treatment and disposal A. Responsibility for waste management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8- Waste treatment and disposal A. Responsibility for waste management 1. Each worker is responsible for correctly bagging and labeling his/her own waste. 2. A BSL3 technician will be responsible for transporting and autoclaving the waste. Waste will be autoclaved once or twice per day, depending on use

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste notes sum" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is collected by the RSO. 2. Dry radioactive waste must be segregated by isotope. 3. Liquid radioactive waste must be separated by isotope. 4. Liquid scintillation vials must be collected separately. 5. Any "mixed waste" must be cleared with the RSO and labeled

202

WIPP Waste Information System Waste Container Data Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIPP Waste Information System Waste Container Data Report 06/06/2008 07:49 2.6 % LAS817174 % % Report Date Run by Report Site Id Container Number Waste Stream Data Status Code PEARCYM Version RP0360 Selection Criteria - Total Pages PRD02Instance 5 #12;Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Container Data Report

203

Integrated Waste Services Association National Solid Wastes Management Association  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Can Help Meet Our Energy Needs October 5, 2006 - WASHINGTON, DC--A broad coalition of government-244-4700 Evan Von Leer, SWANA 240-494-2252 John Varrasi, ASME 212-591-8158 Don't Waste Waste! Waste-Based Energy and utilization of energy produced from waste, or waste-based energy (WBE). The United States Conference of Mayors

Columbia University

204

TSA waste stream and final waste form composition  

SciTech Connect

A final vitrified waste form composition, based upon the chemical compositions of the input waste streams, is recommended for the transuranic-contaminated waste stored at the Transuranic Storage Area of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The quantities of waste are large with a considerable uncertainty in the distribution of various waste materials. It is therefore impractical to mix the input waste streams into an ``average`` transuranic-contaminated waste. As a result, waste stream input to a melter could vary widely in composition, with the potential of affecting the composition and properties of the final waste form. This work examines the extent of the variation in the input waste streams, as well as the final waste form under conditions of adding different amounts of soil. Five prominent Rocky Flats Plant 740 waste streams are considered, as well as nonspecial metals and the ``average`` transuranic-contaminated waste streams. The metals waste stream is the most extreme variation and results indicate that if an average of approximately 60 wt% of the mixture is soil, the final waste form will be predominantly silica, alumina, alkaline earth oxides, and iron oxide. This composition will have consistent properties in the final waste form, including high leach resistance, irrespective of the variation in waste stream. For other waste streams, much less or no soil could be required to yield a leach resistant waste form but with varying properties.

Grandy, J.D.; Eddy, T.L.; Anderson, G.L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Mode-coupling Cerenkov sum-frequency-generation in a multimode planar waveguide  

SciTech Connect

We present experimental and theoretical studies of the mode-coupling Cerenkov sum-frequency radiations in a multimode LiNbO{sub 3} planar waveguide. The radiations result from the coupling of different guided modes of the fundamental wave, which have the same optical frequencies but different propagation constants. At the same time, scattering-involved Cerenkov sum-frequency-generation was also observed and discussed. Our theoretical predictions are in well accordance with the experimental results.

Chen Changdong; Su Jie; Xu Ping; Hu Xiaopeng; Zhao Gang; Liu Yanhua; Lv Xinjie; Zhu Shining [Department of Physics, National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhang Yong [Department of Physics, National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); School of Modern Engineering and Applied Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093 (China)

2010-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

206

Pyrolysis of plastic packaging waste: A comparison of plastic residuals from material recovery facilities with simulated plastic waste  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pyrolysis of plastic waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison of different samples: real waste, simulated and real waste + catalyst. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Study of the effects of inorganic components in the pyrolysis products. - Abstract: Pyrolysis may be an alternative for the reclamation of rejected streams of waste from sorting plants where packing and packaging plastic waste is separated and classified. These rejected streams consist of many different materials (e.g., polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), aluminum, tetra-brik, and film) for which an attempt at complete separation is not technically possible or economically viable, and they are typically sent to landfills or incinerators. For this study, a simulated plastic mixture and a real waste sample from a sorting plant were pyrolyzed using a non-stirred semi-batch reactor. Red mud, a byproduct of the aluminum industry, was used as a catalyst. Despite the fact that the samples had a similar volume of material, there were noteworthy differences in the pyrolysis yields. The real waste sample resulted, after pyrolysis, in higher gas and solid yields and consequently produced less liquid. There were also significant differences noted in the compositions of the compared pyrolysis products.

Adrados, A., E-mail: aitziber_adrados@ehu.es [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, School of Engineering of Bilbao, Alameda Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Marco, I. de; Caballero, B.M.; Lopez, A.; Laresgoiti, M.F.; Torres, A. [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, School of Engineering of Bilbao, Alameda Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

A set of sums for continuous dual q{sup -2}-Hahn polynomials  

SciTech Connect

An infinite set {l_brace}{tau}{sup (l)}(y;r,z){r_brace}{sub r,lisanelementofN{sub 0}} of linear sums of continuous dual q{sup -2}-Hahn polynomials with prefactors depending on a complex parameter z is studied. The sums {tau}{sup (l)}(y;r,z) have an interpretation in context with tensor product representations of the quantum affine algebra U{sub q}{sup '}(sl(2)) involving both a positive and a negative discrete series representation. For each l>0, the sum {tau}{sup (l)}(y;r,z) can be expressed in terms of the sum {tau}{sup (0)}(y;r,z), continuous dual q{sup 2}-Hahn polynomials, and their associated polynomials. The sum {tau}{sup (0)}(y;r,z) is obtained as a combination of eight basic hypergeometric series. Moreover, an integral representation is provided for the sums {tau}{sup (l)}(y;r,z) with the complex parameter restricted by |zq|<1. This gives rise to a bilinear summation formula for the continuous dual q{sup -2}-Hahn polynomials.

Gade, R. M. [Prangerlstrasse 19, 81247 Munich (Germany)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

NDAA Section 3116 Waste Determinations with Related Disposal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NDAA Section 3116 Waste Determinations with Related Disposal Performance Assessments Waste Management Nuclear Materials & Waste Tank Waste and Waste Processing Waste...

209

Integrated Waste Treatment Facility Fact Sheet | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Management Tank Waste and Waste Processing Integrated Waste Treatment Facility Fact Sheet Integrated Waste Treatment Facility Fact Sheet Waste Management Nuclear...

210

NETL: LabNotes - September 2008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Student says studying biogas at NETL was a great learning experience (Editor's note: Penn State student Justin Weber spent his summer at NETL studying the effectiveness of a...

211

A Note on the Consumption Function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zeldes, S. (1989) Consumption and Liquidity Constraints:A Note on the Consumption Function Douglas G.Steigerwald Consumption Function The international

Steigerwald, Douglas G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

DOE Sustainability Assistance Network (SAN) Notes, Thursday,...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Page 1 of 4 DOE Sustainability Assistance Network (SAN) Notes Thursday, November 15, 2012 1. Sustainability Performance Office Highlights Paul Estabrooks, SPO The Sustainability...

213

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

refer to the EIA Energy Glossary. Sources Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas Explanatory Notes Shale Gas production data collected in conjunction with...

214

MODELING IN COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY NOTES OF ... - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MODELING IN COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY. NOTES OF WEEK 9. 1. Fully Observed Markov Model: F. Sometimes we want to model a process of generating...

215

COURSE NOTES: Nuclear Materials (NE120)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 10, 2007 ... This resource provides PDF lecture notes and readings for an undergraduate course covering materials issues in nuclear power systems.

216

Linear Collider Collaboration Tech Notes LCC-0076  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 CBPTech Note - 238 November 2001 Transport Lines for the NLC Damping Rings Andrzej Wolski November 2001 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, California Abstract: The...

217

References and Notes for Astatine ( At )  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Switch to Formatted Version References and Notes for Astatine ( At ). M64a R. McLaughlin, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 54, 965 (1964).

218

References and Notes for Astatine ( At )  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Version References and Notes for Astatine ( At ). Ref. ID, Reference, M64a, R. McLaughlin, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 54, 965 (1964).

219

Mac OS X Installation Notes for EXPGUI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of the following steps: On the finder window for the ... Proceed through the windows by pressing Continue (note ... Mac OS X books that cover this subject ...

220

129 Lecture Notes Relativistic Quantum Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

129 Lecture Notes Relativistic Quantum Mechanics 1 Need for Relativistic Quantum Mechanics's equation of motion in mechanics. The initial condtions to solve the Newton's equation of motion

Murayama, Hitoshi

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste notes sum" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Municipal waste water as a source of cooling water for California electric power plants. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses sources of municipal waste water for potential use as cooling water in California power plants. It notes the major factors which affect this practice. Municipal treatment facilities in California with discharge volumes deemed adequate to supply new power plants are identified. Also included is a summary of the experiences of several utilities in California and other western states with existing or planned applications of municipal waste water in power plant cooling towers.

MacDonald, T.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM CODE NOTES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IECC IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM CODE NOTES 1 The intent of the pipe insulation requirements is to reduce temperature changes while fluids are being transported through piping associated with heating, cooling or service hot water (SHW) systems, thereby saving energy and reducing operating costs. Uninsulated piping systems that transport fluids can create water temperature irregularities, which ultimately requires additional heating or cooling and associated energy costs to bring the water to operating temperature. Any piping that carries heated or cooled water, including piping systems with external heating (e.g., heat trace or impedance heating), should be thermally insulated to reduce heat loss or gain, allowing the fluid to be delivered at the intended temperature.

223

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

18 18 19 T he WIPP's first waste receipt, 11 years later than originally planned, was a monumental step forward in the safe management of nuclear waste. Far from ending, however, the WIPP story has really just begun. For the next 35 years, the DOE will face many challenges as it manages a complex shipment schedule from transuranic waste sites across the United States and continues to ensure that the repository complies with all regulatory requirements. The DOE will work to maintain the highest level of safety in waste handling and trans- portation. Coordination with sites Disposal operations require coordination with sites that will ship transuranic waste to the WIPP and include periodic certification of waste characterization and handling practices at those facilities. During the WIPP's

224

SRS - Programs - Waste Solidification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Solidification Waste Solidification The two primary facilities operated within the Waste Solidification program are Saltstone and the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Each DWPF canister is 10 feet tall and 2 feet in diameter, and typically takes a little over a day to fill. Each DWPF canister is 10 feet tall and 2 feet in diameter, and typically takes a little over a day to fill. The largest radioactive waste glassification plant in the world, DWPF converts the high-level liquid nuclear waste currently stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) into a solid glass form suitable for long-term storage and disposal. Scientists have long considered this glassification process, called "vitrification," as the preferred option for immobilizing high-level radioactive liquids into a more stable, manageable form until a federal

225

Underground waste barrier structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an underground waste barrier structure that consists of waste material, a first container formed of activated carbonaceous material enclosing the waste material, a second container formed of zeolite enclosing the first container, and clay covering the second container. The underground waste barrier structure is constructed by forming a recessed area within the earth, lining the recessed area with a layer of clay, lining the clay with a layer of zeolite, lining the zeolite with a layer of activated carbonaceous material, placing the waste material within the lined recessed area, forming a ceiling over the waste material of a layer of activated carbonaceous material, a layer of zeolite, and a layer of clay, the layers in the ceiling cojoining with the respective layers forming the walls of the structure, and finally, covering the ceiling with earth.

Saha, Anuj J. (Hamburg, NY); Grant, David C. (Gibsonia, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Guidelines for mixed waste minimization  

SciTech Connect

Currently, there is no commercial mixed waste disposal available in the United States. Storage and treatment for commercial mixed waste is limited. Host States and compacts region officials are encouraging their mixed waste generators to minimize their mixed wastes because of management limitations. This document provides a guide to mixed waste minimization.

Owens, C.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Summary report. Low-level radioactive waste management activities in the states and compacts. Volume 4, No. 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

`Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Activities in the States and Compacts` is a supplement to `LLW Notes` and is distributed periodically by Afton Associates, Inc. to state, compact and federal officials that receive `LLW Notes`. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low- Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Summary report, low-level radioactive waste management activities in the states and compacts. Vol. 4. No. 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

`Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Activities in the States and Compacts` is a supplement to `LLW Notes` and is distributed periodically by Afton Associates, Inc. to state, compact and federal officials that receive `LLW Notes`. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low- Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Operational Waste Volume Projection  

SciTech Connect

Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of June. 2000.

STRODE, J.N.

2000-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

230

Waste Confidence Discussion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-Term Long-Term Waste Confidence Update Christine Pineda Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission National Transportation Stakeholders Forum May 2012 ♦ Knoxville, Tennessee Long-Term Update Draft Report, "Background and Preliminary Assumptions for an Environmental Impact Statement- Long-Term Waste Confidence Update" Elements of the Long-Term Update - Draft environmental impact statement - Draft Waste Confidence Decision - Proposed Waste Confidence Rule based on the EIS and Decision, if applicable 2 Overview of Draft Report Background and assumptions report is first step in process. Basic topics in the report are:

231

Solid Waste Permits (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality administers the rules and regulations governing the storage, collection, processing, recovery, and reuse of solid waste protect the air,...

232

Norcal Waste Systems, Inc.  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet describes the LNG long-haul heavy-duty trucks at Norcal Waste Systems Inc.'s Sanitary Fill Company.

Not Available

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Waste Clean Up 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... deployment and clean-up activities of robot arms into a nuclear contaminated pit at the opening of waste storage tank C-106 at Hanford, Washington ...

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

234

The Power of Waste.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Abstract It is estimated that up to 2 percent of the population in Third World countries survives on waste in one way or another. (more)

Frykman, Carina

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Making waste public.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis questions the boundaries that define waste as a public or private dilemma, investigating these boundaries as productive sites for the imagination of social (more)

Gambetta, Curt

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300.degree. C. to 800.degree. C. to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100.degree. C. to 1400.degree. C. at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Make love not waste.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The purpose of this thesis was to investigate a waste management project and its public awareness components, in the Korca region, Albania. We wanted (more)

Carlsson Engstrm, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Making Waste Public.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis questions the boundaries that define waste as a public or private dilemma, investigating these boundaries as productive sites for the imagination of social (more)

Gambetta, Curt

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

WEB RESOURCE: Radioactive Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 8, 2007 ... This resource offers a a very broad explanation of how the Belgian Agency for Management of Radioactive Waste and Enriched Fissile Material...

240

Integrated waste management.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Integrated waste management is considered from a systems approach, with a particular emphasis on advancing sustainability. The focus of the thesis is to examine the (more)

Seadon, Jeffrey Keith

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste notes sum" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300 C to 800 C to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100 C to 1400 C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, G.G.

1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

242

Nuclear Waste Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Management's Yucca Mountain Project and the Office of Nuclear Energy's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) and Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) programs. Efforts...

243

Secondary Waste Cast Stone Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Cast Stone a cementitious waste form, has been selected for solidification of this secondary waste stream after treatment in the ETF. The secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. This secondary waste Cast Stone waste form qualification testing plan outlines the testing of the waste form and immobilization process to demonstrate that the Cast Stone waste form can comply with the disposal requirements. Specifications for the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form have not been established. For this testing plan, Cast Stone specifications are derived from specifications for the immobilized LAW glass in the WTP contract, the waste acceptance criteria for the IDF, and the waste acceptance criteria in the IDF Permit issued by the State of Washington. This testing plan outlines the testing needed to demonstrate that the waste form can comply with these waste form specifications and acceptance criteria. The testing program must also demonstrate that the immobilization process can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. This testing plan also outlines the testing needed to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support performance assessment analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form in the IDF

Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

244

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

dispose of transuranic radioactive waste, or TRU waste, left over from the production of nuclear weapons. After more than 20 years of scientific study, public input, and...

245

Virginia Waste Management Act (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Solid waste and hazardous waste are regulated under a number of programs at the Department of Environmental Quality. These programs are designed to encourage the reuse and recycling of solid waste...

246

Solid Waste Act (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The main purpose of the Solid Waste Act is to authorize and direct the establishment of a comprehensive solid waste management program. The act states details about specific waste management...

247

Solid Waste Disposal Act (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality is responsible for the regulation and management of municipal solid waste and hazardous waste. A fee is applied to all solid waste disposed in the...

248

TESLA-LNF TECHNICAL NOTE Divisione Acceleratori  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TESLA-LNF TECHNICAL NOTE _____________ Divisione Acceleratori Frascati, November 20, 2003 Note: TESLA Report 2003-26 TESLA DAMPING RING: INJECTION/EXTRACTION SCHEMES WITH RF DEFLECTORS D. Alesini, S/extraction schemes in the Damping Ring of TESLA using RF deflectors. We illustrate different possible solutions using

249

Composition and production rate of pharmaceutical and chemical waste from Xanthi General Hospital in Greece  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied pharmaceutical and chemical waste production in a Greek hospital. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pharmaceutical waste comprised 3.9% w/w of total hazardous medical waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unit production rate for total pharmaceutical waste was 12.4 {+-} 3.90 g/patient/d. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemical waste comprised 1.8% w/w of total hazardous medical waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unit production rate for total chemical waste was 5.8 {+-} 2.2 g/patient/d. - Abstract: The objective of this work was to determine the composition and production rates of pharmaceutical and chemical waste produced by Xanthi General Hospital in Greece (XGH). This information is important to design and cost management systems for pharmaceutical and chemical waste, for safety and health considerations and for assessing environmental impact. A total of 233 kg pharmaceutical and 110 kg chemical waste was collected, manually separated and weighed over a period of five working weeks. The total production of pharmaceutical waste comprised 3.9% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. Total pharmaceutical waste was classified in three categories, vial waste comprising 51.1%, syringe waste with 11.4% and intravenous therapy (IV) waste with 37.5% w/w of the total. Vial pharmaceutical waste only was further classified in six major categories: antibiotics, digestive system drugs, analgesics, hormones, circulatory system drugs and 'other'. Production data below are presented as average (standard deviation in parenthesis). The unit production rates for total pharmaceutical waste for the hospital were 12.4 (3.90) g/patient/d and 24.6 (7.48) g/bed/d. The respective unit production rates were: (1) for vial waste 6.4 (1.6) g/patient/d and 13 (2.6) g/bed/d, (2) for syringe waste 1.4 (0.4) g/patient/d and 2.8 (0.8) g/bed/d and (3) for IV waste 4.6 (3.0) g/patient/d and 9.2 (5.9) g/bed/d. Total chemical waste was classified in four categories, chemical reagents comprising 18.2%, solvents with 52.3%, dyes and tracers with 18.2% and solid waste with 11.4% w/w of the total. The total production of chemical waste comprised 1.8% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. Thus, the sum of pharmaceutical and chemical waste was 5.7% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. The unit production rates for total chemical waste for the hospital were 5.8 (2.2) g/patient/d and 1.1 (0.4) g/exam/d. The respective unit production rates were: (1) for reagents 1.7 (2.4) g/patient/d and 0.3 (0.4) g/examination/d, (2) for solvents 248 (127) g/patient/d and 192 (101) g/examination/d, (3) for dyes and tracers 4.7 (1.4) g/patient/d and 2.5 (0.9) g/examination/d and (4) for solid waste 54 (28) g/patient/d and 42 (22) g/examination/d.

Voudrias, Evangelos, E-mail: voudrias@env.duth.gr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Democritus University of Thrace, GR-671 00 Xanthi (Greece); Goudakou, Lambrini; Kermenidou, Marianthi; Softa, Aikaterini [Department of Environmental Engineering, Democritus University of Thrace, GR-671 00 Xanthi (Greece)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

250

Manhattan Project: A Note on Sources  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

A NOTE ON SOURCES A NOTE ON SOURCES Resources > Note on Sources The text for this web site is a combination of original material and adaptations from previous publications of the Department of Energy (including contractors), its predecessor agencies (primarily the Atomic Energy Commission and the Manhattan Engineer District), and other government agencies. Adaptations run the gamut from summaries to close paraphrases to text being taken directly. This material was gathered and adapted for use by the DOE's Office of History and Heritage Resources. For detailed notes on what sources were used for any particular page, see the footnote at the bottom of the page or its entry in Sources and Notes. For a discussion of the best general sources on the Manhattan Project, see the Suggested Readings.

251

LLW Notes: Volume 10, Number 8  

SciTech Connect

The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

Norris, C. [ed.] [Afton Associates, Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

1995-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

252

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2003 Site Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide information needed by the DOE to assess WIPP's environmental performance and to convey that performance to stakeholders and members of the public. This report has been prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A and DOE guidance. This report documents WIPP's environmental monitoring programs and their results for 2003. The WIPP Project is authorized by the DOE National Security and Military Applications of Nuclear Energy Authorization Act of 1980 (Pub. L. 96-164). After more than 20 years of scientific study and public input, WIPP received its first shipment of waste on March 26, 1999. Located in southeastern New Mexico, WIPP is the nation's first underground repository permitted to safely and permanently dispose of TRU radioactive and mixed waste (as defined in the WIPP LWA) generated through the research and production of nuclear weapons and other activities related to the national defense of the United States. TRU waste is defined in the WIPP LWA as radioactive waste containing more than 100 nanocuries (3,700 becquerels [Bq]) of alpha-emitting transuranic isotopes per gram of waste, with half-lives greater than 20 years. Exceptions are noted as high-level waste, waste that has been determined not to require the degree of isolation required by the disposal regulations, and waste the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has approved for disposal. Most TRU waste is contaminated industrial trash, such as rags and old tools, and sludges from solidified liquids; glass; metal; and other materials from dismantled buildings. A TRU waste is eligible for disposal at WIPP if it has been generated in whole or in partby one or more of the activities listed in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (42 United States Code [U.S.C.] 10101, et seq.), including naval reactors development, weapons activities, verification and control technology, defense nuclear materials production, defense nuclear waste and materials by-products management, defense nuclear materials security and safeguards and security investigations, and defense research and development. The waste must also meet the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria. When TRU waste arrives at WIPP, it is transported into the Waste Handling Building. The waste containers are removed from the shipping containers, placed on the waste hoist, and lowered to the repository level of 655 m (2,150 ft; approximately 0.5 mi) below the surface. Next, the containers of waste are removed from the hoist and placed in excavated storage rooms in the Salado Formation, a thick sequence of evaporite beds deposited approximately 250 million years ago (Figure 1.1). After each panel has been filled with waste, specially designed closures are emplaced. When all of WIPP's panels have been filled, at the conclusion of WIPP operations, seals will be placed in the shafts. Salt under pressure is relatively plastic, and mine openings will be allowed to creep closed for final disposal, encapsulating and isolating the waste.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

2005-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

253

Mixed Waste Management Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The management of mixed waste presents serious challenges to nuclear utilities. Regulatory and practical predicaments make compliance with the letter of all applicable regulations extremely difficult. Utility experts developed these guidelines to identify opportunities for improving work practices and regulatory compliance while minimizing any potential adverse impacts of mixed waste management.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

254

Mixed Waste Characterization Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents an overview of the process of characterizing potential mixed waste streams from nuclear power plants. Utility experts developed these guidelines to help guide utility personnel through the characterization process and provide a mechanism for properly documenting the characterization of individual waste streams.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

255

Radioactive waste disposal package  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

Lampe, Robert F. (Bethel Park, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Heterogeneous waste processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combination of treatment methods are provided for treatment of heterogeneous waste including: (1) treatment for any organic compounds present; (2) removal of metals from the waste; and, (3) bulk volume reduction, with at least two of the three treatment methods employed and all three treatment methods emplyed where suitable.

Vanderberg, Laura A. (Los Alamos, NM); Sauer, Nancy N. (Los Alamos, NM); Brainard, James R. (Los Alamos, NM); Foreman, Trudi M. (Los Alamos, NM); Hanners, John L. (Los Alamos, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Nuclear waste solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High efficiency removal of technetium values from a nuclear waste stream is achieved by addition to the waste stream of a precipitant contributing tetraphenylphosphonium cation, such that a substantial portion of the technetium values are precipitated as an insoluble pertechnetate salt.

Walker, Darrel D. (1684 Partridge Dr., Aiken, SC 29801); Ebra, Martha A. (129 Hasty Rd., Aiken, SC 29801)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Radioactive waste storage issues  

SciTech Connect

In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state`s boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected.

Kunz, D.E.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

259

Chapter 19 - Nuclear Waste Fund  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Waste Fund 19-1 Nuclear Waste Fund 19-1 CHAPTER 19 NUCLEAR WASTE FUND 1. INTRODUCTION. a. Purpose. This chapter establishes the financial, accounting, and budget policies and procedures for civilian and defense nuclear waste activities, as authorized in Public Law 97-425, the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended, referred to hereafter as the Act. b. Applicability. This chapter applies to all Departmental elements, including the National Nuclear Security Administration, and activities that are funded by the Nuclear Waste Fund (NWF) or the Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal appropriation. c. Background. The Act established the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) and assigned it responsibility for the management

260

Animal Waste Technology Fund (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A bill passed in 2012 transferred responsibility for animal waste management technology projects to the Maryland Department of Agriculture. The Department will maintain the Animal Waste Technology...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste notes sum" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

SRS - Programs - Solid Waste Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

manner possible. SRS's waste is categorized as transuranic, low-level, hazardous, mixed, high-level or sanitary waste. SWM is responsible for managing all of these...

262

Municipal Waste Combustion (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This rule establishes requirements for emissions from, and design and operation of, municipal waste combustion units. "Municipal waste"means all materials and substances discarded from residential...

263

Hazardous Waste Management (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The New Mexico Environment Department's Hazardous Waste Bureau is responsible for the management of hazardous waste in the state. The Bureau enforces the rules established by the Environmental...

264

Solid waste management of Jakarta.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Solid waste management has been one of the critical issues in Jakarta, Indonesia.With enormous amounts of generated waste per day and limited supportinginfrastructure, the (more)

Trisyanti, Dini

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Treatment of Waste Soils / Solids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About the 1996 International Symposium on Extraction and Processing for the Treatment and Minimization of Wastes: Treatment of Waste Soils / Solids...

266

Drilling Waste Management Technology Descriptions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

skip navigation Drilling Waste Management Information System: The information resource for better management of drilling wastes DWM Logo Search Search you are in this section...

267

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

T h e W a s t e I s o l a t i o n P i l o t P l a n t DOE 1980. Final Environmental Impact Statement, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. DOE/EIS-0026, Washington, DC, Office of Environmental Management, U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1981. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP): Record of Decision. Federal Register, Vol. 46, No. 18, p. 9162, (46 Federal Register 9162), January 28, 1981. U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1990. Final Supplement Environmental Impact Statement, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. DOE/EIS-0026-FS, Washington, DC, Office of Environmental Management, U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1990. Record of Decision: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Federal Register, Vol. 55, No. 121, 25689-25692, U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1994. Comparative Study of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Transportation Alternatives.

268

Salt Waste Processing Initiatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Patricia Suggs Patricia Suggs Salt Processing Team Lead Assistant Manager for Waste Disposition Project Office of Environmental Management Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Initiatives 2 Overview * Current SRS Liquid Waste System status * Opportunity to accelerate salt processing - transformational technologies - Rotary Microfiltration (RMF) and Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) - Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (ARP/MCU) extension with next generation extractant - Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) performance enhancement - Saltstone enhancements * Life-cycle impacts and benefits 3 SRS Liquid Waste Total Volume >37 Million Gallons (Mgal) Total Curies 183 MCi (51% ) 175 MCi (49% ) >358 Million Curies (MCi) Sludge 34.3 Mgal (92% ) 3.0 Mgal (8%)

269

HLW Glass Waste Loadings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HLW HLW Glass Waste Loadings Ian L. Pegg Vitreous State Laboratory The Catholic University of America Washington, DC Overview Overview  Vitrification - general background  Joule heated ceramic melter (JHCM) technology  Factors affecting waste loadings  Waste loading requirements and projections  WTP DWPF  DWPF  Yucca Mountain License Application requirements on waste loading  Summary Vitrification  Immobilization of waste by conversion into a glass  Internationally accepted treatment for HLW  Why glass?  Amorphous material - able to incorporate a wide spectrum of elements over wide ranges of composition; resistant to radiation damage  Long-term durability - natural analogs Relatively simple process - amenable to nuclearization at large  Relatively simple process - amenable to nuclearization at large scale  There

270

AVLIS production plant waste management plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following the executive summary, this document contains the following: (1) waste management facilities design objectives; (2) AVLIS production plant wastes; (3) waste management design criteria; (4) waste management plan description; and (5) waste management plan implementation. 17 figures, 18 tables.

Not Available

1984-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

Charge form factor and sum rules of electromagnetic response functions in Carbon-12  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An "ab initio" calculation of the Carbon-12 elastic form factor, and sum rules of longitudinal and transverse response functions measured in inclusive (e,e') scattering, is reported, based on realistic nuclear potentials and electromagnetic currents. The longitudinal elastic form factor and sum rule are found to be in satisfactory agreement with available experimental data. A direct comparison between theory and experiment is difficult for the transverse sum rule. However, it is shown that the calculated one has large contributions from two-body currents, indicating that these mechanisms lead to a significant enhancement of the quasi-elastic transverse response. This fact may have implications for the anomaly observed in recent neutrino quasi-elastic charge-changing scattering data off Carbon-12.

A. Lovato; S. Gandolfi; Ralph Butler; J. Carlson; Ewing Lusk; Steven C. Pieper; R. Schiavilla

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

272

Waste Management & Research290 Waste Manage Res 2002: 20: 290301  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Management & Research290 Waste Manage Res 2002: 20: 290­301 Printed in UK ­ all rights reserved Copyright © ISWA 2002 Waste Management & Research ISSN 0734­242X Introduction Chromated copper of sorting technologies for CCA treated wood waste Monika Blassino Helena Solo-Gabriele University of Miami

Florida, University of

273

L/O/G/OL/O/G/O Waste Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L/O/G/OL/O/G/O #12;· Waste Waste · Value () · · Flow #12;Genchi GenbutsuGenchi Genbutsu Top management should participate in regular "Ground Zero" walks CQI CQI RCA #12; waste/ value waste/ value · Eliminate · Re-arrange · Re-structure · Simplify · Combine · IT #12

Laksanacharoen, Sathaporn

274

WASTE SEPARATION-DOES IT INFLUENCE MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTOR EMISSIONS?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE SEPARATION- DOES IT INFLUENCE MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTOR EMISSIONS? A. John Chandler A a commendable job in proving that trace emissions from a modem waste to energy plant have little to do with the trace compounds in individual components of municipal solid waste. Ogden, the leader in designing

Columbia University

275

Waste Management & Research172 Waste Manage Res 2003: 21: 172177  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Management & Research172 Waste Manage Res 2003: 21: 172­177 Printed in UK ­ all rights reserved Copyright © ISWA 2003 Waste Management & Research ISSN 0734­242X In many market segments of PVC in Germany increased by 9%, the fastest growth rate of all plastics. The waste stream in Germany

Columbia University

276

FROM WASTE TO WORTH: THE ROLE OF WASTE DIVERSION IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FROM WASTE TO WORTH: THE ROLE OF WASTE DIVERSION IN THE GREEN ECONOMY Submission to the Ministry of the Environment Regarding the Minister's Report on the Waste Diversion Act 2002 Review Submitted by: Submitted to of the Environment 10 Rambert Crescent Integrated Environmental Policy Division Toronto, Ontario M6S 1E6 Waste

Columbia University

277

NERSC Users Group Meeting February 22, 2001 Notes for Greenbook...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Notes Notes for Greenbook Process W. Kramer's Flip Charts - Input from the attendees on the Greenbook NUG Meeting February 22-23, 2001 The following are notes transcribed from the...

278

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 360: Solid Waste Management Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Solid Waste Management 0: Solid Waste Management Facilities (New York) Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 360: Solid Waste Management Facilities (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations apply to all solid wastes with the exception of hazardous or radioactive waste. Proposed solid waste processing facilities are required to obtain permits prior to construction, and the regulations provide details about permitting, construction, registration, and operation requirements. The regulations contain specific guidance for land

279

TRU Waste Sampling Program: Volume I. Waste characterization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Volume I of the TRU Waste Sampling Program report presents the waste characterization information obtained from sampling and characterizing various aged transuranic waste retrieved from storage at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The data contained in this report include the results of gas sampling and gas generation, radiographic examinations, waste visual examination results, and waste compliance with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant-Waste Acceptance Criteria (WIPP-WAC). A separate report, Volume II, contains data from the gas generation studies.

Clements, T.L. Jr.; Kudera, D.E.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Hanford Tank Waste Residuals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Hanford Tank Waste Residuals DOE HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 Chris Kemp, DOE ORP Bill Hewitt, YAHSGS LLC Hanford Tanks & Tank Waste * Single-Shell Tanks (SSTs) - ~27 million gallons of waste* - 149 SSTs located in 12 SST Farms - Grouped into 7 Waste Management Areas (WMAs) for RCRA closure purposes: 200 West Area S/SX T TX/TY U 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) - ~26 million gallons of waste* - 28 DSTs located in 6 DST Farms (1 West/5 East) * 17 Misc Underground Storage Tanks (MUST) * 43 Inactive MUST (IMUST) 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Volumes fluctuate as SST retrievals and 242-A Evaporator runs occur. Major Regulatory Drivers * Radioactive Tank Waste Materials - Atomic Energy Act - DOE M 435.1-1, Ch II, HLW - Other DOE Orders * Hazardous/Dangerous Tank Wastes - Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (TPA) - Retrieval/Closure under State's implementation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste notes sum" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide.

Forsberg, Charles W. (155 Newport Dr., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Beahm, Edward C. (106 Cooper Cir., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Parker, George W. (321 Dominion Cir., Knoxville, TN 37922)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide. 3 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

283

L/O/G/OL/O/G/O Waste Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L/O/G/OL/O/G/O #12;· Waste Waste · Value () · · Flow #12;Genchi GenbutsuGenchi Genbutsu of waste) Zero Inventory #12;Just in Time in HealthcareJust in Time in Healthcare Takt time (pitch), one · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 5 WHY · · · RCA · · · 5 WHY · · #12; waste/ value waste/ value

Laksanacharoen, Sathaporn

284

Method for calcining radioactive wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a method for the preparation of radioactive wastes in a low leachability form by calcining the radioactive waste on a fluidized bed of glass frit, removing the calcined waste to melter to form a homogeneous melt of the glass and the calcined waste, and then solidifying the melt to encapsulate the radioactive calcine in a glass matrix.

Bjorklund, William J. (Richland, WA); McElroy, Jack L. (Richland, WA); Mendel, John E. (Kennewick, WA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Urban Wood Waste Resource Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study collected and analyzed data on urban wood waste resources in 30 randomly selected metropolitan areas in the United States. Three major categories wood wastes disposed with, or recovered from, the municipal solid waste stream; industrial wood wastes such as wood scraps and sawdust from pallet recycling, woodworking shops, and lumberyards; and wood in construction/demolition and land clearing debris.

Wiltsee, G.

1998-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

286

Copenhagen Waste Management and Incineration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copenhagen Waste Management and Incineration Florence, April 24 2009 Julie B. Svendsen 24 20092 Presentation · General introduction to Copenhagen Waste Management System · National incentives · Waste Management plan 2012 · Incineration plants #12;Florence, April 24 20093 Copenhagen Waste

Columbia University

287

Waste to Energy Time Activities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEMINAR Waste to Energy Time Activities 9:30-9:40 Brief introduction of participants 9:40-10:10 Presentation of Dr. Kalogirou, "Waste to Energy: An Integral Part of Worldwide Sustainable Waste Management" 10. Sofia Bethanis, "Production of synthetic aggregates for use in structural concrete from waste to energy

Columbia University

288

Contained recovery of oily waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for recovering oily waste from oily waste accumulations underground comprising sweeping the oily waste accumulation with hot water to recover said oily waste, wherein said area treated is isolated from surrounding groundwater hydraulically. The hot water may be reinjected after the hot-water displacement or may be treated to conform to any discharge requirements.

Johnson, Jr., Lyle A. (Laramie, WY); Sudduth, Bruce C. (Laramie, WY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Methane generation from waste materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An organic solid waste digester for producing methane from solid waste, the digester comprising a reactor vessel for holding solid waste, a sprinkler system for distributing water, bacteria, and nutrients over and through the solid waste, and a drainage system for capturing leachate that is then recirculated through the sprinkler system.

Samani, Zohrab A. (Las Cruces, NM); Hanson, Adrian T. (Las Cruces, NM); Macias-Corral, Maritza (Las Cruces, NM)

2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

290

Certification Plan, low-level waste Hazardous Waste Handling Facility  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan also incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end-product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; an executive summary of the Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP) for the HWHF and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification. This plan provides guidance from the HWHF to waste generators, waste handlers, and the Waste Certification Specialist to enable them to conduct their activities and carry out their responsibilities in a manner that complies with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Waste generators have the primary responsibility for the proper characterization of LLW. The Waste Certification Specialist verifies and certifies that LBL LLW is characterized, handled, and shipped in accordance with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Certification is the governing process in which LBL personnel conduct their waste generating and waste handling activities in such a manner that the Waste Certification Specialist can verify that the requirements of WHC-WAC are met.

Albert, R.

1992-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

291

2009 Environmental Sustainability Network Conference Call Notes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Notes 1. 450.1A Guidance Update - Jane Powers (HS-22), (202) 586-7301, Jane.Powers@hq.doe.gov The Directives Review Board placed the four proposed guidance documents related to...

292

1998 Update --- Notes in the Particle Listings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Reviews, Tables, and Plots and in the Particle Listings Notes in the Gauge and Higgs Boson Listings PostScript PDF (3 pages) The Mass of the W Boson PostScript PDF (12 pages)...

293

221B Lecture Notes Relativistic Quantum Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

221B Lecture Notes Relativistic Quantum Mechanics 1 Need for Relativistic Quantum Mechanics We, similarly to the Newton's equation of motion in mechanics. The initial condtions to solve the Newton

Murayama, Hitoshi

294

221B Lecture Notes Relativistic Quantum Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

221B Lecture Notes Relativistic Quantum Mechanics 1 Need for Relativistic Quantum Mechanics We's equation of motion in mechanics. The initial condtions to solve the Newton's equation of motion

Murayama, Hitoshi

295

Property:Notes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Notes Notes Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Notes Property Type Text Pages using the property "Notes" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 2 2-M Probe At Alum Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) + More than 100 new 2m measurements at Astor Pass, Nevada resolved additional details of near-surface thermal outflow in this blind geothermal system 2-M Probe At Astor Pass Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) + More than 100 new 2m measurements at Astor Pass, Nevada resolved additional details of near-surface thermal outflow in this blind geothermal system 2-M Probe At Columbus Salt Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) + At Columbus Salt Marsh, Nevada, additional 2m measurements better defined the shape of a blind, shallow thermal anomaly; also at this location deeper temperature measurements were used to develop a near-surface temperature gradient.

296

Lube Notes Compilation, 1989-2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Much of the equipment installed in nuclear and fossil power plants relies on proper lubrication for trouble-free operation. EPRI's Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center (NMAC) began publishing the "Lube Notes" newsletter in 1989 to assist maintenance personnel in addressing plant lubrication issues. Each issue provides guidance on lubricant selection, application, and testing in specific plant applications. This report compiles all of the "Lube Notes" published from 1989 through 2001. A subject index i...

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Waste Treatment Plant Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, was the largest of three defense production sites in the U.S. Over the span of 40 years, it was used to produce 64 metric tons of plutonium, helping end World War II and playing a major role in military defense efforts during the Cold War. As a result, 56 million gallons of radioactive and chemical wastes are now stored in 177 underground tanks on the Hanford Site. To address this challenge, the U.S. Department of Energy contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the "Vit Plant," will use vitrification to immobilize most of Hanford's dangerous tank waste.

298

Handford Waste Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Hanford Waste Diversion SAN Teleconference June 21, 2012 Tom Ferns, DOE-RL 2 Hanford Site Mission The Hanford Site is engaged in one of the largest and most complex environmental...

299

Treatment of organic waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An organic waste containing at least one element selected from the group consisting of strontium, cesium, iodine and ruthenium is treated to achieve a substantial reduction in the volume of the waste and provide for fixation of the selected element in an inert salt. The method of treatment comprises introducing the organic waste and a source of oxygen into a molten salt bath maintained at an elevated temperature to produce solid and gaseous reaction products. The gaseous reaction products comprise carbon dioxide and water vapor, and the solid reaction products comprise the inorganic ash constituents of the organic waste and the selected element which is retained in the molten salt. The molten salt bath comprises one or more alkali metal carbonates, and may optionally include from 1 to about 25 wt.% of an alkali metal sulfate.

Grantham, LeRoy F. (Calabasas, CA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

request for further delays After the EPA certified that the WIPP met the standards for disposal of transuranic waste in May 1998, then-New Mexico Attorney General Tom Udall...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste notes sum" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300{degrees}C to 800{degrees}C to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100{degrees}C to 1400{degrees}C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, G.G.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

302

ORNL radioactive waste operations  

SciTech Connect

Since its beginning in 1943, ORNL has generated large amounts of solid, liquid, and gaseous radioactive waste material as a by-product of the basic research and development work carried out at the laboratory. The waste system at ORNL has been continually modified and updated to keep pace with the changing release requirements for radioactive wastes. Major upgrading projects are currently in progress. The operating record of ORNL waste operation has been excellent over many years. Recent surveillance of radioactivity in the Oak Ridge environs indicates that atmospheric concentrations of radioactivity were not significantly different from other areas in East Tennesseee. Concentrations of radioactivity in the Clinch River and in fish collected from the river were less than 4% of the permissible concentration and intake guides for individuals in the offsite environment. While some radioactivity was released to the environment from plant operations, the concentrations in all of the media sampled were well below established standards.

Sease, J.D.; King, E.M.; Coobs, J.H.; Row, T.H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Tank Waste Strategy Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tank Waste Subcommittee www.em.doe.gov safety performance cleanup closure E M Environmental Management 1 Tank Waste Subcommittee Ken Picha Office of Environmental Management December 5, 2011 Background Tank Waste Subcommittee (TWS)originally chartered, in response to Secretary's request to perform a technical review of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) in May 2010. Three tasks: o Verification of closure of WTP External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issues. o WTP Technical Design Review o WTP potential improvements Report completed and briefed to DOE in September 2010 www.em.doe.gov safety performance cleanup closure E M Environmental Management 2 Report completed and briefed to DOE in September 2010 Follow-on scope for TWS identified immediately after briefing to DOE and

304

Preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil field waste into salt caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Caverns can be readily formed in salt formations through solution mining. The caverns may be formed incidentally, as a result of salt recovery, or intentionally to create an underground chamber that can be used for storing hydrocarbon products or compressed air or disposing of wastes. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the feasibility, suitability, and legality of disposing of nonhazardous oil and gas exploration, development, and production wastes (hereafter referred to as oil field wastes, unless otherwise noted) in salt caverns. Chapter 2 provides background information on: types and locations of US subsurface salt deposits; basic solution mining techniques used to create caverns; and ways in which salt caverns are used. Later chapters provide discussion of: federal and state regulatory requirements concerning disposal of oil field waste, including which wastes are considered eligible for cavern disposal; waste streams that are considered to be oil field waste; and an evaluation of technical issues concerning the suitability of using salt caverns for disposing of oil field waste. Separate chapters present: types of oil field wastes suitable for cavern disposal; cavern design and location; disposal operations; and closure and remediation. This report does not suggest specific numerical limits for such factors or variables as distance to neighboring activities, depths for casings, pressure testing, or size and shape of cavern. The intent is to raise issues and general approaches that will contribute to the growing body of information on this subject.

Veil, J.; Elcock, D.; Raivel, M.; Caudle, D.; Ayers, R.C. Jr.; Grunewald, B.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Citrus Waste Biomass Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Renewable Spirits is developing an innovative pilot plant bio-refinery to establish the commercial viability of ehtanol production utilizing a processing waste from citrus juice production. A novel process based on enzymatic hydrolysis of citrus processing waste and fermentation of resulting sugars to ethanol by yeasts was successfully developed in collaboration with a CRADA partner, USDA/ARS Citrus and Subtropical Products Laboratory. The process was also successfully scaled up from laboratory scale to 10,000 gal fermentor level.

Karel Grohman; Scott Stevenson

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

306

Medical and Biohazardous Waste Generator's Guide (Revision 2)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biohazardous Waste Training Medical/Biohazardous WasteInspections 7. Forms and Supplies Medical Waste AccumulationLog Ordering Medical Waste Supplies 8. Solid Medical Waste

Waste Management Group

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

USING WEIGHTED SUM METHOD FOR THE CHOICE OF THE NIGHT VISION GOGGLES BATTERY POWER SUPPLY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

USING WEIGHTED SUM METHOD FOR THE CHOICE OF THE NIGHT VISION GOGGLES BATTERY POWER SUPPLY Daniela into account device working range, weight and price and also electrical battery power supply lifetime, temperature working range and its mechanics. The multicriteria optimization choice of the electrical battery

Borissova, Daniela

308

Royalties vs. upfront lump-sum fees in data communication environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mobile communications markets worldwide, today, are saturated, the number of mobile network operators (MNOs) in market is declining, mobile revenues are stagnant or falling, MNOs are becoming wireless Internet service providers, and economies of scope ... Keywords: Auction, Economies of scope, Lump-sum fee, Royalty, Spectrum

Youngsun Kwon; Buhm-Kyu Kim

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Sum-of-superellipses: a low parameter model for amplitude spectra of natural images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amplitude spectra of natural images look surprisingly alike. Their shape is governed by the famous 1/f power law. In this work we propose a novel low parameter model for describing these spectra. The Sum-of-Superellipses conserves their common ... Keywords: amplitude spectrum, image retrieval, image statistics, lam curve, natural images, superellipse

Marcel Spehr; Stefan Gumhold; Roland W. Fleming

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Capacity Regions and Sum-Rate Capacities of Vector Gaussian Interference Channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The capacity regions of vector, or multiple-input multiple-output, Gaussian interference channels are established for very strong interference and aligned strong interference. Furthermore, the sum-rate capacities are established for Z interference, noisy interference, and mixed (aligned weak/intermediate and aligned strong) interference. These results generalize known results for scalar Gaussian interference channels.

Shang, Xiaohu; Kramer, Gerhard; Poor, H Vincent

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

The off shell [rho][endash][omega] mixing in the QCD sum rules  

SciTech Connect

The q[sup 2] dependence of the [rho] - [omega] mixing amplitude is analyzed with the use of the QCD sum rules and the dispersion relation. In going off shell the mixing decreases, changes sign at q[sup 2] [approx equal] 0.4 m[sub [rho

Hatsuda, T. (Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Physics); Henley, E.M. (Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Physics Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Inst. for Nuclear Theory); Meissner, T. (Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Inst. for Nuclear Theory); Krein, G. (Instituto de Fisica Teorica (IFT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Efficient tail estimation for massive correlated log-normal sums: with applications in statistical leakage analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Existing approaches to statistical leakage analysis focus only on calculating the mean and variance of the total leakage. In practice, however, what concerns most is the tail behavior of the sum distribution, as it tells that to what extent the design ... Keywords: comonotonicity, fast correlation transform, statistical leakage analysis, tail behavior

Mingzhi Gao; Zuochang Ye; Yan Wang; Zhiping Yu

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Optimal approximations for risk measures of sums of lognormals based on conditional expectations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we investigate the approximations for the distribution function of a sum S of lognormal random variables. These approximations are obtained by considering the conditional expectation E[S|@L] of S with respect to a conditioning random variable ... Keywords: Comonotonicity, Conditional expectation, Jensen's inequality, Lognormal, Maximal variance

S. Vanduffel; X. Chen; J. Dhaene; M. Goovaerts; L. Henrard; R. Kaas

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Contact of Oil with Solid Surfaces in Aqueous Media Probed Using Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contact of Oil with Solid Surfaces in Aqueous Media Probed Using Sum Frequency Generation is present between the oil and the sapphire substrate. Below the isoelectric point of the sapphire substrate and the attractive van der Waals interactions. INTRODUCTION An oil drop in contact with a solid surface in aqueous

Dhinojwala, Ali

315

Certification Plan, Radioactive Mixed Waste Hazardous Waste Handling Facility  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of radioactive mixed waste (RMW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). RMW is low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or transuranic (TRU) waste that is co-contaminated with dangerous waste as defined in the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) and the Washington State Dangerous Waste Regulations, 173-303-040 (18). This waste is to be transferred to the Hanford Site Central Waste Complex and Burial Grounds in Hanford, Washington. This plan incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end-product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; an executive summary of the Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP) for the HWHF (Section 4); and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification.

Albert, R.

1992-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

316

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Monthly Supply & Disposition U.S. Monthly Supply & Disposition Definitions Key Terms Definition Balancing Item Represents the difference between the sum of the components of natural gas supply and the sum of the components of natural gas disposition. These differences maybe due to quantities lost or to the effects of data reporting problems. Reporting problems include differences due to the net result of conversions of flow data metered at varying temperature and pressure bases and converted to a standard temperature and pressure base; the effect of variations in company accounting and billing practices; differences between billing cycle and calendar period time frames; and imbalances resulting from the merger of data reporting systems which vary in scope, format, definitions, and type of respondents.

317

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Supply & Disposition by State Annual Supply & Disposition by State Definitions Key Terms Definition Balancing Item Represents the difference between the sum of the components of natural gas supply and the sum of the components of natural gas disposition. These differences maybe due to quantities lost or to the effects of data reporting problems. Reporting problems include differences due to the net result of conversions of flow data metered at varying temperature and pressure bases and converted to a standard temperature and pressure base; the effect of variations in company accounting and billing practices; differences between billing cycle and calendar period time frames; and imbalances resulting from the merger of data reporting systems which vary in scope, format, definitions, and type of respondents.

318

Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities Project Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility  

SciTech Connect

This feasibility study report presents a draft design of the Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility (VWISF), which is one of three subprojects of the Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities (IWVF) project. The primary goal of the IWVF project is to design and construct a treatment process system that will vitrify the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) to a final waste form. The project will consist of three subprojects that include the Waste Collection Tanks Facility, the Waste Vitrification Facility (WVF), and the VWISF. The Waste Collection Tanks Facility will provide for waste collection, feed mixing, and surge storage for SBW and newly generated liquid waste from ongoing operations at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The WVF will contain the vitrification process that will mix the waste with glass-forming chemicals or frit and turn the waste into glass. The VWISF will provide a shielded storage facility for the glass until the waste can be disposed at either the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as mixed transuranic waste or at the future national geological repository as high-level waste glass, pending the outcome of a Waste Incidental to Reprocessing determination, which is currently in progress. A secondary goal is to provide a facility that can be easily modified later to accommodate storage of the vitrified high-level waste calcine. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of the VWISF, which would be constructed in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local laws. This project supports the Department of Energys Environmental Management missions of safely storing and treating radioactive wastes as well as meeting Federal Facility Compliance commitments made to the State of Idaho.

Bonnema, Bruce Edward

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Annual Transuranic Waste Inventory Report - 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

contain both combustible and noncombustible waste items. Combustible waste may include wood, plastics, paper, and rags. Noncombustible waste items may include metals, glass,...

320

Bioenergy development from agricultural waste on Northern ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Summary This project will convert agricultural waste, including food waste, rice straw, and other organic farm waste to bioethanol through bacterial ...

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste notes sum" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Hazardous Waste Management (Oklahoma) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

treatment and storage of such waste. It also mentions the availability of tax credits for waste facilities. Energy recovery from the destruction of a hazardous waste may be...

322

Nonhazardous Solid Waste Management Regulations & Criteria (Mississippi)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of the Nonhazardous Solid Waste Management Regulations & Criteria is to establish a minimum State Criteria under the Mississippi Solid Waste Law for all solid waste management...

323

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Waste -...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste: Hazardous, Biohazardous, Medical or Radioactive Do not transport or ship hazardous material wastes off-site. Only Waste Management, Radiation Protection or approved...

324

Site Programs & Cooperative Agreements: Waste Isolation Pilot...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site Programs & Cooperative Agreements: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) The DOE Carlsbad Field Office funds a number of...

325

Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on February 13, 2013. EZFeed Policy Place Pennsylvania Name Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) Policy Category Other Policy Policy Type Environmental Regulations Affected Technologies Biomass/Biogas, Coal with CCS, Concentrating Solar Power, Energy Storage, Fuel Cells, Geothermal Electric, Hydroelectric, Hydroelectric (Small), Natural Gas, Nuclear, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind energy Active Policy Yes Implementing Sector State/Province Program Administrator Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection

326

Certification plan transuranic waste: Hazardous Waste Handling Facility  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of transuranic (TRU) waste handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). The plan incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end-product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; an executive summary of the Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP) for the HWBF; and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Project Waste Form Qualification Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy has created a waste acceptance process to help guide the overall program for the disposal of high-level nuclear waste in a federal repository. This Waste Form Qualification Program Plan describes the hierarchy of strategies used by the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Project to satisfy the waste form qualification obligations of that waste acceptance process. A description of the functional relationship of the participants contributing to completing this objective is provided. The major activities, products, providers, and associated scheduling for implementing the strategies also are presented.

Randklev, E.H.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Solid Waste and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) Solid Waste and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter of the law that establishes the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency establishes the rules and regulations regarding solid waste. The chapter establishes specific regulations for biomass facilities, which includes permitting, siting, operation, safety guidelines, and closing requirements. Siting regulations include setbacks from waste handling areas for state facilities (1000 feet from jails, schools), requirements for not siting

329

Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations

330

EM QA Working Group September 2011 Notes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

13, 2011 Page 5 of 8 Lessons Learned on Flow-down of Quality Requirements at Idaho's Sodium Bearing Waste Project Including Comparison to the Previous EM QA Corporate Board...

331

Focus Sheet | Hazardous Waste Checklist How to be ready for state hazardous waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Focus Sheet | Hazardous Waste Checklist How to be ready for state hazardous waste inspectors. See a hazardous waste inspection. ons, rrosive. n hemicals? ical waste. Waste-like chemicals have als Are you. Are your waste containers properly labeled? us Waste label as soon t Do you accumulate waste in a safe

Wilcock, William

332

LANL reaches waste shipment milestone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL reaches waste shipment milestone LANL reaches waste shipment milestone LANL reaches waste shipment milestone The Lab surpassed 100,000 plutonium-equivalent curies of TRU waste shipped to WIPP, about one-third of the Lab's total. May 31, 2011 A shipment of transuranic waste on its way to the WIPP repository A shipment of transuranic waste on its way to the WIPP repository. Contact Fred deSousa Communicatons Office (505) 665-3430 Email LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, May 31, 2011 - Los Alamos National Laboratory has reached an important milestone in its campaign to ship transuranic (TRU) waste from Cold War-era nuclear operations to the U.S. Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. This month, the Lab surpassed 100,000 plutonium-equivalent curies of TRU waste shipped to WIPP, about one-third of the Lab's total.

333

The largest radioactive waste glassification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

largest radioactive waste glassification largest radioactive waste glassification plant in the nation, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) converts the liquid nuclear waste currently stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) into a solid glass form suitable for long-term storage and disposal. Scientists have long considered this glassification process, called "vitrification," as the preferred option for treating liquid nuclear waste. By immobilizing the radioactivity in glass, the DWPF reduces the risks associated with the continued storage of liquid nuclear waste at SRS and prepares the waste for final disposal in a federal repository. About 38 million gallons of liquid nuclear wastes are now stored in 49 underground carbon-steel tanks at SRS. This waste has about 300 million curies of radioactivity, of which the vast majority

334

Mixed waste characterization reference document  

SciTech Connect

Waste characterization and monitoring are major activities in the management of waste from generation through storage and treatment to disposal. Adequate waste characterization is necessary to ensure safe storage, selection of appropriate and effective treatment, and adherence to disposal standards. For some wastes characterization objectives can be difficult and costly to achieve. The purpose of this document is to evaluate costs of characterizing one such waste type, mixed (hazardous and radioactive) waste. For the purpose of this document, waste characterization includes treatment system monitoring, where monitoring is a supplement or substitute for waste characterization. This document establishes a cost baseline for mixed waste characterization and treatment system monitoring requirements from which to evaluate alternatives. The cost baseline established as part of this work includes costs for a thermal treatment technology (i.e., a rotary kiln incinerator), a nonthermal treatment process (i.e., waste sorting, macronencapsulation, and catalytic wet oxidation), and no treatment (i.e., disposal of waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)). The analysis of improvement over the baseline includes assessment of promising areas for technology development in front-end waste characterization, process equipment, off gas controls, and monitoring. Based on this assessment, an ideal characterization and monitoring configuration is described that minimizes costs and optimizes resources required for waste characterization.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Waste form product characteristics  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy has operated nuclear facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to support national interests for several decades. Since 1953, it has supported the development of technologies for the storage and reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels (SNF) and the resultant wastes. However, the 1992 decision to discontinue reprocessing of SNF has left nearly 768 MT of SNF in storage at the INEL with unspecified plans for future dispositioning. Past reprocessing of these fuels for uranium and other resource recovery has resulted in the production of 3800 M{sup 3} calcine and a total inventory of 7600 M{sup 3} of radioactive liquids (1900 M{sup 3} destined for immediate calcination and the remaining sodium-bearing waste requiring further treatment before calcination). These issues, along with increased environmental compliance within DOE and its contractors, mandate operation of current and future facilities in an environmentally responsible manner. This will require satisfactory resolution of spent fuel and waste disposal issues resulting from the past activities. A national policy which identifies requirements for the disposal of SNF and high level wastes (HLW) has been established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) Sec.8,(b) para(3)) [1982]. The materials have to be conditioned or treated, then packaged for disposal while meeting US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. The spent fuel and HLW located at the INEL will have to be put into a form and package that meets these regulatory criteria. The emphasis of Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) future operations has shifted toward investigating, testing, and selecting technologies to prepare current and future spent fuels and waste for final disposal. This preparation for disposal may include mechanical, physical and/or chemical processes, and may differ for each of the various fuels and wastes.

Taylor, L.L.; Shikashio, R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Cost effective waste management through composting in Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The financial/social/institutional sustainability of waste management in Africa is analysed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This note is a compendium of a study on the potential for GHG control via improved zero waste in Africa. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study provides the framework for Local Authorities for realizing sustained GHG reductions. - Abstract: Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions per person from urban waste management activities are greater in sub-Saharan African countries than in other developing countries, and are increasing as the population becomes more urbanised. Waste from urban areas across Africa is essentially dumped on the ground and there is little control over the resulting gas emissions. The clean development mechanism (CDM), from the 1997 Kyoto Protocol has been the vehicle to initiate projects to control GHG emissions in Africa. However, very few of these projects have been implemented and properly registered. A much more efficient and cost effective way to control GHG emissions from waste is to stabilise the waste via composting and to use the composted material as a soil improver/organic fertiliser or as a component of growing media. Compost can be produced by open windrow or in-vessel composting plants. This paper shows that passively aerated open windrows constitute an appropriate low-cost option for African countries. However, to provide an usable compost material it is recommended that waste is processed through a materials recovery facility (MRF) before being composted. The paper demonstrates that material and biological treatment (MBT) are viable in Africa where they are funded, e.g. CDM. However, they are unlikely to be instigated unless there is a replacement to the Kyoto Protocol, which ceases for Registration in December 2012.

Couth, R. [CRECHE, Centre for Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, Civil Engineering Programme, School of Engineering, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4041 (South Africa); Trois, C., E-mail: troisc@ukzn.ac.za [CRECHE, Centre for Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, Civil Engineering Programme, School of Engineering, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4041 (South Africa)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

Energy implications of integrated solid waste management systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study develops estimates of energy use and recovery from managing municipal solid waste (MSW) under various collection, processing, and disposal scenarios. We estimate use and recovery -- or energy balance -- resulting from MSW management activities such as waste collection, transport, processing, and disposal, as well as indirect use and recovery linked to secondary materials manufacturing using recycled materials. In our analysis, secondary materials manufacturing displaces virgin materials manufacturing for 13 representative products. Energy implications are expressed as coefficients that measure the net energy saving (or use) of displacing products made from virgin versus recycled materials. Using data developed for the 1992 New York City Master Plan as a starting point, we apply our method to an analysis of various collection systems and 30 types of facilities to illustrate bow energy balances shift as management systems are modified. In sum, all four scenarios show a positive energy balance indicating the energy and advantage of integrated systems versus reliance on one or few technology options. That is, energy produced or saved exceeds the energy used to operate the solid waste system. The largest energy use impacts are attributable to processing, including materials separation and composting. Collection and transportation energy are relatively minor contributors. The largest two contributors to net energy savings are waste combustion and energy saved by processing recycled versus virgin materials. An accompanying spatial analysis methodology allocates energy use and recovery to New York City, New York State outside the city, the U.S., and outside the U.S. Our analytical approach is embodied in a spreadsheet model that can be used by energy and solid waste analysts to estimate impacts of management scenarios at the state and substate level.

Little, R.E.; McClain, G.; Becker, M.; Ligon, P.; Shapiro, K.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Inconsistent pathways of household waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to provide policy-makers and waste management planners with information about how recycling programs affect the quantities of specific materials recycled and disposed of. Two questions were addressed: which factors influence household waste generation and pathways? and how reliable are official waste data? Household waste flows were studied in 35 Swedish municipalities, and a wide variation in the amount of waste per capita was observed. When evaluating the effect of different waste collection policies, it was found to be important to identify site-specific factors influencing waste generation. Eleven municipal variables were investigated in an attempt to explain the variation. The amount of household waste per resident was higher in populous municipalities and when net commuting was positive. Property-close collection of dry recyclables led to increased delivery of sorted metal, plastic and paper packaging. No difference was seen in the amount of separated recyclables per capita when weight-based billing for the collection of residual waste was applied, but the amount of residual waste was lower. Sixteen sources of error in official waste statistics were identified and the results of the study emphasize the importance of reliable waste generation and composition data to underpin waste management policies.

Dahlen, Lisa [Division of Waste Science and Technology, Lulea University of Technology, SE, 971 87 Lulea (Sweden)], E-mail: lisa.dahlen@ltu.se; Aberg, Helena [Department of Food, Health and Environment, University of Gothenburg, P.O. Box 12204, SE, 402 42 Gothenburg (Sweden); Lagerkvist, Anders [Division of Waste Science and Technology, Lulea University of Technology, SE, 971 87 Lulea (Sweden); Berg, Per E.O. [HB Anttilator, Stagnellsgatan 3, SE, 652 23, Karlstad (Sweden)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

DOE Waste Treatability Group Guidance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guidance presents a method and definitions for aggregating U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) waste into streams and treatability groups based on characteristic parameters that influence waste management technology needs. Adaptable to all DOE waste types (i.e., radioactive waste, hazardous waste, mixed waste, sanitary waste), the guidance establishes categories and definitions that reflect variations within the radiological, matrix (e.g., bulk physical/chemical form), and regulated contaminant characteristics of DOE waste. Beginning at the waste container level, the guidance presents a logical approach to implementing the characteristic parameter categories as part of the basis for defining waste streams and as the sole basis for assigning streams to treatability groups. Implementation of this guidance at each DOE site will facilitate the development of technically defined, site-specific waste stream data sets to support waste management planning and reporting activities. Consistent implementation at all of the sites will enable aggregation of the site-specific waste stream data sets into comparable national data sets to support these activities at a DOE complex-wide level.

Kirkpatrick, T.D.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas > Natural Gas Information Query System > Definitions, Sources, & Notes Natural Gas > Natural Gas Information Query System > Definitions, Sources, & Notes Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes The EIA-176 form contains responses submitted from an identified universe of pipelines, local distribution companies, and operators of fields, wells or gas processing plants, who distribute gas to end users or transport gas across State borders; or underground natural gas storage operators. Definitions Key Terms Definition Commercial Consumption Gas used by nonmanufacturing establishments or agencies primarily engaged in the sale of goods or services. Included are such establishments as hotels, restaurants, wholesale and retail stores and other service enterprises; gas used by local, State, and Federal agencies engaged in nonmanufacturing activities.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste notes sum" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

ConsumTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Note: Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton. ASTM: American Society for Testing and Materials Aviation Gasoline (Finished): A complex mixture of relatively volatile hydrocarbons with or without small quantities of additives, blended to form a fuel suitable for use in aviation reciprocating engines. Fuel specifi- cations are provided in ASTM Specification D 910 and Military Specifica- tion MIL-G-5572. Note: Data on blending components are not counted in data on finished aviation gasoline. Aviation Gasoline Blending Components: Naphthas that will be used for blending or compounding into finished aviation gasoline (e.g., straight run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, and xylene). Excludes ox- ygenates (alcohols, ethers), butane, and pentanes plus. Oxygenates are re- ported as other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and oxygenates. Barrel

342

NETL: NewsRoom - LabNotes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LabNotes LabNotes NewsRoom LabNotes January 2014 Chemical Looping 101: The Basics NETL's Chemical Looping Research Facilities Oxygen Carriers in Chemical Looping Combustion Chemical Looping Modeling and Simulation Research at NETL December 2013 Foamed Cement Can Seal Tricky Oil and Gas Wells November 2013 High-Performance Rechargeable Batteries May Help Keep the Lights On Rocks Demystified in Geomechanical Properties Lab October 2013 NETL's Morgantown Supercomputer Sets a High Bar for Energy Efficiency September 2013 NETL's Energy Data Exchange (EDX): Providing Access to Quality Energy Data Sorbents Capturing CO2 Will Make Power Plants Cleaner August 2013 Collaborative Technology Demonstrates Potential in Diabetes Testing Quantifying Uncertainty in Computer Model Predictions

343

Waste Form Performance Modeling [Nuclear Waste Management using...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

344

Transuranic Waste Tabletop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste (Hazard Class 7 Radioactive) Moderator's Version of Tabletop Prepared for the Department of Energy Office of Transportation and Emergency Management 02B00215-07D.p65 This page intentionally left blank table of contents Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) planning tools planning tools planning tools planning tools T T T T Tr r r r ransur ansur ansur ansur ansuranic (TRU) W anic (TRU) W anic (TRU) W anic (TRU) W anic (TRU) Waste aste aste aste aste (Hazar (Hazar (Hazar (Hazar (Hazard Class 7 Radio d Class 7 Radio d Class 7 Radio d Class 7 Radio d Class 7 Radioactiv activ activ activ active) e) e) e) e) Moder Moder Moder Moder Moderat at at at ator' or' or' or' or's V s V s V s V s Version of T ersion of T ersion of T ersion of T ersion of Tablet ablet ablet ablet abletop

345

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 3 T he journey to the WIPP began nearly 60 years before the first barrels of transuranic waste arrived at the repository. The United States produced the world's first sig- nificant quantities of transuranic material during the Manhattan Project of World War II in the early 1940s. The government idled its plutonium- producing reactors and warhead manu- facturing plants at the end of the Cold War and scheduled most of them for dismantlement. However, the DOE will generate more transuranic waste as it cleans up these former nuclear weapons facilities. The WIPP is a cor- nerstone of the effort to clean up these facilities by providing a safe repository to isolate transuranic waste in disposal rooms mined out of ancient salt beds, located 2,150 feet below ground. The need for the WIPP

346

Weigh your waste: a sustainable way to reduce waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An increased concern for the environment has brought about an arena to develop and experiment with new devices to support sustainable design. The 'Weigh Your Waste' (WYW) device will allow the user to monitor their waste charges and provide a platform ... Keywords: bin tax, pay by weight, proenvironmental behavior, recycling, rubbish, sustainable design, trash, waste

Alex A. Gartland; Paulina Piasek

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Swedish nuclear waste efforts  

SciTech Connect

After the introduction of a law prohibiting the start-up of any new nuclear power plant until the utility had shown that the waste produced by the plant could be taken care of in an absolutely safe way, the Swedish nuclear utilities in December 1976 embarked on the Nuclear Fuel Safety Project, which in November 1977 presented a first report, Handling of Spent Nuclear Fuel and Final Storage of Vitrified Waste (KBS-I), and in November 1978 a second report, Handling and Final Storage of Unreprocessed Spent Nuclear Fuel (KBS II). These summary reports were supported by 120 technical reports prepared by 450 experts. The project engaged 70 private and governmental institutions at a total cost of US $15 million. The KBS-I and KBS-II reports are summarized in this document, as are also continued waste research efforts carried out by KBS, SKBF, PRAV, ASEA and other Swedish organizations. The KBS reports describe all steps (except reprocessing) in handling chain from removal from a reactor of spent fuel elements until their radioactive waste products are finally disposed of, in canisters, in an underground granite depository. The KBS concept relies on engineered multibarrier systems in combination with final storage in thoroughly investigated stable geologic formations. This report also briefly describes other activities carried out by the nuclear industry, namely, the construction of a central storage facility for spent fuel elements (to be in operation by 1985), a repository for reactor waste (to be in operation by 1988), and an intermediate storage facility for vitrified high-level waste (to be in operation by 1990). The R and D activities are updated to September 1981.

Rydberg, J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Sum-Rate Optimal Power Policies for Energy Harvesting Transmitters in an Interference Channel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper considers a two-user Gaussian interference channel with energy harvesting transmitters. Different than conventional battery powered wireless nodes, energy harvesting transmitters have to adapt transmission to availability of energy at a particular instant. In this setting, the optimal power allocation problem to maximize sum throughput within a given deadline is formulated. The convergence of the proposed iterative coordinate descent method for the problem is proved and the short-term throughput maximizing offline power allocation policy is found. Examples for interference regions with known sum capacities are given with directional water-filling interpretations when possible. Next, stochastic data arrivals are addressed. Finally online and/or distributed near-optimal policies are proposed. Performance of the proposed algorithms are demonstrated through simulations.

Tutuncuoglu, Kaya

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Explosive Waste Treatment Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

106 106 Environment a 1 Assessment for th.e Explosive Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory MASTER November 1995 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Washington, DOC. 20585 Portions of this document maly be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. Table of Contents 1 . 0 2.0 3 . 0 4.0 5 . 0 6.0 7 . 0 8 . 0 Document Summary .............................................................. 1 Purpose and Need for Agency Action ............................................. 3 Description of the Proposed Action and Alternatives ............................ 4 3.1.1 Location ............................................................. 4

350

SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The Chelan County Public Works Department would like to thank the following organizations and individuals for their assistance in the development of this plan: ? Chelan Countys Solid Waste Council members, past and present, and the municipalities they represent. ? Chelan Countys Solid Waste Advisory Committee members, past and present, and the agencies and businesses they represented. ? the ChelanDouglas Health District staff. ? Washington Department of Ecology staff. Chelan County residents and businesses also contributed to this document through comments provided during public meetings and through various other channels. The Board of County Commissioners and the Public Works Department gratefully acknowledge this input by the

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Ferrocyanide waste simulant characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ferrocyanide waste simulants were prepared and characterized to help assess safety concerns associated with the ferrocyanide sludges stored in underground single-shell waste tanks at the Hanford Site. Simulants were prepared to represent the variety of ferrocyanide sludges stored in the storage tanks. Physical properties, chemical compositions, and thermodynamic properties of the simulants were determined. The simulants, as produced, were shown to not sustain propagating reactions when subjected to a strong ignition source. Additional testing and evaluations are recommended to assess safety concerns associated with postulated ferrocyanide sludge dry-out and exposure to external ignition sources.

Jeppson, D.W.; Wong, J.J.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant AFFIDAVIT FOR SURVIVING RELATIVE STATE _______________ ) ) ss: __________________ COUNTY OF _____________ ) That I, ________________________, am the _________________________ (Indicate relationship) of ___________________________, who is deceased and make the attached request pursuant to 10 CFR, Section 1008. That the information contained on the attached request is true and correct to the best of my knowledge and belief, and I am signing this authorization subject to the penalties provided in 18 U.S.C. 1001. ____________________________ SIGNATURE NOTARIZATION: SUBSCRIBED and SWORN to before me this ______day of __________, 20_____

353

Solid Waste Management Program (Missouri)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Solid Waste Management Program in the Department of Natural Resources regulates the management of solid waste in the state of Missouri. A permit is required prior to the construction or...

354

Waste Management Assistance Act (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section promotes the proper and safe storage, treatment, and disposal of solid, hazardous, and low-level radioactive wastes in Iowa, and calls on Iowans to assume responsibility for waste...

355

The reduction of packaging waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nationwide, packaging waste comprises approximately one third of the waste being sent to our solid waste landfills. These wastes range from product and shipping containers made from plastic, glass, wood, and corrugated cardboard to packaging fillers and wraps made from a variety of plastic materials such as shrink wrap and polystyrene peanuts. The amount of packaging waste generated is becoming an important issue for manufacturers, retailers, and consumers. Elimination of packaging not only conserves precious landfill space, it also reduces consumption of raw materials and energy, all of which result in important economic and environmental benefits. At the US Department of Energy-Richland Field Office's (DOE-RL) Hanford Site as well as other DOE sites the generation of packaging waste has added importance. By reducing the amount of packaging waste, DOE also reduces the costs and liabilities associated with waste handling, treatment, storage, and disposal.

Raney, E.A.; McCollom, M.; Hogan, J.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

The reduction of packaging waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nationwide, packaging waste comprises approximately one third of the waste being sent to our solid waste landfills. These wastes range from product and shipping containers made from plastic, glass, wood, and corrugated cardboard to packaging fillers and wraps made from a variety of plastic materials such as shrink wrap and polystyrene peanuts. The amount of packaging waste generated is becoming an important issue for manufacturers, retailers, and consumers. Elimination of packaging not only conserves precious landfill space, it also reduces consumption of raw materials and energy, all of which result in important economic and environmental benefits. At the US Department of Energy-Richland Field Office`s (DOE-RL) Hanford Site as well as other DOE sites the generation of packaging waste has added importance. By reducing the amount of packaging waste, DOE also reduces the costs and liabilities associated with waste handling, treatment, storage, and disposal.

Raney, E.A.; McCollom, M.; Hogan, J.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Delaware Solid Waste Authority (Delaware)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Delaware Solid Waste Authority (DSWA) runs three landfills, all of which recover methane and generate electricity with a total capacity of 24 MWs. The DSWA Solid Waste Plan includes goals,...

358

Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Working Group Agenda Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda More Documents & Publications...

359

UK Radioactive Waste: Classification, Sources and Management ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Paper contents outlook: Introduction; Radioactive waste classification; Sources of waste (Nuclear power plant operation/decommissioning, Reprocessing and...

360

Radioactive waste systems and radioactive effluents  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive waste systems for handling gaseous, liquid, and solid wastes generated at light and pressurized water reactors are described. (TFD)

Row, T.H.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste notes sum" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Waste Disposal (Illinois) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Disposal (Illinois) Waste Disposal (Illinois) Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Utility Program Information Illinois Program Type Environmental Regulations This...

362

Comprehensive Municipal Solid Waste Management, Resource Recovery...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Municipal Solid Waste Management, Resource Recovery, and Conservation Act (Texas) Comprehensive Municipal Solid Waste Management, Resource Recovery, and Conservation...

363

B to Light Tensor Meson Form Factors Derived from Light-Cone Sum Rules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the recent results for the two-parton light-cone distribution amplitudes of the tensor meson, we calculate the form factors for the decays of $B_{u,d,s}$ into the light $J^{PC}=2^{++}$ tensor mesons via the vector/axial-vector/tensor current with the light-cone sum rules. We also obtain the $q^2$-dependence of the form factors.

Kwei-Chou Yang

2010-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

364

The off shell {rho}{endash}{omega} mixing in the QCD sum rules  

SciTech Connect

The q{sup 2} dependence of the {rho} - {omega} mixing amplitude is analyzed with the use of the QCD sum rules and the dispersion relation. In going off shell the mixing decreases, changes sign at q{sup 2} {approx_equal} 0.4 m{sub {rho}}{sup 2} > 0, and is negative in the space-like region. Implications of this result to the isospin breaking part of the nuclear force are discussed.

Hatsuda, T. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Henley, E.M. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Inst. for Nuclear Theory; Meissner, T. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Inst. for Nuclear Theory; Krein, G. [Instituto de Fisica Teorica (IFT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Dynamic properties of one-component strongly coupled plasmas: The sum-rule approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamic characteristics of strongly coupled one-component plasmas are studied within the moment approach. Our results on the dynamic structure factor and the dynamic local-field correction satisfy the sum rules and other exact relations automatically. A quantitative agreement is obtained with numerous simulation data on the plasma dynamic properties, including the dispersion and decay of collective modes. Our approach allows us to correct and complement the results previously found with other treatments.

Arkhipov, Yu. V.; Askaruly, A.; Davletov, A. E. [Department of Optics and Plasma Physics, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole Bi 96, Almaty 050012 (Kazakhstan); Ballester, D. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Tkachenko, I. M. [Instituto de Matematica Pura y Aplicada, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Zwicknagel, G. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik II, Erlangen-Nuernberg Universitaet, Staudtstr. 7, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

Process for treating fission waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for the treatment of fission waste. A glass forming agent, a metal oxide, and a reducing agent are mixed with the fission waste and the mixture is heated. After melting, the mixture separates into a glass phase and a metal phase. The glass phase may be used to safely store the fission waste, while the metal phase contains noble metals recovered from the fission waste.

Rohrmann, Charles A. (Kennewick, WA); Wick, Oswald J. (Richland, WA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Report of the committee to review the use of J-13 well water in Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Management Project Office of the Department of Energy conducted a special audit of the activities of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation Project at Livermore. It was noted that there never has been a comprehensive, well-documented examination of the basis for the use of J-13 water in the nuclear waste storage investigations. In each of the sections of This Report, an issue relating to the use of J-13 water has been addressed. 58 refs., 19 figs., 8 tabs.

Harrar, J.E.; Carley, J.F.; Isherwood, W.F.; Raber, E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

WASTE DISPOSAL SECTION CORNELL UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2/07 WASTE DISPOSAL SECTION CORNELL UNIVERSITY PROCEDURE for DISPOSAL of RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS This procedure has been developed to ensure the safety of those individuals who handle radioactive waste identified hazardous waste, or other unusual issues require special consideration. Contact the Department

Manning, Sturt

369

Hazardous Waste Management Keith Williams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hazardous Waste Management Keith Williams DES ­ Environmental Affairs Extension 53163 #12,100 Locally · 1998 Univ of Va $33,990 · 1998 Univ. of MD $0 !!!!! #12;Hazardous Waste Disposal Procedures Hazardous (Chemical) Waste Management in University of Maryland Laboratories o All laboratories and work

Appelbaum, Ian

370

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS Items that could cut or puncture skin or trash- can liners. This waste stream must be boxed to protect custodial staff. It goes directly to the landfill lined cardboard box. Tape seams with heavy duty tape to contain waste. Limit weight to 20 lbs. Or

Sheridan, Jennifer

371

Waste Pickup Form User's Guide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Pickup Form User's Guide Updated: 3/13/12 #12;Introduction: Welcome to the Cal State University Fullerton Online Waste Pickup Form User's Guide. In this guide you will learn what you can use phosphorus-32) 3. To request a pickup of universal waste including light bulbs, aerosol cans, batteries

de Lijser, Peter

372

Waste incineration and the community -  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste incineration and the community - The Amsterdam experience The successful community relations strategy followed by the operator of Amsterdam's waste-to- energy plant has convinced the public and other stakeholders of the benefits of incineration for treating the city's waste Thomas McCarthy Article by Thomas Mc

Columbia University

373

RETHINKING WASTE, RECYCLING, AND HOUSEKEEPING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RETHINKING WASTE, RECYCLING, AND HOUSEKEEPING EFFICIENCY.EFFICIENCY. A l GA leaner Green #12 t R li Management Recycling Staff The Office of Waste Reduction & Recycling started in The Office of Waste Reduction & Recycling started in 1990, we have 14 full time staff positions. ·We collect over 40

Kelly, Scott David

374

Tabulation of thermodynamic data for chemical reactions involving 58 elements common to radioactive waste package systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The rate of release and migration of radionuclides from a nuclear waste repository to the biosphere is dependent on chemical interactions between groundwater, the geologic host rock, and the radioactive waste package. For the purpose of this report, the waste package includes the wasteform, canister, overpack, and repository backfill. Chemical processes of interest include sorption (ion exchange), dissolution, complexation, and precipitation. Thermochemical data for complexation and precipitation calculations for 58 elements common to the radioactive waste package are presented. Standard free energies of formation of free ions, complexes, and solids are listed. Common logarithms of equilibrium constants (log K's) for speciation and precipitation reactions are listed. Unless noted otherwise, all data are for 298.15/sup 0/K and one atmosphere.

Benson, L.V.; Teague, L.S.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Property:CompletionNotes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CompletionNotes CompletionNotes Jump to: navigation, search Property Name CompletionNotes Property Type Text Description List of data that still needs to be researched and entered for the NEPA document Subproperties This property has the following 2 subproperties: C CA-96062042 D DOI-BLM-CA-ES-2013-002+1793-EIS Pages using the property "CompletionNotes" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) B BLM-NV-WN-ES-08-01-1310, NV-020-08-01 + 8/2: Data reviewed for completion C CA-017-05-051 + 8/9 Data entry complete. Attached FONSI does not seem to be fully related to the attached EA. The FONSI is for a geothermal well and slimhole exploration project and the EA is for a pipeline project. Need to add Public Health and Safety as a resource 8/22/13 - The 'FONSI/DR is actually for EA CA-170-02-15 Bassalt Canyon..dated Jan 2002 KW 8/26/13 - I deleted the FONSI from this page. Filename is incorrect for the file and stands as "CA-017-05-51-EA-DR -FONSI.pdf," Andrew Gentile. Unable to find Final EA or FONSI online. When RMP added, add "Inyo National Forest "Land and Resource Management Plan" (LRMP) 1988"

376

Nukes (notes on PFFP) Chain reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

corresponds to 300 million kg of TNT = 300 ktons Energetics But the Hiroshima bomb (10 kg) only release 20 Clouds" Nagasaki Atomic Bomb 1945 Volcanic Eruption (Mount Redoubt) Not characteristic of nuclear bombs weapons and nuclear power reactors. #12;Chain reactions in nuclear fission bomb Note the number

Browder, Tom

377

A Note on Supersymmetric Chiral Bosons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this note we extend the Pasti-Sorokin-Tonin formalism for chiral bosons in two dimensions to $N=(1,1)$ and $N=(2,2)$ superspace. In the latter case the formalism is developed for chiral, twisted chiral and semi-chiral superfields.

Alexander Sevrin; Daniel C. Thompson

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

378

EndNote Web Brief Guide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EndNote Web Brief Guide Victoria T. Kok Head, Veterinary Medical Library Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University February 2010 #12;CREATING AN ENDNOTE WEB ACCOUNT Through Web-of-Knowledge: · GototheLibraryHomepagehttp://www.lib.vt.eduandlocatetheWebofKnowledge database. · ClickonMyEndnoteWeb

Wynne, Randolph H.

379

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PIONEERING NUCLEAR WASTE DISPOSAL U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Area Office February 2000 DOECAO-00-3124 T h e W a s t e I s o l a t i o n P i l o t P l a n t ii Table of...

380

D11 WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITIES FOR TRANSURANIC WASTE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 CFR Ch. X (1-1-12 Edition) Pt. 1022 D11 WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITIES FOR TRANSURANIC WASTE Siting, construction or expansion, and op- eration of disposal facilities for transuranic (TRU) waste and TRU mixed waste (TRU waste also containing hazardous waste as designated in 40 CFR part 261). D12 INCINERATORS Siting, construction, and operation of in- cinerators, other than research and develop- ment incinerators or incinerators for non- hazardous solid waste (as designated in 40 CFR 261.4(b)). PART 1022-COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND EN- VIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIRE- MENTS Subpart A-General Sec. 1022.1 Background. 1022.2 Purpose and scope. 1022.3 Policy. 1022.4 Definitions. 1022.5 Applicability. 1022.6 Public inquiries. Subpart B-Procedures for Floodplain and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste notes sum" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Solid Waste Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities (Rhode  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities (Rhode Island) Solid Waste Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Management Facilities which compost putrescible waste and/or leaf and yard waste are subject to these regulations. The regulations establish permitting, registration, and operational requirements for composting facilities. Operational requirements for putrescible waste facilities include siting, distance, and buffer requirements, as well as standards for avoiding harm to endangered species and contamination of air and water sources. Specific

382

WIPP TRANSURANIC WASTE How has the WIPP TRU Waste Inventory Changed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of tank waste from the Hanford site that is currently managed as high-level waste. None of this waste has that these Hanford tank wastes will be treated and will eventually be able to meet the WIPP waste acceptance criteria on the Hanford Tank Waste and K-Basin Sludges that were included in the waste inventory for recertifica- tion

383

Hanford Tank Waste - Near Source Treatment of Low Activity Waste  

SciTech Connect

Treatment and disposition of Hanford Site waste as currently planned consists of I 00+ waste retrievals, waste delivery through up to 8+ miles of dedicated, in-ground piping, centralized mixing and blending operations- all leading to pre-treatment combination and separation processes followed by vitrification at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The sequential nature of Tank Farm and WTP operations requires nominally 15-20 years of continuous operations before all waste can be retrieved from many Single Shell Tanks (SSTs). Also, the infrastructure necessary to mobilize and deliver the waste requires significant investment beyond that required for the WTP. Treating waste as closely as possible to individual tanks or groups- as allowed by the waste characteristics- is being investigated to determine the potential to 1) defer, reduce, and/or eliminate infrastructure requirements, and 2) significantly mitigate project risk by reducing the potential and impact of single point failures. The inventory of Hanford waste slated for processing and disposition as LAW is currently managed as high-level waste (HLW), i.e., the separation of fission products and other radionuclides has not commenced. A significant inventory ofthis waste (over 20M gallons) is in the form of precipitated saltcake maintained in single shell tanks, many of which are identified as potential leaking tanks. Retrieval and transport (as a liquid) must be staged within the waste feed delivery capability established by site infrastructure and WTP. Near Source treatment, if employed, would provide for the separation and stabilization processing necessary for waste located in remote farms (wherein most ofthe leaking tanks reside) significantly earlier than currently projected. Near Source treatment is intended to address the currently accepted site risk and also provides means to mitigate future issues likely to be faced over the coming decades. This paper describes the potential near source treatment and waste disposition options as well as the impact these options could have on reducing infrastructure requirements, project cost and mission schedule.

Ramsey, William Gene

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Biennial Environmental Compliance Report  

SciTech Connect

This Biennial Environmental Compliance Report (BECR) documents environmental regulatory compliance at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility designed for the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste, for the reporting period of April 1, 2000, to March 31, 2002. As required by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA)(Public Law [Pub. L.] 102-579, as amended by Pub. L. 104-201), the BECR documents U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office's (CBFO) compliance with applicable environmental protection laws and regulations implemented by agencies of the federal government and the state of New Mexico. In the prior BECR, the CBFO and the management and operating contractor (MOC)committed to discuss resolution of a Letter of Violation that had been issued by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) in August 1999, which was during the previous BECR reporting period. This Letter of Violation alleged noncompliance with hazardous waste aisle spacing, labeling, a nd tank requirements. At the time of publication of the prior BECR, resolution of the Letter of Violation was pending. On July 7, 2000, the NMED issued a letter noting that the aisle spacing and labeling concerns had been adequately addressed and that they were rescinding the violation alleging that the Exhaust Shaft Catch Basin failed to comply with the requirements for a hazardous waste tank. During the current reporting period, WIPP received a Notice of Violation and a compliance order alleging the violation of the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Regulations and the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP).

Washinton TRU Solutions LLC

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

385

Accumulated waste characterization work plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) as part of the uranium enrichment complex produces enriched uranium for power generation and defense purposes. Since the beginning of diffusion plant operations in 1953, a variety of waste materials and excess equipment has been generated through both normal operations and as part of major system upgrade programs. However, as a result of the closure of former onsite radioactive management facilities and limited onsite and offsite disposal facilities for mixed (hazardous and radioactive) wastes, PORTS has accumulated large quantities of waste awaiting final disposition. These accumulated wastes were estimated in the Accumulated Waste Plan (AWP) to consist of some 21,700 containers of the radioactive, RCRA hazardous, PCB, mixed and asbestos wastes in various storage areas and process buildings with PORTS. In order to proper manage these wastes onsite and prepare for them for ultimate treatment or disposal, a detailed understanding of the waste contents and characteristics must be developed. The strategy for managing and disposing of these wastes was outlined in the AWP. The purpose of this Accumulated Waste Characterization Work Plan (AWCWP) is to provide a detailed plan for characterizing waste containers from the existing PORTS inventory. The AWCWP documents the process and analytical information currently available and describes statistically-based sampling and analyses required to support proper regulatory classification.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Environmental waste disposal contracts awarded  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental contracts awarded locally Environmental contracts awarded locally Environmental waste disposal contracts awarded locally Three small businesses with offices in Northern New Mexico awarded nuclear waste clean-up contracts. April 3, 2012 Worker moves drums of transuranic (TRU) waste at a staging area A worker stages drums of transuranic waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Technical Area 54. the Lap ships such drums to the U.S. Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Southern New Mexico. The Lab annually averages about 120 shipments of TRU waste to WIPP. Contact Small Business Office (505) 667-4419 Email "They will be valuable partners in the Lab's ability to dispose of the waste safely and efficiently." Small businesses selected for environmental work at LANL

387

Waste minimization handbook, Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical guide presents various methods used by industry to minimize low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated during decommissioning and decontamination (D and D) activities. Such activities generate significant amounts of LLW during their operations. Waste minimization refers to any measure, procedure, or technique that reduces the amount of waste generated during a specific operation or project. Preventive waste minimization techniques implemented when a project is initiated can significantly reduce waste. Techniques implemented during decontamination activities reduce the cost of decommissioning. The application of waste minimization techniques is not limited to D and D activities; it is also useful during any phase of a facility`s life cycle. This compendium will be supplemented with a second volume of abstracts of hundreds of papers related to minimizing low-level nuclear waste. This second volume is expected to be released in late 1996.

Boing, L.E.; Coffey, M.J.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Waste Management | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cleanup » Waste Management Cleanup » Waste Management Waste Management November 12, 2013 U.S. Department of Energy to Host Press Call on Radioactive Waste Shipment and Disposal On Tuesday, November 12, 2013, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will host a press call to discuss Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project (CEUSP) shipment and disposal plans in Nevada. September 24, 2013 Hanford Tank Waste Retrieval, Treatment and Disposition Framework Completing the Office of River Protection (ORP) mission of stabilizing 56 million gallons of chemical and radioactive waste stored in Hanford's 177 tanks is one of the Energy Department's highest priorities. This Framework document outlines a phased approach for beginning tank waste treatment while continuing to resolve technical issues with the Pretreatment and

389

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Reports Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Review Report 2013 Review of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Work Planning and Control Activities, April 2013 Review Report 2012 Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, November 2012 Activity Reports 2011 Orientation Visit to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, September 2011 Review Reports 2007 Independent Oversight Inspection of Emergency Management at the Carlsbad Field Office and Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 2007 Review Reports 2002 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health and Emergency Management at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - Summary Report, August 2002 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Management at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - Volume I, August 2002

390

Waste Management | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Management Waste Management Nuclear Materials Disposition In fulfilling its mission, EM frequently manages and completes disposition of surplus nuclear materials and spent nuclear fuel. These are not waste. They are nuclear materials no longer needed for national security or other purposes, including spent nuclear fuel, special nuclear materials (as defined by the Atomic Energy Act) and other Nuclear Materials. Read more Tank Waste and Waste Processing The Department has approximately 88 million gallons of liquid waste stored in underground tanks and approximately 4,000 cubic meters of solid waste derived from the liquids stored in bins. The current DOE estimated cost for retrieval, treatment and disposal of this waste exceeds $50 billion to be spent over several decades.

391

10. Renewable Energy - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

4 Geothermal, solar/PV, and waste. Notes: Sum of components may not equal 100 percent due to independent rounding. Sources: Tables 1.3 and 10.1. Wood 22%

392

Figure 10.1 Renewable Energy Consumption by Major Source  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

4 Geothermal, solar/PV, and waste. Notes: Sum of components may not equal 100 percent due to independent rounding. Sources: Tables 1.3 and 10.1. Wood 22%

393

Waste Logic(TM): Decommissioning Waste Manager, Version 2.1 and Solid Waste Manager, Version 2.1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste Logic(TM) Decommissioning Waste Manager, Version 2.1: Rising program costs and a more competitive business environment have made solid waste management a major cost concern. Effective management of solid waste can reduce long range operating costs for a large nuclear plant by millions of dollars. To assist waste managers in maximizing potential cost savings, EPRI developed the Waste Logic Decommissioning Waste Manager(TM) computer code. It provides a comprehensive methodology for capturing and quan...

2003-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

394

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transuranic Waste Baseline inventory report. Volume 3. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report consists of information related to the waste forms at the WIPP facility from the waste originators. Data for retrievably stored, projected and total wastes are given.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Treatment of halogen-containing waste and other waste materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for treating a halogen-containing waste material. The process provides a bath of molten glass containing a sacrificial metal oxide capable of reacting with a halogen in the waste material. The sacrificial metal oxide is present in the molten glass in at least a stoichiometric amount with respect to the halogen in the waste material. The waste material is introduced into the bath of molten glass to cause a reaction between the halogen in the waste material and the sacrificial metal oxide to yield a metal halide. The metal halide is a gas at the temperature of the molten glass. The gaseous metal halide is separated from the molten glass and contacted with an aqueous scrubber solution of an alkali metal hydroxide to yield a metal hydroxide or metal oxide-containing precipitate and a soluble alkali metal halide. The precipitate is then separated from the aqueous scrubber solution. The molten glass containing the treated waste material is removed from the bath as a waste glass. The process of the invention can be used to treat all types of waste material including radioactive wastes. The process is particularly suited for separating halogens from halogen-containing wastes. 3 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

396

Treatment of halogen-containing waste and other waste materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for treating a halogen-containing waste material. The process provides a bath of molten glass containing a sacrificial metal oxide capable of reacting with a halogen in the waste material. The sacrificial metal oxide is present in the molten glass in at least a stoichiometric amount with respect to the halogen in the waste material. The waste material is introduced into the bath of molten glass to cause a reaction between the halogen in the waste material and the sacrificial metal oxide to yield a metal halide. The metal halide is a gas at the temperature of the molten glass. The gaseous metal halide is separated from the molten glass and contacted with an aqueous scrubber solution of an alkali metal hydroxide to yield a metal hydroxide or metal oxide-containing precipitate and a soluble alkali metal halide. The precipitate is then separated from the aqueous scrubber solution. The molten glass containing the treated waste material is removed from the bath as a waste glass. The process of the invention can be used to treat all types of waste material including radioactive wastes. The process is particularly suited for separating halogens from halogen-containing wastes.

Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Beahm, Edward C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Parker, George W. (Concord, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Methods, systems and apparatus for approximation of peak summed fundamental and third harmonic voltages in a multi-phase machine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods, system and apparatus are provided for quickly approximating a peak summed magnitude (A) of a phase voltage (Vph) waveform in a multi-phase system that implements third harmonic injection.

Ransom, Ray M. (Big Bear City, CA); Gallegos-Lopez, Gabriel (Torrance, CA); Kinoshita, Michael H. (Redondo Beach, CA)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

398

WRAP Module 1 waste analysis plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this waste analysis plan is to document the necessary characterization, sampling, screening, analysis, and waste acceptance criteria for waste received at the WRAP Module 1. Waste expected to be received at WRAP Module 1 includes newly generated and retrieved waste. The newly generated waste will undergo verification prior to treatment, storage, or disposal. Retrieved waste from the burial grounds or above ground storage will undergo further characterization (as needed), treatment, supercompaction, and repackaging

Mayancsik, B.A.

1995-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

399

Technical Note: Evaluation of Effective Microorganisms (EM) In Solid Waste Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

produces a high quality compost, which contributes towardorganic matters, compost, effective microorganisms (EM). Athis point, the finished compost was collected and sieved.

Sekeran, V.; Balaji, C.; Bhagavathipushpa, T.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Tritium waste package  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A containment and waste package system for processing and shipping tritium xide waste received from a process gas includes an outer drum and an inner drum containing a disposable molecular sieve bed (DMSB) seated within outer drum. The DMSB includes an inlet diffuser assembly, an outlet diffuser assembly, and a hydrogen catalytic recombiner. The DMSB absorbs tritium oxide from the process gas and converts it to a solid form so that the tritium is contained during shipment to a disposal site. The DMSB is filled with type 4A molecular sieve pellets capable of adsorbing up to 1000 curies of tritium. The recombiner contains a sufficient amount of catalyst to cause any hydrogen add oxygen present in the process gas to recombine to form water vapor, which is then adsorbed onto the DMSB.

Rossmassler, Rich (Cranbury, NJ); Ciebiera, Lloyd (Titusville, NJ); Tulipano, Francis J. (Teaneck, NJ); Vinson, Sylvester (Ewing, NJ); Walters, R. Thomas (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste notes sum" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Tritium waste package  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A containment and waste package system for processing and shipping tritium oxide waste received from a process gas includes an outer drum and an inner drum containing a disposable molecular sieve bed (DMSB) seated within the outer drum. The DMSB includes an inlet diffuser assembly, an outlet diffuser assembly, and a hydrogen catalytic recombiner. The DMSB absorbs tritium oxide from the process gas and converts it to a solid form so that the tritium is contained during shipment to a disposal site. The DMSB is filled with type 4A molecular sieve pellets capable of adsorbing up to 1000 curies of tritium. The recombiner contains a sufficient amount of catalyst to cause any hydrogen and oxygen present in the process gas to recombine to form water vapor, which is then adsorbed onto the DMSB. 1 fig.

Rossmassler, R.; Ciebiera, L.; Tulipano, F.J.; Vinson, S.; Walters, R.T.

1995-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

402

Tritium waste package  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A containment and waste package system for processing and shipping tritium oxide waste received from a process gas includes an outer drum and an inner drum containing a disposable molecular sieve bed (DMSB) seated within outer drum. The DMSB includes an inlet diffuser assembly, an outlet diffuser assembly, and a hydrogen catalytic recombiner. The DMSB adsorbs tritium oxide from the process gas and converts it to a solid form so that the tritium is contained during shipment to a disposal site. The DMSB is filled with type 4A molecular sieve pellets capable of adsorbing up to 1000 curies of tritium. The recombiner contains a sufficient amount of catalyst to cause any hydrogen and oxygen present in the process gas to recombine to form water vapor, which is then adsorbed onto the DMSB.

Rossmassler, R.; Ciebiera, L.; Tulipano, F.J.; Vinson, S.; Walters, R.T.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

403

Waste | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste Waste Dataset Summary Description The Planning Database Project provides the UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) with regular data to track progress towards achieving EU targets for electricity generation from renewable energy (RE) sources. Extracts from the database are available each month. Information collected in the database includes: name, location and installed capacity of RE projects over 0.1MW; environmental designations; planning status; and construction status. Included here is the October 2010 Progress Datasheet, and an extract from December, 15, 2010 (i.e. Source UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Date Released December 15th, 2010 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords biomass co-firing installed capacity

404

Municipal Solid Waste:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Methodology for Allocating Municipal Solid Waste Methodology for Allocating Municipal Solid Waste to Biogenic and Non-Biogenic Energy May 2007 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contact This report was prepared by staff of the Renewable Information Team, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels.

405

V-211: IBM iNotes Multiple Vulnerabilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

IBM iNotes has two cross-site scripting vulnerabilities and an ActiveX Integer overflow vulnerability

406

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Retail Gasoline and Diesel Surveys Retail Gasoline and Diesel Surveys Definitions Key Terms Definition Conventional Area Any area that does not require the sale of reformulated gasoline. All types of finished motor gasoline may be sold in this area. Conventional Gasoline Finished motor gasoline not included in the reformulated gasoline category. Excludes reformulated gasoline blendstock for oxygenate blending (RBOB) as well as other blendstock. Note: this survey designates all motor gasoline collected within a conventional area as conventional gasoline (see conventional area). Gasoline Grades The classification of gasoline by octane ratings. Each type of gasoline (conventional and reformulated) is classified by three grades - regular, midgrade, and premium. Note: gasoline sales are reported by grade in accordance with their classification at the time of sale. In general, automotive octane requirements are lower at high altitudes. Therefore, in some areas of the United States, such as the Rocky Mountain States, the octane ratings for the gasoline grades may be 2 or more octane points lower.

407

Linear Collider Collaboration Tech Notes LCC-0109  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 TESLA 2002-11 CBP Tech Note-269 November 2002 Alignment Stability Models for Damping Rings Andrej Wolski Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley, CA Winfried Decking Deutsches Elektron Synchrotron (DESY) Hamburg, Germany Abstract: Linear collider damping rings are highly sensitive to magnet alignment. Emittance tuning simulations for current designs of damping rings for TESLA and NLC have given encouraging results, but depend on invasive measurements of dispersion. The frequency with which such measurements must be made is therefore an operational issue, and depends on the time stability of the alignment. In this note, we consider three effects that lead to misalignment and the need to retune the damping ring: (1)

408

Linear Collider Collaboration Tech Notes LCC-0063  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 May 2001 Varying alpha/lambda in NLC Structures - BNS Damping and Emittance Growth G. Stupakov and Z. Li Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stanford, CA Abstract: In this note we consider the effect of varying this iris opening in the NLC structures on the beam dynamics and the rf efficiency in the linac. Varying a/λ in NLC structures - BNS damping and emittance growth G. Stupakov and Z. Li SLAC, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94309 In this note we consider the effect of the varying the iris opening a in the NLC structures on the beam dynamics and the RF efficiency in the linac. The most important consequence of the variation of the iris openings is the change of the longitudinal and transverse wakefields. Wake as a function of parameter a for the NLC structures has been previously calculated by K. Bane. Here we will use his

409

The First Recovery Act Funded Waste Shipment depart from the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The First Recovery Act Funded Waste Shipment departs from the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Facility A shipment of mixed low-level waste left DOEs Advanced Mixed Waste...

410

Nuclear Waste Policy Act Signed | National Nuclear Security Administra...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

> Nuclear Waste Policy Act Signed Nuclear Waste Policy Act Signed January 07, 1983 Washington, DC Nuclear Waste Policy Act Signed President Reagan signs the Nuclear Waste...

411

Mixed Waste Recycling Exemption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of an ongoing integrated mixed waste program, EPRI has documented the process for obtaining state approval to apply the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) recycling exemption. This report examines the regulatory basis for the recycling exemption and the strategy for designing and operating a recycling facility to meet that exemption. Specifically addressed is the process of submitting an actual recycling exemption request to an RCRA authorized state and potential roadblocks utilities m...

1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

412

PROCESSING OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for treating radioactive waste solutions prior to disposal is described. A water-soluble phosphate, borate, and/or silicate is added. The solution is sprayed with steam into a space heated from 325 to 400 deg C whereby a powder is formed. The powder is melted and calcined at from 800 to 1000 deg C. Water vapor and gaseous products are separated from the glass formed. (AEC)

Johnson, B.M. Jr.; Barton, G.B.

1961-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

413

Cooling tower waste reduction  

SciTech Connect

At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the two main cooling tower systems (central and northwest) were upgraded during the summer of 1997 to reduce the generation of hazardous waste. In 1996, these two tower systems generated approximately 135,400 lbs (61,400 kg) of hazardous sludge, which is more than 90 percent of the hazardous waste for the site annually. At both, wet decks (cascade reservoirs) were covered to block sunlight. Covering the cascade reservoirs reduced the amount of chemical conditioners (e.g. algaecide and biocide), required and in turn the amount of waste generated was reduced. Additionally, at the northwest cooling tower system, a sand filtration system was installed to allow cyclical filtering and backflushing, and new pumps, piping, and spray nozzles were installed to increase agitation. the appurtenance upgrade increased the efficiency of the cooling towers. The sand filtration system at the northwest cooling tower system enables operators to continuously maintain the cooling tower water quality without taking the towers out of service. Operational costs (including waste handling and disposal) and maintenance activities are compared for the cooling towers before and after upgrades. Additionally, the effectiveness of the sand filter system in conjunction with the wet deck covers (northwest cooling tower system), versus the cascade reservoir covers alone (south cooling tower south) is discussed. the overall expected return on investment is calculated to be in excess of 250 percent. this upgrade has been incorporated into the 1998 DOE complex-wide water conservation project being led by Sandia National Laboratory/Albuquerque.

Coleman, S.J.; Celeste, J.; Chine, R.; Scott, C.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Tennessee Department Of Environment and Conservation The Solid Waste Disposal Laws and Regulations are found in Tenn. Code 68-211. These rules are enforced and subject to change by the Public Waste Board (PWB), which is established by the Division of Solid and Hazardous

415

Method for processing aqueous wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating waste water such as that from an industrial processing facility comprising the separation of the waste water into a dilute waste stream and a concentrated waste stream. The concentrated waste stream is treated chemically to enhance precipitation and then allowed to separate into a sludge and a supernate. The supernate is skimmed or filtered from the sludge and blended with the dilute waste stream to form a second dilute waste stream. The sludge remaining is mixed with cementitious material, rinsed to dissolve soluble components, then pressed to remove excess water and dissolved solids before being allowed to cure. The dilute waste stream is also chemically treated to decompose carbonate complexes and metal ions and then mixed with cationic polymer to cause the precipitated solids to flocculate. Filtration of the flocculant removes sufficient solids to allow the waste water to be discharged to the surface of a stream. The filtered material is added to the sludge of the concentrated waste stream. The method is also applicable to the treatment and removal of soluble uranium from aqueous streams, such that the treated stream may be used as a potable water supply.

Pickett, John B. (3922 Wood Valley Dr., Aiken, SC 29803); Martin, Hollis L. (Rt. 1, Box 188KB, McCormick, SC 29835); Langton, Christine A. (455 Sumter St. SE., Aiken, SC 29801); Harley, Willie W. (110 Fairchild St., Batesburg, SC 29006)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Method for processing aqueous wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for treating waste water such as that from an industrial processing facility comprising the separation of the waste water into a dilute waste stream and a concentrated waste stream. The concentrated waste stream is treated chemically to enhance precipitation and then allowed to separate into a sludge and a supernate. The supernate is skimmed or filtered from the sludge and blended with the dilute waste stream to form a second dilute waste stream. The sludge remaining is mixed with cementitious material, rinsed to dissolve soluble components, then pressed to remove excess water and dissolved solids before being allowed to cure. The dilute waste stream is also chemically treated to decompose carbonate complexes and metal ions and then mixed with cationic polymer to cause the precipitated solids to flocculate. Filtration of the flocculant removes sufficient solids to allow the waste water to be discharged to the surface of a stream. The filtered material is added to the sludge of the concentrated waste stream. The method is also applicable to the treatment and removal of soluble uranium from aqueous streams, such that the treated stream may be used as a potable water supply. 4 figures.

Pickett, J.B.; Martin, H.L.; Langton, C.A.; Harley, W.W.

1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

417

Method for processing aqueous wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a method for treating waste water such as that from an industrial processing facility comprising the separation of the waste water into a dilute waste stream and a concentrated waste stream. The concentrated waste stream is treated chemically to enhance precipitation and then allowed to separate into a sludge and a supernate. The supernate is skimmed or filtered from the sludge and blended with the dilute waste stream to form a second dilute waste stream. The sludge remaining is mixed with cementitious material, rinsed to dissolve soluble components, then pressed to remove excess water and dissolved solids before being allowed to cure. The dilute waste stream is also chemically treated to decompose carbonate complexes and metal ions and then mixed with cationic polymer to cause the precipitated solids to flocculate. Filtration of the flocculant removes sufficient solids to allow the waste water to be discharged to the surface of a stream. The filtered material is added to the sludge of the concentrated waste stream. The method is also applicable to the treatment and removal of soluble uranium from aqueous streams, such that the treated stream may be used as a potable water supply.

Pickett, J.B.; Martin, H.L.; Langton, C.A.; Harley, W.W.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

418

SRS - Programs - Liquid Waste Disposition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquid Waste Disposition Liquid Waste Disposition This includes both the solidification of highly radioactive liquid wastes stored in SRS's tank farms and disposal of liquid low-level waste generated as a by-product of the separations process and tank farm operations. This low-level waste is treated in the Effluent Treatment Facility. High-activity liquid waste is generated at SRS as by-products from the processing of nuclear materials for national defense, research and medical programs. The waste, totaling about 36 million gallons, is currently stored in 49 underground carbon-steel waste tanks grouped into two "tank farms" at SRS. While the waste is stored in the tanks, it separates into two parts: a sludge that settles on the bottom of the tank, and a liquid supernate that resides on top of the sludge. The waste is reduced to about 30 percent of its original volume by evaporation. The condensed evaporator "overheads" are transferred to the Effluent Treatment Project for final cleanup prior to release to the environment. As the concentrate cools a portion of it crystallizes forming solid saltcake. The concentrated supernate and saltcake are less mobile and therefore less likely to escape to the environment in the event of a tank crack or leak.

419

EART 265 Lecture Notes: Energy Energy Usage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EART 265 Lecture Notes: Energy Energy Usage US per capita energy usage is 10 kW. This represents 1 of 2 kW. Euro- pean countries tend to use less energy per capita by a factor of 2. China's per capita/4 of the worldwide energy usage, and with 1/20th of the world population gives a global average power consumption

Nimmo, Francis

420

A Note on Search Trees Jianer Chen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in (0, ) such that f(r) = 0 for r (0, ) implies that f (r) > 0. Suppose further that f is continuous than one root in (0, ). Let r1 and r2, with r1 r2, be two consecutive such roots (note that we can always find two consecutive roots r1 and r2 because f (r) > 0 for any root r). From the hypothesis, we

Schaefer, Marcus

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste notes sum" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Radioactive waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for use in processing radioactive waste materials for shipment and storage in solid form in a container is disclosed. The container includes a top, and an opening in the top which is smaller than the outer circumference of the container. The apparatus includes an enclosure into which the container is placed, solution feed apparatus for adding a solution containing radioactive waste materials into the container through the container opening, and at least one rotatable blade for blending the solution with a fixing agent such as cement or the like as the solution is added into the container. The blade is constructed so that it can pass through the opening in the top of the container. The rotational axis of the blade is displaced from the center of the blade so that after the blade passes through the opening, the blade and container can be adjusted so that one edge of the blade is adjacent the cylindrical wall of the container, to insure thorough mixing. When the blade is inside the container, a substantially sealed chamber is formed to contain vapors created by the chemical action of the waste solution and fixant, and vapors emanating through the opening in the container.

Nelson, Robert E. (Lombard, IL); Ziegler, Anton A. (Darien, IL); Serino, David F. (Maplewood, MN); Basnar, Paul J. (Western Springs, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Global Stability Analysis of Fluid Flows using Sum-of-Squares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flow is globally stable, if the flow does remain globally stable for Reynolds numbers at least ... ?v1,v2 ?v3? = ??v3,v2 ?v1?,. (2) ... Note that the nonlinear term u?u in (4a) does not feature in the energy equation ...... Transactions on Automatic Control, 54(5):10071011, May 2009. ... Handbook of semidefinite program-.

423

Status of integrated performance assessment of the waste packages and engineered barrier system  

SciTech Connect

Performance assessment of the engineered barrier system for a nuclear waste repository combines information from relevant disciplines and predicts the net long-term performance of the EBS in unites of regulatory goals for performance. The performance assessment models are specific to the proposed Yucca Mountain, Nevada site. Early assessments are used for project planning and feedback. The EBS scenarios activity develops the scenarios and the consequent event sequences. Initial model development for single waste packages indicates that the radionuclide release rate performance is sensitive to the water flux, element solubilities, and/or the mode of water contact with the waste. The latter in turn depends on local scale hydrology and the modes of corrosion for the container material. For the release rate summed over waste packages, variations among waste packages and their near-field environments are anticipated. These variations place demands on data acquisition and modeling, as well as modulate the impact of localized changes of conditions. Sampling in uncertainty assessment is a subsequent step in examining the reliability of predictions made in the performance assessments. Advances made in sampling methods are referenced. 14 refs., 6 figs.

O`Connell, W.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Additive effect of waste tire on the hydrogenolysis reaction of coal liquefaction residue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerous amount of waste tire is landfilled or dumped all over the world, which causes environmental problems, such as destruction of natural places and the risk of fires. On the other hand, the coal liquefaction residue (CLR) is produced in 30% yield through the process supporting unit (PSU) of the NEDOL coal liquefaction process. Therefore, the investigation on an effective method for utilization of waste tire and CLR is required. In this study, the simultaneous hydrogenolysis of CLR and pulverized waste tire was carried out by using tetralin. The yields in the simultaneous hydrogenolysis were compared with algebraic sum of the yields of the individual hydrogenolyses of waste tire alone and coal alone. In the simultaneous hydrogenolysis, the synergistic effects to upgrading, such as an increase in the yield of the oil constituent and a decrease in the yield of the asphaltene constituent, occurred because of the stabilization of asphaltenic radicals from CLR with aliphatic radicals from tire. The decrease in asphaltene yield in the simultaneous hydrogenolysis was pronounced with the increase in the tire:CLR ratio because the solvent effects of liquefied tire, such as stabilization of radicals, hydrogen shuttling, and heat transfer, were enhanced. Accordingly, it is estimated that the simultaneous hydrogenolysis of CLR and waste tire is an effective method for processing both materials. 15 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Motoyuki Sugano; Daigorou Onda; Kiyoshi Mashimo [Nihon University, Tokyo (Japan). Department of Materials and Applied Chemistry, College of Science and Technology

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

compounds VSL Vitreous State Laboratory of the Catholic University of America WESP Wet Electrostatic Precipitator WGI Washington Group International WTP Waste Treatment and...

426

Steel-Based Alloy Waste Forms for Reprocessing Wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... although the release of some radionuclides is limited by the solubilities of the ... Hot Isostatic Pressing of Chlorine-Containing Plutonium Residues and Wastes.

427

Tank waste chemistry: A new understanding of waste aging  

SciTech Connect

There is concern about the risk of uncontrolled exothermic reaction(s) in Hanford Site waste tanks containing NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/NO{sub 2} based salts and/or metal hydroxide sludges in combination with organics or ferrocyanides. However, gradual oxidation of the waste in the tanks to less reactive species appears to have reduced the risk. In addition, wastes sampled to date contain sufficiently large quantities of water so that propagation reactions are highly unlikely. This paper investigates various aspects of the aging of Hanford tank wastes.

Babad, H. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Camaioni, D.M.; Lilga, M.A.; Samuels, W.D.; Strachan, D.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Exploratory Study of Waste Generation and Waste Minimization in Sweden.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The current thesis presents an exploratory study on municipal solid waste generation and minimization in Sweden, with a focus on their connection to basic (more)

Kuslyaykina, Dina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Underground Storage by Type U.S. Underground Storage by Type Definitions Key Terms Definition Base (cushion) gas The volume of gas needed as a permanent inventory to maintain adequate reservoir pressures and deliverability rates throughout the withdrawal season. All native gas is included in the base gas volume. Gas in storage The sum of base gas plus working gas. Injections The volume of gas injected into storage reservoirs. Natural Gas A gaseous mixture of hydrocarbon compounds, the primary one being methane. Net Withdrawals The amount by which storage withdrawals exceed storage injections. Salt Cavern Storage Field A storage facility that is a cavern hollowed out in either a salt "bed" or "dome" formation. Withdrawals The volume of gas withdrawn from storage reservoirs.

430

ConsumTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total Energy The preceding sections of this documentation describe how the Energy In- formation Administration (EIA) arrives at state end-use consumption esti- mates by individual energy source in the State Energy Data System (SEDS). This section describes how all energy sources are added in Btu to create total energy consumption and end-use consumption estimates. Total Energy Consumption Total energy consumption by state is defined in SEDS as the sum of all en- ergy sources consumed. The total includes all primary energy sources used directly by the energy-consuming sectors (residential, commercial, indus- trial, transportation, and electric power), as well as net interstate flow of electricity (ELISB) and net imports of electricity (ELNIB). Energy sources can be categorized as renewable and non-renewable sources: Non-Renewable Sources Fossil fuels: · coal (CL) · net

431

PriceTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

prices prices are developed for the following three categories: coking coal; steam coal (all noncoking coal); and coal coke imports and exports. Coking coal, used in the industrial sector only, is a high-quality bitumi- nous coal that is used to make coal coke. Steam coal, which may be used by all sectors, includes anthracite, bituminous coal, subbituminous coal, and lignite. In the industrial sector, coal consumption is the sum of cok- ing coal and steam coal. The industrial coal price is the quantity- weighted average price of these two components. Imports and exports of coal coke are available only on the national level and are accounted for in the industrial sector. Coal coke imports and ex- ports are reported separately and are not averaged with other coal prices and expenditures. Coking Coal Coking coal is generally more expensive than steam coal; therefore, it is identified separately

432

Waste Management | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 27, 2011 July 27, 2011 End of Year 2010 SNF & HLW Inventories Map of the United States of America that shows the location of approximately 64,000 MTHM of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) & 275 High-Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) Canisters. July 27, 2011 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 The Analysis of the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program presents the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's (OCRWM) May 2007 total system cost estimate for the disposal of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The TSLCC analysis provides a basis for assessing the adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund (NWF) Fee as required by Section 302 of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended.

433

Waste Management Process Improvement Project  

SciTech Connect

The Bechtel Hanford-led Environmental Restoration Contractor team's Waste Management Process Improvement Project is working diligently with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Richland Operations Office to improve the waste management process to meet DOE's need for an efficient, cost-effective program for the management of dangerous, low-level and mixed-low-level waste. Additionally the program must meet all applicable regulatory requirements. The need for improvement was highlighted when a change in the Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project's waste management practices resulted in a larger amount of waste being generated than the waste management organization had been set up to handle.

Atwood, J.; Borden, G.; Rangel, G. R.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

434

Waste/By-Product Hydrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WASTE/BY-PRODUCT HYDROGEN WASTE/BY-PRODUCT HYDROGEN Ruth Cox DOE/DOD Workshop January 13, 2011 January 13, 2011 Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association The Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association FCHEA ƒ Trade Association for the industry ƒ Member driven - Market focused ƒ Developers, suppliers, customers, nonprofits, government Ad ƒ Advocacy ƒ Safety and standardization ƒ Education ƒ Strategic Alliances Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association O M b Our Members 5 W t /B d t H d Waste/By-product Hydrogen Overview Overview ƒ Growing populations, rising standards of living, and increased urbanization leads to a escalating volume of waste leads to a escalating volume of waste. ƒ Huge volumes of waste are collected in dumps, creating a major environmental issue. ƒ ƒ Wastewater treatment plants generate noxious gasses that are released in Wastewater treatment plants generate noxious gasses that are released in

435

WIPP WASTE MINIMIZATION PROGRAM DESCRIPTION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carlsbad, New Mexico 8822 Carlsbad, New Mexico 8822 1 NOV 2 3 2011 Mr. John Kieling , Acting Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environme nt Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Waste Minimization Report Dear Mr. Kieling: This letter provides the submittal of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Waste Minimization Report. This report is required by and has bee n prepared in accordance with the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Perm it Part 2, Permit Condition 2.4. We certify under penalty of law that this document and all enclosures were prepared under our direction or supervision according to a system designed to assure that qualified personnel properly gather and evaluate the information submitted

436

Optimizing Organic Waste to Energy Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A waste-to-energy firm that recycles organic waste with energy recovery performs two environmentally beneficial functions: it diverts waste from landfills and it produces renewable energy. At the same time, the waste-to-energy firm serves and collects ... Keywords: environment, operating strategy, organic waste to energy, regulation, sustainability

Bar?? Ata; Deishin Lee; Mustafa H. Tongarlak

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

What is Hazardous Hazardous waste is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What is Hazardous Waste? Hazardous waste is any product charac- terized or labeled as toxic, reactive, cor- rosive, flammable, combustible that is unwanted, dis- carded or no longer useful. This waste may be harmful to human health and/ or the environment. Hazardous Waste Disposal EH&S x7233 E-Waste

de Lijser, Peter

438

Feed Materials Production Center Waste Management Plan  

SciTech Connect

In the process of producing uranium metal products used in Department of Energy (DOE) defense programs at other DOE facilities, various types of wastes are generated at the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC). Process wastes, both generated and stored, are discussed in the Waste Management Plan and include low-level radioactive waste (LLW), mixed hazardous/radioactive waste, and sanitary/industrial waste. Scrap metal waste and wastes requiring special remediation are also addressed in the Plan. The Waste Management Plan identifies the comprehensive programs developed to address safe storage and disposition of all wastes from past, present, and future operations at the FMPC. Waste streams discussed in this Plan are representative of the waste generated and waste types that concern worker and public health and safety. Budgets and schedules for implementation of waste disposition are also addressed. The waste streams receiving the largest amount of funding include LLW approved for shipment by DOE/ORO to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) (MgF/sub 2/, slag leach filter cake, and neutralized raffinate); remedial action wastes (waste pits, K-65 silo waste); thorium; scrap metal (contaminated and noncontaminated ferrous and copper scrap); construction rubble and soil generated from decontamination and decommissioning of outdated facilities; and low-level wastes that will be handled through the Low-Level Waste Processing and Shipping System (LLWPSS). Waste Management milestones are also provided. The Waste Management Plan is divided into eight major sections: Introduction; Site Waste and Waste Generating Process; Strategy; Projects and Operations; Waste Stream Budgets; Milestones; Quality Assurance for Waste Management; and Environmental Monitoring Program.

Watts, R.E.; Allen, T.; Castle, S.A.; Hopper, J.P.; Oelrich, R.L.

1986-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

439

LLW Notes, Volume 12, Number 2  

SciTech Connect

Contents include the following articles: National Environmental Justice Advisory Council considers Ward Valley resolution; NGA urges Congressional and Presidential support for low-level radioactive waste compacts and transfer of federal land in Ward Valley; RFP issued for SEIS on Ward Valley land transfer; Illinois siting criteria finalized; Consideration of tribal concerns during Ward Valley siting process; State legislators` LLRW working group meets in D.C.; Upcoming state and compact events; Court calendar; Texas compact legislation introduced in Congress; Superfund reform is a priority for 105th Congress; High-level waste bill gets off to an early start; Fort Mojave petition NEJAC for Ward Valley resolution; EPA withdraws cleanup rule from OMB; Board ruling raises doubts about proposed Louisiana enrichment facility; DOE recommends external regulation by NRC; and Supplement--Background on environmental justice.

Norris, C.; Brown, H. [eds.; Colsant, J.; Lovinger, T.; Scheele, L.; Shaker, M.A.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Vitrification of high sulfate wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) through the Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) is investigating the application of vitrification technology to mixed wastes within the DOE system This work involves identifying waste streams, laboratory testing to identify glass formulations and characterize the vitrified product, and demonstration testing with the actual waste in a pilot-scale system. Part of this program is investigating process limits for various waste components, specifically those components that typically create problems for the application of vitrification, such as sulfate, chloride, and phosphate. This work describes results from vitrification testing for a high-sulfate waste, the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basin waste at Hanford. A low melting phosphate glass formulation has been developed for a waste stream high in sodium and sulfate. At melt temperatures in the range of 1,000 C to 1,200 C, sulfate in the waste is decomposed to gaseous oxides and driven off during melting, while the remainder of the oxides stay in the melt. Decomposition of the sulfates eliminates the processing problems typically encountered in vitrification of sulfate-containing wastes, resulting in separation of the sulfate from the remainder of the waste and allowing the sulfate to be collected in the off-gas system and treated as a secondary waste stream. Both the vitreous product and intentionally devitrified samples are durable when compared to reference glasses by TCLP and DI water leach tests. Simple, short tests to evaluate the compatibility of the glasses with potential melter materials found minimal corrosion with most materials.

Merrill, R.A.; Whittington, K.F.; Peters, R.D.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste notes sum" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Gaussian Z-Interference Channel with a Relay Link: Achievability Region and Asymptotic Sum Capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper studies a Gaussian Z-interference channel with a rate-limited digital relay link from one receiver to another. Achievable rate regions are derived based on a combination of Han-Kobayashi common-private information splitting technique and several different relay strategies including compress-and-forward and a partial decode-and-forward strategy, in which the interference is partially decoded then binned and forwarded through the digital link for subtraction at the other end. For the Gaussian Z-interference channel with a digital link from the interference-free receiver to the interfered receiver, the capacity region is established in the strong interference regime; an achievable rate region is established in the weak interference regime. In the weak interference regime, the partial decode-and-forward strategy is shown to be asymptotically sum-capacity achieving in the high signal-to-noise ratio and high interference-to-noise ratio limit. In this case, each relay bit asymptotically improves the sum c...

Zhou, Lei

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Solid Waste Management Act (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act provides for the planning and regulation of solid waste storage, collection, transportation, processing, treatment, and disposal. It requires that municipalities submit plans for municipal...

443

WEB RESOURCE: Nuclear Waste Disposal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 10, 2007 ... The complete "Yucca Mountain Resource Book" is also available for download at this site. Citation: Nuclear Waste Disposal. 2007. Nuclear...

444

FAQS Reference Guide Waste Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the January 2003 edition of DOE-STD-1159-2003, Waste Management Functional Area Qualification Standard.

445

Waste Clean-up 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... These figures are concepts of the Waste Retrieval System and Deployment for the Hanford, Washington tank farm, specifically focused on tank C ...

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

446

Challenges of Nuclear Waste Vitrification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US DOE has developed glass property-composition models to control glass compositions for HLW vitrification at Hanford Waste Treatment & Immobilization...

447

Nuclear waste incineration technology status  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The incinerators developed and/or used for radioactive waste combustion are discussed and suggestions are made for uses of incineration in radioactive waste management programs and for incinerators best suited for specific applications. Information on the amounts and types of radioactive wastes are included to indicate the scope of combustible wastes being generated and in existence. An analysis of recently developed radwaste incinerators is given to help those interested in choosing incinerators for specific applications. Operating information on US and foreign incinerators is also included to provide additional background information. Development needs are identified for extending incinerator applications and for establishing commercial acceptance.

Ziegler, D.L.; Lehmkuhl, G.D.; Meile, L.J.

1981-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

448

Drilling Waste Management Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Drilling Waste Management Information System is an online resource for technical and regulatory information on practices for managing drilling muds and cuttings, including...

449

Waste Bakery on diet Sheep.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This work aimed to evaluate the effects of inclusion of bakery waste (BW) in sheep diets on intake, apparent digestibility, balance of nitrogen compounds and (more)

Almira Biazon Frana

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Treatment of mercury containing waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for the treatment of mercury containing waste in a single reaction vessel which includes a) stabilizing the waste with sulfur polymer cement under an inert atmosphere to form a resulting mixture and b) encapsulating the resulting mixture by heating the mixture to form a molten product and casting the molten product as a monolithic final waste form. Additional sulfur polymer cement can be added in the encapsulation step if needed, and a stabilizing additive can be added in the process to improve the leaching properties of the waste form.

Kalb, Paul D. (Wading River, NY); Melamed, Dan (Gaithersburg, MD); Patel, Bhavesh R (Elmhurst, NY); Fuhrmann, Mark (Babylon, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Waste disposal and renewable resources.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Purpose/aim: The purpose of this dissertation is to find out the effect of waste disposal on environment and to explore the effect of renewable (more)

Hai, Qu; PiaoYi, Sun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Next Generation Waste Glass Melters  

activities as described in EM Tank Waste R&D Plan. Melter project in support of this activity. Facets of WTP processing being investigated/enhanced include:

453

Chernobyls waste site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis of the prospects for using the Chernobyl exclusion zone for development of a spent fuel store, waste disposal site and other nuclear facilities.

Schmieman, Eric A.; Paskevych, Sergiy; Sizov, Andrey; Batiy, Valeriy

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

454

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transuranic Waste Baseline inventory report. Volume 2. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This document is the Baseline Inventory Report for the transuranic (alpha-bearing) wastes stored at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. Waste stream profiles including origin, applicable EPA codes, typical isotopic composition, typical waste densities, and typical rates of waste generation for each facility are presented for wastes stored at the WIPP.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment October 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment CARLSBAD, N.M. - The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) received its

456

DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment October 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment CARLSBAD, N.M. - The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) received its

457

Radioactive waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for use in processing radioactive waste materials for shipment and storage in solid form in a container is disclosed. The container includes a top, and an opening in the top which is smaller than the outer circumference of the container. The apparatus includes an enclosure into which the container is placed, solution feed apparatus for adding a solution containing radioactive waste materials into the container through the container opening, and at least one rotatable blade for blending the solution with a fixing agent such as cement or the like as the solution is added into the container. The blade is constructed so that it can pass through the opening in the top of the container. The rotational axis of the blade is displaced from the center of the blade so that after the blade passes through the opening, the blade and container can be adjusted so that one edge of the blade is adjacent the cylindrical wall of the container, to insure thorough mixing. When the blade is inside the container, a substantially sealed chamber is formed to contain vapors created by the chemical action of the waste solution and fixant, and vapors emanating through the opening in the container. The chamber may be formed by placing a removable extension over the top of the container. The extension communicates with the apparatus so that such vapors are contained within the container, extension and solution feed apparatus. A portion of the chamber includes coolant which condenses the vapors. The resulting condensate is returned to the container by the force of gravity.

Nelson, R.E.; Ziegler, A.A.; Serino, D.F.; Basnar, P.J.

1985-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

458

Waste IncIneratIon and Waste PreventIon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

disposing of waste, it also makes consider- able amounts of energy available in the form of electricity) of electricity and 17 TWh of heat, equivalent to the supply required by a major city like Berlin. This energy can . This is equivalent to the annual CO2 emissions of some 1.6 million passenger cars. This means that waste incineration

459

Municipal waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Municipal waste materials are processed by crushing the materials so that pieces of noncombustible material are smaller than a selected size and pieces of combustible material are larger than the selected size. The crushed materials are placed on a vibrating mesh screen conveyor belt having openings which pass the smaller, noncombustible pieces of material, but do not pass the larger, combustible pieces of material. Pieces of material which become lodged in the openings of the conveyor belt may be removed by cylindrical deraggers or pressurized air. The crushed materials may be fed onto the conveyor belt by a vibrating feed plate which shakes the materials so that they tend to lie flat.

Mayberry, J.L.

1987-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

460

Municipal waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Municipal waste materials are processed by crushing the materials so that pieces of noncombustible material are smaller than a selected size and pieces of combustible material are larger than the selected size. The crushed materials are placed on a vibrating mesh screen conveyor belt having openings which pass the smaller, noncombustible pieces of material, but do not pass the larger, combustible pieces of material. Pieces of material which become lodged in the openings of the conveyor belt may be removed by cylindrical deraggers or pressurized air. The crushed materials may be fed onto the conveyor belt by a vibrating feed plate which shakes the materials so that they tend to lie flat.

Mayberry, John L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste notes sum" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Municipal waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Municipal waste materials are processed by crushing the materials so that pieces of noncombustible material are smaller than a selected size and pieces of combustible material are larger than the selected size. The crushed materials are placed on a vibrating mesh screen conveyor belt having openings which pass the smaller, noncombustible pieces of material, but do not pass the larger, combustible pieces of material. Consecutive conveyors may be connected by an intermediate vibratory plate. An air knife can be used to further separate materials based on weight.

Mayberry, John L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Options for Handling Noncombustion Waste: Third Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities produce a wide variety of noncombustion wastes from generating and distributing electricity as well as from associated support operations. This manual addresses the management of 23 utility noncombustion wastes and describes options for managing these wastes.

1995-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

463

WIPP Documents - Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (RCRA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy to manage, store, and dispose of contact-handled and remote-handled transuranic mixed waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Mixed waste contains radioactive and...

464

Waste Minimization Plan Colorado School of Mines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Minimization Plan Colorado School of Mines Prepared by: Environmental Health and Safety Department Revised February 2008 #12;Waste Minimization Plan Table of Contents Policy Statement Based Chemical Inventory and Database................................................4 Centralized Waste

465

Hazardous Waste Management Standards and Regulations (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This act states the standards and regulations for the management of hazardous waste. No person shall construct, modify or operate a hazardous waste facility or otherwise dispose of hazardous waste...

466

Nuclear Waste Policy Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Waste Policy Act Nuclear Waste Policy Act Document on the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 An Act to provide for the development of repositories for the disposal of...

467

European waste-to-energy systems: case study of Geneva-Cheneviers (Switzerland)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The City of Geneva, population 159,000 is the administrative center of the Canton of Geneva, population 340,000. The Canton owns a number of facilities for the treatment of waste. Geneva's chief waste treatment facility is the Cheneviers Incinerator. Two Von Roll integrated boiler incinerator furnaces have a rated capacity of 200 metric tons (220 short tons) per day each. Superheated steam at 360/sup 0/C and 32.4 bars (32 atm) powers a 6200 kW turbo-generator unit. The electricity is sold to the cantonal grid. Total incinerable waste in the Canton of Geneva has varied from 120,000 to 130,000 metric tons (132,000 to 144,000 short tons) annually during the last five years. For the last two years, total per capita tonnage have been declining. Per capita incinerable waste was 363 kilograms (800 lbs) in the year 1975, of which 257 kilograms (606 lbs) were household waste. Eighty-seven thousand, five hundred metric tons (96,386 short tons) of this waste was burned in the Cheneviers Incinerator in 1975. The remainder was landfilled, due to the lack of capacity at the incinerators. The system which began operating in 1966, cost approximately 40 million Swiss Francs ($9.3 million; 1965 or $23 million; 1976). Three-quarters of this sum was for land, buildings, construction, and equipment. A large station and dock for the transfer of waste accounted for the remainder. The Von Roll design ofthis plant is now out of date. Extensive modifications were made to correct corrosion problems in the furnace.

None

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 Technology Readiness Assessment for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW Waste Vitrification Facility L. Holton D. Alexander C. Babel H. Sutter J. Young August 2007 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection Richland, Washington, 99352 07-DESIGN-046 Technology Readiness Assessment for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW Waste Vitrification Facility L. Holton D. Alexander C. Babel H. Sutter J. Young August 2007 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 07-DESIGN-046 iii Summary The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) and the DOE Office of Environmental and Radioactive Waste Management (EM), Office of Project Recovery have completed a

469

Note on tachyon moduli and closed strings  

SciTech Connect

The collective behavior of the SL(2,R) covariant brane states of noncritical c=1 string theory, found in a previous work, is studied in the Fermi liquid approximation. It is found that such states mimic the coset WZW model, whereas only by further restrictions one recovers the double-scaling limit which was purported to be equivalent to closed string models. Another limit is proposed, inspired by the tachyon condensation ideas, where the spectrum is the same of two-dimensional string theory. We close by noting some strange connections between vacuum states of the theory in their different interpretations.

Carneiro da Cunha, Bruno [Helsinki Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 64, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland) and Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, CEP 53901-970, Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

470

ESC/Java2 Implementation Notes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: ESC/Java2 is a tool for statically checking program specifications. It expands significantly upon ESC/Java, on which it is built. It is consistent with the definition of JML and of Java 1.4. It adds additional static checking to that in ESC/Java; most significantly, it adds support for checking frame conditions and annotations containing method calls. This document describes the status of the final release of ESC/Java2, along with some notes regarding the details of that implementation.

David R. Cok; Joseph R. Kiniry; Dermot Cochran

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Linear Collider Collaboration Tech Notes LCC-0108  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 TESLA 2002-10 CBP Tech Note-268 November 2002 Comparison of Emittance Tuning Simulations in the NLC and TESLA Damping Rings Andrej Wolski Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley, CA Winfried Decking Deutsches Elektron Synchrotron (DESY) Hamburg, Germany Abstract: Vertical emittance is a critical issue for future linear collider damping rings. Both NLC and TESLA specify vertical emittance of the order of a few picometers, below values currently achieved in any storage ring. Simulations show that algorithms based on correcting the closed orbit and the vertical dispersion can be effective in reducing the vertical emittance to the required levels, in the presence of a limited subset of

472

Linear Collider Collaboration Tech Notes LCC-0104  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 October 2002 Beamstrahlung Photon Load on the TESLA Extraction Septum Blade Andrei Seryi Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stanford, CA 94309, USA Abstract: This note describes work performed in the framework of the International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee [1] to estimate the power load on the TESLA extraction septum blade due to beamstrahlung photons. It is shown, that under realistic conditions the photon load can be several orders of magnitude higher than what was estimated in the TESLA TDR [2] for the ideal Gaussian beams, potentially representing a serious limitation of the current design. Beamstrahlung Photon Load on the TESLA Extraction Septum Blade ANDREI SERYI STANFORD LINEAR

473

Waste minimization plan, T plant facilities  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the waste minimization plan for the T Plant facilities, located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site in south central Washington State. A waste minimization plan is one part of a multi-faceted waste management program; this waste minimization plan documents the goals and techniques of the waste minimization program, identifies methods for evaluating the program and ensuring quality assurance, and establishes the current baseline waste generation volume estimates.

Kover, K.K.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Vitrification of hazardous and radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect

Vitrification offers many attractive waste stabilization options. Versatility of waste compositions, as well as the inherent durability of a glass waste form, have made vitrification the treatment of choice for high-level radioactive wastes. Adapting the technology to other hazardous and radioactive waste streams will provide an environmentally acceptable solution to many of the waste challenges that face the public today. This document reviews various types and technologies involved in vitrification.

Bickford, D.F.; Schumacher, R.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

475

The reduction of packaging waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nationwide, packaging waste comprises approximately one-third of the waste disposed in sanitary landfills. the US Department of Energy (DOE) generated close to 90,000 metric tons of sanitary waste. With roughly one-third of that being packaging waste, approximately 30,000 metric tons are generated per year. The purpose of the Reduction of Packaging Waste project was to investigate opportunities to reduce this packaging waste through source reduction and recycling. The project was divided into three areas: procurement, onsite packaging and distribution, and recycling. Waste minimization opportunities were identified and investigated within each area, several of which were chosen for further study and small-scale testing at the Hanford Site. Test results, were compiled into five ``how-to`` recipes for implementation at other sites. The subject of the recipes are as follows: (1) Vendor Participation Program; (2) Reusable Containers System; (3) Shrink-wrap System -- Plastic and Corrugated Cardboard Waste Reduction; (4) Cardboard Recycling ; and (5) Wood Recycling.

Raney, E.A.; Hogan, J.J.; McCollom, M.L.; Meyer, R.J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

The e-waste impact  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The e-services have gained a wide range of attention and became an indispensable part of the majority of people and nations' life and living. New technology is constantly emerging making that old working gadget no longer desirable. On the other hand, ... Keywords: WEEE, e-waste, environment and health hazards, high tech waste, recycle, treatment

Mansour Jaragh; Jenan Boushahri

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Chemotoxicity of nuclear waste repositories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper published studies on chemotoxicity of nuclear waste repositories are reviewed. According to these studies, radiotoxicity is of primary concern. However, there also is a risk, primarily from genotoxic chemical substances, which could eventually reach the biosphere. Possible chemotoxic effects should be studied as an integral part of the risk assessment and risk management of repositories for nuclear waste.

Buchheim, B. (Nordostschweizerische Kraftwerke-AG, Parkstrasse 23, CH-5401 Baden (CH)); Persson, L. (Swedish Radiation Protection Inst., P.O. Box 60204, S-104 01 Stockholm (SE))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

INTERSTATE WASTE TECHNOLOGIES THERMOSELECT TECHNOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/FURANS) 1200 °C 2000 °C 70 °C Quench Degassing channel Gasifier Waste carries dioxins, furans Total destruction Waste Throughput [Mg/h] GasifierGrossLoad[MW] 13 MJ/kg14 MJ/kg THERMOSELECTTHERMOSELECT ­ GASIFIER

Columbia University

479

Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines This legislation gives regulatory authority to the Department of Environmental Management to monitor commercial sites for hazardous wastes; fees on waste received at such sites; hearings and investigations. The legislation also states responsibilities of generators and transporters of hazardous waste as well as responsibilities of hazardous waste storage and treatment facility and hazardous waste disposal site operators. There

480

Missouri Hazardous Waste Management Law (Missouri)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Hazardous Waste Program, administered by the Hazardous Waste Management Commission in the Department of Natural Resources, regulates the processing, transportation, and disposal of hazardous...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste notes sum" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Chapter 47 Solid Waste Facilities (Kentucky)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This chapter establishes the permitting standards for solid waste sites or facilities, the standards applicable to all solid waste sites or facilities, and the standards for certification of...

482

Enforcement Letter, Westinghouse Waste Isolation Division - October...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Westinghouse Waste Isolation Division related to Quality Assurance and Occupational Radiation Protection Noncompliances at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant This letter refers...

483

Materials Science of Nuclear Waste Management I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 6, 2013 ... Separation of the nuclear waste stream into actinides and fission products offers new opportunities for development of ceramic waste forms.

484

Independent Oversight Review, Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Review, Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project - April 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project - April 2013 April 2013 Review of Radiation...

485

Nepheline Crystallization in Nuclear Waste Glasses: Progress ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, One significant limitation to waste loading in glass for Hanford defense wastes is the commonly high Al concentrations. The primary concern is...

486

Date: ____________ MATERIAL FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE DISPOSAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 2003 Date: ____________ MATERIAL FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE DISPOSAL 1) Source: Bldg: ________________________________________ Disinfection? cc YES, Autoclaved (each container tagged with `Treated Biomedical Waste') cc YES, Chemical

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

487

Characteristics Of Fresh Municipal Solid Waste.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hossain, Sahadat The characteristics of fresh municipal solid waste (MSW) are critical in planning, designing, operating or upgrading solid waste management systems. Physical composition, moisture (more)

Taufiq, Tashfeena

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Design of waste tyre pyrolysis process.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??xviii, 164 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm HKUST Call Number: Thesis CBME 2009 LeeK Waste tyre, one kind of non-biodegradable solid wastes, (more)

Lee, King Lung

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Waste to Energy Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste to Energy Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name Waste to Energy Technologies Place Madrid, Spain Zip 28023 Sector Biomass Product Turn key WtEbiomass plant supplier...

490

Waste management handling in Benin City.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The researcher was inspired by the topic Waste management handling due to the ugly situa-tion of waste being littered all over the city, which have (more)

Oseghale, Peter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Small businesses selected for nuclear waste services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small businesses selected for nuclear waste services Small businesses selected for nuclear waste clean-up services Northern New Mexico businesses compete for up to 200 million in...

492

DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This regulation regulates the generation, storage, transportation, treatment, and disposal of hazardous waste, and wherever feasible, reduces or eliminates waste at the source. It is the policy of...

493

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - May 2013 May 2013 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality The U.S....

494

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

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Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

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496

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Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

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497

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

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498

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499

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500

Municipal Solid Waste | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Municipal Solid Waste Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Municipal Solid Waste Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleMunicipalSo...